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Sample records for ii collected chemical

  1. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  2. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  3. Current Evaluation of the Millennium Phytomedicine— Ginseng (II): Collected Chemical Entities, Modern Pharmacology, and Clinical Applications Emanated from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lee; Zhao, Yuqing; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2009-01-01

    This review, a sequel to part 1 in the series, collects about 107 chemical entities separated from the roots, leaves and flower buds of Panax ginseng, quinquefolius and notoginseng, and categorizes these entities into about 18 groups based on their structural similarity. The bioactivities of these chemical entities are described. The ‘Yin and Yang’ theory and the fundamentals of the ‘five elements’ applied to the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) are concisely introduced to help readers understand how ginseng balances the dynamic equilibrium of human physiological processes from the TCM perspectives. This paper concerns the observation and experimental investigation of biological activities of ginseng used in the TCM of past and present cultures. The current biological findings of ginseng and its medical applications are narrated and critically discussed, including 1) its antihyperglycemic effect that may benefit type II diabetics; in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated protection of ginseng on beta-cells and obese diabetic mouse models. The related clinical trial results are stated. 2) its aphrodisiac effect and cardiovascular effect that partially attribute to ginseng’s bioactivity on nitric oxide (NO); 3) its cognitive effect and neuropharmacological effect that are intensively tested in various rat models using purified ginsenosides and show a hope to treat Parkinson’s disease (PD); 4) its uses as an adjuvant or immunotherapeutic agent to enhance immune activity, appetite and life quality of cancer patients during their chemotherapy and radiation. Although the apoptotic effect of ginsenosides, especially Rh2, Rg3 and Compound K, on various tumor cells has been shown via different pathways, their clinical effectiveness remains to be tested. This paper also updates the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and immune-stimulatory activities of ginseng, its ingredients and commercial products, as well as common side effects of ginseng mainly due to its overdose, and its pharmacokinetics. PMID:19689273

  4. Type I and II ?-turns prediction using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2014-07-01

    A method for predicting type I and II ?-turns using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts is proposed. Isolated ?-turn chemical-shift data were collected from 1,798 protein chains. One-dimensional statistical analyses on chemical-shift data of three classes ?-turn (type I, II, and VIII) showed different distributions at four positions, (i) to (i + 3). Considering the central two residues of type I ?-turns, the mean values of C?, C?, H(N), and N(H) chemical shifts were generally (i + 1) > (i + 2). The mean values of C? and H? chemical shifts were (i + 1) < (i + 2). The distributions of the central two residues in type II and VIII ?-turns were also distinguishable by trends of chemical shift values. Two-dimensional cluster analyses on chemical-shift data show positional distributions more clearly. Based on these propensities of chemical shift classified as a function of position, rules were derived using scoring matrices for four consecutive residues to predict type I and II ?-turns. The proposed method achieves an overall prediction accuracy of 83.2 and 84.2% with the Matthews correlation coefficient values of 0.317 and 0.632 for type I and II ?-turns, indicating that its higher accuracy for type II turn prediction. The results show that it is feasible to use NMR chemical shifts to predict the ?-turn types in proteins. The proposed method can be incorporated into other chemical-shift based protein secondary structure prediction methods. PMID:24838372

  5. Collective surfing of chemically active particles.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J

    2014-03-28

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures. PMID:24724685

  6. Collective Surfing of Chemically Active Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures.

  7. COLLECTION OF SULFUR GASES WITH CHEMICALLY-TREATED FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically treated membrane filters were evaluated to collect hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. Four chemical treatments were tested. Silver nitrate and silver nitrate-tartaric acid filters were used to collect hydrogen sulfide, and lithium hydroxide and potassium bicarbonate ...

  8. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes II Table II-2 to Subpart II Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt....

  9. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes II Table II-2 to Subpart II Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt....

  10. Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  11. Featured collection introduction: contaminants of emerging concern II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Kolok, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This collection of 13 articles focuses on CECs, and each of the articles highlights a specific aspect of this broad topic. The articles were solicited from researchers who participated in the second summer specialty conference on this topic, organized by the American Water Resources Association. The title of the conference was “CECs in Water Resources II: Research, Engineering and Community Action,” and the conference, as well as the articles in this featured collection, focus on a better and more comprehensive understanding of these contaminants. The conference was held in Denver, Colorado, on June 25-27, 2012, and approximately 125 conference attendees participated in an interdisciplinary forum of more than 75 presentations including keynote or plenary presentations by Dana Kolpin, Jorg Drewes, Heiko Schoenfuss, Chris Metcalfe, Vicki Blazer, and Tyrone Hayes. The first conference was held in 2007 and also produced a featured collection of articles (Battaglin and Kolpin, 2009).

  12. Adsorption study of copper (II) by chemically modified orange peel.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ningchuan; Guo, Xueyi; Liang, Sha

    2009-05-30

    An adsorbent, the chemically modified orange peel, was prepared from hydrolysis of the grafted copolymer, which was synthesized by interaction of methyl acrylate with cross-linking orange peel. The presence of poly (acrylic acid) on the biomass surface was verified by infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Total negative charge in the biomass surface and the zeta potentials were determined. The modified biomass was found to present high adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate for Cu (II). From Langmuir isotherm, the adsorption capacity for Cu (II) was 289.0 mg g(-1), which is about 6.5 times higher than that of the unmodified biomass. The kinetics for Cu (II) adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The adsorbent was used to remove Cu (II) from electroplating wastewater and was suitable for repeated use for more than four cycles. PMID:19081180

  13. Onset of Collective Oscillation in Chemical Turbulence under Global Feedback

    E-print Network

    Yoji Kawamura; Yoshiki Kuramoto

    2007-05-27

    Preceding the complete suppression of chemical turbulence by means of global feedback, a different universal type of transition, which is characterized by the emergence of small-amplitude collective oscillation with strong turbulent background, is shown to occur at much weaker feedback intensity. We illustrate this fact numerically in combination with a phenomenological argument based on the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with global feedback.

  14. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively.

  15. Strippable coatings for forensic collection of trace chemicals from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Beltis, Kevin J; Drennan, Paul M; Jakubowski, Michael J; Pindzola, Bradford A

    2012-12-18

    Surface sampling for chemical analysis plays a vital role in applications like environmental monitoring, industrial hygiene, homeland security, and forensics. The standard surface sampling tool is a simple cotton gauze pad, but as techniques become more sensitive and the variety of analytes increases, gauze is failing to meet the needs of the community. Here, the collection of eight small molecules from glass surfaces with three different commercial spray-on, strippable coatings was demonstrated and their collection efficiency, as measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, was compared to that of a standard cotton gauze. The three coating systems recovered 87-95% of the each compound, on average, from a nominal initial surface coverage of 0.1 g/m(2) per analyte. These recoveries were 3-fold better than the cotton gauze which had an average collection efficiency of 31%. PMID:23157576

  16. Appendix C. Collection of Samples for Chemical Agent Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, C; Thompson, C; Doerr, T; Scripsick, R

    2005-09-23

    This chapter describes procedures for the collection and analysis of samples of various matrices for the purpose of determining the presence of chemical agents in a civilian setting. This appendix is intended to provide the reader with sufficient information to make informed decisions about the sampling and analysis process and to suggest analytical strategies that might be implemented by the scientists performing sampling and analysis. This appendix is not intended to be used as a standard operating procedure to provide detailed instructions as to how trained scientists should handle samples. Chemical agents can be classified by their physical and chemical properties. Table 1 lists the chemical agents considered by this report. In selecting sampling and analysis methods, we have considered procedures proposed by the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and peer-reviewed scientific literature. EPA analytical methods are good resources describing issues of quality assurance with respect to chain-of-custody, sample handling, and quality control requirements.

  17. 78 FR 41785 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program Initiatives AGENCY... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Implementation of Title I/II Program... Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 6,573. Abstract: The Implementation of Title I/II...

  18. 77 FR 22559 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Chemical Weapons Convention Provisions of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ...Collection; Comment Request; Chemical Weapons Convention Provisions of the Export Administration...INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) is a multilateral arms...achieve an international ban on chemical weapons (CW). The CWC prohibits the use,...

  19. 78 FR 74173 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests: Heritage Health Index II on the State of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests: Heritage Health Index II on... of the Heritage Health Index II on the State of America's Collections (HHI II) is to assess the state.... Title: Heritage Health Index II on the State of America's Collections (HHI II). OMB Number: To...

  20. NOTES ON THE KIVA-II SOFTWARE AND CHEMICALLY REACTIVE FLUID MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    Holst, Michael J.

    NOTES ON THE KIVA-II SOFTWARE AND CHEMICALLY REACTIVE FLUID MECHANICS MICHAEL J. HOLST Numerical, California #12;NOTES ON THE KIVA-II SOFTWARE AND CHEMICALLY REACTIVE FLUID MECHANICS Michael J. Holst intro- duction to continuum mechanics, to fluid mechanics, and to the mechanics of chemically reactive

  1. Improved Devices for Collecting Sweat for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feedback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2011-01-01

    Improved devices have been proposed for collecting sweat for biochemical analysis - especially for determination of the concentration of Ca2+ ions in sweat as a measure of loss of Ca from bones. Unlike commercially available sweat-collection patches used previously in monitoring osteoporosis and in qualitative screening for some drugs, the proposed devices would not allow evaporation of the volatile chemical components (mostly water) of sweat. Moreover, the proposed devices would be designed to enable determination of the volumes of collected sweat. From these volumes and the quantities of Ca(2+) and/or other analytes as determined by other means summarized below, one could determine the concentrations of the analytes in sweat. A device according to the proposal would be flexible and would be worn like a commercial sweat-collection patch. It would be made of molded polydimethylsiloxane (silicone rubber) or other suitable material having properties that, for the purpose of analyzing sweat, are similar to those of glass. The die for molding the silicone rubber would be fabricated by a combination of lithography and electroplating. The die would reproducibly form, in the silicone rubber, a precisely defined number of capillary channels per unit area, each channel having a precisely defined volume. Optionally, electrodes for measuring the Ca(2+) content of the sweat could be incorporated into the device. The volume of sweat collected in the capillary channels of the device would be determined from (1) the amount of light or radio waves of a given wavelength absorbed by the device and (2) the known geometry of the array of capillary channels. Then, in one of two options, centrifugation would be performed to move the sweat from the capillary tubes to the region containing the electrodes, which would be used to measure the Ca(2+) content by a standard technique. In the other option, centrifugation would be performed to remove the sweat from the device to make the sweat available to other analytical instruments for measuring concentrations of substances other than Ca(2+).

  2. Improved Devices for Collecting Sweat for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2011-01-01

    Improved devices have been proposed for collecting sweat for biochemical analysis especially for determination of the concentration of Ca2+ ions in sweat as a measure of loss of Ca from bones. Unlike commercially available sweat-collection patches used previously in monitoring osteoporosis and in qualitative screening for some drugs, the proposed devices would not allow evaporation of the volatile chemical components (mostly water) of sweat. Moreover, the proposed devices would be designed to enable determination of the volumes of collected sweat. From these volumes and the quantities of Ca2+ and/or other analytes as determined by other means summarized below, one could determine the concentrations of the analytes in sweat. A device according to the proposal would be flexible and would be worn like a commercial sweat-collection patch. It would be made of molded polydimethylsiloxane (silicone rubber) or other suitable material having properties that, for the purpose of analyzing sweat, are similar to those of glass. The die for molding the silicone rubber would be fabricated by a combination of lithography and electroplating. The die would reproducibly form, in the silicone rubber, a precisely defined number of capillary channels per unit area, each channel having a precisely defined volume. Optionally, electrodes for measuring the Ca2+ content of the sweat could be incorporated into the device. The volume of sweat collected in the capillary channels of the device would be determined from (1) the amount of light or radio waves of a given wavelength absorbed by the device and (2) the known geometry of the array of capillary channels. Then, in one of two options, centrifugation would be performed to move the sweat from the capillary tubes to the region containing the electrodes, which would be used to measure the Ca2+ content by a standard technique. In the other option, centrifugation would be performed to remove the sweat from the device to make the sweat available to other analytical instruments for measuring concentrations of substances other than Ca2+.

  3. Chemical profile of size-fractionated soils collected in a semiarid industrial area of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Del Mastro, Anabella; Pereyra, Marcelo; Londonio, Agustín; Pereyra, Victoria; Rebagliati, Raúl Jiménez; Dawidowski, Laura; Gómez, Darío; Smichowski, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the chemical profile of soil collected in Bahía Blanca (Argentina). In this industrial city, semiarid soils are affected by different industrial and agricultural activities, the presence of a saltpeter extraction facility, traffic and increasing urbanization. Sixteen soil samples (superficial and sub-superficial) were collected. Samples were sieved in two fractions (A < 37 ?m, and 37 < B < 50 ?m) before elemental analysis. Major, minor and trace elements namely, Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Ti, V and Zn were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Anions (Cl-, F-, SO42-) and cations (K+, Na+ and NH4+) were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after an aqueous extraction. As expected, crustal elements namely, Al, Ca, Fe, Mg and Ti exhibited the highest concentrations. Mean elemental concentration ranged from <0.3 ?g g-1 (Sb) to 14.6 ± 0.6% (Ca). Ions concentrations in the soluble fraction measured at mg g-1 levels were in the order Cl- > Na+ ? SO42- > K+ > NO3-. Three indicators, namely, (i) coefficient of variation, (ii) coefficient of divergence and (iii) ratio of elemental concentration with respect to Ca were used to assess chemical, spatial and inter-profile variability. Chloride > Ca > Na+ > Mo > SO42-, dominated the variability indicating that these are key chemical markers for future assessment of crustal contribution to airborne particles in the area. The ratios Xi/Ca allowed discriminating the soil of the semi-arid region surrounding Bahía Blanca. The chemical profiles obtained in this study, particularly those of topsoil, will be a key input to characterize soil resuspension and its contribution to airborne particulate matter in a forthcoming receptor model analysis.

  4. 78 FR 17680 - Information Collection Request; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ...collection, the categories of respondents, the estimated burden (in hours), and the estimated burden cost necessary to implement the Chemical...of High-Risk Chemical Facilities [cir] Estimated Number of Affected Individuals at Each...

  5. 77 FR 22559 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Chemical Weapons Convention Provisions of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Chemical Weapons Convention Provisions of the Export Administration Regulations AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security...) 482-4895, Lawrence.Hall@bis.doc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Chemical...

  6. 77 FR 59891 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Chemical Weapons Convention Declaration and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Chemical Weapons Convention Declaration and Report Handbook and Forms AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security. ACTION: Notice...@bis.doc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: ] I. Abstract The Chemical Weapons Convention...

  7. Chemical fingerprinting of petroleum biomarkers in Deepwater Horizon oil spill samples collected from Alabama shoreline

    E-print Network

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Chemical fingerprinting of petroleum biomarkers in Deepwater Horizon oil spill samples collected the chromatographic signatures of petroleum biomarkers in Deepwater Horizon (DH) source oil, three other reference

  8. Chemical Pathways Connecting Lead(II) Iodide and Perovskite via Polymeric Plumbate(II) Fiber.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yunlong; Shoyama, Kazutaka; Sato, Wataru; Matsuo, Yutaka; Inoue, Kento; Harano, Koji; Liu, Chao; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2015-12-23

    Despite tremendous progress in optoelectronic devices using lead perovskite (CH3NH3(+)PbI3(-)), there has been a paucity of mechanistic information on how photoactive micron-sized crystals of lead perovskite grow from a mixture of a layered crystal of lead(II) iodide and methylammonium iodide mediated by a polar solvent, DMSO or DMF. We report here that the whole process of the lead perovskite synthesis consists of a series of equilibria driven by reversible solvent participation involving a polymeric strip of plumbate(II) oligomer as a key intermediate. A significant finding includes quick decomposition of perovskite crystal upon exposure to DMSO or DMF at room temperature, where the solvent molecules act as a base to remove acidic ammonium iodide from the perovskite crystal. This observation accounts for the difficulty in controlling perovskite solar cell fabrication. Overall, the polar solvent is indispensible first to degrade a 2-D sheet of crystals of lead(II) iodide into 1-D fibrous intermediates and then to promote Oswald ripening of perovskite crystals. The detailed chemical information provided here will help to rationalize the photovoltaic device studies that have so far remained empirical and to open a new venue to a developing field of microscale lead perovskite devices, as illustrated by fabrication of photovoltaic devices and photodetectors. PMID:26617161

  9. Recovery of Cu(II) by chemical reduction using sodium dithionite.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Wang, Pin-Jan; Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Shiao-Shing

    2015-12-01

    Wastewaters containing Cu(II) along with ligands are ubiquitous in various industrial sectors. Efficacy of treatment processes for copper removal, especially precipitation, is greatly debilitated by ligands. Chemical reduction being commonly employed for production of metal nanoparticles has also been used for removing copper. Addition of ammonia was reported to be essential for improving copper reduction efficiency by increasing copper solubility at alkaline pH values. In this study, chemical reduction was employed to treat ligand-containing wastewater, exploiting the fact that ligands and metals are coexisted in many wastewaters. Result shows that copper ions were removed by either reduction or precipitation mechanisms depending on pH, type of ligands, and mixing condition. Complete copper reduction/removal was achieved under optimal condition. The lowest removal efficiency observed at pH 9.0 for ammonia system is due to formation of nano-sized particles, which are readily to pass through 0.45?m filter used for sample pretreatment before copper analysis. Instead of producing metallic copper, cuprous and copper oxide are identified in the samples collected from ammonia system and EDTA system, respectively. Re-oxidation of metallic copper particles by atmospheric oxygen during sample handling or incomplete reduction of Cu(II) ions during reduction process might be the cause. Finally, reduction process was applied to treat real wastewater, achieving complete removal of copper but only 10% of nickel. PMID:26210323

  10. ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF ZOOPLANKTON SAMPLES COLLECTED DURING PHASE II OF THE EASTERN LAKE SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples from 146 lakes in the northeastern United States, collected during Phase II of the Eastern Lake Survey (ELS-II) were analyzed for abundance of each species and each size class of zooplankton. n estimate of sampling and counting error was provided by replication of lake sa...

  11. Orientation of chemical bonds at type-II heterointerfaces probed by polarized optical spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Orientation of chemical bonds at type-II heterointerfaces probed by polarized optical spectroscopy of the heterojunction, and related to a tetrahedral orientation of chemical bonds along the 111 directions. An ideal QW: the chemical bonds at the opposite interfaces lie in mutually orthogonal planes (11¯0), 110 and both contribu

  12. Thursday, March 26, 2009 POSTER SESSION II: MARS ANALOGS: CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Indexing of Chemical Weathering in the Mid-Infrared: New Means to Evaluate Weathering on Mars [#2289Thursday, March 26, 2009 POSTER SESSION II: MARS ANALOGS: CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL 6:30 p.m. Town supply in chemically reactive host rock. 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (2009) full631.pdf

  13. 78 FR 17680 - Information Collection Request; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... that are unavailable to high-risk chemical facilities. See 72 FR 17709 (April 9, 2007). Thus, under... SECURITY Information Collection Request; Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety... estimated burden (in hours), and the estimated burden cost necessary to implement the Chemical Facility...

  14. 75 FR 68370 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Office of Infrastructure Protection; Chemical Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    .... DHS previously published this ICR in the Federal Register on August 27, 2010 at 75 FR 52768, for a 60... in the chemical industry sector. Information is automatically collected in a computer database as... training is designed for the general chemical facility employee. U.S. chemical industry direct...

  15. The holothuroids, echinoids and asteroids (echinodermata) collected by the Snellius-II expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangoux, Michel; De Ridder, Chantal; Massin, Claude; Darsono, Prapto

    Together the holothuroids, echinoids and asteroids collected by the Snellius-II Expedition represent 144 different species (40 species of holothuroids, 45 species of echinoids and 59 species of asteroids). The collection includes 14 species new to science. Among the remaining 130 species there are five new records for the Austro-Malayan region and 13 new records for the Indonesian seas.

  16. 77 FR 1084 - Agency Information Collection Activities Under Review; Title II of the Americans With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Agency Information Collection Activities Under Review; Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990/Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Discrimination Complaint Form ACTION: 30-Day Notice of Information Collection under review...

  17. Quantum chaos in the nuclear collective model. II. Peres lattices.

    PubMed

    Stránský, Pavel; Hruska, Petr; Cejnar, Pavel

    2009-06-01

    This is a continuation of our paper [Phys. Rev. E 79, 046202 (2009)] devoted to signatures of quantum chaos in the geometric collective model of atomic nuclei. We apply the method by Peres to study ordered and disordered patterns in quantum spectra drawn as lattices in the plane of energy vs average of a chosen observable. Good qualitative agreement with standard measures of chaos is manifested. The method provides an efficient tool for studying structural changes in eigenstates across quantum spectra of general systems. PMID:19658577

  18. Sorption and cosorption of lead (II) and methylene blue on chemically modified biomass.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhuhong; Hu, Xin; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Gao, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Sorption and cosorption of lead (Pb(II)) and methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solutions on low-cost biosorbents made from chemically modified agricultural by-products was investigated. Modified cotton exhibited the highest adsorption capacity for Pb(II), while modified cotton and peanut hull had higher equilibrium adsorption capacity of MB than the other biosorbents. Different chemical modification methods of hickory resulted in no great variation on the equilibrium adsorption capacity of Pb(II) and MB except for the one treated with alkali. Simultaneous sorption of Pb(II) and MB on the biosorbents showed Pb(II) to be preferentially adsorbed at higher Pb(II)-to-MB molar ratios in solution except for modified peanut hull. The equilibrium Pb adsorption contents decreased with the increasing pre-loading of MB and vice versa, suggesting the competitive rather than synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants on the biosorbents. PMID:24998306

  19. METEORLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL DATA COLLECTED IN THE UNITED STATES TO INFER DRY DEPOSITION OF TRACE CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division is responsible for the operation of a prototype network developed to collect meteorological and surface condition data. The network of meteorological and chemical filterpack monitoring stations has been in operation since the summ...

  20. Forensic collection of trace chemicals from diverse surfaces with strippable coatings.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Michael J; Beltis, Kevin J; Drennan, Paul M; Pindzola, Bradford A

    2013-11-01

    Surface sampling for chemical analysis plays a vital role in environmental monitoring, industrial hygiene, homeland security and forensics. The standard surface sampling tool, a simple cotton gauze pad, is failing to meet the needs of the community as analytical techniques become more sensitive and the variety of analytes increases. In previous work, we demonstrated the efficacy of non-destructive, conformal, spray-on strippable coatings for chemical collection from simple glass surfaces. Here we expand that work by presenting chemical collection at a low spiking level (0.1 g m(-2)) from a diverse array of common surfaces - painted metal, engineering plastics, painted wallboard and concrete - using strippable coatings. The collection efficiency of the strippable coatings is compared to and far exceeds gauze pads. Collection from concrete, a particular challenge for wipes like gauze, averaged 73% over eight chemically diverse compounds for the strippable coatings whereas gauze averaged 10%. PMID:24040648

  1. 76 FR 40377 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Class II Special...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... impact of the 1999 over-the- counter (OTC) human drug labeling requirements final rule (64 FR 13254...; Comment Request; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Labeling for Natural Rubber Latex Condoms... labeling of natural rubber latex condoms. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on...

  2. Sustainability Indicators for Chemical Processes : II. Data Needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to begin repair of the environmental quality of the planet, there is a need to embrace sustainable development at many levels of the chemical industry and society. One way that the chemical industry is responding to this need is through sustainability evaluations, retrof...

  3. A Multi-Time-Scale Analysis of Chemical Reaction Networks : II. Stochastic Systems

    E-print Network

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    A Multi-Time-Scale Analysis of Chemical Reaction Networks : II. Stochastic Systems Xingye Kan1 reactions, and for which the time scales are widely separated. We develop a computational algorithm consider stochastic descriptions of chemical reaction networks in which there are both fast and slow

  4. CHEN 3AA0 Chemical Engineering Progress Assessment II (Concepts Inventory Exam)

    E-print Network

    Ashurst, W. Robert

    CHEN 3AA0 Chemical Engineering Progress Assessment II (Concepts Inventory Exam) Instructions in chemical engineering principles and concepts. Furthermore, information from this exam process will allow engineering concepts. Administration: The CIE is offered in CHEN 3AA0 and is part of the passing criteria

  5. Retrospective analysis of an archived soil collection. II. Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Jones, K C; Symon, C J; Johnston, A E

    1987-11-01

    Soil samples collected and stored since the mid-1800s to the present day have been analysed recently for Cd. The samples from long-term experiments under permanent grassland or arable crops at Rothamsted Experimental Station (U.K.) were selected to investigate time trends in elemental composition, due either solely to atmospheric deposition or to a combination of atmospheric deposition and various soil treatments. Increases in soil Cd of 27-55% since the 1850s due to atmospheric deposition were observed. This corresponds to an increase in the soil plough layer Cd concentration of between 0.7 and 1.9 micrograms kg-1 year-1 and is equivalent to an increase of 1.9-5.4 g Cd ha-1 year-1. The changes in soil Cd concentrations since 1846 at one control site corresponded well to predicted increases in the plough layer Cd burden based on assumptions about the temporal trends in atmospheric Cd emissions. In addition, sub-samples of a selection of rock phosphates of known origin and superphosphates, mainly from one supplier, collected and stored in the archive from 1925 onwards were also analysed for Cd. The concentrations ranged from 3.6 to 92 (mean 36) mg Cd kg-1 for rock phosphates and from 3.3 to 40 (9.7) mg kg-1 for superphosphates. On the basis of these data and known application rates the estimated input of Cd to P-treated plots at Rothamsted was 2 g ha-1 year-1, but there was little further increase in soil Cd due to this addition in three long-term arable experiments where soil pH was greater than 6.5. On P-treated plots the mean increase in soil Cd was 1.2 micrograms kg-1 year-1, which is equivalent to an increase in the plough layer burden of 3.1 g Cd ha-1 year-1. By contrast, P-treated soils under permanent grassland with a higher organic matter content and lower pH have increased their Cd content by 7.2 g ha-1 year-1. When permanent grassland soils ranging in pH from 5 to 7 were examined it was found that organic matter had a larger effect on Cd concentration than pH and the effects of pH were not consistent. Farmyard manure applied to some experimental plots at Rothamsted appears to have been a more significant source of Cd than combined atmospheric and phosphate fertiliser inputs. PMID:2827304

  6. High Throughput Pharmacokinetics for Environmental Chemicals (FutureToxII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) models are critical to determine whether chemical exposures produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations. For bioactivity identified in vitro (e.g. ToxCast) – hazardous or not – PK models can forecast exposure thresholds, below which no significant bio...

  7. 76 FR 7841 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collections; Toxic Chemical Release Reporting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... codes other than SIC codes 20 through 39): 212111, 212112, 212113 (correspond to SIC 12, Coal Mining (except 1241)); or 212221, 212222, 212231, 212234, 212299 (correspond to SIC 10, Metal Mining (except 1011.... 8.10). Add an N/A box to match associated text revisions (Part II: Sec. 8.10). Add a field to...

  8. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes Anaerobic process type Cover type Methane collection efficiency Covered anaerobic lagoon (biogas capture) Bank to bank, impermeable 0.975 Modular, impermeable 0.70 Anaerobic sludge digester;...

  9. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes Anaerobic process type Cover type Methane collection efficiency Covered anaerobic lagoon (biogas capture) Bank to bank, impermeable 0.975 Modular, impermeable 0.70 Anaerobic sludge digester;...

  10. Collection, chemical analysis, and evaluation of coal samples in 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Vernon Emanuel; Medlin, J.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Coleman, S.L.; Wood, G.H., Jr.; Woodruff, S.D.; Hildebrand, R.T.

    1976-01-01

    During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with other Federal and State agencies, university groups, and private companies, continued its program to augment and refine information on the composition of coal in the United States. This report includes all analytical data on 799 channel samples of coal beds from major operating mines and core holes in 28 States, collected mainly by State Geological Surveys under a cooperative program funded largely by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. For each sample, the U.S. Geological Survey has quantitatively determined the amounts of 24 major, minor, and trace elements (including AI, As, Cd, Cu, F, Hg, Mn, Na, Pb, Se, U, and Zn), and has semiquantitatively determined the concentrations of 15 to 20 additional trace elements (including B, Be, Cr, Ge, Mo, Ni, and V). In addition, the U.S. Bureau of Mines has provided proximate and ultimate analyses, and Btu and forms-of-sulfur determinations on 488 of the samples. Statistical summaries of the data are given for all coal samples in the United States, for coal divided by rank (53 anthracite, 509 bituminous coal, 183 subbituminous coal, and 54 lignite samples), and the arithmetic means, ranges, and geometric means and deviations are given for the coal in each of seven different major coal areas in the United States. For example, the average coal in the United States contains 11.3 percent ash, 10.0 percent moisture, 2.0 percent sulfur, and has 11,180 Btu per pound; of the 10 major oxides determined on the 525?C ash, the average SiO2 content is 38 percent, Al2O3 20 percent, and Na2O 0.67 percent; the average Cd content is 7.3 ppm, Pb 114 ppm, and Zn 151 ppm (range 1 ppm to 6.0 percent). As determined on the raw coal, the average Hg content is 0.18 ppm (range <0.01 to 63.0 ppm), the Se content 4.1 ppm (range <0.1 to 150 ppm), and the U content 1.8 ppm (range <0.2 to 42.9 ppm).

  11. Effects of chemical speciation in growth media on the toxicity of mercury(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, R.E.; Germida, J.J.; Huang, P.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals to aquatic microbiota are influenced by the chemical form (aqueous species) of the metal. However, the interpretation of bioassay results, and the extrapolation of these results to in situ conditions, is often complicated by the inclusion of complex soluable organics in the bioassay media. This investigation (1) evaluates the effects of complex soluable organics on the acute toxicity of mercury (II) to a Pseudomonas fluorescens isolate in a chemically well-defined synthetic growth media, (2) computes the effects of these organics on the aqueous speciation of mercury (II) in the media, and (3) ascertains the dependence of toxicity on the chemical speciation of mercury (II). 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Photochemical Formation of Hydroxyl Radical, Hydrogen Peroxide and Fe(II) in the Sea Surface Microlayer (SML) Collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaonna, Y.; Tachibana, C.; Kasaba, T.; Ishikawa, R.; Arakaki, T.

    2014-12-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) covers upper 1 to 1000 ?m deep boundary layer of the ocean, where important biogeochemical processes take place. Photo-chemical reactions are activated by sunlight, so it is assumed that more photo-chemical reactions occur in SML than underlying bulk seawater (bulk). We initiated a study to understand chemical changes occurring in the SML by studying photochemical formation of oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical (OH), both of which react with various organic substances and determine their lifetimes. Since OH can be formed by reaction between hydrogen peroxide and Fe(II), Fe(II) photoformation was also studied. We collected SML samples using a widely-used glass plate method and bulk samples by using a polyethylene bottles near the coast of Okinawa Island, Japan. Results showed that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the SML were about twice those of bulk seawater samples. Hydrogen peroxide formation in the SML samples was ca. 2.8 times faster than the bulk seawater samples. On the other hand, Fe(II) and OH photoformation kinetics was similar for both SML and bulk samples. Although it was predicted that more OH could be formed from reaction between hydrogen peroxide and Fe(II), OH formation kinetics was similar in both SML and bulk, suggesting that either Fe(II) did not react with hydrogen peroxide or reaction is very slow, possibly by forming a complex with organic compounds in the SML and bulk.

  13. Chemical abundances in LMC stellar populations. II. The bar sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Swaelmen, M.; Hill, V.; Primas, F.; Cole, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: This paper compares the chemical evolution of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to that of the Milky Way (MW) and investigates the relation between the bar and the inner disc of the LMC in the context of the formation of the bar. Methods: We obtained high-resolution and mid signal-to-noise ratio spectra with FLAMES/GIRAFFE at ESO/VLT and performed a detailed chemical analysis of 106 and 58 LMC field red giant stars (mostly older than 1 Gyr), located in the bar and the disc of the LMC respectively. To validate our stellar parameter determinations and abundance measurement procedures, we performed thorough tests using the well-known mildly metal-poor Milky-Way thick disc giant Arcturus (HD 124897, ? Boo). We measured elemental abundances for O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti (?-elements), Na (light odd element), Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu (iron-peak elements), Y, Zr, Ba, La, and Eu (s- and r-elements). Results: We find that the ?-element ratios [Mg/Fe] and [O/Fe] are lower in the LMC than in the MW while the LMC has similar [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe] to the MW. As for the heavy elements, [Ba,La/Eu] exhibit a strong increase with increasing metallicity starting from [Fe/H] ? -0.8 dex, and the LMC has lower [Y + Zr/Ba + La] ratios than the MW. Cu is almost constant over all metallicities and about 0.5 dex lower in the LMC than in the MW. The LMC bar and inner disc exhibit differences in their [?/ Fe] (slightly larger scatter for the bar in the metallicity range [-1, -0.5]), their Eu (the bar trend is above the disc trend for [Fe/H] ? -0.5 dex), their Y and Zr, their Na and their V (offset between the bar and the disc distributions). Conclusions: Our results show that the chemical history of the LMC experienced a strong contribution from type Ia supernovae as well as a strong s-process enrichment from metal-poor AGB winds. Massive stars made a smaller contribution to the chemical enrichment compared to the MW. The observed differences between the bar and the disc speak in favour of an episode of enhanced star formation a few Gyr ago, occurring in the central parts of the LMC and leading to the formation of the bar. This is in agreement with recently derived star formation histories. Proposals 072.B-0293(B) and 078.B-0323(A), P.I. Vanessa Hill.Full Tables 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and abundances tables for the LMC bar and disc samples are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/560/A44Table 11 is also available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. The Chemical Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II is a new and improved system for the detection and identification of chemical and biological warfare

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    and identification of chemical and biological warfare agents. This system is currently in development for the UThe Chemical Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II is a new and improved system for the detection.S. Army's Soldier and Biological Chemical Command by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  15. Chemical abundances of planetary nebulae from optical recombination lines II. The neon abundance of NGC 7009

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaowei

    Chemical abundances of planetary nebulae from optical recombination lines ­ II. The neon abundance Saturn Nebula NGC 7009. The measured line fluxes are used to determine Ne21 /H1 abundance ratios ­ a pattern also seen in other nebulae analysed by us previously. The ORL Ne21 /H1 abundance ratios of NGC

  16. Rate controls on the chemical weathering of natural polymineralic material. II. Rate-controlling mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Sheffield, University of

    Rate controls on the chemical weathering of natural polymineralic material. II. Rate for comparison of laboratory and field scale weathering studies K.A. Evans a,*, D.C. Watkins a , S.A. Banwart b of the pro- cesses affecting weathering is also relevant to cli- matic modelling, where a better knowledge

  17. Insights into collective cell behaviour from populations of coupled chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Annette F; Tinsley, Mark R; Showalter, Kenneth

    2015-08-21

    Biological systems such as yeast show coordinated activity driven by chemical communication between cells. Here, we show how experiments with coupled chemical oscillators can provide insights into collective behaviour in cellular systems. Two methods of coupling the oscillators are described: exchange of chemical species with the surrounding solution and computer-controlled illumination of a light-sensitive catalyst. The collective behaviour observed includes synchronisation, dynamical quorum sensing (a density dependent transition to population-wide oscillations), and chimera states, where oscillators spontaneously split into coherent and incoherent groups. At the core of the different types of behaviour lies an intracellular autocatalytic signal and an intercellular communication mechanism that influences the autocatalytic growth. PMID:26195263

  18. A chemical confirmation of the faint Boötes II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-10

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = –2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [?/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of –2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  19. Biotechnology for producing fuels and chemicals from biomass. Volume II. Fermentation chemicals from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Villet, R.

    1981-02-01

    The technological and economic feasibility of producing some selected chemicals by fermentation is discussed: acetone, butanol, acetic acid, citric acid, 2,3-butanediol, and propionic acid. The demand for acetone and butanol has grown considerably. They have not been produced fermentatively for three decades, but instead by the oxo and aldol processes. Improved cost of fermentative production will hinge on improving yields and using cellulosic feedstocks. The market for acetic acid is likely to grow 5% to 7%/yr. A potential process for production is the fermentation of hydrolyzed cellulosic material to ethanol followed by chemical conversion to acetic acid. For about 50 years fermentation has been the chief process for citric acid production. The feedstock cost is 15% to 20% of the overall cost of production. The anticipated 5%/yr growth in demand for citric acid could be enhanced by using it to displace phosphates in detergent manufacture. A number of useful chemicals can be derived from 2,3-butanediol, which has not been produced commercially on a large scale. R and D are needed to establish a viable commercial process. The commercial fermentative production of propionic acid has not yet been developed. Recovery and purification of the product require considerable improvement. Other chemicals such as lactic acid, isopropanol, maleic anhydride, fumarate, and glycerol merit evaluation for commercial fermentative production in the near future.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN DEEP AQUIFER MEDIA - PHASE II

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj Gupta; Bruce Sass; Jennifer Ickes

    2000-11-28

    In 1998 Battelle was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under a Novel Concepts project grant to continue Phase II research on the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline formations. The focus of this investigation is to conduct detailed laboratory experiments to examine factors that may affect chemical sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations. Reactions between sandstone and other geologic media from potential host reservoirs, brine solutions, and CO{sub 2} are being investigated under high-pressure conditions. Some experiments also include sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) gases to evaluate the potential for co-injection of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} related gases in the deep formations. In addition, an assessment of engineering and economic aspects is being conducted. This current Technical Progress Report describes the status of the project as of September 2000. The major activities undertaken during the quarter included several experiments conducted to investigate the effects of pressure, temperature, time, and brine composition on rock samples from potential host reservoirs. Samples (both powder and slab) were taken from the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO{sub 2} host formation in the Ohio, the Eau Claire Shale, and Rome Dolomite samples that form the caprock for Mt. Simon Sandstone. Also, a sample with high calcium plagioclase content from Frio Formation in Texas was used. In addition, mineral samples for relatively pure Anorthite and glauconite were experimented on with and without the presence of additional clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The experiments were run for one to two months at pressures similar to deep reservoirs and temperatures set at 50 C or 150 C. Several enhancements were made to the experimental equipment to allow for mixing of reactants and to improve sample collection methods. The resulting fluids (gases and liquids) as well as the rock samples were characterized to evaluate the geochemical changes over the experimental period. Preliminary results from the analysis are presented in the report. More detailed interpretation of the results will be presented in the technical report at the end of Phase II.

  1. Substrate stiffness regulates cadherin-dependent collective migration through myosin-II contractility

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Mei Rosa; Besser, Achim

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment is known to influence single-cell migration; however, the extent to which mechanical cues affect collective migration of adherent cells is not well understood. We measured the effects of varying substrate compliance on individual cell migratory properties in an epithelial wound-healing assay. Increasing substrate stiffness increased collective cell migration speed, persistence, and directionality as well as the coordination of cell movements. Dynamic analysis revealed that wounding initiated a wave of motion coordination from the wound edge into the sheet. This was accompanied by a front-to-back gradient of myosin-II activation and establishment of cell polarity. The propagation was faster and farther reaching on stiff substrates, indicating that substrate stiffness affects the transmission of directional cues. Manipulation of myosin-II activity and cadherin–catenin complexes revealed that this transmission is mediated by coupling of contractile forces between neighboring cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the mechanical environment integrates in a feedback with cell contractility and cell–cell adhesion to regulate collective migration. PMID:23091067

  2. ChBE 3130 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II (required course) Note: This course was previously numbered 3110

    E-print Network

    Sherrill, David

    ChBE 3130 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II (required course) Note: This course was previously numbered 3110 Credit: 3-0-3 Instructor: Carson Meredith Textbook: Introduction to Chemical Engineering Principles (ChBE 2100), Numerical Methods (ChBE 2120), and Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I (ChBE 2130

  3. Evolution of chemical diversity by coordinated gene swaps in type II polyketide gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Vandova, Gergana A; Berlew, Erin E; Charkoudian, Louise K

    2015-11-10

    Natural product biosynthetic pathways generate molecules of enormous structural complexity and exquisitely tuned biological activities. Studies of natural products have led to the discovery of many pharmaceutical agents, particularly antibiotics. Attempts to harness the catalytic prowess of biosynthetic enzyme systems, for both compound discovery and engineering, have been limited by a poor understanding of the evolution of the underlying gene clusters. We developed an approach to study the evolution of biosynthetic genes on a cluster-wide scale, integrating pairwise gene coevolution information with large-scale phylogenetic analysis. We used this method to infer the evolution of type II polyketide gene clusters, tracing the path of evolution from the single ancestor to those gene clusters surviving today. We identified 10 key gene types in these clusters, most of which were swapped in from existing cellular processes and subsequently specialized. The ancestral type II polyketide gene cluster likely comprised a core set of five genes, a roster that expanded and contracted throughout evolution. A key C24 ancestor diversified into major classes of longer and shorter chain length systems, from which a C20 ancestor gave rise to the majority of characterized type II polyketide antibiotics. Our findings reveal that (i) type II polyketide structure is predictable from its gene roster, (ii) only certain gene combinations are compatible, and (iii) gene swaps were likely a key to evolution of chemical diversity. The lessons learned about how natural selection drives polyketide chemical innovation can be applied to the rational design and guided discovery of chemicals with desired structures and properties. PMID:26499248

  4. Evolution of chemical diversity by coordinated gene swaps in type II polyketide gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Hillenmeyer, Maureen E.; Vandova, Gergana A.; Berlew, Erin E.; Charkoudian, Louise K.

    2015-01-01

    Natural product biosynthetic pathways generate molecules of enormous structural complexity and exquisitely tuned biological activities. Studies of natural products have led to the discovery of many pharmaceutical agents, particularly antibiotics. Attempts to harness the catalytic prowess of biosynthetic enzyme systems, for both compound discovery and engineering, have been limited by a poor understanding of the evolution of the underlying gene clusters. We developed an approach to study the evolution of biosynthetic genes on a cluster-wide scale, integrating pairwise gene coevolution information with large-scale phylogenetic analysis. We used this method to infer the evolution of type II polyketide gene clusters, tracing the path of evolution from the single ancestor to those gene clusters surviving today. We identified 10 key gene types in these clusters, most of which were swapped in from existing cellular processes and subsequently specialized. The ancestral type II polyketide gene cluster likely comprised a core set of five genes, a roster that expanded and contracted throughout evolution. A key C24 ancestor diversified into major classes of longer and shorter chain length systems, from which a C20 ancestor gave rise to the majority of characterized type II polyketide antibiotics. Our findings reveal that (i) type II polyketide structure is predictable from its gene roster, (ii) only certain gene combinations are compatible, and (iii) gene swaps were likely a key to evolution of chemical diversity. The lessons learned about how natural selection drives polyketide chemical innovation can be applied to the rational design and guided discovery of chemicals with desired structures and properties. PMID:26499248

  5. Chemical weathering on Mars. Collection of papers. LPI-MSATT Workshop on Chemical Weathering on Mars, Cocoa Beach, FL (USA), 10 - 12 Sep 1992.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, R. G.; Banin, A.

    1993-10-01

    The Workshop on Chemical Weathering on Mars consisted of thirty papers, extended abstracts of which were published in the LPI Technical Report, No. 92-04. The collection of seven papers in this issue report new data and interpretations about the chemical evolution of the Martian surface.

  6. CHAOS I. Direct Chemical Abundances for H II Regions in NGC 628

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.; Moustakas, John; Johnson-Groh, Mara

    2015-06-01

    The CHemical Abundances of Spirals (CHAOS) project leverages the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) with the broad spectral range and sensitivity of the Multi Object Double Spectrograph (MODS) to measure “direct” abundances (based on observations of the temperature-sensitive auroral lines) in large samples of H ii regions in spiral galaxies. We present LBT MODS observations of 62 H ii regions in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 628, with an unprecedentedly large number of auroral lines measurements (18 [O iii] ?4363, 29 [N ii] ?5755, 40 [S iii]?6312, and 40 [O ii] ??7320, 7330 detections) in 45 H ii regions. Comparing derived temperatures from multiple auroral line measurements, we find: (1) a strong correlation between temperatures based on [S iii] ?6312 and [N ii] ?5755 and (2) large discrepancies for some temperatures based on [O ii] ??7320, 7330 and [O iii] ?4363. Both of these trends are consistent with other observations in the literature, yet, given the widespread use and acceptance of [O iii] ?4363 as a temperature determinant, the magnitude of the T[O iii] discrepancies still came as a surprise. Based on these results, we conduct a uniform abundance analysis prioritizing the temperatures derived from [S iii] ?6312 and [N ii] ?5755, and report the gas-phase abundance gradients for NGC 628. Relative abundances of S/O, Ne/O, and Ar/O are constant across the galaxy, consistent with no systematic change in the upper IMF over the sampled range in metallicity. These alpha-element ratios, along with N/O, all show small dispersions (? ? 0.1 dex) over 70% of the azimuthally averaged radius. We interpret these results as an indication that, at a given radius, the interstellar medium in NGC 628 is chemically well-mixed. Unlike the gradients in the nearly temperature-independent relative abundances, O/H abundances have a larger intrinsic dispersion of ?0.165 dex. We posit that this dispersion represents an upper limit to the true dispersion in O/H at a given radius and that some of that dispersion is due to systematic uncertainties arising from temperature measurements.

  7. Adsorption/desorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) using chemically modified orange peel: Equilibrium and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasheen, Mohamed R.; Ammar, Nabila S.; Ibrahim, Hanan S.

    2012-02-01

    Waste materials from industries such as food processing may act as cost effective and efficient biosorbents to remove toxic contaminants from wastewater. This study aimed to establish an optimized condition and closed loop application of processed orange peel for metals removal. A comparative study of the adsorption capacity of the chemically modified orange peel was performed against environmentally problematic metal ions, namely, Cd 2+, Cu 2+ and Pb 2+, from aqueous solutions. Chemically modified orange peel (MOP) showed a significantly higher metal uptake capacity compared to original orange peel (OP). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectra of peel showed that the carboxylic group peak shifted from 1637 to 1644 cm -1 after Pb (II) ions binding, indicated the involvement of carboxyl groups in Pb(II) ions binding. The metals uptake by MOP was rapid and the equilibrium time was 30 min at constant temperature and pH. Sorption kinetics followed a second-order model. The mechanism of metal sorption by MOP gave good fits for Freundlich and Langmuir models. Desorption of metals and regeneration of the biosorbent was attained simultaneously by acid elution. Even after four cycles of adsorption-elution, the adsorption capacity was regained completely and adsorption efficiency of metal was maintained at around 90%.

  8. The KIVA-II computer program for transient multidimensional chemically reactive flows with sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Butler, T.D.; O'Rourke, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Since its public release in 1985, the KIVA computer program has been utilized for the time dependent analysis of chemically reacting flows with sprays in two and three space dimensions. This paper describes some of the improvements to the original version that have been made since that time. The new code called KIVA-II is planned for public release in early 1988. KIVA-II improves the earlier version in the accuracy and efficiency of the computational procedure, the accuracy of the physics submodels, and in versatility and ease of use. Numerical improvements include the use of the ICE solution procedure in place of the acoustic subcycling method and the implementation of a quasi-second-order-accurate convection scheme. Major extensions to the physical submodels include the inclusion of an optional k-epsilon turbulence model, and several additions to the spray model. We illustrate some of the new capabilities by means of example solutions. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  9. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Abe Lederman

    2007-01-08

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (“Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections”) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank™ filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30 . The portal allows the user to select from a number of collections grouped by category and enter a query expression (See Illustration 1 - Science.gov 3.0 Search Page). After the user clicks “search” a results page is displayed that provides a list of results from the selected collections ordered by relevance based on the query expression the user provided. Our grid based solution to deep web search and document ranking has already gained attention within DOE, other Government Agencies and a fortune 50 company. We are committed to the continued development of grid based solutions to large scale data access, filtering, and presentation problems within the domain of Information Retrieval and the more general categories of content management, data mining and data analysis.

  10. Spectrophotometry of Sextans A and B: Chemical Abundances of H II Regions and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniazev, Alexei Y.; Grebel, Eva K.; Pustilnik, Simon A.; Pramskij, Alexander G.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2005-10-01

    We present the results of high-quality long-slit spectroscopy of planetary nebulae (PNe) and H II regions in the two dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies Sextans A and B, which belong to a small group of galaxies just outside the Local Group. The observations were obtained with the New Technology Telescope ESO Multi-Mode Instrument. In Sextans A we obtained the element abundances in its only known PN and in three H II regions with the classical Te method. The oxygen abundances in these three H II regions of Sextans A are all consistent within the individual rms uncertainties, with an average 12+log(O/H)=7.54+/-0.06. The oxygen abundance of the PN in Sextans A is, however, significantly higher: 12+log(O/H)=8.02+/-0.05. This PN is even more enriched in nitrogen and helium, suggesting a classification as a PN of type I. The PN abundances of S and Ar, which are presumably unaffected by nucleosynthesis in the progenitor star, are well below those in the H II regions, indicating lower metallicity at the epoch of the PN progenitor formation (~1.5 Gyr ago, according to our estimates based on the PN parameters). In Sextans B we obtained spectra of one PN and six H II regions. Element abundances with the Te method could be derived for the PN and three of the H II regions. For two of these H II regions, which have a separation of only ~70 pc in projection, the oxygen abundances do not differ within the rms uncertainties, with a mean of 12+log(O/H)=7.53+/-0.05. The third H II region, which is about 0.6 kpc northeast of the first two, is twice as metal-rich, with 12+log(O/H)=7.84+/-0.05. This suggests considerable inhomogeneity in the present-day metallicity distribution in Sextans B. Whether this implies a general chemical inhomogeneity among populations of comparable age in Sextans B, and thus a metallicity spread at a given age, or whether we happen to see the short-lived effects of freshly ejected nucleosynthesis products prior to their dispersal and mixing with the ambient interstellar medium will require further study. For the PN we measured an O/H ratio of 12+log(O/H)=7.47+/-0.16, consistent with that of the low-metallicity H II regions. We discuss the new metallicity data for the H II regions and PNe in the context of the published star formation histories and published abundances of the two dIrr galaxies. Both dIrrs show generally similar star formation histories in the sense of continuous star formation with amplitude variations but differ in their detailed enrichment timescales and star formation rates as a function of time. If we combine the photometrically derived estimates for the mean metallicity of the old red giant branch population in both dIrrs with the present-day metallicity of the H II regions, both dIrrs have experienced chemical enrichment by at least 0.8 dex (lower limit) throughout their history. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile [072.A-0087(B)].

  11. Toxicity Screening of the ToxCast Phase II Chemical Library Using a Zebrafish Developmental Assay (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the chemical screening and prioritization research program of the US EPA, the ToxCast Phase II chemicals were assessed using a vertebrate screen for developmental toxicity. Zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) were exposed in 96-well plates from late-blastula stage (6hr pos...

  12. Chemical pollutants in field-collected canvasback tissues, eggs, and food materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Dieter, M.P.; Stendell, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    In 1972 studies began on the levels of environmental pollutants in canvasback tissues, eggs, and food items. The purpose of the studies were to determine if the levels of toxic chemicals found in canvasbacks were of the magnitude to cause problems affecting reproduction and survival. Overall, levels of organochlorine pesticides and PCB's were low in canvasbacks and their eggs. Some individual birds, however, laid eggs with elevated residues of DDE (12.1 ppm) or PCB's (28.6 ppm). There was no significant difference between eggshell thicknesses of 1972-73 and pre-1946 collections. About 12% of the canvasbacks analyzed had elevated levels of blood lead with reduced ALAD enzyme activity. Adult canvasbacks collected from the Chesapeake Bay in 1975 had moderate to high levels of cadmium in their kidneys. Cadmium, in excessive amounts is very toxic and can curtail spermatogenesis in male birds. Although no single toxic chemical found in wild canvasbacks appears to be a major factor in population declines, the cumulative effects of sublethal levels of all the pollutants may render birds susceptible to disease, hunting pressure or predation.

  13. Relationships between chemical structure and rat repellency. II. Compounds screened between 1950 and 1960

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowles, W.A.; Adomaitis, V.A.; DeWitt, J.B.; Pratt, J.J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Over 4,600 compounds, chiefly organic types, were evaluated using both a food acceptance test (Part A) and a barrier penetration bioassay (Part B), to correlate relationships between chemical structure and rodent repellency.These chemicals are indexed and classified according to the functional groups present and to the degree of substitution within their molecular structures. The results of reduction in foot consumption for each compound appraised are calculated and their K values listed in Table I.The repellent activities of the functional groups represented, alone or in combinations, are expressed in Table II by a Functional Group Repellency Index. A ranking of these indices suggests that acyclic and heteroyclic compounds containing tri- or pentavalent nitrogen would be a parent compound of choice for synthesizing novel repellents. Other molecular arrangements, spatial configurations and combinations of functional groups are compared.There were 123 active, interesting or promising compounds included in the 699 having K values of 85 or greater, which were selected for the barrier appraisal study. These chemicals were formulated in selective solvents at several concentrations and applied to burlap. Small foot bags were fashioned using the fabric impregnated with the candidate formulation, and exposed to rodent attack following storage periods of varying intervals. The results of these tests are listed in Table III. Again, those compounds containing nitrogen in the functional groupings indicated a high order of effectiveness. Several commercial patents covering rodent repellents were issued using the data from the food acceptance and barrier studies.Organizations and cooperators which supplied samples for the program are listed in Appendix I. The Wiswesser cipher for compounds in Table I is used in Appendix II to facilitate location of chemicals by sample code number as they appear under the index headings, and for computer storage and analysis.

  14. Relationships between chemical structure and rat repellency: II. compounds screened between 1950 and 1960

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowles, Walter A.; Adomaitis, V.A.; DeWitt, J.B.; Pratt, J.J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Over 4,600 compounds, chiefly organic types, were evaluated using both a food acceptance test (Part A) and a barrier penetration bioassay (Part B), to correlate relationships between chemical structure and rodent repellency. These chemicals are indexed and classified according to the functional groups present and to the degree of substitution within their molecular structures. The results of reduction in food consumption for each compound appraised are calculated and their K values listed in Table 1. The repellent activities of the functional groups represented, alone or in combinations, are expressed in Table II by a Functional Group Repellency Index.. A ranking of these indices suggests that acyclic and heteroyclic compounds containing tri- or pentavalent nitrogen would be a parent compound of choice for synthesizing novel repellents. Other molecular arrangements, spatial configurations and combinations of functional groups are compared. There were 123 active, interesting or promising compounds included in the 699 having K values of 85 or greater, which were selected for the barrier appraisal study. These chemicals were formulated in selective solvents at several concentrations and applied to burlap. Small food bags were fashioned using the fabric impregnated with the candidate formulation, and exposed to rodent attack following storage periods of varying intervals. The results of these tests are listed in Table III. Again, those compounds containing nitrogen in the functional groupings indicated a high order of effectiveness. Several commercial patents covering rodent repellents were issued using the data from the food acceptance and barrier studies. Organizations and cooperators which supplied samples for the program are listed in Appendix I. The Wiswesser cipher for compounds in Table I is used in Appendix II to facilitate location of chemicals by sample code number as they appear under the index headings, and for computer storage and analysis.

  15. Metabolic profiling of GuanXin II prescription based on metabolic fingerprinting and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Han, Jian; Xu, Man; Zhang, Zi-chuan; Ye, Min; Ye, Guan; Guo, De-an

    2011-03-25

    A sensitive LC/MS method was established to investigate the in vivo metabolism of GuanXin II prescription, a five-component Chinese herbal medicine formulation. Rat plasma, bile, urine, and feces were collected and analyzed following oral administration of the water decoction. A total of 50 compounds were identified, including 17 prototypes and 33 metabolites underwent methylation, oxidation, hydrolysis, sulfate conjugation, glucuronide conjugation, and glutathion conjugation. In addition, the component herb of the formulation from which the metabolites were derived was also identified. Among the five component herbs, Rhizoma Chuanxiong, Flos Carthami, and Lignum Dalbergiae Odoriferae were actively metabolized, contributing 26 metabolites and 2 prototypes, while Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae and Radix Paeoniae Rubra underwent less biotransformation, yielding 7 metabolites and 15 prototypes. This is the first study on the metabolic profile of GuanXin II prescription. The results could be valuable to elucidate the material basis of this formulated Chinese medicine. PMID:21094011

  16. Chemical management in fungicide sensivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Barragan, Alejandra; García-Torres, Ana Elisa; Odriozola-Casas, Olga; Macedo-Raygoza, Gloria; Ogura, Tetsuya; Manzo-Sánchez, Gilberto; James, Andrew C.; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Beltrán-García, Miguel J.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet) requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM) without applications and Intensive management (IM) more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L?1 for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for ?-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L?1 for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices. PMID:24948956

  17. Chemical management in fungicide sensitivity of Mycosphaerella fijiensis collected from banana fields in México.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Barragan, Alejandra; García-Torres, Ana Elisa; Odriozola-Casas, Olga; Macedo-Raygoza, Gloria; Ogura, Tetsuya; Manzo-Sánchez, Gilberto; James, Andrew C; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Beltrán-García, Miguel J

    2014-01-01

    The chemical management of the black leaf streak disease in banana caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Morelet) requires numerous applications of fungicides per year. However this has led to fungicide resistance in the field. The present study evaluated the activities of six fungicides against the mycelial growth by determination of EC50 values of strains collected from fields with different fungicide management programs: Rustic management (RM) without applications and Intensive management (IM) more than 25 fungicide application/year. Results showed a decreased sensitivity to all fungicides in isolates collected from IM. Means of EC50 values in mg L(-1) for RM and IM were: 13.25 ± 18.24 and 51.58 ± 46.14 for azoxystrobin, 81.40 ± 56.50 and 1.8575 ± 2.11 for carbendazim, 1.225 ± 0.945 and 10.01 ± 8.55 for propiconazole, 220 ± 67.66 vs. 368 ± 62.76 for vinclozolin, 9.862 ± 3.24 and 54.5 ± 21.08 for fludioxonil, 49.2125 ± 34.11 and 112.25 ± 51.20 for mancozeb. A molecular analysis for ?-tubulin revealed a mutation at codon 198 in these strains having an EC50 greater than 10 mg L(-1) for carbendazim. Our data indicate a consistency between fungicide resistance and intensive chemical management in banana fields, however indicative values for resistance were also found in strains collected from rustic fields, suggesting that proximity among fields may be causing a fungus interchange, where rustic fields are breeding grounds for development of resistant strains. Urgent actions are required in order to avoid fungicide resistance in Mexican populations of M. fijiensis due to fungicide management practices. PMID:24948956

  18. 77 FR 60743 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS...concerning Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040), Profit or Loss From Farming. DATES...Number: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040). Abstract: Schedule F, Part II...

  19. [Chemical composition of fresh bee pollen collected in the Misintá páramo from the Venezuelan Andes].

    PubMed

    Vit, Patricia; Santiago, B

    2008-12-01

    Venezuelan bee pollen has not been characterized, and marketing is not regulated. Pollen is consumed for apitherapeutical purposes for its nutritional and medicinal properties. This product of the hive is the most popular after honey; therefore it is necessary to characterize and to value it to initiate a database to support the proposal of a norm for bee pollen quality control. Samples of bee pollen collected by bees in the Misintá páramo of Mérida state were characterized accoridng to the chemical composition (moisture, ash, fat, pH, proteins) of four color fractions (yellow, orange, ochre, green). Yellow pollen was the most frequent fraction, with 2.18 g ash/100 g, 5.37 g ether extract/100 g, 14.88 g moisture/100 g, and 37.32 g proteins/100 g. PMID:19368304

  20. Neurocinematography in Pre-World War II Netherlands: The Magnus-Rademaker Collection.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J; Lameris, Bregt; Hielscher, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Historical films made by neuroscientists have shown up in several countries during past years. Although originally supposed to have been lost, we recently found a collection of films produced between 1909 and 1940 by Rudolf Magnus (1873-1927), professor of pharmacology (Utrecht) and his student Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), professor of physiology (1928, succeeding Willem Einthoven) and neurology (1945, both in Leiden). Both collections deal with the physiology of body posture by the equilibrium of reflex musculature contractions for which experimental studies were done with animals (labyrinthectomies, cerebellectomies, and brainstem sections) and observations on patients. The films demonstrate the results of these studies. Moreover, there are films with babies showing tonic neck reflexes and moving images capturing adults with cerebellar symptoms following cerebellectomies for tumors and several other conditions. Magnus' studies resulted in his well-known Körperstellung (1924, "Body Posture") and Rademaker's research in his Das Stehen (1931, "Standing"). The films probably had an educative and scientific purpose. Magnus demonstrated his films at congresses, including the Eighth International Congress of Physiologists (Vienna, 1910) and Rademaker screened his moving images at meetings of the Amsterdam Neurologists Society (at several occasions as reflected in the Winkler-Monakow correspondence and the Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde). Next to these purposes, the films were used to analyze movement and a series of images from the films were published in articles and books. The films are important historical sources that provide a portrait of the pre-World War II era in neuroscience, partly answering questions on how physicians dealt with patients and researchers with their laboratory animals. Moreover, the films confirm that cinematography was an important scientific tool in neuroscience research. PMID:26684426

  1. Chemical and Biochemical Engineering 428 (14:155:428) Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Design and Economics II

    E-print Network

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    Chemical and Biochemical Engineering 428 (14:155:428) Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Design. West, Plant Design and Economics for Chemical Engineers, 5th Edition, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New, which utilizes the fundamentals of chemical and biochemical engineering (material balances, energy

  2. Chemical Analysis of Fractionated Halogens in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuhako, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Murayama, H.; Arakaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Halogens (Cl, Br and I) play important roles in the atmosphere, e.g. ozone depletion by Br during spring in Polar Regions. Sources of halogens in atmospheric aerosols are mainly from ocean. But, for example, when we analyzed Br- with ion chromatography, its concentrations were almost always below the detection limit, which is also much lower than the estimated concentrations from sodium ion concentrations. We hypothesized that portions of halogens are escaped to the atmosphere, similar to chlorine loss, changed their chemical forms to such as BrO3- and IO3-, and/or even formed precipitates. There was few reported data so far about fractionated halogen concentrations in atmospheric aerosols. Thus, purpose of this study was to determine halogen concentrations in different fractions; free ion, water-soluble chemically transformed ions and precipitates using the authentic aerosols. Moreover, we analyzed seasonal variation for each fraction. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) of Okinawa, Japan during January 2010 and August 2013. A high volume air sampler was used for collecting total particulate matters on quartz filters on a weekly basis. Ultrapure water was used to extract water-soluble factions of halogens. The extracted solutions were filtered with the membrane filter and used for chemical analysis with ion chromatography and ICP-MS. Moreover, the total halogens in aerosols were obtained after digesting aerosols with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using the microwave and analysis with ICP-MS. For Cl, water-soluble Cl- accounted for about 70% of the estimates with Na content. No other forms of water-soluble Cl were found. About 30% of Cl was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For Br, water-soluble Br accounted for about 43% of the estimates with Na content, and within the 43%, about 10% of Br was not in the form of Br-. About 46% of Br was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For I, fractioned concentrations are still under investigation, and will be reported and discussed during the meeting. For seasonal variation, in general, concentrations of halogens were the lowest in summer and higher in fall and winter, reflecting air mass movement and wind speed around Okinawa, Japan.

  3. The Chemical and Biological Profile of a Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) Phase II Clinical Extract

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Nancy L.; Overk, Cassia R.; Yao, Ping; Burdette, Joanna E.; Nikolic, Dejan; Chen, Shao-Nong; Bolton, Judy L.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Pauli, Guido F.; Farnsworth, Norman R.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To document the chemical and biological profile of a clinical phase II red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) extract by identifying and measuring the major and minor components visible in the high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) chromatogram and evaluating each compound for estrogenic and antioxidant activity. Design Individual compounds in the pre-formulated (i.e., no excipients present) extract were identified by either chemical isolation followed by structure elucidation or by matching to retention time and molecular mass of chemical standards via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Quantitation of the amounts of compounds found in the pre-formulated extract was done using HPLC-UV or LC-MS. Isolated compounds or standards were evaluated for their ability to 1) induce alkaline phosphatase (AP) in an endometrial carcinoma cell line, 2) competitively bind to recombinant human estrogen receptors (ERs) alpha (?) and beta (?), and 3) act as antioxidants by scavenging 2,2-di(4-tert-octylphenyl)-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals. Results The pre-formulated red clover extract had an EC50 of 2.0–2.2 ?g/mL in the AP estrogenicity assay, and IC50s of 18.4–32.6 ?g/mL and 1.9–3.4 ?g/mL in the ER? and ER? binding assays, respectively. The pre-formulated extract was composed of 35.54% isoflavones, 1.11% flavonoids, 0.06% pterocarpans, ? 0.03% coumarins, and ? 0.03% tyramine. Daidzein, genistein, formononetin, biochanin A, coumestrol and naringenin were estrogenic in the AP assay, and all of these, except formononetin, bound to one or both ERs. Conclusions The major and minor chemical and active estrogenic components of a pre-formulated Phase II red clover clinical extract were identified, quantitatively measured, and the final capsule doses were calculated. The extract is currently under evaluation in a yearlong clinical study for the alleviation of menopausal hot flashes. This is the first report to thoroughly summarize the chemistry and biology of all major peaks observed in the HPLC-UV chromatogram of a clinical red clover dietary supplement. PMID:16566672

  4. Preconcentration and Voltammetric Determination of Mercury(II) at a Chemically Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M de F; Bertazzoli, R

    1996-04-01

    In this work, the organic compound 2-mercaptobenzimidazole was covalently bound on the surface of a glassy carbon rod, via silanization, yielding a material capable of selectively complexing Hg(2+) ions. This material was applied as an electrode for voltammetric determination of mercury(II) following its nonelectrolytic preconcentration. After exchanging the medium, the voltammetric measurements were carried out by anodic stripping in the differential pulse mode (pulse amplitude, 50 mV; scan rate, 1.25 mV s(-)(1)) using 10(-)(2) mol L(-)(1) NaSCN solution as supporting electrolyte. An anodic stripping peak was obtained at 0.06 V (vs SCE) by scanning the potential from -0.3 to +0.3 V. After a 5 min preconcentration period in a pH 4.0 Hg(2+) solution, this electrode shows increasing voltammetric response in the range 0.1-2.2 ?g mL(-)(1), with a relative standard deviation of 5% and a practical detection limit of 0.1 ?g mL(-)(1) (5.0 × 10(-)(7) mol dm(-)(3)). Compared with the conventional stripping approach, this chemically modified glassy carbon electrode procedure presented good discrimination against interference from Cu(II) in up to 10-fold molar excess. PMID:21619158

  5. Dissociation of I II in chemical oxygen-iodine lasers: experiment, modeling, and pre-dissociation by electrical discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, A.; Waichman, K.; Dahan, Z.; Rybalkin, V.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2007-06-01

    The dissociation of I II molecules at the optical axis of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was studied via detailed measurements and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics calculations. Comparing the measurements and the calculations enabled critical examination of previously proposed dissociation mechanisms and suggestion of a mechanism consistent with the experimental and theoretical results obtained in a supersonic COIL for the gain, temperature and I II dissociation fraction at the optical axis. The suggested mechanism combines the recent scheme of Azyazov and Heaven (AIAA J. 44, 1593 (2006)), where I II(A' 3? 2u), I II(A 3? 1u) and O II(a1? g, v) are significant dissociation intermediates, with the "standard" chain branching mechanism of Heidner et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 87, 2348 (1983)), involving I(2P 1/2) and I II(X1? + g, v). In addition, we examined a new method for enhancement of the gain and power in a COIL by applying DC corona/glow discharge in the transonic section of the secondary flow in the supersonic nozzle, dissociating I II prior to its mixing with O II(1?). The loss of O II(1?) consumed for dissociation was thus reduced and the consequent dissociation rate downstream of the discharge increased, resulting in up to 80% power enhancement. The implication of this method for COILs operating beyond the specific conditions reported here is assessed.

  6. Non-peptide angiotensin II receptor antagonists: chemical feature based pharmacophore identification.

    PubMed

    Krovat, Eva M; Langer, Thierry

    2003-02-27

    Chemical feature based pharmacophore models were elaborated for angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AT(1)) antagonists using both a quantitative and a qualitative approach (Catalyst HypoGen and HipHop algorithms, respectively). The training sets for quantitative model generation consisted of 25 selective AT(1) antagonists exhibiting IC(50) values ranging from 1.3 nM to 150 microM. Additionally, a qualitative pharmacophore hypothesis was derived from multiconformational structure models of the two highly active AT(1) antagonists 4u (IC(50) = 0.2 nM) and 3k (IC(50) = 0.7 nM). In the case of the quantitative model, the best pharmacophore hypothesis consisted of a five-features model (Hypo1: seven points, one hydrophobic aromatic, one hydrophobic aliphatic, a hydrogen bond acceptor, a negative ionizable function, and an aromatic plane function). The best qualitative model consisted of seven features (Hypo2: 11 points, two aromatic rings, two hydrogen bond acceptors, a negative ionizable function, and two hydrophobic functions). The obtained pharmacophore models were validated on a wide set of test molecules. They were shown to be able to identify a range of highly potent AT(1) antagonists, among those a number of recently launched drugs and some candidates presently undergoing clinical tests and/or development phases. The results of our study provide confidence for the utility of the selected chemical feature based pharmacophore models to retrieve structurally diverse compounds with desired biological activity by virtual screening. PMID:12593652

  7. THE CHEMICALLY CONTROLLED SYNTHESIS OF DUST IN TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha; Cherchneff, Isabelle E-mail: isabelle.cherchneff@unibas.ch

    2013-10-20

    We study the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejecta of solar metallicity, Type II-P supernovae (SNe) using a chemical kinetic approach. We follow the evolution of molecules and small dust cluster masses from day 100 to day 1500 after explosion. We consider stellar progenitors with initial masses of 12, 15, 19, and 25 M{sub ?} that explode as SNe with stratified ejecta. The molecular precursors to dust grains comprise molecular chains, rings and small clusters of silica, silicates, metal oxides, sulfides and carbides, pure metals, and carbon, where the nucleation of silicate clusters is described by a two-step process of metal and oxygen addition. We study the impact of the {sup 56}Ni mass on the type and amount of synthesized dust. We predict that large masses of molecules including CO, SiO, SiS, O{sub 2}, and SO form in the ejecta. We show that the discrepancy between the small dust masses detected at infrared wavelengths some 500 days post-explosion and the larger amounts of dust recently detected with Herschel in SN remnants can be explained by the non-equilibrium chemistry linked to the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejected material. Dust gradually builds up from small (?10{sup –5} M{sub ?}) to large masses (?5 × 10{sup –2} M{sub ?}) over a 5 yr period after explosion. Subsequent dust formation and/or growth is hampered by the shortage of chemical agents participating in the dust nucleation and the long timescale for accretion. The results highlight the dependence of the dust chemical composition and mass on the amount of {sup 56}Ni synthesized during the explosion. This dependence may partly explain the diversity of epochs at which dust forms in SNe. More generally, our results indicate that Type II-P SNe are efficient but moderate dust producers with an upper limit on the mass of synthesized dust ranging from ?0.03 to 0.09 M{sub ?}. Other dust sources must then operate at high redshift to explain the large quantities of dust present in young galaxies in the early universe.

  8. Collection and Chemical Composition of Phloem Sap from Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck (Sweet Orange)

    PubMed Central

    Hijaz, Faraj; Killiny, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Through utilizing the nutrient-rich phloem sap, sap feeding insects such as psyllids, leafhoppers, and aphids can transmit many phloem-restricted pathogens. On the other hand, multiplication of phloem-limited, uncultivated bacteria such as Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) inside the phloem of citrus indicates that the sap contains all the essential nutrients needed for the pathogen growth. The phloem sap composition of many plants has been studied; however, to our knowledge, there is no available data about citrus phloem sap. In this study, we identified and quantified the chemical components of phloem sap from pineapple sweet orange. Two approaches (EDTA enhanced exudation and centrifugation) were used to collect phloem sap. The collected sap was derivatized with methyl chloroformate (MCF), N-methyl-N- [tert-butyl dimethylsilyl]-trifluroacetamide (MTBSTFA), or trimethylsilyl (TMS) and analyzed with GC-MS revealing 20 amino acids and 8 sugars. Proline, the most abundant amino acid, composed more than 60% of the total amino acids. Tryptophan, tyrosine, leucine, isoleucine, and valine, which are considered essential for phloem sap-sucking insects, were also detected. Sucrose, glucose, fructose, and inositol were the most predominant sugars. In addition, seven organic acids including succinic, fumaric, malic, maleic, threonic, citric, and quinic were detected. All compounds detected in the EDTA-enhanced exudate were also detected in the pure phloem sap using centrifugation. The centrifugation technique allowed estimating the concentration of metabolites. This information expands our knowledge about the nutrition requirement for citrus phloem-limited bacterial pathogen and their vectors, and can help define suitable artificial media to culture them. PMID:25014027

  9. Collection and chemical composition of phloem sap from Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck (sweet orange).

    PubMed

    Hijaz, Faraj; Killiny, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Through utilizing the nutrient-rich phloem sap, sap feeding insects such as psyllids, leafhoppers, and aphids can transmit many phloem-restricted pathogens. On the other hand, multiplication of phloem-limited, uncultivated bacteria such as Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) inside the phloem of citrus indicates that the sap contains all the essential nutrients needed for the pathogen growth. The phloem sap composition of many plants has been studied; however, to our knowledge, there is no available data about citrus phloem sap. In this study, we identified and quantified the chemical components of phloem sap from pineapple sweet orange. Two approaches (EDTA enhanced exudation and centrifugation) were used to collect phloem sap. The collected sap was derivatized with methyl chloroformate (MCF), N-methyl-N- [tert-butyl dimethylsilyl]-trifluroacetamide (MTBSTFA), or trimethylsilyl (TMS) and analyzed with GC-MS revealing 20 amino acids and 8 sugars. Proline, the most abundant amino acid, composed more than 60% of the total amino acids. Tryptophan, tyrosine, leucine, isoleucine, and valine, which are considered essential for phloem sap-sucking insects, were also detected. Sucrose, glucose, fructose, and inositol were the most predominant sugars. In addition, seven organic acids including succinic, fumaric, malic, maleic, threonic, citric, and quinic were detected. All compounds detected in the EDTA-enhanced exudate were also detected in the pure phloem sap using centrifugation. The centrifugation technique allowed estimating the concentration of metabolites. This information expands our knowledge about the nutrition requirement for citrus phloem-limited bacterial pathogen and their vectors, and can help define suitable artificial media to culture them. PMID:25014027

  10. Microbial production of isotopically light iron(II) in a modern chemically precipitated sediment and implications for isotopic variations in ancient rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangalos, G.E.; Beard, B.L.; Johnson, C.M.; Alpers, C.N.; Shelobolina, E.S.; Xu, H.; Konishi, H.; Roden, E.E.

    2012-01-01

    The inventories and Fe isotope composition of aqueous Fe(II) and solid-phase Fe compounds were quantified in neutral-pH, chemically precipitated sediments downstream of the Iron Mountain acid mine drainage site in northern California, USA. The sediments contain high concentrations of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides [Fe(III)am] that allow dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) to predominate over Fe–S interactions in Fe redox transformation, as indicated by the very low abundance of Cr(II)-extractable reduced inorganic sulfur compared with dilute HCl-extractable Fe. ?56Fe values for bulk HCl- and HF-extractable Fe were ? 0. These near-zero bulk ?56Fe values, together with the very low abundance of dissolved Fe in the overlying water column, suggest that the pyrite Fe source had near-zero ?56Fe values, and that complete oxidation of Fe(II) took place prior to deposition of the Fe(III) oxide-rich sediment. Sediment core analyses and incubation experiments demonstrated the production of millimolar quantities of isotopically light (?56Fe ? -1.5 to -0.5?) aqueous Fe(II) coupled to partial reduction of Fe(III)am by DIR. Trends in the Fe isotope composition of solid-associated Fe(II) and residual Fe(III)am are consistent with experiments with synthetic Fe(III) oxides, and collectively suggest an equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III)am of approximately -2?. These Fe(III) oxide-rich sediments provide a model for early diagenetic processes that are likely to have taken place in Archean and Paleoproterozoic marine sediments that served as precursors for banded iron formations. Our results suggest pathways whereby DIR could have led to the formation of large quantities of low-?56Fe minerals during BIF genesis.

  11. Type II Cepheids in the Milky Way disc. Chemical composition of two new W Virginis stars: DD Vel and HQ Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasle, B.; Kovtyukh, V.; Bono, G.; François, P.; Saviane, I.; Yegorova, I.; Genovali, K.; Inno, L.; Galazutdinov, G.; da Silva, R.

    2015-07-01

    Context. A robust classification of Cepheids into their different sub-classes and, in particular, between classical and Type II Cepheids, is necessary to properly calibrate the period-luminosity relations and for populations studies in the Galactic disc. Type II Cepheids are, however, very diverse, and classifications based either on intrinsic (period, light curve) or external parameters (e.g., [Fe/H], | z |) do not provide a unique classification. Aims: We want to ascertain the classification of two Cepheids, HQ Car and DD Vel, that are sometimes classified as classical Cepheids and sometimes as Type II Cepheids. Methods: To achieve this goal, we examine both their chemical composition and the presence of specific features in their spectra. Results: We find emission features in the H? and in the 5875.64 Å He I lines that are typical of W Vir stars. The [Na/Fe] (or [Na/Zn]) abundances are typical of thick-disc stars, while BL Her stars are Na-overabundant ([Na/Fe] > +0.5 dex). Finally, the two Cepheids show a possible (HQ Car) or probable (DD Vel) signature of mild dust-gas separation that is usually observed only in long-period type II Cepheids and RV Tau stars. Conclusions: These findings clearly indicate that HQ Car and DD Vel are both Type II Cepheids from the W Vir sub-class. Several studies have reported an increase in the Cepheids' abundance dispersion towards the outer (thin) disc. A detailed inspection of the Cepheid classification, in particular for those located in the outer disc, will indicate whether this feature is real or simply an artefact of the inclusion of type II Cepheids belonging to the thick disc in the current samples. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (prog. ID: 060.A-9120 and 082.D-0901).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Volume 114. number 4 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 8 March 1985 VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION OF Li2(X ' II>

    E-print Network

    Wadehra, Jogindra M.

    Volume 114. number 4 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 8 March 1985 VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION OF Li2(X ' II The negztlve IOU of hght atoms are currently be- ~ng studred for their possible applicattons tn gaseous discharges, fusion plasmas and gas lasers [ 13_A possi- ble source for the volume productton of atomic amons

  13. Preparation of polyethylene sacks for collection of precipitation samples for chemical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Bricker, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Polyethylene sacks are used to collect precipitation samples. Washing polyethylene with acetone, hexane, methanol, or nitric acid can change the adsorptive characteristics of the polyethylene. In this study, simulated precipitation at pH 4.5 was in contact with the polyethylene sacks for 21 days; subsamples were removed for chemical analysis at 7, 14, and 21 days after intitial contact. Sacks washed with acetone adsorbed iron and lithium; sacks washed with hexane adsorbed barium, iron , and lithium; sacks washed with methanol adsorbed calcium and iron; and sacks washed with 0.30 N nitric acid adsorbed iron. Leaching the plastic sacks with 0.15 N nitric acid did not result in 100-percent recovery of any of the adsorbed metals. Washing polyethylene sacks with dilute nitric acid caused the pH of the simulated precipitation to be decreased by 0.2 pH unit after 1 week of contact with the polyethylene. The specific conductance increased by 10 microsiemens per centimeter. Contamination of precipitation samples by lead was determined to be about 0.1 microgram per liter from contact with precleaned polyethylene sacks. No measurable contamination of precipitation samples by zinc occurred. (USGS)

  14. COMPARISON OF MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF XENOBIOTIC CHEMICALS BETWEEN FIELD-COLLECTED AND LABORATORY MICROCOSM MICROBIOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two second-order transformation rate coefficients--kb, based on total plate counts, and kA, based on periphyton-colonized surface areas--were used to compare xenobiotic chemical transformation by laboratory-developed (microcosm) and by field-collected microbiota. Similarity of tr...

  15. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  16. BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF TOXICITY CAUSED BY CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS ELUTED FROM SITE SOILS COLLECTED AT THE DRAKE CHEMICAL SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The site was used to manufactured specialty intermediate chemicals for the producers of dyes, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, herbicides, and pesticides. he herbicide Fenac (2,3,6-trichlorophenylacetic acid) is a major on- and off-site contaminant. ne hundred twenty -eight soils were...

  17. Characteristics and chemical compositions of particulate matter collected at the selected metro stations of Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Hu, Yunjie; Hu, Qingqing; Lin, Jun; Li, Chunlin; Chen, Jianmin; Li, Lina; Fu, Hongbo

    2014-10-15

    A campaign was conducted to assess and compare the air quality at the different metro platforms at Shanghai City, focusing on particulate matter (PM) levels, chemical compositions, morphology and mineralogy, as well as species of iron. Our results indicated that the average PM?.? concentrations for the three metro lines were 177.7 ?g/m(3), 105.7 ?g/m(3) and 82.5 ?g/m(3), respectively, and the average PM1 concentrations for the three lines were 122.3 ?g/m(3), 84.1 ?g/m(3) and 59.6 ?g/m(3), respectively. Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Sr, Ba and Pb concentrations in all of the sampling sites were significantly higher than that in the urban ambient air, implicating that these trace metals may be associated with the metro systems working. Individual airborne dusts were studied for morphology and mineralogy characteristics. The results revealed that the presence of most individual particles were with no definite shape and most of them were with a large metal content. Furthermore, Fe-rich particles had significantly higher abundance in the metro systems, which were more frequently encountered in the underground lines than the aboveground line. The 2D distribution map of an interested Fe-rich particle showed an uneven Fe distribution, implying that a hollow or core of other substance exists in the particle center during the formation process. Cluster analysis revealed that Fe-rich particles were possibly a mixture of Fe species. Fitting of X-ray absorption near-edge fine structure spectra (XANES) showed the main iron species within the particles collected from the three contrasting metro lines of Shanghai to be hematite, magnetite, iron-metal and mineral Fe. Hematite and mineral Fe were all found in three lines, while magnetite only existed in aboveground metro line. Iron-metal was determined in both the older and younger underground lines, based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. As diverse Fe species have different physical-chemical characteristics and toxicity, the speciation of Fe-containing metro particles is important in the context of public health and control measures. PMID:25105755

  18. Physical, Chemical, and Mineralogical Properties of Comet 81P/Wild 2 Particles Collected by Stardust

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft collected dust from the coma of Comet 81P/Wild 2 by impact into aerogel capture cells or into Al-foils. The first direct, laboratory measurement of the physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties of cometary dust grains ranging from <10-15 to ?10-4 g were made on this dust. Deposition of material along the entry tracks in aerogel and the presence of compound craters in the Al-foils both indicate that many of the Wild 2 particles in the size range sampled by Stardust are weakly bound aggregates of a diverse range of minerals. Mineralogical characterization of fragments extracted from tracks indicates that most tracks were dominated by olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, or Fe-sulfides, although one track was dominated by refractory minerals similar to Ca-Al inclusions in primitive meteorites. Minor mineral phases, including Cu-Fe-sulfide, Fe-Zn-sulfide, carbonate and metal oxides, were found along some tracks. The high degree of variability of the element/Fe ratios for S, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Ga among the 23 tracks from aerogel capture cells analyzed during Stardust Preliminary Examination is consistent with the mineralogical variability. This indicates Wild 2 particles have widely varying compositions at the largest size analyzed (>10 ?m). Because Stardust collected particles from several jets, sampling material from different regions of the interior of Wild 2, these particles are expected to be representative of the non-volatile component of the comet over the size range sampled. Thus, the stream of particles associated with Comet Wild 2 contains individual grains of diverse elemental and mineralogical compositions, some rich in Fe and S, some in Mg, and others in Ca and Al. The mean refractory element abundance pattern in the Wild 2 particles that were examined is consistent with the CI meteorite pattern for Mg, Si, Cr, Fe, and Ni to 35%, and for Ca, Ti and Mn to 60%, but S/Si and Fe/Si both show a statistically significant depletion from the CI values and the moderately volatile elements Cu, Zn, Ga are enriched relative to CI. This elemental abundance pattern is similar to that in anhydrous, porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), suggesting that, if Wild 2 dust preserves the original composition of the Solar Nebula, the anhydrous, porous IDPs, not the CI meteorites, may best reflect the Solar Nebula abundances. This might be tested by elemental composition measurements on cometary meteors.

  19. Chemical Characterization and Removal of Carbon-14 from Irradiated Graphite II - 13023

    SciTech Connect

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Cleaver, James; LaBrier, Daniel; McCrory, Shilo; Smith, Tara E.

    2013-07-01

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (C-14), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates C-14 is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented last year and updated here is to identify the chemical form of C-14 in irradiated graphite and develop a practical method by which C-14 can be removed. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam{sup R}, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of C-14 precursor) and neutron-irradiated (10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2}/s). Finer grained NBG-25 was not exposed to liquid nitrogen prior to irradiation at a neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 14} /cm{sup 2}/s. Characterization of pre- and post-irradiation graphite was conducted to determine the chemical environment and quantity of C-14 and its precursors via the use of surface sensitive characterization techniques. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the morphological features of graphite samples. The concentration, chemical composition, and bonding characteristics of C-14 and its precursors were determined through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis Spectroscopy (EDX). Results of post-irradiation characterization of these materials indicate a variety of surface functional groups containing carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen. During thermal treatment, irradiated graphite samples are heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon were performed at 900 deg. C and 1400 deg. C to evaluate the selective removal of C-14. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 volume % oxygen at temperatures 700 deg. C and 1400 deg. C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of C-14. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient C-14 removal. (authors)

  20. Burnup calculations and chemical analysis of irradiated fuel samples studied in LWR-PROTEUS phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, P.; Guenther-Leopold, I.; Berger, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The isotopic compositions of 5 UO{sub 2} samples irradiated in a Swiss PWR power plant, which were investigated in the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II programme, were calculated using the CASMO-4 and BOXER assembly codes. The burnups of the samples range from 50 to 90 MWd/kg. The results for a large number of actinide and fission product nuclides were compared to those of chemical analyses performed using a combination of chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry. A good agreement of calculated and measured concentrations is found for many of the nuclides investigated with both codes. The concentrations of the Pu isotopes are mostly predicted within {+-}10%, the two codes giving quite different results, except for {sup 242}Pu. Relatively significant deviations are found for some isotopes of Cs and Sm, and large discrepancies are observed for Eu and Gd. The overall quality of the predictions by the two codes is comparable, and the deviations from the experimental data do not generally increase with burnup. (authors)

  1. New chemical models of enzymatic oxidation. II. Oxidation of alcohols to acids, catalyzed by Cu(II) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakharov, A.M.; Skibida, I.P.

    1988-07-01

    It was established that complex compounds of Cu(II) catalyze the oxidation of primary alcohols to acids in the presence of bases; in aqueous media n-propanol is oxidized primarily to formic acid; in anhydrous media n-propanol and benzyl alcohol are capable of being oxidized to propionic and benzoic acids, respectively. It was shown that acids are the primary reaction products, and they are formed as a result of the attack of anions coordinated on Cu(II) sites by molecular oxygen.

  2. 155:307(01) Chemical Engineering Analysis II Fall 2011 Lectures: Mon, Wed 10:20-11:40 am, DSV Lab SOE B-125

    E-print Network

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    155:307(01) Chemical Engineering Analysis II Fall 2011 Lectures: Mon, Wed 10:20-11:40 am, DSV Lab and simulation techniques in the analysis of chemical, and biochemical engineering systems. Application problems encountered in chemical and biochemical engineering. The course gives the student the opportunity

  3. The reaction ensemble method for the computer simulation of chemical and phase equilibria. II. The Br2 Cl2 BrCl system

    E-print Network

    Lisal, Martin

    of reaction and phase equilib- ria is of great interest in the chemical industry.1 The com- bined occurrenceThe reaction ensemble method for the computer simulation of chemical and phase equilibria. II. The Br2 Cl2 BrCl system Martin Li´sal E. Ha´la Laboratory of Thermodynamics, Institute of Chemical

  4. Guidelines for Community Relations Personnel. Criminal Justice Research. Prevention and Control of Collective Violence, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, W. Thomas; Knoblauch, Richard L.

    The objective of this study is to provide local law enforcement agencies with guidelines for the collection and dissemination of elements of information required for sound decision making in response to the threat or actual initiation of collective violence. Informal, semi-structured interviews in fourteen selected cities and six State police…

  5. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume II. Physical and chemical oceanography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J.

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Contents of Volume II include: introduction; physical oceanography; estuarine hydrology and hydrography; analysis of discharge plume; and water and sediment quality.

  6. The promising chemical kinetics for the simulation of propane-air combustion with KIVA-II code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ying, S. J.; Gorla, Rama S. R.; Kundu, Krishna P.

    1993-01-01

    The development of chemical kinetics for the simulation of propane-air combustion with the use of computer code KIVA-II since 1989 is summarized here. In order to let readers understand the general feature well, a brief description of the KIVA-II code, specially related with the chemical reactions is also given. Then the results of recent work with 20 reaction mechanism is presented. It is also compared with the 5 reaction mechanism. It may be expected that the numerical stability of the 20 reaction mechanism is better as compared to that of 5 reaction mechanism, but the CPU time of the CRAY computer is much longer. Details are presented in the paper.

  7. Odor and chemical emissions from dairy and swine facilities: Part 1 - project overview and collection methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock facilities have received numerous criticisms due to their emissions of odorous air and chemicals. Hence, there is a significant need for odor emission factors and identification of principle odorous chemicals. Odor emission factors are used as inputs to odor setback models, while chemica...

  8. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical study of the structure of a new paramagnetic dimeric palladium(II,III) complex with creatine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitewa, Mariana; Enchev, Venelin; Bakalova, Tatyana

    2002-05-01

    The structure and coordination mode of the newly synthesized dimeric paramagnetic Pd(II,III) complex are studied using magneto-chemical, EPR and IR spectroscopic methods. In order to perform reliable assignment of the IR bands, the structure and IR spectrum of the free creatine were calculated using ab initio method. For calculation of the configuration of its deprotonated and doubly deprotonated forms the semiempirical AM1 method was used.

  9. Stochastic theory of nonequilibrium steady states. Part II: Applications in chemical biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Min; Qian, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical theory of nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) has a natural application in open biochemical systems which have sustained source(s) and sink(s) in terms of a difference in their chemical potentials. After a brief introduction in Section 1, in Part II of this review, we present the widely studied biochemical enzyme kinetics, the workhorse of biochemical dynamic modeling, in terms of the theory of NESS (Section 2.1). We then show that several phenomena in enzyme kinetics, including a newly discovered activation-inhibition switching (Section 2.2) and the well-known non-Michaelis-Menten-cooperativity (Section 2.3) and kinetic proofreading (Section 2.4), are all consequences of the NESS of driven biochemical systems with associated cycle fluxes. Section 3 is focused on nonlinear and nonequilibrium systems of biochemical reactions. We use the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC), one of the most important biochemical signaling networks, as an example (Section 3.1). It starts with a brief introduction of the Delbrück-Gillespie process approach to mesoscopic biochemical kinetics (Sections 3.2 and 3.3). We shall discuss the zeroth-order ultrasensitivity of PdPC in terms of a new concept - the temporal cooperativity (Sections 3.4 and 3.5), as well as PdPC with feedback which leads to biochemical nonlinear bistability (Section 3.6). Also, both are nonequilibrium phenomena. PdPC with a nonlinear feedback is kinetically isomorphic to a self-regulating gene expression network, hence the theory of NESS discussed here could have wide applications to many other biochemical systems.

  10. Spatial and temporal variations of chemicals in the TSP aerosols simultaneously collected at three islands in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakaki, Takemitsu; Azechi, Sotaro; Somada, Yuka; Ijyu, Moriaki; Nakaema, Fumiya; Hitomi, Yuya; Handa, Daishi; Oshiro, Yoshito; Miyagi, Youichi; Tsuhako, Ai; Murayama, Hitomi; Higaonna, Yumi; Tanahara, Akira; Itoh, Akihide; Fukushima, Soko; Higashi, Kazuaki; Henza, Yui; Nishikawa, Rin; Shinjo, Hibiki; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-11-01

    East Asia's rapid economic growth has led to concerns about the emission of air pollutants. We collected total suspended particle (TSP) aerosol samples simultaneously at three islands in Okinawa, Japan, which are downwind of East Asia, during the Asian dust season, to examine the spatial and temporal variations and chemical transformations of major chemicals in the aerosols. Weekly samples were collected from July 2008 to June 2010, and the concentrations of water-soluble cations, anions, and organic carbon (WSOC) were determined (n = 303). Spatial distribution analysis showed that monthly mean concentrations of non-sea-salt (nss)-SO42- in the spring (Asian dust season) decreased with increasing distance from Asia, while the trend for NO3- was less evident, suggesting that chemical transformation affected the long-range transport of certain chemicals. Temporal variation analysis showed that concentrations of nss-SO42-, NO3-, and WSOC during the spring were about 2.0, 2.4, and 1.8 times those in the summer (cleaner air mass from the Pacific Ocean), respectively. This study demonstrated that air pollutants were transported from the Asian continent to the Okinawa islands and affected the air quality in the region. There may also be impacts on ecosystems, because increased concentrations of particulate NO3- could increase nutrient levels around the Okinawa islands.

  11. Search for extraterrestrial point sources of high energy neutrinos with AMANDA-II using data collected in 2000-2002

    E-print Network

    The AMANDA Collaboration; M. Ackermann

    2004-12-14

    The results of a search for point sources of high energy neutrinos in the northern hemisphere using data collected by AMANDA-II in the years 2000, 2001 and 2002 are presented. In particular, a comparison with the single-year result previously published shows that the sensitivity was improved by a factor of 2.2. The muon neutrino flux upper limits on selected candidate sources, corresponding to an E^{-2} neutrino energy spectrum, are included. Sky grids were used to search for possible excesses above the background of cosmic ray induced atmospheric neutrinos. This search reveals no statistically significant excess for the three years considered.

  12. Low Budget Biology II: A Collection of Low Cost Labs and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartski, Bert; Wartski, Lynn Marie

    This document contains 13 low budget labs, demonstrations, and activities to be used in the biology classroom. Each activity has a teacher preparation section which states the purpose of each lab, some basic information, a list of materials and what they do, and how to prep the different solutions and chemicals. All labs are designed for a…

  13. Chemical speciation of size-segregated floor dusts and airborne magnetic particles collected at underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, BoWha; Malek, Md Abdul; Koo, Yong Sung; Jung, Jong Hoon; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Kim, HyeKyoung; Ro, Chul-Un

    2012-04-30

    Previous studies have reported the major chemical species of underground subway particles to be Fe-containing species that are generated from wear and friction processes at rail-wheel-brake and catenaries-pantographs interfaces. To examine chemical composition of Fe-containing particles in more details, floor dusts were collected at five sampling locations of an underground subway station. Size-segregated floor dusts were separated into magnetic and non-magnetic fractions using a permanent magnet. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), iron metal, which is relatively harmless, was found to be the dominating chemical species in the floor dusts of the <25 ?m size fractions with minor fractions of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, S, and C. From SEM analysis, the floor dusts of the <25 ?m size fractions collected on railroad ties appeared to be smaller than 10 ?m, indicating that their characteristics should somewhat reflect the characteristics of airborne particles in the tunnel and the platform. As most floor dusts are magnetic, PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. In addition, airborne subway particles, most of which were smaller than 10 ?m, were collected using permanent magnets at two underground subway stations, namely Jegi and Yangjae stations, in Seoul, Korea. XRD and SEM/EDX analyses showed that most of the magnetic aerosol particles collected at Jegi station was iron metal, whereas those at Yangjae station contained a small amount of Fe mixed with Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, and C. The difference in composition of the Fe-containing particles between the two subway stations was attributed to the different ballast tracks used. PMID:22381374

  14. Environmental Technology Verification Report: Grouts for Wastewater Collection Systems, Avanti International AV-118 Acrylic Chemical Grout

    EPA Science Inventory

    Municipalities are discovering rapid degradation of infrastructures in wastewater collection and treatment facilities due to the infiltration of water from the surrounding environments. Wastewater facilities are not only wet, but also experience hydrostatic pressure conditions un...

  15. Collective Surfing of Chemically Active Particles Hassan Masoud1,2,*

    E-print Network

    Shelley, Michael

    -Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has aggregation of motile slime molds, the KS model [26] is a canonical model of mathematical biology [27

  16. User Centered System Design. Part II: Collected Papers from the UCSD HMI Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla. Inst. for Cognitive Science.

    This report is a collection of 11 recent papers by the Human-Machine Interaction Group at the University of California, San Diego. The following papers are included: (1) "Stages and Levels in Human-Machine Interaction," Donald A. Norman; (2) "The Nature of Expertise in UNIX," Stephen W. Draper; (3) "Users in the Real World," David Owen; (4)…

  17. 76 FR 25723 - Proposed Information Collection for Growing America Through Entrepreneurship (GATE) II Evaluation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...Collection for Growing America Through Entrepreneurship...continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent...agencies with an opportunity to comment on proposed...D. ``Growing America Through Entrepreneurship...with employment and reduce the receipt of Unemployment...their experiences in jobs working for...

  18. 78 FR 9915 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Basel II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ..., Capital Adequacy, Transition Provisions, and Prompt Corrective Action (77 FR 52792); Regulatory Capital... FR 52888); Regulatory Capital Rules: Advanced Approaches Risk-Based Capital Rule; Market Risk Capital Rule (77 FR 52978), and OMB review and action on proposed changes to the collection arising from...

  19. Chemical and isotopic properties and origin of coarse airborne particles collected by passive samplers in industrial, urban, and rural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, Florence; Stille, Peter; Dietze, Volke; Gieré, Reto

    2012-12-01

    Passive air samplers have been installed in industrial, urban, rural and remote forested environments in order to collect coarse airborne particles for subsequent chemical characterization. To identify principal polluting sources, isotopic tracers, such as Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic ratios, have been used. The mass deposition rates (MDRs) of trace metals, determined for each of the studied environments, clearly indicate that industrial and traffic sites are especially affected by air pollution. Elements such as V, Pb, Fe, Cr, Co, Mo, Cd, Ni, As, Sb and Zn are notably enriched in samples from industrial zones, whereas V, Mn, Ba, Sr, Al, U, Th, rare earth elements (REE), Zr, Y, Cs, Rb, Sb, Sn and Cu are principal components of the airborne particles collected close to areas influenced by heavy traffic. The chemical/isotopic baseline composition derived from the airborne particles is the result of mixing of particles from different industrial sources, traffic and fertilizers. The monthly analysis of trace-metal MDRs of the collected airborne particle samples from different stations around the industrial zone allows for the detection of distinct atmospheric dust-deposition events during the year, characterized by high MDRs. "Natural" dusts from regional soil re-suspension, including from more distant regions like the Sahara desert, might overprint the regional atmospheric baseline composition, as suggested by trace metal trajectories in ternary diagrams and by Sr, Nd and Pb isotope data.

  20. Initial chemical and biological characterization of hydrotreated solvent refined coal (SRC-II) liquids: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, W.C.; Wilson, B.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Craun, J.C.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of both chemical and biomedical research performed on a solvent refined coal (SRC-II) research material (distillate blend) which was produced by the pilot plant facility at Fort Lewis, Washington. Samples of this distillate blend were subjected to research-scale hydrotreatment by Universal Oil Products, Inc., prior to chemical and biological analysis at PNL. The samples are considered to be, in general, generically representative of raw or hydrotreated materials which might be produced by demonstration or commercial-scale facilities. The above described feedstock and hydrotreated materials were analyzed for chemical composition both prior to and after chemical fractionation. The fractionation procedure used was an acid-base-neutral solvent extraction. The fractions produced, as well as the unfractionated materials, were subjected to microbial mutagenesis testing (Ames assay) and to further chemical analysis. The principal components of the unmodified distillate blend are two and three ringed aromatic and heteroatomic species together with high concentrations of phenolic and polynuclear aromatic components relative to typical levels found in petroleum crudes. The Ames assay mutagenic response for the unfractionated material, as well as the fractions produced by the solvent separation, was reduced considerably in the hydrotreated materials compared to that of the feedstock. Total mutagenic response for the hydrotreated products was approximately 1% of that in the untreated feedstock. The concentrations of two important genetically active compound classes, the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and the primary aromatic amines, were considerably reduced in both of the hydrotreated products compared to the feedstock.

  1. 77 FR 60743 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...The Department of the Treasury, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, invites the general public and other Federal agencies to take this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments......

  2. TESTING DUPLICATE DIET SAMPLE COLLECTION METHODS FOR MEASURING PERSONAL DIETARY EXPOSURES TO CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary ingestion may be a significant pathway of human exposure to many potentially toxic chemicals. The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency-National Human Exposure Laboratory has made the development of methods for measuring persoanl dietary exposures a high priority for its di...

  3. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR A NATIONAL STUDY OF CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FISH - II. PESTICIDES AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical methods and a quality assurance plan have been developed to determine the concentration of a select group of bioaccumulatable chemicals in fish tissue. he analytes include PCBs and 21 pesticides and industrial chemicals. he methodology has been used to conduct a survey...

  4. In Vitro Screening of 1877 Industrial and Consumer Chemicals, Pesticides and Pharmaceuticals in up to 782 Assays: ToxCast Phase I and II (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Phase II of the ToxCast program, the U.S. EPA and Tox21 partners screened 1,877 chemicals, including pesticides; food, cosmetics and personal care ingredients; pharmaceuticals; and industrial chemicals. Testing used a 782 in vitro assays across 7 technologies and multiple bi...

  5. New type of time-series sediment trap for the reliable collection of inorganic and organic trace chemical substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremling, K.; Lentz, U.; Zeitzschel, B.; Schulz-Bull, D. E.; Duinker, J. C.

    1996-12-01

    The new sediment trap has a 0.5 m2 aperture, a funnel slope of 34° and is capable of collecting 21 samples at programmed intervals (1 min-1 year) during deployment in the deep ocean. The trap has been designed to allow reliable data on trace inorganic and organic components (such as trace elements, n-alkanes, PCBs, PAHs, amino/fatty acids) in addition to the standard biogeochemical variables in the collected particles. Due to the exclusive use of synthetic (such as fiberglass, PVC, PTFE, or POM-Delrin®) and highly resistant metallic materials contamination problems have been eliminated for these species. Blank values determined in several tests in the open ocean were as low as 1% or even less of the amounts present in trap material, even at low particulate loadings. Another major aim was the elimination of loss of dissolved components from the sample cups into seawater. Microbial and chemical processes modify the collected particles, thereby mobilizing originally particulate species into solution. It is thus essential to avoid greater losses of dissolved species through diffusion into the surrounding seawater after collection. This was achieved by means of an especially designed sealing mechanism. Tests with tracer substances during field studies proved that losses of dissolved components from supernatants during one year of deployment are as low as 10%. Additionally, the relationship between flow characteristics around the traps and their excursions from the vertical position in a bottom-tethered array was studied during a one-year deployment in the North Atlantic.

  6. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt% sodium polyphosphate (NaP), was designed in response to the identification of the most effective CBC formulation in strengthening the steam-cured concrete specimens. Using this storage system with the material cost of 6.32 cents/lb, the 80 C-20 hour-steam-cured concrete specimens displayed the compressive strength of 3980 psi, tensile splitting of 416 psi, flexural strength of 808 psi, and modulus of elasticity of 3.16 x 10{sup 6} psi. Furthermore, the specimens had a good resistance to acid erosion and a lower permeability of water, compared with those of the conventional Type I cement concrete specimens. Consequently, the cost-effective BA-based CBC gave the promise of being a potentially useful material for fabricating high-performance precast concrete products, such as building blocks, pipes, and slabs.

  7. Thin films of tin(II) sulphide (SnS) by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) using tin(II) dithiocarbamates as single-source precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevin, Punarja; Lewis, David J.; Raftery, James; Azad Malik, M.; O'Brien, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of the asymmetric dithiocarbamates of tin(II) with the formula [Sn(S2CNRR')2] (where R=Et, R'=n-Bu (1); R=Me, R'=n-Bu (2); R=R'=Et (3)) and their use for the deposition of SnS thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) is described. The effects of temperature and the concentration of the precursors on deposition were investigated. The stoichiometry of SnS was best at higher concentrations of precursors (250 mM) and at 450 °C. The direct electronic band gap of the SnS produced by this method was estimated from optical absorbance measurements as 1.2 eV. The composition of films was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) spectroscopy.

  8. Dust as interstellar catalyst - II. How chemical desorption impacts the gas

    E-print Network

    Cazaux, S; Dulieu, F; Hocuk, S

    2015-01-01

    Context. Interstellar dust particles, which represent 1% of the total mass, are recognized to be very powerful interstellar catalysts in star-forming regions. The presence of dust can have a strong impact on the chemical composition of molecular clouds. While observations show that many species that formed onto dust grains populate the gas phase, the process that transforms solid state into gas phase remains unclear. Aims. The aim of this paper is to consider the chemical desorption process, i.e. the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, in astrochemical models. These models allow determining the chemical composition of star-forming environments with an accurate treatment of the solid-phase chemistry. Methods. In paper I we derived a formula based on experimental studies with which we quantified the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process. Here we extend these results to astrophysical conditions. Results. The simulations of astrophysical environments show that the abundances of gas-p...

  9. Characterizing Materials Sources and Sinks; Current Approaches: Part II. Chemical and Physical Characterization

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses methods for characterizing chemical emissions from material sources, including laboratory, dynamic chamber, and full-scale studies. Indoor sources and their interaction with sinks play a major role in determining indoor air quality (IAQ). Techniques for evalua...

  10. Test Driving ToxCast: Endocrine Profiling for 1858 Chemicals Included in Phase II

    PubMed Central

    Filer, Dayne; Patisaul, Heather B.; Schug, Thaddeus; Reif, David; Thayer, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Identifying chemicals, beyond those already implicated, to test for potential endocrine disruption is a challenge and high throughput approaches have emerged as a potential tool for this type of screening. This review focused the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) ToxCast™ high throughput in vitro screening (HTS) program. Utility for identifying compounds was assessed and reviewed by using it to run the recently expanded chemical library (from 309 compounds to 1858) through the ToxPi™ prioritization scheme for endocrine disruption. The analysis included metabolic and neuroendocrine targets. This investigative approach simultaneously assessed the utility of ToxCast, and helped identify novel chemicals which may have endocrine activity. Results from this exercise suggest the spectrum of environmental chemicals with potential endocrine activity is much broader than indicated, and that some aspects of endocrine disruption are not fully covered in ToxCast. PMID:25460227

  11. STRUCTURE-TOXICITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS CAUSING TYPE(II) NARCOSIS SYNDROME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several structure-activity relationships have been published for estimating the lethality of nonpolar nonelectrolytes to fish. The vast majority of non-reactive industrial chemicals produce toxicity symptoms consistent with narcosis. However, researchers have found that many chem...

  12. Dust as interstellar catalyst. II. How chemical desorption impacts the gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazaux, S.; Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F.; Hocuk, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Interstellar dust particles, which represent 1% of the total mass, are recognized to be very powerful interstellar catalysts in star-forming regions. The presence of dust can have a strong impact on the chemical composition of molecular clouds. While observations show that many species that formed onto dust grains populate the gas phase, the process that transforms solid state into gas phase remains unclear. Aims: The aim of this paper is to consider the chemical desorption process, i.e. the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, in astrochemical models. These models allow determining the chemical composition of star-forming environments with an accurate treatment of the solid-phase chemistry. Methods: In paper I we derived a formula based on experimental studies with which we quantified the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process. Here we extend these results to astrophysical conditions. Results: The simulations of astrophysical environments show that the abundances of gas-phase methanol and H2O2 increase by four orders of magnitude, whereas gas-phase H2CO and HO2 increase by one order of magnitude when the chemical desorption process is taken into account. The composition of the ices strongly varies when the chemical desorption is considered or neglected. Conclusions: We show that the chemical desorption process, which directly transforms solid species into gas-phase species, is very efficient for many reactions. Applied to astrophysical environments such as ? Oph A, we show that the chemical desorption efficiencies derived in this study reproduce the abundances of observed gas-phase methanol, HO2, and H2O2, and that the presence of these molecules in the gas shows the last signs of the evolution of a cloud before the frost.

  13. Salmonella mutagenicity tests. II. Results from the testing of 270 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Mortelmans, K.; Haworth, S.; Lawlor, T.; Speck, W.; Tainer, B.; Zeiger, E.

    1986-01-01

    This publication includes data of Salmonella mutagenicity results on 270 coded chemicals, encompassing 329 tests performed by three laboratories under contract to the National Toxicology Program (NTP). The preincubation modification of the Salmonella/mammalian microsome assay was used to test chemicals in up to five Salmonella strains in the presence and absence of rat and hamster liver S-9. With a few exceptions, inter- and intralaboratory reproducibility was good.

  14. Single Molecule and Collective Dynamics of Motor Protein Coupled with Mechano-Sensitive Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Marcucci, Lorenzo; Togashi, Yuichi; Yanagida, Toshio

    2013-12-01

    Motor proteins such as myosin and kinesin hydrolyze ATP into ADP and Pi to convert chemical energy into mechanical work. This resultsin various motile processes like muscle contraction, vesicle transport and cell division. Recent single molecule experiments have revealed that external load applied to these motor proteins perturb not only the mechanical motion, but the ATP hydrolysis cycle as well, making these molecules mechano-enzymes. Here, we describe our single molecule detection techniques to reveal the mechano-enzymatic properties of myosin and introduce recent progress from both experimental and theoretical approaches at the single- and multiple-molecule level.

  15. Insertion of a magnesium(II)-octacarboranyl(hexylsulfanyl) porphyrazine into liposomes: a physico-chemical study

    E-print Network

    Anna Salvati; Sandra Ristori; Daniela Pietrangeli; Julian Oberdisse; Luca Calamai; Giacomo Martini; Giampaolo Ricciardi

    2007-09-07

    The synthesis, characterization and liposome insertion of a novel magnesium(II) carboranyl-porphyrazine, i.e. [2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octakis- (1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaboranyl)-hexylthio-5,10,15,20- porphyrazine]magnesium(II) complex, MgHECSPz, is described. MgHECSPz was designed to improve the potentiality in multiple approach anticancer therapy. Liposomal formulations with different surface charge were prepared as delivering agents. The obtained loaded vectors were characterized by DLS, SAXS, SANS and \\zeta potential measurements in order to define the overall properties and structural details of loaded liposomes.

  16. Divergent Chemical Cues Elicit Seed Collecting by Ants in an Obligate Multi-Species Mutualism in Lowland Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Guerra Bustios, Patricia; Schal, Coby

    2010-01-01

    In lowland Amazonian rainforests, specific ants collect seeds of several plant species and cultivate them in arboreal carton nests, forming species-specific symbioses called ant-gardens (AGs). In this obligate mutualism, ants depend on the plants for nest stability and the plants depend on ant nests for substrate and nutrients. AG ants and plants are abundant, dominant members of lowland Amazonian ecosystems, but the cues ants use to recognize the seeds are poorly understood. To address the chemical basis of the ant-seed interaction, we surveyed seed chemistry in nine AG species and eight non-AG congeners. We detected seven phenolic and terpenoid volatiles common to seeds of all or most of the AG species, but a blend of the shared compounds was not attractive to the AG ant Camponotus femoratus. We also analyzed seeds of three AG species (Anthurium gracile, Codonanthe uleana, and Peperomia macrostachya) using behavior-guided fractionation. At least one chromatographic fraction of each seed extract elicited retrieval behavior in C. femoratus, but the active fractions of the three plant species differed in polarity and chemical composition, indicating that shared compounds alone did not explain seed-carrying behavior. We suggest that the various AG seed species must elicit seed-carrying with different chemical cues. PMID:21209898

  17. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  18. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II,III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  19. Chemical Remediation of Nickel(II) Waste: A Laboratory Experiment for General Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, K. Blake; Rood, Brian E.; Trogden, Bridget G.

    2011-01-01

    This project involved developing a method to remediate large quantities of aqueous waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment. Aqueous Ni(II) waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment was converted into solid nickel hydroxide hydrate with a substantial decrease in waste volume. The remediation method was developed for a…

  20. Hygroscopic and Chemical Properties of Aerosols collected near a Copper Smelter: Implications for Public and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Csavina, Janae; Shingler, Taylor; Dey, Stephen; Brechtel, Fred J.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate matter emissions near active copper smelters and mine tailings in the southwestern United States pose a potential threat to nearby environments owing to toxic species that can be inhaled and deposited in various regions of the body depending on the composition and size of the particles, which are linked by particle hygroscopic properties. This study reports the first simultaneous measurements of size-resolved chemical and hygroscopic properties of particles next to an active copper smelter and mine tailings by the towns of Hayden and Winkelman in southern Arizona. Size-resolved particulate matter samples collected near an active copper smelter were examined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer. Aerosol particles collected at the measurement site are enriched in metals and metalloids (e.g. arsenic, lead, and cadmium) and water-uptake measurements of aqueous extracts of collected samples indicate that the particle diameter range of particles most enriched with these species (0.18–0.55 µm) overlaps with the most hygroscopic mode at a relative humidity of 90% (0.10–0.32 µm). These measurements have implications for public health, microphysical effects of aerosols, and regional impacts owing to the transport and deposition of contaminated aerosol particles. PMID:22852879

  1. Impact of geothermal technology improvements on royalty collections on federal lands: Volume II: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This volume contains the appendices for the ''Impact of Geothermal Technology Improvements on Royalty Collections on Federal Lands, Final Report, Volume I.'' The material in this volume supports the conclusions presented in Volume I and details each Known Geothermal Resource Area's (KGRA's) royalty estimation. Appendix A details the physical characteristics of each KGRA considered in Volume I. Appendix B supplies summary narratives on each state which has a KGRA. The information presented in Appendix C shows the geothermal power plant area proxies chosen for each KGRA considered within the report. It also provides data ranges which fit into the IMGEO model for electric energy cost estimates. Appendix D provides detailed cost information from the IMGEO model if no Geothermal Program RandD goals were completed beyond 1987 and if all the RandD goals were completed by the year 2000. This appendix gives an overall electric cost and major system costs, which add up to the overall electric cost. Appendix E supplies information for avoided cost projections for each state involved in the study that were used in the IMGEO model run to determine at what cost/kWh a 50 MWe plant could come on line. Appendix F supplies the code used in the determination of royalty income, as well as, tabled results of the royalty runs (detailed in Appendix G). The tabled results show royalty incomes, assuming a 10% discount rate, with and without RandD and with and without a $0.01/kWh transmission cost. Individual data sheets for each KGRA royalty income run are presented in Appendix G.

  2. Physico-chemical studies in the removal of Sr(II) from aqueous solutions using activated sericite.

    PubMed

    Lalhmunsiama; Tiwari, Diwakar; Lee, Seung-Mok

    2015-09-01

    Sericite, a mica based natural clay, was annealed at 800 °C for 4 h followed by acid activation using 3.0 mol/L of HCl at 100 °C in order to obtain activated sericite (AS). The activation of sericite causes a significant increase in specific surface area. Further, SEM images of the AS showed a disordered and heterogeneous surface structure with mesopores on its surface whereas the pristine sericite possessed a compact layered structure. The materials were further employed in the removal of Sr(II) from aqueous solutions in a batch reactor system. Removal of Sr(II) was studied as a function of pH, concentration of adsorbate, contact time, background electrolyte concentrations and dose of adsorbents using pristine sericite and AS. The removal of Sr(II) was favoured increasing the pH of the solution and the extent of Sr(II) removal was increased with increasing the sorbate concentration. Equilibrium sorption data obtained with pristine sericite were fitted well to Langmuir adsorption isotherm whereas the sorption data collected using AS better fitted to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The time dependence sorption data showed that the uptake of Sr(II) was very rapid and an apparent sorption equilibrium was achieved within 30 min and 60 min of contact for sericite and AS, respectively. The kinetic data were modelled to the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order rate kinetics and sorption capacities as well as rate constants were evaluated. Increase in background electrolyte concentrations NaNO3 (0.001-0.1 mol/L) indicated that the presence of NaNO3 caused to decrease the percent removal of Sr(II) by sericite and AS. Furthermore, fixed-bed column reactor operations were performed to obtain the breakthrough data. The breakthrough data were fitted well to the non-linear Thomas equation. Therefore, the present study suggested that AS can be adequately applied for the removal of Sr(II) from the aquatic environment. PMID:26048059

  3. Ram-air sample collection device for a chemical warfare agent sensor

    DOEpatents

    Megerle, Clifford A. (Manassas, VA); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2002-01-01

    In a surface acoustic wave sensor mounted within a body, the sensor having a surface acoustic wave array detector and a micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator exposed on a surface of the body, an apparatus for collecting air for the sensor, comprising a housing operatively arranged to mount atop the body, the housing including a multi-stage channel having an inlet and an outlet, the channel having a first stage having a first height and width proximate the inlet, a second stage having a second lower height and width proximate the micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator, a third stage having a still lower third height and width proximate the surface acoustic wave array detector, and a fourth stage having a fourth height and width proximate the outlet, where the fourth height and width are substantially the same as the first height and width.

  4. Atomic Data for Zn II: Improving Spectral Diagnostics of Chemical Evolution in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisielius, Romas; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Ferland, Gary J.; Bogdanovich, Pavel; Som, Debopam; Lykins, Matt L.

    2015-05-01

    Damped Ly? (DLA) and sub-DLA absorbers in quasar spectra provide the most sensitive tools for measuring the element abundances of distant galaxies. The estimation of abundances from absorption lines depends sensitively on the accuracy of the atomic data used. We have started a project to produce new atomic spectroscopic parameters for optical and UV spectral lines using state-of-the-art computer codes employing a very broad configuration interaction (CI) basis. Here we report our results for Zn ii, an ion used widely in studies of the interstellar medium (ISM) as well as DLAs and sub-DLAs. We report new calculations of many energy levels of Zn ii and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations use the CI approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework. We use both nonrelativistic and quasi-relativistic one-electron radial orbitals. We have incorporated the results of these atomic calculations into the plasma simulation code Cloudy and applied them to a lab plasma and examples of a DLA and a sub-DLA. Our values of the Zn ii ? ? 2026, 2062 oscillator strengths are higher than previous values by 0.10 dex. The Cloudy calculations for representative absorbers with the revised Zn atomic data imply ionization corrections lower than calculated earlier by 0.05 dex. The new results imply that Zn metallicities should be lower by 0.1 dex for DLAs and by 0.13-0.15 dex for sub-DLAs than in past studies. Our results can be applied to other studies of Zn ii in the Galactic and extragalactic ISM.

  5. Interplanetary dust particles collected from the stratosphere: Physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties and implications for their sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George J.

    1994-01-01

    The suggestion that significant quantities of interplanetary dust are produced by both main-belt asteroids and comets is based on the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) detection of dust trails or bands associated with these objects. Gravitational focusing strongly biases all near-Earth collections of interplanetary dust in favor of particles with the lowest geocentric velocities, that is the dust from main-belt asteroids spiraling into the Sun under the influence of Poynting-Robertson radiation drag. The major dust bands in the main-belt appear to be associated with the catastrophic disruptions which produced the Eos, Themis and Koronis families of asteroids. If dust particles are produced in the catastrophic collision process, then Poynting-Robertson radiation drag is such an efficient transport mechanism from the main-belt to 1 AU that near-Earth collections of interplanetary dust should include, and perhaps be dominated by, this material. Interplanetary dust particles from 5 to 100 micrometers in diameter have been recovered from the stratosphere of the Earth by NASA sampling aircraft since the mid-1970s. The densities of a large fraction of these interplanetary dust particles are significantly lower than the densities of their constituent silicate mineral phases, indicating significant porosites. The majority of the particles are chemically and mineralogically similar to, but not identical to, the carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Most stony interplanetary dust particles have carbon contents exceeding those of Allende, a carbonaceous chondrite meteorite having a low albedo. Higher albedo particles corresponding to S-type asteroids are underrepresented or absent from the stratospheric collections, and primitive carbonaceous particles seem to be overrepresented in the stratospheric collections compared to the fraction of main-belt asteroids classified as primitive. This suggests that much of the interplanetary dust may be generated by a stochastic process, probably preferentially sampling a few most recent collisional events.

  6. Theory of chemical bonds in metalloenzymes II: Hybrid-DFT studies in iron-sulfur clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Koizumi, K.; Kitagawa, Y.; Yamanaka, S.; Kawakami, T.; Okumura, M.; Yamaguchi, K.

    Important chemical reactions for life often require multistep electron transfers (ET) and strong reducing forces. In these reactions, electron transfer proteins as ferredoxins (Fds) play a key role. For elucidation of the core electronic states in these electron transfer processes, an inorganic model compound [Fe2S2(S2-o-xyl)2] is used as our first study. It was experimentally characterized that the model compound is in a similar electronic state to the active site core in Fds. On the reduced form, the diiron core exists in a characteristic mixed-valence state that has mobile electron (spin). Hybrid density functional theory (HDFT) calculations are performed to investigate the chemical bond nature, electronic structures, and magnetic interactions. The spin states and energy levels are further discussed with spin Hamiltonians, which contain Heisenberg exchange term and double exchange term to describe the mixed-valence state. We have determined their effective exchange integrals (J) and resonance parameters (B) from (HDFT) calculations in several procedures. These magnetic interactions are in good agreement with experiments. To estimate B values, we propose a new procedure using molecular orbital energies. The B values are properly evaluated compared with other procedures, using total energies. The chemical bond natures and the ground electronic structures are elucidated in terms of chemical indices defined by the occupation number of natural orbitals. Finally, implications of the computational results are discussed in relation to rational design of biomolecular devices.

  7. Test driving ToxCast: endocrine profiling for1858 chemicals included in phase II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Identifying chemicals to test for potential endocrine disruption beyond those already implicated in the peer-reviewed literature is a challenge. This review is intended to help by summarizing findings from the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) ToxCast™ high th...

  8. PERFORMANCE OF NORTH AMERICAN BIOREACTOR LANDFILLS: II. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to examine the performance of five North American bioreactor landfills. This paper represents the second of a two part series and addresses biological and chemical aspects of bioreactor performance including gas production and management, and l...

  9. CHEMICALLY ACTIVE FLUID BED FOR SOX CONTROL: VOLUME II. SPENT SORBENT PROCESSING FOR DISPOSAL/UTILIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the processing of spent calcium-based sulfur sorbents (limestones or dolomites) from an atmospheric-pressure, chemically active fluid bed (CAFB) gasification process, using a regenerative sulfur sorbent process that produces low- to intermediate-Btu gas. Data...

  10. 155: 309 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II Fall 2014 Web page: https://sakai.rutgers.edu

    E-print Network

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    of solutions, phase equilibria, thermodynamics of self-assembly and chemical reaction equilibria. Course Objectives: The students will understand phase equilibria as applied to liquid and gases, properties Assignment 1 Sep 3 Assessment Test, Phase Equilibria I: Single Component Ch. 6.1 2 Sep 8 Phase Equilibria I

  11. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTS OF IN VITRO PHARMACOKINETIC DATA AND EXPOSURE INFORMATION FOR THE TOXCAST PHASE II CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Momentum has been growing in Toxicology to assess the utility of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays in the determination of chemical testing priorities. However, in vitro potencies determined in these assays do not consider in vivo bioavailability, clearance or exposure estim...

  12. Robust Numerical Simulation of Porosity Evolution in Chemical Vapor In ltration II: Two Dimensional

    E-print Network

    Jin, Shi

    -solid reactions with solid deposition are exempli#12;ed by the fabrication of ceramic matrix composites through #3) process, during which a matrix of ceramic #12;bers is chemically vapor deposited within a porous preform practical approach to fabricate ceramic composites. Among these composites, #12;ber-reinforced composites

  13. ACCURACY OF PESTICIDE REFERENCE STANDARD SOLUTIONS. PART II. CHEMICAL STABILITY UNDER FOUR STORAGE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to assess the long-term chemical stability of dilute standard pesticide solutions of 4 compound classes. The solutions were studied under 4 storage conditions: freezer at -15C; refrigerator at 3C; ambient temperature in the dark; and ambient temperature on ...

  14. Four-Year Summary, Educational and Commercial Utilization of a Chemical Information Center, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schipma, Peter B., Ed.

    The major objective of the Illinois Institute of Technology Retrieval Institute (IITRI) Computer Search Center (CSC) is to educate and link industry, academia, and government institutions to chemical and other scientific information systems and sources. The CSC is in full operation providing services to users from a variety of machine-readable…

  15. Acidbase properties of cyanobacterial surfaces. II: Silica as a chemical stressor influencing cell surface reactivity

    E-print Network

    Konhauser, Kurt

    2007; accepted in revised form 1 October 2007 Abstract Bacteria grow in complex solutions where that bacteria may alter their surface chemical properties in response to environmental stimuli, to our knowledge by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. INTRODUCTION As bacteria generally lack internal membrane

  16. Chemically Modified Plastic Tube for High Volume Removal and Collection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaitas, Angelo; Kim, Gwangseong

    2015-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, we use a commercially available and chemically modified tube to selectively capture circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood stream by immobilizing human anti-EpCAM antibodies on the tube's interior surface. We describe the requisite and critical steps required to modify a tube into a cancer cell-capturing device. Using these simple modifications, we were able to capture or entrap about 85% of cancer cells from suspension and 44% of cancer cells from spiked whole blood. We also found that the percentage of cells captured was dependent on the tube's length and also the number of cancer cells present. It is our strong belief that with the utilization of appropriate tube lengths and procedures, we can ensure capture and removal of nearly the entire CTC population in whole blood. Importantly after a patient’s entire blood volume has circulated through the tube, the tube can then be trypsinized to release the captured live CTCs for further analysis and testing. PMID:26176235

  17. Computation of the physio-chemical properties and data mining of large molecular collections.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ailan; Diller, David J; Dixon, Steven L; Egan, William J; Lauri, George; Merz, Kenneth M

    2002-01-15

    Very large data sets of molecules screened against a broad range of targets have become available due to the advent of combinatorial chemistry. This information has led to the realization that ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) and toxicity issues are important to consider prior to library synthesis. Furthermore, these large data sets provide a unique and important source of information regarding what types of molecular shapes may interact with specific receptor or target classes. Thus, the requirement for rapid and accurate data mining tools became paramount. To address these issues Pharmacopeia, Inc. formed a computational research group, The Center for Informatics and Drug Discovery (CIDD).* In this review we cover the work done by this group to address both in silico ADME modeling and data mining issues faced by Pharmacopeia because of the availability of a large and diverse collection (over 6 million discrete compounds) of drug-like molecules. In particular, in the data mining arena we discuss rapid docking tools and how we employ them, and we describe a novel data mining tool based on a ID representation of a molecule followed by a molecular sequence alignment step. For the ADME area we discuss the development and application of absorption, blood-brain barrier (BBB) and solubility models. Finally, we summarize the impact the tools and approaches might have on the drug discovery process. PMID:11913384

  18. Physics 116A Additional practice problems II Winter 2011 Here is a collection of practice problems suitable for the second midterm exam.

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    : The simplest way to solve this problem is to make use of the duplication formula for the gamma function (which? In this problem, you will compute the probability that at least two students have social security numbersPhysics 116A Additional practice problems II Winter 2011 Here is a collection of practice problems

  19. New integration techniques for chemical kinetic rate equations. II - Accuracy comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the accuracy of several techniques recently developed for solving stiff differential equations is presented. The techniques examined include two general purpose codes EEPISODE and LSODE developed for an arbitrary system of ordinary differential equations, and three specialized codes CHEMEQ, CREKID, and GCKP84 developed specifically to solve chemical kinetic rate equations. The accuracy comparisons are made by applying these solution procedures to two practical combustion kinetics problems. Both problems describe adiabatic, homogeneous, gas phase chemical reactions at constant pressure, and include all three combustion regimes: induction heat release, and equilibration. The comparisons show that LSODE is the most efficient code - in the sense that it requires the least computational work to attain a specified accuracy level. An important finding is that an iterative solution of the algebraic enthalpy conservation equation for the temperature can be more accurate and efficient than computing the temperature by integrating its time derivative.

  20. Chemical and statistical interpretation of sized aerosol particles collected at an urban site in Thessaloniki, Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridou, Roxani; Papazova, Petia; Simeonova, Pavlina; Simeonov, Vasil

    2013-01-01

    The size distribution of aerosol particles (PM0.015-PM18) in relation to their soluble inorganic species and total water soluble organic compounds (WSOC) was investigated at an urban site of Thessaloniki, Northern Greece. The sampling period was from February to July 2007. The determined compounds were compared with mass concentrations of the PM fractions for nano (N: 0.015 < Dp < 0.06), ultrafine (UFP: 0.015 < Dp < 0.125), fine (FP: 0.015 < Dp < 2.0) and coarse particles (CP: 2.0 < Dp < 8.0) in order to perform mass closure of the water soluble content for the respective fractions. Electrolytes were the dominant species in all fractions (24-27%), followed by WSOC (16-23%). The water soluble inorganic and organic content was found to account for 53% of the nanoparticle, 48% of the ultrafine particle, 45% of the fine particle and 44% of the coarse particle mass. Correlations between the analyzed species were performed and the effect of local and long-range transported emissions was examined by wind direction and backward air mass trajectories. Multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and principal components analysis) of the collected data was performed in order to reveal the specific data structure. Possible sources of air pollution were identified and an attempt is made to find patterns of similarity between the different sized aerosols and the seasons of monitoring. It was proven that several major latent factors are responsible for the data structure despite the size of the aerosols - mineral (soil) dust, sea sprays, secondary emissions, combustion sources and industrial impact. The seasonal separation proved to be not very specific. PMID:24007436

  1. Exclusion of cosmic rays in protoplanetary disks. II. Chemical gradients and observational signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Bergin, Edwin A.; Adams, Fred C.

    2014-10-20

    The chemical properties of protoplanetary disks are especially sensitive to their ionization environment. Sources of molecular gas ionization include cosmic rays (CRs), stellar X-rays, and short-lived radionuclides, each of which varies with location in the disk. This behavior leads to a significant amount of chemical structure, especially in molecular ion abundances, which is imprinted in their submillimeter rotational line emission. Using an observationally motivated disk model, we make predictions for the dependence of chemical abundances on the assumed properties of the ionizing field. We calculate the emergent line intensity for abundant molecular ions and simulate sensitive observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) for a disk at D = 100 pc. The models readily distinguish between high ionization rates (? ? 10{sup –17} s{sup –1} per H{sub 2}) and below, but it becomes difficult to distinguish between low ionization models when ? ? 10{sup –19} s{sup –1}. We find that H{sub 2}D{sup +} emission is not detectable for sub-interstellar CR rates with ALMA (6h integration), and that N{sub 2}D{sup +} emission may be a more sensitive tracer of midplane ionization. HCO{sup +} traces X-rays and high CR rates (?{sub CR} ? 10{sup –17} s{sup –1}), and provides a handle on the warm molecular ionization properties where CO is present in the gas. Furthermore, species like HCO{sup +}, which emits from a wide radial region and samples a large gradient in temperature, can exhibit ring-like emission as a consequence of low-lying rotational level de-excitation near the star. This finding highlights a scenario where rings are not necessarily structural or chemical in nature, but simply a result of the underlying line excitation properties.

  2. Comparison of chemical and thermal protein denaturation by combination of computational and experimental approaches. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Christiansen, Alexander; Samiotakis, Antonios; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2011-11-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation methods have been widely used to investigate folding processes of proteins in vitro. However, a molecular understanding of the relationship between these two perturbation methods is lacking. Here, we combined computational and experimental approaches to investigate denaturing effects on three structurally different proteins. We derived a linear relationship between thermal denaturation at temperature Tb and chemical denaturation at another temperature Tu using the stability change of a protein (?G). For this, we related the dependence of ?G on temperature, in the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, to that of ?G on urea concentration in the linear extrapolation method, assuming that there is a temperature pair from the urea (Tu) and the aqueous (Tb) ensembles that produces the same protein structures. We tested this relationship on apoazurin, cytochrome c, and apoflavodoxin using coarse-grained molecular simulations. We found a linear correlation between the temperature for a particular structural ensemble in the absence of urea, Tb, and the temperature of the same structural ensemble at a specific urea concentration, Tu. The in silico results agreed with in vitro far-UV circular dichroism data on apoazurin and cytochrome c. We conclude that chemical and thermal unfolding processes correlate in terms of thermodynamics and structural ensembles at most conditions; however, deviations were found at high concentrations of denaturant.

  3. Chemical characteristics of rainwater collected at a western site of Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khashman, Omar Ali.

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive study on the chemical composition of rainwater was carried out from October 2006 to May 2007 in Ghore El-Safi area western side of Jordan nearby the Dead Sea. Rainwater samples were analyzed for major ions (Ca 2+, Mg 2+, K +, Na +, NH 4+, HCO 3-, Cl -, NO 3- and SO 42-) and trace metals (Fe, Al, Zn, Pb, Cu, and Cd). The highest concentration of elements is observed at the beginning of the rainfall season when large amounts of dust accumulated in the atmosphere scavenged by rain. The majority of rainwater had a neutral or alkaline character as a result of neutralization caused by the alkaline local dusts which contain large amount of CaCO 3. The pH ranged from 4.8 to 8.2 with a mean value of 6.9 ± 0.65 which was in alkaline range considering 5.6 as the neutral pH of cloud water with atmospheric CO 2 equilibrium. In the total 35 rain events, only three events were observed in acidic range (< 5.6) which occurred after continuous rains. The equivalent concentration of components followed the order: Ca 2+ > HCO 3- > Cl - > Mg 2+ > NO 3- > SO 42- > NH 4+ > Na + > K +. Rainwater chemistry was analyzed using Factor Component Analysis to find the possible sources of the measured species. Three components that accounted for 84% of the total variance were extracted sea salts spray (Na+, Cl - and Mg 2+), and soil particles (natural origin), (Mg 2+, Ca 2+ and HCO 3-) and biomass burning (NH 4+). The results obtained in this study are compared with those other studies conducted at different sites in the world. In general, the results of this study suggested that rainwater chemistry is strongly influenced by local anthropogenic sources (potash factory and agricultural activities in Ghore El-Safi area) rather than natural and marine sources. The pollutants in rainwater samples were mainly derived from long distance transport, local industry and traffic sources.

  4. Preliminary Results of Detailed Chemical Abundance Analysis of Milky Way Satellite Galaxy Reticulum II Discovered in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Daniel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Li, Ting; Dark Energy Survey Milky Way Science Group

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from abundance analysis of stars in Milky Way satellite galaxies found in the Dark Energy Survey (DES). DES has discovered 16 candidate satellite galaxies of the Milky Way in its first two years of operation. Since January 2015, three candidates have subsequently been revealed to be dark matter-dominated by spectroscopic follow-up studies of their kinematics, confirming their status as satellite galaxies. Spectroscopic follow-up of the remaining 13 candidates is underway. We have analyzed high resolution VLT/GIRAFFE spectra of member stars in one of these satellite galaxies, Reticulum II. Using equivalent width measurement and spectral synthesis methods, we measure the abundances of Iron and other species in order to begin to understand the chemical content of these Milky Way satellites.

  5. On the validity of 3D polymer gel dosimetry: II. Physico-chemical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; De Deene, Yves

    2013-01-01

    This study quantifies some major physico-chemical factors that influence the validity of MRI (PAGAT) polymer gel dosimetry: temperature history (pre-, during and post-irradiation), oxygen exposure (post-irradiation) and volumetric effects (experiment with phantom in which a small test tube is inserted). Present results confirm the effects of thermal history prior to irradiation. By exposing a polymer gel sample to a linear temperature gradient of ˜2.8 °C cm-1 and following the dose deviation as a function of post-irradiation time new insights into temporal variations were added. A clear influence of the temperature treatment on the measured dose distribution is seen during the first hours post-irradiation (resulting in dose deviations up to 12%). This effect diminishes to 5% after 54 h post-irradiation. Imposing a temperature offset (maximum 6 °C for 3 h) during and following irradiation on a series of calibration phantoms results in only a small dose deviation of maximum 4%. Surprisingly, oxygen diffusing in a gel dosimeter up to 48 h post-irradiation was shown to have no effect. Volumetric effects were studied by comparing the dose distribution in a homogeneous phantom compared to the dose distribution in a phantom in which a small test tube was inserted. This study showed that the dose measured inside the test tube was closer to the ion chamber measurement in comparison to the reference phantom without test tube by almost 7%. It is demonstrated that physico-chemical effects are not the major causes for the dose discrepancies encountered in the reproducibility study discussed in the concurrent paper (Vandecasteele and De Deene 2013a Phys. Med. Biol. 58 19-42). However, it is concluded that these physico-chemical effects are important factors that should be addressed to further improve the dosimetric accuracy of 3D MRI polymer gel dosimetry. Both authors contributed equally to this study.

  6. Metal-poor dwarf galaxies in the SIGRID galaxy sample. I. H II region observations and chemical abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Jerjen, Helmut; Kewley, Lisa J.; Basurah, Hassan

    2014-05-10

    In this paper we present the results of observations of 17 H II regions in thirteen galaxies from the SIGRID sample of isolated gas-rich irregular dwarf galaxies. The spectra of all but one of the galaxies exhibit the auroral [O III] 4363 Å line, from which we calculate the electron temperature, T{sub e} , and gas-phase oxygen abundance. Five of the objects are blue compact dwarf galaxies, of which four have not previously been analyzed spectroscopically. We include one unusual galaxy which exhibits no evidence of the [N II] ?? 6548,6584 Å lines, suggesting a particularly low metallicity (< Z {sub ?}/30). We compare the electron temperature based abundances with those derived using eight of the new strong-line diagnostics presented by Dopita et al. Using a method derived from first principles for calculating total oxygen abundance, we show that the discrepancy between the T{sub e} -based and strong-line gas-phase abundances have now been reduced to within ?0.07 dex. The chemical abundances are consistent with what is expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation. We derive estimates of the electron densities and find them to be between ?5 and ?100 cm{sup –3}. We find no evidence for a nitrogen plateau for objects in this sample with metallicities 0.5 > Z {sub ?} > 0.15.

  7. ANALYSIS OF TWO SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD H II REGIONS CONSIDERING THERMAL INHOMOGENEITIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DETERMINATIONS OF EXTRAGALACTIC CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Pena-Guerrero, Maria A.; Peimbert, Antonio; Peimbert, Manuel; Ruiz, Maria Teresa E-mail: antonio@astroscu.unam.mx E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.cl

    2012-02-20

    We present long-slit spectrophotometry considering the presence of thermal inhomogeneities (t{sup 2}) of two H II regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC): NGC 456 and NGC 460. Physical conditions and chemical abundances were determined for three positions in NGC 456 and one position in NGC 460, first under the assumption of uniform temperature and then allowing for the possibility of thermal inhomogeneities. We determined t{sup 2} values based on three different methods: (1) by comparing the temperature derived using oxygen forbidden lines with the temperature derived using helium recombination lines (RLs), (2) by comparing the abundances derived from oxygen forbidden lines with those derived from oxygen RLs, and (3) by comparing the abundances derived from ultraviolet carbon forbidden lines with those derived from optical carbon RLs. The first two methods averaged t{sup 2} = 0.067 {+-} 0.013 for NGC 456 and t{sup 2} = 0.036 {+-} 0.027 for NGC 460. These values of t{sup 2} imply that when gaseous abundances are determined with collisionally excited lines they are underestimated by a factor of nearly two. From these objects and others in the literature, we find that in order to account for thermal inhomogeneities and dust depletion, the O/H ratio in low-metallicity H II regions should be corrected by 0.25-0.45 dex depending on the thermal structure of the nebula or by 0.35 dex if such information is not available.

  8. The resonance line of B II in IUE spectra of chemically peculiar stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckrone, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of high-dispersion spectroscopic observations of eight chemically peculiar stars including Kappa Cnc and Mu Lep, and of one normal comparison star, Nu Cap, in the vicinity of 1362 A. The reported data were obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer during the first 15 months of its operation. The initial reduction of the data, which were originally described in a qualitative summary by Leckrone (1980), was affected by a serious error in the calibration of the instrument's intensity transfer function. This error has been corrected in the currently presented data. The results of spectrum syntheses of the 1362 A feature are also described for several of the stars.

  9. Studies in photochemical smog chemistry. I. Atmospheric chemistry of toluene. II. Analysis of chemical reaction mechanisms for photochemical smog

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    This study focuses on two related topics in the gas phase organic chemistry of importance in urban air pollution. Part I describes an experimental and modeling effort aimed at developing a new explicit reaction mechanism for the atmospheric photooxidation of toluene. This mechanism is tested using experimental data from both indoor and outdoor smog chamber facilities. The predictions of the new reaction mechanism are found to be in good agreement with both sets of experimental data. Additional simulations performed with the new mechanism are used to investigate various mechanistic paths, and to gain insight into areas where the understanding is not complete. The outdoor experimental facility, which was built to provide the second set of experimental data, consists of a 65 cubic meter teflon smog chamber together with full instrumentation capable of measuring ozone, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), carbon monoxide, relative humidity, temperature, aerosol size distributions, and of course toluene and its photooxidation products. In Part II, a theoretical analysis of lumped chemical reaction mechanisms for photochemical smog is presented. Included is a description of a new counter species analysis technique which can be used to analyze any complex chemical reaction mechanism. Finally, a new lumped mechanism for photochemical smog is developed and tested against experimental data from two smog chamber facilities. Advantages of this mechanism relative to the existing lumped mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Femtochemistry of orange II in solution and in chemical and biological nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    Douhal, Abderrazzak; Sanz, Mikel; Tormo, Laura

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we report on studies of the nature of the dynamics and hydrophobic binding in cyclodextrins and human serum albumin protein complexes with orange II. With femtosecond time resolution, we examined the proton-transfer and trans-cis isomerization reactions of the ligand in these nanocavities and in pure solvents. Because of confinement at the ground state, the orientational motion in the formed phototautomer is restricted, leading to a rich dynamics. Therefore, the emission lifetimes span a large window of tens to hundreds of picoseconds in the cavities. Possible H-bond interactions between the guest and cyclodextrin do not affect the caged dynamics. For the protein–ligand complexes, slow diffusional motion (?630 ps) observed in the anisotropy decay indicates that the binding structure is not completely rigid, and the embedded guest is not frozen with the hydrophobic pocket. The ultrafast isomerization and decays are explained in terms of coupling motions between N–N and C–N stretching modes of the formed tautomer. We discuss the role of confinement on the trans-cis isomerization with the cavities and its relationships to frequency and time domains of nanostructure emission. PMID:16365300

  11. A physical chemical approach to understanding cellular dysfunction in type II diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranker, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The conversion of soluble protein into b-sheet rich amyloid fibers is the hallmark of a number of serious diseases. Precursors for many of these systems (e.g. Ab from Alzheimer's disease) reside in close association with a biological membranes. Membrane bilayers are reported to accelerate the rate of amyloid assembly. Furthermore, membrane permeabilization by amyloidogenic peptides can lead to toxicity. Given the b-sheet rich nature of mature amyloid, it is seemingly paradoxical that many precursors are either intrinsically b-helical, or transiently adopt an a-helical state upon association with membrane. We have investigated these phenomena in islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). IAPP is a 37-residue peptide hormone which forms amyloid fibers in individuals with type II diabetes. We report here the discovery of an oligomeric species that arises through stochastic nucleation on membranes, and results in disruption of the lipid bilayer. These species are stable, result in all-or-none leakage, and represent a definable protein/lipid phase that equilibrates over time. To characterize the reaction pathway of assembly, we apply an experimental design that includes ensemble and single particle evaluations in vitro and correlate these with quantitative measures of cellular toxicity.

  12. Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II.

    E-print Network

    Inorganic chemical fertilizer application on US farms increased from very low levels to relatively high levels during the two to three decades after World War II. Increased fertilizer use greatly. It was apparent well before the rapid expansion in fertilizer use that inexpensive ways to evaluate the fertility

  13. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David C.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Baich, Mark A.

    2005-08-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is in the process of investigating factors suspected of impacting catalytic hydrogen generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, Chemical Process Cell, CPC. Noble metal catalyzed hydrogen generation in simulation work constrains the allowable acid addition operating window in DWPF. This constraint potentially impacts washing strategies during sludge batch preparation. It can also influence decisions related to the addition of secondary waste streams to a sludge batch. Catalytic hydrogen generation data from 2002-2005 were reviewed. The data came from process simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, and Slurry Mix Evaporator, SME. Most of the data was from the development work for the Sludge Batch 3 process flowsheet. This included simulant and radioactive waste testing. Preliminary Sludge Batch 4 data were also reviewed. A statistical analysis of SB3 simulant hydrogen generation data was performed. One factor considered in the statistical analysis was excess acid. Excess acid was determined experimentally as the acid added beyond that required to achieve satisfactory nitrite destruction.

  14. The Dual Origin of Stellar Halos. II. Chemical Abundances as Tracers of Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi; Willman, Beth; Brooks, Alyson M.; Governato, Fabio; Hogg, David W.; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2010-09-01

    Fully cosmological, high-resolution N-body+smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the chemical abundance trends of stars in simulated stellar halos as a function of their origin. These simulations employ a physically motivated supernova feedback recipe, as well as metal enrichment, metal cooling, and metal diffusion. As presented in an earlier paper, the simulated galaxies in this study are surrounded by stellar halos whose inner regions contain both stars accreted from satellite galaxies and stars formed in situ in the central regions of the main galaxies and later displaced by mergers into their inner halos. The abundance patterns ([Fe/H] and [O/Fe]) of halo stars located within 10 kpc of a solar-like observer are analyzed. We find that for galaxies which have not experienced a recent major merger, in situ stars at the high [Fe/H] end of the metallicity distribution function are more [?/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at similar [Fe/H]. This dichotomy in the [O/Fe] of halo stars at a given [Fe/H] results from the different potential wells within which in situ and accreted halo stars form. These results qualitatively match recent observations of local Milky Way halo stars. It may thus be possible for observers to uncover the relative contribution of different physical processes to the formation of stellar halos by observing such trends in the halo populations of the Milky Way and other local Lsstarf galaxies.

  15. Summary of selected data on chemical contaminants in sediments collected during 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    Since 1984, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Status and Trends (NS T) Program has analyzed samples of surface sediment collected at about 200 coastal and estuarine sites throughout the United States. The chemical contaminants measured are chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCSs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 12 trace elements. Sediment characteristics such as grain size, which affect contaminant concentrations, have also been quantified. With few exceptions, the higher levels of contamination have been found among the 175 sites where the sediment is muddy rather than sandy. Most of the highest concentrations for any particular contaminant have been at the 20 sites near Boston, New York, San Diego, Los Angeles, or Seattle. Despite being sandy, sediments at two Long Island Sound sites showed high levels of PAHs. Except for some sites near the Florida cities of Jacksonville, Tampa, Panama City, and Ft. Walton Beach, levels of contamination at sites in the Gulf of Mexico and in the southeastern United States were relatively low.

  16. Microbial diversity in firework chemical exposed soil and water samples collected in Virudhunagar district, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Dhasarathan, P; Theriappan, P; Ashokraja, C

    2010-03-01

    Microbial diversity of soil and water samples collected from pyrochemicals exposed areas of Virdhunagar district (Tamil Nadu, India) was studied. Soil and water samples from cultivable area, waste land and city area of the same region were also studied for a comparative acount. There is a remarkable reduction in total heterotrophic bacterial population (THB) in pyrochemicals exposed soil and water samples (42 × 10(4) CFU/g and 5.6 × 10(4) CFU/ml respectively), compared to the THB of cultivable area soil and water samples (98 × 10(7) CFU/g and 38.6 × 10(7) CFU/ml). The generic composition the THB of the pyrochemicals exposed samples too exhibited considerable change compared to other samples. Pseudomonas sp. was the predominant one (41.6%) followed by Achromobacter sp. (25%) in pyrochemical exposed soil and Pseudomonas sp. was the predominant one (25%) in pyrochemical exposed water samples followed by Bacillus sp. (25%) and Micrococcus sp. (16.6%). It was observed that Cornybacterium sp. and Micrococcus sp. were absent completely in pyrochemical exposed soil and Achromobacter sp. was missing in the pyrochemical exposed water samples, which were present in the other samples. The outcome of this study clearly demonstrates that pollutants such as chemicals used in pyrotechniques affect the microbial biodiversity and suitable measures have to be taken to control the pollution level and to save biodiversity. PMID:23100806

  17. Chemical analyses of coal, coal-associated rocks and coal combustion products collected for the National Coal Quality Inventory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Joseph R.; Bullock, John H., Jr.; Finkelman, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, the USGS initiated the National Coal Quality Inventory (NaCQI) project to address a need for quality information on coals that will be mined during the next 20-30 years. At the time this project was initiated, the publicly available USGS coal quality data was based on samples primarily collected and analyzed between 1973 and 1985. The primary objective of NaCQI was to create a database containing comprehensive, accurate and accessible chemical information on the quality of mined and prepared United States coals and their combustion byproducts. This objective was to be accomplished through maintaining the existing publicly available coal quality database, expanding the database through the acquisition of new samples from priority areas, and analysis of the samples using updated coal analytical chemistry procedures. Priorities for sampling include those areas where future sources of compliance coal are federally owned. This project was a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), State geological surveys, universities, coal burning utilities, and the coal mining industry. Funding support came from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  18. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ESSENTIAL OILS FROM A COLLECTION OF OCIMUM SPECIES (NCRPIS, AMES, USA); INVESTIGATION OF THEIR ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITIES AND EFFECTS ON FUNGAL POLYAMINES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station conserves germplasm of aromatic plants, including extensive collections of Ocimum providing valuable sources of key genes for developing new basil cultivars. We conducted chemical analyses of essential oils of 73 Ocimum accessions, comparing our...

  19. Cumulative physical uncertainty in modern stellar models. II. The dependence on the chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, G.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: We extend our previous work on the effects of the uncertainties on the main input physics for the evolution of low-mass stars. We analyse the dependence of the cumulative physical uncertainty affecting stellar tracks on the chemical composition. Methods: We calculated more than 6000 stellar tracks and isochrones, with metallicity ranging from Z = 0.0001 to 0.02, by changing the following physical inputs within their current range of uncertainty: 1H(p,?e+)2H, 14N(p,?)15O and triple-? reaction rates, radiative and conductive opacities, neutrino energy losses, and microscopic diffusion velocities. The analysis was performed using a latin hypercube sampling design. We examine in a statistical way - for different metallicities - the dependence on the variation of the physical inputs of the turn-off (TO) luminosity, the central hydrogen exhaustion time (tH), the luminosity and the helium core mass at the red-giant branch (RGB) tip, and the zero age horizontal branch (ZAHB) luminosity in the RR Lyrae region. Results: For the stellar tracks, an increase in the metallicity from Z = 0.0001 to Z = 0.02 produces a cumulative physical uncertainty error variation in TO luminosity from 0.028 dex to 0.017 dex, while the global uncertainty on tH increases from 0.42 Gyr to 1.08 Gyr. For the RGB tip, the cumulative uncertainty on the luminosity is almost constant at 0.03 dex, whereas the one on the helium core mass decreases from 0.0055 M? to 0.0035 M?. The dependence of the ZAHB luminosity error is not monotonic with Z, and it varies from a minimum of 0.036 dex at Z = 0.0005 to a maximum of 0.047 dex at Z = 0.0001. Regarding stellar isochrones of 12 Gyr, the cumulative physical uncertainty on the predicted TO luminosity and mass increases respectively from 0.012 dex to 0.014 dex and from 0.0136 M? to 0.0186 M?. Consequently, from Z = 0.0001 to Z = 0.02 for ages typical of galactic globular clusters, the uncertainty on the age inferred from the TO luminosity increases from 325 Myr to 415 Myr. Tables 1, 3, 6, and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Suggested protocol for collecting, handling and preparing peat cores and peat samples for physical, chemical, mineralogical and isotopic analyses.

    PubMed

    Givelet, Nicolas; Le Roux, Gaël; Cheburkin, Andriy; Chen, Bin; Frank, Jutta; Goodsite, Michael E; Kempter, Heike; Krachler, Michael; Noernberg, Tommy; Rausch, Nicole; Rheinberger, Stefan; Roos-Barraclough, Fiona; Sapkota, Atindra; Scholz, Christian; Shotyk, William

    2004-05-01

    For detailed reconstructions of atmospheric metal deposition using peat cores from bogs, a comprehensive protocol for working with peat cores is proposed. The first step is to locate and determine suitable sampling sites in accordance with the principal goal of the study, the period of time of interest and the precision required. Using the state of the art procedures and field equipment, peat cores are collected in such a way as to provide high quality records for paleoenvironmental study. Pertinent field observations gathered during the fieldwork are recorded in a field report. Cores are kept frozen at -18 degree C until they can be prepared in the laboratory. Frozen peat cores are precisely cut into 1 cm slices using a stainless steel band saw with stainless steel blades. The outside edges of each slice are removed using a titanium knife to avoid any possible contamination which might have occurred during the sampling and handling stage. Each slice is split, with one-half kept frozen for future studies (archived), and the other half further subdivided for physical, chemical, and mineralogical analyses. Physical parameters such as ash and water contents, the bulk density and the degree of decomposition of the peat are determined using established methods. A subsample is dried overnight at 105 degree C in a drying oven and milled in a centrifugal mill with titanium sieve. Prior to any expensive and time consuming chemical procedures and analyses, the resulting powdered samples, after manual homogenisation, are measured for more than twenty-two major and trace elements using non-destructive X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) methods. This approach provides lots of valuable geochemical data which documents the natural geochemical processes which occur in the peat profiles and their possible effect on the trace metal profiles. The development, evaluation and use of peat cores from bogs as archives of high-resolution records of atmospheric deposition of mineral dust and trace elements have led to the development of many analytical procedures which now permit the measurement of a wide range of elements in peat samples such as lead and lead isotope ratios, mercury, arsenic, antimony, silver, molybdenum, thorium, uranium, rare earth elements. Radiometric methods (the carbon bomb pulse of (14)C, (210)Pb and conventional (14)C dating) are combined to allow reliable age-depth models to be reconstructed for each peat profile. PMID:15152318

  1. Photochemical Formation of Fe(II) and Peroxides in Coastal Seawater Collected around Okinawa Island, Japan - Impact of Red Soil Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, K.; Nakajima, H.; Higuchi, T.; Fujimura, H.; Arakaki, T.; Taira, H.

    2003-12-01

    In a study to elucidate the impacts of red soil pollution on the oxidizing power of seawater, photochemical formation of Fe(II) and peroxides was studied in seawaters collected around Okinawa Island, Japan. The northern part of Okinawa Island suffers from red soil pollution which is caused mainly by land development such as pineapple farming and the construction of recreational facilities. We studied photochemical formation of peroxides and Fe(II) in the same seawater samples because the reaction between HOOH and Fe(II) forms hydroxyl radical (OH radical), the most potent environmental oxidant. Photochemical formation of Fe(II) was fast and reached steady-state in 30 minutes of simulated sunlight illumination and the steady-state Fe(II) concentrations were about 80% of total iron concentrations. Photochemical formation of peroxides was relatively slow and formation kinetics varied, depending on the initial peroxide concentrations. Because photochemical formation of peroxides was faster and total iron concentrations in the red soil polluted seawater were higher, red soil polluted seawater is expected to have greater oxidizing power than seawater that is not polluted with red soil.

  2. 155:307(02) Chemical Engineering Analysis II Fall 2011 Lectures: Mon, Wed 5:00-6:20 p.m., DSV Lab (SOE room B125), C-115 (occasional Wed)

    E-print Network

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    155:307(02) Chemical Engineering Analysis II Fall 2011 Lectures: Mon, Wed 5:00-6:20 p.m., DSV Lab, and engineering to analyze and solve numerically problems encountered in chemical and biochemical engineering and methods of numerical analysis as applied to the solution of chemical and biochemical engineering problems

  3. Chemical and isotopic data collected from groundwater, surface-water, and atmospheric precipitation sites in Upper Kittitas County, Washington, 2010-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Ely, D. Matthew

    2013-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey study of water resources in Upper Kittitas County, Washington, chemical and isotopic data were collected from groundwater, surface-water, and atmospheric precipitation sites from 2010 to 2012. These data are documented here so that interested parties can quickly and easily find those chemical and isotopic data related to this study. The locations of the samples are shown on an interactive map of the study area. This report is dynamic; additional data will be added to it as they become available.

  4. Chemical composition of samples collected from waste rock dumps and other mining-related features at selected phosphate mines in southeastern Idaho, western Wyoming, and northern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, Phillip R.; Causey, J. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    This report provides chemical analyses for 31 samples collected from various phosphate mine sites in southeastern Idaho (25), northern Utah (2), and western Wyoming (4). The sampling effort was undertaken as a reconnaissance and does not constitute a characterization of mine wastes. Twenty-five samples were collected from waste rock dumps, 2 from stockpiles, and 1 each from slag, tailings, mill shale, and an outcrop. All samples were analyzed for a suite of major, minor, and trace elements. Although the analytical data set for the 31 samples is too small for detailed statistical analysis, a summary of general observations is made.

  5. Chemical comparison and acute toxicity of water accommodated fraction (WAF) of source and field collected Macondo oils from the Deepwater Horizon spill.

    PubMed

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Altin, Dag; Nordtug, Trond; Daling, Per S; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2015-02-15

    Two Source oils and five field collected oil residues from the Deepwater Horizon incident were chemically characterized. Water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of the Source oils and two of the field-weathered oils were prepared to evaluate the impact of natural weathering on the chemical composition and the acute toxicity of the WAFs. Toxicity test species representing different tropic levels were used (the primary producer Skeletonema costatum (algae) and the herbivorous copepod Acartia tonsa). The results suggest that the potential for acute toxicity is higher in WAFs from non-weathered oils than WAFs from the field weathered oils. The Source oils contained a large fraction of soluble and bioavailable components (such as BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylenes) and naphthalene), whereas in the surface collected oils these components were depleted by dissolution into the water column as the oil rose to the surface and by evaporative loss after reaching the sea surface. PMID:25534626

  6. Odor and odorous chemical emissions from animal buildings: part 1 - project overview, collection methods, and quality control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock facilities have historically generated public concerns due to their emissions of odorous air and various chemical pollutants. Odor emission factors and identification of principal odorous chemicals are needed to better understand the problem. Applications of odor emission factors include i...

  7. Chemical analyses of surface water in Illinois, 1958-74; Volume II, Illinois River basin and Mississippi River tributaries north of Illinois River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Toler, L.G.

    1978-01-01

    Samples of surface water were collected and analyzed by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and its predecessor, the Stream Pollution Control Bureau of the Illinois Department of Public Health. The results for the period 1958 to 1974 are presented in tabular form and the history of sampling and analytical methods are included for all sites where samples were collected at gaging stations or near enough that reliable discharge estimates could be made. The report is contained in three volumes. This volume (Volume II) includes Illinois River basin and Mississippi River tributaries north of Illinois River basin. (See also W78-10034 and W78-10036) (Woodard-USGS)

  8. 78 FR 74173 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests: Heritage Health Index II on the State of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ...satisfaction with cultural programs and services...and international communications and cooperative...collections care across cultural heritage organizations...will be a repeated cross- sectional web survey of U.S. cultural heritage...

  9. Chemical and spectroscopic characterizations, ESI-QTOF mass spectrometric measurements and DFT studies of new complexes of palladium(II) with tryptamine and mefenamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Marcos A.; Arruda, Eduardo G. R.; Profirio, Daniel M.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Gozzo, Fábio C.; Formiga, André L. B.; Corbi, Pedro P.

    2015-11-01

    New palladium(II) complexes with tryptamine (Pd-tra) and mefenamic acid (Pd-mef) were prepared and characterized by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Elemental, ESI-QTOF mass spectrometric and thermogravimetric analyses of the compounds confirm the composition [PdCl2(tra)2] for Pd-tra and [Pd(mef)2(bipy)] for Pd-mef. Infrared data indicate the coordination of tryptamine to Pd(II) by the nitrogen atom of the amino group, while for mefenamic acid coordination occurs by the oxygen atom of carboxylate group in a monodentate form. The 1H, 13C and {15N,1H} NMR spectroscopic data confirm the nitrogen coordination of the NH2 group of trypatmine to Pd(II) in the Pd-tra complex and also the oxygen coordination of the carboxylate group of mefenamic acid to Pd(II) in the Pd-mef complex. Density functional theory (DFT) studies were applied to determine the difference in energy between the geometric isomers (cis/trans) of Pd-tra and to optimize the structure of the Pd-mef complex. Raman spectroscopic measurements reinforce the nitrogen coordination of tryptamine to Pd(II) in the Pd-tra complex and confirms the presence of the cis-[PdCl2(tra)2] isomer in the solid state. The complexes are insoluble in water.

  10. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  11. Collection of chemical-specific toxicological and pharmacokinetic data to improve risk assessments based on epidemiology: Example of Mn

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data limitations led to the application of default uncertainty factors in prior risk assessments for Mn. These limitations were instrumental in the EPA generation of an alternative tier II test rule under section 211 (b) of the Clean Air Act, (fuels and fuel additives) regarding ...

  12. Organic Chemical Concentrations and Reproductive Biomarkers in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) Collected from Two Areas in Lake Mead, Nevada, May 1999-May 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodbred, Steven L.; Leiker, Thomas J.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Jenkins, Jill A.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Orsak, Erik; Rosen, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Reclamation, and Nevada Department of Wildlife, collected and assessed data to determine the general health and reproductive status of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) at two study areas in Lake Mead, Nevada, during May 1999-May 2000. These data will form the basis of interpretations and provide a comparison for continuing studies on the health of the ecosystem in Lake Mead. One study area, Las Vegas Bay, is in the western part of Lake Mead. Las Vegas Bay receives inflows from Las Vegas Wash, which is predominantly tertiary-treated wastewater effluent, and to a lesser extent stormwater runoff from Las Vegas, Henderson, and other nearby communities, and from ground water underlying Las Vegas Valley. The other study area, Overton Arm, is in the northern extent of Lake Mead. Overton Arm receives inflow from the Virgin and Muddy Rivers, which historically are not influenced by wastewater effluent. Both sexes of common carp were collected bimonthly for 12 months using boat-mounted electrofishing gear (a direct electric current is used to temporarily immobilize fish for capture) to determine their health and reproductive status and any relation between these factors and environmental contaminants. This report presents fish tissue chemistry, organic chemical compound concentrations, and biomarker data for 83 male common carp collected from Las Vegas Bay, similar organic chemistry results for 15 male common carp, and similar biomarker measures for 80 male common carp collected from Overton Arm. Tissue chemistry results also are presented for 16 female common carp and biomarker measures for 79 female common carp collected from Las Vegas Bay, and tissue chemistry results for 15 female common carp and biomarker measures for 81 female common carp collected from Overton Arm. Thirty-three organic chemical compounds plus total concentrations for four groups of compounds (chlordanes, polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], brominated diphenyl ethers [BDEs], and triclosans) were analyzed from extracts of whole-body tissue using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in male common carp from Las Vegas Bay during May 1999 through May 2000. All 33 compounds were detected in at least one sample of whole-body tissue from male common carp collected in Las Vegas Bay. In Overton Arm, 37 organic compounds plus total concentrations of three groups of compounds (PCBs, BDEs, and triclosans) were analyzed in male common carp where 20 (54 percent) of the compounds were detected. Sixteen of the 33 compounds detected in male common carp from Las Vegas Bay and 10 compounds detected in males from Overton Arm have the potential to disrupt the endocrine system in fish in Lake Mead. During May and June 1999, the mean concentration of all organic compounds detected in male common carp was 670 micrograms per kilogram from Las Vegas Bay and 109 micrograms per kilogram from Overton Arm. Twenty-seven organic compounds plus total PCBs were analyzed from extracts of whole-body tissue in female common carp collected in Las Vegas Bay and Overton Arm during May 1999. Twenty-four (86 percent) of these compounds were detected in at least one sample of whole-body tissue from female common carp collected from Las Vegas Bay while 10 (36 percent) chemical compounds were detected in female common carp from Overton Arm during that same period. Median concentrations of all chemical compounds were higher in female common carp from Las Vegas Bay compared to those collected from Overton Arm except Dacthal (DCPA), which was similar between sites. Biomarker measures obtained for male and female common carp include gonadosomatic index (percentage of gonad weight to total body weight), plasma vitellogenin (a phospholipid protein normally produced by female common carp and other oviparous fish), and condition factor [body weight/(fork length)3]. Biomarker measures for male c

  13. On the intersection of the shell, collective and cluster models of atomic nuclei II: Symmetry-breaking and large deformations

    E-print Network

    J. Cseh; J. Darai

    2014-04-14

    We discuss the role of the broken symmetries in the connection of the shell, collective and cluster models. The cluster-shell competition is described in terms of cold quantum phases. Stable quasi-dynamical U(3) symmetry is found for specific large deformations for a Nilsson-type Hamiltonian.

  14. NEW YORK CITY BUS TERMINAL DIESEL EMISSIONS STUDY: MEASUREMENT AND COLLECTION OF DIESEL EXHAUST FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper is concerned with the impact of diesel emissions on the quality of the ambient air and the resulting effects on human health. The study was designed to chemically characterize and bioassay heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust as it exists in the ambient atmosphere. Diesel e...

  15. (Collection of North Pacific Ocean surface seawater samples for chemical analysis): Foreign trip report, January 26--February 27, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, J.G.

    1988-03-04

    This trip was a continuation of the sampling program undertaken during 1984--1985 to study the seasonal and regional variability of CO/sub 2/ chemistry in high latitude deep water formation areas of the North Pacific. The work is conducted by Columbia University (Dr. Taro Takahashi, Principal Investigator) for the Department of Energy's Energy Systems Program managed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Aboard the PRESIDENT ARTHUR, surface seawater samples were collected at forty-one stations along the route from Oakland, California, to Keeling, Taiwan, via Guam. On the return trip, samples were collected from thirty-seven stations during transit from Keelung to Los Angeles, California.

  16. Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals of Cloud Droplets and Ice Crystals Collected On Board Research Aircraft in the ISDAC 2008 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Brooks, Sarah D.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Glen, Andrew; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Marry K.; Liu, Peter; MacDonald, A. M.; Strapp, J. Walter; McFarquhar, Greg

    2013-06-24

    Although it has been shown that size of atmospheric particles has a direct correlation with their ability to act as cloud droplet and ice nuclei, the influence of composition of freshly emitted and aged particles in nucleation processes is poorly understood. In this work we combine data from field measurements of ice nucleation with chemical imaging of the sampled particles to link aerosol composition with ice nucleation ability. Field measurements and sampling were conducted during the Indirect and Semidirect Aerosols Campaign (ISDAC) over Barrow, Alaska, in the springtime of 2008. In-situ ice nucleation measurements were conducted using a Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC). Measured number concentrations of ice nuclei (IN) varied from frequent values of 0.01 per liter to more than 10 per liter. Residuals of airborne droplets and ice crystals were collected through a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI). The compositions of individual atmospheric particles and the residuals were studied using Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (CCSEM/EDX) and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Chemical analysis of cloud particle residuals collected during an episode of high ice nucleation suggests that both size and composition may influence aerosol's ability to act as IN. The STXM/NEXAFS chemical composition maps of individual residuals have characteristic structures of either inorganic or black carbon cores coated by organic materials. In a separate flight, particle samples from a biomass burning plume were collected. Although it has previously been suggested that episodes of biomass burning contribute to increased numbers of highly effective ice nuclei, in this episode we observed that only a small fraction were effective ice nuclei. Most of the particles from the biomass plume episode were smaller in size and were composed of homogeneous organic material without identifiable cores.

  17. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Antes, Fabiane Goldschmidt; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Érico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-06-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 °C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 °C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  18. Validation of DSMC results for chemically nonequilibrium air flows against measurements of the electron number density in RAM-C II flight experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shevyrin, Alexander A.; Vashchenkov, Pavel V.; Bondar, Yevgeniy A.; Ivanov, Mikhail S.

    2014-12-09

    An ionized flow around the RAM C-II vehicle in the range of altitudes from 73 to 81 km is studied by the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with three models of chemical reactions. It is demonstrated that vibration favoring in reactions of dissociation of neutral molecules affects significantly the predicted values of plasma density in the shock layer, and good agreement between the results of experiments and DSMC computations can be achieved in terms of the plasma density as a function of the flight altitude.

  19. Fractionally distilled SRC-I, SRC-II, EDS, H-Coal and ITSL direct coal liquefaction process materials: a comparative summary of chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.; Dauble, D.D.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-07-01

    This document reports and compares the results compiled from chemical analyses and biological testing of coal liquefaction process materials which were fractionally distilled, after production, into various comparable boiling-point range cuts. Comparative analyses were performed on solvent refined coal (SRC)-I, SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS an integrated two-stage liquefaction (ITSL) distillate materials. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative, chemical and biological assessments. Where possible, results obtained from the distillate cuts are compared to those from coal liquefaction materials with limited boiling ranges. Work reported here was conducted by investigators in the Biology and Chemistry Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, WA. 38 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  20. Adsorption of aqueous Cd(II) and Pb(II) on activated carbon nanopores prepared by chemical activation of doum palm shell.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Umar Ibrahim; Otene, Emmanuel; Abdullah, Abdul Halim

    2015-01-01

    Non-uniformly sized activated carbons were derived from doum palm shell, a new precursor, by carbonization in air and activation using KOH, NaOH and ZnCl2. The activated carbon fibres were characterised by X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption, scanning electron microscopy, particle size analysis and evaluated for Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal. The 40-50 nm size, less graphitic, mesoporous NaOH activated carbon yielded high adsorption efficiency, pointing largely to the influence surface area. The performance of the KOH based activated carbon was arguably explained for the first time in terms of crystallinity. The efficiencies of the mesoporous ZnCl2-formulated activated carbon diminished due to the presence of larger particles. Batch adsorption of divalent metals revealed dependence on adsorbent dose, agitation time, pH and adsorbate concentrations with high adsorption efficiencies at optimum operating parameters. The equilibrium profiles fitted Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, and kinetics favoured pseudo-second order model. The study demonstrated the practicability of the removal of alarming levels of cadmium and lead ions from industrial effluents. PMID:26339560

  1. The population of planetary nebulae and H II regions in M 81. A study of radial metallicity gradients and chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, L.; Magrini, L.; Villaver, E.; Galli, D.

    2010-10-01

    Context. M 81 is an ideal laboratory to investigate the galactic chemical and dynamical evolution through the study of its young and old stellar populations. Aims: We analyze the chemical abundances of planetary nebulae and H ii regions in the M 81 disk for insight on galactic evolution, and compare it with that of other galaxies, including the Milky Way. Methods: We acquired Hectospec/MMT spectra of 39 PNe and 20 H ii regions, with 33 spectra viable for temperature and abundance analysis. Our PN observations represent the first PN spectra in M 81 ever published, while several H ii region spectra have been published before, although without a direct electron temperature determination. We determine elemental abundances of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon in PNe and H ii regions, and determine their averages and radial gradients. Results: The average O/H ratio of PNe compared to that of the H ii regions indicates a general oxygen enrichment in M 81 in the last ~10 Gyr. The PN metallicity gradient in the disk of M 81 is ?log(O/H)/?RG = -0.055 ± 0.02 dex/kpc. Neon and sulfur in PNe have a radial distribution similar to that of oxygen, with similar gradient slopes. If we combine our H ii sample with the one in the literature we find a possible mild evolution of the gradient slope, with results consistent with gradient steepening with time. Additional spectroscopy is needed to confirm this trend. There are no type I PNe in our M 81 sample, consistently with the observation of only the brightest bins of the PNLF, the galaxy metallicity, and the evolution of post-AGB shells. Conclusions: Both the young and the old populations of M 81 disclose shallow but detectable negative radial metallicity gradient, which could be slightly steeper for the young population, thus not excluding a mild gradients steepening with the time since galaxy formation. During its evolution M 81 has been producing oxygen; its total oxygen enrichment exceeds that of other nearby galaxies. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/521/A3

  2. The chemical abundances of the stellar populations in the Leo I and II dSph galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosler, Tammy L.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2007-06-01

    We have obtained calcium abundances and radial velocities for 102 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) and 74 RGB stars in the Leo II dSph using the low-resolution spectrograph (LRIS) on the Keck I 10-m telescope. We report on the calcium abundances [Ca/H] derived from the strengths of the CaII triplet absorption lines at 8498, 8542 and 8662 Å in the stellar spectra using a new empirical CaII triplet calibration to [Ca/H]. The two galaxies have different average [Ca/H] values of -1.34 +/- 0.02 for Leo I and -1.65 +/- 0.02 for Leo II with intrinsic abundance dispersions of 1.2 and 1.0 dex, respectively. The typical random and total errors in derived abundances are 0.10 and 0.17 dex per star. For comparison to the existing literature, we also converted our CaII measurements to [Fe/H] on the scale of Carretta and Gratton (1997) though we discuss why this may not be the best determinant of metallicity; Leo I has a mean [Fe/H] = -1.34 and Leo II has a mean [Fe/H] = -1.59. The metallicity distribution function of Leo I is approximately Gaussian in shape with an excess at the metal-rich end, while that of Leo II shows an abrupt cut-off at the metal-rich end. The lower mean metallicity of Leo II is consistent with the fact that it has a lower luminosity, hence lower the total mass than Leo I; thus, the evolution of Leo II may have been affected more by mass lost in galactic winds. Our direct and independent measurement of the metallicity distributions in these dSph will allow a more accurate star-formation histories to be derived from future analysis of their colour-magnitude diagrams(CMDs). Data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. E-mail: tlbosler@yahoo.com

  3. UCI Chemical Hygiene Plan i August 2014 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-print Network

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    UCI Chemical Hygiene Plan i August 2014 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN University of California, Irvine (949) 824-8539 #12;UCI Chemical Hygiene Plan ii August 2014 Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) Chapters..................................................... A-1 Appendix B: Container Labelling

  4. World Endometriosis Research Foundation Endometriosis Phenome and biobanking harmonization project: II. Clinical and covariate phenotype data collection in endometriosis research

    PubMed Central

    Vitonis, Allison F.; Vincent, Katy; Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Fassbender, Amelie; Buck Louis, Germaine M.; Hummelshoj, Lone; Giudice, Linda C.; Stratton, Pamela; Adamson, G. David; Becker, Christian M.; Zondervan, Krina T.; Missmer, Stacey A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To harmonize the collection of nonsurgical clinical and epidemiologic data relevant to endometriosis research, allowing large-scale collaboration. Design An international collaboration involving 34 clinical/academic centers and three industry collaborators from 16 countries on five continents. Setting In 2013, two workshops followed by global consultation, bringing together 54 leaders in endometriosis research. Patients None. Intervention(s) Development of a self-administered endometriosis patient questionnaire (EPQ), based on [1] systematic comparison of questionnaires from eight centers that collect data from endometriosis cases (and controls/comparison women) on a medium to large scale (publication on >100 cases); [2] literature evidence; and [3] several global consultation rounds. Main Outcome Measure(s) Standard recommended and minimum required questionnaires to capture detailed clinical and covariate data. Result(s) The standard recommended (EPHect EPQ-S) and minimum required (EPHect EPQ-M) questionnaires contain questions on pelvic pain, subfertility and menstrual/reproductive history, hormone/medication use, medical history, and personal information. Conclusion(s) The EPQ captures the basic set of patient characteristics and exposures considered by the WERF EPHect Working Group to be most critical for the advancement of endometriosis research, but is also relevant to other female conditions with similar risk factors and/or symptomatology. The instruments will be reviewed based on feedback from investigators, and–after a first review after 1 year–triannually through systematic follow-up surveys. Updated versions will be made available through http://endometriosisfoundation.org/ephect. PMID:25256930

  5. Silica, Hybrid Silica, Hydride Silica and Non-Silica Stationary Phases for Liquid Chromatography. Part II: Chemical and Thermal Stability.

    PubMed

    Borges, Endler M; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2015-08-01

    In the first part of this review, stationary phases (silica, hybrid silica, hydride silica and non-silica stationary phases) were characterized and compared with respect to selectivity, efficiency, resolution, solvent consumption and analysis time. The present review focuses on the thermal and chemical stability of stationary phases. Stationary phases of high chemical and thermal stability are required for separations that are carried over a wide pH and/or temperature range. PMID:25609601

  6. Chemical characterization of individual particles and residuals of cloud droplets and ice crystals collected on board research aircraft in the ISDAC 2008 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Moffet, R. C.; Glen, A.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.; Liu, P.; MacDonald, A. M.; Strapp, J. W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2013-06-01

    Ambient particles and the dry residuals of mixed-phase cloud droplets and ice crystals were collected during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) near Barrow, Alaska, in spring of 2008. The collected particles were analyzed using Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to identify physico-chemical properties that differentiate cloud-nucleating particles from the total aerosol population. A wide range of individually mixed components was identified in the ambient particles and residuals including organic carbon compounds, inorganics, carbonates, and black carbon. Our results show that cloud droplet residuals differ from the ambient particles in both size and composition, suggesting that both properties may impact the cloud-nucleating ability of aerosols in mixed-phase clouds. The percentage of residual particles which contained carbonates (47%) was almost four times higher than those in ambient samples. Residual populations were also enhanced in sea salt and black carbon and reduced in organic compounds relative to the ambient particles. Further, our measurements suggest that chemical processing of aerosols may improve their cloud-nucleating ability. Comparison of results for various time periods within ISDAC suggests that the number and composition of cloud-nucleating particles over Alaska can be influenced by episodic events bringing aerosols from both the local vicinity and as far away as Siberia.

  7. Atomic data for S II—toward better diagnostics of chemical evolution in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kisielius, Romas; Bogdanovich, Pavel; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Ferland, Gary J.; Lykins, Matt L.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption-line spectroscopy is a powerful tool used to estimate element abundances in both the nearby and distant universe. The accuracy of the abundances thus derived is naturally limited by the accuracy of the atomic data assumed for the spectral lines. We have recently started a project to perform new extensive atomic data calculations used for optical/UV spectral lines in the plasma modeling code Cloudy using state of the art quantal calculations. Here, we demonstrate our approach by focussing on S II, an ion used to estimate metallicities for Milky Way interstellar clouds as well as distant damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorber galaxies detected in the spectra of quasars and gamma-ray bursts. We report new extensive calculations of a large number of energy levels of S II, and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations are based on the configuration interaction approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework, and utilize both non-relativistic and quasirelativistic one-electron radial orbitals. The results of these new atomic calculations are then incorporated into Cloudy and applied to a lab plasma, and a typical DLA, for illustrative purposes. The new results imply relatively modest changes (?0.04 dex) to the metallicities estimated from S II in past studies. These results will be readily applicable to other studies of S II in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  8. Atomic Data for S II—Toward Better Diagnostics of Chemical Evolution in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisielius, Romas; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Ferland, Gary J.; Bogdanovich, Pavel; Lykins, Matt L.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption-line spectroscopy is a powerful tool used to estimate element abundances in both the nearby and distant universe. The accuracy of the abundances thus derived is naturally limited by the accuracy of the atomic data assumed for the spectral lines. We have recently started a project to perform new extensive atomic data calculations used for optical/UV spectral lines in the plasma modeling code Cloudy using state of the art quantal calculations. Here, we demonstrate our approach by focussing on S II, an ion used to estimate metallicities for Milky Way interstellar clouds as well as distant damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorber galaxies detected in the spectra of quasars and gamma-ray bursts. We report new extensive calculations of a large number of energy levels of S II, and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations are based on the configuration interaction approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework, and utilize both non-relativistic and quasirelativistic one-electron radial orbitals. The results of these new atomic calculations are then incorporated into Cloudy and applied to a lab plasma, and a typical DLA, for illustrative purposes. The new results imply relatively modest changes (?0.04 dex) to the metallicities estimated from S II in past studies. These results will be readily applicable to other studies of S II in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  9. Binary classification of a large collection of environmental chemicals from estrogen receptor assays by quantitative structure-activity relationship and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Zang, Qingda; Rotroff, Daniel M; Judson, Richard S

    2013-12-23

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals subject to regulatory decisions for endocrine disrupting potential. The ToxCast and Tox21 programs have tested ?8200 chemicals in a broad screening panel of in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and antagonist activity. The present work uses this large data set to develop in silico quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models using machine learning (ML) methods and a novel approach to manage the imbalanced data distribution. Training compounds from the ToxCast project were categorized as active or inactive (binding or nonbinding) classes based on a composite ER Interaction Score derived from a collection of 13 ER in vitro assays. A total of 1537 chemicals from ToxCast were used to derive and optimize the binary classification models while 5073 additional chemicals from the Tox21 project, evaluated in 2 of the 13 in vitro assays, were used to externally validate the model performance. In order to handle the imbalanced distribution of active and inactive chemicals, we developed a cluster-selection strategy to minimize information loss and increase predictive performance and compared this strategy to three currently popular techniques: cost-sensitive learning, oversampling of the minority class, and undersampling of the majority class. QSAR classification models were built to relate the molecular structures of chemicals to their ER activities using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), classification and regression trees (CART), and support vector machines (SVM) with 51 molecular descriptors from QikProp and 4328 bits of structural fingerprints as explanatory variables. A random forest (RF) feature selection method was employed to extract the structural features most relevant to the ER activity. The best model was obtained using SVM in combination with a subset of descriptors identified from a large set via the RF algorithm, which recognized the active and inactive compounds at the accuracies of 76.1% and 82.8% with a total accuracy of 81.6% on the internal test set and 70.8% on the external test set. These results demonstrate that a combination of high-quality experimental data and ML methods can lead to robust models that achieve excellent predictive accuracy, which are potentially useful for facilitating the virtual screening of chemicals for environmental risk assessment. PMID:24279462

  10. Chemicals of emerging concern in water and bottom sediment in Great Lakes areas of concern, 2010 to 2011-Collection methods, analyses methods, quality assurance, and data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Kathy E.; Langer, Susan K.; Menheer, Michael A.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Smith, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) cooperated with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on a study to identify the occurrence of chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) in water and bottom-sediment samples collected during 2010–11 at sites in seven areas of concern (AOCs) throughout the Great Lakes. Study sites include tributaries to the Great Lakes in AOCs located near Duluth, Minn.; Green Bay, Wis.; Roches­ter, N.Y.; Detroit, Mich.; Toledo, Ohio; Milwaukee, Wis.; and Ashtabula, Ohio. This report documents the collection meth­ods, analyses methods, quality-assurance data and analyses, and provides the data for this study. Water and bottom-sediment samples were analyzed at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., for a broad suite of CECs. During this study, 135 environmental and 23 field dupli­cate samples of surface water and wastewater effluent, 10 field blank water samples, and 11 field spike water samples were collected and analyzed. Sixty-one of the 69 wastewater indicator chemicals (laboratory method 4433) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 11.2 micrograms per liter. Twenty-eight of the 48 pharmaceuticals (research method 8244) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.0029 to 22.0 micro­grams per liter. Ten of the 20 steroid hormones and sterols analyzed (research method 4434) were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.16 to 10,000 nanograms per liter. During this study, 75 environmental, 13 field duplicate samples, and 9 field spike samples of bottom sediment were collected and analyzed for a wide variety of CECs. Forty-seven of the 57 wastewater indicator chemicals (laboratory method 5433) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.921 to 25,800 nanograms per gram. Seventeen of the 20 steroid hormones and sterols (research method 6434) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.006 to 8,921 nanograms per gram. Twelve of the 20 pharmaceuticals (research method 8244) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 2.35 to 453.5 nanograms per gram. Six of the 11 antidepressants (research method 9008) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 2.79 to 91.6 nanograms per gram.

  11. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  12. Microscopic analysis of quadrupole collective motion in Cr--Fe nuclei: II. Doorway nature of mixed-symmetry states

    E-print Network

    H. Nakada; T. Otsuka

    1997-03-11

    The mixed-symmetry collective modes are investigated in Cr-Fe nuclei, by analyzing the realistic shell-model wavefunctions via the H^n-cooling method. It is clarified that the relatively low-lying mixed-symmetry states behave like doorway states. For these nearly spherical nuclei, the lowest mixed-symmetry state is shown to have $J^P=2^+$. An indication of the mixed-symmetry 3^+ state is obtained. The sequence of the mixed-symmetry 2^+, 1^+ and 3^+ levels and its nucleus-dependence are discussed. Calculated M1 and M3 transitions in the low-energy region suggest that the mixed-symmetry 1^+ and 3^+ components are detectable. We investigate the B(M1) distribution in a wider energy range, without breaking the isospin quantum number. It is confirmed that the mixed-symmetry 1^+ component is well separated from the peak of the spin excitation. The isospin-raising component has a peak, separated well from the isospin-conserving one. The orbital angular-momentum contributes destructively to the spin excitations.

  13. Investigation of the chemical-induced selective type II (T(H)2) allergic response in mice: effect of the length of the sensitizing phase.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Tomoki; Tajima, Yukari; Ueda, Hideo; Hayashi, Koichi; Shutoh, Yasufumi; Saito, Toru R; Harada, Takanori; Kosaka, Tadashi

    2009-06-01

    Allergies are immune system disorders characterized by abnormal, acquired sensitivity to various environmental chemicals. We investigated the mechanism of chemical-induced selective type II (T(H)2) allergy by using three different sensitization protocols and the well-known respiratory sensitizer trimellitic anhydride (TMA). Mice were sensitized for either 1, 2, or 3 weeks. For each sensitization schedule, the mice were allocated into 3 or 4 groups: -/- group, both sensitized and challenged with vehicle; -/+ group, sensitized with vehicle and challenged with 0.1% TMA; +/- group, sensitized with 1% TMA and challenged with vehicle; and +/+ group, both sensitized and challenged with 0.1% TMA. After challenge, we assayed the auricular lymph nodes of all mice for number of lymphocytes, surface antigen expression of B-cells, and local cytokine production, and we measured TMA-specific serum IgE levels. Some parameters in mice sensitized for 1 or 2 wk showed, at most, mild changes. In contrast, all parameters in animals receiving 3-wk sensitization showed marked increases, as well as marked increases in the IgE/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II-positive B-cell population and T(H)2 cell production of IL-10 and IL-13. These results indicate that 3 wk of sensitization according to our protocol led to overt respiratory allergic reactions. While these studies showed that using the approach here, positive reactions were elicited using a typical allergen; whether the same events occur after sensitization by other chemicals that are found in the environment remains uncertain. These findings here should be regarded moreover as preliminary in scope and that additional studies with irritants, dermal sensitizers and other respiratory sensitizers are needed to further evaluate the overall sensitivity and selectivity of this novel protocol. PMID:19589094

  14. Topoisomerase II DNA cleavage stimulation, DNA binding activity, cytotoxicity, and physico-chemical properties of 2-aza- and 2-aza-oxide-anthracenedione derivatives.

    PubMed

    De Isabella, P; Palumbo, M; Sissi, C; Capranico, G; Carenini, N; Menta, E; Oliva, A; Spinelli, S; Krapcho, A P; Giuliani, F C

    1995-07-01

    The cytotoxic activity of mitoxantrone and related anthracenediones has been ascribed to the ability of these compounds to interfere with DNA topoisomerase II function, resulting in DNA cleavage stimulation. The molecular details of enzyme inhibition by these intercalating agents remain to be defined. In an attempt to identify the structural determinants for optimal activity, the molecular and cellular effects of a series of heteroanalogues bearing different side-chains were examined in relation to the physico-chemical and DNA binding properties of these compounds. The results indicated that substitution of a pyridine ring for the dihydroxyphenylene ring in the planar chromophore caused a marked reduction of cytotoxic activity and of the ability to stimulate topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage in intact cells and with simian virus 40 DNA in vitro. Although all tested derivatives were shown to intercalate into DNA, their DNA binding affinities were appreciably lower than that of mitoxantrone. The behavior of 2-aza derivatives more closely resembled that of ametantrone, suggesting that the potency of agents of this class is influenced more by the presence of hydroxyl groups than by the phenylene ring. The observation that a dramatic reduction (or loss) of the ability of aza derivatives to stimulate DNA cleavage is associated with a marked reduction of cytotoxic potency supports a primary role of topoisomerase II-mediated effects in the mechanism of action of the effective agents of this class. Because appreciable cytotoxic activity and significant in vivo antitumor efficacy are retained by compounds inactive (or poorly active) in inhibition of topoisomerase II, these results are consistent with multiple effects of anthracenediones at the cellular level. PMID:7623772

  15. Soft chemicals synthesis of a high-pressure phase of molybdenum trioxide: MoO{sub 3}-II

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.; Feist, T.P.; McCarron, E.M.

    1995-10-01

    Topotactic dehydration of either the white molybdenum trioxide monohydrate, MoO{sub 3}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, or the hemihydrate MoO{sub 3}{center_dot}{1/2}H{sub 2}O, provides a convenient synthetic route to a high-pressure phase of molybdenum trioxide, MoO{sub 3-}II. The structural filiations between the various molybdenum trioxide hydrates phases are delineated, and simple mechanistic models for the transformations are proposed.

  16. Characterization of Chemical Sputtering Using the Mark II DIMES Porous Plug Injector in Attached and Semi-detached Divertor Plasmas of DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, A. G.; Davis, J. W.; Stangeby, P. C.; Allen, S. L.; Boedo, J. A.; Bray, B. D.; Brezinsek, S.; Brooks, N. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Groth, M.; Haasz, A. A.; Hollmann, E. M.; Isler, Ralph C; Lasnier, C. J.; Mu, Y.; Petrie, T. W.; Rudakov, D. L.; Watkins, J. G.; West, W. P.; Whyte, D. G.; Wong, C. P. C.

    2009-01-01

    An improved, self-contained gas injection system for the divertor material evaluation system (DIMES) on DIII-D has been employed for in situ study of chemical erosion in the tokamak divertor environment. To minimize perturbation to local plasma, the Mark II porous plug injector (PPI) releases methane through a porous graphite surface at the outer strike point at a rate precisely controlled by a micro-orifice flow restrictor to be approximately equal as that predicted for intrinsic chemical sputtering. Effective photon efficiencies resulting from CH(4) are found to be 58 +/- 12 in an attached divertor (n(e) similar to 1.5 x 10(13)/cm(3), T(e) similar to 25 eV, T(surf)similar to 450 K), and 94 +/- 20 in a semi-detached cold divertor (n(e) similar to 6.0 x 10(13)/cm(3), T(e) similar to 2-3 eV, T(surf) similar to 350 K). These values are significantly more than previous measurements in similar plasma conditions, indicating the importance of the injection rate and local re-erosion for the integrity of this analysis. The contribution of chemical versus physical sputtering to the source of C(+) at the target is assessed through simultaneous measurement of CII line, and CD plus CH-band emissions during release of CH(4) from the Pill, then compared with that seen in intrinsic sputtering. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical Products in the Home, Workshop and Garden. Proceed with Caution; Consumer Safety in the Home, II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Consumer and Commercial Affairs, Regina.

    The average home has chemical products to clean floors, kill insects, clean ovens, thin paint, remove grease, and perform countless other chores. Many consumers remain unaware of the dangers these products bring into the home. This booklet provides information on the safe use, storage, and disposal of these products. The compounds found in…

  18. Biological profiling of the ToxCast Phase II Chemical Library in Primary Human Cell Co-Culture Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA’s ToxCast research project was developed to address the need for high-throughput testing of chemicals and a pathway-based approach to hazard screening. Phase I of ToxCast tested over 300 unique compounds (mostly pesticides and antimicrobials). With the addition of Ph...

  19. Radial metallicity gradients in spiral galaxies from H II regions and planetary nebulae: probing galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, Letizia

    2015-08-01

    Radial metallicity gradients, typically observed in spiral galaxies, are excellent constraints for chemical evolution models. The contemporary studies of the two stellar populations, whose progenitors have formed at different times, yield to the chemical and time constraining of the models. In this context, planetary nebula and HII region analysis proved to be ideal two-epochs test populations. We present an assortment of galaxies whose oxygen abundances have been determined both with weak- and strong-line methods, and whose radial metallicity gradients and their evolution in time have disclosed very interesting correlations with the galaxy characteristics. New results from our Gemini/GMOS observations, and a review of the best literature data, set the stage for a better understanding of spiral galaxy evolution.

  20. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories, Kauai Test Facility, HI, 1999-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mark Laverne

    2007-11-01

    In 1999, 2002, and 2007, the Environmental Programs and Assurance Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) at the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), HI, has collected soil samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at KTF. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were increasing or decreasing trends that indicated that further investigation might be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Programs and Assurance Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  1. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico environs, 1993-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Deola, Regina Anne; Oldewage, Hans D.; Herrera, Heidi; Miller, Mark Laverne

    2006-03-01

    From 1993 through 2005, the Environmental Management Department of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM), has collected soil and sediment samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for the purpose of determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at the Laboratories. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were year-to-year increasing or decreasing trends which indicated that further investigation may be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Management Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to assess potential current operational impacts or to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  2. Chemical and colloidal analyses of natural seep water collected from the exploratory studies facility inside Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA.

    PubMed

    Cizdziel, James V; Guo, Caixia; Steinberg, Spencer M; Yu, Zhongbo; Johannesson, Karen H

    2008-02-01

    Yucca Mountain is being considered as a geological repository for the USA's spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. Numerous groundwater seeps appeared during March 2005 within the exploratory studies facility (ESF), a tunnel excavated in the mountain. Because of the relevance to radionuclide transport and unsaturated zone-modeling studies, we analyzed the seep samples for major anions and cations, rare earth elements, and colloids. Major ion species and elemental concentrations in seep samples reflect interaction of the water with the volcanic rock and secondary calcites. Elemental fractograms from flow-injection field-flow fractionation ICP-MS scans detected Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, I, Mg, Si, Sr, W, and U at void fractions, suggesting they may be present in the form of dissolved anions. Colloids approximately 10 nm in hydrodynamic diameter, possibly calcite, were also present in the seepage samples. Geochemical calculations indicate, however, these may be an artifact (not present in the groundwater) which arose because of loss of CO2 during sample collection and storage. PMID:17505890

  3. MULTIDIMENSIONAL CHEMICAL MODELING OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS. II. IRRADIATED OUTFLOW WALLS IN A HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Bruderer, S.; Benz, A.O.; Doty, S. D.; Van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bourke, T. L.

    2009-07-20

    Observations of the high-mass star-forming region AFGL 2591 reveal a large abundance of CO{sup +}, a molecule known to be enhanced by far-ultraviolet (FUV) and X-ray irradiation. In chemical models assuming a spherically symmetric envelope, the volume of gas irradiated by protostellar FUV radiation is very small due to the high extinction by dust. The abundance of CO{sup +} is thus underpredicted by orders of magnitude. In a more realistic model, FUV photons can escape through an outflow region and irradiate gas at the border to the envelope. Thus, we introduce the first two-dimensional axisymmetric chemical model of the envelope of a high-mass star-forming region to explain the CO{sup +} observations as a prototypical FUV tracer. The model assumes an axisymmetric power-law density structure with a cavity due to the outflow. The local FUV flux is calculated by a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code taking scattering on dust into account. A grid of precalculated chemical abundances, introduced in the first part of this series of papers, is used to quickly interpolate chemical abundances. This approach allows us to calculate the temperature structure of the FUV-heated outflow walls self-consistently with the chemistry. Synthetic maps of the line flux are calculated using a raytracer code. Single-dish and interferometric observations are simulated and the model results are compared to published and new JCMT and Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations. The two-dimensional model of AFGL 2591 is able to reproduce the JCMT single-dish observations and also explains the nondetection by the SMA. We conclude that the observed CO{sup +} line flux and its narrow width can be interpreted by emission from the warm and dense outflow walls irradiated by protostellar FUV radiation.

  4. On the chemical homogeneity of the 30 Doradus H II region and a local enrichment by Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa, Michael; Mathis, John S.

    1987-01-01

    Emission-line strengths have been obtained at 10 positions in the outer regions of the 30 Dor nebula and analyzed in the standard way. There are two major results: (1) the elemental abundances for nine of the outer regions are remarkably similar to those previously measured in the core. This result implies the spectra of the cores and halos of giant H II regions (subject to the different ionizing radiation fields) are analyzed correctly by the standard methods. Hence measurements of extragalactic H II regions with poor spatial resolution correctly represent the abundances of the whole nebula. The O/H ratio in 30 Dor, by number, is 0.30 solar. The Ne/O, S/O, Ar/O, and Cl/O are close to solar. The gas-phase Fe/O is about 0.2 solar, which probably implies that most of the iron is within solid grains. The He/H is 0.0810 as shown by each of the three strong lines available. One region is cool and rich in helium and all other heavy elements except nitrogen. The spectrum of the region does not resemble that of a supernova remnant in that the forbidden O I and S II lines are not nearly strong enough. The abundances can be explained fairly well as over 10 solar masses of H-poor material ejected during the evolution of a single massive (about 80 solar masses) star during its late O-star and Wolf-Rayet phases.

  5. Comparison between ultrafine and fine particulate matter collected in Lebanon: Chemical characterization, in vitro cytotoxic effects and metabolizing enzymes gene expression in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Borgie, Mireille; Dagher, Zeina; Ledoux, Frédéric; Verdin, Anthony; Cazier, Fabrice; Martin, Perrine; Hachimi, Adam; Shirali, Pirouz; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Courcot, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    During the last few years, the induction of toxicological mechanisms by atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFP) has become one of the most studied topics in toxicology and a subject of huge debates. Fine particles (FP) and UFP collected at urban and rural sites in Lebanon were studied for their chemical composition and toxicological effects. UFP were found more enriched in trace elements, secondary inorganic ions, total carbon and organic compounds than FP. For toxicological analysis, BEAS-2B cells were exposed for 24, 48 and 72 h to increasing concentrations of FP, water-UFP suspension (UFPw) and UFP organic extract (UFPorg). Our findings showed that UFP caused earlier alterations of mitochondrial metabolism and membrane integrity from the lowest concentrations. Moreover, a significant induction of CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and AhRR genes expression was showed after cells exposure to UFPorg and to a lesser extent to UFPw and FP samples. PMID:26093079

  6. Chemical composition of size-segregated aerosol collected all year-round at Concordia Station (Dome C, Antarctica). Transport processes and climatic implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udisti, Roberto; Becagli, Silvia; Frosini, Daniele; Galli, Gaia; Ghedini, Costanza; Rugi, Francesco; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita

    2010-05-01

    Ice-core stratigraphies of chemical components of atmospheric gases and aerosols trapped in the snow layers by scavenging processes are a powerful tool in understanding past climatic and environmental changes. The deep ice core drilled at Dome C in the framework of the EPICA project allowed reconstructing the last 8 glacial-interglacial cycles and highlightened the complex relationships between climatic forcings and environmental feedback processes. In interpreting ice core records as a function of past climatic variations, some difficulties arise from uncertainties in considering selected chemical species as reliable markers of climatic and environmental processes and in attributing the different load and composition of aerosols over Antarctica to changes in source intensity (such as aridity, wind strength, emersion of continental platform by sea-level lowering etc..) and/or to variations in atmospheric processes (such as meridional and zonal atmospheric circulation, polar vortex intensity, scavenging efficiency, transport pathways etc..). Besides, two new aspects are actually under discussions: the possible use of Na as sea-ice cover marker (via frost flower formation on the sea-ice surface during the pack-ice formation) and the identification of continental source areas for mineral dust reaching internal regions of Antarctica during glacial and interglacial periods. In order to better address such controversial issues, since 2005 a continuous, high temporal resolution size-segregated aerosol and surface snow sampling has been performed at Dome C (central East Antarctic Plateau, 75° 06' S, 123° 23' E), in the framework of "Station Concordia" Project (a Italian PNRA- French IPEV joint program). The chemical analysis of size-segregated aerosol and daily superficial snow samples, collected all year-round for more than 4 years, can contribute to clarify some of the above mentioned topics. In particular: the possible seasonal pattern of sea spray aerosol could be related to sea-ice formation timing and/or to changes in zonal wind intensity and atmospheric pathway; the mineralogical analysis of insoluble dust particles can allow the identification of continental sources, by comparison with soils collected in the potential source areas (PSAs); finally, the seasonal pattern of biogenic markers (such as methanesulphonic acid and non-sea-salt sulphate) can be linked to sea surface temperature, sea-ice cover and southern-hemisphere circulation modes (e.g., SOI, AAO or SAM and ACW). As regard as depositional and post-depositional processes, the analysis of chemical markers in aerosol, superficial snow and hoar crystals, sampled contemporaneously, will allow understanding the key factors (e.g., snow acidity, solar irradiation) affecting the preservation of components reversibly fixed in the snow layers (such as, for instance, methanesulphonic acid, nitrate and chloride). A summary of the major results from the chemical analysis of aerosol and snow collected at Dome C is here presented.

  7. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of InAs/GaSb type II superlattices with controllable AsxSb1-x interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    InAs/GaSb type II superlattices were grown on (100) GaSb substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A plane of mixed As and Sb atoms connecting the InAs and GaSb layers was introduced to compensate the tensile strain created by the InAs layer in the SL. Characterizations of the samples by atomic force microscopy and high-resolution X-ray diffraction demonstrate flat surface morphology and good crystalline quality. The lattice mismatch of approximately 0.18% between the SL and GaSb substrate is small compared to the MOCVD-grown supperlattice samples reported to date in the literature. Considerable optical absorption in 2- to 8-?m infrared region has been realized. PACS: 78.67.Pt; 81.15.Gh; 63.22.Np; 81.05.Ea PMID:22373387

  8. Oxocentered Cu(II) lead selenite honeycomb lattices hosting Cu(I)Cl2 groups obtained by chemical vapor transport reactions.

    PubMed

    Kovrugin, Vadim M; Colmont, Marie; Siidra, Oleg I; Mentré, Olivier; Al-Shuray, Alexander; Gurzhiy, Vladislav V; Krivovichev, Sergey V

    2015-06-11

    Chemical vapor transport (CVT) reactions were used to prepare three modular mixed-valent Cu(I)-Cu(II) compounds, (Pb2Cu(2+)9O4)(SeO3)4(Cu(+)Cl(2))Cl5 (1), (PbCu(2+)5O2)(SeO3)2(Cu(+)Cl2)Cl3 (2), and (Pb(x)Cu(2+)(6-x)O2)(SeO3)2(Cu(+)Cl2)K(1-x)Cl(4-x) (x = 0.20) (3). In their crystal structures chains of anion-centered (OCu(2+)4) and (OCu(2+)3Pb) tetrahedra form honeycomb-like double layers with cavities occupied by linear [Cu(+)Cl2](-) groups. PMID:25971954

  9. Collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binary populations of galaxies. II. Pre-low-mass X-ray binary properties, formation rates, and constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadkamkar, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our exploration of the collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binaries in the stellar fields (i.e., outside globular clusters) of normal galaxies. In Paper I of this series, we considered high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this paper (Paper II), we consider low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whose evolutionary scenario is very different from that of HMXBs. We consider the evolution of primordial binaries up to the stage where the neutron star just formed in the supernova explosion of the primary is in a binary with its low-mass, unevolved companion, and this binary has circularized tidally, producing what we call a pre-low-mass X-ray binary (pre-LMXB). We study the constraints on the formation of such pre-LMXBs in detail (since these are low-probability events), and calculate their collective properties and formation rates. To this end, we first consider the changes in the binary parameters in the various steps involved, viz., the common-envelope phase, the supernova, and the tidal evolution. This naturally leads to a clarification of the constraints. We then describe our calculation of the evolution of the distributions of primordial binary parameters into those of pre-LMXB parameters, following the standard evolutionary scenario for individual binaries. We display the latter as both bivariate and monovariate distributions, discuss their essential properties, and indicate the influences of some essential factors on these. Finally, we calculate the formation rate of these pre-LMXBs. The results of this paper will be used in a subsequent one to compute the expected X-ray luminosity function of LMXBs.

  10. Water and Sediment Chemical Data and Data Summary for Samples Collected in 1999 and 2001 in the Goodpaster River Basin, Big Delta B-2 Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Gough, Larry; Wanty, Richard; Vohden, Jim; Crock, Jim; Day, Warren

    2006-01-01

    We report the chemical analysis for water and sediment collected from the Big Delta B-2 quadrangle. These data are part of a study located in the Big Delta B-2 quadrangle that focused on the integration of geology and bedrock geochemistry on with the biogeochemistry of water, sediments, soil, and vegetation. The discovery of the Pogo lode gold deposit in the northwest corner of the quadrangle was the impetus for this study. The study objectives were to create a geologic map, evaluate the bedrock geochemical influence on the geochemical signature of the surficial environment, and define landscape-level predevelopment geochemical baselines. Important to baseline development is an evaluation of what, if any, geochemical difference exists between the mineralized and non-mineralized areas within a watershed or between mineralized and non-mineralized watersheds. The analytic results for the bedrock, soils, and vegetation are reported elsewhere. Presented here, with minimal interpretation, is the analytic data for the water and sediment samples collected in the summers of 1999 and 2001, and a summary statistics of these analyses.

  11. Single particle chemical composition, state of mixing and shape of fresh and aged Saharan dust in Morocco and at Cape Verde Islands during SAMUM I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandler, Konrad; Emmel, Carmen; Ebert, Martin; Lieke, Kirsten; Müller-Ebert, Dörthe; Schütz, Lothar; Weinbruch, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is focussed to the understanding of the radiative effects of mineral dust. During the SAMUM 2006 field campaign at Tinfou, southern Morocco, chemical and mineralogical properties of fresh desert aerosol was measured. The winter campaign of Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment II in 2008 was based in Praia, Island of Santiago, Cape Verde. This second field campaign was dedicated to the investigation of transported Saharan Mineral Dust. Ground-based and airborne measurements were performed in the winter season, where mineral dust from the Western Sahara and biomass burning aerosol from the Sahel region occurred. Samples were collected with a miniature impactor system, a sedimentation trap, a free-wing impactor, and a filter sampler. Beryllium discs as well as carbon coated nickel discs, carbon foils, and nuclepore and fiber filters were used as sampling substrates. The size-resolved particle aspect ratio and the chemical composition are determined by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis of single particles. Mineralogical bulk composition is determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. In Morocco, three size regimes are identified in the aerosol: Smaller than 500 nm in diameter, the aerosol consists of sulfates and mineral dust. Larger than 500 nm up to 50 µm, mineral dust dominates, consisting mainly of silicates, and - to a lesser extent - carbonates and quartz. Larger than 50 µm, approximately half of the particles consist of quartz. Time series of the elemental composition show a moderate temporal variability of the major compounds. Calcium-dominated particles are enhanced during advection from a prominent dust source in Northern Africa (Chott El Djerid and surroundings). More detailed results are found in Kandler et al. (2009) At Praia, Cape Verde, the boundary layer aerosol consists of a superposition of mineral dust, marine aerosol and ammonium sulfate, soot, and other sulfates as well as mixtures of these components. During low-dust periods, the aerosol is dominated by sea salt. During dust events, mineral dust dominates the particle mass (more than 90 %). Particles smaller 500 nm in diameter always show a significant abundance of ammonium sulfate. Comparing a high dust period at Cape Verde with the total data from Morocco, it is found that the atomic ratio distributions of Al/Si, K/Si and Fe/Si for the single particles are very similar for the dust component. This indicates that the dominating silicate minerals are the same. In contrast, the content of calcium rich minerals at Cape Verde is significantly lower than in Morocco which is in agreement with the source regions for the Cape Verde dust (E Mali and W Niger) derived from trajectory analysis. The sulfur content of super-micron aerosol particles at Cape Verde scales with the particle surface, indicating the presence of sulfate coatings. For the submicron particles, the sulfur content scales with particle volume, which can be attributed to the large amount of particles identified as ammonium sulfate. In contrast to findings in Japan (Zhang et al., 2006), no internal mixtures between pristine seasalt and mineral dust are present during this dust period at Cape Verde. However, for a significant number of particles a small amount of sodium and chlorine is associated with internal mixtures of dust and sulfate, what may indicate that these particles started as internal mixture of dust with a sea water droplet before taking up more sulfur from the gas phase. In general, the shape of the particles in Morocco and Cape Verde is rather similar: The distributions of the two-dimensional aspect ratio of an ellipse fitted to each particle's shape for the total aerosol show no significant differences. A median value of 1.6 is found for both locations. References Kandler, K., Schütz, L., Deutscher, C., Hofmann, H., Jäckel, S. and co-authors 2009. Tellus 61B, 32-50. Zhang, D., Iwasaka, Y., Matsuki, A., Ueno, K. and Matsuzaki, T. 2006. Atmos. Environ. 40, 1205-1215. Financial support by the Deutsche Forsch

  12. Chemical abundance analysis of symbiotic giants - II. AE Ara, BX Mon, KX TrA, and CL Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ga?an, Cezary; Miko?ajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the elemental abundances of symbiotic giants is essential to address the role of chemical composition in the evolution of symbiotic binaries, to map their parent population, and to trace their mass transfer history. However, there are few symbiotic giants for which the photospheric abundances are fairly well determined. This is the second in a series of papers on chemical composition of symbiotic giants determined from high-resolution (R ˜ 50 000) near-IR spectra. Results are presented for the late-type giant star in the AE Ara, BX Mon, KX TrA, and CL Sco systems. Spectrum synthesis employing standard local thermal equilibrium (LTE) analysis and stellar atmosphere models were used to obtain photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Sc, Ti, Fe, and Ni). Our analysis resulted in sub-solar metallicities in BX Mon, KX TrA, and CL Sco by [Fe/H] ˜ -0.3 or -0.5 depending on the value of microturbulence. AE Ara shows metallicity closer to solar by ˜ 0.2 dex. The enrichment in 14N isotope found in all these objects indicates that the giants have experienced the first dredge-up. In the case of BX Mon first dredge-up is also confirmed by the low 12C/13C isotopic ratio of ˜ 8.

  13. A forgotten collection: the Libyan ethnobotanical exhibits (1912-14) by A. Trotter at the Museum O. Comes at the University Federico II in Naples, Italy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Ethnobotanical Collection from the Libyan territories of the botanist Alessandro Trotter is included in the Oratio Comes Botanical Museum at the Faculty of Agraria at the University Federico II in Naples. Trotter explored different territories of Libya, mainly Tripolitania, between 1912-1924, collecting plant specimens and the drugs most frequently sold in the markets. The Libyan herbarium currently includes over 2300 sheets of mounted and accessioned plants. The drugs, mostly acquired by Trotter from Tripolitanian markets, were identified and packed in 87 paper sheets or boxes. Trotter added ethnobotanical information for each species when available. Methods A database of the herbarium species and the drugs has been carried out, after a taxonomic update. Nomenclature has been revised according to the African flowering plants database and the World Checklist of selected plant families, and a comparison with currently available ethnopharmacological data from North African has been attempted. Results In this study, ethnopharmacological data related to about 80 species of flowering plants and to 4 lichens are presented. The plants are mainly from Mediterranean or Sub-Saharan habitats and belong to 37 different families; Lamiaceae was the most cited family, with 10 accessions. Generally, the aerial parts of the plants are the most frequently used (28 species), followed by leaves (15 species), flowers and seeds (9 species), fruits (7 species) and hypogean organs (roots, rhizomes, tubers: 5 species). Plants were generally processed in very simple ways: infusion or decoction of the plants were prepared and orally administered or used for topical applications. A wide range of conditions was treated, ranging from mental disorders to skin affections. All the organs of human body are considered, but the pathologies of gastro-intestinal tract, respiratory system and those related to traumatic accidents were the most frequently mentioned. The comparison with the recent ethnopharmacological research in Maghreb and its neighboring countries reveals a high correspondence; almost all the plants cited by Trotter are still used in the folk medicine of at least one of the North African countries, and the therapeutic uses of each plant appear consistent over time. Conclusions The information collected by Trotter is an important contribution to tracing plant utilization in Libyan folk medicine over the last century. PMID:22264313

  14. Critical evaluation of Jet-A spray combustion using propane chemical kinetics in gas turbine combustion simulated by KIVA-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Ying, S.-J.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Jet-A spray combustion were obtained by means of the KIVA-II computer code after Jet-A properties were added to the 12 chemical species the program had initially contained. Three different reaction mechanism models are considered. The first model consists of 131 reactions and 45 species; it is evaluated by comparing calculated ignition delay times with available shock tube data, and it is used in the evaluation of the other two simplified models. The simplified mechanisms consider 45 reactions and 27 species and 5 reactions and 12 species, respectively. In the prediction of pollutants NOx and CO, the full mechanism of 131 reactions is considered to be more reliable. The numerical results indicate that the variation of the maximum flame temperature is within 20 percent as compared with that of the full mechanism of 131 reactions. The chemical compositions of major components such as C3H8, H2O, O2, CO2, and N2 are of the same order of magnitude. However, the concentrations of pollutants are quite different.

  15. Trapping of muscle relaxant methocarbamol degradation product by complexation with copper(II) ion: Spectroscopic and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Ahmed M.; Shehab, Ola R.

    2014-07-01

    Structural properties of methocarbamol (Mcm) were extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically using FT IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis., geometry optimization, Mulliken charge, and molecular electrostatic potential. Stability arises from hyper-conjugative interactions, charge delocalization and H-bonding was analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Mcm was decomposed in ethanol/water mixture at 80 °C to guaifenesin [(RS)-3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol] and carbamate ion [NH2COO-], where the degradation mechanism was explained by trapping the carbamate ion via the complexation with copper(II) ion. The structure of the isolated complex ([Cu(NH2COO)2(H2O)]?4H2O) was elucidated by spectral, thermal, and magnetic tools. Electronic spectra were discussed by TD-DFT and the descriptions of frontier molecular orbitals and the relocations of the electron density were determined. Calculated g-tensor values showed best agreement with experimental values from EPR when carried out using both the B3LYP and B3PW91 functional.

  16. Branched conformational properties of macromolecules in close relation to chemical synthesis. II. Influence of excluded volume interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchard, Walther; Schweins, Ralf; Werner, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The description of perturbed particle conformations needs as a prerequisite the algorithm of unperturbed chains which is outlined in Paper I [J. Chem. Phys. 143, 114906 (2015)]. The mean square segment length = b 2 n 2 ? with ? = 0.588 for linear chains in a good solvent is used as an approximation also for branched samples. The mean square radius of gyration is easily derived, but for the hydrodynamic, the segment distribution by Domb et al. [Proc. Phys. Soc., London 85, 624 (1965)] is required. Both radii can analytically be expressed by Gamma functions. For the angular dependence of scattered light, the Fourier transform of the Domb distribution for self-avoiding random walk is needed, which cannot be obtained as an analytical function and was derived by numerical integration. The summation over all segment length in the particle was performed with an analytic fit-curve for the Fourier transform and was carried out numerically. Results were derived (i) for uniform and polydisperse linear chains, (ii) or f-functional randomly branched polymers and their monodisperse fractions, (iii) for random A3B2 co-polymers, and (iv) for AB2 hyper-branched samples. The deviation of the Gaussian approximation with the variance of = b 2 n 2 ? slightly overestimates the excluded volume interaction but still remains a fairly good approximation for region of qRg < 10.

  17. Chemical relevance of the copper(II)— L-carnosine system in aqueous solution: A thermodynamic and spectrophotometric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniele, Pier G.; Prenesti, Enrico; Zelano, Vincenzo; Ostacoli, Giorgio

    1993-08-01

    The copper(II)— L-carnosine (L -) system has been re-investigated in aqueous solution, at I = 0.1 mol dm -1, different temperatures (5? t?45°C) and with metal to ligand ratios ranging from 3:1 to 1:3. Both potentiometry and visible spectrophotometry were employed. From an overall consideration of all experiments, [CuLH] 2+, [CuL] +, [CuLH -1]°, [Cu 2L 2H -2]° and [Cu 2LH -1] 2+ were recognized as the species which provide the best interpretation of experimental data. The complex formation constants, determined at different temperatures, allowed us to obtain reliable values of ? H° and good estimates of ? C° p. From visible spectrophotometric measurements, carried out at different pH and metal to ligand ratios, it was possible to calculate the electronic spectrum of each complex formed in solution. A structure is also proposed for each species, on the basis of thermodynamic and spectral results.

  18. Chemical Hygiene Michigan State University

    E-print Network

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Chemical Hygiene Plan Michigan State University Environmental Health and Safety Engineering 2014 #12;ii Michigan State University Chemical Hygiene Plan Table of Contents 1.0 SCOPE.................................................................................................... 1 1.4 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL DEFINITIONS

  19. On ammonia binding to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem?II: a quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Schraut, Johannes; Kaupp, Martin

    2014-06-10

    A recent EPR study (M. Perrez Navarro et?al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 2013, 110, 15561) provided evidence that ammonia binding to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem?II in its S2 state takes place at a terminal-water binding position (W1) on the "dangler" manganese center MnA. This contradicted earlier interpretations of (14)N electron-spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data, which were taken to indicate replacement of a bridging oxo ligand by an NH2 unit. Here we have used systematic broken-symmetry density functional theory calculations on large (ca. 200 atom) model clusters of an extensive variety of substitution patterns and core geometries to examine these contradictory pieces of evidence. Computed relative energies clearly favor the terminal substitution pattern over bridging-ligand arrangements (by about 20-30?kcal?mol(-1)) and support W1 as the preferred binding site. Computed (14)N EPR nuclear-quadrupole coupling tensors confirm previous assumptions that the appreciable asymmetry may be accounted for by strong, asymmetric hydrogen bonding to the bound terminal NH3 ligand (mainly by Asp61). Indeed, bridging NH2 substitution would lead to exaggerated asymmetries. Although our computed structures confirm that the reported elongation of an Mn-Mn distance by about 0.15?Å inferred from EXAFS experiments may only be reproduced by bridging NH2 substitution, it seems possible that the underlying EXAFS data were skewed by problems due to radiation damage. Overall, the present data clearly support the suggested terminal NH3 coordination at the W1 site. The finding is significant for the proposed mechanistic scenarios of OEC catalysis, as this is not a water substrate site, and effects of this ammonia binding on catalysis thus must be due to more indirect influences on the likely substrate binding site at the O5 bridging-oxygen position. PMID:24806267

  20. Phenotype-driven chemical screening in zebrafish for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration identifies multiple pathways potentially involved in metastatic invasion

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Viviana E.; Varshney, Gaurav K.; Lee, Minnkyong; Bupp, Sujata; Xu, Lisha; Shinn, Paul; Crawford, Nigel P.; Inglese, James; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the last decade, high-throughput chemical screening has become the dominant approach for discovering novel compounds with therapeutic properties. Automated screening using in vitro or cultured cell assays have yielded thousands of candidate drugs for a variety of biological targets, but these approaches have not resulted in an increase in drug discovery despite major increases in expenditures. In contrast, phenotype-driven screens have shown a much stronger success rate, which is why we developed an in vivo assay using transgenic zebrafish with a GFP-marked migrating posterior lateral line primordium (PLLp) to identify compounds that influence collective cell migration. We then conducted a high-throughput screen using a compound library of 2160 annotated bioactive synthetic compounds and 800 natural products to identify molecules that block normal PLLp migration. We identified 165 compounds that interfere with primordium migration without overt toxicity in vivo. Selected compounds were confirmed in their migration-blocking activity by using additional assays for cell migration. We then proved the screen to be successful in identifying anti-metastatic compounds active in vivo by performing orthotopic tumor implantation assays in mice. We demonstrated that the Src inhibitor SU6656, identified in our screen, can be used to suppress the metastatic capacity of a highly aggressive mammary tumor cell line. Finally, we used CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish to genetically validate predicted targets of compounds. This approach demonstrates that the migrating PLLp in zebrafish can be used for large-scale, high-throughput screening for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration and, potentially, anti-metastatic compounds. PMID:25810455

  1. Phenotype-driven chemical screening in zebrafish for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration identifies multiple pathways potentially involved in metastatic invasion.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Viviana E; Varshney, Gaurav K; Lee, Minnkyong; Bupp, Sujata; Xu, Lisha; Shinn, Paul; Crawford, Nigel P; Inglese, James; Burgess, Shawn M

    2015-06-01

    In the last decade, high-throughput chemical screening has become the dominant approach for discovering novel compounds with therapeutic properties. Automated screening using in vitro or cultured cell assays have yielded thousands of candidate drugs for a variety of biological targets, but these approaches have not resulted in an increase in drug discovery despite major increases in expenditures. In contrast, phenotype-driven screens have shown a much stronger success rate, which is why we developed an in vivo assay using transgenic zebrafish with a GFP-marked migrating posterior lateral line primordium (PLLp) to identify compounds that influence collective cell migration. We then conducted a high-throughput screen using a compound library of 2160 annotated bioactive synthetic compounds and 800 natural products to identify molecules that block normal PLLp migration. We identified 165 compounds that interfere with primordium migration without overt toxicity in vivo. Selected compounds were confirmed in their migration-blocking activity by using additional assays for cell migration. We then proved the screen to be successful in identifying anti-metastatic compounds active in vivo by performing orthotopic tumor implantation assays in mice. We demonstrated that the Src inhibitor SU6656, identified in our screen, can be used to suppress the metastatic capacity of a highly aggressive mammary tumor cell line. Finally, we used CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish to genetically validate predicted targets of compounds. This approach demonstrates that the migrating PLLp in zebrafish can be used for large-scale, high-throughput screening for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration and, potentially, anti-metastatic compounds. PMID:25810455

  2. 78 FR 49547 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; American Radiolabeled Chemicals, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ..., 2013, 78 FR 23596, American Radiolabeled Chemicals, Inc., 101 Arc Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63146... Amphetamine (1100) II Methamphetamine (1105) II Amobarbital (2125) II Phencyclidine (7471) II...

  3. Long-term observation of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals in the total suspended particles collected at Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Somada, Y.; Ijyu, M.; Azechi, S.; Oshiro, Y.; Nakaema, F.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2011-12-01

    The economic growth and population increase in recent Asia have been increasing air pollution. Emission rate of air pollutants from Asia, in particular oxides of nitrogen, surpassed those from North America and Europe and should continue to exceed them for decades. Okinawa Island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location is ideal in observing East Asia's air quality because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background clean air and can be compared with continental air masses which have been affected by anthropogenic activities. We collected total suspended particles (TSP) on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at the Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS), Okinawa, Japan during August 2005 and August 2010. Sampling duration was one week for each sample. We determined the concentrations of water-soluble anions, cations, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and acid-digested metals in TSP samples using ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, total organic carbon analyzer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), respectively. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals showed that the concentrations were the lowest in summer, higher in fall and winter, and the highest in spring. When air mass came from Asian continent, the concentrations of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals were much higher compared to the other directions, suggesting long-range transport of air pollutants from Asian continent. Also, when the air mass came from Asian continent (75-100% dominant), the mean concentrations of non-sea salt sulfate and nitrate increased ca. 1.8 times and ca. 3.7 times, respectively between 2005 and 2010, and the ratio of nitrate to non-sea salt sulfate increased ca. 50% which suggested that automobile exhaust emission increased. In addition, the concentration of soil-originated components such as iron and aluminum increased ca. 2.6 times and ca. 3.0 times, suggesting a probable desertification. We also report the calculated background concentrations of water-soluble chemical components and acid-digested metals at Okinawa, Japan.

  4. Chemical weathering of a soil chronosequence on granitoid alluvium: II. Mineralogic and isotopic constraints on the behavior of strontium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, T.; White, A.; Blum, A.; Harden, J.; Schulz, M.

    1997-01-01

    The use of strontium isotopes to evaluate mineral weathering and identify sources of base cations in catchment waters requires an understanding of the behavior of Sr in the soil environment as a function of time. Our approach is to model the temporal evolution of 87Sr/86Sr of the cation exchange pool in a soil chronosequence developed on alluvium derived from central Sierra Nevada granitoids during the past 3 Ma. With increasing soil age, 87Sr/86Sr of ammonium-acetate extractable Sr initially decreases from values typical of K-feldspar to those of plagioclase and hornblende and then remains constant, even though plagioclase and hornblende are absent from the soils after approximately 1 Ma of weathering. The temporal variation of 87Sr/86Sr of exchangeable Sr is modeled by progressively equilibrating Sr derived from mineral weathering and atmospheric deposition with Sr on exchange sites as waters infiltrate a soil column. Observed decreases in quartz-normalized modal abundances of plagioclase, hornblende, and K-feldspar with time, and the distinct 87Sr/86Sr values of these minerals can be used to calculate Sr flux from weathering reactions. Hydrobiotites in the soils have nearly constant modal abundances, chemistry, and 87Sr/86Sr over the chronosequence and provide negligible Sr input to weathering solutions. The model requires time and soil horizon-dependent changes in the amount of exchangeable Sr and the efficiency of Sr exchange, as well as a biologic cycling term. The model predicts that exchangeable Sr initially has 87Sr/86Sr identical to that of K-feldspar, and thus could be dominated by Sr leached from K-feldspar following deposition of the alluvium. The maximum value of 87Sr/86Sr observed in dilute stream waters associated with granitoids of the Yosemite region is likewise similar to that of the K-feldspars, suggesting that K-feldspar and not biotite may be the dominant source of radiogenic Sr in the streams. This study reveals that, when attempting to use Strontium isotopes to identify sources of base cations in catchment waters and biomass, both preferential leaching of Sr from minerals during incipient soil development and changing Sr exchange efficiency must be considered along with chemical contributions due to mineral dissolution. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Strain-balanced InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice structures and photodiodes grown on InAs substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Dupuis, Russell D.; Zuo, Daniel; Kesler, Benjamin; Chuang, Shun-Lien; Hu, Hefei; Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Ting Lu, Yen; Hsieh, K. C.; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2011-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate strain-balanced InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs) grown on InAs substrates employing GaAs-like interfacial (IF) layers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for effective strain management, simplified growth scheme, improved materials crystalline quality, and reduced substrate absorption. The in-plane compressive strain from the GaSb layers in the T2SLs on the InAs was completely balanced by the GaAs-like IF layers formed by controlled precursor carry-over and anion exchange effects, avoiding the use of complicated IF layers and precursor switching schemes that were used for the MOCVD growth of T2SLs on GaSb. An infrared (IR) p-i-n photodiode structure with 320-period InAs/GaSb T2SLs on InAs was grown and the fabricated devices show improved performance characteristics with a peak responsivity of ˜1.9 A/W and a detectivity of ˜6.78 × 109 Jones at 8 ?m at 78 K. In addition, the InAs buffer layer and substrate show a lower IR absorption coefficient than GaSb substrates in most of the mid- and long-IR spectral range.

  6. Environmental chemical data for perishable sediments and soils collected in New Orleans, Louisiana, and along the Louisiana Delta following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, Emitt C.; Shi, Honglan; Karstensen, Krista A.; Wang, Jianmin; Adams, Craig D.

    2008-01-01

    In October 2005, nearly one month after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, a team of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Missouri University of Science and Technology deployed to southern Louisiana to collect perishable environmental data resulting from the impacts of these storms. Perishable samples collected for this investigation are subject to destruction or ruin by removal, mixing, or natural decay; therefore, collection is time-critical following the depositional event. A total of 238 samples of sediment, soil, and vegetation were collected to characterize chemical quality. For this analysis, 157 of the 238 samples were used to characterize trace element, iron, total organic carbon, pesticide, and polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations of deposited sediment and associated shallow soils. In decreasing order, the largest variability in trace element concentration was detected for lead, vanadium, chromium, copper, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury. Lead was determined to be the trace element of most concern because of the large concentrations present in the samples ranging from 4.50 to 551 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). Sequential extraction analysis of lead indicate that 39.1 percent of the total lead concentration in post-hurricane sediment is associated with the iron-manganese oxide fraction. This fraction is considered extremely mobile under reducing environmental conditions, thereby making lead a potential health hazard. The presence of lead in post-hurricane sediments likely is from redistribution of pre-hurricane contaminated soils and sediments from Lake Pontchartrain and the flood control canals of New Orleans. Arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.84 to 49.1 mg/kg. Although Arsenic concentrations generally were small and consistent with other research results, all samples exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Human Health Medium-Specific Screening Level of 0.39 mg/kg. Mercury concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 1.30 mg/kg. Comparing the mean mercury concentration present in post-hurricane samples with regional background data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Geochemical Dataset, indicates that mercury concentrations in post-hurricane sediment generally are larger. Sequential extraction analysis of 51 samples for arsenic indicate that 54.5 percent of the total arsenic concentration is contained in the extremely mobile iron-manganese oxide fraction. Pesticide and polychlorinated biphenyl Arochlor concentrations in post-hurricane samples were small. Prometon was the most frequently detected pesticide with concentrations ranging from 2.4 to 193 micrograms per kilogram (µg/kg). Methoxychlor was present in 22 samples with a concentration ranging from 3.5 to 3,510 µg/kg. Although methoxychlor had the largest detected pesticide concentration, it was well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s High-Priority Screening Level for residential soils. Arochlor congeners were not detected for any sample above the minimum detection level of 7.9 µg/kg.

  7. Belle II distributing computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovny, P.

    2015-05-01

    The next generation B factory experiment Belle II will collect huge data samples which are a challenge for the computing system. To cope with the high data volume and rate, Belle II is setting up a distributed computing system based on existing technologies and infrastructure, plus Belle II specific extensions for workflow abstraction. This paper describes the highlights of the Belle II computing and the current status. We will also present the experience of the latest MC production campaign in 2014.

  8. Chemical Transformation Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chemical Transformation Simulator (CTS) is a web-based, high-throughput screening tool that automates the calculation and collection of physicochemical properties for an organic chemical of interest and its predicted products resulting from transformations in environmental sy...

  9. I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for Americium-240 II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: Plutonium-242(Calcium-48,5n)(285)114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Paul Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Part I discusses the study of a new nuclear reaction and chemical separation procedure for the production of 240Am. Thin 242Pu, natTi, and natNi targets were coincidently activated with protons from the 88-Inch Cyclotron, producing 240Am, 48V, and 57Ni, respectively. The radioactive decay of these isotopes was monitored using high-purity Ge gamma ray detectors in the weeks following irradiation. The excitation function for the 242 Pu(p, 3n)240Am nuclear reaction was measured to be lower than theoretical predictions, but high enough to be the most viable nuclear reaction for the large-scale production of 240 Am. Details of the development of a chemical separation procedure for isolating 240Am from proton-irradiated 242Pu are discussed. The separation procedure, which includes two anion exchange columns and two extraction chromatography columns, was experimentally investi- gated using tracer-level 241Am, 239Pu, and model proton-induced fission products 95Zr, 95Nb, 125Sb, and 152Eu. The separation procedure was shown to have an Am/Pu separation factor of >2x10 7 and an Am yield of ˜70%. The separation procedure was found to purify the Am sample from >99.9% of Eu, Zr, Nb, and Sb. The procedure is well suited for the processing of ˜1 gram of proton-irradiated 242Pu to produce a neutron-induced fission target consisting of tens of nanograms of 240Am. Part II describes the use of the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron for the study of the 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285114 nuclear re- action. The new, neutron-deficient, superheavy element isotope 285114 was produced in 48Ca irradiations of 242Pu targets at a center-of-target beam energy of 256 MeV ( E* = 50 MeV). The alpha decay of 285114 was followed by the sequential alpha decay of four daughter nuclides, 281Cn, 277Ds, 273Hs, and 269 Sg. 265Rf was observed to decay by spontaneous fission. The measured alpha-decay Q-values were compared with those from a macroscopic-microscopic nuclear mass model to give insight into superheavy element shell effects. The 242Pu(48Ca, 5n)285114 cross section was 0.6-0.2 +1.3 pb.

  10. I. Probing polymer adsorption using an emissive semiconductor substrate. II. Correlation of chemical structure and swelling behavior in N-alkylcrylamide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seker, Fazila

    Semiconductor photoluminescence (PL) is a highly surface-sensitive technique that has allowed characterization of a wide variety of semiconductor-adsorbate interactions. This surface sensitivity can be rationalized through an understanding of the mechanisms by which adsorbate interactions can perturb the electronic structure of semiconductors, leading to observable changes in PL intensity. Using this approach, quenching of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of single-crystal CdSe by adsorption of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) from methanol solutions is introduced in Part I as a sensitive probe of polymer interactions with a semiconductor surface. Comparison with the influence on CdSe PL of methanol solutions of acrylic acid (AA), propionic acid (PrA), methyl acrylate (MA), along with IR data, indicate that surface binding leading to PL quenching involves the carboxylic acid proton. Over the range of PAA molecular weights studied in methanol (Mw ˜2K to 100K), the dependence of PL quenching on concentration is found to be insensitive to PAA chain length and markedly different from that of a surface COOH-derivatived dendrimer (PAMAM-COOH), suggesting that PAA uncoils upon adsorption onto the CdSe surface. The time-dependence of the PL decay indicates diffusion-controlled adsorption kinetics for the PAA/methanol system. Implications of the use of this methodology for characterizing semiconductor-polymer interfaces are discussed. Based on this understanding of the PAA/CdSe interface, molecularly imprinted PAA-film-coated CdSe surfaces are described as a strategy for selective chemical sensing. In this way, selective detection of ammonia from a mixture of trimethylamine and ammonia is achieved. Part II focuses on the swelling properties of hydrogels, which exhibit up to 1000-fold changes in volume in response to various stimuli. The thermoshrinking properties for the series of N-alkylacrylamide hydrogels (alkyl = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and n-propyl), are investigated in order to study the effect of the chemical structure of the alkyl substituent on the gel swelling behavior as a function of temperature. Generally, larger alkyl chains produced dramatic decreases in gel transition temperature, as well as influenced the nature of thermoshrinking. Additionally, a quantitative correlation was found between the gel transition temperatures and the water/octanol partition coefficients for appropriately chosen small molecule model compounds.

  11. Binary Classification of a Large Collection of Environmental Chemicals from Estrogen Receptor Assays by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship and Machine Learning Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: There are thousands of environmental chemicals subject to regulatory decisions for endocrine disrupting potential. A promising approach to manage this large universe of untested chemicals is to use a prioritization filter that combines in vitro assays with in silico QSA...

  12. 40 CFR 125.95 - As an owner or operator of a Phase II existing facility, what must I collect and submit when I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... activities; (2) You must submit to the Director the information required in 40 CFR 122.21(r)(2), (r)(3) and... your NPDES permit application in accordance with the time frames specified in 40 CFR 122.21(d)(2). (ii... qualifications (e.g., in the fields of geology, engineering, and/or biology, etc.) depending upon the...

  13. 40 CFR 125.95 - As an owner or operator of a Phase II existing facility, what must I collect and submit when I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activities; (2) You must submit to the Director the information required in 40 CFR 122.21(r)(2), (r)(3) and... your NPDES permit application in accordance with the time frames specified in 40 CFR 122.21(d)(2). (ii... qualifications (e.g., in the fields of geology, engineering, and/or biology, etc.) depending upon the...

  14. 40 CFR 125.95 - As an owner or operator of a Phase II existing facility, what must I collect and submit when I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... activities; (2) You must submit to the Director the information required in 40 CFR 122.21(r)(2), (r)(3) and... your NPDES permit application in accordance with the time frames specified in 40 CFR 122.21(d)(2). (ii... qualifications (e.g., in the fields of geology, engineering, and/or biology, etc.) depending upon the...

  15. 40 CFR 125.95 - As an owner or operator of a Phase II existing facility, what must I collect and submit when I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... activities; (2) You must submit to the Director the information required in 40 CFR 122.21(r)(2), (r)(3) and... your NPDES permit application in accordance with the time frames specified in 40 CFR 122.21(d)(2). (ii... qualifications (e.g., in the fields of geology, engineering, and/or biology, etc.) depending upon the...

  16. 40 CFR 125.95 - As an owner or operator of a Phase II existing facility, what must I collect and submit when I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activities; (2) You must submit to the Director the information required in 40 CFR 122.21(r)(2), (r)(3) and... your NPDES permit application in accordance with the time frames specified in 40 CFR 122.21(d)(2). (ii... and entrainment (e.g., related to climate and weather differences, spawning, feeding and water...

  17. Historical estimates of external gamma exposure and collective external gamma exposure from testing at the Nevada Test Site. I. Test series through HARDTACK II, 1958

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Church, B.W.

    1985-12-01

    In 1959, the Test Manager's Committee to Establish Fallout Doses calculated estimated external gamma exposure at populated locations based upon measurements of external gamma-exposure rate. Using these calculations and estimates of population, we have tabulated the collective estimated external gamma exposures for communities within established fallout patterns. The total collective estimated external gamma exposure is 85,000 person-R. The greatest collective exposures occurred in three general areas: Saint George, Utah; Ely, Nevada; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Three events, HARRY (May 19, 1953), BEE (March 22, 1955), and SMOKY (August 31, 1957), accounted for over half of the total collective estimated external gamma exposure. The bases of the calculational models for external gamma exposure of ''infinite exposure,'' ''estimated exposure,'' and ''one year effective biological exposure'' are explained. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. THE SPLASH SURVEY: INTERNAL KINEMATICS, CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES, AND MASSES OF THE ANDROMEDA I, II, III, VII, X, AND XIV DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J.; Geha, Marla C.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kirby, Evan N.

    2010-03-10

    We present new Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations of hundreds of individual stars along the sightline to the first three of the Andromeda (M31) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies to be discovered, And I, II, and III, and combine them with recent spectroscopic studies by our team of three additional M31 dSphs, And VII, X, and XIV, as a part of the SPLASH Survey (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo). Member stars of each dSph are isolated from foreground Milky Way dwarf stars and M31 field contamination using a variety of photometric and spectroscopic diagnostics. Our final spectroscopic sample of member stars in each dSph, for which we measure accurate radial velocities with a median uncertainty (random plus systematic errors) of 4-5 km s{sup -1}, includes 80 red giants in And I, 95 in And II, 43 in And III, 18 in And VII, 22 in And X, and 38 in And XIV. The sample of confirmed members in the six dSphs is used to derive each system's mean radial velocity, intrinsic central velocity dispersion, mean abundance, abundance spread, and dynamical mass. This combined data set presents us with a unique opportunity to perform the first systematic comparison of the global properties (e.g., metallicities, sizes, and dark matter masses) of one-third of Andromeda's total known dSph population with Milky Way counterparts of the same luminosity. Our overall comparisons indicate that the family of dSphs in these two hosts have both similarities and differences. For example, we find that the luminosity-metallicity relation is very similar between L {approx} 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7} L{sub sun}, suggesting that the chemical evolution histories of each group of dSphs are similar. The lowest luminosity M31 dSphs appear to deviate from the relation, possibly suggesting tidal stripping. Previous observations have noted that the sizes of M31's brightest dSphs are systematically larger than Milky Way satellites of similar luminosity. At lower luminosities between L = 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} L{sub sun}, we find that the sizes of dSphs in the two hosts significantly overlap and that four of the faintest M31 dSphs are smaller than Milky Way counterparts. The first dynamical mass measurements of six M31 dSphs over a large range in luminosity indicate similar mass-to-light ratios compared to Milky Way dSphs among the brighter satellites, and smaller mass-to-light ratios among the fainter satellites. Combined with their similar or larger sizes at these luminosities, these results hint that the M31 dSphs are systematically less dense than Milky Way dSphs. The implications of these similarities and differences for general understanding of galaxy formation and evolution are summarized.

  19. Inplementation of an automated signal processing approach for the analysis of chemical spectral signatures collected from FT-IR mounted in an aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Kroutil, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    The automated detection of chemical spectral signatures using a passive infrared Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer mounted in an aircraft is a difficult challenge due to the small total infrared energy contribution of a particular chemical species compared to the background signature. The detection of spectral signatures is complicated by the fact that a large, widely varying infrared background is present that is coupled with the presence of a number of chemical interferents in the atmosphere. This paper describes a mathematical technique that has been demonstrated to automatically detect specific chemical species in an automated processing environment. The data analysis methodology has been demonstrated to be effective using data of low spectral resolution at low aircraft altitudes. An overview of the implementation and basic concepts of the approach are presented.

  20. Estimation of the chemical-induced eye injury using a Weight-of-Evidence (WoE) battery of 21 artificial neural network (ANN) c-QSAR models (QSAR-21): part II: corrosion potential.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajeshwar P; Matthews, Edwin J

    2015-03-01

    This is part II of an in silico investigation of chemical-induced eye injury that was conducted at FDA's CFSAN. Serious eye damage caused by chemical (eye corrosion) is assessed using the rabbit Draize test, and this endpoint is an essential part of hazard identification and labeling of industrial and consumer products to ensure occupational and consumer safety. There is an urgent need to develop an alternative to the Draize test because EU's 7th amendment to the Cosmetic Directive (EC, 2003; 76/768/EEC) and recast Regulation now bans animal testing on all cosmetic product ingredients and EU's REACH Program limits animal testing for chemicals in commerce. Although in silico methods have been reported for eye irritation (reversible damage), QSARs specific for eye corrosion (irreversible damage) have not been published. This report describes the development of 21 ANN c-QSAR models (QSAR-21) for assessing eye corrosion potential of chemicals using a large and diverse CFSAN data set of 504 chemicals, ADMET Predictor's three sensitivity analyses and ANNE classification functionalities with 20% test set selection from seven different methods. QSAR-21 models were internally and externally validated and exhibited high predictive performance: average statistics for the training, verification, and external test sets of these models were 96/96/94% sensitivity and 91/91/90% specificity. PMID:25510831

  1. A chemical kinetic model for NO{sub x} removal in an aqueous scrubber system using the additive Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Livengood, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    Addition of the metal chelate, ferrous{center_dot} ethylenediaminetetraacetate anion (Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA{sup 2{minus}}), has been shown to increase the amount of gaseous nitrogen oxides absorbed from a gas stream containing sulfur dioxide, where an aqueous scrubbing process is used to treat the gas. Recently, we published data on improved systems for NO{sub x} removal that incorporate an antioxidant and/or reducing agent (A/R) in the process along with the Fe[H]{center_dot}EDTA. The purpose of the A/R is to maintain the highest possible concentration of iron in the +2 form. The major mechanism for NO removal is believed to be the equilibrium reaction of Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA with dissolved NO to form a Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA{center_dot}NO complex. It has been shown that both sulfite and bisulfite anions can react with Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA{center_dot}NO to regenerate Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA and other products. In a complex system, other oxidation and reduction mechanisms are also possible. We have chosen, therefore, to approach this problem empirically by fitting our experimental data to a model containing at most three kinetic terms, chosen from among the following: a baseline removal rate, which is equivalent to the rate of reaction of Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA with nitric oxide; a regeneration rate, which is equivalent to decomposition of the Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA{center_dot}NO complex to Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA; an oxidation rate, which is a combined rate for all possible oxidation reactions involving Fe[II]{center_dot}EDTA; and a reduction rate, which is a combined rate for all possible reduction reactions involving ferric-EDTA in the system.

  2. This project focused on the continued design, fabrication, and testing of a new aircraft-mounted cloud collector, suitable for collecting samples with micromolar concentrations of relevant chemical

    E-print Network

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    by centrifugal force, where they deposit and are later collected. The axial-flow design was selected because into the collector duct, negating the need for a high volume pump. The air stream encounters the stationary vanes

  3. Chemicals of emerging concern in water and bottom sediment in the Great Lakes Basin, 2012: collection methods, analytical methods, quality assurance, and study data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Kathy E.; Langer, Susan K.; Menheer, Michael A.; Hansen, Donald S.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Choy, Steven J.; Moore, Jeremy N.; Banda, JoAnn; Gefell, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    During this study, 53 environmental samples, 4 field duplicate samples, and 8 field spike samples of bottom sediment and laboratory matrix-spike samples were analyzed for a wide variety of CECs at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory using laboratory schedule 5433 for wastewater indicators; research method 6434 for steroid hormones, sterols, and bisphenol A; and research method 9008 for human-use pharmaceuticals and antidepressants. Forty of the 57 chemicals analyzed using laboratory schedule 5433 had detectable concentrations ranging from 1 to 49,000 micrograms per kilogram. Fourteen of the 20 chemicals analyzed using research method 6434 had detectable concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 24,940 nanograms per gram. Ten of the 20 chemicals analyzed using research method 9008 had detectable concentrations ranging from 0.59 to 197.5 micrograms per kilogr

  4. Subject Indexing and Citation Indexing--Part I: Clustering Structure in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection [and] Part II: An Evaluation and Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, W. M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    These two articles discuss clustering structure in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection, which is derived from the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE file. The exhaustivity of four subject representations and two citation representations is examined, and descriptor-weight thresholds and similarity thresholds are used to compute…

  5. Chemical defense collective protection technology. Volume 12. A procedure for recharging self-contained breathing apparatus air bottles in the presence of simulated chemical warfare agents. Final report, 6-11 September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Conkle, J.P.; Tucker, D.M.; Moore, G.

    1993-05-01

    A procedure was developed and tested for recharging Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) cylinders in an atmosphere contaminated with chemical agent simulant at concentrations which would produce casualties if actual agent were used. With the exception of a rack for storing the cylinders before and after recharging, all items used are currently available commercially or through off-the-shelf DOD supply sources. Cylinders were successfully recharged without contamination in the presence of chemical agent simulant in the compressor area as well as in the cylinder filling area. Inexperienced personnel easily learned and successfully followed the recharging procedures even though they were burdened by protective clothing and equipment. Chemical agents, SCBA, Firefighting, Self-contained breathing apparatus.

  6. Collecting Volcanic Gas Samples

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Steven Ingebritsen (lower right, in blue hat) kneels in the warm mud as he collects samples of the gases emitted from the fumaroles on the north side of Crater Rock on Mount Hood. The samples are taken back to the laboratory for an analysis of the gases' chemical composition. By routinely collecting...

  7. TOPoS . II. On the bimodality of carbon abundance in CEMP stars Implications on the early chemical evolution of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; Spite, M.; Limongi, M.; Chieffi, A.; Klessen, R. S.; François, P.; Molaro, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Zaggia, S.; Spite, F.; Plez, B.; Cayrel, R.; Christlieb, N.; Clark, P. C.; Glover, S. C. O.; Hammer, F.; Koch, A.; Monaco, L.; Sbordone, L.; Steffen, M.

    2015-07-01

    Context. In the course of the Turn Off Primordial Stars (TOPoS) survey, aimed at discovering the lowest metallicity stars, we have found several carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. These stars are very common among the stars of extremely low metallicity and provide important clues to the star formation processes. We here present our analysis of six CEMP stars. Aims: We want to provide the most complete chemical inventory for these six stars in order to constrain the nucleosynthesis processes responsible for the abundance patterns. Methods: We analyse both X-Shooter and UVES spectra acquired at the VLT. We used a traditional abundance analysis based on OSMARCS 1D local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model atmospheres and the turbospectrum line formation code. Results: Calcium and carbon are the only elements that can be measured in all six stars. The range is -5.0 ? [Ca/H] <-2.1 and 7.12 ? A(C) ? 8.65. For star SDSS J1742+2531 we were able to detect three Fe i lines from which we deduced [Fe/H] = -4.80, from four Ca ii lines we derived [Ca/H] = -4.56, and from synthesis of the G-band we derived A(C) = 7.26. For SDSS J1035+0641 we were not able to detect any iron lines, yet we could place a robust (3?) upper limit of [Fe/H] < -5.0 and measure the Ca abundance, with [Ca/H] = -5.0, and carbon, A(C) = 6.90, suggesting that this star could be even more metal-poor than SDSS J1742+2531. This makes these two stars the seventh and eighth stars known so far with [Fe/H] < -4.5, usually termed ultra-iron-poor (UIP) stars. No lithium is detected in the spectrum of SDSS J1742+2531 or SDSS J1035+0641, which implies a robust upper limit of A(Li) < 1.8 for both stars. Conclusions: Our measured carbon abundances confirm the bimodal distribution of carbon in CEMP stars, identifying a high-carbon band and a low-carbon band. We propose an interpretation of this bimodality according to which the stars on the high-carbon band are the result of mass transfer from an AGB companion, while the stars on the low-carbon band are genuine fossil records of a gas cloud that has also been enriched by a faint supernova (SN) providing carbon and the lighter elements. The abundance pattern of the UIP stars shows a large star-to-star scatter in the [X/Ca] ratios for all elements up to aluminium (up to 1 dex), but this scatter drops for heavier elements and is at most of the order of a factor of two. We propose that this can be explained if these stars are formed from gas that has been chemically enriched by several SNe, that produce the roughly constant [X/Ca] ratios for the heavier elements, and in some cases the gas has also been polluted by the ejecta of a faint SN that contributes the lighter elements in variable amounts. The absence of lithium in four of the five known unevolved UIP stars can be explained by a dominant role of fragmentation in the formation of these stars. This would result either in a destruction of lithium in the pre-main-sequence phase, through rotational mixing or to a lack of late accretion from a reservoir of fresh gas. The phenomenon should have varying degrees of efficiency. Based on observations obtained at ESO Paranal Observatory, programme 091.D-0288, 091.D-0305, 189.D-0165.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTables 4 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/579/A28

  8. Solid-state sup 31 P NMR studies of mercury(II) phosphonates. Anisotropies of the sup 31 P chemical shift and the sup 31 P minus sup 199 Hg indirect spin-spin coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Power, W.P.; Lumsden, M.D.; Wasylishen, R.E. )

    1991-07-24

    The {sup 31}P powder NMR line shapes of a number of solid mercury(II) phosphonates are analyzed in order to determine the anisotropies in both the {sup 31}P chemical shift and the {sup 31}P{minus}{sup 199}Hg indirect spin-spin coupling. The magnitudes and orientation of the principal components of the {sup 31}P chemical shift tensor are determined for diethyl N-phenylphosphoramidate, (EtO){sub 2}P(O)NHPh, by using dipolar-chemical shift NMR spectroscopy. Spectral simulations indicate that the most shielded component of the {sup 31}P chemical shift tensor lies along the P{double bond}O plane. This information is used to interpret the {sup 31}P NMR line shapes for a series of mercury phosphonate complexes. These spectra indicate the presence of substantial anisotropies in the {sup 31}P{minus}{sup 199}Hg indirect spin-spin (J) coupling, ranging from 1,500 to 2,700 Hz. The large anisotropies in J indicate that mechanisms other than the Fermi contact contribute to the electron-mediated communication between {sup 31}P and {sup 199}Hg. 47 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Correlation between ¹??Pt chemical shifts and the electronic transitions among d orbitals in pincer NCN Pt(II) complexes: A theoretical study and application of Ramsey's equation.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Majid

    2015-12-01

    The chemical potentials for two series of [PtCl(NCN-Z-4)] (NCN=2,6-bis[(dimethylamino)methyl]phenyl, Z=H, CHO, COOH, NH2, OH, NO2, SiMe3, I, t-Bu) and [PtCl(NCN-4-CHN-C6H4-Z'-4')] (Z'=NMe2, Me, H, Cl, CN) were calculated. The energies of platinum d orbitals were calculated by NBO analysis. Good correlations were obtained between (195)Pt chemical shifts and the spectral parameters obtained from the energies of electronic transitions between Pt d orbitals in these complexes. The correlations between (195)Pt chemical shifts and the chemical potentials were also good. The correlations were discussed based on Ramsey's equation. PMID:26151432

  10. Towards Relativistic Atomic Physics. II. Collective and Relative Relativistic Variables for a System of Charged Particles plus the Electro-Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    David Alba; Horace W. Crater; Luca Lusanna

    2008-11-05

    In this second paper we complete the classical description of an isolated system of "charged positive-energy particles, with Grassmann-valued electric charges and mutual Coulomb interaction, plus a transverse electro-magnetic field" in the rest-frame instant form of dynamics. In particular we show how to determine a collective variable associated with the internal 3-center of mass on the instantaneous 3-spaces, to be eliminated with the constraints ${\\vec {\\cal K}}_{(int)} \\approx 0$. Here ${\\vec {\\cal K}}_{(int)}$ is the Lorentz boost generator in the unfaithful internal realization of the Poincare' group and its vanishing is the gauge fixing to the rest-frame conditions ${\\vec {\\cal P}}_{(int)} \\approx 0$. We show how to find this collective variable for the following isolated systems: a) charged particles with a Coulomb plus Darwin mutual interaction; b) transverse radiation field; c) charged particles with a mutual Coulomb interaction plus a transverse electro-magnetic field. Then we define the Dixon multipolar expansion for the open particle subsystem. We also define the relativistic electric dipole approximation of atomic physics in the rest-frame instant form and we find the a possible relativistic generalization of the electric dipole representation.

  11. Engineering a chemical implementation device and an imaging device for detecting chemiluminescence with a Polaroid high-speed detector film: application to influenza diagnostics with the ZstatFlu-II test.

    PubMed

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Pence, Lisa M; Mantell, Daniel R; Nangeroni, Paul E; Mauchan, Donald M; Aitken, William M; Appleman, James R; Shimasaki, Craig D

    2003-01-01

    We describe the engineering and product development of the chemiluminescent ZstatFlu-II Test kit for influenza diagnostics. The reaction vessel is a chemical implementation device with a polystyrene bottom chamber and a polypropylene top chamber that screw together. The patient's specimen is dispersed in a proprietary diluent and mixed inside the bottom chamber with the influenza viral neuraminidase-specific substrate, 1,2-dioxetane-4,7-dimethoxy-Neu5Ac. Neuraminidase catalysis releases the dioxetane. The top chamber contains 40% NaOH and is sealed at the top with an ABS plastic plug-crush pin assembly. The top chamber floor is 85% thinner at the centre, forming a frangible flap. An automated imaging device serves as an incubator for the chemical implementation devices and also facilitates the piercing of the flap by the crush pin. This action results in NaOH flushing into the bottom chamber, initiating chemiluminescence. The imaging device also exposes the Polaroid high-speed detector film to chemiluminescence. At the end of exposure, the film is automatically processed and ejected. Chemiluminescence from an influenza virus-positive specimen produces a "+"-shaped white image, archiving the diagnostic outcome. The modular ZstatFlu-II test kit components are easily adaptable for the chemiluminescent detection of a wide range of analytes. PMID:12687627

  12. New methods for field collection of human skin volatiles and perspectives for their application in the chemical ecology of human-pathogen-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Dormont, Laurent; Bessière, Jean-Marie; McKey, Doyle; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Odours emitted by human skin are of great interest to biologists in many fields, with practical applications in forensics, health diagnostic tools and the ecology of blood-sucking insect vectors of human disease. Convenient methods are required for sampling human skin volatiles under field conditions. We experimentally compared four modern methods for sampling skin odours: solvent extraction, headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME), and two new techniques not previously used for the study of mammal volatiles, contact SPME and dynamic headspace with a chromatoprobe design. These methods were tested and compared both on European subjects under laboratory conditions and on young African subjects under field conditions. All four methods permitted effective trapping of skin odours, including the major known human skin volatile compounds. In both laboratory and field experiments, contact SPME, in which the time of collection was restricted to 3 min, provided results very similar to those obtained with classical headspace SPME, a method that requires 45 min of collection. Chromatoprobe sampling also proved to be very sensitive, rapid and convenient for the collection of human-produced volatiles in natural settings. Both contact SPME and chromatoprobe design may considerably facilitate the study of human skin volatiles under field conditions, opening new possibilities for examining the olfactory cues mediating the host-seeking behaviour of mosquito vectors implicated in the transmission of major diseases. PMID:23580718

  13. A Short Story Collection

    E-print Network

    Richardson, Kalen06

    2013-08-31

    A Short Fiction Collection By Copyright 2013 Kalen Richardson Submitted to the graduate degree program in English and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master.../17/2013 ii The Thesis Committee for Kalen Richardson certifies that this is the approved version of the following thesis: A Short Story Collection ________________________________ Chairperson Tom Lorenz Date approved: 4...

  14. Kinetic theory of spin-polarized systems in electric and magnetic fields with spin-orbit coupling: II. RPA response functions and collective modes

    E-print Network

    Morawetz, K

    2015-01-01

    The spin and density response functions in the random phase approximation (RPA) are derived by linearizing the kinetic equation including a magnetic field, the spin-orbit coupling, and mean fields with respect to an external electric field. Different polarization functions appear describing various precession motions showing Rabi satellites due to an effective Zeeman field. The latter turns out to consist of the mean-field magnetization, the magnetic field, and the spin-orbit vector. The collective modes for charged and neutral systems are derived and a threefold splitting of the spin waves dependent on the polarization and spin-orbit coupling is shown. The dielectric function including spin-orbit coupling, polarization and magnetic fields is presented analytically for long wave lengths and in the static limit. The dynamical screening length as well as the long-wavelength dielectric function shows an instability in charge modes, which are interpreted as spin segregation and domain formation. The spin response...

  15. Feasibility study of sub-10-nm-half-pitch fabrication by chemically amplified resist processes of extreme ultraviolet lithography: II. Stochastic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Santillan, Julius Joseph; Itani, Toshiro

    2015-03-01

    Line edge roughness (LER) rapidly increases in the sub-10-nm-half-pitch region of resist processes used for the fabrication of semiconductor devices. Sub-10-nm fabrication with high throughput is a challenging task. In this study, the stochastic effects (LER and stochastic defect generation) of chemically amplified resist processes in the sub-10-nm-half-pitch node were investigated, assuming the use of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The latent images were calculated by a Monte Carlo method on the basis of the sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified EUV resists. 7-nm-half-pitch fabrication by chemically amplified resist processes is considered to be feasible. However, significant improvement in the efficiencies of the conversion processes from optical images to resist images is required.

  16. Analysis of chemical warfare agents. II. Use of thiols and statistical experimental design for the trace level determination of vesicant compounds in air samples.

    PubMed

    Muir, Bob; Quick, Suzanne; Slater, Ben J; Cooper, David B; Moran, Mary C; Timperley, Christopher M; Carrick, Wendy A; Burnell, Christopher K

    2005-03-18

    Thermal desorption with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) remains the technique of choice for analysis of trace concentrations of analytes in air samples. This paper describes the development and application of a method for analysing the vesicant compounds sulfur mustard and Lewisites I-III. 3,4-Dimercaptotoluene and butanethiol were used to spike sorbent tubes and vesicant vapours sampled; Lewisite I and II reacted with the thiols while sulfur mustard and Lewisite III did not. Statistical experimental design was used to optimise thermal desorption parameters and the optimum method used to determine vesicant compounds in headspace samples taken from a decontamination trial. 3,4-Dimercaptotoluene reacted with Lewisites I and II to give a common derivative with a limit of detection (LOD) of 260 microg m(-3), while the butanethiol gave distinct derivatives with limits of detection around 30 microg m(-3). PMID:15830938

  17. Crossed beam reaction of cyano radicals with hydrocarbon molecules. II. Chemical dynamics of 1-cyano-1-methylallene ,,CNCH3CCCH2; X 1

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    , Republic of China H. F. Bettinger,d) P. v. R. Schleyer, and H. F. Schaefer III Center for Computational environments such as dark, molecular clouds and the saturnian satellite Titan. © 1999 American Institute detailed chemi- cal reaction networks to understand the chemical history of these environments. The most

  18. QSAR Classification of ToxCast and Tox21 Chemicals on the Basis of Estrogen Receptor Assays (FutureToxII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ToxCast and Tox21 programs have tested ~8,200 chemicals in a broad screening panel of in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and antagonist activity. The present work uses this large in vitro data set to develop in silico QSAR model...

  19. The Most Metal-Poor Stars. II. Chemical Abundances of 190 Metal-Poor Stars Including 10 New Stars With [Fe/H] ? -3.5

    E-print Network

    Frebel, Anna L.

    We present a homogeneous chemical abundance analysis of 16 elements in 190 metal-poor Galactic halo stars (38 program and 152 literature objects). The sample includes 171 stars with [Fe/H] ? –2.5, of which 86 are extremely ...

  20. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 47, NUMBER 9 1 NOVEMBER 1967 Correlation Effects in Complex Spectra. II. Transition Probabilities for the Magnesium

    E-print Network

    on the spacings of the energy levels, and the form of the wavefunctions for the ID and 3D mTHE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS VOLUME 47, NUMBER 9 1 NOVEMBER 1967 Correlation Effects in Complex Transition Probabilities," NSRDS-NBS 4 (U.S. Govern- ment Printing Olflce, Washington, D.C., 1966), Vo!' 1. 2

  1. Relationships between anthropogenic chemical contaminant exposure and associated changes in reproductive parameters in male English sole (Parophrys vetulus) collected from Hylebos Waterway, Puget Sound, Washington.

    PubMed

    Sol, Sean Y; Johnson, Lyndal L; Boyd, Daryle; Olson, O Paul; Lomax, Dan P; Collier, Tracy K

    2008-11-01

    Effects of chemical contaminant exposure on gonadal development in adult male English sole (Parophrys vetulus) from Hylebos Waterway and Colvos Passage, Puget Sound, Washington were investigated. Hylebos Waterway sediment is contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorines (OCs), and Colvos Passage, a nearby nonurban area, is minimally contaminated. Fish from Hylebos Waterway had higher concentrations of both PAHs and OCs in tissues than fish from Colvos Passage. Overall, little correlation was observed between PAH exposure and biological parameters, but strong correlations were observed between OCs and the biological parameters. Migration of fish from less contaminated areas into the Hylebos Waterway during the reproductive season might have influenced these results, based on temporal changes in fish age and contaminant concentrations. PMID:18274819

  2. CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY MANUAL August 2013 #12;ii Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince-Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 6472 Biological the safe use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

  3. Science research annual, volume II: a collection of science staff memoranda and letters from the Illinois Legislature Council - January-June 1980. Annual report Jan 80-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    This volume contains a collection of correspondence and contributions from the Illinois Legislative Council. The memoranda, which have been organized into research reports, answer requests from individual legislators for information on specific science, technology, and public policy issues, and include information sources and pertinent legislation of the 81st Illinois General Assembly. Topics covered are as follows: abortion information; accidental deer slaughter; regulation of airport noise pollution; historical artifacts preservation; asbestos health hazards; automobile repair legislation; HLA blood tests; financial aid for catastrophic illness; cost comparison of coal and nuclear power; mandates for coroners versus medical examiners; dialysis patient programs; drug paraphernalia legislation; electric generating capacity of Fox River dams; energy efficiency in appliances; euthanasia; farmland preservation; licenses for fish dealers; gasohol definition, grants, and other states' laws; medical precautions at football games; the Ames, Iowa methane plant; metric sales laws; proposed mining regulations; nuclear power referenda; nuclear waste disposal; pharmaceutical assistance and renewable prescriptions for the aged; licensing of radiation device operators; scientific creationism; solar energy grants and loans; funding for solar energy programs; sulfur dioxide standards; and visual aid programs.

  4. Kinetic theory of spin-polarized systems in electric and magnetic fields with spin-orbit coupling: II. RPA response functions and collective modes

    E-print Network

    K. Morawetz

    2015-12-05

    The spin and density response functions in the random phase approximation (RPA) are derived by linearizing the kinetic equation including a magnetic field, the spin-orbit coupling, and mean fields with respect to an external electric field. Different polarization functions appear describing various precession motions showing Rabi satellites due to an effective Zeeman field. The latter turns out to consist of the mean-field magnetization, the magnetic field, and the spin-orbit vector. The collective modes for charged and neutral systems are derived and a threefold splitting of the spin waves dependent on the polarization and spin-orbit coupling is shown. The dielectric function including spin-orbit coupling, polarization and magnetic fields is presented analytically for long wave lengths and in the static limit. The dynamical screening length as well as the long-wavelength dielectric function shows an instability in charge modes, which are interpreted as spin segregation and domain formation. The spin response describes a crossover from damped oscillatory behavior to exponentially damped behavior dependent on the polarization and collision frequency. The magnetic field causes ellipsoidal trajectories of the spin response to an external electric field and the spin-orbit coupling causes a rotation of the spin axes. The spin-dephasing times are extracted and discussed in dependence on the polarization, magnetic field, spin-orbit coupling and single-particle relaxation times.

  5. GUIDELINES FOR DISPOSAL OF CHEMICAL WASTE Excess Chemicals and Chemical Wastes

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    GUIDELINES FOR DISPOSAL OF CHEMICAL WASTE wstPS.DOC Excess Chemicals and Chemical Wastes · Toxic and toxics are not present (e.g., heavy metals). If you do the need for additional labels. · Waste Chemicals - - Call EHSO at x2723 for collection. (If the label

  6. Guidelines for sample collecting and analytical methods used in the U.S. Geological Survey for determining chemical composition of coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Vernon Emanuel; Huffman, Claude

    1976-01-01

    This report is intended to meet the many requests for information on current U.S. Geological Survey procedures in handling coal samples. In general, the exact type and number of samples of coal and associated rock to be collected are left to the best judgment of the geologist. Samples should be of unweathered coal or rock and representative of the bed or beds sampled; it is recommended that two channel samples, separated by 10 to 100 yards (10 to 100 metres) and weighing 4 to 5 pounds ( 1.8 to 2.3 kilograms) each, be collected of each 5 feet ( 1.5 metres) of vertical section. Care must be taken to avoid any sample contamination, and to record the exact locality, thickness, and stratigraphic information for each sample. Analytical methods are described for the determination of major, minor, and trace elements in coal. Hg, As, Sb, F, Se, U, and Th are determined in the raw coal, and the following 34 elements are determined after ashing the coal: Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe (total), Cl, Ti, Mn, P, S (total), Cd, Li, Cu, Zn, Pb, B, Ba, Be, Co, Cr, Ga, La, Mo, Nb, Ni, Sc, Sr, Ti, V, Y, Yb, and Zr. The methods used to determine these elements include atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, optical emission spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, selective-ion electrode, and neutron activation analysis. A split of representative coal samples is submitted to the U.S. Bureau of Mines for proximate, ultimate, forms of sulfur, and Btu determinations.

  7. Chemical Principles Exemplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    Collection of two short descriptions of chemical principles seen in life situations: the autocatalytic reaction seen in the bombardier beetle, and molecular potential energy used for quick roasting of beef. Brief reference is also made to methanol lighters. (PS)

  8. Exploring Natural Products from the Biodiversity of Pakistan for Computational Drug Discovery Studies: Collection, Optimization, Design and Development of A Chemical Database (ChemDP).

    PubMed

    Mirza, Shaher Bano; Bokhari, Habib; Fatmi, Muhammad Qaiser

    2015-01-01

    Pakistan possesses a rich and vast source of natural products (NPs). Some of these secondary metabolites have been identified as potent therapeutic agents. However, the medicinal usage of most of these compounds has not yet been fully explored. The discoveries for new scaffolds of NPs as inhibitors of certain enzymes or receptors using advanced computational drug discovery approaches are also limited due to the unavailability of accurate 3D structures of NPs. An organized database incorporating all relevant information, therefore, can facilitate to explore the medicinal importance of the metabolites from Pakistani Biodiversity. The Chemical Database of Pakistan (ChemDP; release 01) is a fully-referenced, evolving, web-based, virtual database which has been designed and developed to introduce natural products (NPs) and their derivatives from the biodiversity of Pakistan to Global scientific communities. The prime aim is to provide quality structures of compounds with relevant information for computer-aided drug discovery studies. For this purpose, over 1000 NPs have been identified from more than 400 published articles, for which 2D and 3D molecular structures have been generated with a special focus on their stereochemistry, where applicable. The PM7 semiempirical quantum chemistry method has been used to energy optimize the 3D structure of NPs. The 2D and 3D structures can be downloaded as .sdf, .mol, .sybyl, .mol2, and .pdb files - readable formats by many chemoinformatics/bioinformatics software packages. Each entry in ChemDP contains over 100 data fields representing various molecular, biological, physico-chemical and pharmacological properties, which have been properly documented in the database for end users. These pieces of information have been either manually extracted from the literatures or computationally calculated using various computational tools. Cross referencing to a major data repository i.e. ChemSpider has been made available for overlapping compounds. An android application of ChemDP is available at its website. The ChemDP is freely accessible at www.chemdp.com. PMID:26343150

  9. 75 FR 8996 - Notice of Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ...representing all NASA Mission Directorates and current NASA missions in Earth and Space Science, mathematics, chemistry, and physics. II. Method of Collection The data collection uses web-based surveys, telephone interviews and in...

  10. A Collection of Chemical, Mineralogical, and Stable Isotopic Compositional Data for Green River Oil Shale from Depositional Center Cores in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, Michele L.W.

    2009-01-01

    For over half a century, the U.S. Geological Survey and collaborators have conducted stratigraphic and geochemical studies on the Eocene Green River Formation, which is known to contain large oil shale resources. Many of the studies were undertaken in the 1970s during the last oil shale boom. One such study analyzed the chemistry, mineralogy, and stable isotopy of the Green River Formation in the three major depositional basins: Piceance basin, Colo.; Uinta basin, Utah; and the Green River basin, Wyo. One depositional-center core from each basin was sampled and analyzed for major, minor, and trace chemistry; mineral composition and sulfide-mineral morphology; sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon forms; and stable isotopic composition (delta34S, delta15N, delta13C, and delta18O). Many of these data were published and used to support interpretative papers (see references herein). Some bulk-chemical and carbonate-isotopic data were never published and may be useful to studies that are currently exploring topics such as future oil shale development and the climate, geography, and weathering in the Eocene Epoch. These unpublished data, together with most of the U.S. Geological Survey data already published on these samples, are tabulated in this report.

  11. Trace metals in PM10 and PM 2.5 samples collected in a highly industrialized chemical/petrochemical area and its urbanized surroundings.

    PubMed

    dos Anjos Paulino, Silvia; Oliveira, Rafael Lopes; Loyola, Josiane; Minho, Alan Silva; Arbilla, Graciela; Quiterio, Simone Lorena; Escaleira, Viviane

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential impact of a highly industrialized area on its urbanized surroundings. The area studied is home to a refinery, a thermoelectric plant and several petrochemical facilities industries. The concentrations of twelve elements were determined in PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected along a busy highway and near the petrochemical complex. Significantly higher concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu and Al were observed in the petrochemical zone, but principal component analysis revealed similar patterns for both the highway site and a site approximately 1.5 km from the petrochemical complex, suggesting that the main pollution source in the area is vehicular flux. Higher concentrations in the industrial area may be attributed to intense diesel-powered truck and bus traffic movement, mainly due to the transport of supplies, fuel and gas. The observed concentrations of the elements Cr, Co, Ni, Cd and Pb were always lower than the detection limits of the technique used. PMID:24509656

  12. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  13. OXALATE MASS BALANCE DURING CHEMICAL CLEANING IN TANK 6F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-22

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRR personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 6F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate. Some conclusions from this work are: (1) Approximately 65% of the oxalate added as oxalic acid was removed with the decanted liquid. (2) Approximately 1% of the oxalate (added to the tank as oxalic acid) formed precipitates with compounds such as nickel, manganese, sodium, and iron (II), and was dissolved with nitric acid. (3) As much as 30% of the oxalate may have decomposed forming carbon dioxide. The balance does not fully account for all the oxalate added. The offset represents the combined uncertainty in the analyses and sampling.

  14. Using a dual plasma process to produce cobalt--polypyrrole catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells -- part II: analysing the chemical structure of the films

    E-print Network

    Walter, Christian; Vyalikh, Denis; Brüser, Volker; Quade, Antje; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; 10.1149/2.043209jes

    2012-01-01

    The chemical structure of cobalt--polypyrrole -- produced by a dual plasma process -- is analysed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX) and extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS).It is shown that only nanoparticles of a size of 3\\,nm with the low temperature crystal structure of cobalt are present within the compound. Besides that, cobalt--nitrogen and carbon--oxygen structures are observed. Furthermore, more and more cobalt--nitrogen structures are produced when increasing the magnetron power. Linking the information on the chemical structure to the results about the catalytic activity of the films -- which are presented in part I of this contribution -- it is concluded that the cobalt--nitrogen structures are the probable catalytically active sites. The cobalt--nitrogen bond length is calculated as 2.09\\,\\AA\\ and the carbon--nitrogen bond length as 1.38\\,\\AA.

  15. A two-stage ceramic tile grout sealing process using a high power diode laser—II. Mechanical, chemical and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J.; Li, L.; Spencer, J. T.

    1998-04-01

    Ceramic tiles sealed using a portable 60 Wcw high power diode laser (HPDL) and a specially developed grout material having an impermeable enamel surface glaze have been tested in order to determine the mechanical, chemical and physical characteristics of the seals. The work showed that the generation of the enamel surface glaze resulted in a seal with improved mechanical and chemical properties over conventional epoxy tile grouts. Both epoxy tile grout and laser generated enamel seals were tested for compressive strength, surface roughness, wear, water permeability and acid/alkali resistance. The enamel seal showed clear improvements in strength, roughness and wear, whilst being impermeable to water, and resistant (up to 80% concentration) to nitric acid, sodium hydroxide and detergent acids. The bond strength and the rupture strength of the enamel seal were also investigated, revealing that the enamel adhered to the new grout and the ceramic tiles with an average bond strength of 45-60 MPa, whilst the rupture strength was comparable with the ceramic tiles themselves. The average surface roughness of the seals and the tiles was 0.36 and 0.06 ?m, respectively, whilst for the conventional epoxy grout the average surface roughness when polished was 3.83 ?m and in excess of 30 ?m without polishing. Life assessment testing revealed that the enamel seals had an increase in actual wear life of 2.9 to 30.4 times over conventional epoxy tile grout, depending upon the corrosive environment.

  16. Common effect of chemical and external pressures on the magnetic properties of R CoPO (R =La ,Pr ,Nd ,Sm ). II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prando, G.; Profeta, G.; Continenza, A.; Khasanov, R.; Pal, A.; Awana, V. P. S.; Büchner, B.; Sanna, S.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the direct correspondence between Co band ferromagnetism and structural parameters in the pnictide oxides R CoPO for different rare-earth ions (R =La ,Pr ,Nd ,Sm ) by means of muon-spin spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, complementing our results published previously [G. Prando et al., Common effect of chemical and external pressures on the magnetic properties of R CoPO (R =La ,Pr ), Phys. Rev. B 87, 064401 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.064401]. We find that both the transition temperature to the ferromagnetic phase TC and the volume of the crystallographic unit cell V are conveniently tuned by the R ionic radius and/or external pressure. We report a linear correlation between TC and V and our ab initio calculations unambiguously demonstrate a full equivalence of chemical and external pressures. As such, we show that R ions influence the ferromagnetic phase only via the induced structural shrinkage without involving any active role from the electronic f degrees of freedom, which are only giving a sizable magnetic contribution at much lower temperatures.

  17. Theoretical study of fabrication of line-and-space patterns with 7 nm quarter-pitch using electron beam lithography with chemically amplified resist processes: II. Stochastic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Electron beam (EB) lithography is a core technology for nanofabrication. Owing to the increasing demand for high-resolution semiconductor lithography, the requirements for the resist processes of EB lithography for the photomasks used in ArF immersion and extreme ultraviolet lithographies and the mold fabrication of nanoimprints have also become stricter. In this study, the feasibility of single nano patterning by EB lithography with a chemically amplified resist process was investigated from the viewpoint of stochastic effects. The latent images of line-and-space patterns with a 7 nm quarter-pitch (7 nm space width and 21 nm line width) were calculated using a Monte Carlo method on the basis of the sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified EB resists. Compared with the line-and-space pattern with a 7 nm half-pitch, line edge roughness (LER) and the stochastic pinching generation are considered to be significantly improved by increasing the pitch. It was found that the suppression of the stochastic generation of bridges is the critical issue in 7 nm quarter-pitch fabrication.

  18. Computer Program for Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions and Applications II. Users Manual and Program Description. 2; Users Manual and Program Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1996-01-01

    This users manual is the second part of a two-part report describing the NASA Lewis CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications) program. The program obtains chemical equilibrium compositions of complex mixtures with applications to several types of problems. The topics presented in this manual are: (1) details for preparing input data sets; (2) a description of output tables for various types of problems; (3) the overall modular organization of the program with information on how to make modifications; (4) a description of the function of each subroutine; (5) error messages and their significance; and (6) a number of examples that illustrate various types of problems handled by CEA and that cover many of the options available in both input and output. Seven appendixes give information on the thermodynamic and thermal transport data used in CEA; some information on common variables used in or generated by the equilibrium module; and output tables for 14 example problems. The CEA program was written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77. CEA should work on any system with sufficient storage. There are about 6300 lines in the source code, which uses about 225 kilobytes of memory. The compiled program takes about 975 kilobytes.

  19. Construction of collagen II/hyaluronate/chondroitin-6-sulfate tri-copolymer scaffold for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering and preliminary analysis of its physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Qing; Huang, Bo; Luo, Gang; Zhang, Chuan-Zhi; Zhuang, Ying; Zhou, Yue

    2010-02-01

    To construct a novel scaffold for nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue engineering, The porous type II collagen (CII)/hyaluronate (HyA)-chondroitin-6-sulfate (6-CS) scaffold was prepared using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linking system. The physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility of CII/HyA-CS scaffolds were evaluated. The results suggested CII/HyA-CS scaffolds have a highly porous structure (porosity: 94.8 +/- 1.5%), high water-binding capacity (79.2 +/- 2.8%) and significantly improved mechanical stability by EDC/NHS crosslinking (denaturation temperature: 74.6 +/- 1.8 and 58.1 +/- 2.6 degrees C, respectively, for the crosslinked scaffolds and the non-crosslinked; collagenase degradation rate: 39.5 +/- 3.4 and 63.5 +/- 2.0%, respectively, for the crosslinked scaffolds and the non-crosslinked). The CII/HyA-CS scaffolds also showed satisfactory cytocompatibility and histocompatibility as well as low immunogenicity. These results indicate CII/HyA-CS scaffolds may be an alternative material for NP tissue engineering due to the similarity of its composition and physico-chemical properties to those of the extracellular matrices (ECM) of native NP. PMID:19763796

  20. LABORATORY CHEMICAL WASTE DISPOSAL POSTER (Post Near Chemical Waste Storage Area)

    E-print Network

    WSTPS.rtf LABORATORY CHEMICAL WASTE DISPOSAL POSTER (Post Near Chemical Waste Storage Area) Excess Chemicals and Chemical Wastes · Toxic and Flammable Chemicals - These cannot go down the drain. Call Environmental Health and Safety (EHSO) at x-2723 for collection. · Corrosive Chemicals (Acids & Bases) - When

  1. Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Libraries in Canada, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Includes 21 articles that discuss collection development in Canadian school libraries. Topics include digital collections in school library media centers; print and electronic library resources; library collections; collaborative projects; print-disabled students; informing administrators of the importance of collection development; censorship;…

  2. Possible Bose-condensate behavior in a quantum phase originating in a collective excitation in the chemically and optically doped Mott-Hubbard system UO2+x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradson, Steven D.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Espinosa-Faller, Francisco J.; An, Yong Q.; Andersson, David A.; Bishop, Alan R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Bradley, Joseph A.; Byler, Darrin D.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Dylan R.; Conradson, Leilani L.; Costello, Alison L.; Hess, Nancy J.; Lander, Gerard H.; Llobet, Anna; Martucci, Mary B.; Mustre de Leon, Jose; Nordlund, Dennis; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Proffen, Thomas E.; Rodriguez, George; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Trugman, Stuart A.; Tyson, Trevor A.; Valdez, James A.

    2013-09-01

    X-ray pair distribution function (pdf) and U L3 extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and neutron pdf measurements that give identical results for UO2 show U(VI)-oxo moieties with x rays for mixed valence U4O9 and U3O7, in contrast to the neutron data that indicate only U(V) sites with no short U-O bonds as well as other differences. In addition, although the EXAFS spectra of UO2 are essentially identical at 30, 100, and 200 K, those of the UO2+x compounds exhibit different nearest-neighbor U-O distributions at each temperature. Further tunneling polaron-type behavior is found in the broadening of the features of the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of the UO2+x compounds. Raman spectra of powders also show a large increase in scattering cross section with increasing O content that would originate in a change in the electronic structure that increases the overall polarizability. The XAS and Raman also show that U4O9 does not behave as a linear combination of the UO2 and U3O7 fluorite endpoints. The properties induced by mobile rather than static charged quasiparticles were explored by optical pumping of the metal-to-metal charge-transfer transition. The temperature dependence of 4.71 eV pump-1.57 eV probe reflectivity on UO2 that initially populates the U 6d-dominated portion of the upper Hubbard band (UHB) shows a sharp 28-?sec lifetime peak at 25 K that may be associated with the fluctuations of its antiferromagnetic transition. Pumping at 3.14 eV into the 5f-dominated portion of the UHB shows an analogous 2.8-?sec peak but also a plateau bracketing this peak that ends in a cusp at 50-60 K and an abrupt change in the hardening rate of a novel 12-15 GHz phonon that is the signature for the quasiparticle quantum phase. The different results for the different excitation channels indicate a highly specific nonthermal relaxation mechanism. These results constitute the first observation of a distinct phase of photoinduced quasiparticles that is sufficiently coupled to the lattice to undergo a gap-opening transition. When the intragap state is probed with a terahertz time domain spectroscopy (TTDS) measurement 33 psec after a 3.14 excitation pulse, it shows increased absorption in the 0.5-1.1 THz range with a decrease in temperature from ˜30 to 10 K instead of the expected decrease, a result consistent with the presence of a condensate. These results are too extreme to originate in the dynamical, nonadiabatic, coupled charge-transfer-phonon/tunneling polaron scenario previously used for doped Mott-Hubbard insulators with intermediate electron-phonon coupling and therefore indicate novel physics. One possibility that could cause all of these behaviors is that a collective, dynamical, charge transfer-coupled Peierls distortion involving the 2 U(V) ? U(IV)+U(VI)-oxo excitation occurs coherently over an entire domain to cause the atoms in this domain to condense into a system with Bose-Einstein or Bose-Einstein-Hubbard properties.

  3. Herschel Observations of Extraordinary Sources: Analysi sof the HIFI 1.2 THz Wide Spectral Survey toward Orion KL II. Chemical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, N. R.; Bergin, E. A.; Neill, J. L.; Favre, C.; Blake, G. A.; Herbst, E.; Anderson, D. E.; Hassel, G. E.

    2015-06-01

    We present chemical implications arising from spectral models fit to the Herschel/HIFI spectral survey toward the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL). We focus our discussion on the eight complex organics detected within the HIFI survey utilizing a novel technique to identify those molecules emitting in the hottest gas. In particular, we find the complex nitrogen bearing species CH3CN, C2H3CN, C2H5CN, and NH2CHO systematically trace hotter gas than the oxygen bearing organics CH3OH, C2H5OH, CH3OCH3, and CH3OCHO, which do not contain nitrogen. If these complex species form predominantly on grain surfaces, this may indicate N-bearing organics are more difficult to remove from grain surfaces than O-bearing species. Another possibility is that hot (Tkin ? 300 K) gas phase chemistry naturally produces higher complex cyanide abundances while suppressing the formation of O-bearing complex organics. We compare our derived rotation temperatures and molecular abundances to chemical models, which include gas-phase and grain surface pathways. Abundances for a majority of the detected complex organics can be reproduced over timescales ?105 years, with several species being underpredicted by less than 3?. Derived rotation temperatures for most organics, furthermore, agree reasonably well with the predicted temperatures at peak abundance. We also find that sulfur bearing molecules that also contain oxygen (i.e., SO, SO2, and OCS) tend to probe the hottest gas toward Orion KL, indicating the formation pathways for these species are most efficient at high temperatures. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  4. Chemical Hygiene Plan (The OSHA Laboratory Standard)

    E-print Network

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Chemical Hygiene Plan (The OSHA Laboratory Standard) Contact: Chemical Hygiene Safety Officer Risk Management & Safety University of Nevada Las Vegas (702) 895-4226 #12;Updated 4/27/2015 ii Chemical Hygiene of the Chemical Hygiene Plan .................................3 D. Permissible Exposure Limits and Threshold

  5. 76 FR 43327 - Certain New Chemicals; Receipt and Status Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...FRL-8881-3] Certain New Chemicals; Receipt and Status Information...EPA's review of the NOC, and chemical identity. Table II--8...Case No. Received notice end Chemical date date...2011 (G) Formaldehyde, reaction products with aromatic...

  6. Integrated Paramagnetic Resonance of High-Spin Co(II) in Axial Symmetry: Chemical Separation of Dipolar and Contact Electron-Nuclear Couplings

    PubMed Central

    Myers, William K.; Duesler, Eileen N.; Tierney, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated paramagnetic resonance, utilizing EPR, NMR and ENDOR, of a series of cobalt bis-trispyrazolylborates, Co(Tpx)2, are reported. Systematic substitutions at the ring carbons and on the apical boron provide a unique opportunity to separate through-bond and through-space contributions to the NMR hyperfine shifts for the parent, unsubstituted Tp complex. A simple relationship between the chemical shift difference (?H ? ?Me) and the contact shift of the proton in that position is developed. This approach allows independent extraction of the isotropic hyperfine coupling, Aiso, for each proton in the molecule. The Co··H contact coupling energies derived from the NMR, together with the known metrics of the compounds, were used to predict the ENDOR couplings at g?. Proton ENDOR data is presented that shows good agreement with the NMR-derived model. ENDOR signals from all other magnetic nuclei in the complex (14N, coordinating and non-coordinating, 11B and 13C) are also reported. PMID:18605690

  7. Chemical analysis of acidic silicon etch solutions II. Determination of HNO(3), HF, and H(2)SiF(6) by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Acker, Jörg; Henßge, Antje

    2007-06-15

    The processing of silicon in microelectronics and photovoltaics involves the isotropic chemical etching using HF-HNO(3) mixtures to clean the surface from contaminations, to remove the saw damage, as well as to polish or to texture the wafer surface. Key element of an effective etch process control is the knowledge of the actual etch bath composition in order to maintain a certain etch rate by replenishment of the consumed acids. The present paper describes a methods for the total analysis of the etch bath constituents HF, HNO(3), and H(2)SiF(6) by ion chromatography. First step is the measurement of the total fluoride and nitrate content in the analyte. In a second step, H(2)SiF(6) is precipitated as K(2)SiF(6). After careful filtration of the precipitate, the fluoride concentration in the filtrate is measured and the content of free HF is calculated therefrom. The K(2)SiF(6) is dissolved again and the fluoride content measured and recalculated as H(2)SiF(6). The results obtained with the presented method are discussed with respect to the results from two other, previously published methods, based on a titration using methanolic cyclohexylamine solution as titrant and based on a method using a fluoride ion selective electrode (F-ISE). An evaluation with respect to the needs for an industrial application is given. PMID:19071795

  8. Quantum chemical QSAR models to distinguish between inhibitory activities of sulfonamides against human carbonic anhydrases I and II and bovine IV isozymes.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Omar; Goodarzi, Mohammad; Khadikar, Padmaker V

    2012-04-01

    Linear and nonlinear quantitative structure activity relationship models for predicting the inhibitory activities of sulfonamides toward different carbonic anhydrase isozymes were developed based on multilinear regression, principal component-artificial neural network and correlation ranking-principal component analysis, to identify a set of structurally based numerical descriptors. Multilinear regression was used to build linear quantitative structure activity relationship models using 53 compounds with their quantum chemical descriptors. For each type of isozyme, separate quantitative structure activity relationship models were obtained. It was found that the hydration energy plays a significant role in the binding of ligands to the CAI isozyme, whereas the presence of five-membered ring was detected as a major factor for the binding to the CAII isozyme. It was also found that the softness exhibited significant effect on the binding to CAIV isozyme. Principal component-artificial neural network and correlation ranking-principal component analysis analyses provide models with better prediction capability for the three types of the carbonic anhydrase isozyme inhibitory activity than those obtained by multilinear regression analysis. The best models, with improved prediction capability, were obtained for the hCAII isozyme activity. Models predictivity was evaluated by cross-validation, using an external test set and chance correlation test. PMID:22181786

  9. The origin of the moon and the early history of the earth - A chemical model. I - The moon. II - The earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, H. St. C.

    1991-04-01

    Assuming that the moon was formed as a result of a giant impact by a celestial Mars-sized body with the earth, a model is developed that accounts for the chemical compositions of both the moon and the earth. The moon model assumes that about 80 percent of the moon came from the primitive earth's mantle after segregation of the earth's core and the other 20 percent came from two sources: (1) the Impactor, which is constrained to be an oxidized undifferentiated body of roughly CI chondritic composition and (2) a late-stage veneer with a composition and oxidation state similar to that of the H-group ordinary chondrites. The earth model assumes that the protoearth accreted from a material resembling a high-temperature condensate from the solar nebula. The model accounts for the siderophile element abundances of the present mantle. It predicts that neither S, O, nor Si were present in sufficient quantities to provide the required light element in the core, whose identity remains enigmatic.

  10. Herschel observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources: Analysis of the HIFI 1.2 THz Wide Spectral Survey Toward Orion KL II. Chemical Implications

    E-print Network

    Crockett, Nathan R; Neill, Justin L; Favre, Cécile; Blake, Geoffrey A; Herbst, Eric; Anderson, Dana E; Hassel, George E

    2015-01-01

    We present chemical implications arising from spectral models fit to the Herschel/HIFI spectral survey toward the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL). We focus our discussion on the eight complex organics detected within the HIFI survey utilizing a novel technique to identify those molecules emitting in the hottest gas. In particular, we find the complex nitrogen bearing species CH$_{3}$CN, C$_{2}$H$_{3}$CN, C$_{2}$H$_{5}$CN, and NH$_{2}$CHO systematically trace hotter gas than the oxygen bearing organics CH$_{3}$OH, C$_{2}$H$_{5}$OH, CH$_{3}$OCH$_{3}$, and CH$_{3}$OCHO, which do not contain nitrogen. If these complex species form predominantly on grain surfaces, this may indicate N-bearing organics are more difficult to remove from grain surfaces than O-bearing species. Another possibility is that hot (T$_{\\rm kin}$$\\sim$300 K) gas phase chemistry naturally produces higher complex cyanide abundances while suppressing the formation of O-bearing complex organics. We compare our derived rotation temperatures ...

  11. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePLUS

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  12. Chemical Peels

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Z Diseases and treatments A - D Chemical peel Chemical peels Also called chemexfoliation , derma peeling Do you ... the cost of cosmetic treatments. Learn more about chemical peels: Is a chemical peel the right choice ...

  13. Collecting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Charles P. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1983-01-01

    An improved collecting apparatus for small aquatic or airborne organisms such as plankton, larval fish, insects, etc. The improvement constitutes an apertured removal container within which is retained a collecting bag, and which is secured at the apex of a conical collecting net. Such collectors are towed behind a vessel or vehicle with the open end of the conical net facing forward for trapping the aquatic or airborne organisms within the collecting bag, while allowing the water or air to pass through the apertures in the container. The container is readily removable from the collecting net whereby the collecting bag can be quickly removed and replaced for further sample collection. The collecting bag is provided with means for preventing the bag from being pulled into the container by the water or air flowing therethrough.

  14. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis – Part II: Evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa, Carlos; Baumgardner, Darrel; Grutter, M.; Allan, James D.; Fast, Jerome D.; Rappengluck, B.

    2012-10-31

    This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009) in which measurements of trace gases and particles at a remote, high-altitude mountain site 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), acyl peroxy nitrate (APN) and particle size distributions (PSDs) of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM) were simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. The model prediction of the diurnal trends of the gases were well correlated with the measurements before the regional boundary layer reached the measurement site but underestimated the concentrations after that time. The differences are caused by an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer by the model with too much dilution. There also appears to be more O3 produced by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources, than predicted by the model. The measured and modeled PSDs compare very well with respect to their general shape and diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log normally distributed with most of the mass in the accumulation mode and the geometric diameter centered at 200 ±20 nm, with little observed or predicted change with respect to the origin of the air mass or the time when the RBL is above the Altzomoni research. Only the total mass changed with time and air mass origin. The invariability of the average diameter of the accumulation mode suggests that there is very little growth of the particles by condensation or coagulation after six hours of aging downwind of the major sources of anthropogenic emissions in Mexico’s Megapolis.

  15. Study of Chemical Surface Structure of Natural Sorbents Used for Removing of Pb2+ Ions from Model Aqueous Solutions (part Ii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo??cka, Agnieszka; Bo??cki, Piotr; Sanak-Rydlewska, Stanis?awa

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the results of the chemical structure research of organic sorbent surface such as walnut shells, plums stones and sunflower hulls with using such methods as infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and elemental analysis. Based on the IR spectra identification of functional groups present on the surface of studied materials has been done as well as determination of their effect on the sorption mechanism of Pb2+ ions from aqueous model solutions W artykule przedstawiono wyniki bada? chemicznej struktury powierzchni sorbentów organicznych takich jak: ?upiny orzecha w?oskiego, pestki ?liwek oraz ?uski s?onecznika z wykorzystaniem metody spektrometrii w podczerwieni (FTIR) oraz analizy elementarnej. W oparciu o uzyskane widma IR dokonano identyfikacji grup funkcyjnych obecnych na powierzchni tych materia?ów i okre?lono ich wp?yw na mechanizm sorpcji jonów Pb2+ z modelowych roztworów wodnych. Analiza elementarna wykaza?a, ?e spo?ród badanych sorbentów, najwi?ksz? zawarto?? w?gla (49,91%) i wodoru (5,93%) maj? pestki ?liwek. Najwi?cej azotu (1,59%) zawieraj? ?uszczyny s?onecznika (tabela 1). Zawarto?? siarki we wszystkich badanych materia?ach jest znikoma, dlatego nie uda?o si? jej oznaczy? t? metod?. Obecno?? pozosta?ych pierwiastków mo?e ?wiadczy? o istnieniu zarówno alifatycznych jak i aromatycznych po??cze? organicznych. Potwierdzeniem tego s? równie? zarejestrowane widma IR (rysunki 1-3). W oparciu o uzyskane wyniki mo?na przypuszcza? tak?e, i? udzia? procesu wymiany jonowej w sorpcji o?owiu z roztworów wodnych jest znacz?cy. ?wiadcz? o tym m.in. intensywno?ci pasm na widmach IR dla próbek badanych materia?ów po ich kontakcie z roztworami jonów Pb2+ (rysunki 4-6).

  16. The Tox21 robotic platform for the assessment of environmental chemicals--from vision to reality.

    PubMed

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Miller, Nicole; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Itkin, Misha; Kavlock, Robert J; Austin, Christopher P; Shinn, Paul; Simeonov, Anton; Tice, Raymond R; Xia, Menghang

    2013-08-01

    Since its establishment in 2008, the US Tox21 inter-agency collaboration has made great progress in developing and evaluating cellular models for the evaluation of environmental chemicals as a proof of principle. Currently, the program has entered its production phase (Tox21 Phase II) focusing initially on the areas of modulation of nuclear receptors and stress response pathways. During Tox21 Phase II, the set of chemicals to be tested has been expanded to nearly 10,000 (10K) compounds and a fully automated screening platform has been implemented. The Tox21 robotic system combined with informatics efforts is capable of screening and profiling the collection of 10K environmental chemicals in triplicate in a week. In this article, we describe the Tox21 screening process, compound library preparation, data processing, and robotic system validation. PMID:23732176

  17. Collections Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCandido, Robert

    Collections conservation is an approach to the preservation treatment of books and book-like materials that is conceptualized and organized in terms of large groups of materials. This guide is intended to enable a library to evaluate its current collections conservation activities. The introduction describes collections conservation and gives…

  18. A systematic study of the interactions between chemical partners (metal, ligands, counterions, and support) involved in the design of Al2O3-supported nickel catalysts from diamine-Ni(II) chelates.

    PubMed

    Négrier, Fabien; Marceau, Eric; Che, Michel; Giraudon, Jean-Marc; Gengembre, Léon; Löfberg, Axel

    2005-02-24

    1.5 Ni wt %/Al2O3 catalysts have been prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using [Ni(diamine)x(H2O)(6-2x)]Y2 precursors (diamine = 1,2-ethanediamine (en) and trans-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (tc); x = 0, 1, and 2; Y = NO3- and Cl-), to avoid the formation, during calcination, of difficult-to-reduce nickel aluminate. N2 was chosen for thermal treatment to help reveal and take advantage of the reactions occurring between Ni2+, ligands, counterions, and support. In the case of [Ni(en)2(H2O)2]Y2 salts used as precursors, in situ UV-vis and DRIFT spectroscopies show that after treatment at 230 degrees C Ni(II) ions are grafted to alumina via two OAl bonds and that the diamine ligands still remain coordinated to grafted nickel ions but in a monodentate way, bridging the cation with the alumina surface. With Y = Cl-, the chloride counterions desorb as hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen released upon decomposition of the en ligands is able to reduce a fraction of nickel ions into metal as evidenced by XPS. In contrast, with Y = NO3-, compounds such as CO or NO are formed during thermal treatment, indicating that nitrate ions burn the en ligands. After thermal treatment at 500 degrees C, a surface phase containing Ni(II) ions forms, characterized by XPS and UV-vis spectroscopy. Temperature-programmed reduction shows that these ions can be quantitatively reduced to the metallic state at 500 degrees C, in contrast with the aluminate obtained when the preparation is carried out from [Ni(H2O)6]2+, which is reduced only partly at 950 degrees C. On the other hand, a total self-reduction of nickel complexes leading to 2-5-nm metal particles is obtained upon thermal treatment via the hydrogen released by a hydrogen-rich ligand such as tc, whatever the Y counterion. An appropriate choice of the ligand and the counterion allows then to obtain selectively Ni(II) ions or a dispersed reduced nickel phase after treatment in N2, as a result of the reactions occurring between the chemical partners present on alumina. PMID:16851295

  19. Collection Mapping and Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes the use of collection mapping to assess media collections of Aurora, Colorado, Public Schools. Case studies of elementary, middle, and high school media centers describe materials selection and weeding and identify philosophies that library collections should support school curriculum, and teacher-library media specialist cooperation in…

  20. The dependence on temperature and concentration of 129Xe NMR chemical shift values of organoxenon(II) salts [RXe][Y] and of the parent molecule XeF2.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Vadim V; Frohn, Hermann-Josef

    2006-06-01

    The dependence of the 129Xe NMR chemical shift value of XeF2 on temperature and concentration was determined in a variety of prototypic media: in acidic (anhydrous HF, aHF), nonprotic but polar (dichloromethane), and basic (CD3CN-EtCN, 1:3 v/v) solvents. The 129Xe NMR spectra of a representative series of organoxenon(II) salts [RXe][Y] (R = C6F5, heptafluoro-1,4-cyclohexadien-1-yl (cyclo-1,4-C6F7), pentafluoro-1,4-cyclohexadien-3-on-1-yl (cyclo-3-O-1,4-C6F5), CF2=C(CF3), (CF3)2CFC[triple bond]C, C4H9C[triple bond]C; Y = BF4, AsF6) in aHF showed, compared with XeF2-aHF, a quantitatively less distinct but qualitatively related dependence of delta(129Xe) vs temperature. The dependence of their delta(129Xe) values on concentration in aHF is negligible. An explanation for the different behavior of [RXe][Y] and XeF2 is offered. PMID:16534834

  1. 76 FR 8804 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Revision and Approval of Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... involving National Infrastructure Investments or ``TIGER II'' Discretionary Grants pursuant to Title I of... referring to these grants as ``TIGER II Discretionary Grants.'' The original collection of information was...-117, 123 Stat. 3034. The purpose of the TIGER II Discretionary Grants program is to advance...

  2. 75 FR 77007 - Notice of Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... the NES project implementation and to provide data that can inform decisions made by NASA leadership and project staff about project modifications and implementation. II. Method of Collection The current paper-based system is used to collect the information. It is deemed not cost effective to collect...

  3. Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-01-30

    A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  4. Jay's Collectibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappel, James J.; Gillman, Jason R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in collectibles of many types, as indicated by the popularity of television programs such as the History Channel's "Pawn Stars" and "American Pickers" and the Public Broadcasting Service's "Antiques Road Show." The availability of online auction sites such as eBay has enabled many people to collect items of interest as a…

  5. Collective Enumeration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrami, Bahador; Didino, Daniele; Frith, Chris; Butterworth, Brian; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Many joint decisions in everyday life (e.g., Which bar is less crowded?) depend on approximate enumeration, but very little is known about the psychological characteristics of counting together. Here we systematically investigated collective approximate enumeration. Pairs of participants made individual and collective enumeration judgments in a…

  6. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  7. Data Collection

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of the various systems that are used for navigation, logging, and data collection during the trip. The USGS returned from a seafloor data mapping mission offshore of the Delmarva Peninsula (Ocean City, MD) on July 25th, 2014. The data collected is foundational to our continued understanding ...

  8. Chemical niche differentiation among sympatric species of orchid bees.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Yvonne; Ramírez, Santiago R; Eltz, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Male Neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini) collect volatile substances (fragrances) from flowers and other sources (e.g., decaying wood) and store them in specialized hind tibial pockets. The accumulated chemicals are later emitted during courtship display, presumably to lure conspecific females for mating. We analyzed tibial fragrances of males of 15 sympatric Panamanian species in the genus Euglossa to test whether communities of euglossine bees are chemically structured, and to elucidate whether male fragrance signals evolve to convey premating isolation. Our analysis revealed substantial chemical disparity among all lineages. Disparity was mediated by compounds that were exclusive to certain species but also by differences in relative quantity of shared compounds. We mapped tibial fragrance compounds present in each species on a DNA-based phylogeny (reconstructed using partial sequences of COI, EF1-alpha, ArgK, and Pol-II) and found that most dominant compounds were highly homoplasious. In an analysis of chemical differentiation in relation to phylogenetic divergence through time, disparity was greater than expected from a null model at any point during evolutionary history, suggesting that diversifying selection has shaped fragrance phenotypes. Notably, chemical disparity was greater within recently diverged lineages than among them, suggesting that chemical preferences in orchid bees evolved rapidly in the early stages of species divergence. We postulate communication interference as the possible mechanism behind the observed fragrance differentiation, which may be the product of reproductive character (fragrance) displacement. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that male fragrance signals evolve to convey premating isolation. PMID:19967856

  9. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2010-09-21

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  10. Collective enumeration.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Bahador; Didino, Daniele; Frith, Chris; Butterworth, Brian; Rees, Geraint

    2013-04-01

    Many joint decisions in everyday life (e.g., Which bar is less crowded?) depend on approximate enumeration, but very little is known about the psychological characteristics of counting together. Here we systematically investigated collective approximate enumeration. Pairs of participants made individual and collective enumeration judgments in a 2-alternative forced-choice task and when in disagreement, they negotiated joint decisions via verbal communication and received feedback about accuracy at the end of each trial. The results showed that two people could collectively count better than either one alone, but not as well as expected by previous models of collective sensory decision making in more basic perceptual domains (e.g., luminance contrast). Moreover, such collective enumeration benefited from prior, noninteractive practice showing that social learning of how to combine shared information about enumeration required substantial individual experience. Finally, the collective context had a positive but transient impact on an individual's enumeration sensitivity. This transient social influence may be explained as a motivational factor arising from the fact that members of a collective must take responsibility for their individual decisions and face the consequences of their judgments. PMID:22889187

  11. Culture collections.

    PubMed

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development. PMID:22569518

  12. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-print Network

    Li, Jiali

    UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY FACILITIES Record Keeping 82 Appendix I: Chemical Hygiene at the 90-day Accumulation Facility 84 Appendix II: List and Safety (EH&S) in accordance with Federal and State regulations provides this Chemical Hygiene Plan

  13. Micrometeorite Collecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toubes, Joe; Hoff, Darrel

    1974-01-01

    Describes how to collect micrometeorites and suggests a number of related activities such as determining the number of meteors entering the atmosphere and determining the composition of the micrometeorites. (BR)

  14. 75 FR 65673 - Notice of Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ...INFORMATION: I. Abstract The purpose of this survey is to assimilate lunar regolith stimulant requirements as well as Apollo sample requests...II. Method of Collection Electronic. III. Data Title: Lunar Regolith & Stimulant Users' Survey for the In Situ...

  15. 75 FR 53349 - Notice of Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ...I. Abstract: The purpose of this survey is to assimilate lunar regolith stimulant requirements as well as Apollo sample requests...II. Method of Collection Electronic. III. Data Title: Lunar Regolith & Stimulant Users' Survey for the In Situ...

  16. Diet History Questionnaire II & Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Web-based DHQ

    Cancer.gov

    The Web-based versions of DHQ II and C-DHQ II are identical in content to the paper forms. By automating the DHQ II and providing versions on the Web for public use, researchers have another tool to collect and analyze food frequency questionnaire data.

  17. Physical and chemical characteristics including total and geochemical forms of phosphorus in sediment from the top 30 centimeters of cores collected in October 2006 at 26 sites in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, Nancy S.; Ingle, Sarah N.

    2011-01-01

    ?This study of phosphorus (P) cycling in eutrophic Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon, was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Lakebed sediments from the upper 30 centimeters (cm) of cores collected from 26 sites were characterized. Cores were sampled at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 cm. Prior to freezing, water content and sediment pH were determined. After being freeze-dried, all samples were separated into greater than 63-micron (?m) particle-size (coarse) and less than 63-?m particle-size (fine) fractions. In the surface samples (0.5 to 4.5 cm below the sediment water interface), approximately three-fourths of the particles were larger than 63-?m. The ratios of the coarse particle-size fraction (>63 ?m) and the fine particle-size fraction (<63 ?m) were approximately equal in samples at depths greater than 10 cm below the sediment water interface. Chemical analyses included both size fractions of freeze-dried samples. Chemical analyses included determination of total concentrations of aluminum (Al), calcium (Ca), carbon (C), iron (Fe), poorly crystalline Fe, nitrogen (N), P, and titanium (Ti). Total Fe concentrations were the largest in sediment from the northern portion of UKL, Howard Bay, and the southern portion of the lake. Concentrations of total Al, Ca, and Ti were largest in sediment from the northern, central, and southernmost portions of the lake and in sediment from Howard Bay. Concentrations of total C and N were largest in sediment from the embayments and in sediment from the northern arm and southern portion of the lake in the general region of Buck Island. Concentrations of total C were larger in the greater than 63-?m particle-size fraction than in the less than 63-?m particle-size fraction. Sediments were sequentially extracted to determine concentrations of inorganic forms of P, including loosely sorbed P, P associated with poorly crystalline Fe oxides, and P associated with mineral phases. The difference between the concentration of total P and sum of the concentrations of inorganic forms of P is referred to as residual P. Residual P was the largest fraction of P in all of the sediment samples. In UKL, the correlation between concentrations of total P and total Fe in sediment is poor (R2<0.1). The correlation between the concentrations of total P and P associated with poorly crystalline Fe oxides is good (R2=0.43) in surface sediment (0.5-4.5 cm below the sediment water interface) but poor (R2<0.1) in sediments at depths between 10 cm and 30 cm. Phosphorus associated with poorly crystalline Fe oxides is considered bioavailable because it is released when sediment conditions change from oxidizing to reducing, which causes dissolution of Fe oxides.

  18. Blood Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The method that is used for the collection, storage and real-time analysis of blood and other bodily fluids has been licensed to DBCD, Inc. by NASA. The result of this patent licensing agreement has been the development of a commercial product that can provide serum or plasma from whole blood volumes of 20 microliters to 4 milliliters. The device has a fibrous filter with a pore size of less than about 3 microns, and is coated with a mixture of mannitol and plasma fraction protein. The coating causes the cellular fraction to be trapped by the small pores, leaving the cellular fraction intact on the fibrous filter while the acellular fraction passes through the filter for collection in unaltered form from the serum sample collection chamber. The method used by this product is useful to NASA for blood analysis on manned space missions.

  19. Dust as interstellar catalyst. I. Quantifying the chemical desorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F.; Cazaux, S.; Hocuk, S.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The presence of dust in the interstellar medium has profound consequences on the chemical composition of regions where stars are forming. Recent observations show that many species formed onto dust are populating the gas phase, especially in cold environments where UV- and cosmic-ray-induced photons do not account for such processes. Aims: The aim of this paper is to understand and quantify the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, the so-called chemical desorption process, so that an explicit formula can be derived that can be included in astrochemical models. Methods: We present a collection of experimental results of more than ten reactive systems. For each reaction, different substrates such as oxidized graphite and compact amorphous water ice were used. We derived a formula for reproducing the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process that considers the equipartition of the energy of newly formed products, followed by classical bounce on the surface. In part II of this study we extend these results to astrophysical conditions. Results: The equipartition of energy correctly describes the chemical desorption process on bare surfaces. On icy surfaces, the chemical desorption process is much less efficient, and a better description of the interaction with the surface is still needed. Conclusions: We show that the mechanism that directly transforms solid species into gas phase species is efficient for many reactions.

  20. 77 FR 21769 - Certain New Chemicals; Receipt and Status Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ...International (G) Additive for (G) Reaction (USA) LLC. pigments and...EPA's review of the NOC, and chemical identity. Table II--10...Received date notice end Chemical date...Hydroxypropyl methacrylate, reaction products with propylene...

  1. Collecting Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Fresh out of college, the author had only a handful of items worthy of displaying, which included some fossils she had collected in her paleontology class. She had binders filled with great science information, but kids want to see "real" science, not paper science. Then it came to her: she could fill the shelves with science artifacts with the…

  2. Wastewater Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjee, Samar; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater collection systems and components. This review covers: (1) planning, (2) construction; (3) sewer system evaluation; (4) maintenance; (5) rehabilitation; (6) overview prevention; and (7) wastewater pumping. A list of 111 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. Collection understanding 

    E-print Network

    Chang, Michelle T.

    2004-09-30

    Finder ................................................................................................................7 iPhoto2 .......................................................................................................................7 Foto... and stored as one collection, providing a means of filing groups of photos for easy browsing. Images are displayed using a two-dimensional grid of thumbnails. FotoFile FotoFile [Kudhinsky, et al. 1999] combines both human and automatic annotation methods...

  4. Collecting Samples

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Collecting Samples at Embden 3. Embden 3 is a 60-degree V trapezoidal flume in a bured concreate culvert located on the other side of the north-south road east of the large data shelter. The flow is measured and sampled from the V flume underground and periodic QW grab samples are taken form the blu...

  5. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  6. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  7. Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    James Barber

    2005-04-28

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  8. The chemical defensome: Environmental sensing and response genes in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome

    E-print Network

    The chemical defensome: Environmental sensing and response genes in the Strongylocentrotus families thought to protect against chemical stressors; these genes collectively comprise the `chemical defensome.' Chemical defense genes include cytochromes P450 and other oxidases, various conjugating enzymes

  9. 75 FR 3939 - Notice of Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... required by its license agreement. II. Method of Collection The current paper-based system is used to... Public: Business or other for-profit; individuals or households. Number of Respondents: 90. Responses per... ADMINISTRATION Notice of Information Collection AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  10. Chemicals for tomorrow J. Ranke, B. Jastorff

    E-print Network

    Koenig, Friederike - Fachbereich 2 Biologie

    risks to the biosphere. BUSINESS CUSTOMER LEGAL ENVIRONMENT PUBLIC BIOSPHERE Sustainable Relationship Sustainable Relationship Sustainable Relationship THESIS II A transfer of knowledge from pharmazeutical of Structure-Activity-Relationships SAR. The cultivation of knowledge about fate and effects of chemicals

  11. Chemical cytometry on a picoliter-scale integrated microfluidic chip

    E-print Network

    Zare, Richard N.

    Chemical cytometry on a picoliter-scale integrated microfluidic chip Hongkai Wu, Aaron Wheeler the chemical contents of a single cell (chemical cytometry). The device is designed to accomplish four different functions: (i) cell handling, (ii) metering and delivering of chemical reagents, (iii) cell lysis

  12. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  13. 21 CFR 1313.24 - Waiver of 15-day advance notice for chemical exporters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Waiver of 15-day advance notice for chemical exporters. 1313.24 Section 1313.24...IMPORTATION AND EXPORTATION OF LIST I AND LIST II CHEMICALS Exportation of Listed Chemicals § 1313.24 Waiver of 15-day advance...

  14. 21 CFR 1313.24 - Waiver of 15-day advance notice for chemical exporters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Waiver of 15-day advance notice for chemical exporters. 1313.24 Section 1313.24...IMPORTATION AND EXPORTATION OF LIST I AND LIST II CHEMICALS Exportation of Listed Chemicals § 1313.24 Waiver of 15-day advance...

  15. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  16. Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions alter the dynamics and distribution of Mn(II) in cultured chick glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wedler, F.C.; Ley, B.W. )

    1990-12-01

    Previous studies revealed that Mn(II) is accumulated in cultured glial cells to concentrations far above those present in whole brain or in culture medium. The data indicated that Mn(II) moves across the plasma membrane into the cytoplasm by facilitated diffusion or counter-ion transport with Ca(II), then into mitochondria by active transport. The fact that 1-10 microM Mn(II) ions activate brain glutamine synthetase makes important the regulation of Mn(II) transport in the CNS. Since Cu(II) and Zn(II) caused significant changes in the accumulation of Mn(II) by glia, the mechanisms by which these ions alter the uptake and efflux of Mn(II) ions has been investigated systematically under chemically defined conditions. The kinetics of (54MN)-Mn(II) uptake and efflux were determined and compared under four different sets of conditions: no adducts, Cu(II) or Zn(II) added externally, and with cells preloaded with Cu(II) or Zn(II) in the presence and absence of external added metal ions. Zn(II) ions inhibit the initial velocity of Mn(II) uptake, increase total Mn(II) accumulated, but do not alter the rate or extent Mn(II) efflux. Cu(II) ions increase both the initial velocity and the net Mn(II) accumulated by glia, with little effect on rate or extent of Mn(II) efflux. These results predict that increases in Cu(II) or Zn(II) levels may also increase the steady-state levels of Mn(II) in the cytoplasmic fraction of glial cells, which may in turn alter the activity of Mn(II)-sensitive enzymes in this cell compartment.

  17. Collection, Isolation and Culture of Marine Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of collecting, isolating, and culturing microscopic and macroscopic marine algae are described. Three different culture media list of chemicals needed and procedures for preparing Erdschreiber's and Provasoli's E. S. media. (BC)

  18. Bright Ideas for Chemical Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lavis, Luke D.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-molecule fluorescent probes embody an essential facet of chemical biology. Although numerous compounds are known, the ensemble of fluorescent probes is based on a modest collection of modular “core” dyes. The elaboration of these dyes with diverse chemical moieties is enabling the precise interrogation of biochemical and biological systems. The importance of fluorescence-based technologies in chemical biology elicits a necessity to understand the major classes of small-molecule fluorophores. Here, we examine the chemical and photophysical properties of oft-used fluorophores, and highlight classic and contemporary examples in which utility has been built upon these scaffolds. PMID:18355003

  19. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  20. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary. PMID:16296384

  1. MYCOBACTERIAL CELL WALLS II.

    PubMed Central

    Takeya, Kenji; Hisatsune, Kazuhito; Inoue, Yasuko

    1963-01-01

    Takeya, Kenji (Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan), Kazuhito Hisatsune, and Yasuko Inoue. Mycobacterial cell walls. II. Chemical composition of the “basal layer.” J. Bacteriol. 85:24–30. 1963.—Chemical composition of the “basal layer” of the mycobacterial cell wall was determined. The layer contained 35% amino acids, 41.5% reducing sugars (mainly composed of arabinose and galactose), 13.8% amino sugars (glucosamine and muramic acid, 2:1), and 7.7% lipid. The main amino acids were alanine, glutamic acid, and diaminopimelic acid. Their molar ratio was approximately 2:2:1. The main difference in chemical composition between the cell wall and the basal layer was found in lipid content. According to the chemical composition, the basal layer resembles the walls of gram-positive bacteria, while the mycobacterial cell wall resembles the walls of gram-negative bacteria. The basal layer was thoroughly disintegrated by lysozyme digestion, and was considered to be an inner layer of the wall, conferring shape and rigidity on the mycobacterial cell wall. Images PMID:13984704

  2. Chemical microsensors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  3. https://title2.ed.gov/Secured/DataCollection/Institution/PrintReport.aspx?Year=2015[4/29/2015 11:58:12 AM] VIEW TITLE II REPORTS SUBMIT REPORTS

    E-print Network

    Hill, Wendell T.

    https://title2.ed.gov/Secured/DataCollection/Institution/PrintReport.aspx?Year=2015[4/29/2015 11.S. Department of Education? (http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oii/tqp/index.html) No If yes, provide the following: Award year: Grantee name: Project name: #12;https://title2.ed.gov

  4. Mostly Plants. Individualized Biology Activities on: I. Investigating Bread Mold; II. Transpiration; III. Botany Project; IV. Collecting/Preserving/Identifying Leaves; [and] V. Student Science Laboratory Write-Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Paul R.

    Individualized biology activities for secondary students are presented in this teaching guide. The guide is divided into five sections: (1) investigating bread mold; (2) investigating transpiration; (3) completing a botany project; (4) collecting, preserving, and identifying leaves; and (5) writing up science laboratory investigations. The…

  5. Subject and Citation Indexing. Part I: The Clustering Structure of Composite Representations in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection. Part II: The Optimal, Cluster-Based Retrieval Performance of Composite Representations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, W. M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two articles discuss the clustering of composite representations in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection from the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE file. Clustering is evaluated as a function of the exhaustivity of composite representations based on Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and citation indexes, and evaluation of retrieval…

  6. Electronic and chemical state of aluminum from the single- (K) and double-electron excitation (KLII&III, KLI) x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of ?-alumina, sodium aluminate, aqueous Al³?•(H?O)?, and aqueous Al(OH)??

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, John L.; Govind, Niranjan; Huthwelker, Thomas; Bylaska, Eric J.; Vjunov, Aleksei; Pin, Sonia; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.

    2015-07-02

    We probe, at high energy resolution, the double electron excitation (KLII&II) x-ray absorption region that lies approximately 115 eV above the main Al K-edge (1566 eV) of ?-alumina and sodium aluminate. The two solid standards, ?-alumina (octahedral) and sodium aluminate (tetrahedral) are compared to aqueous species that have the same Al coordination symmetries, Al³?•6H?O (octahedral) and Al(OH)?? (tetrahedral). For the octahedral species, the edge height of the KLII&III-edge is approximately 10% of the main K-edge however the edge height is much weaker (3% of K-edge height) for Al species with tetrahedral symmetry. For the ?-alumina and aqueous Al³?•6H?O the KLII&III spectra contain white line features and extended absorption fine structure (EXAFS) that mimics the K-edge spectra. The KLII&III-edge feature interferes with an important region of the extended-XAFS region of the spectra for the K-edge of the crystalline and aqueous standards. The K-edge spectra and K-edge positions are predicted using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The TDDFT calculations for the K-edge XANES spectra reproduce the observed transitions in the experimental spectra of the four Al species. The KLII&III and KLI onsets and their corresponding chemical shifts for the four standards are estimated using the delta self-consistent field (?SCF) method. Research by JLF, NG, EJB, AV, TDS was supported by U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. NG thanks Amity Andersen for help with the ?-Al?O? and tetrahedral sodium aluminate (NaAlO?) clusters. All the calculations were performed using the Molecular Science Computing Capability at EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle under Contract # AC05-76RL01830.

  7. Welding II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding II, a performance-based course offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to introduce students to out-of-position shielded arc welding with emphasis on proper heats, electrode selection, and alternating/direct currents. After introductory…

  8. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-09-05

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  9. Fugu II

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-11-19

    Broadcast Transcript: Fugu Part II: In the last Postcard, we talked about fugu, the poisonous poisson that has been a favorite in Japan for centuries. Well, it seems that a fish farm has recently raised fugu that are poison-free. A non-toxic fugu...

  10. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  11. Chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

  12. 78 FR 37782 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Collection of State Level Data on Nutrition...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ...Bureau improve its methods of collecting program...its record linking methods. This linkage will...address, sex, date of birth, and Social Security...external Census Bureau research projects. Only Census...participation research. II. Method of Collection The...III. Data OMB Control Number: None....

  13. 78 FR 60867 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The ICR, titled: ``Safer Detergent Stewardship... collection. II. What information collection activity or ICR does this action apply to? Title: Safer Detergent... regulations is consolidated in 40 CFR part 9. Abstract: The Safer Detergent Stewardship Initiative (SDSI) is...

  14. Collective future thought: 1 Collective future thought

    E-print Network

    Szpunar, Karl K.

    thought, collective memory, group identity, imagining, temporality #12;Collective future thought: 2 People in clinical disorders characterized by anxiety and depression (Watkins, 2008). Notably, efforts to understand;Collective future thought: 3 However, dissociations between the two have been demonstrated

  15. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  16. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  17. BORE II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore »upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  18. UNIVERSITY ART COLLECTIONS AND GALLERIES POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    E-print Network

    UNIVERSITY ART COLLECTIONS AND GALLERIES POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Table of Contents Article I - Mission Article II - Goals Article III - Organization of the University Art Collections and Galleries - Mission The mission of the University Art Collections and Galleries is to inspire and educate

  19. NPDES Phase II Compliance &

    E-print Network

    Radcliffe, David

    NPDES Phase II Compliance & Illicit Discharge Ordinances Benjamin Corson-Knowles Fall 2005 #12;The-0612 jroskie@uga.edu #12;NPDES Phase II Compliance & Illicit Discharge Ordinances Author: Benjamin Corson..................................................................................2 II. Background of the Phase II Rule

  20. Unnecessary Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  1. Chemical Peels

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and ... dermatologist Home Public and patients Diseases and treatments Cosmetic treatments Chemical peels public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases ...

  2. Chemical Agents

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Info Chemical Emergencies A–Z Abrin Adamsite Ammonia Arsenic Arsine Barium Benzene Brevetoxin Bromine BZ Carbon monoxide ... X Y Z A Abrin Adamsite (DM) Ammonia Arsenic Arsine (SA) B Barium Benzene Brevetoxin Bromine (CA) ...

  3. Chemical and ancillary data associated with bed sediment, young of year Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) tissue, and mussel (Mytilus edulis and Geukensia demissa) tissue collected after Hurricane Sandy in bays and estuaries of New Jersey and New York, 2013–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Deshpande, Ashok D.; Blazer, Vicki; Galbraith, Heather S.; Dockum, Bruce W.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Colella, Kaitlyn; Deetz, Anna C.; Fisher, Irene J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Sharack, Beth; Summer, Lisa; Timmons, DeMond; Trainor, John J.; Wieczorek, Daniel; Samson, Jennifer; Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty three PCB congeners, 9 PBDE congeners, and 20 OCPs were detected in composite mussel samples collected throughout the study area. The co-eluting PCB congeners 153 and 132, PBDE 47, 99, and 100, and p,p’-DDE were detected in samples from each site. The highest median concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs were present in mussels from Raritan Bay, N.Y., whereas the highest median concentrations of OCPs were present in mussels from Fire Island Inlet, N.Y., and Shark River, N.J. Mytilus edulis (blue mussels) and Geukensia demissa (ribbed mussels) were thin-sectioned and aged. The blue mussels collected ranged in age from 4 to 13 years, and the ribbed mussels ranged in age from 3 to 12 years.

  4. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  5. 46 CFR 13.605 - Requirements to qualify for an STCW endorsement for advanced chemical tanker cargo operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...provided that the service was on chemical tankers. (c) Applicants...an endorsement in advanced chemical tanker cargo operations with...least 90 days of service as an engineering officer on chemical tankers; (ii) At...

  6. Thiol-functionalized polysilsesquioxane as efficient adsorbent for adsorption of Hg(II) and Mn(II) from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Yuzhong Qu, Rongjun; Liu, Xiguang; Mu, Lei; Bu, Baihui; Sun, Yuting; Chen, Hou; Meng, Yangfeng; Meng, Lina; Cheng, Lin

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • PMPSQ was promising adsorbent for the removal of Hg(II) and Mn(II). • The adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. • The adsorption isotherms can be described by the monolayer Langmuir model. • The adsorption was controlled by film diffusion and chemical ion-exchange mechanism. - Abstract: Thiol-functionalized polysilsesquioxane was synthesized and used for the adsorption of Hg(II) and Mn(II) from aqueous solution. Results showed that the optimal pH was about 6 and 5 for Hg(II) and Mn(II), respectively. Adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption equilibriums were established within 100 min and followed pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption isotherms revealed that the adsorption capacities increased with the increasing of temperature. The adsorption was found to be well described by the monolayer Langmuir isotherm model and took place by chemical ion-exchange mechanism. The thermodynamic properties indicated the adsorption processes were spontaneous and endothermic nature. Selectively adsorption showed that PMPSQ can selectively adsorb Hg(II) from binary ion systems in the presence of the coexistent ions Mn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). Based on the results, it is concluded that PMPSQ had comparable high adsorption efficiency and could be potentially used for the removal of Hg(II) and Mn(II) from aqueous solution.

  7. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

  8. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program…

  9. APOLLO II

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.; Cossic, A.; Zmijarevic, I.

    1988-11-01

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  10. 76 FR 14994 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Reports of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...: Reports of Suspicious Orders or Theft/Loss of Listed Chemicals/Machines ACTION: 60-Day Notice of... Form/Collection: Reports of Suspicious Orders or Theft/Loss of Listed Chemicals/Machines. (3) Agency... and tableting and encapsulating machines are required to report thefts, losses and suspicious...

  11. 76 FR 29792 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Reports of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register at 76 FR 14994, March 18, 2011...: Reports of Suspicious Orders or Theft/Loss of Listed Chemicals/Machines ACTION: 30-Day notice of... of Listed Chemicals/Machines. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of...

  12. 78 FR 76656 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Reports of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ...: Reports of Suspicious Orders or Theft/Loss of Listed Chemicals/Machines ACTION: 60-Day notice. The... Form/Collection: Reports of Suspicious Orders or Theft/Loss of Listed Chemicals/Machines. (3) Agency... and tableting and encapsulating machines are required to report thefts, losses and suspicious...

  13. Chemical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section.

  14. 77 FR 41300 - Hazardous Chemical Reporting: Revisions to the Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Forms...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 370 RIN 2050-AG64 Hazardous Chemical Reporting: Revisions to the Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Forms (Tier I and Tier II) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... new data elements and revising some existing data elements on the Emergency and Hazardous...

  15. Chemical Symbolism and the Solid State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the coordinated polyhedra approach to teaching the solid state. A solid is viewed as a collection of coordination complexes. Also proposes a method of extending the current chemical symbolism to include structural facts of solid state chemistry. (MLH)

  16. Delicious Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    This paper presents an approach to chemistry and nutrition that focuses on food items that people consider delicious. Information is organized according to three categories of food chemicals that provide energy to the human body: (1) fats and oils; (2) carbohydrates; and (3) proteins. Minerals, vitamins, and additives are also discussed along with…

  17. Chemical Evolution

    E-print Network

    Francesca Matteucci

    2007-04-05

    In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

  18. Chemical Mahjong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  19. 76 FR 59660 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; National Marine Sanctuary Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... updated guidelines for the lionfish removal permit. II. Method of Collection Depending on the permit being... use permits, 8 hours; historical resources permits, 13 hours; baitfish permits, lionfish...

  20. Cohesin removal precedes topoisomerase II?-dependent decatenation at centromeres in male mammalian meiosis II.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Rocío; Viera, Alberto; Berenguer, Inés; Llano, Elena; Pendás, Alberto M; Barbero, José Luis; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Suja, José A

    2014-03-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion is regulated by cohesin complexes and topoisomerase II?. Although relevant studies have shed some light on the relationship between these two mechanisms of cohesion during mammalian mitosis, their interplay during mammalian meiosis remains unknown. In the present study, we have studied the dynamics of topoisomerase II? in relation to that of the cohesin subunits RAD21 and REC8, the shugoshin-like 2 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) (SGOL2) and the polo-like kinase 1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH), during both male mouse meiotic divisions. Our results strikingly show that topoisomerase II? appears at stretched strands connecting the sister kinetochores of segregating early anaphase II chromatids, once the cohesin complexes have been removed from the centromeres. Moreover, the number and length of these topoisomerase II?-connecting strands increase between lagging chromatids at anaphase II after the chemical inhibition of the enzymatic activity of topoisomerase II? by etoposide. Our results also show that the etoposide-induced inhibition of topoisomerase II? is not able to rescue the loss of centromere cohesion promoted by the absence of the shugoshin SGOL2 during anaphase I. Taking into account our results, we propose a two-step model for the sequential release of centromeric cohesion during male mammalian meiosis II. We suggest that the cohesin removal is a prerequisite for the posterior topoisomerase II?-mediated resolution of persisting catenations between segregating chromatids during anaphase II. PMID:24013524

  1. 77 FR 12871 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ...approved information collection (IC) for the ``North American Breeding Bird Survey, (1 USGS form).'' As required by the Paperwork...sensitive'' nature are asked. II. Data Title: North American Breeding Bird Survey. OMB Control Number: 1028-0079. Form...

  2. 76 FR 76177 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ...Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request AGENCY...publish information concerning earthquakes. Respondents will have an...effects of shaking from an earthquake--on themselves, buildings...II. Data Title: USGS Earthquake Report. OMB Control...

  3. 78 FR 68089 - Proposed Information Collection; Visibility Valuation Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Visibility Valuation Survey AGENCY: National Park.... II. Data OMB Number: 1024-0255. Title: Visibility Valuation Survey. Type of Request: Reinstatement...

  4. SABER-School Finance: Data Collection Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Elizabeth; Patrinos, Harry; Rogers, Halsey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the SABER-school finance initiative is to collect, analyze and disseminate comparable data about education finance systems across countries. SABER-school finance assesses education finance systems along six policy goals: (i) ensuring basic conditions for learning; (ii) monitoring learning conditions and outcomes; (iii) overseeing…

  5. 76 FR 9820 - Notice of Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... quality and/or the delivery of our products and services. II. Method of Collection We intend to introduce... Responses per Respondent: 1 Estimated Time per Response: 30 minutes Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 15... Administration, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, invites the...

  6. Neurotoxicity of industrial and commercial chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donoghue, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents a collection of information on the neurotoxicity of chemicals used in industry or having commercial value. Chemicals reported to cause a variety of effects on the nervous system are thoroughly reviewed. Exposure data, clinical manifestations, pathology, experimental neurology, metabolism, and structure activity correlates are integrated and presented by the anatomical and functional areas of the nervous systems affected, and also by chemical classes with neurotoxic effects. Much of the information is presented in tabular format.

  7. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Matthew

    2015-08-19

    This presentation covers data collected on two commercial laser stabilization systems, Guidestar-II and MRC, and two optical imaging systems. Additionally, general information about LCLS-II and how to go about continuing-testing is covered.

  8. Chemical and histological comparisons between Brevoortia sp. (menhaden) collected in fall 2010 from Barataria Bay, LA and Delaware Bay, NJ following the DeepWater Horizon (DWH) oil spill.

    PubMed

    Bentivegna, Carolyn S; Cooper, Keith R; Olson, Gregory; Pena, Edwin A; Millemann, Daniel R; Portier, Ralph J

    2015-12-01

    Body burdens of PAHs were compared to histological effects in menhaden (Family: Clupeidae, Genus: Brevoortia) collected in fall 2010 from Barataria Bay, LA (BBLA) and Delaware Bay, NJ (DBNJ). Barataria Bay was heavily oiled during the DeepWater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, while Delaware Bay although urbanized had no reported recent oil spills. GCMS analyses of pre-spill 2009, BBLA and DBNJ fish found predominantly C2/C3 phenanthrene (1.28-6.52 ng/mg). However, BBLA also contained five higher molecular weight PAHs (0.06-0.34 ng/mg DW). Fluorescent aromatic compound spectroscopy (FACS) of gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissue showed statistically higher levels of hydroxypyrene-like PAHs in DBNJ than BBLA fish. Histopathologic lesions were more prevalent in BBLA than DBNJ fish. The lesion prevalence (gill, trunk kidney, epidermis, stomach) in the BBLA menhaden were significantly higher and more severe than observed in the DBNJ menhaden. Reversible lesions included gill lamellar hyperplasia, adhesions, edema, and epidermal hyperplasia. The increased pigmented macrophage centers were indicative of activated macrophages responding to connective tissue damage or other antigens. The liver hepatic necrosis and renal tissue mineralization may well have undergone repair, but damage to the kidney nephrons and hepatic/biliary regions of the liver would be slower to resolve and apparently remained after elimination of PAHs. Therefore, a direct cause and effect between DWH oil spill and increased lesion prevalence in BBLA menhaden could not be established. PMID:26385175

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of the W-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system near the melting temperature of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: II. Chemical interactions at 1 x 10{sup -5} bar

    SciTech Connect

    Kostomarov, D. V.; Bagdasarov, Kh. S. Kobzareva, S. A.; Antonov, E. V.

    2010-05-15

    The W-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system is considered at a basic component ratio of 1: 1. The composition and component concentrations in the closed system under isobaric-isothermal conditions and a residual pressure of 1 x 10{sup -5} bar are determined by stochastic simulation and the minimization of the Gibbs free energy. The basic chemical reactions leading to tungsten oxidation near the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} melting temperature are determined, and the possibilities of their occurrence are calculated. Understanding the behavior of the system under these conditions allows one to stabilize the conditions for growing leucosapphire crystals from melt.

  10. Chemical warfare

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Richard Ian; Mattoso, Thalles Cardoso; Moreira, Denise D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-cutting ants are well known for their highly complex social organization, which provides them with a strong defense against parasites invading their colonies. Besides this attribute, these insects have morphological, physiological and structural characteristics further reinforcing the defense of their colonies. With the discovery of symbiotic bacteria present on the integument of leaf-cutting ants, a new line of defense was proposed and considered to be specific for the control of a specialized fungal parasite of the ants’ fungus gardens (Escovopsis). However, recent studies have questioned the specificity of the integumental bacteria, as they were also found to inhibit a range of fungi, including entomopathogens. The microbiota associated with the leaf-cutting ant gardens has also been proposed as another level of chemical defense, protecting the garden from parasite invasion. Here we review the chemical defense weaponry deployed by leaf-cutting ants against parasites of their fungus gardens and of the ants themselves. PMID:23795235

  11. 77 FR 6785 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Feedback Survey for Annual Tsunami Warning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... exceed seven days. This will be a Web-based survey and will allow for efficient collection of information regarding the effectiveness of the Tsunami Warning System. II. Method of Collection A Web-based survey...

  12. 77 FR 6784 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Scientific Research, Exempted Fishing, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ...purpose of collecting scientific data on catch may submit...submit reports of their scientific research activity after its completion. II. Method of Collection Information...Estimated Time per Response: Scientific research plans, 37...

  13. 77 FR 14348 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Information Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...Coastal Household Telephone Survey, a Directory Frame Telephone Survey of Licensed Marine Recreational Anglers, the Angler Diary Recruitment Screening Questionnaire, and Biological Data Collection. II. Method of Collection Information will be...

  14. Collection Directions: The Evolution of Library Collections and Collecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Lorcan; Malpas, Constance; Lavoie, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This article takes a broad view of the evolution of collecting behaviors in a network environment and suggests some future directions based on various simple models. The authors look at the changing dynamics of print collections, at the greater engagement with research and learning behaviors, and at trends in scholarly communication. The goal is…

  15. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1994, 28, 204-289 Mechanisms of Chromium(I II) Sorption on Silica. 1. Cr(1II) Surface

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Environ. Sci. Technol. 1994, 28, 204-289 Mechanisms of Chromium(I II) Sorption on Silica. 1. Cr(1II, a polynuclear chromium hydroxide surface phase occurred with Cr-Cr distances of 2.99 A, indicative of edge the chemical/ physicalproperties of themonodentatesurface-complexed Cr(II1) and surface-nucleated chromium

  16. COMPUTATION OF GLOBAL PHOTOCHEMISTRY WITH SMVGEAR II (R823186)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computer model was developed to simulate global gas-phase photochemistry. The model solves chemical equations with SMVGEAR II, a sparse-matrix, vectorized Gear-type code. To obtain SMVGEAR II, the original SMVGEAR code was modified to allow computation of different sets of chem...

  17. Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Product and Process Engineering Option

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Product and Process ­ Chemical Engineering Seminar I 0 Total 16 Senior Year First Semester CHE 3820 ­ Chemical Engineering ­ Chemical Engineering Seminar II 1 Chemical Engineering Technical Elective 6 Total 14 Second Semester

  18. Dangerous and cancer-causing properties of products and chemicals in the oil refining and petrochemical industry--Part II: Carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and developmental toxicity of 1,3-butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlman, M.A.; Legator, M.S. )

    1991-05-01

    1,3-butadiene (BD) is present in synthetic rubber and motor fuels (gasoline). BD is shown to cause lymphocytic lymphomas, heart hemangiosarcomas, lung alveolar bronchiolar cancers, forestomach-squamous cell cancers, harderian gland neoplasms, preputial gland adenoma or carcinoma, liver-hepatocellular cancers, mammary gland acinar cell carcinomas, ovary-glanulosa cell carcinoma, brain cancers, pancreas adenoma and carcinoma, testis-Leydig cell tumors, thyroid follicular adenoma and carcinoma, and zymbal gland carcinoma in rodents and to date no exposure level has been established at which this chemical does not cause cancers. In humans BD causes increase in lymphomas, leukemias, and other cancers of hematopoietic systems and organs. BD is also a potent alkylating agent, directly toxic to developing embryos and damages progeny after parental exposure.29 references.

  19. Mid-IR semiconductor lasers for chemical sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The development of mid-IR semiconductor diode lasers based on type-II interband cascade structures is presented. How these diode lasers can be developed to meet the requirements in chemical sensing applications is discussed.

  20. Chemical durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuer, K.D.; Warhus, U.

    1986-03-01

    The chemical durability of NASICON (Na/sub 1+x/Zr/sub 2/Si/sub x/P/sub 3-x/O/sub 12/, x=0-3) versus molten sodium and sulfur at 600 K has been investigated. Degradation by molten sodium has been observed for phosphorus-containing compositions only. The pure silicate (x=3), however, appeared to be stable, because reduction of silicon demanded by thermodynamics did not occur at the given temperature for kinetic reasons. The latter composition has also been shown to have good durability against molten sulfur.

  1. Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Stimulants using Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, S.H.; Hart, K.J.; Vass, A.A.; Wise, M.B.; Wolf, D.A.

    1999-06-14

    Detection of Chemical/Biological Agents and Simulants A new detector for chemical and biological agents is being developed for the U. S. Army under the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II program. The CBMS Block II is designed to optimize detection of both chemical and biological agents through the use of direct sampling inlets [I], a multi- ported sampling valve and a turbo- based vacuum system to support chemical ionization. Unit mass resolution using air as the buffer gas [2] has been obtained using this design. Software to control the instrument and to analyze the data generated from the instrument has also been newly developed. Detection of chemical agents can be accomplished. using the CBMS Block II design via one of two inlets - a l/ I 6'' stainless steel sample line -Chemical Warfare Air (CW Air) or a ground probe with enclosed capillary currently in use by the US Army - CW Ground. The Block II design is capable of both electron ionization and chemical ionization. Ethanol is being used as the Cl reagent based on a study indicating best performance for the Biological Warfare (BW) detection task (31). Data showing good signal to noise for 500 pg of methyl salicylate injected into the CW Air inlet, 50 ng of dimethylmethylphosphonate exposed to the CW Ground probe and 5 ng of methyl stearate analyzed using the pyrolyzer inlet were presented. Biological agents are sampled using a ''bio-concentrator'' unit that is designed to concentrate particles in the low micron range. Particles are collected in the bottom of a quartz pyrolyzer tube. An automated injector is being developed to deliver approximately 2 pL of a methylating reagent, tetramethylamonium- hydroxide to 'the collected particles. Pyrolysis occurs by rapid heating to ca. 55OOC. Biological agents are then characterized by their fatty acid methyl ester profiles and by other biomarkers. A library of ETOH- Cl/ pyrolysis MS data of microorganisms used for a recently published study [3] has been expanded with additional bacteria and fungi. These spectra were acquired on a Finnigan Magnum ion trap using helium buffer gas. A new database of Cl spectra of microorganisms is planned using the CBMS Block II instrument and air as the buffer gas. Using the current database, the fatty acid composition of the organisms was compared using the percentage of the ion current attributable to fatty acids. The data presented suggest promising rules for discrimination of these organisms. Strain, growth media and vegetative state do contribute to some of the distributions observed in the data. However, the data distributions observed in the current study only reflect our experience to date and do not fully represent the variability that might be expected in practice: Acquisition of MS/ MS spectra has begun (using He and air buffer gas) of the protonated molecular ion of a variety of fatty acids and for a number of ions nominally assigned as fatty acids from microorganisms. These spectra will be used to help verify fatty acid .

  2. A Femtosecond Visible/Visible and Visible/Mid-Infrared Transient Absorption Study of the Light Harvesting Complex II

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Andreas D.; Di Donato, Mariangela; van Stokkum, Ivo; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Light harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the most abundant protein in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and green algae. LHCII acts to collect solar radiation, transferring this energy mainly toward photosystem II, with a smaller amount going to photosystem I; it is then converted into a chemical, storable form. We performed time-resolved femtosecond visible pump/mid-infrared probe and visible pump/visible probe absorption difference spectroscopy on purified LHCII to gain insight into the energy transfer in this complex occurring in the femto-picosecond time regime. We find that information derived from mid-infrared spectra, together with structural and modeling information, provides a unique visualization of the flow of energy via the bottleneck pigment chlorophyll a604. PMID:20006959

  3. Holographic Type II Goldstone bosons

    E-print Network

    Irene Amado; Daniel Arean; Amadeo Jimenez-Alba; Karl Landsteiner; Luis Melgar; Ignacio Salazar Landea

    2013-03-20

    The Goldstone theorem implies the appearance of an ungapped mode whenever a continuous global symmetry is spontaneously broken. In general it does not say anything about the precise form of the dispersion relation nor does it imply that there is one massless mode for each broken symmetry generator. It is a well-established fact that even for relativistic field theories in the presence of a chemical potential Goldstone modes with quadratic dispersion relation, the type II Goldstone bosons, appear in the spectrum. We develop two holographic models that feature type II Goldstone modes as part of the quasinormal mode spectrum. The models are based on simple generalizations with U(2) symmetry of the well-studied holographic s-wave superfluid. Our results include Goldstone modes without broken generators but with unusual realization of symmetries and a frequency dependent conductivity of striking resemblance to the one of Graphene.

  4. Holographic Type II Goldstone bosons

    E-print Network

    Amado, Irene; Jimenez-Alba, Amadeo; Landsteiner, Karl; Melgar, Luis; Landea, Ignacio Salazar

    2013-01-01

    The Goldstone theorem implies the appearance of an ungapped mode whenever a continuous global symmetry is spontaneously broken. In general it does not say anything about the precise form of the dispersion relation nor does it imply that there is one massless mode for each broken symmetry generator. It is a well-established fact that even for relativistic field theories in the presence of a chemical potential Goldstone modes with quadratic dispersion relation, the type II Goldstone bosons, appear in the spectrum. We develop two holographic models that feature type II Goldstone modes as part of the quasinormal mode spectrum. The models are based on simple generalizations with U(2) symmetry of the well-studied holographic s-wave superfluid. Our results include Goldstone modes without broken generators but with unusual realization of symmetries and a frequency dependent conductivity of striking resemblance to the one of Graphene.

  5. From organized internal traffic to collective navigation of bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariel, Gil; Shklarsh, Adi; Kalisman, Oren; Ingham, Colin; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial swarming resulting in collective navigation over surfaces provides a valuable example of cooperative colonization of new territories. The social bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits successful and diverse swarming strategies. When grown on hard agar surfaces with peptone, P. vortex develops complex colonies of vortices (rotating bacterial aggregates). In contrast, during growth on Mueller-Hinton broth gelled into a soft agar surface, a new strategy of multi-level organization is revealed: the colonies are organized into a special network of swarms (or ‘snakes’ of a fraction of millimeter in width) with intricate internal traffic. More specifically, cell movement is organized in two or three lanes of bacteria traveling between the back and the front of the swarm. This special form of cellular logistics suggests new methods in which bacteria can share resources and risk while searching for food or migrating into new territories. While the vortices-based organization on hard agar surfaces has been modeled before, here, we introduce a new multi-agent bacterial swarming model devised to capture the swarms-based organization on soft surfaces. We test two putative generic mechanisms that may underlie the observed swarming logistics: (i) chemo-activated taxis in response to chemical cues and (ii) special align-and-push interactions between the bacteria and the boundary of the layer of lubricant collectively generated by the swarming bacteria. Using realistic parameters, the model captures the observed phenomena with semi-quantitative agreement in terms of the velocity as well as the dynamics of the swarm and its envelope. This agreement implies that the bacteria interactions with the swarm boundary play a crucial role in mediating the interplay between the collective movement of the swarm and the internal traffic dynamics.

  6. Chemical evaluation of soil-solution in acid forest soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-solution chemistry is commonly studied in forests through the use of soil lysimeters.This approach is impractical for regional survey studies, however, because lysimeter installation and operation is expensive and time consuming. To address these problems, a new technique was developed to compare soil-solution chemistry among red spruce stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Soil solutions were expelled by positive air pressure from soil that had been placed in a sealed cylinder. Before the air pressure was applied, a solution chemically similar to throughfall was added to the soil to bring it to approximate field capacity. After the solution sample was expelled, the soil was removed from the cylinder and chemically analyzed. The method was tested with homogenized Oa and Bs horizon soils collected from a red spruce stand in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a red spruce stand in east-central Vermont, and a mixed hardwood stand in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Reproducibility, effects of varying the reaction time between adding throughfall and expelling soil solution (5-65 minutes) and effects of varying the chemical composition of added throughfall, were evaluated. In general, results showed that (i) the method was reproducible (coefficients of variation were generally < 15%), (ii) variations in the length of reaction-time did not affect expelled solution concentrations, and (iii) adding and expelling solution did not cause detectable changes in soil exchange chemistry. Concentrations of expelled solutions varied with the concentrations of added throughfall; the lower the CEC, the more sensitive expelled solution concentrations were to the chemical concentrations of added throughfall. Addition of a tracer (NaBr) showed that the expelled solution was a mixture of added solution and solution that preexisted in the soil. Comparisons of expelled solution concentrations with concentrations of soil solutions collected by zero-tension and tension lysimetry indicated that expelled solution concentrations were higher than those obtained with either type of lysimeter, although there was less difference with tension lysimeters than zero-tension lysimeters. The method used for collection of soil solution should be taken into consideration whenever soil solution data are being interpreted.

  7. 32 CFR 705.29 - Navy Art Collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navy Art Collection. 705.29 Section 705...AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.29 Navy Art Collection. (a) The U.S. Navy...explorations, launchings, etc., in fine art form since before World War II. The...

  8. 32 CFR 705.29 - Navy Art Collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navy Art Collection. 705.29 Section 705...AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.29 Navy Art Collection. (a) The U.S. Navy...explorations, launchings, etc., in fine art form since before World War II. The...

  9. 32 CFR 705.29 - Navy Art Collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navy Art Collection. 705.29 Section 705...AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.29 Navy Art Collection. (a) The U.S. Navy...explorations, launchings, etc., in fine art form since before World War II. The...

  10. Collective Locomotion Pierre Arnaud

    E-print Network

    Choset, Howie

    Collective Locomotion Pierre Arnaud Pierre.Arnaud@di.epfl.ch -- http Introduction We are pursuing a bottom-up exploration of the evolution of behaviours involving collective locomotion of numerous miniature autonomous mobile robots. Collective locomotion is a subset of collective

  11. Chemical Engineering Rate Processes

    E-print Network

    Fenster, Sam

    Chemical Engineering · Rate Processes Physical Chemical Biochemical · Example - pharmacokinetics ocw.mit.edu #12;The historical chemical engineer · Chemistry + Mechanical design of equipment chemical engineer today · Electronics · Pharmaceuticals · Environment - Air, Energy and Water

  12. Gamma and the chemical reaction model: fteen years after?

    E-print Network

    Fradet, Pascal

    Gamma and the chemical reaction model: fteen years after? Jean-Pierre Ban^atre1, Pascal Fradet2 the formalism is to describe computation as a form of chemical reaction on a collection of individual pieces on unexpected applications of the chemical reaction model, showing that this paradigm has been a source

  13. Data Mining Strategies for the Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents

    E-print Network

    Solka, Jeff

    4 Data Mining Strategies for the Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents Jeffrey. L. Solka1,2, Edward a classification system for the detection of various chemical warfare agents. The data were collected as part of the Naval Surface Warfare Center on simulant chemicals, which are designed to produce paper signatures sim

  14. Collective Lyapunov modes

    E-print Network

    Kazumasa A. Takeuchi; Hugues Chaté

    2013-06-11

    We show, using covariant Lyapunov vectors in addition to standard Lyapunov analysis, that there exists a set of collective Lyapunov modes in large chaotic systems exhibiting collective dynamics. Associated with delocalized Lyapunov vectors, they act collectively on the trajectory and hence characterize the instability of its collective dynamics. We further develop, for globally-coupled systems, a connection between these collective modes and the Lyapunov modes in the corresponding Perron-Frobenius equation. We thereby address the fundamental question of the effective dimension of collective dynamics and discuss the extensivity of chaos in presence of collective dynamics.

  15. Chemical constituents of fugitive dust.

    PubMed

    Van Pelt, R Scott; Zobeck, Ted M

    2007-07-01

    Wind erosion selectively winnows the fine, most chemically concentrated portions of surface soils and results in the inter-regional transport of fugitive dust containing plant nutrients, trace elements and other soil-borne contaminants. We sampled and analyzed surface soils, sediments in transport over eroding fields, and attic dust from a small area of the Southern High Plains of Texas to characterize the physical nature and chemical constituents of these materials and to investigate techniques that would allow relatively rapid, low cost techniques for estimating the chemical constituents of fugitive dust from an eroding field. From chemical analyses of actively eroding sediments, it would appear that Ca is the only chemical species that is enriched more than others during the process of fugitive dust production. We found surface soil sieved to produce a sub-sample with particle diameters in the range of 53-74 microm to be a reasonably good surrogate for fugitive dust very near the source field, that sieved sub-samples with particle diameters <10 microm have a crustal enrichment factor of approximately 6, and that this factor, multiplied by the chemical contents of source soils, may be a reasonable estimator of fugitive PM(10) chemistry from the soils of interest. We also found that dust from tractor air cleaners provided a good surrogate for dust entrained by tillage and harvesting operations if the chemical species resulting from engine wear and exhaust were removed from the data set or scaled back to the average of enrichment factors noted for chemical species with no known anthropogenic sources. Chemical analyses of dust samples collected from attics approximately 4 km from the nearest source fields indicated that anthropogenic sources of several environmentally important nutrient and trace element species are much larger contributors, by up to nearly two orders of magnitude, to atmospheric loading and subsequent deposition than fugitive dust from eroding soils. PMID:17285256

  16. Abrupt versus Gradual Spin-Crossover in Fe(II)(phen)2(NCS)2 and Fe(III)(dedtc)3 Compared by X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy and Quantum-Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mebs, Stefan; Braun, Beatrice; Kositzki, Ramona; Limberg, Christian; Haumann, Michael

    2015-12-21

    Molecular spin-crossover (SCO) compounds are attractive for information storage and photovoltaic technologies. We compared two prototypic SCO compounds with Fe(II)N6 (1, [Fe(phen)2(NCS)2], with phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) or Fe(III)S6 (2, [Fe(dedtc)3], with dedtc = N,N'-diethyldithiocarbamate) centers, which show abrupt (1) or gradual (2) thermally induced SCO, using K-edge X-ray absorption and K? emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) in a 8-315 K temperature range, single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), and density functional theory (DFT). Core-to-valence and valence-to-core electronic transitions in the XAS/XES spectra and bond lengths change from XRD provided benchmark data, verifying the adequacy of the TPSSh/TZVP DFT approach for the description of low-spin (LS) and high-spin (HS) species. Determination of the spin densities, charge distributions, bonding descriptors, and valence-level configurations, as well as similar experimental and calculated enthalpy changes (?H), suggested that the varying metal-ligand bonding properties and deviating electronic structures converge to similar enthalpic contributions to the free-energy change (?G) and thus presumably are not decisive for the differing SCO behavior of 1 and 2. Rather, SCO seems to be governed by vibrational contributions to the entropy changes (?S) in both complexes. Intra- and intermolecular interactions in crystals of 1 and 2 were identified by atoms-in-molecules analysis. Thermal excitation of individual dedtc ligand vibrations accompanies the gradual SCO in 2. In contrast, extensive inter- and intramolecular phen/NCS vibrational mode coupling may be an important factor in the cooperative SCO behavior of 1. PMID:26624918

  17. Hazardous Educational Waste Collections in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Environmental Protection Agency, Springfield.

    This report presents the status of programs designed to manage hazardous educational waste collections in secondary schools in the state of Illinois. Laboratory wastes, expired chemicals, unstable compounds, and toxic or flammable materials are accounted for in this document. The report contains an executive summary, a review of Illinois statutes…

  18. Epitaxial growth and characterization of InAs/GaSb and InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices on GaSb substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition for long wavelength infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ryou, J.-H.; Dupuis, R. D.; D'Costa, V. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.; Fan, J.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Petschke, A.; Mandl, M.; Chuang, S.-L.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the epitaxial growth and characterization of InAs/GaSb and InAs/InAsSb type-?? superlattices (T2SLs) on GaSb substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. For InAs/GaSb strained T2SLs, interfacial layers were introduced at the superlattice interfaces to compensate the tensile strain and hence to improve the overall material quality of the superlattice structures. The optimal morphology and low strain was achieved via a combined interfacial layer scheme with 1 monolayer (ML) InAsSb+1 ML InGaSb layers. In contrast, the InAs/InAsSb strain-balanced T2SLs allow for a relatively easy strain management and simple precursor flow switching scheme while maintaining device-quality materials. Surface root mean square roughness of 0.108 nm and a nearly zero net strain were obtained, with effective bandgaps of 147 and 94 meV determined for two sets of InAs/InAsSb strain-balanced T2SLs.

  19. Chemically modified graphite for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, Ronald Alfred (Medina, OH); Lewis, Irwin Charles (Strongsville, OH)

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to chemically modified graphite particles: (a) that are useful in alkali metal-containing electrode of a electrochemical cell comprising: (i) the electrode, (ii) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent which solvent tends to decompose when the electrochemical cell is in use, and an electrically conductive salt of an alkali metal, and (iii) a counterelectrode; and (b) that are chemically modified with fluorine, chlorine, iodine or phosphorus to reduce such decomposition. This invention also relates to electrodes comprising such chemically modified graphite and a binder and to electrochemical cells containing such electrodes.

  20. Chemicals Industry New Process Chemistry Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2000-08-01

    The Materials Technology I workshop was held in November 1998 to address future research needs for materials technology that will support the chemical industry. Areas covered included disassembly, recovery, reuse and renewable technology; new materials; and materials measurement and characterization. The Materials Technology II workshop was held in September 1999 and covered additives, modeling and prediction and an additional segment on new materials. Materials Technology Institute (MTI) for the Chemical Process Industries, Inc. and Air Products & Chemicals lead the workshops. The Materials Technology Roadmap presents the results from both workshops.

  1. Chemical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    As a preliminary study on the effects of chemical aging of polymer materials MERL and TRI have examined two polymeric materials that are typically used for offshore umbilical applications. These two materials were Tefzel, a copolymer of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene, and Coflon, polyvinylidene fluoride. The Coflon specimens were cut from pipe sections and exposed to H2S at various temperatures and pressures. One of these specimens was tested for methane permeation, and another for H2S permeation. The Tefzel specimens were cut from .05 mm sheet stock material and were exposed to methanol at elevated temperature and pressure. One of these specimens was exposed to methanol permeation for 2 days at 100 C and 2500 psi. An additional specimen was exposed to liquid methanol for 3 days at 150 C and 15 Bar. Virgin specimens of each material were similarly prepared and tested.

  2. 76 FR 71577 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Announcement of Office of Management and Budget...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... Management and Budget Approval; Followup Study for Infant Feeding Practices Study II AGENCY: Food and Drug... collection of information entitled ``Followup Study for Infant Feeding Practices Study II'' has been approved..., the Agency submitted a proposed collection of information entitled ``Followup Study for Infant...

  3. 78 FR 24392 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Evaluation and Accountability Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Evaluation and Accountability Report for Title II, Part D... in response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Evaluation and... agencies (LEAs) that receive Title II, Part D grant funds to conduct rigorous evaluation of...

  4. Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"

    E-print Network

    Meetings Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators" is scarcely older than for one or two dozen people grew to include nearly a hundred. Chemical accelerators is a name sug- gested by one of us for devices that produce beams of chemically interesting species at relative kinetic

  5. 77 FR 5268 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... October 1, 2010, transferring our regulations from chapter II to chapter XII in title 30 of the Code of... the subject collection of information. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: 30 CFR parts 1227, 1228, and...). Under the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act of 1953, Geothermal Steam...

  6. 77 FR 2569 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request for Information Collection: Guam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ...://marianaslabor.net/employer.asp , and in the following states: i. Alaska ( www.jobs.state.ak.us ); ii. California... travel requirements and where applicants will likely have to reside to perform the services or labor; (c... and Training Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request for...

  7. 77 FR 33766 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Renewal of a Currently Approved Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ...Collection (OMB Control Number 1006-0029...Supply Program (OMB Control Number 1006-0029...prioritize requests for financial or technical assistance...plan the design and construction of projects to serve...authorized to provide financial and technical assistance...II. Data OMB Control Number:...

  8. Aromatic chelator-specific lattice architecture and dimensionality in binary and ternary Cu(II)-organophosphonate materials.

    PubMed

    Georgantas, V; Menelaou, M; Psycharis, V; Raptopoulou, C P; Terzis, A; Tangoulis, V; Mateescu, C; Salifoglou, A

    2013-05-01

    Synthetic efforts linked to the design of defined lattice dimensionality and architecture materials in the binary/ternary systems of Cu(II) with butylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) (H8BDTMP) and heterocyclic organic chelators (pyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline) led to the isolation of new copper organophosphonate compounds, namely, Na6[Cu2(BDTMP)(H2O)4]·[Cu2(BDTMP)(H2O)4]0.5·26H2O (1), [Cu2(H4BDTMP)(py)4]·2H2O (2), and [Cu2(H4BDTMP)(phen)2]n·6.6nH2O·1.5nMeOH (3). 1-3 are the first compounds isolated from the Cu(II)-BDTMP family of species. They were characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, UV-vis), magnetic susceptibility, TGA-DTG, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. The lattice in 1 reveals the presence of discrete dinuclear Cu(II) units bound to BDTMP(8-) and water molecules in a square pyramidal geometry. The molecular lattice of 2 reveals the presence of ternary dinuclear assemblies of Cu(II) ions bound to H4BDTMP(4-) and pyridine in a square pyramidal environment. The molecular lattice of 3 reveals the presence of dinuclear assemblies of Cu(II) ions bound to H4BDTMP(4-) and 1,10-phenanthroline in a square pyramidal environment, with the organophosphonate ligand serving as the connecting link to abutting dinuclear Cu(II) assemblies in a ternary polymeric system. The magnetic susceptibility data on 1, 2, and 3 suggest that compounds 1 and 3 exhibit a stronger antiferromagnetic behavior than 2, which is also confirmed from magnetization measurements. The physicochemical profiles of 1-3 (a) earmark the influence of the versatile H8BDTMP ligand as a metal ion binder on the chemical reactivity in binary and ternary systems of Cu(II) in aqueous and nonaqueous media and (b) denote the correlation of ligand hydrophilicity, aromaticity, denticity, charge, and H-bonding interactions with emerging defined Cu(II)-H8BDTMP structures of distinct lattice identity and spectroscopic-magnetic properties. Collectively, such structural and chemical factors formulate the interplay and contribution of binary and ternary interactions to lattice architecture and specified properties of new Cu(II)-organophosphonate materials with defined 2D-3D dimensionality. PMID:23614821

  9. Arduino Microcontrollers II PHYS 309 Name

    E-print Network

    Herman, Rhett

    Arduino Microcontrollers II PHYS 309 Name: A. Introduction--Arduino part deux As you know, LEDs, and other input/output devices. The Arduino is a simple little computer to which you write your the Arduino's role as a data collection unit, and an output device that can react to that input. The ANALOG

  10. COLLECTIVE EFFECTS IN THE RHIC-II ELECTRON COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    POZDEYEV,E.; BEN-ZVI, I.; FEDOTOV, A.; KAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.; WANG, G.

    2007-06-25

    Electron cooling at RHIC-I1 upgrade imposes strict requirements on the quality of the electron beam at the cooling section. Beam current dependent effects such as the space charge, wake fields, CSR in bending magnets, trapped ions, etc., will tend to spoil the beam quality and decrease the cooling efficiency. In this paper, we estimate the defocusing effect of the space charge at the cooling section and describe our plan to compensate the defocusing space charge force by focusing solenoids. We also estimate the energy and emittance growth cased by wake fields. Finally, we discuss ion trapping in the electron cooler and consider different techniques to minimize the effect of ion trapping.

  11. Information Requirements Specification II: Brainstorming Collective Decision-Making Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telem, Moshe

    1988-01-01

    Information requirements specification (IRS) constitutes an Achilles heel in the system life cycle of management information systems. This article establishes a systematic overall IRS technique applicable to organizations of all types and sizes. The technique's integration of brainstorming and theory Z principles creates an effective, stimulating,…

  12. Featured collection introduction: riparian ecosystems and buffers II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian ecosystems, the interface of terrestrial and aquatic systems, are zones of high biodiversity (Naiman et al., 1993), rapid biogeochemical activity (Vidon et al., 2010), complex hydrologic activity (Mayer et al., 2010a), and offer solace that can bestow significant mental ...

  13. Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II): Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Among Younger Nurses

    Cancer.gov

    Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II) continues follow-up of more than 116,000 women who in 1989 were enrolled in a prospective study to evaluate potentially modifiable risk factors for major health problems among younger women. In this unique cohort, exposure information has been collected at 2-year intervals in early adult life, and a more than 90 percent response rate has been maintained for follow-up questionnaires.

  14. Using a source-receptor approach to characterise VOC behaviour in a French urban area influenced by industrial emissions. Part II: source contribution assessment using the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model.

    PubMed

    Badol, Caroline; Locoge, Nadine; Galloo, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-25

    In Part I of this study (Badol C, Locoge N, Leonardis T, Gallo JC. Using a source-receptor approach to characterise VOC behaviour in a French urban area influenced by industrial emissions, Part I: Study area description, data set acquisition and qualitative data analysis of the data set. Sci Total Environ 2007; submitted as companion manuscript.) the study area, acquisition of the one-year data set and qualitative analysis of the data set have been described. In Part II a source profile has been established for each activity present in the study area: 6 profiles (urban heating, solvent use, natural gas leakage, biogenic emissions, gasoline evaporation and vehicle exhaust) have been extracted from literature to characterise urban sources, 7 industrial profiles have been established via canister sampling around industrial plants (hydrocarbon cracking, oil refinery, hydrocarbon storage, lubricant storage, lubricant refinery, surface treatment and metallurgy). The CMB model is briefly described and its implementation is discussed through the selection of source profiles and fitting species. Main results of CMB modellings for the Dunkerque area are presented. (1) The daily evolution of source contributions for the urban wind sector shows that the vehicle exhaust source contribution varies between 40 and 55% and its relative increase at traffic rush hours is hardly perceptible. (2) The relative contribution of vehicle exhaust varies from 55% in winter down to 30% in summer. This decrease is due to the increase of the relative contribution of hydrocarbon storage source reaching up to 20% in summer. (3) The evolution of source contributions with wind directions has confirmed that in urban wind sectors the contribution of vehicle exhaust dominate with around 45-55%. For the other wind sectors that include some industrial plants, the contribution of industrial sources is around 60% and could reach 80% for the sector 280-310 degrees , which corresponds to the most dense industrial area. (4) The pollution in Dunkerque has been globally characterised taking into account the frequency of wind directions and contributions of sources in each wind direction for the whole year. It has been concluded that contribution of industrial sources is below 20% whereas vehicle exhaust contribution is superior to 40%. PMID:17936336

  15. Cryogenic particle collection on a cometary mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szara, R. J.; Economou, T. E.; Blume, E.; Turkevich, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with research related to the design of a method for capturing effectively particulate matter and volatiles from the tail of a comet for the purpose of chemical analysis. It is envisaged to conduct a space mission with a means of propulsion which would make it possible to maneuver the space probe into the coma of the comet. The collecting medium has to be chemically inert and easily distinguishable from the particles being collected. It is proposed to employ a film of solid xenon at a temperature of 65 K as the collecting medium. Sublimation of this film and the resultant pressure will be used to concentrate the particles on a small area suitable for analysis. Attention is given to the laboratory apparatus, the experimental work, the experimental results, and the cryogenic requirements for a space mission.

  16. Rhizobium etli asparaginase II

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed; Moreno-Enriquez, Angélica; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial l-asparaginase has been a universal component of therapies for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia since the 1970s. Two principal enzymes derived from Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi are the only options clinically approved to date. We recently reported a study of recombinant l-asparaginase (AnsA) from Rhizobium etli and described an increasing type of AnsA family members. Sequence analysis revealed four conserved motifs with notable differences with respect to the conserved regions of amino acid sequences of type I and type II l-asparaginases, particularly in comparison with therapeutic enzymes from E. coli and E. chrysanthemi. These differences suggested a distinct immunological specificity. Here, we report an in silico analysis that revealed immunogenic determinants of AnsA. Also, we used an extensive approach to compare the crystal structures of E. coli and E. chrysantemi asparaginases with a computational model of AnsA and identified immunogenic epitopes. A three-dimensional model of AsnA revealed, as expected based on sequence dissimilarities, completely different folding and different immunogenic epitopes. This approach could be very useful in transcending the problem of immunogenicity in two major ways: by chemical modifications of epitopes to reduce drug immunogenicity, and by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues to diminish immunogenicity without reduction of enzymatic activity. PMID:22895060

  17. Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology Study Program Handbook

    E-print Network

    Henkel, Werner

    Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology Study Program Handbook Bachelor of Science #12;Jacobs University Undergraduate Handbook MCCB - Matriculation Fall 2015 Page: ii Contents 1 The Medicinal Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.4 Modularization of the Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology Program . . 7 2.4.1 Content

  18. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent, chemically reacting flows

    E-print Network

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    at the Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics Department for providing an enjoyable place to work. In particular, I, (ii) performs several validation simulations, (iii) studies auto­ignition of a hydrogen vortex ring. The chemical source terms are implicit in time to allow for stiff chemical mechanisms. The algorithm is readily

  19. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  20. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOEpatents

    Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO); Ghosh, Tushar K. (Columbia, MO); Tompson, Jr., Robert V. (Columbia, MO); Viswanath, Dabir (Columbia, MO); Loyalka, Sudarshan K. (Columbia, MO)

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  1. Characteristics of comprehensive Chemical Industry Database CD-NET : Centered around chemical product information file

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Hideo

    This paper describes Chemical Product Information File of Chemical Industry Database, CD-NET provided by Chemical Data Service Inc.. It defines "information" first, then explains file organization and presents how Chemical product Information File is located in CD-NET. Mentioning its complementary relation with JICST's JOIS-F the author defines the File as chemical product information for business purpose. All of the information items in the File emphasize that it is exactly a type of business and practical database. To distinguish general items from important items by product, all of the information is categorized into II classes by general chemical product and by area. The scope and emphasized items under each class are described in detail.

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, Spectral Studies and Antifungal Activity of Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) Complexes with 2-(4- Sulphophenylazo)-1,8-Dihydroxy-3,6-Napthalene Disulphonic Acid Trisodium Salt

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Gajanan; Narang, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes of the type Na6[M(HL)2(H2O)2], where M= Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) and Na3H2L= 2-(4-sulphophenylazo)-1,8-dihydroxy 3,6 naphthalene disulphonic acid trisodium salt, have been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical (elemental analyses, solubility, electrolytic conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurement) and spectral (UV-Visible, IR, ESR, powder x-ray diffraction) techniques for their structure and studied for their antifungal activity against ten fungi. The anionic 1:2 metal:ligand complexes show octahedral geometry around M(II), a significant antifungal activity against Curvularia lunata and Alternaria triticina and a moderate activity against Alternaria brassicicola, Alternaria brassicae, Alternaria solanae, Curvularia species, Helminthosporium oryzae, Collectotrichum capsici, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium udum. PMID:18365101

  3. a Submillimeter Chemical Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neese, Christopher F.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Plummer, Grant M.; Ball, Christopher D.; Frank, Aaron J.

    2010-06-01

    Rotational spectroscopy has been recognized a potentially powerful tool for chemical analysis since the very beginnings of the field. A typical rotational fingerprint consists of 10^5 resolvable spectral channels, leading to `absolute' specificity, even in complex mixtures. Furthermore, rotational spectroscopy requires very small amounts of sample with detection limits as low as picograms. Nevertheless, this technique has not yet been widely applied to analytical science because of the size, cost, and complexity of traditional spectrometers. A resurgence of interest in spectroscopic sensors has been fueled by increases in performance made possible by advances in laser systems and applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and national security. Most of these new approaches make use of the optical/infrared spectral regions and their well established, but still rapidly evolving technology base. The submillimeter (SMM) spectral region, while much less well known, has also seen significant technological advances, allowing the design of powerful spectroscopic sensors. Using modern solid-state multiplier technology we have built a small bench top SMM spectrometer designed for use as a chemical sensor. This spectrometer includes a sample acquisition system including the vacuum equipment to provide the ideal pressures (1--10 mtorr) for SMM spectroscopy and a sorbent tube for analyte collection and preconcentration. The entire spectrometer, including power supplies, frequency synthesizers, a 1.2 m folded sample cell, and a computer for data analysis fits into a cubic foot box.

  4. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks

    E-print Network

    Simone Köhler; Volker Schaller; Andreas R. Bausch

    2011-05-23

    Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsative collective long range dynamics. The reorganizations in the highly dynamic steady state of the active gel are characterized by alternating periods of runs and stalls resulting in a superdiffusive dynamics of the network's constituents. They are dominated by the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network: Collective dynamics are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. The feedback between structure formation and dynamics can be resolved by combining these experiments with phenomenological simulations based on simple interaction rules.

  5. Spectroscopic Confirmation of the Dwarf Galaxies Hydra II and Pisces II and the Globular Cluster Laevens 1

    E-print Network

    Kirby, Evan N; Cohen, Judith G

    2015-01-01

    We present Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of stars in the recently discovered Milky Way satellites Hydra II, Pisces II, and Laevens 1. We measured a velocity dispersion of 5.4 (+3.6 -2.4) km/s for Pisces II, but we did not resolve the velocity dispersions of Hydra II or Laevens 1. We marginally resolved the metallicity dispersions of Hydra II and Pisces II but not Laevens 1. Furthermore, Hydra II and Pisces II obey the luminosity-metallicity relation for Milky Way dwarf galaxies ( = -2.02 +/- 0.08 and -2.45 +/- 0.07, respectively), whereas Laevens 1 does not ( = -1.68 +/- 0.05). The kinematic and chemical properties suggest that Hydra II and Pisces II are dwarf galaxies, and Laevens 1 is a globular cluster. We determined that two of the previously observed blue stars near the center of Laevens 1 are not members of the cluster. A third blue star has ambiguous membership. If it is a member, we suggest that it could be a Type II Cepheid variable. Hydra II has a radial velocity = 303.1 +/- 1.4 km/s, similar to the lea...

  6. USE OF DISPOSABLE DIAPERS TO COLLECT URINE IN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large studies of children's health as it relates to exposures to chemicals in the environment often require measurements of biomarkers of chemical exposures or effects in urine samples. But collection of urine samples from infants and toddlers is difficult. For large exposure s...

  7. COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT BETWEEN QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AND THE CANADIAN UNION OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEES AND ITS...................................................................................................................................35 ARTICLE 26 TOOLS, EQUIPMENT AND ALLOWANCES ................................................37;Collective Agreement - July1, 2010 ­ June 30, 2014 CUPE Local 229 Page 2 ARTICLE 29 DISCIPLINE

  8. Evaluation of Chemical Abstracts(4) - Analysis of Technical Reports Collection -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Nobumasa

    It has been long time since various data bases appeared. Amid so-called information flood data bases have played a role in improving performances of industrial activities or social life by providing appropriate information at right time from them. Particularly CA Search is indispensable and important to persons who are engaged in R & D in chemistry and the related fields. For the purpose of advancing on-line searching efficiency by clarifying the scope and coverage by document type the author analyzed the information covered in CA, which results were reported in the series of articles "Evaluation of CA". In this article the author analyzed the coverage of technical reports and compared the result with NTIS file.

  9. Guide to data collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines and recommendations are presented for the collection of software development data. Motivation and planning for, and implementation and management of, a data collection effort are discussed. Topics covered include types, sources, and availability of data; methods and costs of data collection; types of analyses supported; and warnings and suggestions based on software engineering laboratory (SEL) experiences. This document is intended as a practical guide for software managers and engineers, abstracted and generalized from 5 years of SEL data collection.

  10. Irregular Collective Behavior of Heterogeneous Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luccioli, Stefano; Politi, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    We investigate a network of integrate-and-fire neurons characterized by a distribution of spiking frequencies. Upon increasing the coupling strength, the model exhibits a transition from an asynchronous regime to a nontrivial collective behavior. Numerical simulations of large systems indicate that, at variance with the Kuramoto model, (i) the macroscopic dynamics stays irregular and (ii) the microscopic (single-neuron) evolution is linearly stable.

  11. COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT BETWEEN QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AND THE CANADIAN UNION OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEES AND ITS LOCAL 254: KINGSTON TECHNICIANS' UNION #12;Collective Agreement - July1, 2010 ­ June 30, 2014 CUPE 254 Page 2 COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT BETWEEN QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY AND THE CANADIAN UNION OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEES

  12. Ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (ESCi)-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry with novel mass spectrometry(Elevated Energy) (MS(E)) data collection technique: determination and pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and biliary excretion study of ergone in rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Yong; Cheng, Xian-Long; Wei, Feng; Bai, Xu; Lin, Rui-Chao

    2012-07-01

    Ergosta-4,6,8(14),22-tetraen-3-one (ergone) has been proved to have novel antitumor effects on HepG2 cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and biliary excretion of ergone in rats following a single oral administration (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg). The levels of ergone in plasma, tissues, and bile were measured by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (ESCi)-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry with novel mass spectrometry(Elevated Energy) (MS(E)) data collection technique method. The results show ergone was distributed and eliminated from rat plasma and in non-linear pharmacokinetics from a dose range of 5-20 mg/kg. The ergone was found to distribute widely in the internal organs, with tissue concentrations in order of lungs, spleen, liver, intestine, kidneys, heart, stomach, parorchis, teasticles, and brain. At 12 h after dosing, the tissue concentrations in the organs were markedly decreased. The lungs, spleen, and liver were the dominant organs with high tissue concentrations that might be the primary sites for metabolism and elimination of ergone. Total recoveries of ergone within 24 h in bile were 34.14%. PMID:22761140

  13. Reveille II - 19 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    Copyright 2012 Asmaa Sadek Kassab ii ABSTRACT In an effort to understand the resuspension phenomena, interactions of spherical micro-meter particles (glass beads (GB) and Stainless steel (SS)) were investigated experimentally on different surfaces... ABSTRACT .......................................................................................................... ii DEDICATION....................................................................................................... iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS...

  14. Solvent Refined Coal-II (SRC-II) detailed environmental plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This document describes environmental research which will: aid in the development of an environmentally acceptable SRC-II process; and provide data for environmental assessment of the process. The SRC-II process is described, criteria for selection of samples to undergo environmental analyses are given, and approximate timelines are presented for obtaining pertinent samples. At this time, the SRC-II process is at the pilot-plant stage of development and a demonstration facility is scheduled to begin operation in 1984. Since design criteria may change, the environmental research described in this document is organized in four phases which correlate with and will provide information early in process development. Phase I research (screening) evaluates samples from existing SRC-II facilities (pilot, process demonstration unit (PDU), bench) which may bracket potential demonstration/commercial practice in terms of physical and chemical criteria. The samples are being subjected to a battery of short-term biomedical and ecological assays. Chemical fractionation and analysis are being performed to determine compounds and compound classes of potential concern. Phase II (baseline) research will evaluate SRC-II materials which are considered most representative of potential demonstration/commercial practice. These materials will be subjected to longer-term, more-extensive biological and ecological analyses relative to effects and environmental fate. Phase III research will examine effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential environmental properties of SRC-II materials. Phase IV research (onsite monitoring) will develop methods and initiate environmental monitoring for effects at the SRC-II demonstration facility and potential commercial sites. This document also describes industrial hygiene programs which must occur throughout SRC-II process development.

  15. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes

    E-print Network

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 1. Chemical engineering students must complete not included in the required chemical engineering curriculum. All technical electives are subject to approval be in chemical engineering. 2. Chemical engineering students must complete a minimum of 18 credits in the Social

  16. Chemical kin label in seabirds

    PubMed Central

    Célérier, Aurélie; Bon, Cécile; Malapert, Aurore; Palmas, Pauline; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Chemical signals yield critical socio-ecological information in many animals, such as species, identity, social status or sex, but have been poorly investigated in birds. Recent results showed that chemical signals are used to recognize their nest and partner by some petrel seabirds whose olfactory anatomy is well developed and which possess a life-history propitious to olfactory-mediated behaviours. Here, we investigate whether blue petrels (Halobaena caerulea) produce some chemical labels potentially involved in kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance. To overcome methodological constraints of chemical analysis and field behavioural experiments, we used an indirect behavioural approach, based on mice olfactory abilities in discriminating odours. We showed that mice (i) can detect odour differences between individual petrels, (ii) perceive a high odour similarity between a chick and its parents, and (iii) perceive this similarity only before fledging but not during the nestling developmental stage. Our results confirm the existence of an individual olfactory signature in blue petrels and show for the first time, to our knowledge, that birds may exhibit an olfactory kin label, which may have strong implications for inbreeding avoidance. PMID:21525047

  17. Chemical Ecology: Chemical Communication in Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, William F.

    1983-01-01

    Substances that deliver chemical messages between same/different species are called semiochemicals. Surveyed are three types of semiochemicals (pheromones, allomones, and kairomones), types of organisms involved, and specific chemicals used to carry the various kinds of messages. (JN)

  18. -PTOLEMY II -HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -PTOLEMY II - HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT MODELING AND DESIGN IN JAVA John Davis, II Mudit Goel University of California at Berkeley http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu Memorandum UCB/ERL M99/40 Document Contents Part 1: Using Ptolemy II 1. Introduction 1-1 1.1.Modeling and Design 1-1 1.2.Architecture Design 1

  19. -PTOLEMY II -HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -PTOLEMY II - HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT MODELING AND DESIGN IN JAVA John Davis, II Christopher of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley http://ptolemy with Ptolemy II 1.0 March 15, 2001 This project is supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

  20. Herschel/HIFI observations of [C II] and [13C II] in photon-dominated regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossenkopf, V.; Röllig, M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Pilleri, P.; Lis, D. C.; Fuente, A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Bergin, E.

    2013-02-01

    Context. Chemical fractionation reactions in the interstellar medium can result in molecular isotopologue abundance ratios that differ by many orders of magnitude from the isotopic abundance ratios. Understanding variations in the molecular abundance ratios through astronomical observations provides a new toolto sensitively probe the underlying physical conditions. Aims: Recently, we have introduced detailed isotopic chemistry into the KOSMA-? model for photon-dominated regions (PDRs), which allows calculating abundances of carbon isotopologues as a function of PDR parameters. Radiative transfer computations then allow to predict the observed [C ii]/[13C ii] line intensity ratio for specific geometries. Here, we compare these model predictions with new Herschel observations. Methods: We performed Herschel/HIFI observations of the [C ii] 158 ?m line in a number of PDRs. In all sources, we observed at least two hyperfine components of the [13C ii] transition, allowing determination of the [C ii]/[13C ii] intensity ratio, using revised intrinsic hyperfine ratios. Comparing the observed line ratios with the predictions from the updated KOSMA-? model, we identify conditions under which the chemical fractionation effects are important, and not masked by the high optical depth of the main isotopic line. Results: An observable enhancement of the [C ii]/[13C ii] intensity ratio due to chemical fractionation depends mostly on the source geometry and velocity structure,and to a lesser extent on the gas density and radiation field strength. The enhancement is expected to be largest for PDR layers that are somewhat shielded from UV radiation, but not completely hidden behind a surface layer of optically thick [C ii]. In our observations the [C ii]/[13C ii] integrated line intensity ratio is always dominated by the optical depth of the main isotopic line. However, an enhanced intensity ratio isfound for particular velocity components in several sources: in the red-shifted material in the ultracompact H ii region Mon R2, in the wings of the turbulent line profile in the Orion Bar, and possibly in the blue wing in NGC 7023. Mapping of the [13C ii] lines in the Orion Bar gives a C+ column density map, which confirms the temperature stratification of the C+ layer, in agreement with the PDR models of this region. Conclusions: Carbon fractionation can be significant even in relatively warm PDRs, but a resulting enhanced [C ii]/[13C ii] intensity ratio is only observable for special configurations. In most cases, a reduced [C ii]/[13C ii] intensity ratiocan be used instead to derive the [C ii] optical depth, leading to reliable column density estimates that can be compared with PDR model predictions. The C+ column densities show that, for all sources, at the position of the [C ii] peak emission, the dominant fraction of the gas-phase carbon is in the form of C+. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. Chemical compositions of primitive solar system particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Steve R.; Bajt, S.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical studies of micrometeorites are of fundamental importance primarily because atmospheric entry selection effects (such as destruction of friable objects) are less significant than those for conventional meteorites. As a result, particles that have experienced very little postaccretional processing have a significant chance of surviving the Earth encounter and subsequent collection. Thus, chemical analyses of these relatively unaltered micrometeorites may lead to a better understanding of the compositions of the most primitive materials in the solar system and thereby constrain the conditions (physical and chemical) that existed in the early solar nebula. Micrometeorites have been collected from the stratosphere, polar ices, and ocean sediments, but the stratospheric collection is the best source for the most unaltered material because they are small and are not heated to their melting points. Despite the fact that the stratospheric micrometeorites have masses in the nanogram range, a variety of microanalytical techniques have been applied to bulk chemical analyses with part-per-million sensitivity. In some cases, multi-disciplinary studies (e.g., chemistry and mineralogy) have been performed on individual particles. The first-order conclusion is that the chondrite-like particles are chemically similar to carbonaceous chondrites but in detail are distinct from members of the conventional meteorite collection. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the results to date and identify important areas for further study.

  2. NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dierker, S.

    2007-11-01

    Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes

  3. The Chemical Engineer in the Chemical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabicky, Jacob

    1986-01-01

    Describes a course for third- or fourth-year chemical engineering students designed to acquaint them with the chemical industry. The course deals with productivity, characteristics of the chemical industry, sources of information, industrial intelligence, research and development, patent law, technology transfer, and quality control. (TW)

  4. CHEMICAL SAFETY ALERTS-

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Safety Alerts are short publications which explain specific hazards that have become evident through chemical accident investigation efforts. EPA has produced over a dozen Alerts to date. This year's Alert: Managing Chemical Reactivity Hazards

  5. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  6. Type II supernova diversity

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    It is now firmly established that at a significant fraction of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae (SNe II) arise from red supergiant progenitors. However, a large diversity of SN properties exist, and it is presently unclear how this can be understood in terms of progenitor differences and pre-SN stellar evolution. In this contribution, I present the diversity of SN II V-band light-curves for a large sample of SNe II, and compare these to photometry of SNe II which have progenitor mass constraints from pre-explosion imaging.

  7. Influence of the chemical structure on mobility of PCB congeners in female and male sardine (Sardina pilchardus) from Portuguese coast.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Paulo; Amado, Joana; Vale, Carlos; Gil, Odete

    2007-09-01

    Concentrations of 30 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (CBs) were determined in muscle, liver and gonad tissues of female and male sardines (Sardina pilchardus) collected in February-May 2000 and September-January 2001 from purse seine vessels operating around Peniche, Portugal. The determined CBs were aggregated in four groups (I, II, III and IV), according to similarities of their chemical structures. Muscle and liver of males contained significantly higher concentrations of groups I and II than females during the final period of spawning (February-April). A less contrast was observed for the groups III and IV. This seasonal fluctuation associated with the spawning indicates that female sardines regulate the excess of CBs sequestrated during fatten period. On the contrary, levels of groups I and II were higher in males than in females indicating slower mobility of these compounds as lipids were consumed during the final period of spawning. The deficient regulation of those CBs in muscle of male sardines can not be attributed to selective transfer to gonads and subsequent excretion. Although the full explanation was not found for the different mobility of PCBs with the gender, the results provide evidence of slower elimination of group I and II congeners in male sardines. PMID:17573094

  8. 40 CFR 723.175 - Chemical substances used in or for the manufacture or processing of instant photographic and peel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... upon its shape or design during end use, and (iii) which has either no change of chemical composition... possessing comparable physical-chemical properties under similar manufacturing and processing conditions. (ii... physical-chemical and toxicological properties of the chemical substances handled in the area;...

  9. 40 CFR 723.175 - Chemical substances used in or for the manufacture or processing of instant photographic and peel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... upon its shape or design during end use, and (iii) which has either no change of chemical composition... possessing comparable physical-chemical properties under similar manufacturing and processing conditions. (ii... physical-chemical and toxicological properties of the chemical substances handled in the area;...

  10. 40 CFR 723.175 - Chemical substances used in or for the manufacture or processing of instant photographic and peel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... upon its shape or design during end use, and (iii) which has either no change of chemical composition... possessing comparable physical-chemical properties under similar manufacturing and processing conditions. (ii... physical-chemical and toxicological properties of the chemical substances handled in the area;...

  11. 40 CFR 723.175 - Chemical substances used in or for the manufacture or processing of instant photographic and peel...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... upon its shape or design during end use, and (iii) which has either no change of chemical composition... possessing comparable physical-chemical properties under similar manufacturing and processing conditions. (ii... physical-chemical and toxicological properties of the chemical substances handled in the area;...

  12. Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Molecular Engineering and Nanotechnology Option

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Molecular ­ Research Preparation I 1 CHE 3820 ­ Chemical Engineering Laboratory 2 CHE 4200 ­ Product and Process Design 3 CHE 4600 ­ Process Dynamics and Simulation 2 CHE 4860 ­ Chemical Engineering Seminar II 1 Chemical

  13. Chemical Management System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-10-30

    CMS provides an inventory of all chemicals on order or being held in the laboratory, to provide a specific location for all chemical containers, to ensure that health and safety regulatory codes are being upheld, and to provide PNNL staff with hazardous chemical information to better manage their inventories. CMS is comprised of five major modules: 1) chemical purchasing, 2) chemical inventory, 3) chemical names, properties, and hazard groups, 4) reporting, and 5) system administration.

  14. 75 FR 24690 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Plant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... without change and may be made available on-line at http://www.regulations.gov , including any personal...) codes for respondents under this ICR include: Pesticide and other agricultural chemical manufacturing... which have subsequently changed; train personnel to be able to respond to a collection of...

  15. 76 FR 12967 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Channels of Trade...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ...; Comment Request; Channels of Trade Policy for Commodities With Residues of Pesticide Chemicals, for Which... collection provisions of FDA's guidance for industry entitled ``Channels of Trade Policy for Commodities With... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Channels of Trade Policy for Commodities With...

  16. Extension of the ACE solar panels is tested in SAEF-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the solar panels is tested on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II (SAEF-II). Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  17. 76 FR 40377 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Class II Special...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... regarding the overall effectiveness or lack of effectiveness in preventing sexually transmitted diseases..., including the extent of protection provided by condoms against various types of sexually transmitted... impact of the 1999 over-the- counter (OTC) human drug labeling requirements final rule (64 FR...

  18. 76 FR 40377 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Class II Special...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ...Guidance Document: Labeling for Natural Rubber Latex Condoms AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...requirements for the labeling of natural rubber latex condoms. DATES: Submit either...Guidance Document: Labeling for Natural Rubber Latex Condoms Classified Under 21...

  19. Radioisotope Detection Device and Methods of Radioisotope Collection

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oertel, Christopher P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Giles, John R. (Pocatello, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Rigby, ID); McIlwain, Michael E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-04-12

    A device for collection of radionuclides includes a mixture of a polymer, a fluorescent organic scintillator and a chemical extractant. A radionuclide detector system includes a collection device comprising a mixture of a polymer, a fluorescent agent and a selective ligand. The system includes at least one photomultiplier tube (PMT). A method of detecting radionuclides includes providing a collector device comprising a mixture comprising a polymer, a fluorescent organic scintillator and a chemical extractant. An aqueous environment is exposed to the device and radionuclides are collected from the environment. Radionuclides can be concentrated within the device.

  20. Superlite Plasma Collection System.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Sohachi

    2003-02-01

    The Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare launched a national initiative to become plasma self-sufficient by reducing reliance on imported plasma products and increasing plasma collections to enable plasma-derived pharmaceuticals, including albumin, globulin, and Factor VIII products to use plasma collected within Japan. In order to realize this goal, plasma collections from volunteer donors must increase to about 1.5 million litres of plasma per year (1) or about 50% more than what the Japan Red Cross currently collects. A mobile device, such as the Superlite system, will make it easier and more efficient for Japan's sole blood collection agency, the Japan Red Cross, to add plasma collection to mobile blood drives. Haemonetics Corporation (Braintree, MA, USA) has combined many years of apheresis experience with up-to-date technology to create the Superlite Plasma Collection System (PCS) for the Japan Red Cross. This new device, which is expected to greatly contribute to the Red Cross's national source plasma collection program, is even smaller than the Ultralite PCS and offers several advanced features and benefits. Light, compact, and very portable, the Superlite has a Japanese language friendly user interface that continually displays collection status, including time remaining in the collection procedure. The device features a protocol that limits extra-corporeal blood volume for low-weight donors; a program used in conjunction with a reduced volume disposable bowl. Superlite, designed for use in both fixed-site and mobile applications, combines the portable ease-of-use of the Ultralite with the collection process calculation abilities of the CCS to provide a state-of-the-art collection device that will help define the future of Japan plasma collection. PMID:12921116