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Sample records for igneous processes relevant

  1. Is phosphorus predictably incompatible in igneous processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Barnes, S.

    1984-01-01

    Siderophile element abundances are central to recent models for core formation in the Earth and Moon and the origin of the Moon. It is important to identify siderophile elements whose behavior in igneous processes is predictable, so that primary mantle abundances can be deduced by subtracting out the effects of igneous processes. Newsom's model for core formation in the Moon requires subchondritic P, and suggests that P was depleted due to volatility. Experiments were conducted to determine P olivine/liquid distribution coefficients. Preliminary results indicate that P can be compatible with olivine during rapid cooling, but is not during isothermal crystallization with long growth times, and tends to be expelled during annealing. It is therefore not likely that P is compatible under any widespread igneous conditions, and the incompatible behavior of P in lunar crustal rocks can be safety assumed. In addition, low fO2 is insufficient to cause P compatibility, so it is unlikely that P-rich silicates formed during the early evolution of the Earth or Moon. These results indicate that P is depleted in the Moon.

  2. Volcanism and igneous processes in small icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence for the production of endogenic processes of the small Saturnian satellites by igneous activity of low melting point NH3-H2O magma heated radiogenically is presented. An initial state of the inner satellites is modeled as a homogeneous mixture of particulate silicates and ices. Conductive transport is assumed to have either combined with heat capacity in a mixture of crystalline phases, or to have been reduced by the presence of dust, defects, vitreous or amorphous phases, and clathrates. The extent to which a eutectic melt could form is calculated in terms of the volume percentage of melt, with all heating above 175 K going toward overcoming the latent heat of the eutectic mix. Mimas and Enceladus were treated as free from radiogenic heat sources, which were significant for Tethys, Dione, Rhea, and Iapetus. The migrations of inner materials to form surface structures and seal off the interiors of the moons are described.

  3. The behaviour of copper isotopes during igneous processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, P. S.; Moynier, F.; Harvey, J.; Burton, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Application of Cu isotopes to high temperature systems has recently gained momentum and has the potential for probing sulphide fractionation during planetary differentiation [1]. This requires robust estimates for planetary reservoirs, and a fundamental understanding of how igneous processes affect Cu isotopes; this study aims to tackle the latter. Cogenetic suites affected by both fractionation crystallisation and cumulate formation were analysed to study such effects on Cu isotopes. In S-undersatured systems, Cu behaves incompatibly during melt evolution and the Cu isotope composition of such melt is invariant over the differentiation sequence. In contrast, S-saturated systems show resolvable Cu isotope variations relative to primitive melt. Such variations are minor but imply a slightly heavy Cu isotope composition for continental crust compared to BSE, consistent with granite data [2]. Although olivine accumulation does not affect Cu isotopes, spinel-hosted Cu is isotopically light relative to the bulk. Analysis of variably melt-depleted cratonic peridotites shows that partial melting can affect Cu isotope composition in restite, with the depleted samples isotopically light compared to BSE. This could be due to residual spinel and/or incongruent melting of sulphides - individual sulphides picked from a single xenolith reveal a range of Cu isotope compositions, dependent on composition. Although partial melting may fractionate Cu isotopes, models suggest most mantle-derived melt will have δ65Cu ≈ BSE, as most source Cu will be transferred to the melt. Small degree melts such as ocean island basalts are predicted to be isotopically heavier than MORB, if derived from a primitive mantle source. OIBs have a range of Cu isotope compositions: some are heavier than MORB as predicted; however, some have much lighter compositions. Since Cu isotopes can be significantly fractionated in the surface environment [e.g. 3] OIB Cu isotopic variations may be linked to

  4. Crustal structure and igneous processes in a chondritic Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid sulfur can form when metal-free C1 or C2 chondrites are heated. It may be obtained either by direct melting of native sulfur in disequilibrated C1 or C2 chondrites or by incongruent melting of pyrite and other sulfides in thermodynamically equilibrated rocks of the same composition. Hence, Lewis considered C2 chondrites to be the best meteoritic analog for Io's bulk composition. Metal-bearing C3 and ordinary chondrites are too chemically reduced to yield liquid sulfur and are not thought to represent plausible analogs of Io's bulk composition. An important aspect of Lewis' work is that CaSO4 and MgSO4 are predicted to be important in Io. Real C1 and C2 chondrites contain averages of, respectively, 11 percent and 3 percent by mass of salts (plus water of hydration). The most abundant chondritic salts are magnesium and calcium sulfates, but other important components include sulfates of sodium, potassium, and nickel and carbonates of magnesium, calcium, and iron. It is widely accepted that chondritic salts are formed by low-temperature aqueous alteration. Even if Io originally did not contain salts, it is likely that aqueous alteration would have yielded several percent sulfates and carbonates. In any event, Io probably contains sulfates and carbonates. This report presents the results of a model of differentiation of a simplified C2 chondrite-like composition that includes 1.92 percent MgSO4, 0.56 percent CaSO4, 0.53 percent CaCO3, and 0.094 percent elemental sulfur. The temperature of the model is gradually increased; ensuing fractional melting results in these components extruding or intruding at gravitationally stable levels in Io's crust. Relevant phase equilibria were reviewed. A deficiency of high-pressure phase equilibria renders the present model qualitative.

  5. Igneous processes and dike swarms: Magnetic signatures in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIP) are common in planetary environments: at Mars, Venus, Mercury, Io, and of course the Earth and its Moon. Dike swarms are often associated with LIPs, and are one of the only remaining signatures of a LIP in old, eroded settings. On Earth, dike swarms are often recognized by their magnetic signatures. The World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (version 2, 2015) is now based on a higher resolution 5 km grid, so many more dike swarms are apparent. We review this latest compilation. Several new high resolution planetary magnetic data sets have also recently become available, and we review evidence for igneous processes, and dikes, in these new data sets. We also review the prospect for new planetary magnetic data sets that might further elucidate igneous processes. At Mars, for example, we have photogeologic evidence for a host of dike swarms, but because of the high altitude of the magnetic data sets, no magnetic evidence exists. A new technique based on remotely sensing the magnetic field of the atomic Na in micro-meteorite ablation layers offers the promise of improving the spatial resolution by a factor of 2-4 at Mars.

  6. Classification of mafic clasts from mesosiderites: Implications for endogenous igneous processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.E. ); Mittlefehldt, D.W. )

    1992-02-01

    The authors have analyzed thirteen igneous pebbles from the Vaca Muerta, EET87500, and Bondoc mesosiderites by electron microprobe and instrumental neutron activation and combined these data with literature data for forty-three analyzed mesosiderite clasts. They classify these well-characterized clasts into the following five principal groups: (1) Polygenic and monogenic cumulates (39%) are coarse-grained gabbros that are highly depleted in incompatible elements (relative to H chondrites); they formed at moderate depth either as residues of low-degree partial melting of pre-existing cumulate eucrites or as cumulates from parent melts similar to cumulate eucrites. (2) Polygenic basalts (30%) are finer-grained rocks with positive europium anomalies, La/Lu ratios < 1, and lower rare earth element abundances than basaltic eucrites. It seems likely that these rocks were formed near their parent body surface by remelting mixtures of major amounts of basaltic eucrites and lesser amounts of cumulate eucrites. (3) Quench-textured rocks comprise two compositional groups, (a) those which resemble basaltic eucrites (5%), and (b) those which resemble cumulate eucrites (2%). The quench-textured rocks are probably monogenic; they formed most likely when small-scale impacts at their parent body surface totally melted small amounts of basaltic or cumulate eucrite material. (4) Monogenic basalts (11%) resemble basaltic eucrites and formed by endogenous igneous processes on the mesosiderite parent body (MPB). (5) Ultramafic rocks are cumulates consisting mainly of large crystals of orthopyroxene (9%) or olivine (4%). Orthopyroxenite clasts closely resemble diogenites and were formed most likely by endogenous igneous processes.

  7. The role of igneous and metamorphic processes in triggering mass extinctions and Earth crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Henrik; Planke, Sverre; Polozov, Alexander G.; Jerram, Dougal; Jones, Morgan T.

    2016-04-01

    Mass extinctions and transient climate events commonly coincide in time with the formation of Large igneous provinces (LIPs). The end-Permian event coincides with the Siberian Traps, the end-Triassic with the Central Atlantic Magmatic Event (CAMP), the Toarcian with the Karoo LIP, and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) with the North Atlantic Igneous Province. Although the temporal relationship between volcanism and the environmental crises has been known for decades, the geological processes linking LIPs to these environmental events are strongly debated: Explosive LIP volcanism should lead to short term cooling (not long term warming), mantle CO2 is too 13C-enriched to explain negative 13C carbon isotope excursions from sedimentary sequences, the LIP volcanism is poorly dated and apparently lasts much longer that the associated environmental events, large portions of the LIPs remain poorly explored, especially the sub-volcanic parts where sills and dikes are emplaced in sedimentary host rocks, and thus gas flux estimates from contact aureoles around sill intrusions are often poorly constrained. In this presentation, we discuss the status of LIP research with an emphasis on the sub volcanic processes. We show that potential for degassing of greenhouse gases, aerosols, and ozone destructive gases is substantial and can likely explain the triggering of both climatic events and mass extinctions.

  8. Evolutionary relevance facilitates visual information processing.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Russell E; Calvillo, Dusti P

    2013-01-01

    Visual search of the environment is a fundamental human behavior that perceptual load affects powerfully. Previously investigated means for overcoming the inhibitions of high perceptual load, however, generalize poorly to real-world human behavior. We hypothesized that humans would process evolutionarily relevant stimuli more efficiently than evolutionarily novel stimuli, and evolutionary relevance would mitigate the repercussions of high perceptual load during visual search. Animacy is a significant component to evolutionary relevance of visual stimuli because perceiving animate entities is time-sensitive in ways that pose significant evolutionary consequences. Participants completing a visual search task located evolutionarily relevant and animate objects fastest and with the least impact of high perceptual load. Evolutionarily novel and inanimate objects were located slowest and with the highest impact of perceptual load. Evolutionary relevance may importantly affect everyday visual information processing. PMID:24184882

  9. Classification of mafic clasts from mesosiderites - Implications for endogenous igneous processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of 13 igneous pebbles from the Vaca Muerta, EET87500, and Bondoc mesosiderites, using electron microprobe and instrumental neutron activation techniques. These data, combined with literature data on compositions of 43 mesosiderite clasts were used to compile a classification scheme for the various types of mafic silicate clasts that occur in mesosiderites. These clasts were classified into five principal groups: (1) polygenic and monogenic cumulates (30 percent); (2) polygenic basalts (30 percent); (3) quench-textured rocks, comprising two compositional subgroups (those which resemble basaltic eucrites (5 percent), and those which resemble cumulate eucrites (2 percent)); (4) monogenic basalts (11 percent); and (5) ultramafic rocks, consisting mainly of large crystals of orthopyroxene (9 percent) or olivine (4 percent). The conditions under which these clasts were formed are discussed.

  10. Interactions of tectonic, igneous, and hydraulic processes in the North Tharsis Region of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Golombek, M. P.; Plescia, J. B.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the north Tharsis of Mars has revealed a complex geologic history involving volcanism, tectonism, flooding, and mass wasting. Our detailed photogeologic analysis of this region found many previously unreported volcanic vents, volcaniclastic flows, irregular cracks, and minor pit chains; additional evidence that volcanic tectonic processes dominated this region throughout Martian geologic time; and the local involvement of these processes with surface and near surface water. Also, photoclinometric profiles were obtained within the region of troughs, simple grabens, and pit chains, as well as average spacings of pits along pit chains. These data were used together with techniques to estimate depths of crustal mechanical discontinuities that may have controlled the development of these features. In turn, such discontinuities may be controlled by stratigraphy, presence of water or ice, or chemical cementation.

  11. Igneous vs impact processes for the origin of the Mare lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gornitz, V.

    1973-01-01

    The respective role of external vs internal processes is considered. The inner Orientale basin was formed by the explosive impact of an asteroidal body. Within minutes after the impact, the concentric fracture system developed as an adjustment to the stresses generated by the shock wave. Examples are presented to illustrate that the upwelling of lava in the center of Mare Orientale and several craters on its ejecta blanket occurred well after the asteroidal collision which generated the bulls-eye structure. Thus, the lavas were not strictly impact melts. However, a close relationship may have existed between the impact and subsequent volcanism.

  12. Silicon isotopes in granulite xenoliths: Insights into isotopic fractionation during igneous processes and the composition of the deep continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Paul S.; Georg, R. Bastian; Williams, Helen M.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2013-03-01

    The silicon (Si) cycle is of great current interest but the isotopic composition of the continental crust has not been determined. Magmatic differentiation generates liquids with heavier Si and the lower crust, thought to be dominated by cumulates and restites, is predicted to have a light isotopic composition. This is borne out by the composition of many types of granite, which appear to have relative light Si for their silica content. Here we report the Si isotopic compositions of two granulite facies xenolith suites, from the Chudleigh and McBride volcanic provinces, Australia, providing new constraints on deep crustal processes and the average composition of the deep continental crust. The xenoliths display a range of isotopic compositions (δ30Si=-0.43‰ to -0.15‰) comparable to that measured previously for igneous rocks. The isotopic compositions of the McBride xenoliths reflect assimilation and fractional crystallisation (AFC) and/or partial melting processes. Silicon and O isotopes are correlated in the McBride suite and can be explained by AFC of various evolved parent melts. In contrast, the Chudleigh xenoliths have Si isotope compositions predominantly controlled by the specific mineralogy of individual cumulates. Using the xenolith data and a number of weighting methods, the Si isotope compositions of the lower and middle crust are calculated to be δ30Si=-0.29±0.04‰ (95% s.e.) and -0.23±0.04‰ (95% s.e.) respectively. These values are almost identical to the composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth, implying minimal isotope fractionation associated with continent formation and no light lower crustal reservoir.

  13. Igneous and shock processes affecting chassignite amphibole evaluated using chlorine/water partitioning and hydrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesting, Paul A.; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Filiberto, Justin; Starkey, Natalie A.; Franchi, Ian A.; Treiman, Allan H.; Tindle, Andy G.; Grady, Monica M.

    2015-03-01

    Amphibole in chassignite melt inclusions provides valuable information about the volatile content of the original interstitial magma, but also shock and postshock processes. We have analyzed amphibole and other phases from NWA 2737 melt inclusions, and we evaluate these data along with published values to constrain the crystallization Cl and H2O content of phases in chassignite melt inclusions and the effects of shock on these amphibole grains. Using a model for the Cl/OH exchange between amphibole and melt, we estimate primary crystallization OH contents of chassignite amphiboles. SIMS analysis shows that amphibole from NWA 2737 currently has 0.15 wt% H2O. It has lost ~0.6 wt% H2O from an initial 0.7-0.8 wt% H2O due to intense shock. Chassigny amphibole had on average 0.3-0.4 wt% H2O and suffered little net loss of H2O due to shock. NWA 2737 amphibole has δD ≈ +3700‰; it absorbed Martian atmosphere-derived heavy H in the aftermath of shock. Chassigny amphibole, with δD ≤ +1900‰, incorporated less heavy H. Low H2O/Cl ratios are inferred for the primitive chassignite magma, which had significant effects on melting and crystallization. Volatiles released by the degassing of Martian magma were more Cl-rich than on Earth, resulting in the high Cl content of Martian surface materials.

  14. Kinetics of crystallization of igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The geochemistry of igneous rocks is discussed, with the primary objectives of bringing together the theories underlying the kinetics of crystallization of igneous rocks and illustrating the use of these theories in understanding experimental and observational data. The primary purpose of the chapter is to introduce current thinking about the kinetics of igneous rocks and to provide a basis for understanding other work. A basic assumption made in the discussion is that the rate of any chemical reaction, including the crystallization of igneous rocks, is zero at equilibrium and proceeds at a finite rate only at a finite deviation from equilibrium. As such, an understanding of the processes operating in igneous rocks requires an understanding of how deviation from equilibrium affects the rates and mechanisms of the processes occurring during crystallization. These processes are detailed, with special emphasis given to nucleation and crystal growth. (JMT)

  15. Relevance and Goal-Focusing in Text Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrudden, Matthew T.; Schraw, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the role of relevance in text processing. It argues that relevance instructions provided by instructors and texts help readers identify text segments that are germane to a reading goal. A taxonomy of relevance instructions is presented and four basic types of relevance manipulations are considered (i.e., targeted segments,…

  16. Rates and processes of crystal growth in the system anorthite-albite. [magmatic liquids in igneous rock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Klein, L.; Uhlmann, D. R.; Hays, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The growth rates and interface morphologies of crystals of synthetic compositions in the anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8)-albite (NaAlSi3O8) plagioclase feldspar system are measured in an investigation of the crystallization of igneous rocks. Mixed plagioclase glasses with compositions of 75% and 50% anorthite were observed using the microscope heating technique as they crystallized at temperatures near the liquidus, and 75%, 50% and 20% anorthite crystals were treated by resistance heating and observed at greater degrees of undercooling. Growth rates were found to be independent of time and to decrease with increasing albite content, ranging from 0.5 to 2 x 10 to the -5th cm/min. The crystal morphologies for all compositions are faceted near the liquidus and become progressively skeletal, dendritic and fibrillar with increasing undercooling.

  17. Graphene nanoribbons: Relevance of etching process

    SciTech Connect

    Simonet, P. Bischoff, D.; Moser, A.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2015-05-14

    Most graphene nanoribbons in the experimental literature are patterned using plasma etching. Various etching processes induce different types of defects and do not necessarily result in the same electronic and structural ribbon properties. This study focuses on two frequently used etching techniques, namely, O{sub 2} plasma ashing and O{sub 2 }+ Ar reactive ion etching (RIE). O{sub 2} plasma ashing represents an alternative to RIE physical etching for sensitive substrates, as it is a more gentle chemical process. We find that plasma ashing creates defective graphene in the exposed trenches, resulting in instabilities in the ribbon transport. These are probably caused by more or larger localized states at the edges of the ashed device compared to the RIE defined device.

  18. Origins of Igneous Layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Bruce

    Anyone who has ever seen a photo of a layered intrusion, let alone visited one first hand, or even seen a thin section from one, cannot help but be impressed by the stunning record of crystal growth and deposition. Such bodies stand as majestic monuments of undeniable evidence that intricate magmatic processes exist, processes that couple crystallization, convection, and crystal sorting to form rocks so highly ordered and beautiful that they are a wonder to behold. These are the altars to which petrologists must carry their conceived petrologic processes for approval.Although significant in number, the best layered intrusions seem to be found almost always in remote places. Their names, Bushveld, Muskox, Kiglapait, Stillwater, Duke Island, Skaergaard, Rhum, ring through igneous petrology almost as historic military battles (Saratoga, Antietam, Bull Run, Manassas, Gettysburg) do through American history. People who have worked on such bodies are almost folk heros: Wager, Deer, Brown, Jackson, Hess, Irvine, McBirney, Morse; these names are petrologic household words. Yet with all this fanfare and reverence, layered instrusions are nearly thought of as period pieces, extreme examples of what can happen, but not generally what does. This is now all changing with the increasing realization that these bodies are perhaps highly representative of all magmatic bodies. They are simply more dynamically complete, containing more of the full range of interactions, and of course, exposing a more complete record. They are one end of a spectrum containing lava flows, lava lakes, large sills, plutons, and layered intrusions. This book uniquely covers this range with an abundance of first-hand field observations and a good dose of process conceptualization, magma physics, and crystal growth kinetics.

  19. Insights into Igneous Geochemistry from Trace Element Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Hanson, B. Z.

    2001-01-01

    Partitioning of trivalent elements into olivine are used to explore basic issues relevant to igneous geochemistry, such as Henry's law. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Magmas and magmatic rocks: An introduction to igneous petrology

    SciTech Connect

    Middlemost, E.A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book melds traditional igneous petrology with the emerging science of planetary petrology to provide an account of current ideas on active magmatic and volcanic processes, drawing examples from all igneous provinces of the world as well as from the moon and planets. It reviews the history and development of concepts fundamental to modern igneous petrology and includes indepth sections on magmas, magnetic differentiation and volcanology.

  1. Microscopic tubes in igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, D.; Simmons, G.

    1977-01-01

    Microscopic tubes have been observed in several igneous rocks and may be quite common. They occur in single crystals and have either elliptical or circular cross-sections 1 to 5 microns in diameter and are ten to hundreds of microns long. Microtubes may be hollow or partially or completely filled with another phase, but are distinct from acicular crystals of accessory minerals such as rutile. Microtubes can form by at least three processes: (1) the partial annealing of microcracks, (2) the natural etching of dislocations, or (3) the primary inclusion of fluid material during crystal growth.

  2. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  3. Theoretical petrology. [of igneous and metamorphic rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolper, E.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper, some areas of growing interest in the American efforts in petrology during the 1975-1978 quadrennium are reviewed. In igneous petrology, studies of structures and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts and of kinetics of igneous processes are in a period of rapid growth. Plate tectonic concepts have had (and will no doubt continue to have) an important influence by focusing interest on specific problems and by providing a framework for the understanding of petrogenesis. An understanding of mantle processes and evolution through the integration of petrological, geophysical, and geochemical constraints has been developed over the past 20 years, and will undoubtedly provide direction for future petrological studies.

  4. Do Specific Relevance Instructions Promote Transfer Appropriate Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrudden, Matthew T.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether specific relevance instructions affect transfer appropriate processing. Undergraduates (n = 52) were randomly assigned to one of three pre-reading question conditions that asked them what-questions, why-questions, or to read for understanding (i.e., control condition). There were no differences in reading time across…

  5. Relevance as Process: Judgements in the Context of Scholarly Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Theresa Dirndorfer

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: This paper discusses how exploring the research process in-depth and over time contributes to a fuller understanding of interactions with various representations of information. Method. A longitudinal ethnographic study explored decisions made by two informants involved in scholarly research. Relevance assessment and information…

  6. Geochemistry of 2-4-mm particles from Apollo 14 soil (14161) and implications regarding igneous components and soil-forming processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Korotev, R. L.; Haskin, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    The present paper describes the compositional systematics of 381 particles analyzed from 14161, which was taken near the lunar module as part of the bulk sample. Attention is given to the distribution of lithologies, based on petrographic examination and compositions determined by INAA, and to implications of the compositions of polymict particles regarding igneous precursors and soil-forming processes. It was found that the most abundant particles are the impact-melt lithologies and regolith and fragmental breccias. The mean composition of the entire suite of 2-4-mm particles differs from that of the associated less-than-1-mm fines by having higher concentrations of incompatible trace elements and Na2O, and a lower concentration of CaO. There is a subset of regolith breccia particles and agglutinates in the 2-4-mm particles that have nearly identical compositions and Is/FeO similar to those of the less-than-1-mm fines. It is suggested that these particles are constructional products formed from the local regolith rather than comminuted fragments of ancient regolith breccias.

  7. Ureilites are not igneous differentiates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.

    1988-01-01

    Although most all meteorites are as old as the solar system (4.5 billion years), they can be subdivided into primitive and evolved groups, depending on the extent of their chemical and physical processing. Primitive meteorites, most of which are chondrites, are assemblages of dust and millimeter-sized pellets from the presolar nebula, which were not extensively heated and processed since their assembly. Thus they provide information about the conditions in the nebular cloud. Many of the evolved meteorites are achondrites, which are igneous rocks produced by melting on or within an asteroidal object known as the parent body. A major unsolved problem in solar system studies is identification of the source of heat which led to melting of the achondrites. The role of oxygen isotopes in establishing genetic relationships among meteorites is examined.

  8. Diapiric transfer of melt in Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii: a quick, efficient process of igneous differentiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, R.T.; Kirschenbaum, H.; Marinenko, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Kilauea Iki lava lake, formed in 1959, is a large pond of picritic basalt (average MgO content = 15.34% by weight), which has cooled and crystallized as a small, self-roofed magma chamber. Differentiation processes recognized as active in the lake include rather inefficient settling of the larger (2-10 mm) olivine phenocrysts, formation of segregation veins, and formation of diapir-like vertical olivine-rich bodies, all processes which occur in one or more of the other Kilauean lava lakes as well. In addition, most of the central part of Kilauea Iki has been affected by diapiric melt transfer. Diapiric melt transfer was active from 1960 to 1971 and has affected most of the central part of the lake from 13 m to at least 80 m. The process ran simultaneously with the other three main differentiation processes but started and stopped independently of the others. Calculations suggest that between 21 and 42 wt % liquid has been extracted from the depleted zone at 56-78 m in the center of the lake, making this a very efficient process of chemical differentiation. -from Authors

  9. Adaptive Memory: Evaluating Alternative Forms of Fitness-Relevant Processing in the Survival Processing Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Sandry, Joshua; Trafimow, David; Marks, Michael J.; Rice, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Memory may have evolved to preserve information processed in terms of its fitness-relevance. Based on the assumption that the human mind comprises different fitness-relevant adaptive mechanisms contributing to survival and reproductive success, we compared alternative fitness-relevant processing scenarios with survival processing. Participants rated words for relevancy to fitness-relevant and control conditions followed by a delay and surprise recall test (Experiment 1a). Participants recalled more words processed for their relevance to a survival situation. We replicated these findings in an online study (Experiment 2) and a study using revised fitness-relevant scenarios (Experiment 3). Across all experiments, we did not find a mnemonic benefit for alternative fitness-relevant processing scenarios, questioning assumptions associated with an evolutionary account of remembering. Based on these results, fitness-relevance seems to be too wide-ranging of a construct to account for the memory findings associated with survival processing. We propose that memory may be hierarchically sensitive to fitness-relevant processing instructions. We encourage future researchers to investigate the underlying mechanisms responsible for survival processing effects and work toward developing a taxonomy of adaptive memory. PMID:23585858

  10. Adaptive memory: evaluating alternative forms of fitness-relevant processing in the survival processing paradigm.

    PubMed

    Sandry, Joshua; Trafimow, David; Marks, Michael J; Rice, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Memory may have evolved to preserve information processed in terms of its fitness-relevance. Based on the assumption that the human mind comprises different fitness-relevant adaptive mechanisms contributing to survival and reproductive success, we compared alternative fitness-relevant processing scenarios with survival processing. Participants rated words for relevancy to fitness-relevant and control conditions followed by a delay and surprise recall test (Experiment 1a). Participants recalled more words processed for their relevance to a survival situation. We replicated these findings in an online study (Experiment 2) and a study using revised fitness-relevant scenarios (Experiment 3). Across all experiments, we did not find a mnemonic benefit for alternative fitness-relevant processing scenarios, questioning assumptions associated with an evolutionary account of remembering. Based on these results, fitness-relevance seems to be too wide-ranging of a construct to account for the memory findings associated with survival processing. We propose that memory may be hierarchically sensitive to fitness-relevant processing instructions. We encourage future researchers to investigate the underlying mechanisms responsible for survival processing effects and work toward developing a taxonomy of adaptive memory. PMID:23585858

  11. A New Model for U-Series Isotope Fractionation During Igneous Processes, With Finite Diffusion and Multiple Solid Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Orman, J.; Saal, A.; Bourdon, B.; Hauri, E.

    2002-12-01

    U-series radioactive disequilibria in basaltic lavas have been used to infer many important aspects of melt generation and extraction processes, including the porosity of the melting zone, the mantle upwelling rate, and the melt transport rate. These inferences are based on simplified models for the fractionation of U-series isotopes during melting and melt transport. The commonly used "dynamic melting" and "equilibrium porous flow" models neglect solid-state diffusion and do not consider the influence of multiple solid phases on the initial distribution and subsequent fractionation of U-series isotopes. These factors can be very important, particularly for 226Ra which has a short half-life (~1600 yrs) and is strongly partitioned into minerals like plagioclase, amphibole, and mica while being almost perfectly excluded from clinopyroxene and garnet, the major U and Th bearing minerals in peridotite. Ignoring diffusion and multi-phase effects can lead to conclusions about the melting process that have no basis in reality. We have developed a numerical model that takes into account the effects of solid-state diffusion and considers the distribution of U-series isotopes among multiple solid phases and melt at each step of the melting process. In an undisturbed rock in secular equilibrium, daughter isotopes will tend to be transferred among the component phases until they reach a steady state in which diffusive fluxes are balanced by radioactive production and decay. In general the individual minerals will be neither in secular equilibrium (on the equiline) nor in partitioning equilibrium with each other (on a horizontal line on the equiline diagram), unless diffusion is very slow or very fast relative to the daughter decay rate. We start with an arbitrary distribution of daughter isotopes among the phases in the system, then turn on diffusion and allow isotopes to redistribute themselves until the steady state is reached (on a time scale comparable to the half-life of

  12. Major compositional provinces on Mars: a record of igneous processes and H2O-rock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D.; Hamilton, V. E.

    2011-12-01

    The spatial distribution of surface compositions provides critical information needed to understand the formation of Martian crustal materials as well as the interactions between the surface, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. To this end, we present a new global map of major compositional provinces on Mars. The map was derived by applying statistical methods to new mineral distributions derived from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. The new mineral distributions [1] were calculated using a larger set of olivine and pyroxene compositions, and at a higher spatial resolution (8 pixels per degree), relative to previous global studies [e.g, 2]. Consistent with previous results [2], we find that: A) Syrtis Major and circum-Tharsis volcanic plains are compositionally distinct from other, older highland surfaces, B) lowland materials exhibit elevated abundance of "high-silica" phases (amorphous silica and/or poorly crystalline silicates), and C) northern Acidalia surfaces are compositionally distinct from those in southern Acidalia. New findings include the following: D) northwestern Syrtis Major shield materials are enriched in feldspar relative to southern Syrtis Major, E) within Thaumasia and Aonium Plana (Hesperian aged plains), there are possibly 3 different classes of mineral assemblage, and F) heavily cratered Noachian terrains including Terra Meridiani, Tyrrhena Terra, and Cimmeria Terra can be divided into at least two classes based on relative abundance of plagioclase and low-Ca pyroxene. These new reported classes exhibit spatial coherency over a scale of at least tens of km; select areas were verified using spectral ratios from individual TES orbits that cross compositional class boundaries. These spatial trends in mineral assemblage may partially reflect global variations in melt generation and magmatic processes, and may also partially reflect spatial variation in precipitation, erosion, and/or ice-related alteration. For example, the

  13. Experimental studies of reactions relevant for γ-process nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, P.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Mayer, J.; Netterdon, L.; Zilges, A.; Sauerwein, A.

    2014-05-09

    We report on our recent experimental studies of reactions relevant for the γ process nucleosynthesis. Applying the activation method using the Cologne Clover Counting Setup total cross sections of the reactions {sup 168}Yb(α,γ), {sup 168}Yb(α,n), and {sup 187}Re(α,n) could be obtained. Furthermore, the reaction {sup 89}Y(p,γ) was investigated via the in-beam technique with HPGe detectors at the high-efficiency g-ray spectrometer HORUS in Cologne in order to determine partial and total cross sections.

  14. Aspects of two corrosion processes relevant to military hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, J.W.; Buchheit, R.G.

    1997-11-01

    Corrosion is a leading material degradation mode observed in many military systems. This report contains a description of a small project that was performed to allow some of the important electrochemical aspects of two distinct and potentially relevant degradation modes to be better understood: environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of aluminum alloys and corrosion in moist salt. Two specific and respective tasks were completed: (A) the characterization of the effect of aluminum microstructural variability on its susceptibility to EAC, and (B) the development of experimental and analytical techniques that can be used to identify the factors and processes that influence the corrosivity of moist salt mixtures. The resultant information constitutes part of the basis needed to ultimately predict component reliability and/or possibly to identify techniques that could be used to control corrosion in critical components. In Task A, a physical model and related understanding for the relevant degradation processes were formulated. The primary result from Task B included the identification and qualitative validation of a methodology for determining the corrosivity of salt mixtures. A detailed compilation of the results obtained from each of these two diverse tasks is presented separately in the body of this report.

  15. Encoding and processing biologically relevant temporal information in electrosensory systems.

    PubMed

    Fortune, E S; Rose, G J; Kawasaki, M

    2006-06-01

    Wave-type weakly electric fish are specialists in time-domain processing: behaviors in these animals are often tightly correlated with the temporal structure of electrosensory signals. Behavioral responses in these fish can be dependent on differences in the temporal structure of electrosensory signals alone. This feature has facilitated the study of temporal codes and processing in central nervous system circuits of these animals. The temporal encoding and mechanisms used to transform temporal codes in the brain have been identified and characterized in several species, including South American gymnotid species and in the African mormyrid genus Gymnarchus. These distantly related groups use similar strategies for neural computations of information on the order of microseconds, milliseconds, and seconds. Here, we describe a suite of mechanisms for behaviorally relevant computations of temporal information that have been elucidated in these systems. These results show the critical role that behavioral experiments continue to have in the study of the neural control of behavior and its evolution. PMID:16450118

  16. On some fundamentals of igneous petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.

    2013-09-01

    The age-old process of crystal fractionation leading to the diversity of the igneous rocks and Earth itself is an exceedingly well-understood chemical process in magmatism and physical chemistry. But the broader physical aspects of this and related processes have proven elusive on many fronts, especially in its relation to the spatial variations in rock composition, texture, and macroscopic features like layering. Magmatic systems, be they volcanic, dikes, sills, or plutons, are generally analyzed with a problem at hand and an end result in mind. The processes invoked to solve these problems, which are most often purely chemical, are often unique to each problem with few if any general principles emerging that are central to understanding the wider perspective of magmatic processes and problems. An attempt is made at the outset to provide a list of inviolate Magmatic First Principles that are relevant to analyzing most magmatic problems. These involve: initial conditions; critical crystallinity; solidification fronts; transport and emplacement fluxes; phenocrysts, xenocrysts, primocrysts; crystal size; layering and crystal sorting; thermal convection; magmatic processes are physical. Along with these principles, two reference magmatic systems are suggested where the initial conditions and outcome are unequivocal: the Sudbury impact melt sheet and the Hawaiian lava lakes. Sudbury formed in ~5 min by superheated magma crystallized to a near uniform sequence, while the tiny lava lakes, formed of crystal-laden slurries, form a highly differentiated layered sequence. The major difference is in the initial conditions of formation, especially the nature of the input materials. The challenge is to construct and analyze magmatic systems (i.e., magma chambers, sills, dikes, and lavas) using these reference end members and the suggested principles. The Hawaiian 500,000 year volcanic record exhibits what can be expected as input materials, namely a highly varied output of

  17. Kinetics of Elementary Processes Relevant to Incipient Soot Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M C; Heaven, M C

    2008-04-30

    Soot formation and abatement processes are some of the most important and challenging problems in hydrocarbon combustion. The key reactions involved in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), the precursors to soot, remain elusive. Small aromatic species such as C5H5, C6H6 and their derivatives are believed to play a pivotal role in incipient soot formation. The goal of this project is to establish a kinetic database for elementary reactions relevant to soot formation in its incipient stages. In the past year, we have completed by CRDS the kinetics for the formation and decomposition of C6H5C2H2O2 in the C6H5C2H2 +O2 reaction and the formation of C10H7O2 in the C10H7 + O2 reaction by directly monitoring C6H5C2H2O2 and C10H7O2 radicals in the visible region; their mechanisms have been elucidated computationally by quantum-chemical calculations. The O + C2H5OH reaction has been studied experimentally and computationally and the OH + HNCN reaction has been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital calculation. In addition, a new pulsed slit molecular beam system has been constructed and tested for spectroscopic studies of aromatic radicals and their derivatives by the cavity ringdown technique (CRDS).

  18. Trace elements in magnetite from massive iron oxide-apatite deposits indicate a combined formation by igneous and magmatic-hydrothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipping, Jaayke L.; Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Barra, Fernando; Deditius, Artur P.; Wälle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Holtz, François; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposits are an important source of iron and other elements (e.g., REE, P, U, Ag and Co) vital to modern society. However, their formation, including the namesake Kiruna-type IOA deposit (Sweden), remains controversial. Working hypotheses include a purely magmatic origin involving separation of an Fe-, P-rich, volatile-rich oxide melt from a Si-rich silicate melt, and precipitation of magnetite from an aqueous ore fluid, which is either of magmatic-hydrothermal or non-magmatic surface or metamorphic origin. In this study, we focus on the geochemistry of magnetite from the Cretaceous Kiruna-type Los Colorados IOA deposit (∼350 Mt Fe) located in the northern Chilean Iron Belt. Los Colorados has experienced minimal hydrothermal alteration that commonly obscures primary features in IOA deposits. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) transects and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectrometry mapping demonstrate distinct chemical zoning in magnetite grains, wherein cores are enriched in Ti, Al, Mn and Mg. The concentrations of these trace elements in magnetite cores are consistent with igneous magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt, whereas magnetite rims show a pronounced depletion in these elements, consistent with magnetite grown from an Fe-rich magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. Further, magnetite grains contain polycrystalline inclusions that re-homogenize at magmatic temperatures (>850 °C). Smaller inclusions (<5 μm) contain halite crystals indicating a saline environment during magnetite growth. The combination of these observations are consistent with a formation model for IOA deposits in northern Chile that involves crystallization of magnetite microlites from a silicate melt, nucleation of aqueous fluid bubbles on magnetite surfaces, and formation and ascent of buoyant fluid bubble-magnetite aggregates. Decompression of the fluid-magnetite aggregate

  19. Petrology of the igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    Papers published during the 1983-1986 period on the petrology and geochemistry of igneous rocks are discussed, with emphasis on tectonic environment. Consideration is given to oceanic rocks, subdivided into divergent margin suites (mid-ocean ridge basalts, ridge-related seamounts, and back-arc basin basalts) and intraplate suites (oceanic island basalts and nonridge seamounts), and to igneous rocks formed at convergent margins (island arc and continental arc suites), subdivided into volcanic associations and plutonic associations. Other rock groups discussed include continental flood basalts, layered mafic intrusions, continental alkalic associations, komatiites, ophiolites, ash-flow tuffs, anorthosites, and mantle xenoliths.

  20. Surface chemistry relevant to material processing for semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Lynne Aiko

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures are the core of many modern integrated circuit (IC) devices. Each material utilized in the different regions of the device has its own unique chemistry. Silicon is the base semiconductor material used in the majority of these devices. With IC device complexity increasing and device dimensions decreasing, understanding material interactions and processing becomes increasingly critical. Hsb2 desorption is the rate-limiting step in silicon growth using silane under low temperature conditions. Activation energies for Hsb2 desorption measured during Si chemical vapor deposition (CVD) versus single-crystal studies are found to be significantly lower. It has been proposed that defect sites on the silicon surface could explain the observed differences. Isothermal Hsb2 desorption studies using laser induced thermal desorption (LITD) techniques have addressed this issue. The growth of low temperature oxides is another relevant issue for fabrication of IC devices. Recent studies using 1,4-disilabutane (DSB) (SiHsb3CHsb2CHsb2SiHsb3) at 100sp°C in ambient Osb2 displayed the successful low temperature growth of silicon dioxide (SiOsb2). However, these studies provided no information about the deposition mechanism. We performed LITD and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies on single-crystal and porous silicon surfaces to examine the adsorption, decomposition, and desorption processes to determine the deposition mechanism. Titanium nitride (TiN) diffusion barriers are necessary in modern metallization structures. Controlled deposition using titanium tetrachloride (TiClsb4) and ammonia (NHsb3) has been demonstrated using atomic layered processing (ALP) techniques. We intended to study the sequential deposition method by monitoring the surface intermediates using LITD techniques. However, formation of a Cl impurity source, ammonium chloride (NHsb4sp+Clsp-), was observed, thereby, limiting our ability for effective studies. Tetrakis

  1. Winter Ice and Snow as Models of Igneous Rock Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romey, William D.

    1983-01-01

    Examines some features of ice and snow that offer teachers and researchers help in understanding many aspects of igneous processes and configurations. Careful observation of such processes as melting, decay, evolution, and snow accumulation provide important clues to understanding processes by which many kinds of rocks form. (Author/JN)

  2. An ERP indicator of processing relevant gestalts in masked priming.

    PubMed

    Verleger, Rolf; Görgen, Stefani; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2005-11-01

    Briefly presented arrows, made indistinguishable by masks that contain arrows, inversely prime responses to following visible arrows. This inverse effect might reflect general regularities of masked priming or be either due to the task-relevant elements of the mask or to special features of arrows. Here we report a slow negative EEG potential recorded from the scalp above the visual cortex, which is evoked by masks that contain arrows. Even being evoked when arrows masks were presented in isolation, this "Nd-mask" appeared to be an obligatory response. Yet Nd-mask was enhanced when primes and targets were arrows and was reduced in the other cases, and even reversed its polarity with appropriate control stimuli. These findings provide support both for the special status of arrows and for the notion of mask relevance. Nd-mask might be one instance of negative EEG potentials evoked by stimuli with familiar gestalts. PMID:16364063

  3. Cognitive Processes in Spelling and Their Relevance to Spelling Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, Uta

    Cognitive psychology has provided an information processing model that distinguishes between input processes such as listening to speech or reading and output processes such as speaking or writing. It is useful for spelling reformers to consider reading (input) and writing (output) processes separately, because the demands of the reader and of the…

  4. Igneous Graphite in Enstatite Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1997-01-01

    Igneous graphite. a rare constituent in terrestrial mafic and ultramafic rocks. occurs in three EH and one EL enstatite chondrite impact-melt breccias as 2-150 Ilm long euhedrallaths. some with pyramidal terminations. In contrast. graphite in most enstatite chondrites exsolved from metallic Fe-Ni as polygonal. rounded or irregular aggregates. Literature data for five EH chondrites on C combusting at high temperatures show that Abee contains the most homogeneous C isotopes (i.e. delta(sup 13)C = -8.1+/-2.1%); in addition. Abee's mean delta(sup l3)C value is the same as the average high-temperature C value for the set of five EH chondrites. This suggests that Abee scavenged C from a plurality of sources on its parent body and homogenized the C during a large-scale melting event. Whereas igneous graphite in terrestrial rocks typically forms at relatively high pressure and only moderately low oxygen fugacity (e.g., approx. 5 kbar. logfO2, approx. -10 at 1200 C ). igneous graphite in asteroidal meteorites formed at much lower pressures and oxygen fugacities.

  5. Spirit Discovers New Class of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During the past two-and-a-half years of traversing the central part of Gusev Crater, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has analyzed the brushed and ground-into surfaces of multiple rocks using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which measures the abundance of major chemical elements. In the process, Spirit has documented the first example of a particular kind of volcanic region on Mars known as an alkaline igneous province. The word alkaline refers to the abundance of sodium and potassium, two major rock-forming elements from the alkali metals on the left-hand side of the periodic table.

    All of the relatively unaltered rocks -- those least changed by wind, water, freezing, or other weathering agents -- examined by Spirit have been igneous, meaning that they crystallized from molten magmas. One way geologists classify igneous rocks is by looking at the amount of potassium and sodium relative to the amount of silica, the most abundant rock-forming mineral on Earth. In the case of volcanic rocks, the amount of silica present gives scientists clues to the kind of volcanism that occurred, while the amounts of potassium and sodium provide clues about the history of the rock. Rocks with more silica tend to erupt explosively. Higher contents of potassium and sodium, as seen in alkaline rocks like those at Gusev, may indicate partial melting of magma at higher pressure, that is, deeper in the Martian mantle. The abundance of potassium and sodium determines the kinds of minerals that make up igneous rocks. If igneous rocks have enough silica, potassium and sodium always bond with the silica to form certain minerals.

    The Gusev rocks define a new chemical category not previously seen on Mars, as shown in this diagram plotting alkalis versus silica, compiled by University of Tennessee geologist Harry McSween. The abbreviations 'Na2O' and 'K2O' refer to oxides of sodium and potassium. The abbreviation 'SiO2' refers to silica. The abbreviation 'wt

  6. Alcohol sensory processing and its relevance for ingestion.

    PubMed

    Brasser, Susan M; Castro, Norma; Feretic, Brian

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol possesses complex sensory attributes that are first detected by the body via sensory receptors and afferent fibers that promptly transmit signals to brain areas involved in mediating ingestive motivation, reinforcement, and addictive behavior. Given that the chemosensory cues accompanying alcohol consumption are among the most intimate, consistent, and immediate predictors of alcohol's postabsorptive effects, with experience these stimuli also gain powerful associative incentive value to elicit craving and related physiologic changes, maintenance of ongoing alcohol use, and reinstatement of drug seeking after periods of abstinence. Despite the above, preclinical research has traditionally dichotomized alcohol's taste and postingestive influences as independent regulators of motivation to drink. The present review summarizes current evidence regarding alcohol's ability to directly activate peripheral and central oral chemosensory circuits, relevance for intake of the drug, and provides a framework for moving beyond a dissociation between the sensory and postabsorptive effects of alcohol to understand their neurobiological integration and significance for alcohol addiction. PMID:25304192

  7. Temperament, Anxiety, and the Processing of Threat-Relevant Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonigan, Christopher J.; Vasey, Michael W.; Phillips, Beth M.; Hazen, Rebecca A.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses converging evidence from developmental, clinical, and cognitive psychology suggesting that there is significant overlap between research findings on affect, temperament, and attentional processes associated with pathological anxiety. We offer a proposal for the integration of these 3 areas aimed at developing a more clear…

  8. Microbial Metagenomics Reveals Climate-Relevant Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Long, Philip E; Williams, Kenneth H; Hubbard, Susan S; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms play key roles in terrestrial system processes, including the turnover of natural organic carbon, such as leaf litter and woody debris that accumulate in soils and subsurface sediments. What has emerged from a series of recent DNA sequencing-based studies is recognition of the enormous variety of little known and previously unknown microorganisms that mediate recycling of these vast stores of buried carbon in subsoil compartments of the terrestrial system. More importantly, the genome resolution achieved in these studies has enabled association of specific members of these microbial communities with carbon compound transformations and other linked biogeochemical processes-such as the nitrogen cycle-that can impact the quality of groundwater, surface water, and atmospheric trace gas concentrations. The emerging view also emphasizes the importance of organism interactions through exchange of metabolic byproducts (e.g., within the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles) and via symbioses since many novel organisms exhibit restricted metabolic capabilities and an associated extremely small cell size. New, genome-resolved information reshapes our view of subsurface microbial communities and provides critical new inputs for advanced reactive transport models. These inputs are needed for accurate prediction of feedbacks in watershed biogeochemical functioning and their influence on the climate via the fluxes of greenhouse gases, CO2, CH4, and N2O. PMID:27156744

  9. On the relevance of glycolysis process on brain gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kounelakis, M G; Zervakis, M E; Giakos, G C; Postma, G J; Buydens, L M C; Kotsiakis, X

    2013-01-01

    The proposed analysis considers aspects of both statistical and biological validation of the glycolysis effect on brain gliomas, at both genomic and metabolic level. In particular, two independent datasets are analyzed in parallel, one engaging genomic (Microarray Expression) data and the other metabolomic (Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging) data. The aim of this study is twofold. First to show that, apart from the already studied genes (markers), other genes such as those involved in the human cell glycolysis significantly contribute in gliomas discrimination. Second, to demonstrate how the glycolysis process can open new ways towards the design of patient-specific therapeutic protocols. The results of our analysis demonstrate that the combination of genes participating in the glycolytic process (ALDOA, ALDOC, ENO2, GAPDH, HK2, LDHA, LDHB, MDH1, PDHB, PFKM, PGI, PGK1, PGM1 and PKLR) with the already known tumor suppressors (PTEN, Rb, TP53), oncogenes (CDK4, EGFR, PDGF) and HIF-1, enhance the discrimination of low versus high-grade gliomas providing high prediction ability in a cross-validated framework. Following these results and supported by the biological effect of glycolytic genes on cancer cells, we address the study of glycolysis for the development of new treatment protocols. PMID:22614725

  10. Electron-Nitrogen Collision Processes Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Electron-N2 collisions play an important role in the nitrogen-rich upper atmospheres of Titan, Triton, and Earth. Modeling these processes requires accurate laboratory data. Despite the recognized importance of such data, there remained an unsatisfactory degree of consensus among much of the available laboratory collision cross section data. To address this situation, our group has devoted considerable effort over the past decade to improve the status of low energy electron collision data. In doing so, we have measured direct excitation cross sections for at least 17 electronic states of neutral N2 and a variety of key UV emission cross sections. Here we review the result of this effort, highlighting how the picture of electron collision processes has evolved, where consensus has been reached and where discrepancies still exist. New electron energy-loss measurements will be presented for excitation of the valence states, with finely spaced (<1eV) impact energy increments in the threshold-to-peak region where excitation is not in proportion to the Franck-Condon factors. These data are novel in that they include measurements at fixed electron scattering angles, differential in impact energy over a range of scattering angle. Also, new near-threshold integral cross sections are provided and compared to existing data.

  11. Pristine Igneous Rocks and the Early Differentiation of Planetary Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.

    2005-01-01

    Our studies are highly interdisciplinary, but are focused on the processes and products of early planetary and asteroidal differentiation, especially the genesis of the ancient lunar crust. The compositional diversity that we explore is the residue of process diversity, which has strong relevance for comparative planetology. Most of the accessible lunar crust consists of materials hybridized by impact-mixing. Our lunar research concentrates on the rare pristine (unmixed) samples that reflect the original genetic diversity of the early crust. Among HED basalts (eucrites and clasts in howardites), we distinguish as pristine the small minority that escaped the pervasive thermal metamorphism of the parent asteroid's crust. We have found a correlation between metamorphically pristine HED basalts and the similarly small minority of compositionally evolved "Stannern trend" samples, which are enriched in incompatible elements and titanium compared to main group eucrites, and yet have relatively high mg ratios. Other topics under investigation included: lunar and SNC (martian?) meteorites; igneous meteorites in general; impact breccias, especially metal-rich Apollo samples and polymict eucrites; siderophile compositions of the lunar and martian mantles; and planetary bulk compositions and origins.

  12. Inferring Relevance of Matrix and Preferential Flow Processes Flow Multi-Year Well Concentration Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preferential and matrix flow are the two dominate processes influencing chemical transport to groundwater. Unfortunately the relevance of these processes is difficult to quantify without chemical flux data. Seventy-one observations times from 31, 3-m wells were evaluated to determine relevance of p...

  13. Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain: Technical Basis for Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, W.; Marsh, B.; Weiner, R.; Coleman, N.

    2007-12-01

    Eighty thousand years ago a small-volume basaltic volcano erupted 20 km south of the Department of Energy's (DOE) proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lathrop Wells is one of the infrequent basaltic volcanoes that have occurred near Yucca Mountain during the past 10 million years. The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste and Materials (ACNW&M) has prepared a summary and analysis of the technical views on the nature, likelihood and potential consequences of future igneous activity at the proposed repository. The technical views have been abstracted from public literature and agency reports. Alternate views reflect uncertainties of the igneous processes that have occurred in the region and those that are likely to occur, as well as the interaction of these processes with the proposed repository. There is general agreement that either extrusive or intrusive igneous activity may occur. The extrusive scenario is likely to cause a larger risk and the effect is greatest within the first thousand years. The nature of igneous activity that could occur will probably be similar in composition, structure, and style to the Lathrop Wells volcano. Certain styles of volcanism, like explosive phreatic eruptions (maar volcanism) are not expected because conditions necessary for these do not exist at Yucca Mountain. The volcanic record, particularly during the past 5 million years, suggests a variety of models for evaluating the probability of future igneous activity. The anticipated range of probability of an igneous event intersecting the proposed repository is low, between 1E-9 and 1E-7/yr. An ongoing DOE expert elicitation incorporating the latest geophysical and drilling data will provide an up-to-date, credible estimate of the probability of volcanic intersection. An understanding of the processes involved in interaction between magma and drifts, waste packages, and waste is evolving and providing new insights. As a result, there is limited

  14. Interactive Effects of Working Memory Self-Regulatory Ability and Relevance Instructions on Text Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Nancy Jo

    2012-01-01

    Reading is a process that requires the enactment of many cognitive processes. Each of these processes uses a certain amount of working memory resources, which are severely constrained by biology. More efficiency in the function of working memory may mediate the biological limits of same. Reading relevancy instructions may be one such method to…

  15. Self-glazing ceramic tiles based on acidic igneous glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Merkin, A.P.; Nanazashvili, V.I.

    1988-07-01

    A technology was derived to produce self-glazing ceramic tiles based on single-component systems of acidic igneous (volcanic) glasses. A weakly alkaline solution of NaOH or KOH was used as the sealing water to activate the sintering process. Tests conducted on the self-glazing ceramic tiles showed that their water absorption amounts to 2.5-8%, linear shrinkage is 3.2-7%, and frost resistance amounts to 35-70 cycles. The application of acidic igneous glasses as the main raw material for the production of ceramic facing tiles made it possible to widen the raw material base and simplify the technology for fabricating ceramic facing tiles at lower cost. The use of waste products when processing perlite-bearing rocks, when carrying out mining and cutting of tuffs, slags, and tuff breccia for recovering cut materials was recommended.

  16. Igneous Consequence Modeling for the TSPA-SR

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2001-10-29

    code is not run within this AMR and any sensitivity runs will be performed within the TSPA-SR. This change has no impact on the technical output from this AMR. The objectives of the work are to: (1) Develop TSPA-SR conceptual models for volcanic eruptive and igneous intrusion groundwater transport releases from igneous activity consistent with the available conceptual models and data; (2) Document support from conceptual models and data; (3) Deliver conceptual model parameter inputs to the TSPA-SR Model; (4) Provide appropriate documentation for conceptual models, data, and parameters to relevant project databases; and (5) Recommend an appropriate mathematical model for the volcanic eruption release scenario and provide appropriate parameter values for this model which will be run within the TSPA-SR Model.

  17. On the Basic Principles of Igneous Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    How and why Differentiation occurs has dominated Igneous Petrology since its beginning (~1880) even though many of the problems associated with it have been thoroughly solved. Rediscovery of the proverbial wheel with new techniques impedes progress. As soon as thin section petrography was combined with rock and mineral chemistry, rock diversity, compositional suites, and petrographic provinces all became obvious. The masterful 1902 CIPW norm in a real sense solved the chemical mystery of differentiation: rocks are related by the addition and subtraction of minerals in the anciently appreciated process of fractional crystallization. Yet few believed this, even after phase equilibria arrived. Assimilation, gas transfer, magma mixing, Soret diffusion, immiscibility, and other processes had strong adherents, even though by 1897 Becker conclusively showed the ineffectiveness of molecular diffusion in large-scale processes. The enormity of heat to molecular diffusion (today's Lewis no.) should have been convincing; but few paid attention. Bowen did, and he refined and restated the result; few still paid attention. And in spite of his truly masterful command of experiment and field relations in promoting fractional crystallization, Fenner and others fought him with odd arguments. The beauty of phase equilibria eventually dominated at the expense of knowing the physical side of differentiation. Bowen himself saw and struggled with the connection between physical and chemical processes. Progress has come from new concepts in heat transfer, kinetics, and slurry dynamics. The key approach is understanding the dynamic competition between spatial rates of solidification and all other processes. The lesson is clear: Scholarship and combined field, laboratory and technical expertise are critical to understanding magmatic processes. Magma is a limitlessly enchanting and challenging material wherein physical processes buttressed by chemistry govern.

  18. Crystallization trends of precursor pyroxene in ordinary chondrites: Implications for igneous origin of precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T.; Kitamura, M.

    1994-01-01

    Various observations suggest that the precursor of the fine fragments and the relict pyroxene was formed by an igneous process in a grandparent body of the chondrite. Furthermore, the fact that the precursors appear as fragments in the matrix as well as relicts in the chondrule suggests a shock origin for the chondrite by collision of two or more bodies, which had already to some extent undergone igneous differentiation.

  19. Martian Igneous Geochemistry: The Nature of the Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Peng, Z. X.; Herrin, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mafic igneous rocks probe the interiors of their parent objects, reflecting the compositions and mineralogies of their source regions, and the magmatic processes that engendered them. Incompatible trace element contents of mafic igneous rocks are widely used to constrain the petrologic evolution of planets. We focus on incompatible element ratios of martian meteorites to constrain the petrologic evolution of Mars in the context of magma ocean/cumulate overturn models [1]. Most martian meteorites contain some cumulus grains, but regardless, their incompatible element ratios are close to those of their parent magmas. Martian meteorites form two main petrologic/ age groupings; a 1.3 Ga group composed of clinopyroxenites (nakhlites) and dunites (chassignites), and a <1 Ga group composed of basalts and lherzolites (shergottites).

  20. Measurement of proton capture cross sections relevant to rp process with Coulomb dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Togano, Y.

    2010-08-12

    We have studied proton capture reactions on unstable proton-rich nuclei relevant to rapid proton-capture (rp) process using a Coulomb dissociation method. Using this method, three stellar reactions, {sup 22}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 23}Al, {sup 26}Si(p, {gamma}){sup 27}P, and {sup 30}S(p, {gamma}){sup 31}Cl were studied at RIKEN Nishina Center. The radiative widths of the first excited state in {sup 23}Al and {sup 27}P, which are relevant to the stellar reactions, were obtained. We discuss the details of the Coulomb dissociation the astrophysical implications obtained from our studies.

  1. Organic protomolecule assembly in igneous minerals

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Friedemann; Staple, Aaron; Scoville, John

    2001-01-01

    C—H stretching bands, νCH, in the infrared spectrum of single crystals of nominally high purity, of laboratory-grown MgO, and of natural upper mantle olivine, provide an “organic” signature that closely resembles the symmetrical and asymmetrical C—H stretching modes of aliphatic —CH2 units. The νCH bands indicate that H2O and CO2, dissolved in the matrix of these minerals, converted to form H2 and chemically reduced C, which in turn formed C—H entities, probably through segregation into defects such as dislocations. Heating causes the C—H bonds to pyrolyze and the νCH bands to disappear, but annealing at 70°C causes them to reappear within a few days or weeks. Modeling dislocations in MgO suggests that the segregation of C can lead to Cx chains, x = 4, with the terminal C atoms anchored to the MgO matrix by bonding to two O−. Allowing H2 to react with such Cx chains leads to [O2C(CH2)2CO2] or similar precipitates. It is suggested that such Cx—Hy—Oz entities represent protomolecules from which derive the short-chain carboxylic and dicarboxylic and the medium-chain fatty acids that have been solvent-extracted from crushed MgO and olivine single crystals, respectively. Thus, it appears that the hard, dense matrix of igneous minerals represents a medium in which protomolecular units can be assembled. During weathering of rocks, the protomolecular units turn into complex organic molecules. These processes may have provided stereochemically constrained organics to the early Earth that were crucial to the emergence of life. PMID:11226206

  2. Organic Protomolecule Assembly in Igneous Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Staple, Aaron; Scoville, John

    2001-01-01

    C-H stretching bands in the infrared spectrum of single crystals of nominally high purity, laboratory-grown MgO and of natural upper mantle olivine provide an "organic" signature that closely resembles the symmetrical and asymmetrical C-H stretching modes of aliphatic -CH2- units. The C-H stretching bands indicate that H20 and CO2, dissolved in the matrix of these minerals, converted to form H2 and chemically reduced C, which in turn formed C-H entities, probably through segregation into defects such as dislocations. Heating causes the C-H bonds to pyrolyze and the C-H stretching bands to disappear, but annealing at 70 C causes them to reappear within a few days or weeks. Modeling dislocations in MgO suggests that the segregation of C can lead to Cx chains, x less than or equal to 4, with the terminal C atoms anchored to the MgO matrix by bonding to two U. Allowing H2 to react with such Cx chains leads to [O2C(CH2)2CO2] or similar precipitates. It is suggested that such Cx-Hy-Oz entities represent protomolecules from which derive the short-chain carboxylic and dicarboxylic and of the medium-chain fatty acids that have been solvent-extracted from crushed MgO and olivine single crystals, respectively. Thus it appears that the hard, dense matrix of igneous minerals represents a medium in which protomolecular units can be assembled. During weathering of rocks the protomolecular units turn into complex organic molecules. These processes may have provided stereochemically constrained organics to the early Earth that were crucial to the emergence of Life.

  3. Synthesis of Co/Co3O4 nanocomposite particles relevant to magnetic field processing.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A K; Madhavi, S; Menon, M; Ramanujan, R V

    2010-10-01

    Co/Co3O4 nanocomposite particles of various morphologies were synthesized by the reverse micelle technique. Equiaxed, rod and faceted crystals with rectangular, pentagonal and hexagonal cross sections were observed. Annealing resulted in the formation of a composite of cobalt oxide (Co3O4) and fcc cobalt (Co). Removal of boron residues from the final product was established by surface characterization. Magnetic moment of these nanocomposite particles is relevant to magnetic field processing. PMID:21137765

  4. Sudbury Igneous Complex: Impact melt or igneous rock? Implications for lunar magmatism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Marc D.

    1992-01-01

    The recent suggestion that the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) is a fractionated impact melt may have profound implications for understanding the lunar crust and the magmatic history of the Moon. A cornerstone of much current thought on the Moon is that the development of the lunar crust can be traced through the lineage of 'pristine' igneous rocks. However, if rocks closely resembling those from layered igneous intrusions can be produced by differentiation of a large impact melt sheet, then much of what is thought to be known about the Moon may be called into question. This paper presents a brief evaluation of the SIC as a differentiated impact melt vs. endogenous igneous magma and possible implications for the magmatic history of the lunar crust.

  5. The relevance of rhythmical alternation in language processing: an ERP study on English compounds.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Karen; Alter, Kai; Wiese, Richard; Domahs, Ulrike

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the influence of rhythmic expectancies on language processing. It is assumed that language rhythm involves an alternation of strong and weak beats within a linguistic domain. Hence, in some contexts rhythmically induced stress shifts occur in order to comply with the Rhythm Rule. In English, this rule operates to prevent clashes of stressed adjacent syllables or lapses of adjacent unstressed syllables. While previous studies investigated effects on speech production and perception, this study focuses on brain responses to structures either obeying or deviating from this rule. Event-related potentials show that rhythmic regularity is relevant for language processing: rhythmic deviations evoked different ERP components reflecting the deviance from rhythmic expectancies. An N400 effect found for shifted items reflects higher costs in lexical processing due to stress deviation. The overall results disentangle lexical and rhythmical influences on language processing and complement the findings of previous studies on rhythmical processing. PMID:25113242

  6. Examining the freezing process of an intermediate bulk containing an industrially relevant protein

    PubMed Central

    Reinsch, Holger; Spadiut, Oliver; Heidingsfelder, Johannes; Herwig, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Numerous biopharmaceuticals are produced in recombinant microorganisms in the controlled environment of a bioreactor, a process known as Upstream Process. To minimize product loss due to physico-chemical and enzymatic degradation, the Upstream Process should be directly followed by product purification, known as Downstream Process. However, the Downstream Process can be technologically complex and time-consuming which is why Upstream and Downstream Process usually have to be decoupled temporally and spatially. Consequently, the product obtained after the Upstream Process, known as intermediate bulk, has to be stored. In those circumstances, a freezing procedure is often performed to prevent product loss. However, the freezing process itself is inseparably linked to physico-chemical changes of the intermediate bulk which may in turn damage the product. The present study analysed the behaviour of a Tris-buffered intermediate bulk containing a biopharmaceutically relevant protein during a bottle freezing process. Major damaging mechanisms, like the spatiotemporal redistribution of ion concentrations and pH, and their influence on product stability were investigated. Summarizing, we show the complex events which happen in an intermediate bulk during freezing and explain the different causes for product loss. PMID:25765305

  7. Crystal mat-formation as an igneous layering-forming process: Textural and geochemical evidence from the 'lower layered' nepheline syenite sequence of the Ilímaussaq complex, South Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindhuber, Matthias J.; Marks, Michael A. W.; Bons, Paul D.; Wenzel, Thomas; Markl, Gregor

    2015-05-01

    The lower layered nepheline syenite sequence (kakortokites) of the Mesoproterozoic alkaline to peralkaline Ilímaussaq complex, South Greenland shows spectacular rhythmic meter-scale igneous layering. The 29 exposed units have sharp contacts against each other and each of these units consists of three modally graded layers dominated by arfvedsonitic amphibole, eudialyte-group minerals, and alkali feldspar, respectively. This study uses field observations on changes in mineral orientation, recurrent mineral textures, compositional data from eudialyte-group minerals and amphibole, and settling rate calculations based on a modified Stokes' equation to explain the igneous layering of the kakortokites. We propose that the three major cumulus minerals (amphibole, eudialyte s.l., and alkali feldspar) were separated from each other by density contrasts, resulting in modally graded layers within each unit. The densest of these three minerals (amphibole) formed crystal mats within the cooling magma body. These crystal mats acted as barriers that inhibited large-scale vertical migration of melts and crystals with increasing effectiveness over time. The sub-volumes of magma captured in between the crystal mats evolved largely as geochemically independent sub-systems, as indicated by the observed trends in mineral composition.

  8. Beta-decay spectroscopy relevant to the r-process nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Shunji; Collaboration: RIBF Decay Collaboration

    2012-11-12

    A scientific program of beta-decay spectroscopy relevant to r-process nucleosynthesis has been started using high intensity U-beam at the RIBF. The first results of {beta}-decay half-lives of very neutron-rich Kr to Tc nuclides, all of which lie close to the r-process path, suggest a systematic enhancement of the the {beta}-decay rates of the Zr and Nb isotopes around A110 with respect to the predictions of the deformed quasiparticle-random-phase-approximation model (FRDM + QRPA). An impact of the results on the astrophysical r-process is discussed together with the future perspective of the {beta}-decay spectroscopy with the EURICA.

  9. Potential Future Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    M. Cline; F. Perry; G. Valentine; E. Smistad

    2005-05-26

    Location, timing, and volumes of post-Miocene volcanic activity, along with expert judgment, provide the basis for assessing the probability of future volcanism intersecting a proposed repository for nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analog studies of eruptive centers in the region that may represent the style and extent of possible future igneous activity at Yucca Mountain have aided in defining the consequence scenarios for intrusion into and eruption through a proposed repository. Modeling of magmatic processes related to magma/proposed repository interactions has been used to assess the potential consequences of a future igneous event through a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Results of work to date indicate future igneous activity in the Yucca Mountain region has a very low probability of intersecting the proposed repository. Probability of a future event intersecting a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is approximately 1.7 x 10{sup -8} per year. Since completion of the Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Assessment (PVHA) in 1996, anomalies representing potential buried volcanic centers have been identified from aeromagnetic surveys. A re-assessment of the hazard is currently underway to evaluate the probability of intersection in light of new information and to estimate the probability of one or more volcanic conduits located in the proposed repository along a dike that intersects the proposed repository. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for siting and licensing a proposed repository require that the consequences of a disruptive event (igneous event) with annual probability greater than 1 x 10{sup -8} be evaluated. Two consequence scenarios are considered: (1) igneous intrusion-poundwater transport case and (2) volcanic eruptive case. These scenarios equate to a dike or dike swarm intersecting repository drifts containing waste packages, formation of a conduit leading to a volcanic eruption through the repository that carries the

  10. Probing polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, Dario; Portale, Giuseppe; Androsch, René

    2015-12-17

    Processing of polymeric materials to produce any kind of goods, from films to complex objects, involves application of flow fields on the polymer melt, accompanied or followed by its rapid cooling. Typically, polymers solidify at cooling rates which span over a wide range, from a few to hundreds of °C/s. A novel method to probe polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates is proposed. Using a custom-built quenching device, thin polymer films are ballistically cooled from the melt at rates between approximately 10 and 200 °C/s. Thanks to highly brilliant synchrotron radiation and to state-of-the-art X-ray detectors, the crystallization process is followed in real-time, recording about 20 wide angle X-ray diffraction patterns per second while monitoring the instantaneous sample temperature. The method is applied to a series of industrially relevant polymers, such as isotactic polypropylene, its copolymers and virgin and nucleated polyamide-6. Their crystallization behaviour during rapid cooling is discussed, with particular attention to the occurrence of polymorphism, which deeply impact material’s properties.

  11. Measurements of proton radiative capture cross sections relevant to the astrophysical rp- and γ-processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chloupek, F. R.; Murphy, A. St J.; Boyd, R. N.; Cole, A. L.; Görres, J.; Guray, R. T.; Raimann, G.; Zach, J. J.; Rauscher, T.; Schwarzenberg, J. V.; Tischhauser, P.; Wiescher, M. C.

    1999-06-01

    Measurements have been made of the 96Zr(p,γ)97Nb, 112Sn(p,γ)113Sb, and 119Sn(p,γ)120Sb cross section excitation functions. Incident proton energies ranged from 2.8 MeV to 8.5 MeV. These reactions are relevant to several processes of stellar nucleosynthesis. The resulting astrophysical S-factors are compared to those from theoretical statistical model calculations using the SMOKER, and the more recent NON-SMOKER, codes to judge their applicability to these reactions.

  12. Gaussian process classification using automatic relevance determination for SAR target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangrong; Gou, Limin; Hou, Biao; Jiao, Licheng

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, a Synthetic Aperture Radar Automatic Target Recognition approach based on Gaussian process (GP) classification is proposed. It adopts kernel principal component analysis to extract sample features and implements target recognition by using GP classification with automatic relevance determination (ARD) function. Compared with k-Nearest Neighbor, Naïve Bayes classifier and Support Vector Machine, GP with ARD has the advantage of automatic model selection and hyper-parameter optimization. The experiments on UCI datasets and MSTAR database show that our algorithm is self-tuning and has better recognition accuracy as well.

  13. Experimental studies of reactions relevant for γ-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P.; Endres, J.; Hennig, A.; Mayer, J.; Netterdon, L.; Sauerwein, A.; Zilges, A.

    2014-05-01

    We report on our recent experimental studies of reactions relevant for the γ process nucleosynthesis. Applying the activation method using the Cologne Clover Counting Setup total cross sections of the reactions 168Yb(α,γ), 168Yb(α,n), and 187Re(α,n) could be obtained. Furthermore, the reaction 89Y(p,γ) was investigated via the in-beam technique with HPGe detectors at the high-efficiency g-ray spectrometer HORUS in Cologne in order to determine partial and total cross sections.

  14. Modeling the evolution of Sm and Eu abundances during lunar igneous differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weill, D. F.; Mckay, G. A.; Kridelbaugh, S. J.; Grutzeck, M.

    1974-01-01

    The current work presents models for the evolution of europium and samarium abundances during lunar igneous processes. The effect of probable variations in lunar temperature and oxygen fugacity, mineral-liquid distribution coefficients, and the crystallization or melting progression are considered in the model calculations. Changes in the proportions of crystallizing phases strongly influence the evolution of trace element abundances during fractional crystallization, and models must include realistic estimates of the major phase equilibria during crystallization. The results are applied to evaluating the possibility of generating KREEP-rich materials by lunar igneous processes.

  15. Ocean anoxia and large igneous provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, Micha; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald E.; Korte, Christoph; Stemmerik, Lars; Frei, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Earth's history is marked by multiple events of ocean anoxia developing along continental margins and potentially into the open ocean realm. These events often coincide with the emplacement of large igneous provinces (LIPs) on continents, major perturbations of global geochemical cycles and marine (mass) extinction. The geographic and temporal extend and the intensity (ferruginous vs. euxinic) of anoxic conditions is often, however, poorly constraint. This complicates understanding of close coupling between Earth's physical, chemical and biological processes. We studied ocean redox change over two major mass extinction events in Earth history, the Permian-Triassic (at ~252 Ma) and Triassic-Jurassic (at ~201.3 Ma) mass extinctions. Both extinction events are marked by a major perturbation of the global exogenic carbon cycle (and associated major negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE)), likely initiated by carbon outgassing of the Siberian Traps and the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), respectively. We compare Permian-Triassic and Triassic-Jurassic ocean redox change along continental margins in different geographic regions (Permian-Triassic: Greenland, Svalbard, Iran; Triassic-Jurassic: UK, Austria) and discuss its role in marine mass extinction. We show strongly enhanced sedimentary redox-sensitive trace element concentrations (e.g. Mo) during both events. However, increased Permian-Triassic values are in all localities distinctly delayed relative to the associated negative CIE. Triassic-Jurassic values are only delayed in the oceanographically restricted western Germanic basin (UK) while increased Mo-values in the north-western Tethys Ocean (Austria) directly match the onset of the associated negative CIE. Speciation of iron [giving (Fe-HR/ Fe-T) and (Fe(Py)/ Fe-HR)] in the Triassic-Jurassic western Germanic basin (UK) however shows close coupling between the onset of the global carbon cycle perturbation and a shift to anoxic and even euxinic conditions

  16. Teaching Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology Through Guided Inquiry Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, N. J.

    2003-12-01

    Undergraduate Petrology at New Mexico State University (GEOL 399) has been taught using three, 5-6 week long projects in place of lectures, lab, and exams for the last six years. Reasons for changing from the traditional format include: 1) to move the focus from identification and memorization to petrologic thinking; 2) the need for undergraduate students to apply basic chemical, structural, and field concepts to igneous and metamorphic rocks; 3) student boredom in the traditional mode by the topic that has captivated my professional life, in spite of my best efforts to offer thrilling lectures, problems, and labs. The course has three guided inquiry projects: volcanic, plutonic, and pelitic dynamothermal. Two of the rock suites are investigated during field trips. Each project provides hand samples and thin sections; the igneous projects also include whole-rock major and trace element data. Students write a scientific paper that classifies and describes the rocks, describes the data (mineralogical and geochemical), and uses data to interpret parameters such as tectonic setting, igneous processes, relationship to phase diagrams, geologic history, metamorphic grade, metamorphic facies, and polymetamorphic history. Students use the text as a major resource for self-learning; mini-lectures on pertinent topics are presented when needed by the majority of students. Project scores include evaluation of small parts of the paper due each Friday and participation in peer review as well as the final report. I have found that petrology is much more fun, although more difficult, to teach using this method. It is challenging to be totally prepared for class because students are working at different speeds on different levels on different aspects of the project. Students enjoy the course, especially the opportunity to engage in scientific investigation and debate. A significant flaw in this course is that students see fewer rocks and have less experience in rock classification

  17. Dynamic Effects of Self-Relevance and Task on the Neural Processing of Emotional Words in Context

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Eric C.; Kuperberg, Gina R.

    2016-01-01

    We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine the interactions between task, emotion, and contextual self-relevance on processing words in social vignettes. Participants read scenarios that were in either third person (other-relevant) or second person (self-relevant) and we recorded ERPs to a neutral, pleasant, or unpleasant critical word. In a previously reported study (Fields and Kuperberg, 2012) with these stimuli, participants were tasked with producing a third sentence continuing the scenario. We observed a larger LPC to emotional words than neutral words in both the self-relevant and other-relevant scenarios, but this effect was smaller in the self-relevant scenarios because the LPC was larger on the neutral words (i.e., a larger LPC to self-relevant than other-relevant neutral words). In the present work, participants simply answered comprehension questions that did not refer to the emotional aspects of the scenario. Here we observed quite a different pattern of interaction between self-relevance and emotion: the LPC was larger to emotional vs. neutral words in the self-relevant scenarios only, and there was no effect of self-relevance on neutral words. Taken together, these findings suggest that the LPC reflects a dynamic interaction between specific task demands, the emotional properties of a stimulus, and contextual self-relevance. We conclude by discussing implications and future directions for a functional theory of the emotional LPC. PMID:26793138

  18. Laboratory studies of chemical and photochemical processes relevant to stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in several key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact our understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring rate coefficients and product channels for reactions of HO(sub x) and NO(sub x) species in the temperature range 200 K to 240 K relevant to the lower stratosphere. Other areas of study have included infrared spectroscopic studies of the HO2 radical, measurements of OH radical reactions with alternative fluorocarbons, and determination of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions. The results of these studies will improve models of stratospheric ozone chemistry and predictions of perturbations due to human influences. In this annual report, we focus on our recent accomplishments in the quantitative spectroscopy of the HO2 radical. This report details the measurements of the broadening coefficients for the v(sub 2) vibrational band. Further measurements of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates relevant to the polar stratospheric cloud formation indicate the importance of metastable crystalline phases of H2SO4, HNO3, and H2O. Large particles produced from these metastable phases may provide a removal mechanism for HNO3 in the polar stratosphere.

  19. The role of igneous sills in shaping the Martian uplands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelms, D. E.; Baldwin, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Relations among geologic units and landforms suggest that igneous sills lie beneath much of the intercrater and intracrater terrain of the Martian uplands. The igneous rocks crop out along the upland-lowland front and in crater floors and other depressions that are low enough to intersect the sill's intrusion horizons. It is suggested that heat from the cooling sills melted some of the ice contained in overlying fragmental deposits, creating valley networks by subsurface flow of the meltwater. Terrains with undulatory, smooth surfaces and softened traces of valleys were created by more direct contact with the sills. Widespread subsidence following emplacement of the sills deformed both them and the nonvolcanic deposits that overlie them, accounting for the many structures that continue from ridged plains into the hilly uplands. Crater counts show that the deposit that became valleyed, softened, and ridged probably began to form (and to acquire interstitial ice) during or shortly after the Middle Noachian Epoch, and continued to form as late as the Early Hesperian Epoch. The upper layers of this deposit, many of the visible valleys, and the ridged plains and postulated sills all have similar Early Hesperian ages. Continued formation of valleys is indicated by their incision of fresh-appearing crater ejecta. The dependence of valley formation on internal processes implies that Mars did not necessarily have a dense early atmosphere or warm climate.

  20. Stimulus-response correspondence effect as a function of temporal overlap between relevant and irrelevant information processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Yuan Debbie; Richard, F Dan; Ray, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    The stimulus-response correspondence (SRC) effect refers to advantages in performance when stimulus and response correspond in dimensions or features, even if the common features are irrelevant to the task. Previous research indicated that the SRC effect depends on the temporal course of stimulus information processing. The current study investigated how the temporal overlap between relevant and irrelevant stimulus processing influences the SRC effect. In this experiment, the irrelevant stimulus (a previously associated tone) preceded the relevant stimulus (a coloured rectangle). The irrelevant and relevant stimuli onset asynchrony was varied to manipulate the temporal overlap between the irrelevant and relevant stimuli processing. Results indicated that the SRC effect size varied as a quadratic function of the temporal overlap between the relevant stimulus and irrelevant stimulus. This finding extends previous experimental observations that the SRC effect size varies in an increasing or decreasing function with reaction time. The current study demonstrated a quadratic function between effect size and the temporal overlap. PMID:26555858

  1. Presentation and interpretation of chemical data for igneous rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, T.L.

    1974-01-01

    Arguments are made in favor of using variation diagrams to plot analyses of igneous rocks and their derivatives and modeling differentiation processes by least-squares mixing procedures. These methods permit study of magmatic differentiation and related processes in terms of all of the chemical data available. Data are presented as they are reported by the chemist and specific processes may be modeled and either quantitatively described or rejected as inappropriate or too simple. Examples are given of the differing interpretations that can arise when data are plotted on an AEM ternary vs. the same data on a full set of MgO variation diagrams. Mixing procedures are illustrated with reference to basaltic lavas from the Columbia Plateau. ?? 1974 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Magmatic systems of large continental igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    2014-05-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) of the modern type are known from the middle Paleoproterozoic and have a great abundance in the Phanerozoic. The most researches considered their appearance with ascending of the mantle thermochemical superplumes which provided simultaneously eruption of the same type of lavas on the huge territories. Judging on presence among them different subprovinces, formation of concrete magmatic systems were linked with protuberances (secondary plumes) on the superplumes surfaces. We suggest that origin of such plumes was linked with local enrichment of upper part of the superplumes head beneath roofing by fluid components; it led to lowering of the plume material density and initiated ascending of the secondary plumes. As a result, their heads, where partial melting occurred, can reach the level of the upper crust as it follows from absence of lower-crustal rocks among xenoliths in basalts, although mantle xenoliths existed in them. Important feature of LIPs is presence of two major types of mafic lavas: (1) geochemical-enriched alkali Fe-Ti basalts and picrites, and (2) basalts of normal alkalinity (tholeiites) with different contents of TiO2. At that the first type of mafites are usually typical for lower parts of LIPs which initially developed as continental rifts, whereas the second type composed the upper part of the traps' cover. Magmatic systems of the LIPs are subdivided on three levels of different deep: (1) zones of magma generation, (2) areas of transitional magma chambers where large often layered intrusive bodies are formed, and (3) areas on surface where lava eruptions and subvolcanic intrusions occurred. All these levels are linked by feeder dykes. The least known element of the system is area of magma generation, and, especially, composition of melting substratum. Important information about it is contained in aforementioned mantle xenoliths in alkali basalts and basanites. They practically everywhere are represented by two

  3. High Xylose Yields from Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover Under Process-Relevant Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, N. D.; Nagle, N. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Elander, R. T.

    2009-01-01

    Pretreatment experiments were carried out to demonstrate high xylose yields at high solids loadings in two different batch pretreatment reactors under process-relevant conditions. Corn stover was pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid using a 4-l Steam Digester and a 4-l stirred ZipperClave{reg_sign} reactor. Solids were loaded at 45% dry matter (wt/wt) after sulfuric acid catalyst impregnation using nominal particle sizes of either 6 or 18 mm. Pretreatment was carried out at temperatures between 180 and 200 C at residence times of either 90 or 105 s. Results demonstrate an ability to achieve high xylose yields (>80%) over a range of pretreatment conditions, with performance showing little dependence on particle size or pretreatment reactor type. The high xylose yields are attributed to effective catalyst impregnation and rapid rates of heat transfer during pretreatment.

  4. Laboratory Studies of Chemical and Photochemical Processes Relevant to Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villalta, Peter W.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in several key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact our understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring rate coefficients and product channels for reactions of HO(x) and NO(x) species in the temperature range 200 K to 240 K relevant to the lower stratosphere. The results of these studies will improve models of stratospheric ozone chemistry and predictions of perturbations due to human influences. The second year's effort has focussed the design and construction of the proposed high pressure flow reactor on three separate areas: (1) the construction of the high pressure flow reactor; (2) characterization of the turbulent flow profile; and (3) demonstration of the instrument by measuring HO2 + NO2 and HO2 + NO reaction rate coefficients.

  5. Laboratory Studies of Chemical and Photochemical Processes Relevant to Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in several key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact our understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring rate coefficients and product channels for reactions of HOx and NOx species in the temperature range 200 K to 240 K relevant to the lower stratosphere. Other areas of study have included infrared spectroscopic studies of the HO radical, measurements of OH radical reactions with alternative fluorocarbons, and determination of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions. The results of these studies will improve models of stratospheric ozone chemistry and predictions of perturbations due to human influences.

  6. Uranium in NIMROC standard igneous rock samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, M. W.; Herndon, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for analysis of the uranium in multiple samples of each of six igneous-rock standards (dunite, granite, lujavrite, norite, pyroxenite, and syenite) prepared as geochemical reference standards for elemental and isotopic compositions. Powdered rock samples were examined by measuring delayed neutron emission after irradiation with a flux of the order of 10 to the 13th power neutrons/sq cm per sec in a nuclear reactor. The measurements are shown to compare quite favorably with previous uranium determinations for other standard rock samples.

  7. Petrogenesis of Igneous-Textured Clasts in Martian Meteorite Northwest Africa 7034

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, A. R.; Agee, C. B.; Humayun, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; Shearer, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    The martian meteorite Northwest Africa 7034 (and pairings) is a breccia that samples a variety of materials from the martian crust. Several previous studies have identified multiple types of igneous-textured clasts within the breccia [1-3], and these clasts have the potential to provide insight into the igneous evolution of Mars. One challenge presented by studying these small rock fragments is the lack of field context for this breccia (i.e., where on Mars it formed), so we do not know how many sources these small rock fragments are derived from or the exact formation his-tory of these sources (i.e., are the sources mantle de-rived melt or melts contaminated by a meteorite impactor on Mars). Our goal in this study is to examine specific igneous-textured clast groups to determine if they are petrogenetically related (i.e., from the same igneous source) and determine more information about their formation history, then use them to derive new insights about the igneous history of Mars. We will focus on the basalt clasts, FTP clasts (named due to their high concentration of iron, titanium, and phosphorous), and mineral fragments described by [1] (Fig. 1). We will examine these materials for evidence of impactor contamination (as proposed for some materials by [2]) or mantle melt derivation. We will also test the petrogenetic models proposed in [1], which are igneous processes that could have occurred regardless of where the melt parental to the clasts was formed. These models include 1) derivation of the FTP clasts from a basalt clast melt through silicate liquid immiscibility (SLI), 2) derivation of the FTP clasts from a basalt clast melt through fractional crystallization, and 3) a lack of petrogenetic relationship between these clast groups. The relationship between the clast groups and the mineral fragments will also be explored.

  8. On the observation of climate-relevant processes in the UTLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riese, Martin; Ungermann, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    Changes and variability of UTLS composition are major drivers of surface climate change (e.g. Solomon et al., 2010). Even small changes of spatially highly variable concentrations of greenhouse gases such as water vapor (H2O) and ozone (O3), aerosols and cirrus clouds have significant effects on the atmospheric radiation balance. Improved prediction capabilities of chemistry-climate models (CCM) therefore rely on a realistic representation of physical and chemical processes affecting UTLS composition. This is problematic, because UTLS composition is governed by the complex interactions of various physical and chemical processes that operate at a wide range of temporal and spatial scales (local to global). Water vapor and ozone are particularly sensitive to atmospheric transport due to their steep spatial mixing ratio gradients in this region. Small-scale trace gas filaments in the UTLS represent an important example of structures that are not yet adequately characterized. The same applies to small-scale gravity-waves that are important for the dynamical coupling between different atmospheric layers. In the past, most progress in our understanding of the UTLS and small-scale processes in this region was made on the basis of detailed airborne in-situ observations. Satellite limb observations, e. g. by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) onboard Envisat, provided the global view, however, at limited spatial resolution. For this reason, there is a gap of observations concerning small-scale trace gas structures and temperature fluctuations, with a vertical extent of less than 500 m and a horizontal extent of less than 100 km. The talk will give an overview on climate-relevant processes in the UTLS and important associated scientific questions. Limitations of current observation system are discussed as well as need for three-dimensional observation of trace gases, clouds and temperature structures with adequate spatial resolution.

  9. The Role of the Auditory Brainstem in Processing Musically Relevant Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Bidelman, Gavin M.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging work has shed light on the cerebral architecture involved in processing the melodic and harmonic aspects of music. Here, recent evidence is reviewed illustrating that subcortical auditory structures contribute to the early formation and processing of musically relevant pitch. Electrophysiological recordings from the human brainstem and population responses from the auditory nerve reveal that nascent features of tonal music (e.g., consonance/dissonance, pitch salience, harmonic sonority) are evident at early, subcortical levels of the auditory pathway. The salience and harmonicity of brainstem activity is strongly correlated with listeners’ perceptual preferences and perceived consonance for the tonal relationships of music. Moreover, the hierarchical ordering of pitch intervals/chords described by the Western music practice and their perceptual consonance is well-predicted by the salience with which pitch combinations are encoded in subcortical auditory structures. While the neural correlates of consonance can be tuned and exaggerated with musical training, they persist even in the absence of musicianship or long-term enculturation. As such, it is posited that the structural foundations of musical pitch might result from innate processing performed by the central auditory system. A neurobiological predisposition for consonant, pleasant sounding pitch relationships may be one reason why these pitch combinations have been favored by composers and listeners for centuries. It is suggested that important perceptual dimensions of music emerge well before the auditory signal reaches cerebral cortex and prior to attentional engagement. While cortical mechanisms are no doubt critical to the perception, production, and enjoyment of music, the contribution of subcortical structures implicates a more integrated, hierarchically organized network underlying music processing within the brain. PMID:23717294

  10. An analytical and numerical study of Galton-Watson branching processes relevant to population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Sa-Han

    Galton-Watson branching processes of relevance to human population dynamics are the subject of this thesis. We begin with an historical survey of the invention of the invention of this model in the middle of the 19th century, for the purpose of modelling the extinction of unusual surnames in France and Britain. We then review the principal developments and refinements of this model, and their applications to a wide variety of problems in biology and physics. Next, we discuss in detail the case where the probability generating function for a Galton-Watson branching process is a geometric series, which can be summed in closed form to yield a fractional linear generating function that can be iterated indefinitely in closed form. We then describe the matrix method of Keyfitz and Tyree, and use it to determine how large a matrix must be chosen to model accurately a Galton-Watson branching process for a very large number of generations, of the order of hundreds or even thousands. Finally, we show that any attempt to explain the recent evidence for the existence thousands of generations ago of a 'mitochondrial Eve' and a 'Y-chromosomal Adam' in terms of a the standard Galton-Watson branching process, or indeed any statistical model that assumes equality of probabilities of passing one's genes to one's descendents in later generations, is unlikely to be successful. We explain that such models take no account of the advantages that the descendents of the most successful individuals in earlier generations enjoy over their contemporaries, which must play a key role in human evolution.

  11. Current knowledge on mycolic acids in Corynebacterium glutamicum and their relevance for biotechnological processes.

    PubMed

    Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Tropis, Maryelle; Daffé, Mamadou

    2013-12-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is the world's largest producer of glutamate and lysine. Industrial glutamate overproduction is induced by empirical processes, such as biotin limitation, supplementation with specific surfactants or addition of sublethal concentration of certain antibiotics to the culture media. Although Gram-positive bacteria, C. glutamicum and related bacterial species and genera contain, in addition to the plasma membrane, an outer permeability membrane similar to that of Gram-negative microorganisms. As the amino acids have to cross both membranes, their integrity, composition and fluidity influence the export process. While the precise mechanism of the export of the amino acids by C. glutamicum is not fully understood, the excretion of amino acids through the inner membrane involved at least a major export system mechanosensitive channel MscS family (MscCG) encoded by NCgl1221. As the various industrial treatments have been shown to affect the lipid content of the bacterial cell, it is strongly believed that defects in the hallmark of the outer membrane, 2-alkyl, 3-hydroxylated long-chain fatty acids (mycolic acids), could be key factors in the glutamate overproduction. This review aims at giving an overview of the current knowledge on mycolic acids structure, biosynthesis and transfer in C. glutamicum and their relevance for amino acid biotechnological production. PMID:24113823

  12. Northeast Atlantic Igneous Province volcanic margin development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mjelde, R.; Breivik, A. J.; Faleide, J. I.

    2009-04-01

    Early Eocene continental breakup in the NE Atlantic Volcanic Province (NAIP) was associated with voluminous extrusive and intrusive magmatism, and initial seafloor spreading produced anomalously thick oceanic crust. Recent publications based on crustal-scale wide-angle seismic data show that there is a positive correlation between igneous crustal thickness (H) and average P-wave velocity (Vp) on all investigated margins in the NAIP. Vp can be used as a proxy for crustal composition, which can be related to the mode of mantle melting. A positive H-Vp correlation indicates that excessive mantle melting the first few million years after breakup was driven by an initial increased temperature that cools off as seafloor spreading develops, consistent with a mantle plume model. Variations in mantle composition can explain excess magmatism, but will generate a negative H-Vp correlation. Active mantle convection may increase the flux of mantle rocks through the melting zone above the rate of passive corner flow, which can also produce excessive magmatism. This would produce little H-Vp correlation, and place the curve lower than the passive flow melting curve in the diagram. We have compiled earlier published results with our own analyses of published and unpublished data from different groups to look for systematic variations in the mantle melting mode along the NAIP margins. Earlier studies (Holbrook et al., 2002, White et al, 2008) on the southeast Greenland conjugate system, indicate that the thick igneous crust of the southern NAIP (SE Greenland ? Hatton Bank) was dominated by increased mantle temperature only, while magmatism closer to the southern side of and including the Greenland-Iceland-Færøy Ridge (GIFR) was created by combined temperature increase and active mantle convection. Recent publications (Breivik et al., 2008, White et al, 2008) north of the GIFR for the Norway Basin segment, indicate temperature dominated magmatism between the Jan Mayen Fracture

  13. Lithium Isotope Systematics of Rift-related Alkaline Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halama, R.; McDonough, W. F.; Rudnick, R. L.; Trumbull, R.; Klaudius, J.; Keller, J.; Taubald, H.

    2006-05-01

    Intracontinental alkaline igneous rocks from the Proterozoic Gardar Province (Greenland), the Cretaceous Damaraland Province (Namibia), the Tertiary Kaiserstuhl complex (Germany) and from the Holocene volcano Oldoinyo Lengai (Tanzania) were analyzed to characterize Li isotopic compositions of their mantle sources and to determine the processes affecting δ7Li in alkaline igneous rocks. The inferred mantle Li isotope signatures of the primitive alkaline rocks (δ7Li = +1 to +7) are similar to those of present- day MORB, OIB and carbonatites, and appear to be relatively constant in time and space. Gabbros from the Gardar Province define a relatively small field of Li isotope compositions (δ7Li = +4 to +7). Mineral separates (clinopyroxene, plagioclase) mostly overlap with the whole-rock values, which we interpret to reflect the δ7Li of the mantle sources of the gabbros. Mantle-like δ7Li values are also observed for primitive alkaline rocks from the other regions. Li isotope compositions in more differentiated rocks (syenites, phonolites and rhyolites) are highly variable (+11 to -22 per mil) and reflect a diversity of evolutionary processes that may vary from complex to complex. δ7Li values vary independently of Sr and Nd isotope values and indices of differentiation (e.g. MgO content) or weathering (e.g. LOI). Consistently light δ7Li values (+2 to -22) occur in Gardar syenites associated with a carbonatite. These may be explained by weathering and sub-solidus alteration, as indicated by petrographic observations. Alternatively, fluid-assisted diffusion processes, related to a fenitizing fluid from the carbonatite, may have led to extreme Li isotope fractionation. Whole-rock oxygen isotope analyses will be carried out to evaluate interaction with meteoric water, which would be reflected in a decrease in δ18O compared to magmatic values. The heaviest Li isotopic composition (+11 per mil) was obtained for a rhyolite, probably related to the presence of quartz

  14. Development of advanced host cell protein enrichment and detection strategies to enable process relevant spike challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Soderquist, Ryan G; Trumbo, Mihaela; Hart, Roger A; Zhang, Qingchun; Flynn, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    An orthogonal chromatography methodology for the enrichment of host cell protein (HCP) species relative to monoclonal antibody (mAb) products was developed and applied for the successful enrichment of HCP from post-Protein A process pools for seven different mAb products. An advanced two-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry platform (2D-LC/MS(E) ) was utilized to demonstrate that the HCP enriched material was representative, in terms of species content, to pre-enriched process pools. The HCP enrichment methodology was scaled up for two different mAb products, and this process relevant enriched HCP material was used to conduct advanced spike challenge studies to demonstrate the utility of the approach for the understanding of (1) quantitative HCP clearance, (2) individual species clearance, and (3) species clearance redundancy across polishing chromatography steps. The combined ability to enrich process relevant HCP, detect individual HCP species with 2D-LC/MS(E) technology, and conduct advanced challenge studies with process relevant material surmounts prior limitations to high integrity process challenge study implementation, and facilitates significant process understanding for development of risk-based control strategies and strategic process design. This also demonstrates implementation of a foundational strategy for conducting spike-challenge studies using process-relevant impurities isolated from processes of interest using orthogonal approaches. PMID:26014278

  15. Groundwater in the Earth's critical zone: Relevance to large-scale patterns and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ying

    2015-05-01

    Although we have an intuitive understanding of the behavior and functions of groundwater in the Earth's critical zone at the scales of a column (atmosphere-plant-soil-bedrock), along a toposequence (ridge to valley), and across a small catchment (up to third-order streams), this paper attempts to assess the relevance of groundwater to understanding large-scale patterns and processes such as represented in global climate and Earth system models. Through observation syntheses and conceptual models, evidence are presented that groundwater influence is globally prevalent, it forms an environmental gradient not fully captured by the climate, and it can profoundly shape critical zone evolution at continental to global scales. Four examples are used to illustrate these ideas: (1) groundwater as a water source for plants in rainless periods, (2) water table depth as a driver of plant rooting depth, (3) the accessibility of groundwater as an ecological niche separator, and (4) groundwater as the lower boundary of land drainage and a global driver of wetlands. The implications to understanding past and future global environmental change are briefly discussed, as well as critical discipline, scale, and data gaps that must be bridged in order for us to translate what we learn in the field at column, hillslope and catchment scales, to what we must predict at regional, continental, and global scales.

  16. Alpha-particle capture reactions in inverse kinematics relevant to p-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujić, P.; Lagoyannis, A.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Harissopulos, S.; Demetriou, P.; Perrot, L.; Stodel, Ch.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Kamalou, O.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Spyrou, A.; Amthor, M. A.; Grevy, S.; Caceres, L.; Koivisto, H.; Laitinen, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Julin, R.

    2011-10-01

    The first feasibility study of an α-particle capture reaction in inverse kinematics at energies relevant to the p process was performed at the Wien Filter of the LISE spectrometer at GANIL. Hereby, the 4He(78Kr,γ)82Sr reaction was investigated using as target an 4He-implanted thin Al foil. The analysis of the data has shown that the determination of (α,γ) reaction cross sections at rather low energies around 2 MeV/u in inverse kinematics is indeed feasible regarding the high rejection rate of the primary beam, which in the present work was better than a factor of 109. However, the expected position of the recoils of interest was completely masked by particles of currently unknown origin that could hardly be attributed to scattering of the primary beam. The most probable explanation for the origin of these "pollutants" could be microscopic dust particles of 10 μm diameter and less, that are extremely difficult to avoid in standard experimental conditions. Hence, the use of a gas-jet target instead of a solid one is compulsory.

  17. Laboratory Studies of Chemical and Photochemical Processes Relevant to Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villalta, P. W.; Zahniser, M. S.; Nelson, D. D.; Kolb, C. E.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for this project. Its purpose is to reduce the uncertainty in rate coefficients for key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact our understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring the rate coefficients for the reactions of HO2 + O3, and HO2 + NO2 in the temperature range (200-240 K) relevant to the lower stratosphere. In order to accomplish this, a high pressure turbulent flow tube reactor was built and its flow characteristics were quantified. The instrument was coupled with tunable diode laser spectroscopy for HO2 detection. Room temperature measurements of the HO2 + NO2 rate coefficients over the pressure range of 50-300 torr agree well with previous measurements. Preliminary measurements of the HO2 + O, rate coefficients at 50 - 300 Torr over the temperature range of 208-294 K agree with the NASA evaluation from 294-225 K but deviate significantly (50 % higher) at approximately 210 K.

  18. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (Phb) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Mohagheghi, Ali; Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heidi; Johnson, David K.

    2015-03-22

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. In recent years a great effort has been made in bacterial production of PHB, yet the production cost of the polymer is still much higher than conventional petrochemical plastics. The high cost of PHB is because the cost of the substrates can account for as much as half of the total product cost in large scale fermentation. Thus searching for cheaper and better substrates is very necessary for PHB production. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB by Cupriavidus necator from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified hydrolysate slurry from pretreated corn stover. Good cell growth was observed on slurry saccharified with advanced enzymes and 40~60% of PHB was accumulated in the cells. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by pretreatment and saccharification of biomass, will be discussed.

  19. Large igneous provinces and mass extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wignall, P. B.

    2001-03-01

    Comparing the timing of mass extinctions with the formation age of large igneous provinces reveals a close correspondence in five cases, but previous claims that all such provinces coincide with extinction events are unduly optimistic. The best correlation occurs for four consecutive mid-Phanerozoic examples, namely the end-Guadalupian extinction/Emeishan flood basalts, the end-Permian extinction/Siberian Traps, the end-Triassic extinction/central Atlantic volcanism and the early Toarcian extinction/Karoo Traps. Curiously, the onset of eruptions slightly post-dates the main phase of extinctions in these examples. Of the seven post-Karoo provinces, only the Deccan Traps coincide with a mass extinction, but in this case, the nature of the biotic crisis is best reconciled with the effects of a major bolide impact. Intraoceanic volcanism may also be implicated in a relatively minor end-Cenomanian extinction crisis, although once again the main phase of volcanism occurs after the crisis. The link between large igneous province formation and extinctions remains enigmatic; volume of extrusives and extinction intensity are unrelated and neither is there any apparent relationship with the rapidity of province formation. Violence of eruptions (proportions of pyroclastics) also appears unimportant. Six out of 11 provinces coincide with episodes of global warming and marine anoxia/dysoxia, a relationship that suggests that volcanic CO 2 emissions may have an important effect on global climate. Conversely, there is little, if any, geological evidence for cooling associated with continental flood basalt eruptions suggesting little long-term impact of SO 2 emissions. Large carbon isotope excursions are associated with some extinction events and intervals of flood basalt eruption but these are too great to be accounted for by the release of volcanic CO 2 alone. Thus, voluminous volcanism may in some circumstances trigger calamitous global environmental changes (runaway greenhouses

  20. Introduction to the Apollo collections. Part 1: Lunar igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, P. E.; Warner, J. L.; Simonds, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The basic petrographic, chemical, and age data is presented for a representative suite of igneous rocks gathered during the six Apollo missions. Tables are given for 69 samples: 32 igneous rocks and 37 impactites (breccias). A description is given of 26 basalts, four plutonic rocks, and two pyroclastic samples. The textural-mineralogic name assigned each sample is included.

  1. SMART-1 highlights and relevant studies on early bombardment and geological processes on rocky planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; Racca, G. D.; Josset, J. L.; Koschny, D.; Frew, D.; Almeida, M.; Zender, J.; Heather, D.; Peters, S.; Marini, A.; Stagnaro, L.; Beauvivre, S.; Grande, M.; Kellett, B.; Huovelin, J.; Nathues, A.; Mall, U.; Ehrenfreund, P.; McCannon, P.

    2008-08-01

    present here SMART-1 results relevant to the study of the early bombardment and geological processes on rocky planets. Further information and updates on the SMART-1 mission can be found on the ESA Science and Technology web pages, at: http://sci.esa.int/smart-1/.

  2. LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE SHAPES PROCESSING OF PITCH RELEVANT INFORMATION IN THE HUMAN BRAINSTEM AND AUDITORY CORTEX: ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.

    2015-01-01

    Pitch is a robust perceptual attribute that plays an important role in speech, language, and music. As such, it provides an analytic window to evaluate how neural activity relevant to pitch undergo transformation from early sensory to later cognitive stages of processing in a well coordinated hierarchical network that is subject to experience-dependent plasticity. We review recent evidence of language experience-dependent effects in pitch processing based on comparisons of native vs. nonnative speakers of a tonal language from electrophysiological recordings in the auditory brainstem and auditory cortex. We present evidence that shows enhanced representation of linguistically-relevant pitch dimensions or features at both the brainstem and cortical levels with a stimulus-dependent preferential activation of the right hemisphere in native speakers of a tone language. We argue that neural representation of pitch-relevant information in the brainstem and early sensory level processing in the auditory cortex is shaped by the perceptual salience of domain-specific features. While both stages of processing are shaped by language experience, neural representations are transformed and fundamentally different at each biological level of abstraction. The representation of pitch relevant information in the brainstem is more fine-grained spectrotemporally as it reflects sustained neural phase-locking to pitch relevant periodicities contained in the stimulus. In contrast, the cortical pitch relevant neural activity reflects primarily a series of transient temporal neural events synchronized to certain temporal attributes of the pitch contour. We argue that experience-dependent enhancement of pitch representation for Chinese listeners most likely reflects an interaction between higher-level cognitive processes and early sensory-level processing to improve representations of behaviorally-relevant features that contribute optimally to perception. It is our view that long

  3. Igneous rocks from Apollo 16 rake samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, E.; Keil, K.; Prinz, M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported for a study of seven holocrystalline feldspathic rocks (including a spinel troctolite and six melt rocks) and one mare basalt clast from the Apollo-16 rake samples. The composition and grain structure of each rock is described in detail. Only the spinel troctolite is considered a good candidate for a primary igneous cumulate formed during the original differentiation of the lunar crust. It is shown that the melt rocks probably resulted from shock melting followed by rapid crystallization of heterogeneous highland material and that compositional variations are probably due to mixing of various amounts of heterogeneous cumulates and KREEP components. It is suggested that the mare basalt clast may have been derived from Mare Fecunditatis, although the nearest mare to the Apollo-16 site is Nectaris.

  4. Number of Waste Package Hit by Igneous Intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wallace

    2004-10-13

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to document calculations of the number of waste packages that could be damaged in a potential future igneous event through a repository at Yucca Mountain. The analyses include disruption from an intrusive igneous event and from an extrusive volcanic event. This analysis supports the evaluation of the potential consequences of future igneous activity as part of the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Igneous activity is a disruptive event that is included in the TSPA-LA analyses. Two igneous activity scenarios are considered: (1) The igneous intrusion groundwater release scenario (also called the igneous intrusion scenario) considers the in situ damage to waste packages or failure of waste packages that occurs if they are engulfed or otherwise affected by magma as a result of an igneous intrusion. (2) The volcanic eruption scenario depicts the direct release of radioactive waste due to an intrusion that intersects the repository followed by a volcanic eruption at the surface. An igneous intrusion is defined as the ascent of a basaltic dike or dike system (i.e., a set or swarm of multiple dikes comprising a single intrusive event) to repository level, where it intersects drifts. Magma that does reach the surface from igneous activity is an eruption (or extrusive activity) (Jackson 1997 [DIRS 109119], pp. 224, 333). The objective of this analysis is to develop a probabilistic measure of the number of waste packages that could be affected by each of the two scenarios.

  5. Large wood storage in streams of the Eastern Italian Alps and the relevance of hillslope processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon, E.; Comiti, F.; Lenzi, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the dynamics of large wood (LW) in mountain channels provides the basis for evaluating natural morphological patterns as well as managing potentially hazardous wood transport during flood events. Few studies have investigated the distribution of LW in managed streams of the Alps across a wide spatial scale. This paper presents extensive field measurements of LW storage and channel morphology carried out in 13 channels of the Eastern Italian Alps with drainage areas ranging from 1.2 to 70 km2, mean bed slope between 0.03 and 0.38, and channel width between 2 and 20 m. More than 9000 LW elements were measured in the 33 reaches surveyed. A geostatistical, geographic information system (GIS)-based model for wood recruitment from hillslope instabilities was also developed and applied to the study basin. LW storage in the study channels results as being much lower than in seminatural basins of comparable size and climate, and only basins characterized by extensive mass wasting processes contain high wood loads with relevant morphological consequences. The statistical analysis of LW storage at the reach scale indicates that unit stream power is apparently the most significant hydromorphological factor influencing LW storage, in agreement with studies in other world regions. However, we argue that the effect of unit stream power on LW storage is not only linked to flow transport capacity but also derives from its association with LW supply and valley morphology. Both the GIS model and statistical tests on field data indicate that hillslope instabilities connected to the channel network dominate the LW recruitment volume and the distribution of in-channel wood storage.

  6. Attentional demand and processing of relevant visual information during simulated driving: a MEG study.

    PubMed

    Fort, Alexandra; Martin, Robert; Jacquet-Andrieu, Armelle; Combe-Pangaud, Chantal; Foliot, Gérald; Daligault, Sébastien; Delpuech, Claude

    2010-12-01

    It is a well-known fact that attention is crucial for driving a car. This innovative study aims to assess the impact of attentional workload modulation on cerebral activity during a simulated driving task using magnetoencephalography (MEG). A car simulator equipped with a steering wheel, turn indicators, an accelerator and a brake pedal has been specifically designed to be used with MEG. Attentional demand has been modulated using a radio broadcast. During half of the driving scenarios, subjects could ignore the broadcast (simple task, ST) and during the other half, they had to actively listen to it in order to answer 3 questions (dual task, DT). Evoked magnetic responses were computed in both conditions separately for two visual stimuli of interest: traffic lights (from green to amber) and direction signs (arrows to the right or to the left) shown on boards. The cortical sources of these activities have been estimated using a minimum-norm current estimates modeling technique. Results show the activation of a large distributed network similar in ST and DT and similar for both the traffic lights and the direction signs. This network mainly involves sensory visual areas as well as parietal and frontal regions known to play a role in selective attention and motor areas. The increase of attentional demand affects the neuronal processing of relevant visual information for driving, as early as the perceptual stage. By demonstrating the feasibility of recording MEG activity during an interactive simulated driving task, this study opens new possibilities for investigating issues regarding drivers' activity. PMID:20920486

  7. Possible Biosphere-Lithosphere Interactions Preserved in Igneous Zircon and Implications for Hadean Earth.

    PubMed

    Trail, Dustin; Tailby, Nicholas D; Sochko, Maggie; Ackerson, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    Granitoids are silicic rocks that make up the majority of the continental crust, but different models arise for the origins of these rocks. One classification scheme defines different granitoid types on the basis of materials involved in the melting/crystallization process. In this end-member case, granitoids may be derived from melting of a preexisting igneous rock, while other granitoids, by contrast, are formed or influenced by melting of buried sedimentary material. In the latter case, assimilated sedimentary material altered by chemical processes occurring at the near surface of Earth-including biological activity-could influence magma chemical properties. Here, we apply a redox-sensitive calibration based on the incorporation of Ce into zircon crystals found in these two rock types, termed sedimentary-type (S-type) and igneous-type (I-type) granitoids. The ∼400 Ma Lachlan Fold Belt rocks of southeastern Australia were chosen for investigation here; these rocks have been a key target used to describe and explore granitoid genesis for close to 50 years. We observe that zircons found in S-type granitoids formed under more reducing conditions than those formed from I-type granitoids from the same terrain. This observation, while reflecting 9 granitoids and 289 analyses of zircons from a region where over 400 different plutons have been identified, is consistent with the incorporation of (reduced) organic matter in the former and highlights one possible manner in which life may modify the composition of igneous minerals. The chemical properties of rocks or igneous minerals may extend the search for ancient biological activity to the earliest period of known igneous activity, which dates back to ∼4.4 billion years ago. If organic matter was incorporated into Hadean sediments that were buried and melted, then these biological remnants could imprint a chemical signature within the subsequent melt and the resulting crystal assemblage, including zircon. PMID

  8. Natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in Brazilian igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Moura, C L; Artur, A C; Bonotto, D M; Guedes, S; Martinelli, C D

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports the natural radioactivity of Brazilian igneous rocks that are used as dimension stones, following the trend of other studies on the evaluation of the risks to the human health caused by the rocks radioactivity as a consequence of their use as cover indoors. Gamma-ray spectrometry has been utilized to determine the (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th activity concentrations in 14 rock types collected at different quarries. The following activity concentration range was found: 12.18-251.90 Bq/kg for (226)Ra, 9.55-347.47 Bq/kg for (232)Th and 407.5-1615.0 Bq/kg for (40)K. Such data were used to estimate Ra(eq), H(ex) and I(γ), which were compared with the threshold limit values recommended in literature. They have been exceeded for Ra(eq) and H(ex) in five samples, where the highest indices corresponded to a rock that suffered a process of ductile-brittle deformation that caused it a microbrecciated shape. The exhalation rate of Rn and daughters has also been determined in slabs consisting of rock pieces ~10 cm-long, 5 cm-wide and 3 cm-thick. It ranged from 0.24 to 3.93 Bq/m(2)/h and exhibited significant correlation with eU (=(226)Ra), as expected. The results indicated that most of the studied rocks did not present risk to human health and may be used indoors, even with low ventilation. On the other hand, igneous rocks that yielded indices above the threshold limit values recommended in literature may be used outdoors without any restriction or indoors with ample ventilation. PMID:21459585

  9. Toxicologically Relevant Aldehydes Produced during the Frying Process Are Trapped by Food Phenolics.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Rosario; Aguilar, Isabel; Granvogl, Michael; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2016-07-13

    The lipid-derived carbonyl trapping ability of phenolic compounds under common food processing conditions was studied by determining the presence of carbonyl-phenol adducts in both onions fried in the laboratory and commercially crispy fried onions. Four carbonyl-phenol adducts produced between quercetin and acrolein, crotonaldehyde, or (E)-2-pentenal were prepared and characterized by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS). The synthesized compounds were 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,5,8-trihydroxy-9,10-dihydro-4H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromen-4-one (4), 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,5,8-trihydroxy-10-methyl-9,10-dihydro-4H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromen-4-one (5), 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,5-dihydroxy-8-methyl-4H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromen-4-one (9), and 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-8-ethyl-3,5-dihydroxy-4H,8H-pyrano[2,3-f]chromen-4-one (10). When onions were fried in fresh rapeseed oil spiked with acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and (E)-2-pentenal (2.7 μmol/g of oil), adduct 10 was the major compound produced, and trace amounts of adducts 4 and 5, but not of adduct 9, were also detected. In contrast, compound 4 was the major adduct present in commercially crispy fried onions. Compound 10 was also present to a lower extent, and trace amounts of compound 5, but not of compound 9, were also detected. These data suggested that lipid-derived carbonyl-phenol adducts are formed in food products under standard cooking conditions. They also pointed to a possible protective role of food polyphenols, which might contribute to the removal of toxicologically relevant aldehydes produced during deep-frying, assuming that the formed products are stable during food consumption in the human organism. PMID:27322490

  10. Igneous rock from Severnyi Kolchim (H3) chondrite: Nebular origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarov, M. A.; Brandstaetter, F.; Kurat, G.

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of lithic fragments with compositions and textures similar to igneous differentiates in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOC's) and carbonaceous chondrites (CC's) has been interpreted as to suggest that planetary bodies existed before chondrites were formed. As a consequence, chondrites (except, perhaps CI chondrites) cannot be considered primitive assemblages of unprocessed nebular matter. We report about our study of an igneous clast from the Severnyi Kolchim (H3) chondrite. The results of the study are incompatible with an igneous origin of the clast but are in favor of a nebular origin similar to that of chondrules.

  11. Effect of igneous intrusive bodies on sedimentary thermal maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Lerche, I.; Walter, C. )

    1989-09-01

    The high temperatures of igneous intrusives cause localized thermal maturity of sediments far in excess of the regional variation. Previous studies have shown that igneous bodies cool in less than about 1 million years for all but the most exceptional geological conditions. Three case studies are provided which show how the increase in thermal maturity around an igneous body can be used to assess the temperature of the intrusive at emplacement and also the time of intrusion. Corollative implications for localized hydrocarbon generation, migration, and accumulation are also discussed briefly.

  12. Automated igneous rock identifiers for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Morris, R. L.; Gazis, P.; Bishop, J. L.; Alena, R.; Hart, S. D.; Horton, A.

    2003-04-01

    A key task for human or robotic explorers on the surface of Mars is choosing which particular rock or mineral samples should be selected for more intensive study. The usual challenges of such a task are compounded by the lack of sensory input available to a suited astronaut or the limited downlink bandwidth available to a rover. Additional challenges facing a human mission include limited surface time and the similarities in appearance of important minerals (e.g. carbonates, silicates, salts). Yet the choice of which sample to collect is critical. To address this challenge we are developing science analysis algorithms to interface with a Geologist's Field Assistant (GFA) device that will allow robotic or human remote explorers to better sense and explore their surroundings during limited surface excursions [1]. We aim for our algorithms to interpret spectral and imaging data obtained by various sensors. Our algorithms, for example, will identify key minerals, rocks, and sediments from mid-IR, Raman, and visible/near-IR spectra as well as from high-resolution and microscopic images to help interpret data and to provide high-level advice to the remote explorer. A top-level system will consider multiple inputs from raw sensor data output by imagers and spectrometers (visible/near-IR, mid-IR, and Raman) as well as human opinion to identify rock and mineral samples. Our prototype image analysis system identifies some igneous rocks from texture and color information. Spectral analysis algorithms have also been developed that successfully identify quartz, silica polymorphs, calcite, pyroxene, and jarosite from both visible/near-IR and mid-IR spectra. We have also developed spectral recognizers that identify high-iron pyroxenes and iron-bearing minerals using visible/near-IR spectra only. We are building a combined image and spectral database of rocks and minerals with which to continue development of our algorithms. Future plans include developing algorithms to identify

  13. Behavioral and Event-Related-Potential Correlates of Processing Congruent and Incongruent Self-Relevant Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sheri L.

    2013-01-01

    People want to be viewed by others as they view themselves. Being confronted with self-relevant information that is either congruent or incongruent with one's self-view has been shown to differentially affect subsequent behavior, memory for the information, and evaluation of the source of the information. However, no research has examined…

  14. Igneous intrusions in coal-bearing sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.B.; Shishlov, S.B.

    1987-08-01

    Intrusions of various compositions, sizes, and shapes have been observed in 115 out of 620 coal basins or deposits on all the continents. They are mainly subvolcanic and hypabyssal, with depths of emplacement estimated as ranging from a few hundred meters to 6 km, but usually 3-4 km. Compositionally, 42% are basic, 31% intermediate, 23% acid, and 4% ultrabasic. Mafic (and related) rock types include dolerites, trachydolerites, gabbro-dolerites, gabbro-monzonites, monzonites, diabases, gabbrodiabases, and less often gabbros and basalts (subvolcanic bodies). These mafic intrusions occur in coal formations of various ages from Carboniferous through Neogene, but predominate in Paleozoic (47%) and Cenozoic beds (45%). They also occur in coal formations of all genetic types, apart from those on ancient stable platforms, where there are no signs of intrusive activity. The mafic intrusions are almost everywhere associated with comagmatic lavas and tuffs (mainly in the younger strata), and the coal beds themselves are to some extent enriched in pyroclastic material, particularly in the upper horizons. This paper gives a worldwide review of igneous intrusions in coal beds. 24 references.

  15. On the weathering of Martian igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreibus, G.; Waenke, H.

    1992-01-01

    Besides the young crystallization age, one of the first arguments for the martian origin of shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite (SNC) meteorites came from the chemical similarity of the meteorite Shergotty and the martian soil as measured by Viking XRF analyses. In the meantime, the discovery of trapped rare gas and nitrogen components with element and isotope ratios closely matching the highly characteristic ratios of the Mars atmosphere in the shock glasses of shergottite EETA79001 was further striking evidence that the SNC's are martian surface rocks. The martian soil composition as derived from the Viking mission, with its extremely high S and Cl concentrations, was interpreted as weathering products of mafic igneous rocks. The low SiO2 content and the low abundance of K and other trace elements in the martian soils point to a mafic crust with a considerably smaller degree of fractionation compared to the terrestrial crust. However, the chemical evolution of the martian regolith and soil in respect to surface reaction with the planetary atmosphere or hydrosphere is poorly understood. A critical point in this respect is that the geochemical evidence as derived from the SNC meteorites suggests that Mars is a very dry planet that should have lost almost all its initially large water inventory during its accretion.

  16. Did the Kiruna iron ores form as a result of a metasomatic or igneous process? New U-Pb and Nd data for the iron oxide apatite ores and their host rocks in the Norrbotten region of northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westhues, A.; Hanchar, J. M.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Fisher, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    -Pb dating of zircon from both host rock and ore samples confirms a previously documented event around 1880 - 1900 Ma in the Norrbotten region. However, U-Pb in monazite from an ore sample suggests a further event at ca. 1650 Ma, a period of known activity in Fennoscandia. Further investigation and more U-Pb data are needed to confirm those dates and how the iron mineralization is related to those two events. The combination of U-Th-Pb ages, tracer isotopes and trace element abundances at mineral scale (e.g., Lu-Hf in zircon, and Sm-Nd in monazite, apatite, titanite), along with the O isotopic composition of zircon, will be used to decipher whether the Kiruna iron ore deposits are of metasomatic or igneous origin. Overall, the study also intends to develop a predictive model for exploration of similar iron oxide apatite deposits worldwide.

  17. Variations in the Pb isotope composition in polyformational magmatic rocks of the Ketkap-Yuna igneous province of the Aldan Shield: Evidence for mantle-crust interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, V. F.; Dril, S. I.; Khanchuk, A. I.; Velivetskaya, T. A.; Vladimirova, T. A.; Il'ina, N. N.

    2016-06-01

    The Pb isotope composition of polyformational Mesozoic igneous rocks of the Ketkap-Yuna igneous province (KYIP) and lower crustal metamorphic rocks of the Batomga granite-greenstone area (the complex of the KYIP basement) of the Aldan Shield was studied for the first time. Based on the data obtained, several types of material sources participating in petrogenetic processes were distinguished. The mantle source identified as PREMA is registered in most of the igneous formations and predominates in mafic alkaline rocks. According to the isotope characteristics, the upper crustal source corresponds to a source of the "Orogen" type by the model of "plumbotectonics" or to the average composition of the continental crust by the Stacey-Kramers model. The lower crust is the third material source; however, the type of lower crustal protolith involved in the igneous process is still not defined, which makes difficult to estimate its role in the petrogenetic processes.

  18. Some Environmental Consequences of Large Igneous Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, M. F.

    2009-12-01

    The formation of large igneous provinces (LIPs)—continental flood basalts, ‘volcanic’ margins, and oceanic plateaus—may impact the atmosphere, oceans, and biosphere by rapidly releasing huge amounts of particulates, magmatic volatiles (CO2, SO2, Cl, F, etc.), and potentially volatiles (CO2, CH4, SO2, etc.) from intruded sediments (e.g., carbonates, organic-rich shales, evaporites). A key factor affecting the magnitude of volatile release is whether eruptions are subaerial or marine; hydrostatic pressure inhibits vesiculation and degassing of relatively soluble volatile components (H2O, S, Cl, F) in deep water submarine eruptions, although low solubility components (CO2, noble gases) are mostly degassed even at abyssal depths. Directly or indirectly, such injections may cause changes in the atmosphere/ocean system that can lead to perturbations of atmosphere/ocean chemistry, circulation, ecology, and biological productivity. These changes can be global in extent, particularly if environmental conditions were at or near a threshold state or tipping point. LIPs may have been responsible for some of the most dramatic and rapid changes in the global environment. For example, between ~145 and ~50 Ma, the global ocean was characterized by chemical and isotopic variations (especially in C and Sr isotope ratios, trace metal concentrations, and biocalcification), relatively high temperatures, high relative sea level, episodic deposition of black shales (oceanic anoxic events), high production of hydrocarbons, mass extinctions of marine organisms, and radiations of marine flora and fauna. Temporal correlations between the intense pulses of igneous activity associated with LIP formation and environmental changes suggest more than pure coincidence. The 1783-84 eruption of Laki on Iceland provides the only historical record of the type of volcanism that constructs transient LIPs. Although Laki produced a basaltic lava flow representing only ~1% of the volume of a typical

  19. Databases related to Large Igneous Provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Richard; Pisarevsky, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) represent large volume (>0.1 Mkm3; often above >1 Mkm3), mainly mafic (-ultramafic) magmatic events of intraplate affinity in both continental and oceanic settings, and are typically of short duration (<5 m.y.) or consist of multiple short pulses over a maximum of a few 10s of m.y. Silicic, carbonatite and kimberlite magmatism may be associated. The young LIP record is dominated by continental flood basalts and oceanic plateaus, but Proterozoic LIPs have typically lost their flood basalt component during erosion, thus exposing the plumbing system of mafic (-ultramafic) dykes, sills and layered intrusions. LIPs occur at a rate of about 1 every 20-30 m.y. back through the Proterozoic, and Archean analogues are also recognized. The LIP record is growing as more events are recognized and the size of known LIPs (even those of those of Mesozoic age) is increasing through targeted U-Pb geochronology. We review databases related to this fast moving field. The LIPs Commission (www.largeigneousprovinces.org) of IAVCEI ongoingly highlights new insights and events through the "LIP of the Month" series. A global 1:5M scale global LIPs ArcGIS database is under construction through Industry and government funded projects (e.g. www.supercontinent.org) and will form a framework for additional thematic databases related to LIPs, including geochemistry, geochronology, and paleomagnetism (GPMDB, MAGIC). LIP databases provide useful constraints for global Precambrian paleogeographic reconstructions, a context for understanding some global and regional environmental changes, and a useful framework for resource exploration (mineral and hydrocarbon). One of the most important aspects of this global LIPs ArcGIS database is that it is integrating data on the volcanic component of LIPs (both flood basalts, and associated ultramafic and silicic volcanism) with data on the plumbing system component in order to develop an understanding of LIPs as an integrated

  20. Charge Generation and Propagation in Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2000-01-01

    Resistivity changes, ground potentials, electromagnetic (EM) and luminous signals prior to or during earthquakes have been reported, in addition to ground uplift and tilt, and to changes in the seismic wave propagation parameters. However, no physical model exists that ties these diverse phenomena together. Through time-resolved impacts experiments it has been observed that, when igneous rocks (gabbro, diorite, granite) are impacted at low velocities (approx. 100 m/sec), highly mobile electronic charge carriers are generated, spreading from a small volume near the impact point, causing electric potentials, EM and light emission. The rock becomes momentarily conductive. When impacted at higher velocities (approx. 1.5 km/sec), the propagation of the P and S waves is registered through the transient piezoelectric response of quartz. At the same time, the rock volume is filled with mobile charge carriers, and a positive surface potential is registered. During the next 1-2 msec the surface potential oscillates, due to electron injection from ground. These observations are consistent with positive holes, e.g. defect electrons in the O(2-) sublattice, that can travel via the O 2p-dominated valence band of the silicate minerals at the speed of a phonon-mediated charge transfer. Before activation, the positive hole charge carriers lay dormant in form of positive hole pairs, PHP, electrically inactive, chemically equivalent to peroxy links in the structures of constituent minerals. PHPs are introduced by way of hydroxyl (O3Si-OH) incorporated into nominally anhydrous minerals when they crystallize in water-laden environments. Given that sound waves of even relatively low intensity appear to cause PHPs dissociation, thus generating mobile positive holes, it is proposed that microfracturing during rock deformation cause PHP dissociation. Depending on where and how much the rock volume is stressed, the positive holes are expected to form fluctuating charge clouds in the

  1. Active black holes: Relevant plasma structures, regimes and processes involving all phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, Bruno

    2011-03-01

    The presented theory is motivated by the growing body of experimental information on the characteristics, connected with relevant spectral, time, and space resolutions, of the radiation emission from objects considered as rotating black holes. In the immediate surroundings of these objects, three plasma regions are identified: an innermost Buffer Region, an intermediate Three-regime Region, and a Structured Peripheral Region. In the last region, a Composite Disk Structure made of a sequence of plasma rings corresponding to the formation of closed magnetic surfaces is considered to be present and to allow intermittent accretion flows along the relevant separatrices. The nonlinear ``Master Equation'' describing composite disk structures is derived and solved in appropriate asymptotic limits. A ring configuration, depending on the state of the plasma at the microscopic level: (i) can be excluded from forming given the strongly nonthermal nature of the electron distribution (in momentum space) within the Three-regime Region allowing the onset of a spiral structure; the observed High Frequency Quasi Periodic Oscillations are associated with these tridimensional structures; (ii) may be allowed to propagate to the outer edge of the Buffer Region where successive rings carrying currents in opposite directions are ejected vertically (in opposite directions) and originate the observed jets; or (iii) penetrates in the Three-regime Region and is dissipated before reaching the outer edge of the Buffer Region. The absence of a coherent composite disk structure guiding accretion in the presence of a significant magnetic field background is suggested to characterize quiescent black holes.

  2. Active black holes: Relevant plasma structures, regimes and processes involving all phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, Bruno

    2011-03-15

    The presented theory is motivated by the growing body of experimental information on the characteristics, connected with relevant spectral, time, and space resolutions, of the radiation emission from objects considered as rotating black holes. In the immediate surroundings of these objects, three plasma regions are identified: an innermost Buffer Region, an intermediate Three-regime Region, and a Structured Peripheral Region. In the last region, a Composite Disk Structure made of a sequence of plasma rings corresponding to the formation of closed magnetic surfaces is considered to be present and to allow intermittent accretion flows along the relevant separatrices. The nonlinear 'Master Equation' describing composite disk structures is derived and solved in appropriate asymptotic limits. A configuration, depending on the state of the plasma at the microscopic level: (i) can be excluded from forming given the strongly nonthermal nature of the electron distribution (in momentum space) within the Three-regime Region allowing the onset of a spiral structure; the observed High Frequency Quasi Periodic Oscillations are associated with these tridimensional structures; (ii) may be allowed to propagate to the outer edge of the Buffer Region where successive rings carrying currents in opposite directions are ejected vertically (in opposite directions) and originate the observed jets; or (iii) penetrates in the Three-regime Region and is dissipated before reaching the outer edge of the Buffer Region. The absence of a coherent composite disk structure guiding accretion in the presence of a significant magnetic field background is suggested to characterize quiescent black holes.

  3. Geology is the Key to Explain Igneous Activity in the Mediterranean Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustrino, M.

    2014-12-01

    Igneous activity in tectonically complex areas can be interpreted in many different ways, producing completely different petrogenetic models. Processes such as oceanic and continental subduction, lithospheric delamination, changes in subduction polarity, slab break-off and mantle plumes have all been advocated as causes for changes in plate boundaries and magma production, including rate and temporal distribution, in the circum-Mediterranean area. This region thus provides a natural laboratory to investigate a range of geodynamic and magmatic processes. Although many petrologic and tectonic models have been proposed, a number of highly controversial questions still remain. No consensus has yet been reached about the capacity of plate-tectonic processes to explain the origin and style of the magmatism. Similarly, there is still not consensus on the ability of geochemical and petrological arguments to reveal the geodynamic evolution of the area. The wide range of chemical and mineralogical magma compositions produced within and around the Mediterranean, from carbonatites to strongly silica-undersaturated silico-carbonatites and melilitites to strongly silica-oversaturated rhyolites, complicate models and usually require a large number of unconstrained assumptions. Can the calcalkaline-sodic alkaline transition be related to any common petrogenetic point? Is igneous activity plate-tectonic- (top-down) or deep-mantle-controlled (bottom-up)? Do the rare carbonatites and carbonate-rich igneous rocks derive from the deep mantle or a normal, CO2-bearing upper mantle? Do ultrapotassic compositions require continental subduction? Understanding chemically complex magmas emplaced in tectonically complex areas require open minds, and avoiding dogma and assumptions. Studying the geology and shallow dynamics, not speculating about the deep lower mantle, is the key to understanding the igneous activity.

  4. Geochemical and modal data for igneous rocks associated with epithermal mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this report are to (1) present available geochemical and modal data for igneous rocks associated with epithermal mineral deposits and (2) to make those data widely and readily available for subsequent, more in-depth consideration and interpretation. Epithermal precious and base-metal deposits are commonly associated with subduction-related calc-alkaline to alkaline arc magmatism as well as back-arc continental rift magmatism. These deposits form in association with compositionally diverse extrusive and intrusive igneous rocks. Temperature and depth regimes prevailing during deposit formation are highly variable. The deposits form from hydrothermal fluids that range from acidic to near-neutral pH, and they occur in a variety of structural settings. The disparate temperature, pressure, fluid chemistry, and structural controls have resulted in deposits with wide ranging characteristics. Economic geologists have employed these characteristics to develop classification schemes for epithermal deposits and to constrain the important genetic processes responsible for their formation.

  5. Kinetics of elementary processes relevant to incipient soot formation. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1998-03-09

    In order to better understand the mechanism of soot formation (one of the most challenging problems in the study of hydrocarbon combustion chemistry), reliable rate constants for the key reaction steps involved in the formation and polymerization of aromatic hydrocarbons in the inception stage are required for kinetic modeling. In this DOE sponsored work, the authors have developed three new experimental methods: cavity ring-down (CRD) spectrometry, pyrolysis/Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (p/FTIRS) and pulsed laser photolysis/mass spectrometry (PLP/MS) for kinetic measurements of C{sub 6}H{sub 5} reactions pivotal to incipient soot formation chemistry. In addition, the authors have also carried out ab initio molecular orbital (MO) calculations for several key elementary combustion reactions relevant to soot formation. The results are briefly summarized in the report using selected examples for more detailed discussion. 84 refs.

  6. Connecting Organic Aerosol Climate-Relevant Properties to Chemical Mechanisms of Sources and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Joel

    2015-01-26

    The research conducted on this project aimed to improve our understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere, and how the properties of the SOA impact climate through its size, phase state, and optical properties. The goal of this project was to demonstrate that the use of molecular composition information to mechanistically connect source apportionment and climate properties can improve the physical basis for simulation of SOA formation and properties in climate models. The research involved developing and improving methods to provide online measurements of the molecular composition of SOA under atmospherically relevant conditions and to apply this technology to controlled simulation chamber experiments and field measurements. The science we have completed with the methodology will impact the simulation of aerosol particles in climate models.

  7. The Role of the Auditory Brainstem in Processing Linguistically-Relevant Pitch Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, the brainstem has been neglected as a part of the brain involved in language processing. We review recent evidence of language-dependent effects in pitch processing based on comparisons of native vs. nonnative speakers of a tonal language from electrophysiological recordings in the auditory brainstem. We argue that there is enhancing…

  8. Paleomagnetism of large igneous provinces: case-study from West Greenland, North Atlantic igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisager, Janna; Riisager, Peter; Pedersen, Asger Ken

    2003-09-01

    We present new paleomagnetic and multi-model stereo photogrammetry data from lava sequences in the West Greenland part of the North Atlantic igneous province (NAIP). The joint analyses of paleomagnetic and photogrammetric data yield a well-defined paleomagnetic pole located at Lat=73.6°N, Long=160.5°E ( N=44, α95=6.2°, K=13.1; age ˜61-55 Ma), which is statistically indistinguishable from a pole recently obtained for the Eurasian part of the NAIP on Faroe Islands [Riisager et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 201 (2002) 261-276]. Combining the two datasets we obtain a joint NAIP paleomagnetic pole in Greenland coordinates: Lat=71.1°N, Long=161.1°E ( N=87, α95=4.3°, K=13.6; age ˜61-54 Ma). The results presented here represent the first study in which photogrammetry profiles were photographed at the exact same locations where paleomagnetic fieldwork was carried out, and a direct flow-to-flow comparison of the two datasets is possible. Photogrammetry is shown to be particularly useful because of (i) highly precise dip/strike measurements and (ii) detailed 'field observations' that can be made in the laboratory. Highly precise determination of the structural attitude of well-exposed Kanisut Mb lava sequences demonstrates that their apparently reliable in-field dip/strike measurements typically are up to ˜6° wrong. Erroneous dip/strike readings are particularly problematic as they offset paleomagnetic poles without affecting their confidence limits. Perhaps more important for large igneous provinces is the recognition of a variable temporal relationship between consecutive lava flows. We demonstrate how correct interpretation of paleosecular variation, facilitated by the detailed photogrammetry analysis, is crucial for the rapidly emplaced Vaigat Formation lavas. Inaccurate tectonic correction, non-averaged paleosecular variation and unrecognized excursional directions may, perhaps, explain why coeval paleomagnetic poles from large igneous provinces are often

  9. Adamantane derivatives of sulfonamides: sublimation, solubility, solvation and transfer processes in biologically relevant solvents.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, G L; Volkova, T V; Sharapova, A V; Kazachenko, V P; Strakhova, N N; Proshin, A N

    2016-04-01

    Eight adamantane derivatives of sulfonamides were synthesized and characterized. Temperature dependencies of saturation vapor pressure were obtained using the transpiration method and thermodynamic functions of the sublimation processes were calculated. Solubility values of the selected compounds in buffer (pH 7.4), 1-octanol and 1-hexane were determined at different temperatures using the isothermal saturation method. Thermophysical characteristics of fusion processes (melting points and fusion enthalpies) of the substances were studied using the DSC method. Transfer processes from buffer to 1-octanol, from buffer to 1-hexane and 1-hexane to 1-octanol were analyzed. The impact of the molecules' structural modification on sublimation, solubility and solvation/hydration processes in the solvents was studied. Correlation equations connecting the thermodynamic functions with physicochemical descriptors were obtained. PMID:26976747

  10. Behavioral Recommendations in Health Research News as Cues to Action: Self-Relevancy and Self-Efficacy Processes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chingching

    2016-08-01

    This study argues that behavioral recommendations in health news function as cues to action. A proposed self-oriented model seeks to explore the impacts of behavioral recommendations in health research news as cues to action through their influences on self-relevancy and self-efficacy. A content analysis (Study 1) first establishes that health research news commonly features behavioral recommendations. A message experiment (Study 2) then explores the utility of behavioral recommendations as cues to action by demonstrating a self-relevancy effect: Health research news with, as opposed to without, behavioral recommendations increases the self-relevancy of advocated health behaviors, which then improve people's attitudes toward and intentions to adopt those behaviors. A second message experiment (Study 3) tests whether varying presentations of behavioral recommendations alter their effectiveness as cues to action and thus people's behavioral intentions through a dual effect process. In addition to the previously demonstrated self-relevancy effect, this experiment shows that concrete, as opposed to abstract, behavioral recommendations trigger a self-efficacy effect, increasing perceived self-efficacy and further improving behavioral intentions. PMID:27442057

  11. A Model of Auditory-Cognitive Processing and Relevance to Clinical Applicability.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss and cognitive function interact in both a bottom-up and top-down relationship. Listening effort is tied to these interactions, and models have been developed to explain their relationship. The Ease of Language Understanding model in particular has gained considerable attention in its explanation of the effect of signal distortion on speech understanding. Signal distortion can also affect auditory scene analysis ability, however, resulting in a distorted auditory scene that can affect cognitive function, listening effort, and the allocation of cognitive resources. These effects are explained through an addition to the Ease of Language Understanding model. This model can be generalized to apply to all sounds, not only speech, representing the increased effort required for auditory environmental awareness and other nonspeech auditory tasks. While the authors have measures of speech understanding and cognitive load to quantify these interactions, they are lacking measures of the effect of hearing aid technology on auditory scene analysis ability and how effort and attention varies with the quality of an auditory scene. Additionally, the clinical relevance of hearing aid technology on cognitive function and the application of cognitive measures in hearing aid fittings will be limited until effectiveness is demonstrated in real-world situations. PMID:27355775

  12. Strain fabric evolution within and near deformed igneous sheets: The Sudbury Igneous Complex, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenauer, Iris; Riller, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    Deformation structures differing in style and orientation within a given terrane are often attributed to distinct tectono-metamorphic events. However, mechanical heterogeneities may locally cause strain perturbations that can have a profound effect on the geometry of such structures. Here we document highly variable orientations of planar structures, metre- to kilometre-scale folds and shortening directions inferred from brittle fault analysis within the synclinal and layered Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) and its Huronian host rocks. NW-SE shortening during Palaeoproterozoic deformation led to the formation of planar structures in the host rocks that are parallel to the NE-SW striking contact of the southern SIC. During deformation, local contact-parallel shortening became more important than regional NW-SE shortening and generated contact-orthogonal planar mineral fabrics and folds. Local contact-parallel shortening is attributed to the shape change of the southern SIC from a convex outward to a concave inward curvi-planar geometry. Contact-parallel shortening accounts for the formation of a previously unidentified kilometre-scale buckle fold in the SIC and respective axial-planar mineral fabrics in Huronian host rocks. This buckle fold shares similar structural characteristics with known higher-order buckle folds of the eastern SIC. We suggest that non-cylindrical buckling and associated mineral fabric development accommodated the shape change of the SIC. This resulted in mutually perpendicular fabric orientations, which are compatible with overall NW-SE shortening. The original shape of the SIC seems to have had a profound influence particularly on the geometry of metamorphic foliations. Our structural analysis supports earlier structural studies advocating that highly discordant planar strain fabrics can be generated by local strain perturbations near igneous sheets under uniform regional shortening.

  13. Magnetostratigraphy of the Etendeka Large Igneous Province, Namibia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, S. C.; Muxworthy, A. R.; Mac Niocaill, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Paraná - Etendeka large igneous province (≈ 135 Ma) has not been linked to a known mass extinction event, despite large igneous provinces being postulated as a cause. The reason why some large igneous provinces appear the cause of huge fluctuations in the global biosphere, an example being the link between Siberian trap volcanism and the Permo-Triassic boundary, while others seem to have only a minor effect is still debated. Establishing detailed histories of these large igneous provinces is important for understanding why such variations in effect may occur. Why does the volume of the province not reflect the magnitude of the effects seen? During the early Cretaceous, reversals of Earth's magnetic field were more frequent than at other times in Earth's history. Magnetostratigraphy is therefore a tool capable of providing high resolution constraints on the history and duration of the Paraná - Etendeka large igneous province volcanism. Detailed sampling of the Etendeka volcanic stratigraphy, followed by progressive demagnetisation of 893 specimens, yields 70 individual polarities gained from throughout the central volcanic succession. Correlation of the individual sections sampled reveals a minimum of 16 separate polarities are recorded. Subsequent links to the geomagnetic polarity timescale suggest a minimum province duration of > 1 Myrs, with no obvious period of short, high volume volcanism as is often suggested. A protracted duration (>1Myr) may therefore provide the reason why at least the Paraná - Etendeka appears to have no associated extinction event.

  14. Origins of large igneous provinces: Thermal or chemical? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, J.

    2010-12-01

    Large igneous provinces such as continental flood basalts and oceanic plateaus are commonly believed to be caused by massive thermal anomalies in the mantle, or more specifically, mantle plume heads possibly rising from the core-mantle boundary. The existence of such plume heads is more elusive than that of mantle plumes, because there is no currently ongoing formation of continental flood basalt or oceanic plateau, so potential evidence for plume heads must come from the detailed analysis of their fossil traces, i.e., their melting products represented as igneous crust. Compared to petrological and geochemical inference based on surface lavas, seismological studies on large igneous provinces have the advantage of probing the entire crustal section, thereby providing potentially more robust constraints on primary melt composition and the nature of the source mantle. In this talk, I will review the debates over the North Atlantic igneous province, which includes the Iceland hotspot, as well as discuss the prospects of studying oceanic plateaus for providing key information to resolve the origins of large igneous provinces.

  15. Fundamental processes in sputtering of relevance to the fabrication of thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, John A.

    1987-08-01

    Atomic-level processes which occur during the deposition of thin films by sputtering, that influence film properties, are discussed, with special attention given to the deposition of the semiconducting coatings of CuInSe2 and amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) by reactive sputtering. Experiments designed to investigate the critical issues in CuInSe2 and a-Si:H reactive sputtering are described, including a hybrid CuInSe2-deposition process which combines sputtered fluxes of Cu and In with an evaporated flux of Se, thereby avoiding the use of the extremely toxic H2Se. None of the processes discussed appears to preclude the fabrication of high-quality CuInSe2 and a-Si:H films by reactive sputtering.

  16. Chemical transformations of complex mixtures relevant to atmospheric processes: Laboratory and ambient studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samy, Shahryar (Shar)

    The study of atmospheric chemistry and chemical transformations, which are relevant to conditions in the ambient atmosphere require the investigation of complex mixtures. In the atmosphere, complex mixtures (e.g. diesel emissions) are continually evolving as a result of physical and chemical transformations. This dissertation examines the transformations of modern diesel emissions (DE) in a series of experiments conducted at the European Outdoor Simulation Chamber (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain. Experimental design challenges are addressed, and the development of a NOx removal technology (denuder) is described with results from the application of the newly developed NOx denuder in the most recent EUPHORE campaign (2006). In addition, the data from an ambient aerosol study that examines atmospheric transformation products is presented and discussed. Atmospheric transformations of DE and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, along with chemical characterization of polar organic compounds (POC) in the EUPHORE experiments, provides a valuable insight on the tranformations of modern DE in environmentally relevant atmospheres. The greatest SOA production occurred in DE with toluene addition experiments (>40%), followed by DE with HCHO (for OH radical generation) experiments. A small amount of SOA (3%) was observed for DE in dark with N2O5 (for NO3 radical production) experiments. Distinct POC formation in light versus dark experiments suggests the role of OH initiated reactions in these chamber atmospheres. A trend of increasing concentrations of dicarboxylic acids in light versus dark experiments was observed when evaluated on a compound group basis. The production of diacids (as a compound group) demonstrates a consistent indicator for photochemical transformation in relation to studies in the ambient atmosphere. The four toluene addition experiments in this study were performed at different [tol]o/[NOx]o ratios and displayed an average SOA %yield (in

  17. Marine omega-3 fatty acids and inflammatory processes: Effects, mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Calder, Philip C

    2015-04-01

    Inflammation is a condition which contributes to a range of human diseases. It involves a multitude of cell types, chemical mediators, and interactions. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids found in oily fish and fish oil supplements. These fatty acids are able to partly inhibit a number of aspects of inflammation including leukocyte chemotaxis, adhesion molecule expression and leukocyte-endothelial adhesive interactions, production of eicosanoids like prostaglandins and leukotrienes from the n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid, production of inflammatory cytokines, and T-helper 1 lymphocyte reactivity. In addition, EPA gives rise to eicosanoids that often have lower biological potency than those produced from arachidonic acid and EPA and DHA give rise to anti-inflammatory and inflammation resolving mediators called resolvins, protectins and maresins. Mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory actions of marine n-3 fatty acids include altered cell membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition, disruption of lipid rafts, inhibition of activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B so reducing expression of inflammatory genes, activation of the anti-inflammatory transcription factor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ and binding to the G protein coupled receptor GPR120. These mechanisms are interlinked, although the full extent of this is not yet elucidated. Animal experiments demonstrate benefit from marine n-3 fatty acids in models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asthma. Clinical trials of fish oil in RA demonstrate benefit, but clinical trials of fish oil in IBD and asthma are inconsistent with no overall clear evidence of efficacy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance". PMID:25149823

  18. Investigations of Physical Processes in Microgravity Relevant to Space Electrochemical Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovich, Vadim F.; Green, Robert; Jakupca, Ian

    2015-01-01

    NASA has performed physical science microgravity flight experiments in the areas of combustion science, fluid physics, material science and fundamental physics research on the International Space Station (ISS) since 2001. The orbital conditions on the ISS provide an environment where gravity driven phenomena, such as buoyant convection, are nearly negligible. Gravity strongly affects fluid behavior by creating forces that drive motion, shape phase boundaries and compress gases. The need for a better understanding of fluid physics has created a vigorous, multidisciplinary research community whose ongoing vitality is marked by the continuous emergence of new fields in both basic and applied science. In particular, the low-gravity environment offers a unique opportunity for the study of fluid physics and transport phenomena that are very relevant to management of fluid - gas separations in fuel cell and electrolysis systems. Experiments conducted in space have yielded rich results. These results provided valuable insights into fundamental fluid and gas phase behavior that apply to space environments and could not be observed in Earth-based labs. As an example, recent capillary flow results have discovered both an unexpected sensitivity to symmetric geometries associated with fluid container shape, and identified key regime maps for design of corner or wedge-shaped passive gas-liquid phase separators. In this presentation we will also briefly review some of physical science related to flight experiments, such as boiling, that have applicability to electrochemical systems, along with ground-based (drop tower, low gravity aircraft) microgravity electrochemical research. These same buoyancy and interfacial phenomena effects will apply to electrochemical power and energy storage systems that perform two-phase separation, such as water-oxygen separation in life support electrolysis, and primary space power generation devices such as passive primary fuel cell.

  19. FINAL REPORT (PART 2). RADIOLYTIC AND THERMAL PROCESSES RELEVANT TO DRY STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of our experimental research activities at Rutgers University was to characterize the effects of temperature and radiation processes on the interactions of H2O with oxide surfaces. Our experiments focused on the fundamental interaction of H2O molecules with surfaces of ...

  20. FINAL PROGRESS REPORT. RADIOLYTIC AND THERMAL PROCESSES RELEVANT TO DRY STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of our experimental research activities at Rutgers University was to characterize the effects of temperature and radiation processes on the interactions of H2O with oxide surfaces. Our experiments focused on the fundamental interaction of H2O molecules with surfaces of ...

  1. Structure, Content, and Process in Teacher Training: The Relevance of Copernicus, Gardner, and Dewey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Louise M.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that a unique combination of (1) the Copernican Plan for block scheduling; (2) the application of Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences; and (3) John Dewey's basic ideas about process create a teacher training program in which mastery is an achievable goal. Describes each component and illustrates how each has worked in one…

  2. Correlation of palaeomagnetic directions constrains eruption rate of large igneous provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttie, Neil; Biggin, Andrew J.; Holme, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The rate of eruption of lava flows in large igneous provinces is a highly controversial topic with implications for the processes by which mass extinctions of life occurred throughout the Phanerozoic. It is also an extremely difficult parameter to measure, but may be accessed through the correlation of palaeomagnetic directions recorded in neighbouring lava flows. The next-neighbour correlation can be described by a single additional parameter which can be evaluated by constructing a suitable covariance matrix. It is found to be a useful proxy for the rate of eruption of Cenozoic lavas from the North Atlantic igneous province and has the potential to help constrain the eruptive histories of other large igneous provinces. Significant next-neighbour correlation is revealed even in the absence of grouping of directions, giving a method of detecting changing eruption rates when there are no magnetostratigraphic markers. Significant correlation is found over timescales of tens of thousands of years in volcanic datasets making it doubtful that records of recent secular variation over shorter timescales can be used as a model for palaeosecular variation. By eliminating next-neighbour correlation, it is demonstrated how estimates of palaeosecular variation may be derived, with formal confidence limits, allowing robust comparisons to be made between sites. Using this method we show that the angular dispersion of the field dropped significantly during the 2.5 million year long polarity chron C24r.

  3. Preferential processing of self-relevant stimuli occurs mainly at the perceptual and conscious stages of information processing.

    PubMed

    Tacikowski, P; Ehrsson, H H

    2016-04-01

    Self-related stimuli, such as one's own name or face, are processed faster and more accurately than other types of stimuli. However, what remains unknown is at which stage of the information processing hierarchy this preferential processing occurs. Our first aim was to determine whether preferential self-processing involves mainly perceptual stages or also post-perceptual stages. We found that self-related priming was stronger than other-related priming only because of perceptual prime-target congruency. Our second aim was to dissociate the role of conscious and unconscious factors in preferential self-processing. To this end, we compared the "self" and "other" conditions in trials where primes were masked or unmasked. In two separate experiments, we found that self-related priming was stronger than other-related priming but only in the unmasked trials. Together, our results suggest that preferential access to the self-concept occurs mainly at the perceptual and conscious stages of the stimulus processing hierarchy. PMID:26930161

  4. The Central-Western Mediterranean: Anomalous igneous activity in an anomalous collisional tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustrino, Michele; Duggen, Svend; Rosenberg, Claudio L.

    2011-01-01

    The central-western Mediterranean area is a key region for understanding the complex interaction between igneous activity and tectonics. In this review, the specific geochemical character of several 'subduction-related' Cenozoic igneous provinces are described with a view to identifying the processes responsible for the modifications of their sources. Different petrogenetic models are reviewed in the light of competing geological and geodynamic scenarios proposed in the literature. Plutonic rocks occur almost exclusively in the Eocene-Oligocene Periadriatic Province of the Alps while relatively minor plutonic bodies (mostly Miocene in age) crop out in N Morocco, S Spain and N Algeria. Igneous activity is otherwise confined to lava flows and dykes accompanied by relatively greater volumes of pyroclastic (often ignimbritic) products. Overall, the igneous activity spanned a wide temporal range, from middle Eocene (such as the Periadriatic Province) to the present (as in the Neapolitan of southern Italy). The magmatic products are mostly SiO 2-oversaturated, showing calcalkaline to high-K calcalcaline affinity, except in some areas (as in peninsular Italy) where potassic to ultrapotassic compositions prevail. The ultrapotassic magmas (which include leucitites to leucite-phonolites) are dominantly SiO 2-undersaturated, although rare, SiO 2-saturated (i.e., leucite-free lamproites) appear over much of this region, examples being in the Betics (southeast Spain), the northwest Alps, northeast Corsica (France), Tuscany (northwest Italy), southeast Tyrrhenian Sea (Cornacya Seamount) and possibly in the Tell region (northeast Algeria). Excepted for the Alpine case, subduction-related igneous activity is strictly linked to the formation of the Mediterranean Sea. This Sea, at least in its central and western sectors, is made up of several young (< 30 Ma) V-shaped back-arc basins plus several dispersed continental fragments, originally in crustal continuity with the European

  5. The Relevance Of The Preform Design In Coining Processes Of Cupronickel Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.; Micari, F.

    2007-05-01

    Coining is a forging process in which a metallic disk, characterized by a low volume-surface ratio, is deformed with the aim to impress 3D images on its three surfaces. Due to the large production volumes and, at the same time, to the high quality standards required to the final products in terms of final dimensions, tolerances and surface finishing, such closed-die, cold forging process requires a careful evaluation and choice of the proper operative parameters. In particular, along with technological parameters as the die velocity, die stroke and lubrication, which, in turn, contribute to affect the pressure values on the die surfaces, and thus the press choice, geometrical parameters as the side ring inner diameter and, above all, the preform geometry, strongly affect the quality of the obtained parts. In this paper, a 3D FEM model for coining processes is proposed, that is Lagrangian implicit, rigid-viscoplastic. The relationships between the obtained geometry and the starting preform shape is numerically investigated, allowing, through the analysis of the effective stresses, strain, and strain rate on the coin, as well as of the loads on the dies, to highlight the significance of the perform design in order to obtain a final product that satisfies the strict geometrical tolerances required. It is found that the best results on the final part are obtained with chamfered preform geometries, though larger values of force on the dies are observed.

  6. The Relevance Of The Preform Design In Coining Processes Of Cupronickel Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.; Micari, F.

    2007-05-17

    Coining is a forging process in which a metallic disk, characterized by a low volume-surface ratio, is deformed with the aim to impress 3D images on its three surfaces. Due to the large production volumes and, at the same time, to the high quality standards required to the final products in terms of final dimensions, tolerances and surface finishing, such closed-die, cold forging process requires a careful evaluation and choice of the proper operative parameters. In particular, along with technological parameters as the die velocity, die stroke and lubrication, which, in turn, contribute to affect the pressure values on the die surfaces, and thus the press choice, geometrical parameters as the side ring inner diameter and, above all, the preform geometry, strongly affect the quality of the obtained parts. In this paper, a 3D FEM model for coining processes is proposed, that is Lagrangian implicit, rigid-viscoplastic. The relationships between the obtained geometry and the starting preform shape is numerically investigated, allowing, through the analysis of the effective stresses, strain, and strain rate on the coin, as well as of the loads on the dies, to highlight the significance of the perform design in order to obtain a final product that satisfies the strict geometrical tolerances required. It is found that the best results on the final part are obtained with chamfered preform geometries, though larger values of force on the dies are observed.

  7. Mesotrypsin and caspase-14 participate in prosaposin processing: potential relevance to epidermal permeability barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Tanaka, Mami; Motoyama, Akira; Miyai, Masashi; Matsunaga, Yukiko; Matsuda, Junko; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Hibino, Toshihiko

    2014-07-18

    A proteomics-based search for molecules interacting with caspase-14 identified prosaposin and epidermal mesotrypsin as candidates. Prosaposin is a precursor of four sphingolipid activator proteins (saposins A-D) that are essential for lysosomal hydrolysis of sphingolipids. Thus, we hypothesized that caspase-14 and mesotrypsin participate in processing of prosaposin. Because we identified a saposin A sequence as an interactor with these proteases, we prepared a specific antibody to saposin A and focused on saposin A-related physiological reactions. We found that mesotrypsin generated saposins A-D from prosaposin, and mature caspase-14 contributed to this process by activating mesotrypsinogen to mesotrypsin. Knockdown of these proteases markedly down-regulated saposin A synthesis in skin equivalent models. Saposin A was localized in granular cells, whereas prosaposin was present in the upper layer of human epidermis. The proximity ligation assay confirmed interaction between prosaposin, caspase-14, and mesotrypsin in the granular layer. Oil Red staining showed that the lipid envelope was significantly reduced in the cornified layer of skin from saposin A-deficient mice. Ultrastructural studies revealed severely disorganized cornified layer structure in both prosaposin- and saposin A-deficient mice. Overall, our results indicate that epidermal mesotrypsin and caspase-14 work cooperatively in prosaposin processing. We propose that they thereby contribute to permeability barrier formation in vivo. PMID:24872419

  8. Mechanistic study of the Polymer-Induced Liquid-Precursor (PILP) process: Relevance to biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lijun

    Biomineralization is a process in which cells construct a mineralization platform based on framework proteins and water-soluble proteins, and utilize some transportation vesicles, such as matrix vesicles to regulate the transportation of ions and precursor phases. The mineral morphologies formed by the Polymer-Induced Liquid-Precursor (PILP) process, which utilizes acidic polypeptides or polymers to mimic the acidic proteins in biominerals, have been shown to have a great similarity with many biominerals. This drives us to investigate the important factors and underlying mechanisms governing the generation, stabilization and transformation of polymer-induced liquid-precursor phases. First, the PILP phase composition has been characterized during a reaction time series using a combination of measuring water loss with elemental analysis. This phase is found to be a highly hydrated phase with a large amount of acidic polymers entrapped within. By FT-Raman, it is found that these acidic polymers can chelate with calcium ions by breaking the initial calcium-water complexes, liberating free water near the calcium-polymer complexes. It is then shown that when calcium carbonate complexes are formed, most of the acidic polymer can be liberated from the formed precursor phase to re-induce more PILP phase. By FTIR, it is found that acidic polymers can stabilize the PILP amorphous phase. The extended stabilization lifetime of the PILP phase is due to the entrapped acidic polymers and the free water in the precursor phase. They disrupt the ordered packing of the calcium carbonate complexes. Second, to investigate how different protein structures would affect the PILP phase quality, quantity, and stability, a series of synthetic peptides mimicking proteins involved in biomineralization were synthesized and applied to generate the PILP process using various techniques. Peptides with high charge density, phosphorylation density and molecular weight to a limit of 5000 Da in

  9. The relevance of individual microphysical processes for potential vorticity anomalies in extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crezee, Bas; Joos, Hanna; Wernli, Heini

    2016-04-01

    Extratropical cyclones have a large impact on daily weather through their accompanying strong winds and precipitation. The latent heating and cooling associated with microphysical processes like condensation, freezing and melting, sublimation and evaporation leads to the formation of distinct cloud diabatic potential vorticity (CDPV) anomalies. Positive low-level CDPV anomalies - which typically are formed along the fronts and close to the cyclone center - have been shown to interact with upper-level PV anomalies thereby potentially enhancing storm intensification. Here a novel method is applied, which calculates backward trajectories from the mature storm stage, integrates cloud diabatic PV changes due to microphysical processes, and constructs a CDPV budget for each individual anomaly. Thereby we quantify the contributions of, e.g., cloud condensation, depositional growth of snow and melting of snow to the individual anomalies and in turn to the near-surface circulation. First, we apply this method to an idealized mid-latitude cyclone. The formation of the relatively small low-level negative CDPV anomalies is dominated each by one specific process, depending on their location relative to the front. For the large positive PV anomaly we find that the strongest contributions are from in-cloud condensation and below-cloud snow melting and rain evaporation. Although contributions of in-cloud depositional growth of ice are rather small, they cover a very large area and are therefore dynamically significant, i.e., they produce a fairly large-scale but low-amplitude anomaly. In addition the results from the idealized simulations are compared to a wintertime cyclone. It will be discussed how well the method works for real cyclones and how closely the results agree with those from the idealized channel model experiment.

  10. Hydrogen Reduction Kinetics of Hematite Concentrate Particles Relevant to a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Mohassab, Yousef; Jiang, Tao; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2015-04-01

    As an integral part of developing a novel ironmaking process, the hydrogen reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles (average particle size 21 µm) were measured in the temperature range from 1423 K to 1623 K (1150 °C to 1350 °C). The novel ironmaking process aims at producing iron from iron oxide concentrates in a flash reactor using gaseous fuels and reductants, which will help reduce energy consumption and minimize greenhouse gas emissions. More than 90 pct reduction of hematite concentrate particles could be obtained by hydrogen at a temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C) and 3 seconds of residence time, indicating that hematite concentrate is suitable for the flash reduction process under development largely aimed at the use of magnetite concentrates. The nucleation and growth rate equation with the Avrami parameter, n, of 1.0 well described the kinetics of hematite reduction. The reduction rate has a 1st-order dependence on the partial pressure of hydrogen. The activation energy of the reaction was 214 kJ/mol, indicating strong temperature dependence. The following complete rate equation was developed that can satisfactorily predict the kinetics of hematite concentrate particles and is suitable for the design of a flash reactor: {{{d}}X}/{{{d}t}} = 4.41 × 107 × {{e}}^{{ - 214{,}000/RT}} × ( {p{{H}}2 - {p{{H}}2 {{O}}}/K} ) × (1 - X), where X is fractional reduction degree, R is 8.314 J/mol K, T is in K, p is in atm, and t is in seconds.

  11. Incorporation of arsenic into gypsum: Relevant to arsenic removal and immobilization process in hydrometallurgical industry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danni; Yuan, Zidan; Wang, Shaofeng; Jia, Yongfeng; Demopoulos, George P

    2015-12-30

    Gypsum precipitates as a major secondary mineral during the iron-arsenate coprecipitation process for the removal of arsenic from hydrometallurgical effluents. However, its role in the fixation of arsenic is still unknown. This work investigated the incorporation of arsenic into gypsum quantitatively during the crystallization process at various pHs and the initial arsenic concentrations. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to characterize the coprecipitated solids. The results showed that arsenate was measurably removed from solution during gypsum crystallization and the removal increased with increasing pH. At lower pH where the system was undersaturated with respect to calcium arsenate, arsenate ions were incorporated into gypsum structure, whereas at higher pH, calcium arsenate was formed and constituted the major arsenate bearing species in the precipitated solids. The findings may have important implications for arsenic speciation and stability of the hydrometallurgical solid wastes. PMID:26188870

  12. Uranium and other element analyses of igneous rocks of Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, K.F.

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-six samples of igneous rocks representing a variety of rock types and locations in Arkansas were analyzed by neutron activation analysis for the elements U, Th, Na, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Dy, Yb, Lu, and Hf. Samples were collected from the major igneous intrusions at Granite Mountain, Bauxite, Magnet Cove, Potash Sulfur Springs, and Murfreesboro, representing various syenites, lamprophyres, carbonatite, kimberlite, and periodotite. To make the data available for public use without further delay, this report is being issued without the normal technical and copy editing.

  13. Behavior of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli relevant to lettuce washing processes and consideration of factors for evaluating washing process surrogates.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kaiping; Wang, Xue; Yen, Li-Han; Ding, Hongliu; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2014-11-01

    Postharvest processes for fresh produce commonly include washing in water containing antimicrobial chemicals, such as chlorine; however, if the antimicrobials are not present in sufficient levels, washing can promote the spread of contamination that might be present. To understand cross-contamination risk during washing, we tested a collection of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC), including O157:H7 and other non-O157 strains, for certain traits during washing of fresh-cut lettuce, i.e., sensitivity to sublethal chlorine levels and ability to cross-contaminate (detach from and attach to) lettuce in the presence of sublethal chlorine levels. Nonpathogenic E. coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) and Pediococcus pentosaceus lactic acid bacterial species (LAB) were included as potential washing process validation surrogates. As measured by extension of the lag phase of growth in media containing 0.15 ppm of chlorine, chlorine sensitivity varied among the STECs. Cross-contamination was assessed by evaluating transfer of bacteria from inoculated to uninoculated leaves during washing. Without chlorine, similar transfer to wash water and uninoculated leaves was shown. In 1 ppm of chlorine, cross-contamination was not detected with most strains, except for the substantial transfer by a STEC O111 strain and EcN in some replicates. Strain O111 and EcN showed less inactivation in 0.25 ppm of chlorine water compared with O157 (P < 0.05). LAB showed similar transfer and similar chlorine inactivation to O157. Considering together the sublethal chlorine sensitivity and detachment/attachment traits, neither EcN nor LAB displayed optimal characteristics as washing process surrogates for the STEC strains, although further evaluation is needed. This work demonstrated a range of behaviors of STEC strains during lettuce washing and may be helpful in hazard characterization, identifying factors to consider for evaluating washing process efficacy, and identifying phenotypic traits to select

  14. Cost-Efficient Methods and Processes for Safety Relevant Embedded Systems (CESAR) - An Objective Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliffe, Graham

    For developing embedded safety critical systems, industrial companies have to face increasing complexity and variety coupled with increasing regulatory constraints, while costs, performances and time to market are constantly challenged. This has led to a profusion of enablers (new processes, methods and tools), which are neither integrated nor interoperable because they have been developed more or less independently (addressing only a part of the complexity: e.g. Safety) in the absence of internationally recognized open standards. CESAR has been established under ARTEMIS, the European Union's Joint Technology Initiative for research in embedded systems, with the aim to improve this situation and this pa-per will explain what CESAR's objectives are, how they are expected to be achieved and, in particular, how current best practice can ensure that safety engineering requirements can be met.

  15. The default network and self-generated thought: component processes, dynamic control, and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R.; Smallwood, Jonathan; Spreng, R. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Though only a decade has elapsed since the default network was first emphasized as being a large-scale brain system, recent years have brought great insight into the network’s adaptive functions. A growing theme highlights the default network as playing a key role in internally-directed—or self-generated—thought. Here, we synthesize recent findings from cognitive science, neuroscience, and clinical psychology to focus attention on two emerging topics as current and future directions surrounding the default network. First, we present evidence that self-generated thought is a multi-faceted construct whose component processes are supported by different subsystems within the network. Second, we highlight the dynamic nature of the default network, emphasizing its interaction with executive control systems when regulating aspects of internal thought. We conclude by discussing clinical implications of disruptions to the integrity of the network, and consider disorders when thought content becomes polarized or network interactions become disrupted or imbalanced. PMID:24502540

  16. Naturalistic Observation of Health-Relevant Social Processes: The Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) Methodology in Psychosomatics

    PubMed Central

    Mehl, Matthias R.; Robbins, Megan L.; Deters, Fenne große

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a novel, observational ambulatory monitoring method called the Electronically Activated Recorder or EAR. The EAR is a digital audio recorder that runs on a handheld computer and periodically and unobtrusively records snippets of ambient sounds from participants’ momentary environments. In tracking moment-to-moment ambient sounds, it yields acoustic logs of people’s days as they naturally unfold. In sampling only a fraction of the time, it protects participants’ privacy and makes large observational studies feasible. As a naturalistic observation method, it provides an observer’s account of daily life and is optimized for the objective assessment of audible aspects of social environments, behaviors, and interactions (e.g., habitual preferences for social settings, idiosyncratic interaction styles, and subtle emotional expressions). The article discusses the EAR method conceptually and methodologically, reviews prior research with it, and identifies three concrete ways in which it can enrich psychosomatic research. Specifically, it can (a) calibrate psychosocial effects on health against frequencies of real-world behavior, (b) provide ecological, observational measures of health-related social processes that are independent of self-report, and (c) help with the assessment of subtle and habitual social behaviors that evade self-report but have important health implications. An important avenue for future research lies in merging traditional, self-report based ambulatory monitoring methods with observational approaches such as the EAR to allow for the simultaneous yet methodologically independent assessment of inner, experiential (e.g., loneliness) and outer, observable aspects (e.g., social isolation) of real-world social processes to reveal their unique effects on health. PMID:22582338

  17. Naturalistic observation of health-relevant social processes: the electronically activated recorder methodology in psychosomatics.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Matthias R; Robbins, Megan L; Deters, Fenne Große

    2012-05-01

    This article introduces a novel observational ambulatory monitoring method called the electronically activated recorder (EAR). The EAR is a digital audio recorder that runs on a handheld computer and periodically and unobtrusively records snippets of ambient sounds from participants' momentary environments. In tracking moment-to-moment ambient sounds, it yields acoustic logs of people's days as they naturally unfold. In sampling only a fraction of the time, it protects participants' privacy and makes large observational studies feasible. As a naturalistic observation method, it provides an observer's account of daily life and is optimized for the objective assessment of audible aspects of social environments, behaviors, and interactions (e.g., habitual preferences for social settings, idiosyncratic interaction styles, subtle emotional expressions). This article discusses the EAR method conceptually and methodologically, reviews prior research with it, and identifies three concrete ways in which it can enrich psychosomatic research. Specifically, it can (a) calibrate psychosocial effects on health against frequencies of real-world behavior; (b) provide ecological observational measures of health-related social processes that are independent of self-report; and (c) help with the assessment of subtle and habitual social behaviors that evade self-report but have important health implications. An important avenue for future research lies in merging traditional self-report-based ambulatory monitoring methods with observational approaches such as the EAR to allow for the simultaneous yet methodologically independent assessment of inner, experiential aspects (e.g., loneliness) and outer, observable aspects (e.g., social isolation) of real-world social processes to reveal their unique effects on health. PMID:22582338

  18. Biological processes and optical measurements near the sea surface: Some issues relevant to remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, John J.; Lewis, Marlon R.

    1995-01-01

    The advent of remote sensing, the develpmemt of new optical instrumentation, and the associated advances in hydrological optics have transformed oceanography; it is now feasible to describe ocean-scale biogeochemical dynamcis from satellite observations, verified and complemented by measurements from optical sensors on profilers, moorings, and drifters. Only near-surface observations are common to both remote sensing and in situ observation, so it is critical to understand processes in the upper euphotic zone. Unfortunately, the biological principles that must be used to interpret optical variability near the sea surface are weaker than we would like, because relatively few experiments and analyses have examined bio-optical relationships under high irradiance characteristic of the upper optical depth. Special consideration of this stratum is justified, because there is good evidence that bio-optical relationships are altered near the surface; (1) the fluorescence yield from chlorophyll declines, leading to bias in the estimation of pigment from fluorometry; (2) the modeled relationship between solar-stimulated fluorecence and photosynthesis seems to deviate significantly from that presented for the lower euphotic zone; and (3) carbon-specific and cellular attenuation cross sections of phytoplankton change substantially during exposures to bright light. Even the measurement of primary productivity is problematic near the sea surface, because vertical mixing is not simulated and artifactual inhibition of photosynthesis can result. These problems can be addressed by focusing more sampling effort, experimental simulation, and analytical consideration on the upper optical depth, and by shortening timescales for the measurement of marine photosynthesis. Special efforts to study near-surface processes are justified, because new bio-optical algorithms will require quantitaitve descriptions of the responses of phytoplankton to bright light.

  19. Translational Rodent Paradigms to Investigate Neuromechanisms Underlying Behaviors Relevant to Amotivation and Altered Reward Processing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jared W.; Markou, Athina

    2015-01-01

    Amotivation and reward-processing deficits have long been described in patients with schizophrenia and considered large contributors to patients’ inability to integrate well in society. No effective treatments exist for these symptoms, partly because the neuromechanisms mediating such symptoms are poorly understood. Here, we propose a translational neuroscientific approach that can be used to assess reward/motivational deficits related to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia using behavioral paradigms that can also be conducted in experimental animals. By designing and using objective laboratory behavioral tools that are parallel in their parameters in rodents and humans, the neuromechanisms underlying behaviors with relevance to these symptoms of schizophrenia can be investigated. We describe tasks that measure the motivation of rodents to expend physical and cognitive effort to gain rewards, as well as probabilistic learning tasks that assess both reward learning and feedback-based decision making. The latter tasks are relevant because of demonstrated links of performance deficits correlating with negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. These tasks utilize operant techniques in order to investigate neural circuits targeting a specific domain across species. These tasks therefore enable the development of insights into altered mechanisms leading to negative symptom-relevant behaviors in patients with schizophrenia. Such findings will then enable the development of targeted treatments for these altered neuromechanisms and behaviors seen in schizophrenia. PMID:26194891

  20. Thermochemical analysis of chemical processes relevant to the stability and processing of SiC-reinforced Si3N4 composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical processes relevant to the stability and processing of SiC-reinforced Si3N4 composites have been examined from thermochemical considerations. The thermodynamic stabilities of various interfaces, such as SiC-Si3N4, SiC-Si3N4-Si2ON2, and SiC-Si3N4-SiO2, have been examined as a function of temperature, and the temperatures above which these interfaces become unstable have been calculated. The degradation of SiC during the processing of the composite has been examined. The processing routes considered in this study include the reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) process and the pressure-assisted sintering processes with suitable sintering additives.

  1. Transport phenomena relevant to the impact regime of the process of spray deposition: A review. Part 1: Heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Poulikakos, D.; Waldvogel, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    Spray deposition is a novel rapid solidification technology for the creation of advanced metals and metal composites. This technology is particularly attractive to manufacturing because it shows promise to provide materials and products that combine superior properties and near net shape. With reference to the former, the extremely high cooling rates present in the process of spray deposition capture non equilibrium states that cannot be captured by more conventional casting methods because the atomic mobility in the liquid phase of a metal is far greater than that in the solid phase. To this end, the cooling rates at the early stages of the spray deposition process are of the order of (10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8}) {sup 0}C/s. With reference to the latter, the spray deposition process has been shown to produce near net shape products which eliminates the need for additional finishing steps in the manufacturing process. Moreover, the fine and homogeneous microstructure that appears to be resulting from the spray deposition process may eliminate the need for additional mechanical working. In this, as well as its companion paper appearing subsequently in this volume, a review is presented of the existing knowledge base of the impact regime of the process of spray deposition, focusing on issues in which transport phenomena are relevant. Further, this paper addresses only heat transfer aspects of the process which do not involve sophisticated modeling of the accompanying complex fluid dynamics.

  2. Effects of intranasal oxytocin on neural processing within a socially relevant neural circuit.

    PubMed

    Singh, Fiza; Nunag, Jason; Muldoon, Glennis; Cadenhead, Kristin S; Pineda, Jaime A; Feifel, David

    2016-03-01

    Dysregulation of the Mirror Neuron System (MNS) in schizophrenia (SCZ) may underlie the cognitive and behavioral manifestations of social dysfunction associated with that disorder. In healthy subjects intranasal (IN) oxytocin (OT) improves neural processing in the MNS and is associated with improved social cognition. OT's brain effects can be measured through its modulation of the MNS by suppressing EEG mu-band electrical activity (8-13Hz) in response to motion perception. Although IN OT's effects on social cognition have been tested in SCZ, OT's impact on the MNS has not been evaluated to date. Therefore, we designed a study to investigate the effects of two different OT doses on biological motion-induced mu suppression in SCZ and healthy subjects. EEG recordings were taken after each subject received a single IN administration of placebo, OT-24IU and OT-48IU in randomized order in a double-blind crossover design. The results provide support for OT's regulation of the MNS in both healthy and SCZ subjects, with the optimal dose dependent on diagnostic group and sex of subject. A statistically significant response was seen in SCZ males only, indicating a heightened sensitivity to those effects, although sex hormone related effects cannot be ruled out. In general, OT appears to have positive effects on neural circuitry that supports social cognition and socially adaptive behaviors. PMID:26727038

  3. Theoretical and Practical Issues That Are Relevant When Scaling Up hMSC Microcarrier Production Processes.

    PubMed

    Jossen, Valentin; Schirmer, Cedric; Mostafa Sindi, Dolman; Eibl, Regine; Kraume, Matthias; Pörtner, Ralf; Eibl, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for allogeneic cell therapies has created a large amount of interest. However, this presupposes the availability of efficient scale-up procedures. Promising results have been reported for stirred bioreactors that operate with microcarriers. Recent publications focusing on microcarrier-based stirred bioreactors have demonstrated the successful use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and suspension criteria (N S1u , N S1) for rapidly scaling up hMSC expansions from mL- to pilot scale. Nevertheless, one obstacle may be the formation of large microcarrier-cell-aggregates, which may result in mass transfer limitations and inhomogeneous distributions of stem cells in the culture broth. The dependence of microcarrier-cell-aggregate formation on impeller speed and shear stress levels was investigated for human adipose derived stromal/stem cells (hASCs) at the spinner scale by recording the Sauter mean diameter (d 32) versus time. Cultivation at the suspension criteria provided d 32 values between 0.2 and 0.7 mm, the highest cell densities (1.25 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) hASCs), and the highest expansion factors (117.0 ± 4.7 on day 7), while maintaining the expression of specific surface markers. Furthermore, suitability of the suspension criterion N S1u was investigated for scaling up microcarrier-based processes in wave-mixed bioreactors for the first time. PMID:26981131

  4. Theory and High-Energy-Density Laser Experiments Relevant to Accretion Processes in Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Drake, R.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Busschaert, C.; Ravasio, A.; Yurchak, R.; Pelka, A.; Koenig, M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Plewa, T.; Huntington, C. M.; Kaczala, D. N.; Klein, S.; Sweeney, R.; Villete, B.; Young, R.; Keiter, P. A.

    2012-05-01

    We present results from high-energy-density (HED) laboratory experiments that explore the contribution of radiative shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) systems in which they reside. CVs can be classified under two main categories, non-magnetic and magnetic. In the process of accretion, both types involve strongly radiating shocks that provide the main source of radiation in the binary systems. This radiation can cause varying structure to develop depending on the optical properties of the material on either side of the shock. The ability of high-intensity lasers to create large energy densities in targets of millimeter-scale volume makes it feasible to create similar radiative shocks in the laboratory. We provide an overview of both CV systems and their connection to the designed and executed laboratory experiments preformed on two laser facilities. Available data and accompanying simulations will likewise be shown. Funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Prog. in High-Energy-Density Lab. Plasmas, by the Nat. Laser User Facility Prog. in NNSA-DS and by the Predictive Sci. Acad. Alliances Prog. in NNSA-ASC, under grant numbers are DE-FG52-09NA29548, DE-FG52-09NA29034, and DE-FC52-08NA28616.

  5. Theoretical and Practical Issues That Are Relevant When Scaling Up hMSC Microcarrier Production Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jossen, Valentin; Schirmer, Cedric; Mostafa Sindi, Dolman; Eibl, Regine; Kraume, Matthias; Pörtner, Ralf; Eibl, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for allogeneic cell therapies has created a large amount of interest. However, this presupposes the availability of efficient scale-up procedures. Promising results have been reported for stirred bioreactors that operate with microcarriers. Recent publications focusing on microcarrier-based stirred bioreactors have demonstrated the successful use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and suspension criteria (NS1u, NS1) for rapidly scaling up hMSC expansions from mL- to pilot scale. Nevertheless, one obstacle may be the formation of large microcarrier-cell-aggregates, which may result in mass transfer limitations and inhomogeneous distributions of stem cells in the culture broth. The dependence of microcarrier-cell-aggregate formation on impeller speed and shear stress levels was investigated for human adipose derived stromal/stem cells (hASCs) at the spinner scale by recording the Sauter mean diameter (d32) versus time. Cultivation at the suspension criteria provided d32 values between 0.2 and 0.7 mm, the highest cell densities (1.25 × 106 cells mL−1 hASCs), and the highest expansion factors (117.0 ± 4.7 on day 7), while maintaining the expression of specific surface markers. Furthermore, suitability of the suspension criterion NS1u was investigated for scaling up microcarrier-based processes in wave-mixed bioreactors for the first time. PMID:26981131

  6. A review of abiotic and biotic interactions in pelagic communities: Processes relevant to L Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a state-of-the-art review of structural and functional processes in pelagic communities and extrapolate these empirical and theoretical results to L Lake, the once-through cooling reservoir at the Savannah River Plant. Man-made reservoirs differ from natural lakes in their origins, hydrodynamics, sedimentation patterns, and general eutrophication histories. Phosphorus and nitrogen limitation of phytoplankton productivity controls the rate of eutrophication, while also determining algal community structure. Here the Lean and Monod models of nutrient fluxing and uptake kinetics provide useful constructs for predictive purposes. Much of the reduced carbon synthesized by primary production is shunted through the microbial loop where heterotrophic flagellates and protozoans pass this carbon on to the macrozooplankton. This recently discovered pathway is common to eutrophic reservoirs where blue-green species dominate phytoplankton assemblages. Through selective grazing and tactile oriented predation, the crustacean zooplankton partially regulates the relative abundance of algae and microzooplankton species. 194 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Electron Irradiation and Thermal Processing of Mixed-ices of Potential Relevance to Jupiter Trojan Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Brown, Michael E.; Hodyss, Robert; Blacksberg, Jordana; Eiler, John M.; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In this work we explore the chemistry that occurs during the irradiation of ice mixtures on planetary surfaces, with the goal of linking the presence of specific chemical compounds to their formation locations in the solar system and subsequent processing by later migration inward. We focus on the outer solar system and the chemical differences for ice mixtures inside and outside the stability line for H2S. We perform a set of experiments to explore the hypothesis advanced by Wong & Brown that links the color bimodality in Jupiter's Trojans to the presence of H2S in the surface of their precursors. Non-thermal (10 keV electron irradiation) and thermally driven chemistry of CH3OH-NH3-H2O (“without H2S”) and H2S-CH3OH-NH3-H2O (“with H2S”) ices were examined. Mid-IR analyses of ice and mass spectrometry monitoring of the volatiles released during heating show a rich chemistry in both of the ice mixtures. The “with H2S” mixture experiment shows a rapid consumption of H2S molecules and production of OCS molecules after a few hours of irradiation. The heating of the irradiated “with H2S” mixture to temperatures above 120 K leads to the appearance of new infrared bands that we provisionally assign to SO2and CS. We show that radiolysis products are stable under the temperature and irradiation conditions of Jupiter Trojan asteroids. This makes them suitable target molecules for potential future missions as well as telescope observations with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also suggest the consideration of sulfur chemistry in the theoretical modeling aimed at understanding the chemical composition of Trojans and KOBs.

  8. Radiative Reverse Shock Laser Experiments Relevant to Accretion Processes in Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine

    2012-10-01

    We present results from experiments that explore radiative reverse shock waves and their contribution to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) system in which they reside. CVs are close binary star systems containing a white dwarf (WD) that accretes matter from its late-type main sequence companion star. In the process of accretion, a reverse shock forms when the supersonic infalling plasma is impeded. It provides the main source of radiation in the binary systems. In the case of a non-magnetic CV, the impact on an accretion disk produces this ``hot spot,'' where the flow obliquely strikes the rotating accretion disk. This collision region has many ambiguities as a radiation hydrodynamic system, but shock development in the infalling flow can be modeled [1]. We discuss the production of radiative reverse shocks in experiments at the Omega-60 laser facility. The ability of this high-intensity laser to create large energy densities in targets having millimeter-scale volumes makes it feasible to create supersonic plasma flows. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires a sufficiently fast flow (> 60 km/s) within a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable layers. We will show the radiographic and emission data from three campaigns on Omega-60 with accompanying CRASH [2] simulations, and will discuss the implications in the context of the CV system. [4pt] [1] Armitage, P. J. and Livio, M., ApJ, 493, 898 (1998).[0pt] [2] van der Holst, B., Toth, G., Sokolov, I.V., et al., ApJS, 194, 23 (2011).

  9. Numerical Investigations of Photoevaporative Disks: Processes relevant to planet and regular satellite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Tyler Robert

    Traditional models of disks around young planets and stars make a number of simplifying assumptions. These include the use of ad hoc radial temperature profiles, or isothermal disks. Another common assumption is in regard to the treatment of the outer boundary, which is allowed to expand to infinity, or neglected completely. There has also been a lack of time-dependent viscous models that include the affects of photoevaporation and/or ongoing accretion. We alleviate many of these issues by adapting numerical methods for solving propagating phase change problems to astrophysical disks in a completely novel way. These models are all viscous, time-dependent models that include a self-consistent treatment of mass loss via photoevaporation at the disk outer edge. In the case of circumplanetary disks, they also include continued accretion from the solar nebula. I present investigations of disks around young planets and stars, made using a variety of numerical models. The investigations are primarily focused on how disk structure and evolution affect the growth and migration of growing satellite and planetary embryos. Another focus is to assess what, if any, processes are responsible for angular momentum transport in circumplanetary disks. I present detailed descriptions of these models as well as the results of applying these models to both the solar nebula and to disks around giant planets, in which regular satellites formed. Photoevaporation can substantially truncate disks and has a similar level of affect on disk evolution and morphology as variations in the viscosity parameter, alpha All of the solar nebula models were truncated, yet none of them match the steep radial surface density profile inferred from the compact configuration of the giant planets in the Nice model. Furthermore, photoevaporation has the ability to remove gas and dissipate disks on very short timescales. Despite their evolving nature, we find that giant planets and satellites can form in the

  10. Pristine Igneous Rocks and the Genesis of Early Planetary Crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Our studies are highly interdisciplinary, but are focused on the processes and products of early planetary and asteroidal differentiation, especially the genesis of the ancient lunar crust. The compositional diversity that we explore is the residue of process diversity, which has strong relevance for comparative planetology.

  11. Ca Isotopic Ratios in Igneous Rocks: Some Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Farkas, J.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Calcium (Ca) is the 5th most abundant element on the Earth, and it is an important geochemical and cosmochemical tracer. It has six isotopes and only H and He have a larger percentage mass difference (Δm/m) between the heaviest and the lightest isotopes. Systematic Ca isotopic studies have mostly focused on low-temperature geochemical processes, and most Ca isotopic analyses have been applied on modern and ancient marine carbonates and sulphates, documenting large and systematic isotopic variations, which were used to infer the chemical evolution of seawater. Detailed work on igneous rocks is very limited. Here we show two examples of how stable Ca isotopic ratios can be a useful geochemical tool in understanding igneous processes. Ca isotopic fractionation between coexisting clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene from mantle peridotites: We report Ca isotopic ratios on co-existing clino- and ortho-pyroxenes from Kilbourne Hole and San Carlos mantle peridotites. The 44Ca/40Ca in orthopyroxenes is ~0.5 per mil heavier than that in co-existing clinopyroxenes. Combined with published Ca isotopic data on low-temperature Ca-bearing minerals (calcite, aragonite and barite), we show that the fractionation of Ca isotopes between Ca-bearing minerals (at both low-temperature and high-temperature) is primarily controlled by the strength of Ca-O bond in the minerals. The mineral with shorter (i.e., stronger) Ca-O bond yields heavier Ca isotopic ratio. Using our measured 44Ca/40Ca in mantle pyroxenes and the relative proportions of major Ca-bearing minerals in the upper mantle, the estimated 44Ca/40Ca of the upper mantle is 1.1 per mil heavier relative to the NIST 915a, ~0.1 to 0.2 per mil higher than basalts. Ca isotopic variation in Hawaiian shield lavas: Large geochemical and isotopic variations have been observed in lavas forming the large tholeiitic shields of Hawaiian volcanoes, with lavas from the surface of the Koolau volcano (Makapuu-stage) defining one compositional and

  12. Integrating isotopic fingerprinting with petrology: how do igneous rocks evolve?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, J. P.

    2002-12-01

    In the title of his seminal work, N.L. Bowen recognized the fundamental importance of magmatic evolution in producing the spectrum of igneous rocks. Indeed it is difficult to imagine a hot highly reactive fluid passing through c. 100 km of a chemically distinct medium (lithosphere) without evolving through cooling, crystallization and interaction with the wall rocks. The fact that magmas evolve - almost invariably through open system processes - has been largely marginalized in the past 30 years by the desire to use them as probes of mantle source regions. This perspective has been driven principally by advances offered by isotope geochemistry, through which components and sources can be effectively fingerprinted. Two fundamental observations urge caution in ignoring differentiation effects; 1) the scarcity of truly primary magmas according to geochemical criteria (recognized long ago by petrologists), and 2) the common occurrence of petrographic criteria attesting to open system evolution. Recent advances in multicollector mass spectrometry permit integration of the powerful diagnostic tools of isotope geochemistry with petrographic observations through accurate and precise analysis of small samples. Laser ablation and microdrilling enable sampling within and between mineral phases. The results of our microsampling investigations give widespread support for open system evolution of magmas, and provide insights into the mechanisms and timescales over which this occurs. For example; 1) core-rim decreases in 87Sr/86Sr in zoned plagioclase crystals from 1982 lavas of El Chichon volcano, Mexico, argue that the zoning and isotopic changes are in response to magma recharge mixing with an originally contaminated resident magma; 2) Single grain and intra-grain isotopic analyses of mineral phases from Ngauruhoe andesites (New Zealand) are highly variable, arguing that bulk rock data reflect mechanical aggregations of components which have evolved in discrete domains of the

  13. Large Silica-Rich Igneous-Textured Inclusions in the Buzzard Coulee (H4) Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, A.; Hutson, M.; Floss, C.; Hildebrand, A.

    2012-03-01

    Buzzard Coulee (H4) contains two types of large, igneous inclusions that are best explained by igneous differentiation, but which also show evidence for cooling and vapor phase phenomena consistent with transit through a space environment.

  14. Culturally relevant family-based treatment for adolescent delinquency and substance abuse: understanding within-session processes.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Phillippe B; Foster, Sharon L; Warner, Sarah E

    2010-08-01

    Identifying psychotherapy processes that likely contribute to client outcome with ethnic minorities is a vital practice and research need, particularly within family-focused, evidence-based treatments (EBT) for youth with externalizing problems. Identifying process variables within a cross-cultural context may improve the efficacy of EBTs by informing psychotherapists how to modify their behavior when working with ethnically diverse clients. The authors described one approach to the development of culturally competent psychotherapy, using an observational coding system comprising Afrocentric codes to investigate culturally relevant therapist behaviors. Qualitative examples illustrated the quantitative findings relating to therapist in-session behavior that promote client engagement and positive responding during a midtreatment session of multisystemic therapy. PMID:20564683

  15. The Formation of Igneous CAIs and Chondrules by Impacts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Love, Stanley G.

    2001-01-01

    Numerous challenges exist with forming the igneous spheres found within chondrites via collision events in the early solar nebula. We explore these challenges and discuss potential methods to overcome them. Collision models should be received cautiously. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Igneous fractionation and subsolidus equilibration of diogenite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Diogenites are coarse-grained orthopyroxenite breccias of remarkably uniform major element composition. Most diogenites contain homogeneous pyroxene fragments up to 5 cm across of Wo2En74Fs24 composition. Common minor constituents are chromite, olivine, trolite and metal, while silica, plagioclase, merrillite and diopside are trace phases. Diogenites are generally believed to be cumulates from the eucrite parent body, although their relationship with eucrites remains obscure. It has been suggested that some diogenites are residues after partial melting. I have performed EMPA and INAA for major, minor and trace elements on most diogenites, concentrating on coarse-grained mineral and lithic clasts in order to elucidate their igneous formation and subsequent metamorphic history. Major element compositions of diogenites are decoupled from minor and trace element compositions; the latter record an igneous fractionation sequence that is not preserved in the former. Low equilibration temperatures indicate that major element diffusion continued long after crystallization. Diffusion coefficients for trivalent and tetravalent elements in pyroxene are lower than those of divalent elements. Therefore, major element compositions of diogenites may represent means of unknown portions of a cumulate homogenized by diffusion, while minor and trace elements still yield information on their igneous history. The scale of major element equilibration is unknown, but is likely to be on the order of a few cm. Therefore, the diogenite precursors may have consisted largely of cm-sized, igneously zoned orthopyroxene grains, which were subsequently annealed during slow cooling, obliterating major element zoning but preserving minor and trace incompatible element zoning.

  17. Potentially clinically relevant prostate cancer is found more frequently after complete than after partial histopathological processing of radical cystoprostatectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, H M; Aziz, A; Eder, F; Otto, W; Denzinger, S; Wieland, W F; May, M; Hofstädter, F; Hartmann, A; Burger, M

    2012-12-01

    Incidental prostate cancer is often found in cystoprostatectomy specimens. The presence of a clinically significant tumour has an impact on follow-up strategies. In prostatectomy specimen for prostate cancer, whole-mount sections improve diagnostic accuracy. The present study compares detection of incidental prostate cancer in complete to routine processing. We included 295 consecutive patients who underwent radical cystoprostatectomy. Between 01/1995 and 12/2003 (period I), specimens of 129 patients were partially processed, whereas between 01/2004 and 03/2009 (period II), specimens of 166 patients were completely processed. Incidental prostate cancer was detected overall in 91 (30.8 %) patients. Prostate cancer was detected in 24 (18.6 %) patients in period 1 and in 67 (40.4 %) patients in period 2 (p < 0.001). Potentially clinically significant prostate cancer was detected in 12 (9.2 %) and 29 (17.5 %) patients, respectively (p = 0.044). Complete embedding and processing of cystoprostatectomy specimen yield significantly more potentially clinically relevant prostate cancers. The present data suggest that notably in younger men the specimens should be completely processed. PMID:23052374

  18. Thermal, High Pressure, and Electric Field Processing Effects on Plant Cell Membrane Integrity and Relevance to Fruit and Vegetable Quality

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Maria E; Barrett, Diane M

    2010-01-01

    Advanced food processing methods that accomplish inactivation of microorganisms but minimize adverse thermal exposure are of great interest to the food industry. High pressure (HP) and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing are commercially applied to produce high quality fruit and vegetable products in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Both microbial and plant cell membranes are significantly altered following exposure to heat, HP, or PEF. Our research group sought to quantify the degree of damage to plant cell membranes that occurs as a result of exposure to heat, HP, or PEF, using the same analytical methods. In order to evaluate whether new advanced processing methods are superior to traditional thermal processing methods, it is necessary to compare them. In this review, we describe the existing state of knowledge related to effects of heat, HP, and PEF on both microbial and plant cells. The importance and relevance of compartmentalization in plant cells as it relates to fruit and vegetable quality is described and various methods for quantification of plant cell membrane integrity are discussed. These include electrolyte leakage, cell viability, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). PMID:20492210

  19. Did North Atlantic Igneous Province igneous sills trigger or maintain Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Karina; Jones, Stephen M.; Schofield, Nick; Clayton, Geoff

    2010-05-01

    Igneous sills of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) were intruded into organic-rich sediments, generating methane and carbon dioxide by thermal maturation. These greenhouse gases escaped to the ocean and atmosphere through hydrothermal vents above the sills that have been observed on seismic reflection data and by drilling. It has been suggested that the NAIP sills provided a significant component of the greenhouse gases that forced warming during the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Here we consider whether methane released by NAIP sills could have triggered, as well as maintained, the PETM warming. Warming resulting from the PETM trigger began a few thousand years before the major upheaval in the carbon cycle that was associated with the PETM itself. Recent organic geochemical investigations have suggested that methane was involved in the trigger. Since the lifetime of methane in the atmosphere was approximately one decade during the Paleocene, the triggering methane pulse probably contained on the order of 100 Gt or more of carbon and was probably released in a period of c. 10 years or less. We use recent field observations of fluidized country rocks around sills to speculate on a model for sill emplacement, greenhouse gas generation and escape. The observation of fluidized sediments associated with lobe and finger structures along inward-dipping sections of many sills suggests that these sill rims propagated laterally by fluidizing a restricted volume of country rock, allowing the magma to advance into the fluidized region as a viscous fingering front. At this stage, the fluidized region was not connected to the surface by a conduit, so greenhouse gases could not escape rapidly. Eventually, as the sill rim propagated laterally and upward, a hydrothermal conduit was initiated and propagated rapidly upward to the surface. This model, based on field observations implies that the gases which initially escaped up the hydrothermal conduit were

  20. The Kenna ureilite - An ultramafic rock with evidence for igneous, metamorphic, and shock origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkley, J. L.; Brown, H. G.; Keil, K.; Carter, N. L.; Mercier, J.-C. C.; Huss, G.

    1976-01-01

    Ureilites are a rare group of achondrites. They are composed mainly of olivine and pigeonite in a matrix of carbonaceous material, including graphite, lonsdaleite, diamond, and metal. In most respects Kenna is a typical ureilite with the requisite mineralogical and chemical properties of the group. Differences of the Kenna ureilite from previously studied ureilites are related to a greater density, the occurrence of exceedingly minute quantities of feldspar, and a very strong elongation lineation of the silicate minerals. A description is presented of a study which indicates a complex history for Kenna, including igneous, mild metamorphic, and shock processes.

  1. Petrology of the Betulia Igneous Complex, Cauca, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Rodriguez, Javier

    2014-12-01

    The Betulia Igneous Complex (BIC) is a group of Late-Miocene (11.8 ± 0.2 Ma) hypabyssal intrusions of intermediate to felsic composition located in the SW of the Colombian Andes. These bodies have a calc-alkaline tendency and are related to the subduction of the Nazca plate under the South American plate. Diorites, quartz diorites and tonalities have porphyritic and phaneritic textures and are composed of plagioclase, amphibole, quartz, biotite, and orthoclase. Plagioclase is mainly of andesine-type and the amphiboles were classified mainly as magnesiohornblendes, actinolites, and tschermakites. BIC rocks have a narrow range of SiO2 content (59-67wt%) and exhibit an enrichment of LILE and LREE relative to HFSE and HREE, respectively. These features are attributed to enrichment of LILE from the source and retention of HFSE (mainly Nb, Ta, and Ti) by refractory phases within the same source. The depletion of HREE is explained by fractionation of mineral phases that have a high partition coefficients for these elements, especially amphiboles, the major mafic phase in the rocks. Nevertheless, the fractionation of garnet in early stages of crystallization is not unlikely. Probably all BIC units were generated by the same magma chamber or at least by the same petrologic mechanism as shown by the similar patterns in spider and REE diagrams; fractional crystallization and differentiation processes controlled the final composition of the rocks, and crystallization stages determined the texture. Isotopic compositions of BIC rocks (87Sr/86Sr: 0.70435-0.70511; 143Nd/144Nd: 0.51258-0.51280; 206Pb/204Pb: 19.13-19.31; 207Pb/204Pb: 15.67-15.76; 208Pb/204Pb: 38.93-39.20) indicate a source derived from the mantle with crustal contamination. The model proposed for the BIC consists of fluids from the dehydration of the subducted slab (Nazca plate) and subducted sediments that generated partial melting of the mantle wedge. These basaltic melts ascended to the mantle-crust boundary

  2. Protease recognition sites in Bet v 1a are cryptic, explaining its slow processing relevant to its allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Freier, Regina; Dall, Elfriede; Brandstetter, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite a high similarity with homologous protein families, only few proteins trigger an allergic immune response with characteristic TH2 polarization. This puzzling observation is illustrated by the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1a and its hypoallergenic protein isoforms, e.g., Bet v 1d. Given the key role of proteolytic processing in antigen presentation and T cell polarization, we investigated the recognition of Bet v 1 isoforms by the relevant protease cathepsin S. We found that at moderately acidic pH values Bet v 1a bound to cathepsin S with significantly lower affinity and was more slowly cleaved than its hypoallergenic isoform Bet v 1d. Only at pH values ≤4.5 the known proteolytic cleavage sites in Bet v 1a became accessible, resulting in a strong increase in affinity towards cathepsin S. Antigen processing and class II MHC loading occurs at moderately acidic compartments where processing of Bet v 1a and Bet v 1d differs distinctly. This difference translates into low and high density class II MHC loading and subsequently in TH2 and TH1 polarization, respectively. PMID:26235974

  3. Lunar igneous rocks and the nature of the lunar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. F.; Walker, D.

    1977-01-01

    Lunar igneous rocks, properly interpreted, can give useful information about mineral assemblages and mineral chemistry as a function of depth in the lunar interior. Though intensely brecciated, terra rocks reveal, in their chemistry, evidence for a magmatic history. Partial melting of feldspathic lunar crustal material occurred in the interval 4.6 to 3.9 Gy. Melting of ilmenite-bearing cumulates at depths near 100 km produced parent magmas for Apollo 11 and 17 titaniferous mare basalts in the interval 3.8 to 3.6 Gy. Melting of ilmenite-free olivine pyroxenites (also cumulates?) at depths greater than 200 km produced low-titanium mare basalts in the interval 3.4 to 3.1 Gy. No younger igneous rocks have yet been recognized among the lunar samples and present-day melting seems to be limited to depths greater than 1000 km.

  4. Lunar igneous rocks and the nature of the lunar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. F.; Walker, D.

    1974-01-01

    Lunar igneous rocks are interpreted, which can give useful information about mineral assemblages and mineral chemistry as a function of depth in the lunar interior. Terra rocks, though intensely brecciated, reveal, in their chemistry, evidence for a magmatic history. Partial melting of feldspathic lunar crustal material occurred in the interval 4.6 to 3.9 gy. Melting of ilmenite-bearing cumulates at depths near 100 km produced parent magmas for Apollo 11 and 17 titaniferous mare basalts in the interval 3.8 to 3.6 gy. Melting of ilmenite-free olivine pyroxenites at depths greater than 200 km produced low-titanium mare basalts in the interval 3.4 to 3.1 gy. No younger igneous rocks have yet been recognized among the lunar samples and present-day melting seems to be limited to depths greater than 1000 km.

  5. Kinetics of the Reduction of Hematite Concentrate Particles by Carbon Monoxide Relevant to a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Mohassab, Yousef; Zhang, Shengqin; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2015-08-01

    A novel ironmaking process is under development at the University of Utah to produce iron directly from iron oxides concentrates by the gas-solid flash reaction using gaseous fuels and reductants. This process will reduce energy consumption and minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Having investigated the hydrogen reduction kinetics of magnetite and hematite concentrate particles relevant to the novel flash ironmaking process, the carbon monoxide reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles (average particle size 21 µm) was determined in the temperature range 1473 K to 1623 K (1200 °C to 1350 °C) under various carbon monoxide partial pressures. At 1623 K (1350 °C) and residence time 5 seconds, the reduction degree of hematite concentrate particles was more than 90 pct under a pure carbon monoxide. This is slower than reduction by hydrogen but still significant, indicating that CO will contribute to the reduction of hematite concentrate in the flash process. The kinetics of CO reduction separately from hydrogen is important for understanding and analyzing the complex kinetics of hematite reduction by the H2 + CO mixtures. The nucleation and growth rate equation with the Avrami parameter n = 1.0 adequately described the carbon monoxide reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles. The reduction rate is of 1st order with respect to the partial pressure of carbon monoxide and the activation energy of the reaction was 231 kJ/mol, indicating strong temperature dependence. The following complete rate equation was developed that can satisfactorily predict the carbon monoxide reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles and is suitable for the design of a flash reactor where X is the fraction of oxygen removed from iron oxide, R is 8.314 J/mol K, T is in K, p is in atm, and t is in seconds.

  6. On the Formation of Amide Polymers via Carbonyl-Amino Group Linkages in Energetically Processed Ices of Astrophysical Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förstel, Marko; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Jones, Brant M.; Sun, Bing J.; Lee, Huan C.; Chang, Agnes H. H.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the formation of organic amide polymers via carbonyl-amino group linkages in carbon monoxide and ammonia bearing energetically processed ices of astrophysical relevance. The first group comprises molecules with one carboxyl group and an increasing number of amine moieties starting with formamide (45 u), urea (60 u), and hydrazine carboxamide (75 u). The second group consists of species with two carboxyl (58 u) and up to three amine groups (73 u, 88 u, and 103 u). The formation and polymerization of these linkages from simple inorganic molecules via formamide und urea toward amide polymers is discussed in an astrophysical and astrobiological context. Our results show that long chain molecules, which are closely related to polypeptides, easily form by energetically processing simple, inorganic ices at very low temperatures and can be released into the gas phase by sublimation of the ices in star-forming regions. Our experimental results were obtained by employing reflectron time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, coupled with soft, single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization; they are complemented by theoretical calculations.

  7. Dielectric properties of pharmaceutical materials relevant to microwave processing: effects of field frequency, material density, and moisture content.

    PubMed

    Heng, Paul W S; Loh, Z H; Liew, Celine V; Lee, C C

    2010-02-01

    The rising popularity of microwaves for drying, material processing and quality sensing has fuelled the need for knowledge concerning dielectric properties of common pharmaceutical materials. This article represents one of the few reports on the density and moisture content dependence of the dielectric properties of primary pharmaceutical materials and their relevance to microwave-assisted processing. Dielectric constants (epsilon') and losses (epsilon'') of 13 pharmaceutical materials were measured over a frequency range of 1 MHz-1 GHz at 23 +/- 1 degrees C using a parallel-electrode measurement system. Effects of field frequency, material density and moisture content on dielectric properties were studied. Material dielectric properties varied considerably with frequency. At microwave frequencies, linear relationships were established between cube-root functions of the dielectric parameters [symbols: see text] and density which enabled dielectric properties of materials at various densities to be estimated by regression. Moisture content was the main factor that contributed to the disparities in dielectric properties and heating capabilities of the materials in a laboratory microwave oven. The effectiveness of a single frequency density-independent dielectric function for moisture sensing applications was explored and found to be suitable within low ranges of moisture contents for a model material. PMID:19708060

  8. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Mittal, A.; Mohagheghi, A.; Johnson, D. K.

    2014-04-01

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. Cupriavidus necator is the microorganism that has been most extensively studied and used for PHB production on an industrial scale; However the substrates used for producing PHB are mainly fructose, glucose, sucrose, fatty acids, glycerol, etc., which are expensive. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified slurry from pretreated corn stover. The strain was first investigated in shake flasks for its ability to utilize glucose, xylose and acetate. In addition, the strain was also grown on pretreated lignocellulose hydrolyzate slurry and evaluated in terms of cell growth, sugar utilization, PHB accumulation, etc. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by the pretreatment and saccharification process of biomass, was also studied.

  9. Log evaluation of oil-bearing igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Khatchikian, A.

    1983-12-01

    The evaluation of porosity, water saturation and clay content of oilbearing igneous rocks with well logs is difficult due to the mineralogical complexity of this type of rocks. The log responses to rhyolite and rhyolite tuff; andesite, dacite and zeolite tuff; diabase and basalt have been studied from examples in western Argentina and compared with values observed in other countries. Several field examples show how these log responses can be used in a complex lithology program to make a complete evaluation.

  10. Crustal architecture of a continental large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Alexander; Faleide, Jan Inge; Krupnova, Natalia; Sakoulina, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    The northern Barents Sea was strongly affected by the Cretaceous High Arctic Large Igneous Province through abundant mafic intrusions, eruption of flood basalts, and regional uplift. Recently acquired geophysical data in this region provide a unique opportunity to study in detail crustal architecture of large igneous provinces. A giant dike swarm is identified based on magnetic anomalies coherent over a distance of hundreds of kilometers. Coincident ocean bottom seismometer, multichannel streamer, and gravity data indicate that the surface basalts and shallow sills were associated with feeder systems cross-cutting the entire crust. At the same time, the distribution of dikes exhibits more complex pattern than radially symmetric with respect to the presumable magmatic center in the Alpha Ridge region. Thus, the preferred orientation of dikes could be controlled by both paleostress and pre-existing weaknesses (Early-Late Paleozoic faults). The data do not indicate a thick igneous mafic lower crust while the existence of heavy ultramafic cumulates below the Moho has not been resolved yet. In view of these observations different models of magma transport and related paleo-surface topography are discussed.

  11. Relevance of the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process to biomineralization and development of biomimetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xingguo

    Natural biominerals often contain small amount of acidic macromolecules. These soluble macromolecules are thought to play a very important role in regulating the biomineralization process. By using synthetic acidic biopolymer and natural proteins extracted from biominerals to mimic these acidic macromolecules, the Polymer-Induced Liquid-Precursor (PILP) process is proposed to have great relevance to biomineralization. Like some biominerals, the minerals formed by the PILP process have both non-equilibrium morphology (e.g., "molded" crystal morphologies, films, rods, and tablets) and non-equilibrium composition (e.g., high magnesian calcite). Our goal was to study the formation of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate formation by the PILP process. By using fluorescence labeling, in-situ observation, and TEM study, we examined the formation of liquid-precursor and polymer-mineral association (exclusion, occlusion). The cooperation of Mg and polymer leads to pronounced amorphous-crystalline transition and formation of thin films incorporating high amount of impurity comparable to biominerals. By taking advantage of amorphous-crystalline transition in the PILP process, calcium carbonate amorphous liquid precursors are molded inside a porous hydrogel and transform to crystalline calcite. After removal of the organic mold, a calcite scaffold with complex morphology is formed. Natural soluble proteins are extracted from nacre. Our in-vitro crystallization studies using these proteins show similar amorphous-crystalline transition and thin film morphology in the presence of Mg. The combination of organic substrate and nacre proteins leads to thin aragonite films. Finally we studied the formation of calcium phosphate using our in-vitro crystallization model. As in the calcium carbonate system, thin films were formed on organic substrate and glass slides in the presence of polymer. We also successfully prepared PHEMA-CaP and collagen-HA organic inorganic composites for

  12. Pristine Igneous Rocks and the Early Differentiation of Planetary Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Our studies are highly interdisciplinary, but are focused on the processes and products of early planetary and asteroidal differentiation, especially the genesis of the ancient lunar crust. Most of the accessible lunar crust consists of materials hybridized by impact-mixing. Rare pristine (unmixed) samples reflect the original genetic diversity of the early crust. We studied the relative importance of internally generated melt (including the putative magma ocean) versus large impact melts in early lunar magmatism, through both sample analysis and physical modeling. Other topics under investigation included: lunar and SNC (martian?) meteorites; igneous meteorites in general; impact breccias, especially metal-rich Apollo samples and polymict eucrites; effects of regolith/megaregolith insulation on thermal evolution and geochronology; and planetary bulk compositions and origins. We investigated the theoretical petrology of impact melts, especially those formed in large masses, such as the unejected parts of the melts of the largest lunar and terrestrial impact basins. We developed constraints on several key effects that variations in melting/displacement ratio (a strong function of both crater size and planetary g) have on impact melt petrology. Modeling results indicate that the impact melt-derived rock in the sampled, megaregolith part of the Moon is probably material that was ejected from deeper average levels than the non-impact-melted material (fragmental breccias and unbrecciated pristine rocks). In the largest lunar impacts, most of the impact melt is of mantle origin and avoids ejection from the crater, while most of the crust, and virtually all of the impact-melted crust, in the area of the crater is ejected. We investigated numerous extraordinary meteorites and Apollo rocks, emphasizing pristine rocks, siderophile and volatile trace elements, and the identification of primary partial melts, as opposed to partial cumulates. Apollo 15 sample 15434,28 is an

  13. Igneous origin of K-feldspar Megacrysts in Granitic Rocks of the Sierra Nevada Batholith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. G.; Sisson, T. W.

    2007-12-01

    Study of the four principal K-feldspar megacrystic granitic plutons and related porphyrys in the Sierra Nevada composite batholith indicates that the included megacrysts are phenocrysts that grew in contact with granitic melt in long-lasting magma chambers. These 89-83 Ma plutons or intrusions are the youngest in the range, and represent the culminating magmatic phase of the batholith. They are the: Granodiorite of Topaz Lake; Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, Mono Creek Granite, Whitney Granodiorite, Johnson Granite Porphyry, and Golden Bear Dike. The zoned megacrysts in each of these igneous bodies attain 4-10 cm in length and all display oscillatory zoning with each zone beginning with a sharp increase followed by a gradual decrease in the concentration of BaO - commonly from 3 to 1 weight percent. Some of the more pronounced zones overlie resorption and channeling features on the underlying zone. Trains of small mineral inclusions (plagioclase, biotite, hornblende, quartz, sphene, and accessory minerals) are parallel to the BaO-delineated zones. The long axes of the inclusions are preferentially aligned parallel to the zone boundaries and inclusions are sorted by size from zone to zone. The growth temperature of sphene included in K-feldspar megacrysts is estimated by use of a Zr-in-sphene geothermometer. The sphene grains all yield igneous temperatures, mainly 735 - 760 °C. Sphene grains in the granodiorite host marginal to the megacrysts range to lower growth temperatures, in some instances into the subsolidus range. The zoning of the megacrysts, their presence in quenched porphry dikes, and the limited range and igneous values of growth temperatures of sphene inclusions within them, support the interpretation that the megacrysts formed as igneous sanidine phenocrysts, and that intrusion temperatures varied by only small amounts while the megacrysts grew. Each Ba- enriched zone was apparently formed by a repeated surge of new, hot melt injected into the large

  14. Simultaneous UV- and ion processing of astrophysically relevant ices. The case of CH3OH:N2 solid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, F.; Baratta, G. A.; Palumbo, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Interstellar ices are known to be simultaneously processed by both cosmic-ray bombardment and UV photolysis. Our knowledge of the effects of energetic processing on relevant icy samples is mainly based on laboratory investigations. In the past 35 years many experiments have been performed to study these effects separately but, to the best of our knowledge, never simultaneously. Aims: The aim of this work is to study the effects of simultaneous processing of ices by both cosmic rays and UV photons to investigate to what extent the combined effect of ion bombardment and UV photolysis influences the chemical pathways. Methods: We carried out the simultaneous processing of CH3OH:N2 ice held at 16 K by 200 keV H+ ions and Lyman-alpha 10.2 eV UV photons. The samples were analyzed by in situ transmission infrared spectroscopy. The un-combined processes of UV irradiation and bombardment by H+ ions of CH3OH:N2 ice were also studied. This mixture was chosen because the effects of ion bombardment and UV photolysis on methanol and nitrogen have been extensively studied in previous investigations. This mixture enables one to investigate whether simultaneous processing (a) influences the destruction of original species; (b) influences the formation of new species; or (c) causes synergistic effects since Lyman-alpha photons have a very low efficiency in breaking the dinitrogen bond because N2 is almost transparent at Lyman-alpha wavelengths. Results: After processing a CH3OH:N2 sample, the intensity of the methanol bands was observed to decrease at the same rate in all cases. After ion bombardment, species such as CO2, CO, H2CO, CH4, N2O, HNCO, and OCN- are formed in the ice mixture. After UV photolysis, species such as CO2, CO, H2CO, and CH4 are formed, but no N-bearing species are detected. Spectra of ices processed by both UV photons and ions were compared with spectra of ices bombarded only by ions. We find that there are no differences in the band area and profile

  15. Processes relevant for decadal changes in primary production of the North Sea and Baltic Sea: hindcast and scenario modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daewel, Ute; Schrum, Corinna; Pushpadas, Dhanya

    2016-04-01

    Despite their geographical vicinity, the North Sea and the Baltic Sea ecosystems exhibit very different characteristics in both physical and biological parameters. Nonetheless, since both ecosystems are characterized by the same general functional groups in phytoplankton and zooplankton and, their geographical distribution indicates comparable thermal adaptation of the plankton groups, we propose that the same ecosystem parameterization can be utilized to simulate the dynamics in both ecosystems simultaneously. Here we present results from an updated version of the 3d coupled ecosystem model ECOSMO valid for both areas. The model allows both multi-decadal hind cast simulation of primary production and specific process studies under controlled environmental conditions. Our results from a long-term hind-cast (1948-2008) indicate incoherent "regime shifts" in the primary productivity (PP) between the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Correlation analysis between atmospheric forcing and PP indicates significant correlations for both solar radiation and wind but cannot serve to identify causal relationship. Therefore additional scenario tests with perturbations in individual atmospheric condition where accomplished emphasizing specifically the role of solar radiation, wind and eutrophication. The results revealed that, although all parameters are relevant for the PP in North Sea and Baltic Sea, the dominant impact on long term variability was introduced by modulations of the wind fields.

  16. Rb-Sr ages of igneous rocks from the Apollo 14 mission and the age of the Fra Mauro formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Internal Rb-Sr isochrons were determined on four basaltic rocks and on a basaltic clast from a breccia from the Fra Mauro landing site. An internal isochron was determined for rock 12004 and yielded a value in agreement with previous results for basaltic rocks from the Apollo 12 site. The crystallization ages for Apollo 14 basalts are only 0.2 to 0.3 AE older than were found for mare basalts from the Sea of Tranquility. Assuming these leucocratic igneous rocks to be representative of the Fra Mauro site, it follows that there were major igneous processes active in these regions, and presumably throughout the highlands, at times only slightly preceding the periods at which the maria were last flooded.

  17. Drilling through the largest magma chamber on Earth: Bushveld Igneous Complex Drilling Project (BICDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumbull, R. B.; Ashwal, L. D.; Webb, S. J.; Veksler, I. V.

    2015-05-01

    A scientific drilling project in the Bushveld Igneous Complex in South Africa has been proposed to contribute to the following scientific topics of the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP): large igneous provinces and mantle plumes, natural resources, volcanic systems and thermal regimes, and deep life. An interdisciplinary team of researchers from eight countries met in Johannesburg to exchange ideas about the scientific objectives and a drilling strategy to achieve them. The workshop identified drilling targets in each of the three main lobes of the Bushveld Complex, which will integrate existing drill cores with new boreholes to establish permanently curated and accessible reference profiles of the Bushveld Complex. Coordinated studies of this material will address fundamental questions related to the origin and evolution of parental Bushveld magma(s), the magma chamber processes that caused layering and ore formation, and the role of crust vs. mantle in the genesis of Bushveld granites and felsic volcanic units. Other objectives are to study geophysical and geodynamic aspects of the Bushveld intrusion, including crustal stresses and thermal gradient, and to determine the nature of deep groundwater systems and the biology of subsurface microbial communities.

  18. Occurrences of igneous rocks in the Adriatic Sea: a possible indicator of the Paleozoic supercontinent disintegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrna Prašek, Marko; Petrinec, Zorica; Balen, Dražen

    2014-05-01

    stratification inside the igneous body, together with a varying degree of alteration (chloritization, uralitization, prehnitization, albitization) and weathering, resulted in slight diversification between the studied sites/samples. The samples gathered during this research are compared to those of wider Mediterranean area (particularly with Moroccan localities) related to the rifting system that lead to the continental breakup and the formation of the oceanic domain. Data obtained here indicate an existing connection between those localities i.e. petrogenetic processes. When all geochemical characteristics are put into previously published, although wide, age context (K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages; ranging 276-200 Ma), correlation of recorded petrogenetic processes with the Triassic magmatism i.e. active continental margin setting (continental breakup) becomes quite tentative. From that perspective these scarce localities inside the Adriatic Sea may be regarded as the easternmost occurrences of Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP)-like rocks and possibly an important source of information about the processes that accompanied the disintegration of the Paleozoic supercontinent Pangea.

  19. Determination of Fissile Loadings onto Monosodium Titanate (MST) under Conditions Relevant to the Actinide Removal Process Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T

    2005-11-15

    This report describes the results of an experimental study to measure the sorption of fissile actinides on monosodium titanate (MST) at conditions relevant to operation of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP). The study examined the effect of a single contact of a large volume of radionuclide-spiked simulant solution with a small mass of MST. The volume of simulant to MST (8.5 L to 0.2 g of MST solids) was designed to mimic the maximum phase ratio that occurs between the multiple contacts of MST and waste solution and washing of the accumulated solids cycle of ARP. This work provides the following results. (1) After a contact time of {approx}2 weeks, we measured the following actinide loadings on the MST (average of solution and solids data), Pu: 2.79 {+-} 0.197 wt %, U: 14.0 {+-} 1.04 wt %, and Np: 0.839 {+-} 0.0178 wt %. (2) The plutonium and uranium loadings reported above are considerably higher than previously reported values. The higher loading result from the very high phase ratio and the high initial mass concentrations of uranium and plutonium. A separate upcoming document details the predicted values for this system versus the results. (3) The strontium DF values measured in these tests proved much lower than those reported previously with simulants having the same bulk chemical composition. The low strontium DF values reflect the very low initial mass concentration of strontium in this simulant (<100 {micro}g/L) compared to that in previous testing (> 600 {micro}g/L).

  20. Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bernot

    2004-08-16

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The model is based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. This constitutes the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of SR and LA (BSC 2003a) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2002a). The technical work plan is governed by the procedures of AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model: (1) Impacts of magma intrusion on the components of engineered barrier system (e.g., drip shields and cladding) of emplacement drifts in Zone 1, and the fate of waste forms. (2) Impacts of conducting magma heat and diffusing magma gases on the drip shields, waste packages, and cladding in the Zone 2 emplacement drifts adjacent to the intruded drifts. (3) Impacts of intrusion on Zone 1 in-drift thermal and geochemical environments, including seepage hydrochemistry. The scope of this model only includes impacts to the components stated above, and does not include impacts to other engineered barrier system (EBS) components such as the invert and

  1. Igneous and tectonic evolution of Venusian and terrestrial coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Komatsu, G.

    1992-01-01

    A great variety of tectonic and volcanic features have been documented on Venus. It is widely appreciated that there are close spatial associations among certain types of tectonic structures and some classes of volcanic flows and constructs. Coronae are endowed with a particularly rich variety of volcanism. It is thought that coupled tectonic and volcanic aspects of coronae are cogenetic manifestations of mantle plumes. An outstanding feature of most venusian coronae is their circular or elliptical shape defined by peripheral zones of fracturing and/or folding. Some coronae are composite, consisting of two or more small coronae within a larger enclosing corona, suggesting complex histories of structured diapirism analogous in some ways to salt dome tectonics. Coronae range widely in size, from smaller than 100 km to over 1000 km in diameter. Volcanic features associated with venusian coronae include lunar-like sinuous rilles, thin lava flows, cinder cone-like constructs, shield volcanos, and pancake domes. Several types of volcanic features are often situated within or near a single corona, in many instances including land-forms indicating effusions of both low- and high-viscosity lavas. In some cases stratigraphic evidence brackets emplacement of pancake domes during the period of tectonic development of the corona, thus supporting a close link between the igneous and tectonic histories of coronae. These associations suggest emplacement of huge diapirs and massive magmatic intrusions, thus producing the tectonic deformations defining these structures. Igneous differentiation of the intrusion could yield a range of lava compositions. Head and Wilson suggested a mechanism that would cause development of neutral buoyancy zones in the shallow subsurface of Venus, thereby tending to promote development of massive igneous intrusions.

  2. Magnetostriction and palæomagnetism of igneous rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, John W.; Buddington, A.F.; Balsley, J.R.

    1959-01-01

    IN a recent communication, Stott and Stacey1 report on a “crucial experiment” from which they conclude: “This excellent agreement between the dip and the directions of artificial thermoremanent magnetization of the stressed and unstressed rocks indicates that large systematic errors due to magnetostriction are most improbable in igneous rocks of types normally used for palæomagnetic work”. This experiment was intended to test the proposals2 and measurements3 bearing on the role of magnetostriction in rock magnetism. We present here our reasons for believing that the experiment was not crucial and that the conclusion is not justified.

  3. Magnetic fabric constraints of the emplacement of igneous intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Stephanie M.

    Fabric analysis is critical to evaluating the history, kinematics, and dynamics of geological deformation. This is particularly true of igneous intrusions, where the development of fabric is used to constrain magmatic flow and emplacement mechanisms. Fabric analysis was applied to three mafic intrusions, with different tectonic and petrogenetic histories, to study emplacement and magma flow: the Insizwa sill (Mesozoic Karoo Large Igneous Province, South Africa), Sonju Lake intrusion (Proterozoic Midcontinent Rift, Minnesota, USA), and Palisades sill (Mesozoic rift basin, New Jersey, USA). Multiple fabric analysis techniques were used to define the fabric in each intrusive body. Using digital image analysis techniques on multiple thin sections, the three-dimensional shape-preferred orientation (SPO) of populations of mineral phases were calculated. Low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements were used as a proxy for the mineral fabric of the ferromagnetic phases (e.g., magnetite). In addition, a new technique---high-field AMS---was used to isolate the paramagnetic component of the fabric (e.g., silicate fabric). Each fabric analysis technique was then compared to observable field fabrics as a framework for interpretation. In the Insizwa sill, magnetic properties were used to corroborate vertical petrologic zonation and distinguish sub-units within lithologically defined units. Abrupt variation in magnetic properties provides evidence supporting the formation of the Insizwa sill by separate magma intrusions. Low-field AMS fabrics in the Sonju Lake intrusion exhibit consistent SW-plunging lineations and SW-dipping foliations. These fabric orientations provide evidence that the cumulate layers in the intrusion were deposited in a dynamic environment, and indicate magma flowed from southwest to northeast, parallel to the pre-existing rift structures. In the Palisades sill, the magnetite SPO and low-field AMS lineation have developed orthogonal to

  4. Evolution and timing of tectonic events in the Arabia-Eurasia convergence zone as inferred from igneous geochemistry from the EarthChem database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieu, W. K.; Stern, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The timing of tectonic events in the Anatolia-Iranian region can be inferred from analysis of igneous rocks. Magmatic activities in the region are generally associated with the convergence of the African-Arabian and Eurasian plates and the subduction of the Neotethys Ocean. Ancillary processes such as subduction of continental crust, delamination of upper plate lithosphere or lower crust, or asthenospheric decompression accompanying post-collisional relaxation also contribute to the composition of igneous rocks. Here we use geochemical data gathered from the EarthChem database to assess broad chemical implications of Cenozoic tectonic activities of the convergence region. We search for geochemical signal of the timing of first contact of the subducting Arabian and overriding Eurasian continental crust. Of particular interest is how igneous rock compositions vary during the transition from pre- to post-contact of the continental crusts. Also, is there a geographic variation along the convergence zone during this tectonic transition? We generate maps and geochemical plots for four different epochs and two different regions since Cenozoic time: Iran and Anatolia in the Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Plio-Quaternary. This board, region-scaled analysis of major and trace element patterns suggests the following tectonic events: Subduction-related medium K calc-alkaline igneous rocks reflect Eocene subduction of the Neo-Tethys oceanic lithosphere. Oligocene igneous rocks are characterized by K2O-SiO2 trends scattering to higher silica and alkaline content, which may reflect subduction of stretched continental margin lithosphere and sediments. A bimodal pattern of potash-silica trends during Miocene time may mark the transition from subduction-related to intra-plate magmatism, perhaps signaling contact between the continental crust of Arabia-Africa with Eurasia. Pliocene and younger igneous rocks show an intra-plate and ocean island basalt trend, as the region's activities

  5. Theoretical studies of nonadiabatic and spin-forbidden processes: Investigations of the reactions and spectroscopy of radical species relevant to combustion reactions and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yarkony, D.R.

    1993-12-01

    This research program focusses on studies of spin-forbidden and electronically nonadiabatic processes involving radical species relevant to combustion reactions and combustion diagnostics. To study the electronic structure aspects of these processes a unique and powerful system of electronic structure programs, developed over the past nine years, the BROOKLYN codes, is employed. These programs enable the authors to address questions basic to the understanding of elementary combustion processes not tractable using more standard quantum chemistry codes.

  6. Relevancy 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Newman, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Where we present an overview on why relevancy is a problem, how important it is and how we can improve it. The topic of relevancy is becoming increasingly important in earth data discovery as our audience is tuned to the accuracy of standard search engines like Google.

  7. Modeling differentiation of Karaj Dam basement igneous rocks (northern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeily, D.; M-Mashhour, R.

    2009-04-01

    The Karaj Dam basement igneous body (KDB) is located in the north of city of Karaj, 30 km from city of Tehran, which lies between 35° 50' N to 36° 05' N and between 50° 50' E to 51° 15' E. It is one of the several plutonic bodies within the E-W trending Alborz zone in northern Iran. Following the late Cretaceous orogenic movements, vast volumes of dacite, andesites and basaltic lavas with tuffaceous and other clastic sediments were deposited during Eocene time, forming Karaj Formation in central Iran and Albourz. The KDB is penetrated thorough middle and upper tuff units from Karaj Formation which is underlain by late Jurassic depositions (Shemshak Formation) and overlain by the Neogene red Conglomerates in regard to stratographic consideration. It is mainly composed of a layered series dominated by gabbro, diorite and monzonite, which is a rock sequence formed upward from the lower to upper chilled margins, respectively. The chilled margins, which have gabbroic in composition, show porphyritic texture with euhedral to subhedral plagioclase (andesine & labradorite) and pyroxene (augite) megacrysts up to 5 mm long. These rocks become coarse-grained inward and transform to equigranular texture gradually.In addition, a small fine-grained doleritic stock as well as some doleritic dykes is intrusive into the pyroclastic volcanic rocks of Karaj Formation. It is possible to observe doleritic enclaves included in the KDB, indicating that the KDB are slightly younger than the dolerites. Whole rock geochemistry and mineral chemistry of the plagioclase and pyroxene in various rock samples, suggest differentiation processes. The Mg# of the pyroxene and An% of plagioclase of the contact chilled samples can be used as an indication of the original magma and plotted between the gabbro and monzonitic samples. In addition, increasing of the Mg# within the whole rock samples from the upper of contact chilled, in comparison to the lower one, demonstrates elemental differentiation

  8. Post-igneous redistribution of components in eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Martinez, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    In our analyses, we utilize a microdrilling technique that removes 40 to 100 micron diameter cores from mineral grains in thin sections analyzed by microprobe. The cores are then analyzed by INAA using the technique of Lindstrom. Three eucrites were selected for application of this analytical technique: monomict breccias Pasamonte and Stannern and unbrecciated EET90020. Pasamonte is among the most unequilibrated of the eucrites on the basis of zoning in pyroxenes and is considered to be an igneous rock not significantly affected by metamorphism. Stannern has igneous texture but its pyroxenes indicate some re-equilibration, although little, if any, recrystallization. EET90020 has a granulite texture and has been substantially recrystallized. Our sample of Pasamonte contains several clasts of different grain sizes ranging from glass to fine grained with diabasic texture containing lathy plagioclase, unexsolved pigeonite, and mesostasis. Cores were taken of the glass and from minerals and mesostases in six lithic clasts which normally allowed sampling of more than one phase per clast. Our sample of Stannern is also a breccia but with little difference in grain size between clasts and matrix. The plagioclase and pigeonite are blocky, twinned, and exsolved and coexist with a bit of mesostasis. Cores were taken of plagioclase and pigeonite with no attempt to distinguish separate clasts. EET90020 is a granular mixture of twinned plagioclase and pigeonite having rather uniform size and many triple junctions. Several cores were taken of both phases. Both clear and cloudy grains of plagioclase and pyroxene were sampled in all three eucrites.

  9. The High Arctic Large Igneous Province Mantle Plume caused uplift of Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Jennifer; Ernst, Richard; Hadlari, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The Sverdrup Basin is an east-west-trending extensional sedimentary basin underlying the northern Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The tectonic history of the basin began with Carboniferous-Early Permian rifting followed by thermal subsidence with minor tectonism. Tectonic activity rejuvenated in the Hauterivian-Aptian by renewed rifting and extension. Strata were deformed by diapiric structures that developed during episodic flow of Carboniferous evaporites during the Mesozoic and the basin contains igneous components associated with the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). HALIP was a widespread event emplaced in multiple pulses spanning ca. 180 to 80 Ma, with igneous rocks on Svalbard, Franz Josef Island, New Siberian Islands, and also in the Sverdrup Basin on Ellef Ringnes, Axel Heiberg, and Ellesmere islands. Broadly contemporaneous igneous activity across this broad Arctic region along with a reconstructed giant radiating dyke swarm suggests that HALIP is a manifestation of large mantle plume activity probably centred near the Alpha Ridge. Significant surface uplift associated with the rise of a mantle plume is predicted to start ~10-20 my prior to the generation of flood basalt magmatism and to vary in shape and size subsequently throughout the LIP event (1,2,3) Initial uplift is due to dynamical support associated with the top of the ascending plume reaching a depth of about 1000 km, and with continued ascent the uplift topography broadens. Additional effects (erosion of the ductile lithosphere and thermal expansion caused by longer-term heating of the mechanical lithosphere) also affect the shape of the uplift. Topographic uplift can be between 1 to 4 km depending on various factors and may be followed by subsidence as the plume head decays or become permanent due to magmatic underplating. In the High Arctic, field and geochronological data from HALIP relevant to the timing of uplift, deformation, and volcanism are few. Here we present new evidence

  10. Breakup magmatism style on the North Atlantic Igneous Province: insight from Mid-Norwegian volcanic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour Abdelmalak, Mohamed; Faleide, Jan Inge; Planke, Sverre; Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Zastrozhnov, Dmitrii; Breivik, Asbjørn Johan; Gernigon, Laurent; Myklebust, Reidun

    2014-05-01

    The distribution of breakup-related igneous rocks on rifted margins provide important constraints on the magmatic processes during continental extension and lithosphere separation which lead to a better understanding of the melt supply from the upper mantle and the relationship between tectonic setting and volcanism. The results can lead to a better understanding of the processes forming volcanic margins and thermal evolution of associated prospective basins. We present a revised mapping of the breakup-related igneous rocks in the NE Atlantic area, which are mainly based on the Mid-Norwegian (case example) margin. We divided the breakup related igneous rocks into (1) extrusive complexes, (2) shallow intrusive complexes (sills/dykes) and (3) deep intrusive complexes (Lower Crustal Body: LCB). The extrusive complex has been mapped using the seismic volcanostratigraphic method. Several distinct volcanic seismic facies units have been identified. The top basalt reflection is easily identified because of the high impedance contrast between the sedimentary and volcanic rocks resulting in a major reflector. The basal sequence boundary is frequently difficult to identify but it lies usually over the intruded sedimentary basin. Then the base is usually picked above the shallow sill intrusions identified on seismic profile. The mapping of the top and the base of the basaltic sequences allows us to determine the basalt thickness and estimate the volume of the magma production on the Mid- Norwegian margin. The thicker part of the basalt corresponds to the seaward dipping reflector (SDR). The magma feeder system, mainly formed by dyke and sill intrusions, represents the shallow intrusive complex. Deeper interconnected high-velocity sills are also mappable in the margin. Interconnected sill complexes can define continuous magma network >10 km in vertical ascent. The large-scale sill complexes, in addition to dyke swarm intrusions, represent a mode of vertical long-range magma

  11. Venus: chemical weathering of igneous rocks and buffering of atmospheric composition.

    PubMed

    Nozette, S; Lewis, J S

    1982-04-01

    Data from the Pioneer Venus radar mapper, combined with measurements of wind velocity and atmospheric composition, suggest that surface erosion on Venus varies with altitude. Calcium- and magnesium-rich weathering products are produced at high altitudes by gas-solid reactions with igneous minerals, then removed into the hotter lowlands by surface winds. These fine-grained weathering products may then rereact with the lower atmosphere and buffer the composition of the observed gases carbon dioxide, water vapor, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen fluoride in some regions of the surface. This process is a plausible mechanism for the establishment in the lowlands of a calcium-rich mineral assemblage, which had previously been found necessary for the buffering of these species. PMID:17736250

  12. Venus - Chemical weathering of igneous rocks and buffering of atmospheric composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozette, S.; Lewis, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Data from the Pioneer Venus radar mapper, combined with measurements of wind velocity and atmospheric composition, suggest that surface erosion on Venus varies with altitude. Calcium- and magnesium-rich weathering products are produced at high altitudes by gas-solid reactions with igneous minerals, then removed into the hotter lowlands by surface winds. These fine-grained weathering products may then rereact with the lower atmosphere and buffer the composition of the observed gases carbon dioxide, water vapor, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen fluoride in some regions of the surface. This process is a plausible mechanism for the establishment in the lowlands of a calcium-rich mineral assemblage, which had previously been found necessary for the buffering of these species.

  13. An Igneous Origin for Features of a Candidate Crater-Lake System in Western Memnonia, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leverington, D. W.; Maxwell, T. A.

    2004-01-01

    The association of channels, inner terraces, and delta-like features with Martian impact craters has previously been interpreted as evidence in favor of the past existence of crater lakes on Mars. However, examination of a candidate crater-lake system in western Memnonia suggests instead that its features may have formed through igneous processes involving the flow and ponding of lava. Accumulations of material in craters and other topographic lows throughout much of the study region have characteristics consistent with those of volcanic deposits, and terraces found along the inner flanks of some of these craters are interpreted as having formed through drainage or subsidence of volcanic materials. Channels previously identified as inlets and outlets of the crater-lake system are interpreted instead as volcanic rilles. These results challenge previous interpretations of terrace and channel features in the study region and suggest that candidate crater lakes located elsewhere should be reexamined.

  14. Mafic and felsic igneous rocks at Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Violaine; Cousin, Agnès; Mangold, Nicolas; Toplis, Michael; Fabre, Cécile; Forni, Olivier; Payré, Valérie; Gasnault, Olivier; Ollila, Anne; Rapin, William; Fisk, Martin; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Wiens, Roger; Maurice, Sylvestre; Lasue, Jérémie; Newsom, Horton; Lanza, Nina

    2015-04-01

    The Curiosity rover landed at Gale, an early Hesperian age crater formed within Noachian terrains on Mars. The rover encountered a great variety of igneous rocks to the west of the Yellow Knife Bay sedimentary unit (from sol 13 to 800) which are float rocks or clasts in conglomerates. Textural and compositional analyses using MastCam and ChemCam Remote micro Imager (RMI) and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with a ˜300-500 µm laser spot lead to the recognition of 53 massive (non layered) igneous targets, both intrusive and effusive, ranging from mafic rocks where feldspars form less than 50% of the rock to felsic samples where feldspar is the dominant mineral. From morphology, color, grain size, patina and chemistry, at least 5 different groups of rocks have been identified: (1) a basaltic class with shiny aspect, conchoidal frature, no visible grains (less than 0.2mm) in a dark matrix with a few mm sized light-toned crystals (21 targets) (2) a porphyritic trachyandesite class with light-toned, bladed and polygonal crystals 1-20 mm in length set in a dark gray mesostasis (11 targets); (3) light toned trachytes with no visible grains sometimes vesiculated or forming flat targets (6 targets); (4) microgabbro-norite (grain size < 1mm) and gabbro-norite (grain size >1 mm) showing dark and light toned crystals in similar proportion ( 8 targets); (5) light-toned diorite/granodiorite showing coarse granular (>4 mm) texture either pristine or blocky, strongly weathered rocks (9 rock targets). Overall, these rocks comprise 2 distinct geochemical series: (i) an alkali-suite: basanite, gabbro trachy-andesite and trachyte) including porphyritic and aphyric members; (ii) quartz-normative intrusives close to granodioritic composition. The former looks like felsic clasts recently described in two SNC meteorites (NWA 7034 and 7533), the first Noachian breccia sampling the martian regolith. It is geochemically consistent with differentiation of liquids produced by low

  15. Rb-Sr age of lunar igneous rocks 62295 and 14310

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, R. K.; Lee-Hu, C.-N.; Wetherill, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of Rb-Sr ages of crystallization performed on igneous lunar highland rocks 62295 and 14310 are reported. Lunar sample 62295 is a mesostasis-rich spinel-troctolite very-high-alumina basalt exhibiting a variable igneous structure. Sample 14310 is a feldspathic KREEP-rich basalt. The determined ages probably date the cooling of shock melts.

  16. The "Key" Method of Identifying Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks in Introductory Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eves, Robert Leo; Davis, Larry Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that identification keys provide an orderly strategy for the identification of igneous and metamorphic rocks in an introductory geology course. Explains the format employed in the system and includes the actual key guides for both igneous and metamorphic rocks. (ML)

  17. Igneous phenocrystic origin of K-feldspar megacrysts in granitic rocks from the Sierra Nevada batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Sisson, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    interpretation that the megacrysts formed ag igneous sanidine phenocrysts, that intrusion temperatures varied by only small amounts while the megacrysts grew, and that megacryst growth ceased before the intrusions cooled below the solidus. Individual Ba-enriched zones were apparently formed by repeated surges of new, hotter granitic melt that replenished these large magma chambers. Each recharge of hot magron offset cooling, maintained the partially molten or mushy character of the chamber, stirred up crystals, and induced convective currents that lofted, settling megacrysts back up into the chamber. Because of repeated reheating of the magma chamber and prolonged maintenance of the melt, this process apparently continued long enough to provide the ideal environment for the growth of these extraordinarily large K-feldspar phenocrysts. ??2008 Geological Society of America.

  18. On the original igneous source of Martian fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, A. K.; Clark, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    The composition of the silicate portion of Martian regolith fines indicates derivation of the fines from mafic to ultramafic rocks, probably rich in pyroxene. Rock types similar in chemical and mineralogical composition include terrestrial Archean basalts and certain achondrite meteorites. If these igneous rocks weathered nearly isochemically, the nontronitic clays proposed earlier as an analog to Martian fines could be formed. Flood basalts of pyroxenitic lavas may be widespread and characteristic of early volcanism on Mars, analogous to maria flood basalts on the moon and early Precambrian basaltic komatiites on earth. Compositional differences between lunar, terrestrial, and Martian flood basalts may be related to differences in planetary sizes and mantle compositions of the respective planetary objects.

  19. Igneous intrusion models for floor fracturing in lunar craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, R. W.; Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are primarily located near the maria and frequently contain ponded mare units and dark mantling deposits. Fracturing is confined to the crater interior, often producing a moat-like feature near the floor edge, and crater depth is commonly reduced by uplift of the crater floor. Although viscous relaxation of crater topography can produce such uplift, the close association of modification with surface volcanism supports a model linking floor fracture to crater-centered igneous intrusions. The consequences of two intrusion models for the lunar interior are quantitatively explored. The first model is based on terrestrial laccoliths and describes a shallow intrusion beneath the crater. The second model is based on cone sheet complexes where surface deformation results from a deeper magma chamber. Both models, their fit to observed crater modifications and possible implications for local volcanism are described.

  20. The key role of mica during igneous concentration of tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Aleksandr; A. Mavrogenes, John; Meffre, Sebastien; Davidson, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Igneous rocks with high Ta concentrations share a number of similarities such as high Ta/Nb, low Ti, LREE and Zr concentrations and granitic compositions. These features can be traced through fractionated granitic series. Formation of Ta-rich melts begins with anatexis in the presence of residual biotite, followed by magmatic crystallization of biotite and muscovite. Crystallization of biotite and muscovite increases Ta/Nb and reduces the Ti content of the melt. Titanium-bearing oxides such as rutile and titanite are enriched in Ta and have the potential to deplete Ta at early stages of fractionation. However, mica crystallization suppresses their saturation and allows Ta to increase in the melt. Saturation with respect to Ta and Nb minerals occurs at the latest stages of magmatic crystallization, and columbite can originate from recrystallization of mica. We propose a model for prediction of intrusion fertility for Ta.

  1. Major and trace elements in igneous rocks from Apollo 15.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmke, P. A.; Blanchard, D. P.; Haskin, L. A.; Telander, K.; Weiss, C.; Jacobs, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The concentrations of major and trace elements have been determined in igneous rocks from Apollo 15. All materials analyzed have typical depletions of Eu except for minerals separated from sample 15085. Four samples have concentrations of trace elements that are similar to those of KREEP. The samples of mare basalt from Apollo 15 have higher concentrations of FeO, MgO, Mn, and Cr and lower concentrations of CaO, Na2O, K2O, and rare-earth elements (REE) as compared to the samples of mare basalt from Apollos 11, 12, and 14. The samples can be divided into two groups on the basis of their normative compositions. One group is quartz normative and has low concentrations of FeO while the other is olivine normative and has high concentrations of FeO. The trace element data indicate that the samples of olivine normative basalt could be from different portions of a single lava flow.

  2. The Search for Igneous Materials at the Viking Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Dale-Bannister, M.; Guinnes, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of Viking Lander 6 channel (0.4 to 1.1 microns) images to identify igneous materials is discussed. Movies of synthetic image cubes demonstrate that there are a number of contrast reversals between soils and certain rocks. Typically, large, angular rocks are brighter than the surrounding soils in the shortest wavelengths, and much darker than the soils at longest wavelengths. These results, which seem difficult to explain solely on the basis of photometric effects related to local lighting and viewing, are consistent with the presence of Fe+2 bearing silicates at the rock surfaces, producing relatively moderate absorptions in the blue and green parts of the spectrum, but more significant absorptions near about 1.0 micrometer (e.g., Fe+2 bearing pyroxenes). The soils, on the other hand, have signatures consistent with strong Fe+3 related absorptions at shorter wavelengths (e.g., Fe+3 bearing oxides or hydroxides).

  3. The nakhlite meteorites: Augite-rich igneous rocks from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2005-01-01

    The seven nakhlite meteorites are augite-rich igneous rocks that formed in flows or shallow intrusions of basaltic magma on Mars. They consist of euhedral to subhedral crystals of augite and olivine (to 1 cm long) in fine-grained mesostases. The augite crystals have homogeneous cores of Mg' = 63% and rims that are normally zoned to iron enrichment. The core-rim zoning is cut by iron-enriched zones along fractures and is replaced locally by ferroan low-Ca pyroxene. The core compositions of the olivines vary inversely with the steepness of their rim zoning - sharp rim zoning goes with the most magnesian cores (Mg' = 42%), homogeneous olivines are the most ferroan. The olivine and augite crystals contain multiphase inclusions representing trapped magma. Among the olivine and augite crystals is mesostasis, composed principally of plagioclase and/or glass, with euhedra of titanomagnetite and many minor minerals. Olivine and mesostasis glass are partially replaced by veinlets and patches of iddingsite, a mixture of smectite clays, iron oxy-hydroxides and carbonate minerals. In the mesostasis are rare patches of a salt alteration assemblage: halite, siderite, and anhydrite/ gypsum. The nakhlites are little shocked, but have been affected chemically and biologically by their residence on Earth. Differences among the chemical compositions of the nakhlites can be ascribed mostly to different proportions of augite, olivine, and mesostasis. Compared to common basalts, they are rich in Ca, strongly depleted in Al, and enriched in magmaphile (incompatible) elements, including the LREE. Nakhlites contain little pre-terrestrial organic matter. Oxygen isotope ratios are not terrestrial, and are different in anhydrous silicates and in iddingsite. The alteration assemblages all have heavy oxygen and heavy carbon, while D/H values are extreme and scattered. Igneous sulfur had a solar-system isotopic ratio, but in most minerals was altered to higher and lower values. High precision

  4. Primary igneous rocks on Mars: Composition and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Robert B.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The present knowledge of the crustal composition of Mars is synthesized and implications discussed for in-situ resource utilization. Sources of information include remote sensing observations, Viking XRF chemical measurements, and characteristics of the SNC meteorites (which most researchers now believe originated on Mars). There are a number of lines of evidence that abundant ferrous-iron rich igneous crustal rocks (and derivative soils) are available at or very near the current Martian surface at many locations on the planet. Most of these exposures show spectroscopic evidence for abundant pyroxene, consistent with basaltic compositions. The SNC meteorites, which have basaltic compositions, were also studied extensively. Interpretations of Mars crustal chemistry and mineralogy (petrology) based on these various sources are reviewed, and their consistencies and differences are discussed.

  5. Evolution of the martian mantle as recorded by igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Martian igneous rocks provide our best window into the current state of the martian mantle and its evolution after accretion and differentiation. Currently, those rocks have been examined in situ by rovers, characterized in general from orbiting spacecraft, and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories when found as meteorites. However, these data have the potential to bias our understanding of martian magmatism, as most of the available meteorites and rover-analyzed rocks come from the Amazonian (<2 Ga) and Hesperian (~3.65 Ga) periods respectively, while igneous rocks from the Noachian (>3.8 Ga) have only been examined by orbiters and as the unique meteorite ALH 84001. After initial differentiation, the main planetary-scale changes in the structure of Mars which impact igneous compositions are cooling of the planet and thickening of the crust with time. As the shergottite meteorites give ages <500 Ma1, they might be expected to represent thick-crust, recent volcanism. Using spacecraft measurements of volcanic compositions and whole rock compositions of meteorites, we demonstrate that the shergottite meteorites do not match the composition of the igneous rocks composing the young volcanoes on Mars, particularly in their silica content, and no crystallization or crustal contamination trend reproduces the volcanoes from a shergottite-like parent magma. However, we show that the shergottite magmas do resemble older martian rocks in composition and mineralogy. The Noachian-aged meteorite ALH 84001 has similar radiogenic-element signatures to the shergottites and may derive from a similar mantle source despite the age difference2. Thus, shergottite-like magmas may represent melting of mantle sources that were much more abundant early in martian history. We propose that the shergottites represent the melting products of an originally-hydrous martian mantle, containing at least several hundred ppm H2O. Dissolved water can increase the silica content of magmas and thus

  6. Magnetic anomalies along the contact between sedimentary and igneous rocks:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Speer, A. J.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2002-05-01

    Intrusion of the Liberty Hill granite (South Carolina) into the surrounding shale causes a distinct aureole along the metamorphic contact. The aureole is divided by five isograds, which are the result of a sequence of continuous reactions. One consequence of the continuous reactions is production of contrasting proportion of magnetite and exsolved titanohematite. The continuous change in the relative amounts of these two minerals, controls the magnetic properties of the hornfelses. This causes magnetic anomaly changes associated with the aureole with inflexions occurring at the isograds. The maximum intensity of the magnetic anomaly coincides with the maximum abundance of titanohematite. The anomaly sharply drops when stable remanence of titanohematite is replaced by unstable remanence of magnetite. Magnetic properties of the aureole, which is the contact between igneous and sedimentary rocks, demonstrate an example of magnetic remanence acquisition in petrological environment that is likely to occur on planet Mars.

  7. Chip-off-the-old-rock: the study of reservoir-relevant geological processes with real-rock micromodels.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; de Haas, Thomas W; Fadaei, Hossein; Sinton, David

    2014-11-21

    We present a real-rock micromodel approach whereby microfluidic channels are fabricated in a naturally occurring mineral substrate. The method is applied to quantify calcite dissolution which is relevant to oil/gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, and wastewater disposal in carbonate formations - ubiquitous worldwide. The key advantage of this method is the inclusion of both the relevant substrate chemistry (not possible with conventional microfluidics) and real-time pore-scale resolution (not possible with core samples). Here, microchannels are etched into a natural calcite crystal and sealed with a glass slide. The approach is applied to study acidified brine flow through a single channel and a two-dimensional micromodel. The single-channel case conforms roughly to a 1-D analytical description, with crystal orientation influencing the local dissolution rate an additional 25%. The two-dimensional experiments show highly flow-directed dissolution and associated positive feedback wherein acid preferentially invades high conductivity flow paths, resulting in higher dissolution rates ('wormholing'). These experiments demonstrate and validate the approach of microfabricating fluid structures within natural minerals for transport and geochemical studies. More broadly, real-rock microfluidics open the door to a vast array of lab-on-a-chip opportunities in geology, reservoir engineering, and earth sciences. PMID:25236399

  8. Constraining the History of the North Atlantic Igneous Province: a Palaeomagnetic and Geochronologic Ballad in the British Tertiary Volcanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganerød, M.; Rousse, S.; Smethurst, M.; Prestvik, T.

    2006-12-01

    Large Igneous Provinces (LIP), overwhelmingly of basaltic affinity constitute the surface expressions of catastrophically rapid dissipation of large quantities of internal heat. Subsequent to their extrusion, most LIPs have changed position in the Earth's surface due to plate motions. With an estimated volume of ca 107 km3 the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) represents the third largest magmatic event on Earth during the last 150 Myr. The NAIP formed during two major magmatic phases: a pre- break-up phase (62-58 Ma) and a syn- break-up phase (56-54 Ma) contemporaneous with the onset of North Atlantic sea-floor spreading. The formation of the NAIP has been linked to the proto-Icelandic plume through paleogeographic reconstructions and geochemical observations. Since the late 1980's much of the research focus on the NAIP has been guided by the understanding of the genetic relationship between North Atlantic magmatism that began in the earliest Palaeocene, the genesis/position of the Iceland Hotspots and/or related mantle plume(s) through the Cenozoic, and the change at c. 54 Ma from a long period of continental rifting and thinning of sea- floor spreading. However, despite the number of data available, the temporal and physio-chemical ties between NAIP rocks, hotspot motion and continental break-up have not been demonstrated to fit a single regionally applicable and consistent geodynamic model. For example, discrepancies between recent palaeomagnetic poles from western Greenland and the Faeroe Islands (Riisager et al. 2002a,b) and older data from the British Tertiary Igneous Province (BTIP) have questioned the reliability of the latest. Therefore, to ultimately understand the Tertiary evolution of the North Atlantic, extensive palaeomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar sampling on the lava fields of the British Igneous Provinces (Isle of Skye, Isle of Mull, Antrim Plateau) has been initiated. Our findings are in agreement with older published poles from the BTIP and support

  9. The Eastern Iowa Community College District Program Evaluation Process: A Vital and Practical Tool for Ensuring Program Relevancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Janice Nahra

    The process developed and implemented by the Eastern Iowa Community College District (EICCD) to evaluate its vocational and technical programs is described. The process provides for the flow of information and recommendations from the faculty through administrative ranks to the Chancellor of the District. The EICCD is comprised of three colleges…

  10. Processing Coordinated Verb Phrases: The Relevance of Lexical-Semantic, Conceptual, and Contextual Information towards Establishing Verbal Parallelism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutunjian, Damon A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the influence of lexical-semantic representations, conceptual similarity, and contextual fit on the processing of coordinated verb phrases. The study integrates information gleaned from current linguistic theory with current psycholinguistic approaches to examining the processing of coordinated verb phrases. It has…

  11. IGNEOUS INTRUSION IMPACTS ON WASTE PACKAGES AND WASTE FORMS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bernot

    2004-04-19

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The models are based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. The models described in this report constitute the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA (BSC 2004 [DIRS:167796]) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2003 [DIRS: 166296]). The technical work plan was prepared in accordance with AP-2.27Q, Planning for Science Activities. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the following sections as they occur. The TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model assessments: (1) Mechanical and thermal impacts of basalt magma intrusion on the invert, waste packages and waste forms of the intersected emplacement drifts of Zone 1. (2) Temperature and pressure trends of basaltic magma intrusion intersecting Zone 1 and their potential effects on waste packages and waste forms in Zone 2 emplacement drifts. (3) Deleterious volatile gases, exsolving from the intruded basalt magma and their potential effects on waste packages of Zone 2 emplacement drifts. (4) Post-intrusive physical

  12. Relevance of the time-quasi-polynomials in the classic linear thermodynamic theory of coupled transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, Cs.; Kirschner, I.; Bálint, Á.

    2014-07-01

    A general description of the basic system of ordinary differential equations of coupled transport processes is given within framework of a linear approximation and treated by tools of matrix analysis and group representation theory. It is shown that the technique of hyperdyads directly generalizes the method of simple dyadic decomposition of operators used earlier in the classical linear irreversible thermodynamics and leads to possible new applications of the concept of quasi-polynomials at descriptions of coupled transport processes.

  13. Complete Analytical Data for Samples of Jurassic Igneous Rocks in the Bald Mountain Mining District, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents all petrographic, major oxide, and trace element data for a set of 109 samples collected during an investigation of Jurassic igneous rocks in the Bald Mountain mining district, Nevada. Igneous rocks in the district include the Bald Mountain stock, quartz-feldspar porphyry dikes, basaltic andesite dikes, aplite sills, and rare lamprophyre dikes. These rocks, although variably altered near intrusion-related mineral deposits, are fresh in many parts of the district. Igneous rocks in the district are hosted by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks.

  14. Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    F. Perry; B. Youngs

    2000-11-06

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model (AMR) report is twofold. (1) The first is to present a conceptual framework of igneous activity in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) consistent with the volcanic and tectonic history of this region and the assessment of this history by experts who participated in the Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Analysis (PVHA) (CRWMS M&O 1996). Conceptual models presented in the PVHA are summarized and extended in areas in which new information has been presented. Alternative conceptual models are discussed as well as their impact on probability models. The relationship between volcanic source zones defined in the PVHA and structural features of the YMR are described based on discussions in the PVHA and studies presented since the PVHA. (2) The second purpose of the AMR is to present probability calculations based on PVHA outputs. Probability distributions are presented for the length and orientation of volcanic dikes within the repository footprint and for the number of eruptive centers located within the repository footprint (conditional on the dike intersecting the repository). The probability of intersection of a basaltic dike within the repository footprint was calculated in the AMR ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (CRWMS M&O 2000g) based on the repository footprint known as the Enhanced Design Alternative [EDA II, Design B (CRWMS M&O 1999a; Wilkins and Heath 1999)]. Then, the ''Site Recommendation Design Baseline'' (CRWMS M&O 2000a) initiated a change in the repository design, which is described in the ''Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Consequently, the probability of intersection of a basaltic dike within the repository footprint has also been calculated for the current repository footprint, which is called the 70,000 Metric Tons of Uranium (MTU) No-Backfill Layout (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The calculations for both footprints are presented in this AMR. In addition, the

  15. Perceived Parenting Dimensions and Identity Styles: Exploring the Socialization of Adolescents' Processing of Identity-Relevant Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Ilse; Soenens, Bart; Luyckx, Koen; Duriez, Bart; Berzonsky, Michael; Goossens, Luc

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between crucial dimensions of perceived parenting (support, behavioral control, and psychological control) and the three identity styles defined by Berzonsky [Berzonsky, M. D. (1990). "Self-construction over the life span: A process perspective on identity formation." "Advances in Personal Construct…

  16. Seeing (and Inferring) is Believing: Using the Nature of Science to reinforce process skills and teach relevant science content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egge, Noah; Bell, Randy

    2010-05-01

    If science education can be compared to building a house, then conceptually it can be divided into three parts: content knowledge, process skills, and nature of science or science as a way of thinking. The basis of understanding any discipline begins with the accumulation of facts, theories and concepts. These are the building blocks which are used to construct and strengthen a foundation. Next are the investigatory processes and the methods; these are the tools necessary to create new knowledge and enable students to strengthen and expand their foundation. Closely linked with processes and methods are the values and assumptions that are intertwined with interpretations and conclusions. Students must be taught that science is not infallible or an absolute field. Theories and relationships are created and refuted based on the availability of data, and are heavily laden with personal and cultural bias. Teachers need to emphasize the importance of the different aspects of the nature of science—for example the connection between creativity and science—so that students will know there is not merely a single set of blueprints to build the house but an infinite number that merely await discovery. In the United States, the National Science Education Standards recognize the importance of the nature of science as an instructional objective. As a consequence many states have incorporated the nature of science into their standards. In this presentation we will clarify what is meant by "nature of science" and relate it to the more traditional topics of science content and process skills. The focus of the presentation will be on introducing a sequence of teacher-tested activities designed for middle and secondary school students. These activities address specific aspects of the nature of science; they are designed to be engaging and student-centered and to link abstract concepts of the nature of science to more familiar science process-skills.

  17. Thermal diffusivity of igneous rocks at elevated pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Mirkovich, V.V.; Heard, H.C.

    1987-10-10

    Thermal diffusivity measurements of seven igneous rocks were made to temperatures of 400 /sup 0/C and pressures of 200 MPa. The measuring method was based on the concept of cylindrical symmetry and periodic heat pulses. The seven rocks measured were Westerly (Rhode Island) granite, Climax Stock (Nevada) quartz monzonite, Pomona (Washington) basalt, Atikokan (Ontario, Canada) granite, Creighton (Ontario, Canada) gabbro, East Bull Lake (Ontario, Canada) gabbro, and Stripa (Sweden) granite. The diffusivity of all the rocks showed a positive linear dependence on inverse temperature and, excluding the East Bull Lake gabbro, showed a linear dependence on quartz content. (Quartz content varied from 0 to 31% by volume.) Diffusivity in all cases rose or remained steady with increasing confining pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at lowest pressures and vanished by levels between 10 and 100 MPa, depending on rock type. The pressure effect (measured as a percentage change in diffusivity) is stronger in the four rocks of granite composition than in the three of basaltic composition. Our results agree well with existing thermal diffusivity measurements at atmospheric pressure.

  18. Calcium isotopes in igneous rocks and the origin of granite

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.D.; DePaolo, D.J. )

    1989-04-01

    The K-Ca radioactive parent-daughter system provides a tool for tracing the origins of igneous rocks. It is complementary to other isotopic systems because as stoichiometric constituents of major minerals, the concentrations of K and Ca, and the K/Ca ratio in rocks, are simply related to mineralogy. In this paper the authors report the first high-precision calcium isotopic analyses of continental granitic rocks, island arc rocks, and mid-ocean ridge basalts. These data show that mid-ocean ridge basalts have the low {sup 40}Ca/{sup 42}Ca ratios expected for the Earth's mantle, but that island arc rocks have slightly higher {sup 40}Ca/{sup 42}Co ratios indicative of crustal calcium in their magma sources. Many granitic rocks have high initial {sup 40}Ca/{sup 42}Ca ratios, and in conjunction with independent evidence for the age of the crustal sources, these ratios provide constraints on the K/Ca ratios, and in turn on the silica contents and residual mineralogy, of the deep crustal magma sources.

  19. The Igneous SPICEs Suite: Old Programs with a New Look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the chemistry of magma is important for understanding how the planets differentiated into crusts, rocky mantles, and metallic cores. Magma formation and crystallization can be modeled using computer programs. A valuable and useful set of programs was developed by John Longhi (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, New York). John Longhi generously shared these programs widely with colleagues, but they were written in Fortran by John for his own use, and not as user-friendly research tools. As a major part of my Masters thesis at the University of Notre Dame, I was using the programs to do numerous calculations of the crystallization of the lunar magma ocean, the deep, global magma layer surrounding the Moon when it formed. It occurred to me that it would make my life easier if the programs were more straightforward, so working with others at Notre Dame and elsewhere, including John Longhi, I converted the programs for use with MATLAB, a powerful mathematical program. The revisions (Simulating Planetary Igneous Crystallization Environments, SPICEs) have a simple graphical interface for ease of input and output, yet use the same rigorous calculations in the original Longhi programs. My goal is to make the programs more widely used for research and education.

  20. Large Igneous Provinces, Sulfur Aerosols, and Initiation of Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, F. A.; Wordsworth, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The events that led to the initiation of Snowball Earth remain poorly understood. Proposed scenarios include a methane addiction, a biological innovation that led to an increase in organic carbon burial and anaerobic remineralization, or an increase in global weatherability due to a paleogeography with a preponderance of low latitude continents, and the subareal implacement of large igneous provinces (LIPs) at the equator. The Franklin LIP was emplaced between 730 and 710 Ma and covers an area of over 2.25 Mkm2 with lavas, sills, and dikes extending over much of northern Laurentia from Alaska through northern Canada to Greenland and potentially to Siberia. The most precise geochronological constraints on the Franklin LIP overlap with the onset of the Sturtian Snowball Earth glaciation, which began between 717 and 716 Ma and marked the first glaciation in over 1 billion years. The Franklin LIP is the largest preserved Neoproterozoic LIP and one of the largest in Earth History. Additionally, it was emplaced at equatorial latitudes with associated sills that invaded epicontinental sulfur evaporite basins, potentially maximizing environmental effects. Here we explore the hypothesis that the Sturtian Snowball Earth was initiated in part by an increase in planetary albedo from the conversion of volcanic SO2/H2S emissions to tropospheric and stratospheric sulfate aerosols through a combination of geochemical and modeling studies.

  1. Intentional action processing results from automatic bottom-up attention: An EEG-investigation into the Social Relevance Hypothesis using hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Eleonore; Brown, Elliot C; Lee-Grimm, Sie-In; Newen, Albert; Brüne, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Social stimuli grab our attention. However, it has rarely been investigated how variations in attention affect the processing of social stimuli, although the answer could help us uncover details of social cognition processes such as action understanding. In the present study, we examined how changes to bottom-up attention affects neural EEG-responses associated with intentional action processing. We induced an increase in bottom-up attention by using hypnosis. We recorded the electroencephalographic μ-wave suppression of hypnotized participants when presented with intentional actions in first and third person perspective in a video-clip paradigm. Previous studies have shown that the μ-rhythm is selectively suppressed both when executing and observing goal-directed motor actions; hence it can be used as a neural signal for intentional action processing. Our results show that neutral hypnotic trance increases μ-suppression in highly suggestible participants when they observe intentional actions. This suggests that social action processing is enhanced when bottom-up attentional processes are predominant. Our findings support the Social Relevance Hypothesis, according to which social action processing is a bottom-up driven attentional process, and can thus be altered as a function of bottom-up processing devoted to a social stimulus. PMID:26998562

  2. Neutron capture reactions relevant to the s and p processes in the region of the N =50 shell closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Saumi; Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    2016-08-01

    The radiative neutron capture cross sections for nuclei participating in the s -process and the p -process nucleosynthesis in and around the N =50 closed neutron shell have been calculated in a statistical semimicroscopic Hauser-Feshbach approach for the energy range of astrophysical interest. A folded optical-model potential is constructed utilizing the standard DDM3Y real nucleon-nucleon interaction. The folding of the interaction with target radial matter densities, obtained from the relativistic mean-field theory, is done in coordinate space using the spherical approximation. The standard nuclear reaction code talys1.8 is used for cross-section calculation. The cross sections are compared with experimental results. Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for a number of selected nuclei are also presented.

  3. Quantifying planetary limits of Earth system processes relevant to human activity using a thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Food, water, and energy play, obviously, a central role in maintaining human activity. In this contribution, I derive estimates for the fundamental limits on the rates by which these resources are provided by Earth system processes and the levels at which these can be used sustainably. The key idea here is that these resources are, directly or indirectly, generated out of the energy associated with the absorption of sunlight, and that the energy conversions from sunlight to other forms ultimately limit the generation of these resources. In order to derive these conversion limits, we need to trace the links between the processes that generate food, water and energy to the absorption of sunlight. The resource "food" results from biomass production by photosynthesis, which requires light and a sufficient magnitude of gas exchange of carbon dioxide at the surface, which is maintained by atmospheric motion which in turn is generated out of differential radiative heating and cooling. The resource "water" is linked to hydrologic cycling, with its magnitude being linked to the latent heat flux of the surface energy balance and water vapor transport in the atmosphere which is also driven by differential radiative heating and cooling. The availability of (renewable) energy is directly related to the generation of different forms of energy of climate system processes, such as the kinetic energy of atmospheric motion, which, again, relates to radiative heating differences. I use thermodynamics and its limits as a basis to establish the planetary limits of these processes and use a simple model to derive first-order estimates. These estimates compare quite well with observations, suggesting that this thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system provides an objective, physical basis to define and quantify planetary boundaries as well as the factors that shape these boundaries.

  4. Summing NaI(Tl) detector (SuN) for radioactive beam experiments relevant for the p-process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Anna; Beskin, Ilya; Liddick, Sean; Padmanabhan, Karthik; Peace, Jessica; Quinn, Stephen; Spyrou, Artemis; Stefanek, Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    P-process refers to (γ,p), (γ, α) and (γ,n) reactions producing nuclei on the neutron-deficient side of the valley of stability that cannot be reached by s- and r-processes. This process can be investigated via inversed reactions, i.e. proton or alpha capture with gamma emission. Gamma spectra resulting from capture reactions, may be complicated in structure and as such difficult to analyze. However, this difficulty may be omitted by implementing a summing technique, for which all gamma rays emitted during the decay cascade are summed into one peak, so called ``sum peak.'' Thus, in ideal case, the resulting spectrum will comprise of one peak of the energy E = Ecm+Q. This technique has already been successfully tested during stable beam experiments. In order to apply this technique to radioactive beam experiments a new Summing NaI(Tl) (SuN) detector was designed at NSCL. It is a 16x16 inch cylindrical barrel divided into eight optically separated segments, each of them read by three photomultipliers. Each of the PMTs is read independently by a digital data acquisition system (DDAS) and the final sum spectrum is obtained by software summing of the individual spectra. Here, first results obtained with the SuN detector as well as its possible future applications will be presented.

  5. Workshop on Evolution of Igneous Asteroids: Focus on Vesta and the HED Meteorites. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W. (Editor); Papike, James J. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Evolution of Igneous Asteroids: Focus on Vesta and the HED Meteorites, October 16-18, 1996, in Houston, Texas.

  6. Recrystallized Impact Glasses of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Sudbury Structure, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Weiser, T.; Brockmeyer, P.

    1996-01-01

    The origin of the Sudbury Structure and of the associated heterolithic breccias of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex have been controversial. While an impact origin of the structure has gained wide acceptance over the last 15 years, the origin of the recrystallized Onaping Formation glasses and of the igneous complex is still being debated. Recently the interpretation of the breccias of the Onaping Formation as suevitic fall-back impact breccias has been challenged. The igneous complex is interpreted either as a differentiated impact melt sheet or as a combination of an upper impact melt represented by the granophyre, and a lower, impact-triggered magmatic body consisting of the norite-sublayer formations. The Onaping Formation contains glasses as fluidal and nonfluidal fragments of various shapes and sizes. They are recrystallized, and our research indicates that they are petrographically heterogeneous and span a wide range of chemical compositions. These characteristics are not known from glasses of volcanic deposits. This suggests an origin by shock vitrification, an interpretation consistent with their association with numerous and varied country rock clasts that exhibit microscopic shock metamorphic features. The recrystallized glass fragments represent individual solid-state and liquid-state vitrified rocks or relatively small melt pods. The basal member lies beneath the Gray and Black members of the Onaping Formation and, where not metamorphic, has an igneous matrix. Igneous-textured melt bodies occur in the upper two members and above the Basal Member. A comparison of the chemical compositions of recrystallized glasses and of the matrices of the Basal Member and the melt bodies with the components and the bulk composition of the igneous complex is inconclusive as to the origin of the igneous complex. Basal Member matrix and Melt Bodies, on average, are chemically similar to the granophyre of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, suggesting that

  7. Modeling pCO{sub 2} in the upper ocean: A review of relevant physical, chemical, and biological processes

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    The pCO{sub 2} of the surface ocean is controlled by a combination of physical, chemical, and biological processes. Modeling surface ocean pCO{sub 2} is analogous to modeling sea surface temperature (SST), in that sea surface pCO{sub 2} is affected by fluxes across the air-sea interface and by exchange with deeper water. However, pCO{sub 2} is also affected by chemical and biological processes which have no analog in SST. Seawater pCO{sub 2} is buffered by pH equilibrium reactions between the species CO{sub 2}, HCO{sub 3}-, and CO{sub 3}{sup =}. This effect provides an effective reservoir for CO{sub 2} in seawater that is 10 times larger than it would be for an unbuffered gas. The equilibrium between dissolved and atmospheric CO{sub 2} is sensitive to temperature, tending to higher pCO{sub 2} in warmer water. Biological export of carbon as sinking particles maintains a gradient of pCO{sub 2}, with lower values near the surface (this processes is called the {open_quotes}biological pump{close_quotes}). In most of the ocean, biological activity removes all of the available nutrients from the surface water; that is, the rate of carbon export in these locations is limited by the rate of nutrient supply to the euphotic zone. However, in much of the high-latitude oceans, primary production does not deplete the euphotic zone of nutrients, a fact to which the atmospheric pCO{sub 2} is extraordinarily sensitive. Understanding the limits to phytoplankton growth in the high latitudes, and how these limits might change under different climatic regimes, is essential to prediction of future ocean uptake of fossil fuel CO{sub 2}.

  8. Attention effects on the processing of task-relevant and task-irrelevant speech sounds and letters

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Maria; Inauri, Karina; Huovilainen, Tatu; Leminen, Miika; Salo, Emma; Rinne, Teemu; Kujala, Teija; Alho, Kimmo

    2013-01-01

    We used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to study effects of selective attention on the processing of attended and unattended spoken syllables and letters. Participants were presented with syllables randomly occurring in the left or right ear and spoken by different voices and with a concurrent foveal stream of consonant letters written in darker or lighter fonts. During auditory phonological (AP) and non-phonological tasks, they responded to syllables in a designated ear starting with a vowel and spoken by female voices, respectively. These syllables occurred infrequently among standard syllables starting with a consonant and spoken by male voices. During visual phonological and non-phonological tasks, they responded to consonant letters with names starting with a vowel and to letters written in dark fonts, respectively. These letters occurred infrequently among standard letters with names starting with a consonant and written in light fonts. To examine genuine effects of attention and task on ERPs not overlapped by ERPs associated with target processing or deviance detection, these effects were studied only in ERPs to auditory and visual standards. During selective listening to syllables in a designated ear, ERPs to the attended syllables were negatively displaced during both phonological and non-phonological auditory tasks. Selective attention to letters elicited an early negative displacement and a subsequent positive displacement (Pd) of ERPs to attended letters being larger during the visual phonological than non-phonological task suggesting a higher demand for attention during the visual phonological task. Active suppression of unattended speech during the AP and non-phonological tasks and during the visual phonological tasks was suggested by a rejection positivity (RP) to unattended syllables. We also found evidence for suppression of the processing of task-irrelevant visual stimuli in visual ERPs during auditory tasks involving left-ear syllables

  9. Chemical weathering on Mars - Thermodynamic stabilities of primary minerals /and their alteration products/ from mafic igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Chemical weathering on Mars is examined theoretically from the standpoint of thermodynamic equilibrium between primary rock-forming minerals and the atmospheric gases O2, H2O, and CO2. The primary minerals considered are those common to mafic igneous rocks and include olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, troilite, pyrrhotite, and apatite. The importance of kinetics and reaction mechanisms in controlling possible weathering processes on Mars is discussed within the limits of currently available data, and the possible influence of liquid water on Martian weathering processes is evaluated where appropriate. For gas-solid weathering of mafic igneous rocks at the Martian surface, it is concluded that upon attainment of thermodynamic equilibrium: (1) oxides and carbonates should dominate the mineral assemblage of weathering products; (2) hematite rather than goethite should be the stable mineral form of Fe (III); (3) FeSO4 or FeSO4.H2O could be the stable weathering product of iron sulfides in the absence of liquid water; and (4) kaolinite is apparently the only clay mineral that should be thermodynamically stable over all ranges of temperature and water-vapor abundance at the Martian surface.

  10. Depletion of nucleus accumbens dopamine leads to impaired reward and aversion processing in mice: Relevance to motivation pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, Giorgio; Sigrist, Hannes; Ferger, Boris; Singewald, Nicolas; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, particularly the ventral tegmental area-nucleus accumbens (VTA-NAcc) projection, underlies reward and aversion processing, and deficient DA function could underlie motivational impairments in psychiatric disorders. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection is an established method for chronic DA depletion, principally applied in rat to study NAcc DA regulation of reward motivation. Given the increasing focus on studying environmental and genetic regulation of DA function in mouse models, it is important to establish the effects of 6-OHDA DA depletion in mice, in terms of reward and aversion processing. This mouse study investigated effects of 6-OHDA-induced NAcc DA depletion using the operant behavioural test battery of progressive ratio schedule (PRS), learned non-reward (LNR), learned helplessness (LH), treadmill, and in addition Pavlovian fear conditioning. 6-OHDA NAcc DA depletion, confirmed by ex vivo HPLC-ED, reduced operant responding: for gustatory reward under effortful conditions in the PRS test; to a stimulus recently associated with gustatory non-reward in the LNR test; to escape footshock recently experienced as uncontrollable in the LH test; and to avoid footshock by physical effort in the treadmill test. Evidence for specificity of effects to NAcc DA was provided by lack of effect of medial prefrontal cortex DA depletion in the LNR and LH tests. These findings add significantly to the evidence that NAcc DA is a major regulator of behavioural responding, particularly at the motivational level, to both reward and aversion. They demonstrate the suitability of mouse models for translational study of causation and reversal of pathophysiological DA function underlying motivation psychopathologies. PMID:27036890