Science.gov

Sample records for ii faint infrared

  1. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-01-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  2. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  3. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II. The IRAS faint source survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.; Conrow, T.P.; Rowan-Robinson, M. Queen Mary College, London )

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling. 105 refs.

  4. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    Fainting is a temporary loss of consciousness. If you're about to faint, you'll feel dizzy, ... at the same time, and may fall down. Fainting usually happens when your blood pressure drops suddenly, ...

  5. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  6. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle control at the same time, and may fall down. Fainting usually happens when your blood pressure drops suddenly, causing a decrease in blood flow to your brain. It is more common in older people. Some causes of fainting include Heat or dehydration ...

  7. THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF SPITZER 24 mum GALAXIES IN THE COSMIC EVOLUTION SURVEY FIELD. II. FAINT INFRARED SOURCES IN THE zCOSMOS-BRIGHT 10k CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Caputi, K. I.; Lilly, S. J.; Maier, C.; Carollo, C. M.; Aussel, H.; Floc'h, E. Le; Frayer, D.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Coppa, G.; Bongiorno, A.

    2009-12-20

    We have used the zCOSMOS-bright 10k sample to identify 3244 Spitzer/MIPS 24 mum-selected galaxies with 0.06 mJy < S{sub 24{sub m}}u{sub m} approx< 0.50 mJy and I{sub AB} < 22.5, over 1.5 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, and studied different spectral properties, depending on redshift. At 0.2 < z < 0.3, we found that different reddening laws of common use in the literature explain the dust extinction properties of approx80% of our infrared (IR) sources, within the error bars. For up to 16% of objects, instead, the Halpha lambda6563/Hbeta lambda4861 ratios are too high for their IR/UV attenuations, which is probably a consequence of inhomogeneous dust distributions. In only a few of our galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.3, the IR emission could be mainly produced by dust heated by old rather than young stars. Besides, the line ratios of approx22% of our galaxies suggest that they might be star-formation/nuclear-activity composite systems. At 0.5 < z < 0.7, we estimated galaxy metallicities for 301 galaxies: at least 12% of them are securely below the upper-branch mass-metallicity trend, which is consistent with the local relation. Finally, we performed a combined analysis of the H{sub d}elta equivalent width versus D{sub n} (4000) diagram for 1722 faint and bright 24 mum galaxies at 0.6 < z < 1.0, spanning two decades in mid-IR luminosity. We found that, while secondary bursts of star formation are necessary to explain the position of the most luminous IR galaxies in that diagram, quiescent, exponentially declining star formation histories can well reproduce the spectral properties of approx40% of the less luminous sources. Our results suggest a transition in the possible modes of star formation at total IR luminosities L{sub TIR} approx (3 +- 2) x 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}.

  8. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... reasons why teens faint: Physical triggers. Getting too hot or being in a crowded, poorly ventilated setting ...

  9. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fainting: Certain medicines, including those used for anxiety, depression, and high blood pressure (these drugs may cause a drop in blood pressure) Drug or alcohol use Hyperventilation Low blood sugar Seizures Sudden drop in blood pressure (such as ...

  10. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain does not get enough oxygen. You lose consciousness, or "pass out," for a brief time (usually ... Taking longer than a few seconds to regain consciousness Fainting when you turn your head to the ...

  11. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  12. Spectrophotometric Redshifts in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharo, John; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined HST grism spectroscopy and deep broadband imaging to measure spectro-photometric redshifts (SPZs) of faint galaxies. Using a technique pioneered by Ryan et al. 2007, one can combine spectra and photometry to yield an SPZ that is more accurate than pure photometric redshifts, and can probe more deeply than ground-based spectroscopic redshifts. By taking mid-resolution spectra from the HST Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS), SPZs can be found for measurements potentially down to 27th magnitude (the typical brightness of a dwarf galaxy at redshift ∼1.5). A galaxy’s redshift is vital for understanding its place in the growth and evolution of the universe. The measurement of high-accuracy SPZs for FIGS sources will improve the faint-end and high-redshift portions of the luminosity function, and make possible a robust analysis of the FIGS fields for signs of Large Scale Structure (LSS). The improved redshift and distance measurements allowed for the identification of a structure at z=0.83 in one of the FIGS fields.

  13. NIFTE: The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, James J.; Lange, Andrew E.; Matsumoto, T.; Eisenhardt, Peter B.; Hacking, Perry B.; Schember, Helene R.

    1994-01-01

    The high sensitivity of large format InSb arrays can be used to obtain deep images of the sky at 3-5 micrometers. In this spectral range cool or highly redshifted objects (e.g. brown dwarfs and protogalaxies) which are not visible at shorter wavelengths may be observed. Sensitivity at these wavelengths in ground-based observations is severly limited by the thermal flux from the telescope and from the earth's atmosphere. The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment (NIFTE), a 50 cm cooled rocket-borne telescope combined with large format, high performance InSb arrays, can reach a limiting flux less than 1 micro-Jy(1-sigma) over a large field-of-view in a single flight. In comparison, the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) will require days of observation to reach a sensitivity more than one order of magnitude worse over a similar area of the sky. The deep 3-5 micrometer images obtained by the rocket-borne telescope will assist in determining the nature of faint red objects detected by ground-based telescopes at 2 micrometers, and by ISO at wavelengths longer than 5 micrometers.

  14. Morphology and astrometry of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Randall, Kate; Mao, Minnie; Hales, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, are an unexpected class of object discovered in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, ATLAS. They are compact 1.4GHz radio sources with no visible counterparts in co-located (relatively shallow) Spitzer infrared and optical images. We have detected two of these objects with VLBI, indicating the presence of an AGN. These observations and our ATLAS data indicate that IFRS are extended on scales of arcseconds, and we wish to image their morphologies to obtain clues about their nature. These observations will also help us to select optical counterparts from very deep, and hence crowded, optical images which we have proposed. With these data in hand, we will be able to compare IFRS to known object types and to apply for spectroscopy to obtain their redshifts.

  15. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  16. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  17. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  18. NEUTRAL GAS OUTFLOWS AND INFLOWS IN INFRARED-FAINT SEYFERT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Hannah B.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.ed

    2010-01-10

    Previous studies of the Na I D interstellar absorption line doublet have shown that galactic winds occur in most galaxies with high infrared luminosities. However, in infrared-bright composite systems where a starburst coexists with an active galactic nucleus (AGN), it is unclear whether the starburst, the AGN, or both are driving the outflows. The present paper describes the results from a search for outflows in 35 infrared-faint Seyferts with 10{sup 9.9}< L{sub IR}/L{sub sun} < 10{sup 11}, or, equivalently, star formation rates (SFRs) of approx0.4-9 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, to attempt to isolate the source of the outflow. We find that the outflow detection rates for the infrared-faint Seyfert 1s (6%) and Seyfert 2s (18%) are lower than previously reported for infrared-luminous Seyfert 1s (50%) and Seyfert 2s (45%). The outflow kinematics of infrared-faint and infrared-bright Seyfert 2 galaxies resemble those of starburst galaxies, while the outflow velocities in Seyfert 1 galaxies are significantly larger. Taken together, these results suggest that the AGN does not play a significant role in driving the outflows in most infrared-faint and infrared-bright systems, except the high-velocity outflows seen in Seyfert 1 galaxies. Another striking result of this study is the high rate of detection of inflows in infrared-faint galaxies (39% of Seyfert 1s, 35% of Seyfert 2s), significantly larger than in infrared-luminous Seyferts (15%). This inflow may be contributing to the feeding of the AGN in these galaxies, and potentially provides more than enough material to power the observed nuclear activity over typical AGN lifetimes.

  19. Infrared guiding with faint stars with the wide-field infrared camera at CFHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeple, Douglas; Riopel, Martin; Baril, Marc; Barrick, Gregory; Albert, Loic; Vermeulen, Tom; Ward, Jeff

    2006-06-01

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) is commissioning a new Wide field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) that uses a mosaic of 4 HAWAII-2RG near- infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell. At the heart of the instrument is an On-Chip Guiding System (OCGS) that exploits the unique parallel science/guide frame readout capability of the HAWAII-2RG detectors. A small sub sample of each array is continuously read at a rate of up to 50 Hz while the integration of the science image is ongoing with the full arrays (read at a maximal rate of 1.4 s per full frame). Each of these guiding windows is centered on a star to provide an error signal for the telescope guiding. An Image Stabilizer Unit (ISU) (i.e. a tip-tilt silica plate), provides the corrections. A Proportional Integral Differential (PID) closed loop controls the ISU such that telescope tracking is corrected at a rate of 5 Hz. This paper presents the technical architecture of the guiding system and performance measurements on the sky in engineering runs with WIRCam with faint stars up to magnitude 14.

  20. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  1. Infrared-faint radio sources are at high redshifts. Spectroscopic redshift determination of infrared-faint radio sources using the Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Sharp, R.; Spitler, L. R.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between the two classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study difficult. Prior to this work, no redshift was known for any IFRS in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) fields which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims: This work aims at measuring the first redshifts of IFRS in the ATLAS fields. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that IFRS are similar to HzRGs, that they are higher-redshift or dust-obscured versions of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and Low Dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data were calibrated based on the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) and redshifts extracted from the final spectra, where possible. This information was then used to calculate rest-frame luminosities, and to perform the first spectral energy distribution modelling of IFRS based on redshifts. Results: We found redshifts of 1.84, 2.13, and 2.76, for three IFRS, confirming the suggested high-redshift character of this class of object. These redshifts and the resulting luminosities show IFRS to be similar to HzRGs, supporting our hypothesis. We found further evidence that fainter IFRS are at even higher redshifts. Conclusions: Considering the similarities between IFRS and HzRGs substantiated in this work, the detection of IFRS, which have a significantly higher sky density than HzRGs, increases the number of active galactic nuclei in the early universe and adds to the problems of explaining the formation of

  2. Infrared Faint Radio Sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh T.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) which have no observable counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE). The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6 to 70 micron) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the SED of these objects shows that they are consistent with high redshift AGN (z > 2).

  3. A Faint Near-Infrared Counterpart to the AXP 1E 2259+58.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulleman, F.; Tennant, Allyn F., Jr.; vanKerkwijk, M. H.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kouveliotou, C.; Patel, S. K.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present near-infrared and optical observations of the field of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 2259+58.6 taken with the Keck telescope. We derive a subarcsecond Chandra position and tie it to our optical reference frame using other stars in the field. We find a very faint source, K(s) = 21.7 +/- 0.2 mag, with a position coincident with the Chandra position. We argue that this is the counterpart. In the J, I, and R bands, we derive (two sigma) limits of 23.8, 25.6 and 26.4mag, respectively. As with 4U 0142+61, for which a similarly faint counterpart was found, our results are inconsistent with models in which the source is powered by accretion from a disk. The only model that is not inconsistent, appears to be that in which 1E 2259+58.6 is a magnetar.

  4. The Search for Faint Infrared Calibration Standards - Extending Landolt's Standards to V=19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, M.; González-Pérez, J. N.; Martín-Luis, F.; Cohen, M.

    ISO has shown the need to obtain a reliable calibration network of good pedigree to permit data from a wide range of instruments, covering an enormous wavelength range, to be calibrated on a consistent scale. We describe the first results of a programme to extend the Landolt calibration standards to at least V=19. At the same time we calibrate into the near-infrared JHK bands and measure fields separated from the celestial equator. This programme is one of several coordinated efforts to find faint type AV and KIII stars suitable for the mid-IR calibration of the Spanish 10-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). We have obtained a total of 34 712 measurements of 373 stars in 26 quasar fields between Declination -30o and +70o, calculating magnitudes with high precision in the visible and near-infrared (UBVRIJHK). We describe the results obtained and the characteristics of the sample of stars. The typical error on the magnitude in a single band is <1%, including all error sources. Very few candidate type AV or KIII stars are found, either in our sample, or amongst the fainter Landolt stars. We conclude that both samples are increasingly dominated by local dwarfs at increasingly faint magnitudes. We discuss the implications for taking mid-infrared calibration to the increasingly faint limits required by post-ISO instrumentation. The next steps in this project will be: -- To increase significantly the number of fields covered to ˜40. -- To take additional observations of all poorly covered fields and to add JHK data where none is available. -- To use our existing database to extend Landolt photometry of Selected Areas to include many stars not previously measured. -- To assign a spectral type to all candidate KIII and AV stars in our sample.

  5. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts ≳2, potentially linked to high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). Aims: This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS. Furthermore, the data enable examining the putative relationship between IFRS and HzRGs and testing whether IFRS are more distant or fainter siblings of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 μm and 500 μm. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. Results: All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared channels (stacking limits: σ = 0.74 mJy at 100 μm, σ = 3.45 mJy at 500 μm). Based on our SED modelling, we ruled out the following objects to explain the photometric characteristics of IFRS: (a) known radio-loud quasars and compact steep-spectrum sources at any redshift; (b) starburst galaxies with and without an AGN and Seyfert galaxies at any redshift, even if the templates were modified; and (c) known HzRGs at z ≲ 10.5. We find that the IFRS analysed in this work can only be explained by objects that fulfil the selection criteria of HzRGs. More precisely, IFRS could be (a) known HzRGs at very high redshifts (z ≳ 10.5); (b) low-luminosity siblings of HzRGs with additional dust obscuration at lower redshifts; (c) scaled or unscaled versions of Cygnus A at any

  6. Variable Stars in the Field of the Hydra II Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, Anna Katherina; Olsen, Knut A.; Blum, Robert D.; Nidever, David L.; Walker, Alistair R.; Martin, Nicolas; Besla, Gurtina; Gallart, Carme; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Majewski, Steven R.; Munoz, Ricardo; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair; Jin, Shoko

    2016-06-01

    We searched for variable stars in Hydra II, one of the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way, using gri time-series obtained with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We discovered one RR Lyrae star in the galaxy which was used to derive a distance of 154±8 kpc to this system and to re-calculate its absolute magnitude and half-light radius.A comparison with other RR Lyrae stars in ultra-faint systems indicates similar pulsational properties among them, which are different to those found among halo field stars and those in the largest of the Milky Way satellites. We also report the discovery of 31 additional short period variables in the field of view (RR Lyrae, SX Phe, eclipsing binaries, and a likely anomalous cepheid) which are likely not related with Hydra II.

  7. The first VLBI image of an infrared-faint radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Tingay, S.; Mao, M. Y.; Phillips, C. J.; Hotan, A. W.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  8. NOTE: Red, Gray, and Blue: Near Infrared Spectrophotometry of Faint Moons of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, David E.; Brown, Robert H.

    2000-11-01

    Using the CoCo Cold Coronagraph at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, we observed the uranian satellites Miranda, Puck, Portia, and Rosalind and the neptunian satellite Proteus in the near infrared (JHK) to determine the albedos of those faint satellites. In V-J, all of Puck, Portia, Rosalind, and Proteus are very blue, similar to the colors of many icy satellites and of water ice. The satellites we observed have a wide range of J-H colors, with Miranda being blue, Proteus being gray, and Puck, Portia, and Rosalind being red. For the satellites for which we could determine H-K (Miranda, Puck, and Proteus), the colors are gray to red. As a whole, spectrally, these five satellites lie between icy Solar System satellites (e.g., saturnian satellites or the major uranian satellites) and Kuiper belt objects. The redness of Proteus and Puck and perhaps other satellites suggests the presence of organic material, although the redness is also similar to that of C- and D-class asteroids and some outer jovian moons. In all cases, diagnostic spectral features could be masked by broadband photometry.

  9. A Study of Planetary Nebulae using the Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    A planetary nebula is formed following an intermediate-mass (1-8 solar M) star's evolution off of the main sequence; it undergoes a phase of mass loss whereby the stellar envelope is ejected and the core is converted into a white dwarf. Planetary nebulae often display complex morphologies such as waists or torii, rings, collimated jet-like outflows, and bipolar symmetry, but exactly how these features form is unclear. To study how the distribution of dust in the interstellar medium affects their morphology, we utilize the Faint Object InfraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) to obtain well-resolved images of four planetary nebulae--NGC 7027, NGC 6543, M2-9, and the Frosty Leo Nebula--at wavelengths where they radiate most of their energy. We retrieve mid infrared images at wavelengths ranging from 6.3 to 37.1 micron for each of our targets. IDL (Interactive Data Language) is used to perform basic analysis. We select M2-9 to investigate further; analyzing cross sections of the southern lobe reveals a slight limb brightening effect. Modeling the dust distribution within the lobes reveals that the thickness of the lobe walls is higher than anticipated, or rather than surrounding a vacuum surrounds a low density region of tenuous dust. Further analysis of this and other planetary nebulae is needed before drawing more specific conclusions.

  10. The optical-infrared colour distribution of a statistically complete sample of faint field spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menanteau, F.; Ellis, R. S.; Abraham, R. G.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    1999-10-01

    In hierarchical models, where spheroidal galaxies are primarily produced via a continuous merging of disc galaxies, the number of intrinsically red systems at faint limits will be substantially lower than in `traditional' models where the bulk of star formation was completed at high redshifts. In this paper we analyse the optical-near-infrared colour distribution of a large flux-limited sample of field spheroidal galaxies identified morphologically from archival Hubble Space Telescope data. The I_814-HK' colour distribution for a sample jointly limited at I_814<23mag and HK'<19.5mag is used to constrain their star formation history. We compare visual and automated methods for selecting spheroidals from our deep HST images and, in both cases, detect a significant deficit of intrinsically red spheroidals relative to the predictions of high-redshift monolithic-collapse models. However, the overall space density of spheroidals (irrespective of colour) is not substantially different from that seen locally. Spectral synthesis modelling of our results suggests that high-redshift spheroidals are dominated by evolved stellar populations polluted by some amount of subsidiary star formation. Despite its effect on the optical-infrared colour, this star formation probably makes only a modest contribution to the overall stellar mass. We briefly discuss the implications of our results in the context of earlier predictions based on models where spheroidals assemble hierarchically.

  11. A search for AGN activity in Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenc, Emil; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Mao, Minnie

    2009-04-01

    We propose to observe a large sample of radio sources from the ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) source catalogue with the LBA, to determine their compactness. The sample consists of 36 sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubber Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS), is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations. We will measure the flux densities on long baselines to determine their compactness. Only five IFRS have been previously targeted with VLBI observations (resulting in two detections). We propose using single baseline (Parkes-ATCA) eVLBI observations with the LBA at 1 Gbps to maximise sensitivity. With the observations proposed here we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from 5 to 36, allowing us to draw statistical conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  12. A search for AGN activity in Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenc, Emil; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Mao, Minnie

    2010-04-01

    We propose to observe a large sample of radio sources from the ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) source catalogue with the LBA, to determine their compactness. The sample consists of 36 sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubber Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS), is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations. We will measure the flux densities on long baselines to determine their compactness. Only five IFRS have been previously targeted with VLBI observations (resulting in two detections). We propose using single baseline (Parkes-ATCA) eVLBI observations with the LBA at 1 Gbps to maximise sensitivity. With the observations proposed here we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from 5 to 36, allowing us to draw statistical conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  13. Variable Stars in the Field of the Hydra II Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivas, A. Katherina; Olsen, Knut; Blum, Robert; Nidever, David L.; Walker, Alistair R.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Besla, Gurtina; Gallart, Carme; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Majewski, Steven R.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Jin, Shoko

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of one RR Lyrae star in the ultra-faint satellite galaxy Hydra II based on time series photometry in the g, r and i bands obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. The association of the RR Lyrae star discovered here with Hydra II is clear because is located at 42\\prime\\prime from the center of the dwarf, well within its half-light radius of 102\\prime\\prime . The RR Lyrae star has a mean magnitude of i=21.30+/- 0.04 which is too faint to be a field halo star. This magnitude translates to a heliocentric distance of 151 ± 8 kpc for Hydra II; this value is ∼ 13% larger than the estimate from the discovery paper based on the average magnitude of several blue horizontal branch star candidates. The new distance implies a slightly larger half-light radius of {76}-10+12 pc and a brighter absolute magnitude of {M}V=-5.1+/- 0.3, which keeps this object within the realm of the dwarf galaxies. A comparison with other RR Lyrae stars in ultra-faint systems indicates similar pulsational properties among them, which are different to those found among halo field stars and those in the largest of the Milky Way satellites. We also report the discovery of 31 additional short period variables in the field of view (RR Lyrae, SX Phe, eclipsing binaries, and a likely anomalous cepheid) which are likely not related with Hydra II.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Infrared-faint radio sources catalog (Collier+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, J. D.; Banfield, J. K.; Norris, R. P.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Kimball, A. E.; Filipovic, M. D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Tothill, N. F. H.

    2014-11-01

    The 20cm radio data come from the Unified Radio Catalog (URC) compiled by Kimball & Ivezic (2008AJ....136..684K). This radio catalogue combines data from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) VLA Sky Survey (NVSS; Condon et al., 1998, Cat. VIII/65), Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST; Becker, White & Helfand, 1995, cat. VIII/92), Green Bank 6cm survey (GB6; Gregory et al., 1996, Cat. VIII/40), the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS; Rengelink et al. 1997; de Bruyn et al. 2000, Cat. VIII/62) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6; Adelman-McCarthy et al., 2008, Cat. II/282). We use updated NVSS and FIRST data from the URC version 2.0 (Kimball & Ivezic, in preparation), which includes a number of new sources as well as updated positions and flux densities. The IR data come from WISE (Wright et al. (WISE Team) 2009, Cat. II/311), which is an all-sky survey centred at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22um (referred to as bands W1, W2, W3 and W4), with respective angular resolutions of 6.1, 6.4, 6.5 and 12.0-arcsec (full width at half-maximum, FWHM), and typical 5σ sensitivity levels of 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6mJy, with sensitivity increasing towards the ecliptic poles. (1 data file).

  15. The faint radio source population at 15.7 GHz - II. Multi-wavelength properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittam, I. H.; Riley, J. M.; Green, D. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Vaccari, M.

    2015-11-01

    A complete, flux density limited sample of 96 faint (>0.5 mJy) radio sources is selected from the 10C survey at 15.7 GHz in the Lockman Hole. We have matched this sample to a range of multi-wavelength catalogues, including Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey, Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic survey, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey and optical data; multi-wavelength counterparts are found for 80 of the 96 sources and spectroscopic redshifts are available for 24 sources. Photometric redshifts are estimated for the sources with multi-wavelength data available; the median redshift of the sample is 0.91 with an interquartile range of 0.84. Radio-to-optical ratios show that at least 94 per cent of the sample are radio loud, indicating that the 10C sample is dominated by radio galaxies. This is in contrast to samples selected at lower frequencies, where radio-quiet AGN and star-forming galaxies are present in significant numbers at these flux density levels. All six radio-quiet sources have rising radio spectra, suggesting that they are dominated by AGN emission. These results confirm the conclusions of Paper I that the faint, flat-spectrum sources which are found to dominate the 10C sample below ˜1 mJy are the cores of radio galaxies. The properties of the 10C sample are compared to the Square Kilometre Array Design Studies Simulated Skies; a population of low-redshift star-forming galaxies predicted by the simulation is not found in the observed sample.

  16. A Chemical Confirmation of the Faint Boötes II Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-01

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = -2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of -2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  17. A chemical confirmation of the faint Boötes II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-10

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = –2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of –2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  18. Stellar kinematics and metallicities in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J. D.

    2015-07-23

    With this study, we present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of $62.8\\pm 0.5\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$ and a velocity dispersion of $3.3\\pm 0.7\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is $470\\pm 210\\ {M}_{\\odot }/{L}_{\\odot }$, demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 $\\mathrm{km}\\ {{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 ± 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with ${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3$. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of ${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65\\pm 0.07$, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is ${\\mathrm{log}}_{10}(J)=18.8\\pm 0.6\\;\\;\\mathrm{GeV}{\\;}^{2}\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-5}\\;$ within 0fdg2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies.

  19. Stellar Kinematics and Metallicities in the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. D.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Li, T. S.; Nord, B.; Geha, M.; Bechtol, K.; Balbinot, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Lin, H.; Marshall, J.; Santiago, B.; Strigari, L.; Wang, M.; Wechsler, R. H.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T.; Bauer, A. H.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dodelson, S.; Cunha, C. E.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; DES Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of 62.8+/- 0.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and a velocity dispersion of 3.3+/- 0.7 {km} {{{s}}}-1. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is 470+/- 210 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ , demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 {km} {{{s}}}-1, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 ± 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with {{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of {{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65+/- 0.07, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is {{log}}10(J)=18.8+/- 0.6 {GeV}{ }2 {{cm}}-5 within 0.°2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under request number 157689.

  20. Stellar kinematics and metallicities in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Simon, J. D.

    2015-07-23

    With this study, we present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity ofmore » $$62.8\\pm 0.5\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$ and a velocity dispersion of $$3.3\\pm 0.7\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is $$470\\pm 210\\ {M}_{\\odot }/{L}_{\\odot }$$, demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 $$\\mathrm{km}\\ {{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$$, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 ± 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with $${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3$$. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of $${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65\\pm 0.07$$, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is $${\\mathrm{log}}_{10}(J)=18.8\\pm 0.6\\;\\;\\mathrm{GeV}{\\;}^{2}\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-5}\\;$$ within 0fdg2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies.« less

  1. ALMA constraints on the faint millimetre source number counts and their contribution to the cosmic infrared background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Maiolino, R.; De Zotti, G.; Negrello, M.; Marconi, A.; Bothwell, M. S.; Capak, P.; Carilli, C.; Castellano, M.; Cristiani, S.; Ferrara, A.; Fontana, A.; Gallerani, S.; Jones, G.; Ohta, K.; Ota, K.; Pentericci, L.; Santini, P.; Sheth, K.; Vallini, L.; Vanzella, E.; Wagg, J.; Williams, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    We have analysed 18 ALMA continuum maps in Bands 6 and 7, with rms down to 7.8 μJy, to derive differential number counts down to 60 μJy and 100 μJy at λ = 1.3 mm and λ = 1.1 mm, respectively. Furthermore, the non-detection of faint sources in the deepest ALMA field enabled us to set tight upper limits on the number counts down to 30 μJy. This is a factor of four deeper than the currently most stringent upper limit. The area covered by the combined fields is 9.5 × 10-4 deg2 at 1.1 mm and 6.6 × 10-4 deg2 at 1.3 mm. With respect to previous works, we improved the source extraction method by requiring that the dimension of the detected sources be consistent with the beam size. This method enabled us to remove spurious detections that have plagued the purity of the catalogues in previous studies. We detected 50 faint sources (at fluxes <1 mJy) with signal-to-noise (S/N) >3.5 down to 60 μJy, hence improving the statistics by a factor of four relative to previous studies. The inferred differential number counts are dN/ d(Log10S) = 1 × 105 deg2 at a 1.1 mm flux Sλ = 1.1 mm = 130 μJy, and dN/ d(Log10S) = 1.1 × 105 deg2 at a 1.3 mm flux Sλ = 1.3 mm = 60 μJy. At the faintest flux limits probed by our data, i.e. 30 μJy and 40 μJy, we obtain upper limits on the differential number counts of dN/ d(Log10S) < 7 × 105 deg2 and dN/ d(Log10S) < 3 × 105 deg2, respectively. Determining the fraction of cosmic infrared background (CIB) resolved by the ALMA observations was hampered by the large uncertainties plaguing the CIB measurements (a factor of four in flux). However, our results provide a new lower limit to CIB intensity of 17.2 Jy deg-2 at 1.1 mm and of 12.9 Jy deg-2 at 1.3 mm. Moreover, the flattening of the integrated number counts at faint fluxes strongly suggests that we are probably close to the CIB intensity. Our data imply that galaxies with star formation rate (SFR) < 40 M⊙/yr certainly contribute less than 50% to the CIB (and probably a much lower

  2. Hydra II: A Faint and Compact Milky Way Dwarf Galaxy Found in the Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Nidever, David L.; Besla, Gurtina; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina; Gruendl, Robert A.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Blum, Robert D.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Bell, Eric F.; Chu, You-Hua; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; de Boer, Thomas J. L.; Gallart, Carme; Jin, Shoko; Kunder, Andrea; Majewski, Steven R.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E. D.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2015-05-01

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4 m Telescope. The new satellite is compact ({{r}h}=68 ± 11 pc) and faint ({{M}V}=-4.8 ± 0.3), but well within the realm of dwarf galaxies. The stellar distribution of Hydra II in the color-magnitude diagram is well-described by a metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-2.2) and old (13 Gyr) isochrone and shows a distinct blue horizontal branch, some possible red clump stars, and faint stars that are suggestive of blue stragglers. At a heliocentric distance of 134 ± 10 kpc, Hydra II is located in a region of the Galactic halo that models have suggested may host material from the leading arm of the Magellanic Stream. A comparison with N-body simulations hints that the new dwarf galaxy could be or could have been a satellite of the Magellanic Clouds.

  3. Infrared-faint radio sources: a cosmological view. AGN number counts, the cosmic X-ray background and SMBH formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Ibar, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5σ sensitivities as low as 1 μJy. Aims: Spectral energy distribution (hereafter SED) modelling and analyses of their radio properties indicate that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. We demonstrate some astrophysical implications of this population and compare them to predictions from models of galaxy evolution and structure formation. Methods: We compiled a list of IFRS from four deep extragalactic surveys and extrapolated the IFRS number density to a survey-independent value of (30.8 ± 15.0) deg-2. We computed the IFRS contribution to the total number of AGN in the Universe to account for the cosmic X-ray background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simulations of structure formation after the Big Bang. Results: The number density of AGN derived from the IFRS density was found to be ~310 deg-2, which is equivalent to a SMBH mass density of the order of 103 M⊙ Mpc-3 in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. This produces an X-ray flux of 9 × 10-16 W m-2 deg-2 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band and 3 × 10-15 W m-2 deg-2 in the 2.0-10 keV band, in agreement with the missing unresolved components of the Cosmic X-ray Background. To address SMBH formation after the Big Bang we invoke a scenario involving both halo gas accretion and major mergers.

  4. Faint CO Line Wings in Four Star-forming (Ultra)luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Bolatto, Alberto; Zschaechner, Laura; Weiss, Axel

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a search for large velocity width, low-intensity line wings—a commonly used signature of molecular outflows—in four low redshift (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies that appear to be dominated by star formation. The targets were drawn from a sample of fourteen targets presented in Chung et al., who showed the stacked CO spectrum of the sample to exhibit 1000 km s-1-wide line wings. We obtained sensitive, wide bandwidth imaging of our targets using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We detect each target at very high significance but do not find the claimed line wings in these four targets. Instead, we constrain the flux in the line wings to be only a few percent. Casting our results as mass outflow rates following Cicone et al. we show them to be consistent with a picture in which very high mass loading factors preferentially occur in systems with high active galactic nucleus contributions to their bolometric luminosity. We identify one of our targets, IRAS 05083 (VII Zw 31), as a candidate molecular outflow.

  5. Triangulum II: Possibly a Very Dense Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2015-11-01

    Laevens et al. recently discovered Triangulum II (Tri II), a satellite of the Milky Way. Its Galactocentric distance is 36 kpc, and its luminosity is only 450 {L}⊙ . Using Keck/DEIMOS, we measured the radial velocities of six member stars within 1.‧2 of the center of Tri II, and we found a velocity dispersion of {σ }v={5.1}-1.4+4.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We also measured the metallicities of three stars and found a range of 0.8 dex in [Fe/H]. The velocity and metallicity dispersions identify Tri II as a dark matter-dominated galaxy. The galaxy is moving very quickly toward the Galactic center ({v}{{GSR}}=-262 {km} {{{s}}}-1). Although it might be in the process of being tidally disrupted as it approaches pericenter, there is no strong evidence for disruption in our data set. The ellipticity is low, and the mean velocity, < {v}{{helio}}> =-382.1+/- 2.9 {km} {{{s}}}-1, rules out an association with the Triangulum-Andromeda substructure or the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey stellar stream. If Tri II is in dynamical equilibrium, then it would have a mass-to-light ratio of {3600}-2100+3500 {M}⊙ {L}⊙ -1, the highest of any non-disrupting galaxy (those for which dynamical mass estimates are reliable). The density within the 3D half-light radius would be {4.8}-3.5+8.1 {M}⊙ {{{pc}}}-3, even higher than Segue 1. Hence, Tri II is an excellent candidate for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  6. STELLAR ARCHAEOLOGY IN THE GALACTIC HALO WITH THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARFS. VI. URSA MAJOR II

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Ora, M.; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Marconi, Marcella; Musella, Ilaria E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it E-mail: ilaria@na.astro.it; and others

    2012-06-10

    We present a B, V color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of the Milky Way dwarf satellite Ursa Major II (UMa II), spanning the magnitude range from V {approx} 15 to V {approx} 23.5 mag and extending over an 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 arcmin{sup 2} area centered on the Galaxy. Our photometry goes down to about 2 mag below the Galaxy's main-sequence turnoff that we detected at V {approx} 21.5 mag. We have discovered a bona fide RR Lyrae variable star in UMa II, which we use to estimate a conservative dereddened distance modulus for the galaxy of (m - M){sub 0} = 17.70 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.12 mag, where the first error accounts for the uncertainties of the calibrated photometry, and the second reflects our lack of information on the metallicity of the star. The corresponding distance to UMa II is 34.7{sup +0.6}{sub -0.7}({sup +2.0}{sub -1.9}) kpc. Our photometry shows evidence of a spread in the Galaxy's subgiant branch, compatible with a spread in metal abundance in the range between Z = 0.0001 and Z = 0.001. Based on our estimate of the distance, a comparison of the fiducial lines of the Galactic globular clusters M68 and M5 ([Fe/H] = -2.27 {+-} 0.04 dex and -1.33 {+-} 0.02 dex, respectively), with the position on the CMD of spectroscopically confirmed Galaxy members, may suggest the existence of stellar populations of different metal abundance/age in the central region of UMa II.

  7. Fainting (Syncope)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Fainting (Syncope) Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  8. Active galactic nuclei cores in infrared-faint radio sources. Very long baseline interferometry observations using the Very Long Baseline Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Deller, A. T.; Collier, J. D.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) form a new class of galaxies characterised by radio flux densities between tenths and tens of mJy and faint or absent infrared counterparts. It has been suggested that these objects are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at significant redshifts (z ≳ 2). Aims: Whereas the high redshifts of IFRS have been recently confirmed based on spectroscopic data, the evidence for the presence of AGNs in IFRS is mainly indirect. So far, only two AGNs have been unquestionably confirmed in IFRS based on very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In this work, we test the hypothesis that IFRS contain AGNs in a large sample of sources using VLBI. Methods: We observed 57 IFRS with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) down to a detection sensitivity in the sub-mJy regime and detected compact cores in 35 sources. Results: Our VLBA detections increase the number of VLBI-detected IFRS from 2 to 37 and provide strong evidence that most - if not all - IFRS contain AGNs. We find that IFRS have a marginally higher VLBI detection fraction than randomly selected sources with mJy flux densities at arcsec-scales. Moreover, our data provide a positive correlation between compactness - defined as the ratio of milliarcsec- to arcsec-scale flux density - and redshift for IFRS, but suggest a decreasing mean compactness with increasing arcsec-scale radio flux density. Based on these findings, we suggest that IFRS tend to contain young AGNs whose jets have not formed yet or have not expanded, equivalent to very compact objects. We found two IFRS that are resolved into two components. The two components are spatially separated by a few hundred milliarcseconds in both cases. They might be components of one AGN, a binary black hole, or the result of gravitational lensing.

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-05-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  11. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRA FAINT DWARF GALAXIES, CANES VENATICI I, BOOeTES I, CANES VENATICI II, AND LEO IV

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Sakurako; Arimoto, Nobuo; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Onodera, Masato

    2012-01-10

    We take deep images of four ultra faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Canes Venatici I (CVn I), Booetes I (Booe I), Canes Venatici II (CVn II), and Leo IV, using the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) extend below main-sequence turnoffs (MSTOs) and yield measurements of the ages of stellar populations. The stellar populations of three faint galaxies, the Booe I, CVn II, and Leo IV dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), are estimated to be as old as the Galactic globular cluster M92. We confirm that Booe I dSph has no intrinsic color spread in the MSTO and no spatial difference in the CMD morphology, which indicates that Booe I dSph is composed of an old single stellar population. One of the brightest UFDs, CVn I dSph, shows a relatively younger age ({approx}12.6 Gyr) with respect to Booe I, CVn II, and Leo IV dSphs, and the distribution of red horizontal branch (HB) stars is more concentrated toward the center than that of blue HB stars, suggesting that the galaxy contains complex stellar populations. Booe I and CVn I dSphs show the elongated and distorted shapes. CVn II dSph has the smallest tidal radius of a Milky Way satellite and has a distorted shape, while Leo IV dSph shows a less concentrated spherical shape. The simple stellar population of faint UFDs indicates that the gases in their progenitors were removed more effectively than those of brighter dSphs at the occurrence of their initial star formation. This is reasonable if the progenitors of UFDs belong to less massive halos than those of brighter dSphs.

  12. HerMES: Current Cosmic Infrared Background Estimates Can Be Explained by Known Galaxies and Their Faint Companions at z < 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, M. P.; Moncelsi, L.; Quadri, R. F.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Burgarella, D.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Duivenvoorden, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Farrah, D.; Franceschini, A.; Halpern, M.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Magdis, G.; Marchetti, L.; Álvarez-Márquez, J.; Marsden, G.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Schulz, B.; Scott, Douglas; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Zemcov, M.

    2015-08-01

    We report contributions to cosmic infrared background (CIB) intensities originating from known galaxies and their faint companions at submillimeter wavelengths. Using the publicly available UltraVISTA catalog and maps at 250, 350, and 500 μm from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, we perform a novel measurement that exploits the fact that uncataloged sources may bias stacked flux densities—particularly if the resolution of the image is poor—and intentionally smooth the images before stacking and summing intensities. By smoothing the maps we are capturing the contribution of faint (undetected in {K}S˜ 23.4) sources that are physically associated, or correlated, with the detected sources. We find that the cumulative CIB increases with increased smoothing, reaching 9.82 ± 0.78, 5.77 ± 0.43 and 2.32+/- 0.19 {{nWm}}-2 {{sr}}-1 at 250, 350, and 500 μm at 300 {arcsec} FWHM. This corresponds to a fraction of the fiducial CIB of 0.94 ± 0.23, 1.07 ± 0.31, and 0.97 ± 0.26 at 250, 350, and 500 μm, where the uncertainties are dominated by those of the absolute CIB. We then propose, with a simple model combining parametric descriptions for stacked flux densities and stellar mass functions, that emission from galaxies with log(M/{M}⊙ )\\gt 8.5 can account for most of the measured total intensities and argue against contributions from extended, diffuse emission. Finally, we discuss prospects for future survey instruments to improve the estimates of the absolute CIB levels, and observe any potentially remaining emission at z\\gt 4.

  13. GTC/OSIRIS SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION OF A FAINT L SUBDWARF IN THE UKIRT INFRARED DEEP SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Lodieu, N.

    2010-01-10

    We present the discovery of an L subdwarf in 234 deg{sup 2} common to the UK InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey Large Area Survey Data Release 2 and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3. This is the fifth L subdwarf announced to date, the first one identified in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, and the faintest known. The blue optical and near-infrared colors of ULAS J135058.86+081506.8 and its overall spectra energy distribution are similar to the known mid-L subdwarfs. Low-resolution optical (700-1000 nm) spectroscopy with the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy spectrograph on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio de Canarias reveals that ULAS J135058.86+081506.8 exhibits a strong K I pressure-broadened line at 770 nm and a red slope longward of 800 nm, features characteristics of L-type dwarfs. From direct comparison with the four known L subdwarfs, we estimate its spectral type to be sdL4-sdL6 and derive a distance in the interval 94-170 pc. We provide a rough estimate of the space density for mid-L subdwarfs of 1.5 x 10{sup -4} pc{sup -3}.

  14. The Chandra Deep Survey of the Hubble Deep Field-North Area. II. Results from the Caltech Faint Field Galaxy Redshift Survey Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, A. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Garmire, G. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Barger, A. J.; Broos, P. S.; Cowie, L. L.; Townsley, L. K.; Bautz, M. W.; Burrows, D. N.; Chartas, G.; Feigelson, E. D.; Griffiths, R. E.; Lumb, D.; Nousek, J. A.; Ramsey, L. W.; Sargent, W. L. W.

    2001-06-01

    A deep X-ray survey of the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDF-N) and its environs is performed using data collected by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Currently a 221.9 ks exposure is available, the deepest ever presented, and here we give results on X-ray sources located in the 8.6‧×8.7‧ area covered by the Caltech Faint Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (the ``Caltech area''). This area has (1) deep photometric coverage in several optical and near-infrared bands; (2) extensive coverage at radio, submillimeter, and mid-infrared wavelengths; and (3) some of the deepest and most complete spectroscopic coverage ever obtained. It is also where the X-ray data have the greatest sensitivity; the minimum detectable fluxes in the 0.5-2 keV (soft) and 2-8 keV (hard) bands are ~1.3×10-16 and ~6.5×10-16 ergs cm-2 s-1, respectively. More than ~80% of the extragalactic X-ray background in the hard band is resolved. The 82 Chandra sources detected in the Caltech area are correlated with more than 25 multiwavelength source catalogs, and the results of these correlations as well as spectroscopic follow-up results obtained with the Keck and Hobby-Eberly Telescopes are presented. All but nine of the Chandra sources are detected optically with R<~26.5. Redshifts are available for 39% of the Chandra sources, including 96% of the sources with R<23 the redshift range is 0.1-3.5, with most sources having z<1.5. Eight of the X-ray sources are located in the HDF-N itself, including two not previously reported. A population of X-ray faint, optically bright, nearby galaxies emerges at soft-band fluxes of <~3×10-16 ergs cm-2 s-1. Our multiwavelength correlations have set the tightest constraints to date on the X-ray emission properties of μJy radio sources, mid-infrared sources detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), and very red (R-Ks>5.0) objects. A total of 16 of the 67 1.4 GHz μJy sources in the Caltech area are detected in the

  15. Optical-faint, Far-infrared-bright Herschel Sources in the CANDELS Fields: Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies at z > 1 and the Effect of Source Blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haojing; Stefanon, Mauro; Ma, Zhiyuan; Willner, S. P.; Somerville, Rachel; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Davé, Romeel; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Wiklind, Tommy; Kocevski, Dale; Rafelski, Marc; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Cooray, Asantha; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A.

    2014-07-01

    The Herschel very wide field surveys have charted hundreds of square degrees in multiple far-IR (FIR) bands. While the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is currently the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas, it does not detect a large number of Herschel FIR sources and leaves their nature undetermined. As a test case, we studied seven "SDSS-invisible," very bright 250 μm sources (S 250 > 55 mJy) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey fields where we have a rich multi-wavelength data set. We took a new approach to decompose the FIR sources, using the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors. This is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the priors are from mid-IR data that still suffer from the problem of source blending. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that are not necessarily at the same redshifts. Our decomposition succeeded in identifying and extracting their major contributors. We show that these are all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at z ~ 1-2 whose high L IR is mainly due to dust-obscured star formation. Most of them would not be selected as submillimeter galaxies. They all have complicated morphologies indicative of mergers or violent instability, and their stellar populations are heterogeneous in terms of stellar masses, ages, and formation histories. Their current ultra-luminous infrared galaxy phases are of various degrees of importance in their stellar mass assembly. Our practice provides a promising starting point for developing an automatic routine to reliably study bright Herschel sources.

  16. OPTICAL-FAINT, FAR-INFRARED-BRIGHT HERSCHEL SOURCES IN THE CANDELS FIELDS: ULTRA-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES AT z > 1 AND THE EFFECT OF SOURCE BLENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Haojing; Stefanon, Mauro; Ma, Zhiyuan; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Somerville, Rachel; Davé, Romeel; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Wiklind, Tommy; Kocevski, Dale; Rafelski, Marc; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Cooray, Asantha; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A.

    2014-07-01

    The Herschel very wide field surveys have charted hundreds of square degrees in multiple far-IR (FIR) bands. While the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is currently the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas, it does not detect a large number of Herschel FIR sources and leaves their nature undetermined. As a test case, we studied seven ''SDSS-invisible'', very bright 250 μm sources (S {sub 250} > 55 mJy) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey fields where we have a rich multi-wavelength data set. We took a new approach to decompose the FIR sources, using the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors. This is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the priors are from mid-IR data that still suffer from the problem of source blending. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that are not necessarily at the same redshifts. Our decomposition succeeded in identifying and extracting their major contributors. We show that these are all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at z ∼ 1-2 whose high L {sub IR} is mainly due to dust-obscured star formation. Most of them would not be selected as submillimeter galaxies. They all have complicated morphologies indicative of mergers or violent instability, and their stellar populations are heterogeneous in terms of stellar masses, ages, and formation histories. Their current ultra-luminous infrared galaxy phases are of various degrees of importance in their stellar mass assembly. Our practice provides a promising starting point for developing an automatic routine to reliably study bright Herschel sources.

  17. Analysis of Infrared Fe II Lines in NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger I.

    1993-12-01

    Analysis of the infrared Fe II line strengths in NGC 4151 indicates that the electron density is 3.8 < log(Ne) < 4.25 and the electron temperature is 8000 < Te < 10,000 K in the narrow line emission region. The analysis utilizes the new collision strengths calculate by Pradhan and Zhang (1993, Ap.J. Letters, 409, L77) for the infrared lines. The line strengths are taken from new spectra between 0.88 and 2.5 microns with the GRIS spectrometer and from earlier work of Osterbrock, Shaw, and Veilleux (1990 Ap.J. 352, 561). The infrared Fe II lines have the advantage of critical densities in the range of log(Ne) 5, a large separation between lines, and greatly reduced extinction. The new infrared spectrum has the additional advantage of a consistent spectrum in time, aperture, and resolution over a large number of lines. For a typical AGN iron to hydrogen ratio the ratio of Fe II emission to Paschen Beta indicates that approximately 10% of the iron in NGC 4151 is in the form of Fe II. Comparision with typical H II region results show that significant grain destruction has occurred in the emission region.

  18. Type II superlattice infrared focal plane arrays: Optical, electrical, and mid-wave infrared imaging characterization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John; Svensson, Stefan; Goldberg, Arnie; Kennerly, Steve; Olver, Kim; Hongsmatip, Trirat; Winn, Michael; Uppal, Parvez

    2006-03-01

    We have studied the infrared optical and temperature dependent electrical properties of 320 x 256 arrays of GaSb/InAs type II superlattice infrared photodiodes. Good agreement between single-pixel and focal plane array measurements of the photon-to- electron/hole conversion efficiency was obtained, and the infrared absorption coefficient extracted from these measurements was found to be comparable to that of HgCdTe with the same bandgap as the type II superlattice. Temperature and voltage dependent dark current measurements and the voltage dependent photocurrent generated by a 300 K background scene were described well using a semi-empirical model of the photodiode. We will show high-quality images obtained from the mid-infrared focal plane array operating at 78 K.

  19. Type-II superlattice infrared detector technology at Fraunhofer IAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Daumer, Volker; Hugger, Tsvetelina; Kohn, Norbert; Luppold, Wolfgang; Müller, Raphael; Niemasz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Johannes; Rutz, Frank; Stadelmann, Tim; Wauro, Matthias; Wörl, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    For more than two decades, Antimony-based type-II superlattice photodetectors for the infrared spectral range between 3-15 μm are under development at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF). Today, Fraunhofer IAF is Germany's only national foundry for InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice detectors and we cover a wide range of aspects from basic materials research to small series production in this field. We develop single-element photodetectors for sensing systems as well as two-dimensional detector arrays for high-performance imaging and threat warning systems in the mid-wavelength and long-wavelength region of the thermal infrared. We continuously enhance our production capabilities by extending our in-line process control facilities. As a recent example, we present a semiautomatic wafer probe station that has developed into an important tool for electrooptical characterization. A large amount of the basic materials research focuses on the reduction of the dark current by the development of bandgap engineered device designs on the basis of heterojunction concepts. Recently, we have successfully demonstrated Europe's first LWIR InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice imager with 640x512 pixels with 15 μm pitch. The demonstrator camera already delivers a good image quality and achieves a thermal resolution better than 30 mK.

  20. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Raymond, John C.; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR) and important as diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by te{raymond1979} with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of the IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive their fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of the IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-IR lines, e.g., fethreefive/fetwofive, fefive/fetwofive, and fefive/feoneseven, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss possible explanations and conclude that while uncertainties in the shock modeling and the observations certainly exist, the uncertainty in atomic rates appears to be the major source of discrepancy.

  1. Infrared spectra and interstellar reddening of anonymous type II OH/IR stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Hackwell, J. A.; Grasdalen, G. L.; Kleinmann, S. G.; Mason, S.

    1985-01-01

    Infrared positions and multicolor infrared photometry for a sample of type II OH/IR stars are reported. The infrared colors and 11.4-micron silicate optical depths of the confirmed sources in this group increase as a function of distance, suggesting that interstellar reddening must be taken into account in assessing their infrared energy distributions and physical characteristics.

  2. Optical properties of infrared FELs from the FELI Facility II

    SciTech Connect

    Saeki, K.; Okuma, S.; Oshita, E.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI Facility II has succeeded in infrared FEL oscillation at 1.91 {mu} m using a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam from the FELI S-band linac in February 27, 1995. The FELI Facility II is composed of a 3-m vertical type undulator ({lambda}u=3.8cm, N=78, Km a x=1.4, gap length {ge}20mm) and a 6.72-m optical cavity. It can cover the wavelength range of 1-5{mu}m. The FELs can be delivered from the optical cavity to the diagnostics room through a 40-m evacuated optical pipeline. Wavelength and cavity length dependences of optical properties such as peak power, average power, spectrum width, FEL macropulse, FEL transverse profile are reported.

  3. Fainting Starting Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pederiva, Federica; Barbi, Egidio; Zennaro, Floriana; Neri, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Complications such as mechanical accidents, infections, and thrombosis are commonly described in the presence of a central venous catheter. We present a case of a boy who had fainting episodes due to dislocation of a central venous catheter. PMID:25853719

  4. Defects and noise in Type-II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Wörl, Andreas; Daumer, Volker; Rehm, Robert; Kirste, Lutz; Rutz, Frank; Schmitz, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    To examine defects in InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices we investigated GaSb substrates and epitaxial InAs/GaSb layers by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography to characterize the distribution of threading dislocations. Those measurements are compared with wet chemical etch pit density measurements on GaSb substrates and InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices epitaxial layer structures. The technique uses a wet chemical etch process to decorate threading dislocations and an automated optical analyzing system for mapping the defect distribution. Dark current and noise measurements on processed InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice single element photo diodes reveal a generation-recombination limited dark current behavior without contributions by surface leakage currents for midwavelength infrared detectors. In the white noise part of the noise spectrum, the extracted diode noise closely matches the theoretically expected shot noise behavior. For diodes with an increased dark current in comparison to the dark current of generation-recombination limited material, the standard shot-noise model fails to describe the noise experimentally observed in the white part of the spectrum. Instead, we find that McIntyre's noise model for avalanche multiplication processes fits the data quite well. We suggest that within high electric field domains localized around crystallographic defects, electrons initiate avalanche multiplication processes leading to increased dark current and excess noise.

  5. First Results from the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS): First Simultaneous Detection of Lyα Emission and Lyman Break from a Galaxy at z = 7.51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilvi, V.; Pirzkal, N.; Malhotra, S.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Rhoads, J. E.; Windhorst, R.; Grogin, N. A.; Koekemoer, A.; Zakamska, N. L.; Ryan, R.; Christensen, L.; Hathi, N.; Pharo, J.; Joshi, B.; Yang, H.; Gronwall, C.; Cimatti, A.; Walsh, J.; O’Connell, R.; Straughn, A.; Ostlin, G.; Rothberg, B.; Livermore, R. C.; Hibon, P.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2016-08-01

    Galaxies at high redshifts are a valuable tool for studying cosmic dawn, therefore it is crucial to reliably identify these galaxies. Here, we present an unambiguous and first simultaneous detection of both the Lyα emission and the Lyman break from a z=7.512 +/- 0.004 galaxy, observed in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6σ ) in two observational position angles (PAs), with Lyα line flux of 1.06+/- 0.19× {10}-17 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2. The line flux is nearly a factor of four higher than that in the archival MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations. This is consistent with other recent observations, implying that ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy underestimates the total emission line fluxes, and if confirmed, can have strong implications for reionization studies that are based on ground-based Lyα measurements. A 4σ detection of the NV line in one PA also suggests a weak active galactic nucleus (AGN), and if confirmed, would make this source the highest-redshift AGN yet found. These observations from HST thus clearly demonstrate the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy for studying the epoch of reionization.

  6. 77 FR 27081 - II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, Pennsylvania; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... was published in the Federal Register on February 14, 2012 (77 FR 8281). The workers were engaged in... Employment and Training Administration II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg... former workers of II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg,...

  7. Near-Infrared Faint Galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field: Comparing the Theory with Observations for Galaxy Counts, Colors, and Size Distributions to K ~ 24.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totani, Tomonori; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Maihara, Toshinori; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Motohara, Kentaro

    2001-10-01

    Galaxy counts in the K band, (J-K) colors, and apparent size distributions of faint galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) down to K~24.5 were studied in detail. Special attention has been paid to take into account various selection effects, including the cosmological dimming of surface brightness, to avoid any systematic bias that may be the origin of controversy in previously published results. We also tried to be very careful about systematic model uncertainties; we present a comprehensive survey of these systematic uncertainties and dependence on various parameters, and we have shown that the dominant factors to determine galaxy counts in this band are cosmology and number evolution. We found that the pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model is very consistent with all the SDF data down to K~22.5, without any evidence for number or size evolution in a low-density, Λ-dominated flat universe, which is now favored by various cosmological observations. On the other hand, a number evolution of galaxies with η~2, when invoked as the luminosity conserving mergers as φ*~(1+z)η and L*~(1+z)-η for all types of galaxies, is necessary to explain the data in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. If the popular Λ-dominated universe is taken for granted, our result then gives a strong constraint on the number evolution of giant elliptical or early-type galaxies to z~1-2 that must be met by any models in the hierarchically clustering universe, since such galaxies are the dominant population in this magnitude range (K<~22.5). A number evolution with η~1 is already difficult to reconcile with the data in this universe. On the other hand, number evolution of late-type galaxies and/or dwarf galaxies, which has been suggested by previous studies of optical galaxies, is allowed from the data. In the fainter magnitude range of K>~22.5, we found a slight excess of observed counts over the prediction of the PLE model when elliptical galaxies are treated as a single population. We

  8. Spectrophotometry of faint comets: The asteroid approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degewij, J.

    1981-01-01

    Observing programs at optical (0.35-0.8 micron) and near-infrared (1.1-2.4 micron) wavelengths, directed at the acquisition of reflection spectra of faint and distant comets, are described. The ultimate goal is to obtain spectrophotometric measurements of comets for which a significant part of the light is expected to be reflected by the solid surface of the nucleus.

  9. First light observations with TIFR Near Infrared Imaging Camera (TIRCAM-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; D'Costa, S. L. A.; Naik, M. B.; Sandimani, P. R.; Poojary, S. S.; Bhagat, S. B.; Jadhav, R. B.; Meshram, G. S.; Bakalkar, C. B.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Mohan, V.; Joshi, J.

    TIFR near infrared imaging camera (TIRCAM-II) is based on the Aladdin III Quadrant InSb focal plane array (512×512 pixels; 27.6 μm pixel size; sensitive between 1 - 5.5 μm). TIRCAM-II had its first engineering run with the 2 m IUCAA telescope at Girawali during February - March 2011. The first light observations with TIRCAM-II were quite successful. Several infrared standard with TIRCAM-II were quite successful. Several infrared standard stars, the Trapezium Cluster in Orion region, McNeil's nebula, etc., were observed in the J, K and in a narrow-band at 3.6 μm (nbL). In the nbL band, some bright stars could be detected from the Girawali site. The performance of TIRCAM-II is discussed in the light of preliminary observations in near infrared bands.

  10. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: Part II. Advantages of FT-IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    This is Part II in a series on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Described are various advantages of FT-IR spectroscopy including energy advantages, wavenumber accuracy, constant resolution, polarization effects, and stepping at grating changes. (RH)

  11. Deep infrared galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Houck, J. R.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1992-01-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of 17 infrared-bright emission-line galaxies near the north ecliptic pole are presented. Reddening-corrected line ratios forbidden O III 5007/H-beta, N II 6583/H-alpha, S II (6716 + 6731)/H-alpha, and O I 6300/H-alpha are used to discriminate between candidate energy generation mechanisms in each galaxy. These criteria have frequently been applied to optically selected samples of galaxies in the past, but this is the first time they have been applied to a set of faint flux-limited infrared-selected objects. The analysis indicates the sample contains seven starburst galaxies and three (AGN). However, seven galaxies in the present sample elude the classification scheme based on these line ratios. It is concluded that a two-component (starburst plus AGN) model for energy generation is inadequate for infrared galaxies.

  12. Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program (SURFS UP). II. IRAC-detected Lyman-Break Galaxies at 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 behind Strong-lensing Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; Bradač, Maruša; Lemaux, Brian C.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Hoag, Austin; Castellano, Marco; Amorín, Ricardo; Fontana, Adriano; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Cain, Benjamin; Lubin, L. M.; Merlin, Emiliano; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Schrabback, Tim; Treu, Tommaso; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; von der Linden, Anja; Knight, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    We study the stellar population properties of the IRAC-detected 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 galaxy candidates from the Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program. Using the Lyman Break selection technique, we find a total of 17 galaxy candidates at 6 ≲ z ≲ 10 from Hubble Space Telescope images (including the full-depth images from the Hubble Frontier Fields program for MACS 1149 and MACS 0717) that have detections at signal-to-noise ratios ≥ 3 in at least one of the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm channels. According to the best mass models available for the surveyed galaxy clusters, these IRAC-detected galaxy candidates are magnified by factors of ˜1.2-5.5. Due to the magnification of the foreground galaxy clusters, the rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M1600 are between -21.2 and -18.9 mag, while their intrinsic stellar masses are between 2 × 108M⊙ and 2.9 × 109M⊙. We identify two Lyα emitters in our sample from the Keck DEIMOS spectra, one at zLyα = 6.76 (in RXJ 1347) and one at zLyα = 6.32 (in MACS 0454). We find that 4 out of 17 z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates are favored by z ≲ 1 solutions when IRAC fluxes are included in photometric redshift fitting. We also show that IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] color, when combined with photometric redshift, can be used to identify galaxies which likely have strong nebular emission lines or obscured active galactic nucleus contributions within certain redshift windows.

  13. GALACTIC CEPHEIDS WITH SPITZER. II. SEARCH FOR EXTENDED INFRARED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Barmby, P.; Marengo, M.; Evans, N. R.; Huelsman, D.; Fazio, G. G.; Bono, G.; Su, K. Y. L.; Welch, D. L.

    2011-02-15

    A deep and detailed examination of 29 classical Cepheids with the Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed three stars with strong nearby extended emission detected in multiple bands which appears to be physically associated with the stars. RS Pup was already known to possess extended infrared emission, while the extended emission around the other two stars (S Mus and {delta} Cep) is newly discovered in our observations. Four other stars (GH Lup, l Car, T Mon, and X Cyg) show tentative evidence for extended infrared emission. An unusual elongated extended object next to SZ Tau appears to be a background or foreground object in a chance alignment with the Cepheid. The inferred mass-loss rate upper limits for S Mus and {delta} Cep are in the range from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, with the upper limit for RS Pup as high as 10{sup -6} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Mass loss during post-main-sequence evolution has been proposed as a resolution to the discrepancy between pulsational and dynamical masses of Cepheid variable stars: dust in the lost material would make itself known by the presence of an infrared bright nebula or unresolved infrared excess. The observed frequency of infrared circumstellar emission (<24%) and the mass-loss rate we estimate for our sources show that dusty mass loss can only account for part of the Cepheid mass-loss discrepancy. Nevertheless, our direct evidence that mass loss is active during the Cepheid phase is an important confirmation that these processes need to be included in evolutionary and pulsation models of these stars and should be taken into account in the calibration of the Cepheid distance scale.

  14. AKARI INFRARED CAMERA SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke; Sakon, Itsuki; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kawamura, Akiko; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2013-02-01

    We performed a near-infrared spectroscopic survey toward an area of {approx}10 deg{sup 2} of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the infrared satellite AKARI. Observations were carried out as part of the AKARI Large-area Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LSLMC). The slitless multi-object spectroscopic capability of the AKARI/IRC enabled us to obtain low-resolution (R {approx} 20) spectra in 2-5 {mu}m for a large number of point sources in the LMC. As a result of the survey, we extracted about 2000 infrared spectra of point sources. The data are organized as a near-infrared spectroscopic catalog. The catalog includes various infrared objects such as young stellar objects (YSOs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, supergiants, and so on. It is shown that 97% of the catalog sources have corresponding photometric data in the wavelength range from 1.2 to 11 {mu}m, and 67% of the sources also have photometric data up to 24 {mu}m. The catalog allows us to investigate near-infrared spectral features of sources by comparison with their infrared spectral energy distributions. In addition, it is estimated that about 10% of the catalog sources are observed at more than two different epochs. This enables us to study a spectroscopic variability of sources by using the present catalog. Initial results of source classifications for the LSLMC samples are presented. We classified 659 LSLMC spectra based on their near-infrared spectral features by visual inspection. As a result, it is shown that the present catalog includes 7 YSOs, 160 C-rich AGBs, 8 C-rich AGB candidates, 85 O-rich AGBs, 122 blue and yellow supergiants, 150 red super giants, and 128 unclassified sources. Distributions of the classified sources on the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are discussed in the text. Continuous wavelength coverage and high spectroscopic sensitivity in 2-5 {mu}m can only be achieved by space observations. This is an unprecedented large-scale spectroscopic survey toward the

  15. Detecting stellar-wind bubbles through infrared arcs in H ii regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Haworth, Thomas J.; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Mohamed, Shazrene; Langer, Norbert; Harries, Tim J.

    2016-02-01

    Mid-infrared arcs of dust emission are often seen near ionizing stars within H ii regions. A possible explanations for these arcs is that they could show the outer edges of asymmetric stellar wind bubbles. We use two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of wind bubbles within H ii regions around individual stars to predict the infrared emission properties of the dust within the H ii region. We assume that dust and gas are dynamically well-coupled and that dust properties (composition, size distribution) are the same in the H ii region as outside it, and that the wind bubble contains no dust. We post-process the simulations to make synthetic intensity maps at infrared wavebands using the torus code. We find that the outer edge of a wind bubble emits brightly at 24 μm through starlight absorbed by dust grains and re-radiated thermally in the infrared. This produces a bright arc of emission for slowly moving stars that have asymmetric wind bubbles, even for cases where there is no bow shock or any corresponding feature in tracers of gas emission. The 24 μm intensity decreases exponentially from the arc with increasing distance from the star because the dust temperature decreases with distance. The size distribution and composition of the dust grains has quantitative but not qualitative effects on our results. Despite the simplifications of our model, we find good qualitative agreement with observations of the H ii region RCW 120, and can provide physical explanations for any quantitative differences. Our model produces an infrared arc with the same shape and size as the arc around CD -38°11636 in RCW 120, and with comparable brightness. This suggests that infrared arcs around O stars in H ii regions may be revealing the extent of stellar wind bubbles, although we have not excluded other explanations.

  16. MOLECULAR LINE OBSERVATIONS OF INFRARED DARK CLOUDS. II. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, David; Plume, Rene; Evans, Natalie; Bergin, Edwin; Ragan, Sarah

    2009-11-01

    Using a source selection biased toward high-mass star-forming regions, we used a large velocity gradient code to calculate the H{sub 2} densities and CS column densities for a sample of Midcourse Space Experiment 8 mum infrared dark cores. Our average H{sub 2} density and CS column density were 1.14 x 10{sup 6}cm{sup -3} and 1.21 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, respectively. In addition, we have calculated the Jeans mass and Virial mass for each core to get a better understanding of their gravitational stability. We found that core masses calculated from observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} J = 1->0 and C{sup 18}O J = 1->0 by Ragan et al. (Paper I) were sufficient for collapse, though most regions are likely to form protoclusters. We have explored the star-forming properties of the molecular gas within our sample and find some diversity which extends the range of infrared dark clouds from the very massive clouds that will create large clusters, to clouds that are similar to some of our local counterparts (e.g., Serpens, Ophiuchus).

  17. A Deep Search For Faint Galaxies Associated With Very Low-redshift C IV Absorbers. II. Program Design, Absorption-line Measurements, and Absorber Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.; Tumlinson, Jason; O'Meara, John M.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Katz, Neal; Willmer, C. N. A.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the evolution of metal-enriched gas over recent cosmic epochs as well as to characterize the diffuse, ionized, metal-enriched circumgalactic medium, we have conducted a blind survey for C iv absorption systems in 89 QSO sightlines observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We have identified 42 absorbers at z < 0.16, comprising the largest uniform blind sample size to date in this redshift range. Our measurements indicate an increasing C iv absorber number density per comoving path length (d{N}/{dX}= 7.5 ± 1.1) and modestly increasing mass density relative to the critical density of the universe (ΩC iv = 10.0 ± 1.5 × 10-8) from z ˜ 1.5 to the present epoch, consistent with predictions from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Furthermore, the data support a functional form for the column density distribution function that deviates from a single power law, also consistent with independent theoretical predictions. As the data also probe heavy element ions in addition to C iv at the same redshifts, we identify, measure, and search for correlations between column densities of these species where components appear to be aligned in velocity. Among these ion-ion correlations, we find evidence for tight correlations between C ii and Si ii, C ii and Si iii, and C iv and Si iv, suggesting that these pairs of species arise in similar ionization conditions. However, the evidence for correlations decreases as the difference in ionization potential increases. Finally, when controlling for observational bias, we find only marginal evidence for a correlation (86.8% likelihood) between the Doppler line width b(C iv) and column density N(C iv).

  18. Calculation of Intensity Ratios of Observed Infrared [Fe II] Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Narayan C.; Hibbert, Alan

    2010-03-01

    Two recent observational studies of the [Fe II] λ12567/λ16435 line ratio by Smith & Hartigan and Rodriguez-Ardila et al. have suggested that the available theoretical A-values could be incorrect to 10%-40%. We have carried out an extensive configuration interaction calculation of [Fe II] lines to investigate this claim, as well as the variability in observed line ratios for λ8617/λ9052 and λ8892/λ9227 of Dennefeld. For these transitions, we are generally in good agreement with the results of Nussbaumer & Storey, less so with those of Quinet et al. In comparison, the ratios derived from observations appear either to be less secure, or other factors influence those results.

  19. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, Christoph

    The Type II InAs/GaInSb and InAs/InAsSb superlattices are material systems for implementation as photodetector absorbers in infrared imaging applications. In addition to cutoff wavelengths spanning the infrared spectrum, they offer degrees of freedom in their materials design (e.g. layer thicknesses, alloy compositions, number of layers in one superlattice period) that permit the optimization of an infrared photon detector's figures of merit such as detectivity through the tuning of material properties like generation/recombination lifetimes and optical absorption. We describe efforts to obtain accurate electronic band structures of superlattice semiconductors with infrared energy gaps, and employing them to evaluate nonradiative minority carrier lifetimes. Simple device models are utilized to suggest potential performance enhancements that arise from employing superlattices as infrared absorber. We also discuss current efforts to simulate the molecular beam epitaxial growth of InAs/InAsSb superlattices to predict dominant native point defects and other growth nonidealities. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors.

  20. 77 FR 21586 - II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, PA; Notice of Affirmative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... was published in the Federal Register on February 14, 2012 (77 FR 8281). The workers were engaged in... Employment and Training Administration II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg... former workers of II-VI, Incorporated, Infrared Optics--Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg,...

  1. An infrared study of the NGC 1977 H II region/molecular cloud interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, P.; Harvey, P. M.; Wilking, B. A.; Evans, N. J., II

    1985-01-01

    The results of an infrared study of the H II region NGC 1977 and the adjacent dense molecular cloud are reported. Extensive far-infrared maps with 45 arcsec resolution allow the spatial structure of the dust temperature and optical depth variations across the ionization front to be delineated. Analysis of the dust energetics indicates that the only significant energy source is the B1 V star HD 37018 which ionizes the H II region. This result, together with a favorable geometry, provides a good opportunity to determine the ratio of ultraviolet absorption efficiency to far-infrared emission efficiency, 790 + 460 or - 180. Analysis of the gas energetics indicates that collisions with warm dust grains can explain the observed gas temperatures.

  2. Far-infrared observations of the evolved H II region M16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbreen, B.; Fazio, G. G.; Jaffe, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    The results of far infrared (FIR) observations of the larger H II region M16, associated with the young open star cluster NGC 6611, are discussed. Three FIR sources detected on an extended ridge of FIR emission within the scanned region are described. The observations confirm that M16 is an H II region in a late stage of evolution. The H II region has expanded and is now extremely density bounded, consisting of an extended region of ionized gas and a series of ionization fronts located at the surrounding molecular cloud boundaries nearest to the exciting OB star cluster. The FIR radiation arises from heated dust at these boundaries.

  3. The faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Shaun; Treyer, Marie-Agnes; Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Models of the faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light are presented, which are consistent with current data on faint galaxy number counts and redshifts. The autocorrelation function of surface brightness fluctuations in the extragalactic diffuse light is predicted, and the way in which these predictions depend on the cosmological model and assumptions of biasing is determined. It is confirmed that the recent deep infrared number counts are most compatible with a high density universe (Omega-0 is approximately equal to 1) and that the steep blue counts then require an extra population of rapidly evolving blue galaxies. The faintest presently detectable galaxies produce an interesting contribution to the extragalactic diffuse light, and still fainter galaxies may also produce a significant contribution. These faint galaxies still only produce a small fraction of the total optical diffuse background light, but on scales of a few arcminutes to a few degrees, they produce a substantial fraction of the fluctuations in the diffuse light.

  4. Hα kinematics of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicaire, I.; Carignan, C.; Amram, P.; Hernandez, O.; Chemin, L.; Daigle, O.; de Denus-Baillargeon, M.-M.; Balkowski, C.; Boselli, A.; Fathi, K.; Kennicutt, R. C.

    2008-04-01

    This is the second part of an Hα kinematics follow-up survey of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) sample. The aim of this paper is to shed new light on the role of baryons and their kinematics and on the dark/luminous matter relation in the star-forming regions of galaxies, in relation with studies at other wavelengths. The data for 37 galaxies are presented. The observations were made using Fabry-Perot interferometry with the photon-counting camera FaNTOmM on four different telescopes, namely the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6-m, the ESO La Silla 3.6-m, the William Herschel 4.2-m and the Observatoire du mont Mégantic 1.6-m telescopes. The velocity fields are computed using custom IDL routines designed for an optimal use of the data. The kinematical parameters and rotation curves are derived using the GIPSY software. It is shown that non-circular motions associated with galactic bars affect the kinematical parameters fitting and the velocity gradient of the rotation curves. This leads to incorrect determinations of the baryonic and dark matter distributions in the mass models derived from those rotation curves. Based on observations made with the ESO 3.60-m telescope at La Silla Observatories under programme ID 076.B-0859 and on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and the University of Hawaii. E-mail: isabelle@astro.umontreal.ca (ID);claude.carignan@umontreal.ca (CC) ‡ Visiting Astronomer, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique de France and the University of Hawaii.

  5. Cadenced IRAC Monitoring of Infrared-Variable AGNs, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Fouesneau, Morgan; Hora, Joseph; Krick, Jessica; Smith, Howard; Surace, Jason

    2008-03-01

    We have analyzed IRAC imaging data from all 97 Spitzer visits to a very well-studied field, the IRAC Dark Calibration Field (IRAC-CF) near the north ecliptic pole. With this extensive dataset we have already identified a unique sample of 30 IR-variable galaxies which we are now working to characterize with respect to variability amplitudes and timescales, panchromatic SEDs, and host morphologies, among other quantities. Unfortunately, the continual change in spacecraft roll angle means that our sources are typically observed for at most six months at a time by each IRAC FOV in succession -- in other words, the visibility windows are exactly out of phase. Thus the existing data, despite the fact that they extend over more than four years, present large, unavoidable gaps that frustrate the time-delay analysis we wish to perform on exactly the timescales known to be common in active galaxies. This has only changed beginning in 2007 July: since that time cadenced IRAC observations have been carried out in synchrony with the IRAC-CF dark-calibration observations as part of our approved Cycle-4 program (PID 40553). Here we are proposing to continue this successful AGN monitoring campaign until the end of the cryogenic mission. The resulting timelines (covering 1500 days thus far and expected to run ultimately to some 2200+ days), will be a unique legacy of the Spitzer mission. This dataset, especially for the sizable, unbiased AGN sample we now have, holds unique promise for measuring the colors and temperatures of IR-varying AGN, and will have much to say about the underlying physical models of the infrared AGN emission. Accordingly we ask for just 8 h to gather IRAC photometry in the temporal gaps that would otherwise accrue in Cycle 5.

  6. Infrared and Raman spectra of ethylene trithiocarbonate complexes of some Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, J. Guillermo; Gnecco, Juan A.

    Coordination compounds of ethylene trithiocarbonate (ETTC) with some Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) halides have been prepared, characterized and their infrared and Raman spectra recorded. The i.r. spectra in the range 4000-400 cm -1 suggest that the organic ligand is bonded to the metal ions through its exocyclic sulphur atom, whereas the far-i.r. and Raman spectra show that the complexes of the type HgX 2(ETTC) (X = Cl, Br or I) possess a trans dimeric halogen-bridged structure. The Cd(II) and Zn(II) species are of the type MX 2(ETTC) 2 and they possess a pseudotetrahedral structure of C2υ symmetry.

  7. THE COSMIC NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND. II. FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Elizabeth R.; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Shapiro, Paul R.; Iliev, Ilian T.

    2010-02-20

    The near-infrared background (NIRB) is one of a few methods that can be used to observe the redshifted light from early stars at a redshift of 6 and above, and thus it is imperative to understand the significance of any detection or nondetection of the NIRB. Fluctuations of the NIRB can provide information on the first structures, such as halos and their surrounding ionized regions in the intergalactic medium (IGM). We combine, for the first time, N-body simulations, radiative transfer code, and analytic calculations of luminosity of early structures to predict the angular power spectrum (C{sub l} ) of fluctuations in the NIRB. We study in detail the effects of various assumptions about the stellar mass, the initial mass spectrum of stars, the metallicity, the star formation efficiency (f{sub *}), the escape fraction of ionizing photons (f{sub esc}), and the star formation timescale (t{sub SF}), on the amplitude as well as the shape of C{sub l} . The power spectrum of NIRB fluctuations is maximized when f{sub *} is the largest (as C{sub l} {proportional_to} f {sup 2}{sub *}) and f{sub esc} is the smallest (as more nebular emission is produced within halos). A significant uncertainty in the predicted amplitude of C{sub l} exists due to our lack of knowledge of t{sub SF} of these early populations of galaxies, which is equivalent to our lack of knowledge of the mass-to-light ratio of these sources. We do not see a turnover in the NIRB angular power spectrum of the halo contribution, which was claimed to exist in the literature, and explain this as the effect of high levels of nonlinear bias that was ignored in the previous calculations. This is partly due to our choice of the minimum mass of halos contributing to NIRB ({approx}2 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}), and a smaller minimum mass, which has a smaller nonlinear bias, may still exhibit a turnover. Therefore, our results suggest that both the amplitude and shape of the NIRB power spectrum provide important information

  8. OPTICAL AND INFRARED ANALYSIS OF TYPE II SN 2006bc

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Joseph S.; Sugerman, B. E. K.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Andrews, J. E.; Clem, J. E-mail: ben.sugerman@goucher.edu E-mail: jandrews@phys.lsu.edu; and others

    2012-07-10

    We present nebular phase optical imaging and spectroscopy and near/mid-IR imaging of the Type II SN 2006bc. Observations reveal the central wavelength of the symmetric H{alpha} line profile to be redshifted with respect to the host galaxy H{alpha} emission by day 325. Such a phenomenon has been argued to result from an asymmetric explosion in the iron-peak elements resulting in a larger mass of {sup 56}Ni and higher excitation of hydrogen on the far side of the supernova (SN) explosion. We also observe a gradual blueshifting of this H{alpha} peak which is indicative of dust formation in the ejecta. Although showing a normal peak brightness, V {approx} -17.2, for a core-collapse SN, 2006bc fades by {approx}6 mag during the first 400 days suggesting either a relatively low {sup 56}Ni yield, an increase in extinction due to new dust, or both. A short-duration flattening of the light curve is observed from day 416 to day 541 suggesting an optical light echo. Based on the narrow time window of this echo, we discuss implications on the location and geometry of the reflecting interstellar medium. With our radiative transfer models, we find an upper limit of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} of dust around SN 2006bc. In the event that all of this dust were formed during the SN explosion, this quantity of dust is still several orders of magnitude lower than that needed to explain the large quantities of dust observed in the early universe.

  9. Near infrared fluorescence quenching properties of copper (II) ions for potential applications in biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Dolonchampa; Zhou, Mingzhou; Sarder, Pinaki; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence quenching properties of copper(II) ions have been used for designing Cu(II) sensitive fluorescent molecular probes. In this paper, we demonstrate that static quenching plays a key role in free Cu(II)-mediated fluorescence quenching of a near infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye cypate. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant was calculated to be KSV = 970,000 M-1 in 25 mM MES buffer, pH 6.5 at room temperature. We synthesized LS835, a compound containing cypate attached covalently to chelated Cu(II) to study fluorescence quenching by chelated Cu(II). The fluorescence quenching mechanism of chelated Cu(II) is predominantly dynamic or collisional quenching. The quenching efficiency of chelated Cu(II) was calculated to be 58% ± 6% in dimethylsulfoxide at room temperature. Future work will involve further characterization of the mechanism of NIR fluorescence quenching by Cu(II) and testing its reversibility for potential applications in designing fluorophore-quencher based molecular probes for biological imaging.

  10. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  11. High-resolution mid-infrared spectra of Co II, Ni I, and Fe II in SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Boyle, R. J.; Wiedemann, G. R.; Moseley, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    Ground-based infrared observations of SN 1987A on day 612 after the explosion have yielded resolved line profiles of Co II, Ni I, Fe II at 10.52, 11.31, and 17.94 micron, respectively. The spectra were taken at a resolving power of about 1000 with an array grating spectrometer on the 4 m telescope of Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Based on the observed line intensities we have estimated the minimum mass of each ion: M(Co II) = (6.0 +/- 1.8) x 10 exp -5 solar mass; M(Ni I) = (1.1 +/- 0.1) x 10 exp -3 solar mass; and M(Fe II) = (8.0 +/- 1.5) x 10 exp -3 solar mass. From these we infer total masses for cobalt, nickel, and iron in the ejecta. The nickel and iron line profiles are markedly asymmetric. We interpret these as arising from two components, one centered on the stellar rest velocity with an approximately 3250 km/s full width, and the second at about +1200 km/s with an approximately 1100 km/s full width. The asymmetry may represent a large-scale fracturing of the ejecta by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities.

  12. 77 FR 36579 - II-VI, Inc., Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, PA; Leased Workers From Adecco, Carol...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... in the Federal Register on February 14, 2012 (77 FR 8281). The workers' firm is engaged in activities... Employment and Training Administration II-VI, Inc., Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, PA; Leased...., Infrared Optics-Saxonburg Division, Saxonburg, PA; Notice of Revised Determination on Reconsideration...

  13. Empirical calibration of the near-infrared Ca II triplet - III. Fitting functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Cardiel, N.; Vazdekis, A.; Peletier, R. F.

    2002-02-01

    Using a near-infrared stellar library of 706 stars with a wide coverage of atmospheric parameters, we study the behaviour of the CaII triplet strength in terms of effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity. Empirical fitting functions for recently defined line-strength indices, namely CaT*, CaT and PaT, are provided. These functions can be easily implemented into stellar population models to provide accurate predictions for integrated CaII strengths. We also present a thorough study of the various error sources and their relation to the residuals of the derived fitting functions. Finally, the derived functional forms and the behaviour of the predicted CaII are compared with those of previous works in the field.

  14. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Behind the Frontier Field Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Cowie, Lennox; Barger, Amy; Wang, Wei-Hao; Chen, Chian-Chou

    2015-08-01

    Faint submillimeter galaxies are the major contributors to the submillimeter extragalactic background light and hence the dominant star-forming population in the dusty universe. Determining how much these galaxies overlap the optically selected samples is critical to fully account for the cosmic star formation history. To explore this faint submillimeter population, we have been observing nine galaxy clusters with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, including five of the clusters in the HST Frontier Fields program. We have also been using the Submillimeter Array to determine the positions of our detected sources precisely. Our recent observations have discovered several high-redshift dusty galaxies with far-infrared luminosities similar to that of the Milky Way or luminous infrared galaxies but which are undetected in current deep radio, optical and near-infrared images. These remarkable results suggest that a substantial amount of star formation in even the faint submillimeter population may be hidden from rest-frame optical surveys.

  15. Near-infrared (Fe II) and Pa Beta imaging and spectroscopy of Arp 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armus, L.; Shupe, D. L.; Matthews, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have imaged the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 in light of the near-infrared (Fe II) 1.257 micron and Pa-beta lines, and have obtained spectra in the J- and H-band atmospheric windows. Arp 220 is a strong source of (Fe II) and Pa-beta emission, with luminosities of 1.3 x 10(exp 41) and 9.2 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s, respectively. The (Fe II) and Pa-beta emission are both extended over the central 2 sec-3 sec, but with different morphologies. We suggest that the extended (Fe II) emission is produced through the interaction of fast shocks with ambient gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) at the base of the outflowing, supernovae-driven superwind mapped by Heckman et al. (1987). The bolometric luminosity of the starburst required to power this wind is estimated to be at least 2 x 10(exp 11) solar luminosity. If the spatially unresolved (Fe II) emission is produced via a large number of supernova remnants, the implied rate is approximately 0.6/yr. The overall luminosity of such a starburst could account for a large fraction (1/2-1/3) of the Arp 220 energy budget, but the large deficit of ionizing photons (as counted by the Pa-beta luminosity) requires that the starburst be rapidly declining and/or have a low upper mass cutoff. Alternatively, dust may effectively compete with the gas for ionizing photons, or much of the ionizing radiation may escape through 'holes' in the ISM. It is also possible that a buried active galactic nuclei (AGN) produces a large fraction of the unresolved (Fe II) and Pa-beta emission. We briefly discuss these possibilities in light of these new imaging and spectroscopic data.

  16. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Bartko, F.; Mccoy, J.; Ripp, L.; Bohlin, R.; Davidsen, A. F.; Ford, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) designed for use with The Space Telescope (ST), is currently preparing for instrument assembly, integration, alignment, and calibration. Nearly all optical and detector elements have been completed and calibrated, and selection of flight detectors and all but a few optical elements has been made. Calibration results for the flight detectors and optics are presented, and plans for forthcoming system calibration are briefly described.

  17. CASSIS: The Cornell Atlas of Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph Sources. II. High-resolution Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebouteiller, V.; Barry, D. J.; Goes, C.; Sloan, G. C.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Weedman, D. W.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Houck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope observed about 15,000 objects during the cryogenic mission lifetime. Observations provided low-resolution (R=λ /{Δ }λ ≈ 60-127) spectra over ≈ 5-38 μm and high-resolution (R≈ 600) spectra over 10-37 μm. The Cornell Atlas of Spitzer/IRS Sources (CASSIS) was created to provide publishable quality spectra to the community. Low-resolution spectra have been available in CASSIS since 2011, and here we present the addition of the high-resolution spectra. The high-resolution observations represent approximately one-third of all staring observations performed with the IRS instrument. While low-resolution observations are adapted to faint objects and/or broad spectral features (e.g., dust continuum, molecular bands), high-resolution observations allow more accurate measurements of narrow features (e.g., ionic emission lines) as well as a better sampling of the spectral profile of various features. Given the narrow aperture of the two high-resolution modules, cosmic ray hits and spurious features usually plague the spectra. Our pipeline is designed to minimize these effects through various improvements. A super-sampled point-spread function was created in order to enable the optimal extraction in addition to the full aperture extraction. The pipeline selects the best extraction method based on the spatial extent of the object. For unresolved sources, the optimal extraction provides a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over a full aperture extraction. We have developed several techniques for optimal extraction, including a differential method that eliminates low-level rogue pixels (even when no dedicated background observation was performed). The updated CASSIS repository now includes all the spectra ever taken by the IRS, with the exception of mapping observations.

  18. The infrared emission of G333.6-0.2 - An extremely nonspherical H II region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, A. R.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Robinson, G.; Thomas, J. A.; Becklin, E. E.; Gatley, I.; Werner, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The southern H II region G333.6-0.2, which has a total luminosity of 3.3 million solar luminosities (for an assumed distance of 4 kpc) was mapped at 2.2, 10, 30, 50, and 100 microns. At all wavelengths, the surface brightness of the infrared radiation is unusually high and the structure of the source is compact and symmetrical. The present observations, along with previous data, suggest that G333.6-0.2 is excited by a single luminous object or a very compact cluster, which has formed on the front surface of a dense molecular cloud as seen from the earth. It is shown that the spectral and spatial characteristics of the infrared radiation can be understood in terms of this blister model.

  19. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids: drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather or during physical activity take frequent breaks and move around as much as possible when sitting or standing for long periods of time slowly breathe into a paper bag ... Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  20. Faintness

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  1. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... severely dehydrated ) Standing up very suddenly from a lying position Less common but more serious reasons for ... avoid or change them. Get up from a lying or seated position slowly. If having blood drawn ...

  2. The [C II] 158 Micron Line in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhman, M. L.; Satyapal, S.; Fischer, J.; Wolfire, M. G.; Sturm, E.; Dudley, C. C.; Lutz, D.; Genzel, R.

    2003-01-01

    We present a study of the [C II] 157.74 micron fine-structure line in a sample of 15 ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies (IR luminosity L(sub IR greater than or equal to 10(exp 12)L.; ULIRGs) using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). We confirm the observed order of magnitude deficit (compared to normal and starburst galaxies) in the strength of the [C II] line relative to the far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission found in our initial report, but here with a sample that is twice as large. This result suggests that the deficit is a general phenomenon affecting 4 out of 5 ULIRGs. We present an analysis using observations of generally acknowledged photodissociation region (PDR) tracers ([C II], [OI] 63 and 145 micron, and FIR continuum emission), which suggests that a high ultraviolet flux G(sub 0) incident on a moderate density n PDR could explain the deficit. However, comparisons with other ULIRG observations, including CO (1-0), [C I] (1-0), and 6.2 micron polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, suggest that high G(sub 0)/n PDRs alone cannot produce a self-consistent solution that is compatible with all of the observations. We propose that non-PDR contributions to the FIR continuum can explain the apparent [C II] deficiency. Here, unusually high G(sub 0) and/ or n physical conditions in ULIRGs as compared to those in normal and starburst galaxies are not required to explain the [C II] deficit. Dust-bounded photoionization regions, which generate much of the FIR emission but do not contribute significant [C II] emission, offer one possible physical origin for this additional non-PDR component. Such environments may also contribute to the observed suppression of FIR fine-structure emission from ionized gas and PAHs, as well as the warmer FIR colors found in ULIRGs. The implications for observations at higher redshifts are also revisited.

  3. Zinc(ii)-induced control of the internalization of a near-infrared fluorescent probe by live cells.

    PubMed

    König, Sandra G; Öz, Simin; Krämer, Roland

    2016-04-22

    We describe zinc-promoted cellular uptake of a near-infrared fluorophore modified with a terpyridine ligand. In response to varying concentrations of exogenous zinc(ii), we observed increasing cellular uptake in live HeLa cells as well as other cell lines, whereas only negligible staining was detected in the absence of zinc(ii). PMID:26902388

  4. Noncollinear parametric amplification in the near-infrared based on type-II phase matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.; Bühler, J.; Heinrich, A.-C.; Leitenstorfer, A.; Brida, D.

    2015-09-01

    Noncollinear parametric amplification based on type-II phase matching for the generation of ultrabroadband and tunable spectra in the near infrared is investigated. In a noncollinear geometry the group velocity matching condition between signal and idler can be obtained in frequently used crystals such as β-barium borate (BBO) even for wavelengths fully located in the anomalous dispersion region. The extremely broadband operation, peculiar tuning possibilities and straightforward experimental implementation with the standard BBO crystal pave the way for a versatile NIR source in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  5. The appearance of dusty H II blisters at radio and infrared wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Icke, V.; Gatley, I.; Israel, F. P.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed calculations for the observational appearance of nonspherical Stromgren regions at radio and infrared wavelengths are presented. The computations are made feasible by two assumptions, namely (1) no stellar photon leaves the solid angle within which it was emitted, and (2) the radiation spectrum can be represented by three delta functions corresponding to Lyman continuum, Lyman alpha, and softer radiation. These calculations are used to develop models for the H II blisters M17 A and 30 Doradus, and also first order parameters for a sample of other well-studied galactic H II regions. It is concluded that the observations are well explained by an ionizing object in a density gradient, without the need for peculiar dust properties or distribution.

  6. Effect of hole transport on performance of infrared type-II superlattice light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Youxi; Suchalkin, Sergey; Kipshidze, Gela; Hosoda, Takashi; Westerfeld, David; Shterengas, Leon; Belenky, Gregory; Laikhtman, Boris

    2015-04-28

    The effect of hole transport on the performance of infrared light emitting diodes (LED) was investigated. The active area of the LEDs comprised two type-II superlattices with different periods and widths connected in series. Electroluminescence spectra of the devices with different positions of long wave and mid wave superlattice sections were mostly contributed by the superlattice closest to the p-contact. The experimental results indicate that due to suppressed vertical hole transport, the recombination of electrically injected electrons and holes in a type II superlattice LED active region takes place within a few superlattice periods near p-barrier. Possible reason for the effect is reduction of hole diffusion coefficient in an active area of a superlattice LED under bias.

  7. EXTENDED [C II] EMISSION IN LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Surace, J. A.; Charmandaris, V.; Stacey, G.; Murphy, E. J.; Haan, S.; Stierwalt, S.; Evans, A. S.; Malhotra, S.; Appleton, P.; Inami, H.; Magdis, G. E.; Elbaz, D.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Meijerink, R.; and others

    2014-06-10

    We present Herschel/PACS observations of extended [C II] 157.7 μm line emission detected on ∼1-10 kpc scales in 60 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey. We find that most of the extra-nuclear emission show [C II]/FIR ratios ≥4 × 10{sup –3}, larger than the mean ratio seen in the nuclei, and similar to those found in the extended disks of normal star-forming galaxies and the diffuse interstellar medium of our Galaxy. The [C II] ''deficits'' found in the most luminous local LIRGs are therefore restricted to their nuclei. There is a trend for LIRGs with warmer nuclei to show larger differences between their nuclear and extra-nuclear [C II]/FIR ratios. We find an anti-correlation between [C II]/FIR and the luminosity surface density, Σ{sub IR}, for the extended emission in the spatially resolved galaxies. However, there is an offset between this trend and that found for the LIRG nuclei. We use this offset to derive a beam filling-factor for the star-forming regions within the LIRG disks of ∼6% relative to their nuclei. We confront the observed trend to photo-dissociation region models and find that the slope of the correlation is much shallower than the model predictions. Finally, we compare the correlation found between [C II]/FIR and Σ{sub IR} with measurements of high-redshift starbursting IR-luminous galaxies.

  8. J-Band Infrared Spectroscopy of a Sample of Brown Dwarfs Using NIRSPEC on Keck II.

    PubMed

    McLean; Wilcox; Becklin; Figer; Gilbert; Graham; Larkin; Levenson; Teplitz; Kirkpatrick

    2000-04-10

    Near-infrared spectroscopic observations of a sample of very cool, low-mass objects are presented with higher spectral resolution than in any previous studies. Six of the objects are L dwarfs, ranging in spectral class from L2 to L8/9, and the seventh is a methane or T dwarf. These new observations were obtained during commissioning of the near-infrared spectrometer (NIRSPEC), the first high-resolution near-infrared cryogenic spectrograph for the Keck II 10 m telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Spectra with a resolving power of R approximately 2500 from 1.135 to 1.360 µm (approximately J band) are presented for each source. At this resolution, a rich spectral structure is revealed, much of which is due to blending of unresolved molecular transitions. Strong lines due to neutral potassium (K i) and bands due to iron hydride (FeH) and steam (H2O) change significantly throughout the L sequence. Iron hydride disappears between L5 and L8, the steam bands deepen, and the K i lines gradually become weaker but wider because of pressure broadening. An unidentified feature occurs at 1.22 µm that has a temperature dependence like FeH but has no counterpart in the available FeH opacity data. Because these objects are 3-6 mag brighter in the near-infrared compared with the I band, spectral classification is efficient. One of the objects studied (2MASSW J1523+3014) is the coolest L dwarf discovered so far by the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), but its spectrum is still significantly different from the methane-dominated objects such as Gl 229B or SDSS 1624+0029. PMID:10727388

  9. Analysis of SO II point source emissions using NASA atmospheric infrared sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sylvia S.; Miller, David P.; Lewis, Paul E.

    2007-04-01

    Determining the extent to which large power plant emission sources interacting with atmospheric constituents affect the environment could play a significant role in future U.S. energy production policy. The effects on the environment caused by the interaction between power plant emissions and atmospheric constituents has not been investigated in depth due to the lack of calibrated spectral data on a suitable temporal and spatial scale. The availability of NASA's space-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data makes it possible to explore, and begin the first steps toward establishing, a correlation between known emission sources and environmental indicators. An exploratory study was conducted in which a time series of 26 cloud-free AIRS data containing two coal-fired power plants in northern New Mexico were selected, acquired, and analyzed for SO II emissions. A generic forward modeling process was also developed to derive an estimate of the expected AIRS pixel radiance containing the SO II emissions from the two power plants based on published combustion analysis data for coal and available power plant documentation. Analysis of the AIRS NEΔR calculated in this study and subsequent comparison with the radiance values for SO II calculated from the forward model provided essential information regarding the suitability and risk in the use of a modified AIRS configuration for monitoring anthropogenic point source emissions. The results of this study along with its conclusions and recommendations in conjunction with additional research collaboration in several specific topics will provide guidance for the development of the next generation infrared spectrometer system that NASA is considering building for environmental monitoring.

  10. Spectral Indices of Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Hansung B.; Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Yun, Min Su

    2015-01-01

    The significant improvement in bandwidth and the resultant sensitivity offered by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) allows us to explore the faint radio source population. Through the study of the radio continuum we can explore the spectral indices of these radio sources. Robust radio spectral indices are needed for accurate k-corrections, for example in the study of the radio - far-infrared (FIR) correlation. We present an analysis of measuring spectral indices using two different approaches. In the first, we use the standard wideband imaging algorithm in the data reduction package CASA. In the second, we use a traditional approach of imaging narrower bandwidths to derive the spectral indices. For these, we simulated data to match the observing parameter space of the CHILES Con Pol survey (Hales et al. 2014). We investigate the accuracy and precision of spectral index measurements as a function of signal-to noise, and explore the requirements to reliably probe possible evolution of the radio-FIR correlation in CHILES Con Pol.

  11. High resolution far-infrared observations of the evolved H II region M16

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, B.; Fazio, G.G.; Jaffe, D.T.

    1982-03-01

    M16 is an evolved, extremely density bounded H II region, which now consists only of a series of ionization fronts at molecular cloud boundaries. The source of ionization is the OB star cluster (NGC 6611) which is about 5 x 10/sup 6/ years old. We used the CFA/UA 102 cm balloon-borne telescope to map this region and detected three far-infrared (far-IR) sources embedded in an extended ridge of emission. Source I is an unresolved far-IR source embedded in a molecular cloud near a sharp ionization front. An H/sub 2/O maser is associated with this source, but no radio continuum emission has been observed. The other two far-IR sources (II and III) are associated with ionized gas-molecular cloud interfaces, with the far-IR radiation arising from dust at the boundary heated by the OB cluster. Source II is located at the southern prominent neutral intrusion with its associated bright rims and dark ''elephant trunk'' globules that delineate the current progress of the ionization front into the neutral material, and Source III arises at the interface of the northern molecular cloud fragment.

  12. The ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Harding E.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey ISO Satellite observations of over 600 IRAS sources have been obtained with the ISOCAM instrument. Because our survey strategy involved relatively short integrations, great care was required in developing analysis software including cosmic-ray and transient removal and calibration. These observations have now been through final pipeline processing at IPAC and ground-based follow-up is ongoing. The observations are for sources from two samples: a " Filler' sample selected to be at z greater than 0.1 and a fainter sample which selected for the highest redshift galaxies in the IRAS survey, with redshifts 0.2 less than z less than 1.0. I now have obtained ground-based follow-up spectrophotometry at Lick and Palomar observatories for 100 LFIRGs with 0.1 less than z less than 0.7. Our observations have confirmed that these systems are comparable to nearby LFIRGs such as Arp 220, with L (sub -)(fir) greater than 10(exp 11) L(sub -) sun and typically HII/Liner optical excitation. About 10% of the galaxies show true AGN (Sy2) excitation. Based on our work on a nearby complete sample of LFIRGS, we believe that the majority of these systems are luminous Starbursts, thus this project is tracing the luminous end of the galaxy star-forming luminosity function - the (infrared) star-formation history of the Universe to z approx. 1, a topic of some considerable recent interest. A by-product of these ISOCAM observations is approximately 1 square degree of deep 2 microns pointings outside the IRAS error boxes, allowing us an independent estimate of the mid-infrared log N - log S relation. Ground-based observations of this sample are continuing.

  13. Faint dwarfs in nearby groups

    SciTech Connect

    Speller, Ryan; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2014-06-20

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to Δm{sub r} ≡ (m{sub r,} {sub sat} – m{sub r,} {sub main}) ∼ 6-8, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead, we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down to Δm{sub r} = 12, 4 mag fainter than most recent studies. We detect an overdensity of objects at separations <400 kpc, corresponding to about 4.6 ± 0.5 satellites per central galaxy, consistent with the satellite abundance expected from the Local Group, given our selection function. Although the sample of satellites detected is incomplete by construction, since it excludes the least and most compact dwarfs, this detection provides a lower bound on the average satellite luminosity function, down to luminosities corresponding to the faintest ''classical'' dwarfs of the Local Group.

  14. The IRAS 1 Jy Sample of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-C.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Sanders, D. B.

    1998-12-01

    This is the second paper in a series discussing the properties of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs: LIR > 1012 L⊙ H0 = 75 km s-1 Mpc-1 and q0 = 0.0) from the 1 Jy sample of Kim. This paper presents the first results of a spectroscopic survey at optical wavelengths of a randomly selected subset of 45 ULIGs from Kim & Sanders. These new data are combined with previous data from Veilleux et al. to determine the spectral properties of luminous infrared galaxies (LIGs) with LIR ~ 1010.5-1013 L⊙. We find that the fraction of Seyfert galaxies among LIGs increases dramatically above LIR ~ 1012.3 L⊙--nearly one-half of the galaxies with LIR > 1012.3 L⊙ present Seyfert characteristics. Many of the optical properties of these Seyfert galaxies are consistent with the presence of genuine active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the cores of these objects. The continuum colors and strengths of the stellar Hβ and Mg I b features in and out of the nuclei of ULIGs indicate that star formation has recently (~107 yr) taken place in the nuclear and circumnuclear regions of many of these objects. As expected, photoionization by hot stars appears to be the dominant source of ionization in the objects with H II region-like spectra. Evidence is presented that the ionization source in infrared-selected galaxies with nuclear LINER-like spectra (38% of the ULIGs in our sample) is likely to be shocks or of stellar origins rather than AGNs. Shock ionization associated with starburst-driven outflows may also explain the LINER-like emission detected outside the nuclei of some galaxies. No significant differences are found between the mean color excess of ULIGs and that of IRAS galaxies of lower infrared luminosity. However, in contrast to what was found in low-luminosity infrared galaxies, the color excess in the nuclei of ULIGs does not seem to depend on spectral types. The reddening in ULIGs is generally observed to decrease with distance from the nucleus as in their low

  15. Far-infrared lines from H II regions: Abundance variations in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Rubin, Robert H.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    Far-infrared lines of (N III) (57 microns), (O III) (52, 88 microns), (Ne III) (36 microns), and (S III) (19, 33 microns) have been measured in the H II regions G1.13 - 0.11, W31B, G23.95 + 0.15, G25.38 - 0.18, G29.96 - 0.02, W43, W51e, S156, S158, NGC 3576, NGC 3603, and G298.22-0.34. These observations were made with the facility Cryogenic Grating Spectrometer on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory to examine variations in abundances throughout the Galaxy. Previously published observations of G0.095 + 0.012, G333.60 - 0.21, G45.13 + 0.14A, K3-50, and M17 are also discussed. The giant H II region 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) was observed for comparison. Fluxes for (Ne II) (12.8 microns), (S IV) (10.5 microns), and the radio free-free continuum were collected from the literature for those sources. Electron densities were estimated from FIR line-pair ratios, and ionic abundances were estimated from the FIR line and radio fluxes. The excitation was estimated from the O(2+)/S(2+) ratio. Corrections for unseen ionization stages were calculated with the use of constnat-density H II region models. The validity and range of applicability of such semiempirical ionization correction schemes are discussed. The abundances with respect to hydrogen exhibit gradients with R(sub G) comparable to those previously measured for our Galaxy and for other galaxies. The overall gradients are d (log N/H)/dR = -0.10 +/- 0.02 dex/kpc, d(log Ne/H)/dR = -0.08 +/- 0.02 dex/kpc and d(log S/H)/dR = 0.07 +/- 0.02 dex/kpc. Compared to the Orion Nebula, the intermediate R(sub G) H II regions with 6 is less than R(sub G) is less than 11 kpc have similar or lower S/H and N/O ratios. The N/O ratios in the inner Galaxy are more than twice those observed in the Orion Nebula and intermediate R(sub G) H II regions. In fact, all the abundance ratios are as well or better fitted by a step fit with two levels than by a linear gradient. As has been noted in previous studies, the N/O ratio

  16. The Near-Infrared Ca II Triplet-σ Relation for Bulges of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Peletier, Reynier F.; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Balcells, Marc

    2003-05-01

    We present measurements of the near-infrared Ca II triplet (CaT, CaT*), Paschen (PaT), and magnesium (Mg I) indices for a well-studied sample of 19 bulges of early to intermediate spiral galaxies. We find that both the CaT* and CaT indices decrease with central velocity dispersion σ with small scatter. This dependence is similar to that recently found by Cenarro for elliptical galaxies, implying a uniform CaT*-σ relation that applies to galaxies from ellipticals to intermediate-type spirals. The decrease of CaT and CaT* with σ contrasts with the well-known increase of another α-element index, Mg2, with σ. We discuss the role of Ca underabundance ([Ca/Fe]<0) and initial mass function variations in the onset of the observed relations.

  17. Strain-balanced Si/SiGe type-II superlattices for near-infrared photodetection

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K.

    2014-07-21

    Strain balanced silicon-silicon germanium type-II superlattice p-i-n photodetectors grown on a silicon germanium relaxed buffer layer are shown to exhibit an absorption band that extends beyond 0.7 eV (λ = 1.77 μm) with dark current densities of 27 μA cm{sup −2}. Simulations of the absorption edge, which are based on x-ray diffraction characterization, low observed dark current densities, and low dislocation densities, are consistent with fully strained heterostructures. Potential applications for devices made from this heterostructure design could include integrated silicon detectors, or low-noise absorption regions for infrared-extended silicon based avalanche photodiodes.

  18. Near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Part II: Copper and gold colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, S. M.; Katz, L. F.; Archibald, D. D.; Honigs, D. E.

    1989-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) on copper and gold metal colloids were obtained with a Fourier transform Raman spectrometer using a Nd:YAG laser (1.064 ..mu..m) for excitation. Enhanced spectra were observed for pyridine and 3-chloropyridine (CP) on copper colloids and for tris(orthophenanthroline)ruthenium(II), Ru(o-phen)/sup 2 +//sub 3/, on copper and gold colloids. The copper-colloid surface-enhanced Raman spectra of pyridine and CP were compared with spectra measured for these molecules on copper electrodes. NIR-SERS enhancements on the metal colloids were at least as large as for visible-wavelength excited SERS. Good-quality spectra of Ru(o-phen)/sup 2 +//sub 3/ were obtained at solution concentrations as low as 0.025 mM.

  19. Isotope effects in far-infrared spectra of bis(theophyllinato)copper(II)-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drożdżewski, Piotr; Kordon, Ewa

    1998-07-01

    Far-infrared spectra have been measured for 63Cu and 65Cu isotope substituted theophylline (Tp)-metal ion complexes: Cu(Tp) 2(NH 3) 2 · 2H 2O, Cu(Tp) 2(NH 3) 2, Cu(Tp) 2 · 2H 2O and Cu(Tp) 2. In addition, spectrum of Cu(Tp) 2(ND 3) 2 · 2D 2O has been recorded. Metal-theophylline, metal-ammine and water librational and translational modes have been assigned based on observed isotope shifts and complex dehydration effects. The copper-ammine vibrations have been found at 453 and 224 cm -1, whereas the bis(theophyllinato)copper(II) modes have been detected at 192 cm -1 for Cu(Tp) 2(NH 3) 2 and presumably at about 170 cm -1 for Cu(Tp) 2.

  20. Quantum efficiency investigations of type-II InAs/GaSb midwave infrared superlattice photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Giard, E. Ribet-Mohamed, I.; Jaeck, J.; Viale, T.; Haïdar, R.; Taalat, R.; Delmas, M.; Rodriguez, J.-B.; Christol, P.; Steveler, E.; Bardou, N.; Boulard, F.

    2014-07-28

    We present in this paper a comparison between different type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice (T2SL) photodiodes and focal plane array (FPA) in the mid-wavelength infrared domain to understand which phenomenon drives the performances of the T2SL structure in terms of quantum efficiency (QE). Our measurements on test photodiodes suggest low minority carrier diffusion length in the “InAs-rich” design, which penalizes carriers' collection in this structure for low bias voltage and front side illumination. This analysis is completed by a comparison of the experimental data with a fully analytic model, which allows to infer a hole diffusion length shorter than 100 nm. In addition, measurements on a FPA with backside illumination are finally presented. Results show an average QE in the 3–4.7 μm window equal to 42% for U{sub bias} = −0.1 V, 77 K operating temperature and no anti-reflection coating. These measurements, completed by modulation transfer function and noise measurements, reveal that the InAs-rich design, despite a low hole diffusion length, is promising for high performance infrared imaging applications.

  1. Quantum efficiency investigations of type-II InAs/GaSb midwave infrared superlattice photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giard, E.; Ribet-Mohamed, I.; Jaeck, J.; Viale, T.; Haïdar, R.; Taalat, R.; Delmas, M.; Rodriguez, J.-B.; Steveler, E.; Bardou, N.; Boulard, F.; Christol, P.

    2014-07-01

    We present in this paper a comparison between different type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice (T2SL) photodiodes and focal plane array (FPA) in the mid-wavelength infrared domain to understand which phenomenon drives the performances of the T2SL structure in terms of quantum efficiency (QE). Our measurements on test photodiodes suggest low minority carrier diffusion length in the "InAs-rich" design, which penalizes carriers' collection in this structure for low bias voltage and front side illumination. This analysis is completed by a comparison of the experimental data with a fully analytic model, which allows to infer a hole diffusion length shorter than 100 nm. In addition, measurements on a FPA with backside illumination are finally presented. Results show an average QE in the 3-4.7 μm window equal to 42% for Ubias = -0.1 V, 77 K operating temperature and no anti-reflection coating. These measurements, completed by modulation transfer function and noise measurements, reveal that the InAs-rich design, despite a low hole diffusion length, is promising for high performance infrared imaging applications.

  2. Optically pumped type-II mid-infrared tunable distributed feedback lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang

    Optically-pumped type-II mid-infrared index-coupled tunable distributed feed-back (DFB) semiconductor lasers have been developed to provide continuous-wave (CW) single longitudinal mode (SLM) operation with features including narrow spectral linewidth, high output power, good beam quality and wide continuous wavelength tunability for applications such as remote sensing or spectroscopy in the 3 to 5 microm midwave-infrared range of atmospheric transmission window. In the demonstration of this type of laser, a hyperbolically chirped grating was patterned using interferometric lithography (IL) with spherical wavefronts which was then transferred into the top clad of the slab waveguide epi-structure of the laser device. Wavelength tuning is achieved by translationally projecting pump stripe at different positions of this chirped grating on the laser device, thus different grating periods along the pump stripe at different pump positions select different lasing wavelengths. Primary results were acquired on one device of 4 mm in lateral dimension with continuously tuning range of about 80 nm centered at 3100 nm, single facet output power of 830 mW and typical spectral linewidth of 1.2 nm at 2.5xthreshold pumping. Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer was used as artificial target gas to demonstrate potential application of gas spectroscopy with this type of laser.

  3. Hole effective masses and subband splitting in type-II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2016-05-01

    We explore band structure effects to help determine the suitability of n-type type-II superlattice (T2SL) absorbers for infrared detectors. It is often assumed that the exceedingly large growth-direction band-edge curvature hole effective mass in n-type long wavelength infrared (LWIR) T2SL would lead to low hole mobility and therefore low detector collection quantum efficiency. We computed the thermally averaged conductivity effective mass and show that the LWIR T2SL hole conductivity effective mass along the growth direction can be orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding band-edge effective mass. LWIR InAs/GaSb T2SL can have significantly smaller growth-direction hole conductivity effective mass than its InAs/InAsSb counterpart. For the InAs/InAsSb T2SL, higher Sb fraction is more favorable for hole transport. Achieving long hole diffusion length becomes progressively more difficult for the InAs/InAsSb T2SL as the cutoff wavelength increases, since its growth-direction hole conductivity effective mass increases significantly with decreasing band gap. However, this is mitigated by the fact that the splitting between the top valence subbands also increases with the cutoff wavelength, leading to reduced inter-subband scattering and increased relaxation time.

  4. The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treyer, Marie A.; Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of the B- and K-band luminosity functions of galaxies is inferred in a relatively model-independent way from deep spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We confirm earlier evidence by Eales for an increase in the amplitude of the B-band galaxy luminosity function at modest redshift (z less than or approx. 0.2). We find in addition that the slope of the faint end of the luminosity function must systematically steepen and progress toward more luminous galaxies with increasing lookback time, assuming that the galaxy redshift distribution may be smoothly extrapolated 2 mag fainter than observed, as suggested by recent gravitational lensing studies. This evolution is shown to be color-dependent, and we predict the near-infrared color distribution of faint galaxies. The luminosity function of blue (B - K less than or approx. 4) galaxies in the range 0.2 less than or approx. z less than or approx. 1 can be represented by a Schechter function with characteristic light density phi(sup *) L(sup *) comparable to that of present-day late-type galaxies, but with a steeper faint end slope alpha approx. 1.4.

  5. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  6. 450 d of Type II SN 2013ej in optical and near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Jerkstrand, A.; Valenti, S.; Sollerman, J.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Pastorello, A.; Schulze, S.; Chen, T.-W.; Childress, M. J.; Fraser, M.; Fremling, C.; Kotak, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Schmidt, B. P.; Smartt, S. J.; Taddia, F.; Terreran, G.; Tucker, B. E.; Barbarino, C.; Benetti, S.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Gal-Yam, A.; Howell, D. A.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Lee, M. Y.; Li, K. L.; Maguire, K.; Margheim, S.; Mehner, A.; Ochner, P.; Sullivan, M.; Tomasella, L.; Young, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    We present optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2013ej, in galaxy M74, from 1 to 450 d after the explosion. SN 2013ej is a hydrogen-rich supernova, classified as a Type IIL due to its relatively fast decline following the initial peak. It has a relatively high peak luminosity (absolute magnitude MV = -17.6) but a small 56Ni production of ˜0.023 M⊙. Its photospheric evolution is similar to other Type II SNe, with shallow absorption in the Hα profile typical for a Type IIL. During transition to the radioactive decay tail at ˜100 d, we find the SN to grow bluer in B - V colour, in contrast to some other Type II supernovae. At late times, the bolometric light curve declined faster than expected from 56Co decay and we observed unusually broad and asymmetric nebular emission lines. Based on comparison of nebular emission lines most sensitive to the progenitor core mass, we find our observations are best matched to synthesized spectral models with a MZAMS = 12-15 M⊙ progenitor. The derived mass range is similar to but not higher than the mass estimated for Type IIP progenitors. This is against the idea that Type IIL are from more massive stars. Observations are consistent with the SN having a progenitor with a relatively low-mass envelope.

  7. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

  8. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cotton, W. D.; Chandler, C.; Churchwell, E. B.; Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T.; Dougherty, S. M.; Fender, R. P.; Gledhill, T. M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Hindson, L.; Jackson, J. M.; Kurtz, S. E.; Marti, J. [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  9. THE SPATIAL EXTENT OF (U)LIRGS IN THE MID-INFRARED. II. FEATURE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    DIaz-Santos, T.; Charmandaris, V.; Armus, L.; Stierwalt, S.; Haan, S.; Howell, J. H.; Petric, A. O.; Surace, J. A.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Veilleux, S.; Murphy, E. J.; Appleton, P.; Evans, A. S.; Sanders, D. B.

    2011-11-01

    We present results from the second part of our analysis of the extended mid-infrared (MIR) emission of the GOALS sample based on 5-14 {mu}m low-resolution spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer. We calculate the fraction of extended emission (FEE) as a function of wavelength for all galaxies in the sample, FEE{sub {lambda}}, defined as the fraction of the emission that originates outside of the unresolved central component of a source, and spatially separate the MIR spectrum of a galaxy into its nuclear and extended components. We find that the [Ne II]12.81 {mu}m emission line is as compact as the hot dust MIR continuum, while the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission is more extended. In addition, the 6.2 and 7.7 {mu}m PAH emission is more compact than that of the 11.3 {mu}m PAH, which is consistent with the formers being enhanced in a more ionized medium. The presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) or a powerful nuclear starburst increases the compactness and the luminosity surface density of the hot dust MIR continuum, but has a negligible effect on the spatial extent of the PAH emission on kpc-scales. Furthermore, it appears that both processes, AGN and/or nuclear starburst, are indistinguishable in terms of how they modify the integrated PAH-to-continuum ratio of the FEE in (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs). Globally, the 5-14 {mu}m spectra of the extended emission component are homogeneous for all galaxies in the GOALS sample. This suggests that, independently of the spatial distribution of the various MIR features, the physical properties of star formation occurring at distances farther than 1.5 kpc from the nuclei of (U)LIRGs are very similar, resembling local star-forming galaxies with L{sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}, as well as star-formation-dominated ULIRGs at z {approx} 2. In contrast, the MIR spectra of the nuclear component of local ULIRGs and LIRGs are very diverse. These results imply that the observed

  10. Observational studies on the near-infrared unidentified emission bands in galactic H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Tamami I.; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Bell, Aaron C.; Ishihara, Daisuke; Shimonishi, Takashi

    2014-03-20

    Using a large collection of near-infrared spectra (2.5-5.4 μm) of Galactic H II regions and H II region-like objects, we perform a systematic investigation of astronomical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. Thirty-six objects were observed using the infrared camera on board the AKARI satellite as a part of a director's time program. In addition to the well known 3.3-3.6 μm features, most spectra show a relatively weak emission feature at 5.22 μm with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, which we identify as the PAH 5.25 μm band (previously reported). By careful analysis, we find good correlations between the 5.25 μm band and both the aromatic hydrocarbon feature at 3.3 μm and the aliphatic hydrocarbon features at around 3.4-3.6 μm. The present results give us convincing evidence that the astronomical 5.25 μm band is associated with C-H vibrations, as suggested by previous studies, and show its potential to probe the PAH size distribution. The analysis also shows that the aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio of I {sub 3.4-3.6} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm} decreases against the ratio of the 3.7 μm continuum intensity to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub cont,} {sub 3.7} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}, which is an indicator of the ionization fraction of PAHs. The midinfrared color of I {sub 9} {sub μm}/I {sub 18} {sub μm} also declines steeply against the ratio of the hydrogen recombination line Brα at 4.05 μm to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub Brα}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}. These facts indicate possible dust processing inside or at the boundary of ionized gas.

  11. Observational Studies on the Near-infrared Unidentified Emission Bands in Galactic H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Tamami I.; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ishihara, Daisuke; Shimonishi, Takashi; Ohsawa, Ryou; Bell, Aaron C.

    2014-03-01

    Using a large collection of near-infrared spectra (2.5-5.4 μm) of Galactic H II regions and H II region-like objects, we perform a systematic investigation of astronomical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. Thirty-six objects were observed using the infrared camera on board the AKARI satellite as a part of a director's time program. In addition to the well known 3.3-3.6 μm features, most spectra show a relatively weak emission feature at 5.22 μm with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, which we identify as the PAH 5.25 μm band (previously reported). By careful analysis, we find good correlations between the 5.25 μm band and both the aromatic hydrocarbon feature at 3.3 μm and the aliphatic hydrocarbon features at around 3.4-3.6 μm. The present results give us convincing evidence that the astronomical 5.25 μm band is associated with C-H vibrations, as suggested by previous studies, and show its potential to probe the PAH size distribution. The analysis also shows that the aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio of I 3.4-3.6 μm/I 3.3 μm decreases against the ratio of the 3.7 μm continuum intensity to the 3.3 μm band, I cont, 3.7 μm/I 3.3 μm, which is an indicator of the ionization fraction of PAHs. The midinfrared color of I 9 μm/I 18 μm also declines steeply against the ratio of the hydrogen recombination line Brα at 4.05 μm to the 3.3 μm band, I Brα/I 3.3 μm. These facts indicate possible dust processing inside or at the boundary of ionized gas.

  12. Big Fish, Little Fish: Two New Ultra-faint Satellites of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokurov, V.; Walker, M. G.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Irwin, M. J.; Just, D.; Koposov, S.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E.; Watkins, L.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    2010-03-01

    We report the discovery of two new Milky Way satellites in the neighboring constellations of Pisces and Pegasus identified in data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Pisces II, an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy lies at the distance of ~180 kpc, some 15° away from the recently detected Pisces I. Segue 3, an ultra-faint star cluster lies at the distance of 16 kpc. We use deep follow-up imaging obtained with the 4-m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory to derive their structural parameters. Pisces II has a half-light radius of ~60 pc, while Segue 3 is 20 times smaller at only 3 pc.

  13. A single prolific r-process event preserved in an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Alexander; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh; Simon, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    The heaviest elements in the periodic table are synthesized through the r-process, but the astrophysical site for r-process nucleosynthesis is still unknown. Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies contain a simple fossil record of early chemical enrichment that may determine this site. Previous measurements found very low levels of neutron-capture elements in ultra-faint dwarfs, preferring supernovae as the r-process site. I present high-resolution chemical abundances of nine stars in the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf Reticulum II, which display extremely enhanced r-process abundances 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than the other ultra-faint dwarfs. Stars with such extreme r-process enhancements are only rarely found in the Milky Way halo. The r-process abundances imply that the neutron-capture material in Reticulum II was synthesized in a single prolific event that is incompatible with r-process yields from ordinary core-collapse supernovae. Reticulum II provides an opportunity to discriminate whether the source of this pure r-process signature is a neutron star merger or magnetorotationally driven supernova. The single event is also a uniquely stringent constraint on the metal mixing and star formation history of this ultra-faint dwarf galaxy.

  14. Dark current measurement of Type-II superlattice infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Michito; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Murooka, Junpei; Kimata, Masafumi; Iguchi, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-01

    We report the result of a dark current measurement of a Type-II superlattice (T2SL) infrared focal plane array (FPA), which consists of a 6 μm cutoff T2SL detector array and the readout integration circuit (ROIC) ISC0903 of FLIR Systems. In order to measure the dark current of the FPA, we obtained images with different exposure times in a fully closed cold shield of 77 K. Using the temporal change rate of the output and considering the charge conversion efficiency of the ROIC, we obtained a dark current density with an average value of 4 × 10-5 A/cm2 at a bias of -100 mV. We also compare the result of the FPA dark current measurement with that of a test element group (TEG), which was a single pixel detector, fabricated by the same process as the FPA. The dark current density of the TEG was 3 × 10-6 A/cm2 at a bias of -100 mV, lower than that of the FPA. We discuss the discrepancy between the dark current densities of the FPA and the TEG.

  15. A high resolution far-infrared survey of a section of the galactic plane. II - Far-infrared, CO, and radio continuum results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, M. T.; Fazio, G. G.; Roberge, W. G.; Thum, C.; Wilson, T. L.; Jaffe, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    An area of 7.5 sq deg of the galactic plane at 70 microns have been surveyed with a 1-arcmin beam. The region lies between lII equals 10 deg and lII equals 16 deg and includes the M17 and W33 complexes. The weakest of the 42 sources detected had a flux density of 350 Jy at 70 microns. Detailed far-infrared, (C-12)O, (C-13)O, and radio continuum observations of the sources are presented. The derivation of the important physical parameters of the sources and their surrounding molecular clouds are discussed. The properties of the individual regions are also discussed and maps of selected sources are presented.

  16. High resolution far-infrared survey of a section of the galactic plane. II. Far-infrared, CO, and radio continuum results

    SciTech Connect

    Stier, M.T.; Jaffe, D.T.; Fazio, G.G.; Roberge, W.G.; Thum, C.; Wilson, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    We have surveyed 7.5 deg/sup 2/ of the galactic plane at 70 ..mu..m with a approx.1' beam (Jaffe, Stier, and Fazio). The region lies between l/sup i/I = 10/sup 0/ and l/sup i/I = 16/sup 0/ and includes the M17 and W33 complexes. The weakest of the 42 sources detected had a flux density of 350 Jy at 70 ..mu..m. We present detailed far-infrared, /sup 12/CO, /sup 13/CO, and radio continuum observations of these sources. We discuss the derivation of the important physical parameters of the sources and their surrounding molecular clouds. We also discuss the properties of the individual regions and present maps of selected sources.

  17. High angular resolution far-infrared and submillimeter mapping survey of the dust cores associated with ultracompact H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective of the research funded under this grant has been to perform a high angular resolution mapping survey of the far-infrared and submillimeter continuum emission from the dust cocoons surrounding young, deeply embedded massive stars and the ultracompact H II regions they create. The high infrared, submillimeter, and radio luminosity makes the ultracompact H II regions ideal tracers of current high-mass star formation. Detailed investigations of their structure, evolution, and interaction with their parent molecular clouds are thus important for understanding the early evolutionary phases of massive main sequence stars, the nature of the dense molecular cores in which they form, and the relationship to coeval low-mass star formation.

  18. Synthetic hydroxyapatites doped with Zn(II) studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared, Raman and thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-López, José R.; Echeverría, Gustavo A.; Güida, Jorge A.; Viña, Raúl; Punte, Graciela

    2015-06-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHap) formation when different amounts of Zn(II) are present in the mother solution has been investigated by atomic absorption, infrared and Raman spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis (DTA and TG). The studied samples have been synthesized at T=95 °C and pH 9 in air. The analysis of the results have shown that the pure CaHap sample crystallizes in the monoclinic form P21/b. Concentrations up to 20% of Zn(II) in the mother solution, equivalent to smaller concentrations in solid (up to 9.1% in wt), favor the formation of the hexagonal apatite, P63/m, while Zn(II) concentrations higher than 20% in solution help an amorphous phase development where vibrational spectra indicated coexistence of two phases: an apatite and ZnNH4PO4·H2O. Infrared data of thermal treated samples endorse that HPO42- ion had not been incorporated in Zn(II) doped samples during the synthesis process. Present results also allow to conclude that Zn(II) cation exhibits a preference to occupy the Ca2 site of the apatite structure and induces water adsorption and a small quantity of CO32- cation incorporation, leading to formation of a less crystalline Ca deficient apatite.

  19. High-pressure infrared and Raman studies of polymorphism in pharmaceutical compounds: Spironolactone, Forms I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisegna, Gisia L.; Gilson, Denis F. R.; Butler, Ian S.

    2014-12-01

    The infrared and Raman spectra of the two polymorphic forms, I and II, of the synthetic steroid spironolactone (C24H32O4S) have been examined under high pressures up to about 50 kbar with the aid of a diamond-anvil cell. While the differences in peak wavenumbers between the two polymorphs are small, the difference in the pressure dependence is dramatic. Both forms undergo structural transformations under pressure, but over different pressure ranges.

  20. Differentiation of group I and group II strains of Clostridium botulinum by focal plane array Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Jonah; Ghetler, Andrew; Sedman, Jacqueline; Leclair, Daniel; Pagotto, Franco; Austin, John W; Ismail, Ashraf A

    2006-10-01

    A method was developed for whole-organism fingerprinting of Clostridium botulinum isolates by focal plane array Fourier transform infrared (FPA-FTIR) spectroscopy. A database of 150,000 infrared spectra of 44 strains of C. botulinum was acquired using a FPA-FTIR imaging spectrometer equipped with a 16 x 16 array detector to evaluate the ability of FTIR spectroscopy to differentiate the 44 strains. The database contained strains from C. botulinum groups I and II producing botulinum neurotoxin of serotypes A, B, E, and F. All strains were grown on each of three agar media (brain heart infusion, McClung Toabe agar base, and universal) prior to spectral acquisition. Given the dependence of the infrared spectra of microorganisms on the composition of the growth medium, the spectra were initially separated into three subsets corresponding to the three growth media employed. However, the replicate spectra of all strains, regardless of growth medium, were properly clustered by hierarchical cluster analysis based on differences in their infrared spectral profiles in three narrow spectral regions (1,428 to 1,412, 1,296 to 1,284, and 1,112 to 1,100 cm(-1)). The dendrogram generated from the FTIR data revealed complete separation between group I and group II strains. The spectral differences between group I and group II strains allowed accurate classification of C. botulinum strains at the group level in two blind validation studies (n = 40). These results demonstrate that FPA-FTIR spectroscopy has the potential for rapid discrimination of group I and group II C. botulinum strains in less than 3 min per sample. PMID:17066916

  1. On the clustering of faint red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haojie; Zheng, Zheng; Guo, Hong; Zhu, Ju; Zehavi, Idit

    2016-08-01

    Faint red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey show a puzzling clustering pattern in previous measurements. In the two-point correlation function (2PCF), they appear to be strongly clustered on small scales, indicating a tendency to reside in massive haloes as satellite galaxies. However, their weak clustering on large scales suggests that they are more likely to be found in low-mass haloes. The interpretation of the clustering pattern suffers from the large sample variance in the 2PCF measurements, given the small volume of the volume-limited sample of such faint galaxies. We present improved clustering measurements of faint galaxies by making a full use of a flux-limited sample to obtain volume-limited measurements with an increased effective volume. In the improved 2PCF measurements, the fractional uncertainties on large scales drop by more than 40 per cent, and the strong contrast between small-scale and large-scale clustering amplitudes seen in previous work is no longer prominent. From halo occupation distribution modelling of the measurements, we find that a considerable fraction of faint red galaxies to be satellites in massive haloes, a scenario supported by the strong covariance of small-scale 2PCF measurements and the relative spatial distribution of faint red galaxies and luminous galaxies. However, the satellite fraction is found to be degenerate with the slope of the distribution profile of satellites in inner haloes. We compare the modelling results with semi-analytic model predictions and discuss the implications.

  2. VO II-based microbolometer uncooled infrared focal plane arrays with CMOS readout integrated circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiqu; Yi, Xinjian

    2005-11-01

    Thin films of vanadium dioxide (VO II) were selected for microbolometers. The thin films were fabricated with a novel method mainly including ion-sputtering and annealing. It is found that the electrical properties of these thin films can be controlled by adjusting the time of ion-sputtering and annealing. A standard microbolometer pixel structure of micro-bridge has been applied. Two-dimensional arrays of microbolometers have been fabricated on silicon integrated circuit wafers using a surface micromachining technique. A new type of on-chip readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for 32×32 pixel bolometric detector arrays has been designed and fabricated using a 1.5μm double metal poly complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processing. The readout circuit consists of three stages, which provides low noise, a highly stable detector bias, high photon current injection efficiency, high gain, and high speed. Several prototypes of 32×32 pixel bolometric detector arrays have been designed and fabricated. These arrays consist of detectors with lateral dimensions of 50μm 50μm, and each bolometric detector is on a 100μm pitch. The results of measurement show that the fabricated uncooled infrared focal plane arrays (UIRFPAs) have excellent performance. The frame rate is 50Hz, the pixel operability is above 96%, the responsivity (R) @ f/1 value is up to 15000V/W, the noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) @ f/1 and 30Hz is about 50mK, and the average power dissipation is only 24.7mW. The results indicate that the technology of fabricating these 32×32 UIRFPAs has potential to be utilized for fabricating low cost and large-scale UIRFPAs.

  3. Upconverting Nanoparticles Prompt Remote Near-Infrared Photoactivation of Ru(II)-Arene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Emmanuel; Garino, Claudio; Mareque-Rivas, Juan C; Habtemariam, Abraha; Salassa, Luca

    2016-02-18

    The synthesis and full characterisation (including X-ray diffraction studies and DFT calculations) of two new piano-stool Ru(II) -arene complexes, namely [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpy)(m-CCH-Py)][(PF)6]2 (1) and [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpm)(m-CCH-Py)][(PF)6]2 (2; p-cym=p-cymene, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, bpm=2,2'-bipyrimidine, and m-CCH-Py=3-ethynylpyridine), is described and discussed. The reaction of the m-CCH-Py ligand of 1 and 2 with diethyl-3-azidopropyl phosphonate by Cu-catalysed click chemistry affords [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpy)(P-Trz-Py)][(PF)6]2 (3) and [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpm)(P-Trz-Py)][(PF)6]2 (4; P-Trz-Py=[3-(1-pyridin-3-yl-[1,2,3]triazol-4-yl)-propyl]phosphonic acid diethyl ester). Upon light excitation at λ=395 nm, complexes 1-4 photodissociate the monodentate pyridyl ligand and form the aqua adduct ions [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpy)(H2O)](2+) and [(η(6) -p-cym)Ru(bpm)(H2O)](2+). Thulium -doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) are functionalised with 4, thus exploiting their surface affinity for the phosphonate group in the complex. The so-obtained nanosystem UCNP@4 undergoes near-infrared (NIR) photoactivation at λ=980 nm, thus producing the corresponding reactive aqua species that binds the DNA-model base guanosine 5'-monophosphate. PMID:26785101

  4. Mid-infrared Properties of Luminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Probing the Dust and Gas Physics of the GOALS Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stierwalt, S.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Marshall, J.; Evans, A. S.; Haan, S.; Howell, J.; Iwasawa, K.; Kim, D. C.; Murphy, E. J.; Rich, J. A.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Inami, H.; Petric, A. O.; U, V.

    2014-08-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is a comprehensive, multiwavelength study of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe. Here, we present the results of a multi-component, spectral decomposition analysis of the low-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra from 5-38 μm of 244 LIRG nuclei. The detailed fits and high-quality spectra allow for characterization of the individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features, warm molecular hydrogen emission, and optical depths for both silicate dust grains and water ices. We find that starbursting LIRGs, which make up the majority of the GOALS sample, are very consistent in their MIR properties (i.e., τ9.7 μm, τice, neon line ratios, and PAH feature ratios). However, as their EQW6.2 μm decreases, usually an indicator of an increasingly dominant active galactic nucleus (AGN), LIRGs cover a larger spread in these MIR parameters. The contribution from PAH emission to the total IR luminosity (L(PAH)/L(IR)) in LIRGs varies from 2%-29% and LIRGs prior to their first encounter show significantly higher L(PAH)/L(IR) ratios on average. We observe a correlation between the strength of the starburst (represented by IR8 = L IR/L 8 μm) and the PAH fraction at 8 μm but no obvious link between IR8 and the 7.7 to 11.3 PAH ratio, suggesting that the fractional photodissociation region (PDR) emission, and not the overall grain properties, is associated with the rise in IR8 for galaxies off the starburst main sequence. We detect crystalline silicate features in ~6% of the sample but only in the most obscure sources (s 9.7 μm < -1.24). Ice absorption features are observed in ~11% (56%) of GOALS LIRGs (ULIRGs) in sources with a range of silicate depths. Most GOALS LIRGs have L(H2)/L(PAH) ratios elevated above those observed for normal star-forming galaxies and exhibit a trend for increasing L(H2)/L(PAH) ratio with increasing L(H2). While star formation appears to be the

  5. Mid-infrared properties of luminous infrared galaxies. II. Probing the dust and gas physics of the goals sample

    SciTech Connect

    Stierwalt, S.; Armus, L.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Marshall, J.; Haan, S.; Howell, J.; Murphy, E. J.; Inami, H.; Petric, A. O.; Charmandaris, V.; Evans, A. S.; Iwasawa, K.; Kim, D. C.; Rich, J. A.; Spoon, H. W. W.; U, V.

    2014-08-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is a comprehensive, multiwavelength study of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe. Here, we present the results of a multi-component, spectral decomposition analysis of the low-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra from 5-38 μm of 244 LIRG nuclei. The detailed fits and high-quality spectra allow for characterization of the individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features, warm molecular hydrogen emission, and optical depths for both silicate dust grains and water ices. We find that starbursting LIRGs, which make up the majority of the GOALS sample, are very consistent in their MIR properties (i.e., τ{sub 9.7μm}, τ{sub ice}, neon line ratios, and PAH feature ratios). However, as their EQW{sub 6.2{sub μm}} decreases, usually an indicator of an increasingly dominant active galactic nucleus (AGN), LIRGs cover a larger spread in these MIR parameters. The contribution from PAH emission to the total IR luminosity (L(PAH)/L(IR)) in LIRGs varies from 2%-29% and LIRGs prior to their first encounter show significantly higher L(PAH)/L(IR) ratios on average. We observe a correlation between the strength of the starburst (represented by IR8 = L{sub IR}/L{sub 8{sub μm}}) and the PAH fraction at 8 μm but no obvious link between IR8 and the 7.7 to 11.3 PAH ratio, suggesting that the fractional photodissociation region (PDR) emission, and not the overall grain properties, is associated with the rise in IR8 for galaxies off the starburst main sequence. We detect crystalline silicate features in ∼6% of the sample but only in the most obscure sources (s{sub 9.7{sub μm}} < –1.24). Ice absorption features are observed in ∼11% (56%) of GOALS LIRGs (ULIRGs) in sources with a range of silicate depths. Most GOALS LIRGs have L(H{sub 2})/L(PAH) ratios elevated above those observed for normal star-forming galaxies and exhibit a trend for increasing L(H{sub 2})/L

  6. Direct Imaging of Faint Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudi, Riccardo

    The exoplanets around stars in the solar neighborhood are expected to be bright enough for us to characterize them with direct imaging; however, they are much fainter than their parent stars, and separated by very small angles, so conventional imaging techniques are totally inadequate, and new methods are needed. The direct imaging of exoplanets is extremely challenging. Jupiter is 109 times fainter than our Sun in reflected visible light. A direct imaging instrument for exoplanets must suppress (1) the bright star image and diffraction pattern and (2) the stellar scattered light from imperfections in the telescope. The main goal of high-contrast imaging is primarily to discover and characterize extrasolar planetary systems. High-contrast observations, in optical and infrared astronomy, are defined as any observation requiring a technique to reveal a low mass companion that is so close to the primary, brighter by a factor of at least 105, that optical effects hinder or prevent the collection of photons directly from the target of observation. To overcome this, astronomers combined large telescopes (to reduce the impact of diffraction), adaptive optics (to correct for phase errors induced by atmospheric turbulence), and sophisticated image processing.

  7. Mid-infrared Extinction Mapping of Infrared Dark Clouds. II. The Structure of Massive Starless Cores and Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2012-07-01

    We develop the mid-infrared extinction (MIREX) mapping technique of Butler & Tan (Paper I), presenting a new method to correct for the Galactic foreground emission based on observed saturation in independent cores. Using Spitzer GLIMPSE 8 μm images, this allows us to accurately probe mass surface densities, Σ, up to ~= 0.5 g cm-2 with 2'' resolution and mitigate one of the main sources of uncertainty associated with Galactic MIREX mapping. We then characterize the structure of 42 massive starless and early-stage cores and their surrounding clumps, selected from 10 infrared dark clouds, measuring Σcl(r) from the core/clump centers. We first assess the properties of the core/clump at a scale where the total enclosed mass as projected on the sky is M cl = 60 M ⊙. We find that these objects have a mean radius of R cl ~= 0.1 pc, mean \\bar{\\Sigma }_cl = 0.3\\:g\\:cm^{-2} and, if fitted by a power-law (PL) density profile \\rho _cl\\propto r^{-k_\\rho ,cl}, a mean value of k ρ, cl = 1.1. If we assume a core is embedded in each clump and subtract the surrounding clump envelope to derive the core properties, then we find a mean core density PL index of k ρ, c = 1.6. We repeat this analysis as a function of radius and derive the best-fitting PL plus uniform clump envelope model for each of the 42 core/clumps. The cores have typical masses of Mc ~ 100 M ⊙ and \\bar{\\Sigma }_c\\sim 0.1\\:g\\:cm^{-2}, and are embedded in clumps with comparable mass surface densities. We also consider Bonnor-Ebert density models, but these do not fit the observed Σ profiles as well as PLs. We conclude that massive starless cores exist and are well described by singular polytropic spheres. Their relatively low values of Σ and the fact that they are IR dark may imply that their fragmentation is inhibited by magnetic fields rather than radiative heating. Comparing to massive star-forming cores and clumps, there is tentative evidence for an evolution toward higher densities and steeper

  8. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic characterization and optimization of Pb(II) biosorption by fish (Labeo rohita) scales.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Raziya; Ansari, Tariq Mahmood; Khalid, Ahmad Mukhtar

    2008-08-15

    The present study reports the use of locally available fish (Labeo rohita) scales for Pb(II) removal from aqueous solutions under different experimental conditions. Maximum Pb(II) adsorption (196.8 mg g(-1)) occurred at pH 3.5. Pb(II) sorption was found to be pH, dose, initial metal concentration, contact time and shaking speed dependent while particle size and temperature independent. Experimental data of Pb(II) biosorption onto fish scales fitted well to Freundlich isotherm model in comparison to the model of Langmuir. The fast adsorption process in first 30 min followed by subsequent slow adsorption rate was suitably described by pseudo-second order model. In addition, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of physical and chemical pretreatments on surface properties of fish scales by the application of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopic analysis. Physical pretreatments resulted in partial degradation of some functional groups. Alkaline pretreatments of fish scales did not have any significant influence on the nature of functional groups responsible for Pb(II) uptake, while acidic pretreatments resulted in degeneration of the most of functional groups on biosorbent cell wall. FTIR analysis confirmed the involvement of amino, carboxylic, phosphate and carbonyl groups in Pb(II) biosorption by fish scales. PMID:18242826

  9. Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice LEDs: Applications for infrared scene projector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Dennis Thomas, Jr.

    Optoelectronic devices operating in the mid-wave (3-5 mum) and long-wave (8-12 mum) infrared (IR) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum are of a great interest for academic and industrial applications. Due to the lack of atmospheric absorption, devices operating within these spectral bands are particularly useful for spectroscopy, imaging, and dynamic scene projection. Advanced IR imaging systems have created an intense need for laboratory-based infrared scene projector (IRSP) systems which can be used for accurate simulation of real-world phenomena occurring in the IR. These IRSP systems allow for reliable, reproducible, safe, and cost-effective calibration of IR detector arrays. The current state-of-the-art technology utilized for the emitter source of IRSP systems is thermal pixel arrays (TPAs) which are based on thin film resistor technology. Thermal pixel array technology has fundamental limitations related to response time and maximum simulated apparent temperature, making them unsuitable for emulation of very hot (> 700 K) and rapidly evolving scenes. Additionally, there exists a need for dual wavelength emitter arrays for IRSP systems dedicated to calibration of dual wavelength detector arrays. This need is currently met by combining the spectral output from two separate IRSP systems. This configuration requires precise alignment of the output from both systems and results in the maximum radiance being limited to approximately half that of the capability of a given emitter array due to the optics used to combine the outputs. The high switching speed inherent to IR light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and the potential for high power output makes them an appealing candidate to replace the thermal pixel arrays used for IRSP systems. To this end, research has been carried out to develop and improve the device performance of IR LEDs based on InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices (T2SLs). A common method employed to achieve high brightness from LEDs is to incorporate

  10. Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2014-06-20

    We propose a new approach to discovering faint microlensing signals below traditional thresholds, and for estimating the binary-lens mass ratio and the apparent separation from such signals. The events found will be helpful in accurately estimating the true distribution of planetary semimajor axes, which is an important goal of space microlensing surveys.

  11. A spectral atlas of H II galaxies in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Lucimara P.; Rodríguez-Ardila, Alberto; Diniz, Suzi; Gruenwald, Ruth; de Souza, Ronaldo

    2013-05-01

    Recent models show that thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branches (TP-AGB) stars should dominate the near-infrared (NIR) spectra of populations 0.3-2 Gyr old, leaving unique signatures that can be used to detect young/intermediate stellar population in galaxies. However, no homogeneous data base of star-forming galaxies is available in the NIR to fully explore and apply these results. With this in mind, we study the NIR spectra of a sample of 23 H II and starburst galaxies, aimed at characterizing the most prominent spectral features (emission and absorption) and continuum shape in the 0.8-2.4 μm region of these objects. Five normal galaxies are also observed as a control sample. Spectral indices are derived for the relevant absorption lines/bands and a comparison with optical indices of the same sample of galaxies available in the literature is made. We found no correlation between the optical and the NIR indices. This is probably due to the differences in aperture between these two sets of data. That result is further supported by the absence or weakness of emission lines in the NIR for a subsample of galaxies, while in the optical the emission lines are strong and clear, which means that the ionization source in many of these galaxies is not nuclear, but circumnuclear or located in hotspots outside the nucleus. We detected important signatures predicted for a stellar population dominated by the TP-AGB, like CN 1.1 μm and CO 2.3 μm. In at least one galaxy (NGC 4102), the CN band at 1.4 μm was detected for the first time. We also detect TiO and ZrO bands in the region 0.8-1 μm that have never been reported before in extragalactic sources. The shape of the continuum emission is found to be strongly correlated to the presence/lack of emission lines. An observational template for the star-forming galaxies is derived to be used as a benchmark of stellar population(s) in starburst galaxies against which to compare NIR spectroscopy of different types of galaxies

  12. Broad [C II] Line Wings as Tracer of Molecular and Multi-phase Outflows in Infrared Bright Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, A. W.; Christopher, N.; Sturm, E.; Veilleux, S.; Contursi, A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Fischer, J.; Davies, R.; Verma, A.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Sternberg, A.; Tacconi, L.; Burtscher, L.; Poglitsch, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report a tentative correlation between the outflow characteristics derived from OH absorption at 119 μm and [C ii] emission at 158 μm in a sample of 22 local and bright ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). For this sample, we investigate whether [C ii] broad wings are a good tracer of molecular outflows, and how the two tracers are connected. Fourteen objects in our sample have a broad wing component as traced by [C ii], and all of these also show OH119 absorption indicative of an outflow (in one case an inflow). The other eight cases, where no broad [C ii] component was found, are predominantly objects with no OH outflow or a low-velocity (≤100 km s‑1) OH outflow. The FWHM of the broad [C ii] component shows a trend with the OH119 blueshifted velocity, although with significant scatter. Moreover, and despite large uncertainties, the outflow masses derived from OH and broad [C ii] show a 1:1 relation. The main conclusion is therefore that broad [C ii] wings can be used to trace molecular outflows. This may be particularly relevant at high redshift, where the usual tracers of molecular gas (like low-J CO lines) become hard to observe. Additionally, observations of blueshifted Na i D λλ 5890, 5896 absorption are available for 10 of our sources. Outflow velocities of Na i D show a trend with OH velocity and broad [C ii] FWHM. These observations suggest that the atomic and molecular gas phases of the outflow are connected.

  13. Auger recombination in long-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, B. V.; Grein, C. H.; Kim, J. K.; Kadlec, E. A.; Klem, J. F.; Hawkins, S. D.; Shaner, E. A.

    2015-12-29

    The Auger lifetime is a critical intrinsic parameter for infrared photodetectors as it determines the longest potential minority carrier lifetime and consequently the fundamental limitations to their performance. Here, Auger recombination is characterized in a long-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattice. Auger coefficients as small as 7.1×10–26 cm6/s are experimentally measured using carrier lifetime data at temperatures in the range of 20 K–80 K. The data are compared to Auger-1 coefficients predicted using a 14-band K•p electronic structure model and to coefficients calculated for HgCdTe of the same bandgap. In conclusion, the experimental superlattice Auger coefficients are found to be an order-of-magnitude smaller than HgCdTe.

  14. Auger recombination in long-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, B. V.; Grein, C. H.; Kim, J. K.; Kadlec, E. A.; Klem, J. F.; Hawkins, S. D.; Shaner, E. A.

    2015-12-29

    The Auger lifetime is a critical intrinsic parameter for infrared photodetectors as it determines the longest potential minority carrier lifetime and consequently the fundamental limitations to their performance. Here, Auger recombination is characterized in a long-wave infrared InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattice. Auger coefficients as small as 7.1×10–26 cm6/s are experimentally measured using carrier lifetime data at temperatures in the range of 20 K–80 K. The data are compared to Auger-1 coefficients predicted using a 14-band K•p electronic structure model and to coefficients calculated for HgCdTe of the same bandgap. In conclusion, the experimental superlattice Auger coefficients are found to be anmore » order-of-magnitude smaller than HgCdTe.« less

  15. The subarcsecond mid-infrared view of local active galactic nuclei - II. The mid-infrared-X-ray correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Gandhi, P.; Hönig, S. F.; Smette, A.; Duschl, W. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present an updated mid-infrared (MIR) versus X-ray correlation for the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) population based on the high angular resolution 12 and 18μm continuum fluxes from the AGN subarcsecond MIR atlas and 2-10 keV and 14-195 keV data collected from the literature. We isolate a sample of 152 objects with reliable AGN nature and multi-epoch X-ray data and minimal MIR contribution from star formation. Although the sample is not homogeneous or complete, we show that our results are unlikely to be affected by significant biases. The MIR-X-ray correlation is nearly linear and within a factor of 2 independent of the AGN type and the wavebands used. The observed scatter is <0.4 dex. A possible flattening of the correlation slope at the highest luminosities probed (˜1045 erg s-1) towards low MIR luminosities for a given X-ray luminosity is indicated but not significant. Unobscured objects have, on average, an MIR-X-ray ratio that is only ≤0.15 dex higher than that of obscured objects. Objects with intermediate X-ray column densities (22 < log NH < 23) actually show the highest MIR-X-ray ratio on average. Radio-loud objects show a higher mean MIR-X-ray ratio at low luminosities while the ratio is lower than average at high luminosities. This may be explained by synchrotron emission from the jet contributing to the MIR at low luminosities and additional X-ray emission at high luminosities. True Seyfert 2 candidates do not show any deviation from the general behaviour suggesting that they possess a dusty obscurer as in other AGN. Double AGN also do not deviate. Finally, we show that the MIR-X-ray correlation can be used to investigate the AGN nature of uncertain objects. Specifically, we give equations that allow us to determine the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosities and column densities for objects with complex X-ray properties to within 0.34 dex. These techniques are applied to the uncertain objects of the remaining AGN MIR atlas, demonstrating the

  16. Charting the Winds that Change the Universe, II: The Single Aperture Far Infrared Observatory (SAFIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Benford, D. J.; Harvey, P. M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Lester, D. F.; Mather, J. C.; Stacey, G. J.; Werner, M. W.; Yorke, H. W.

    2004-01-01

    SAFIR will study the birth and evolution of stars and planetary systems so young that they are invisible to optical and near-infrared telescopes such as NGST. Not only does the far-infrared radiation penetrate the obscuring dust clouds that surround these systems, but the protoplanetary disks also emit much of their radiation in the far infrared. Furthermore, the dust reprocesses much of the optical emission from the newly forming stars into this wavelength band. Similarly, the obscured central regions of galaxies, which harbor massive black holes and huge bursts of star formation, can be seen and analyzed in the far infrared. SAFIR will have the sensitivity to see the first dusty galaxies in the universe. For studies of both star-forming regions in our galaxy and dusty galaxies at high redshifts, SAFIR will be essential in tying together information that NGST will obtain on these systems at shorter wavelengths and that ALMA will obtain at longer wavelengths.

  17. Mid-wavelength infrared heterojunction phototransistors based on type-II InAs/AlSb/GaSb superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, A.; Adhikary, S.; Dehzangi, A.; Razeghi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A mid-wavelength infrared heterojunction phototransistor based on type-II InAs/AlSb/GaSb superlattices on GaSb substrate has been demonstrated. Near a wavelength of 4 μm saturated optical gains of 668 and 639 at 77 and 150 K, respectively, are demonstrated over a wide dynamic range. At 150 K, the unity optical gain collector dark current density and DC current gain are 1 × 10-3 A/cm2 and 3710, respectively. This demonstrates the potential for use in high-speed applications. In addition, the phototransistor exhibits a specific detectivity value that is four times higher compared with a state-of-the-art type-II superlattice-based photodiode with a similar cut-off wavelength at 150 K.

  18. Charting the Winds that Change the Universe, II The Single Aperture Far Infrared Observatory (SAFIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David

    2003-01-01

    The Single Aperture Far Infrared Observatory (SAFIR) will study the birth and evolution of stars and planetary systems so young that they are invisible to optical and near-infrared telescopes such as NGST. Not only does the far-infrared radiation penetrate the obscuring dust clouds that surround these systems, but the protoplanetary disks also emit much of their radiation in the far infrared. Furthermore, the dust reprocesses much of the optical emission from the newly forming stars into this wavelength band. Similarly, the obscured central regions of galaxies, which harbor massive black holes and huge bursts of star formation, can be seen and analyzed in the far infrared. SAFIR will have the sensitivity to see the first dusty galaxies in the universe. For studies of both star-forming regions in our galaxy and dusty galaxies at high redshifts, SAFIR will be essential in tying together information that NGST will obtain on these systems at shorter wavelengths and that ALMA will obtain at longer wavelengths.

  19. THE WIRED SURVEY. II. INFRARED EXCESSES IN THE SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Leisawitz, David T.; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Cohen, Martin

    2011-12-01

    With the launch of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new era of detecting planetary debris and brown dwarfs (BDs) around white dwarfs (WDs) has begun with the WISE InfraRed Excesses around Degenerates (WIRED) Survey. The WIRED Survey is sensitive to substellar objects and dusty debris around WDs out to distances exceeding 100 pc, well beyond the completeness level of local WDs. In this paper, we present a cross-correlation of the preliminary Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) WD catalog between the WISE, Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and SDSS DR7 photometric catalogs. From {approx}18,000 input targets, there are WISE detections comprising 344 'naked' WDs (detection of the WD photosphere only), 1020 candidate WD+M dwarf binaries, 42 candidate WD+BD systems, 52 candidate WD+dust disk systems, and 69 targets with indeterminate infrared excess. We classified all of the detected targets through spectral energy distribution model fitting of the merged optical, near-IR, and WISE photometry. Some of these detections could be the result of contaminating sources within the large ( Almost-Equal-To 6'') WISE point-spread function; we make a preliminary estimate for the rates of contamination for our WD+BD and WD+disk candidates and provide notes for each target of interest. Each candidate presented here should be confirmed with higher angular resolution infrared imaging or infrared spectroscopy. We also present an overview of the observational characteristics of the detected WDs in the WISE photometric bands, including the relative frequencies of candidate WD+M, WD+BD, and WD+disk systems.

  20. DUST AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS. II. INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN AN H-POOR ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Lambert, D. L. E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in

    2013-08-20

    Residual Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectra for a sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are presented and discussed in terms of narrow emission features superimposed on the quasi-blackbody continuous infrared emission. A broad {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust emission complex is seen in the RCBs showing an extreme H-deficiency. A secondary and much weaker {approx}11.5-15 {mu}m broad emission feature is detected in a few RCBs with the strongest {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust complex. The Spitzer infrared spectra reveal for the first time the structure within the {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust complex, showing the presence of strong C-C stretching modes at {approx}6.3 and 8.1 {mu}m as well as of other dust features at {approx}5.9, 6.9, and 7.3 {mu}m, which are attributable to amorphous carbonaceous solids with little or no hydrogen. The few RCBs with only moderate H-deficiencies display the classical ''unidentified infrared bands (UIRs)'' and mid-infrared features from fullerene-related molecules. In general, the characteristics of the RCB infrared emission features are not correlated with the stellar and circumstellar properties, suggesting that the RCB dust features may not be dependent on the present physical conditions around RCB stars. The only exception seems to be the central wavelength of the 6.3 {mu}m feature, which is blueshifted in those RCBs showing also the UIRs, i.e., the RCBs with the smallest H deficiency.

  1. Extreme Faint Flux Imaging with an EMCCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Olivier; Carignan, Claude; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guillaume, Christian; Lessard, Simon; Fortin, Charles-Anthony; Blais-Ouellette, Sébastien

    2009-08-01

    An EMCCD camera, designed from the ground up for extreme faint flux imaging, is presented. CCCP, the CCD Controller for Counting Photons, has been integrated with a CCD97 EMCCD from e2v technologies into a scientific camera at the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique Expérimentale (LAE), Université de Montréal. This new camera achieves subelectron readout noise and very low clock-induced charge (CIC) levels, which are mandatory for extreme faint flux imaging. It has been characterized in laboratory and used on the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic 1.6 m telescope. The performance of the camera is discussed and experimental data with the first scientific data are presented.

  2. Near-infrared spectra and intrinsic luminosities of candidate type II quasars at 2 < z < 3.4

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Alexandroff, Rachael; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin; Lang, Dustin; Hamann, Frederick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; Brandt, W. Niel; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald

    2014-06-10

    We present JHK near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy of 25 candidate Type II quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using Triplespec on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette at the Magellan/Baade 6.5 m telescope, and the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph on Gemini. At redshifts of 2 < z < 3.4, our NIR spectra probe the rest-frame optical region of these targets, which were initially selected to have strong lines of C IV and Ly α, with FWHM < 2000 km s{sup –1} from the SDSS pipeline. We use the [O III] λ5007 line shape as a model for the narrow-line region emission and find that Hα consistently requires a broad component with FWHMs ranging from 1000 to 7500 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the C IV lines also require broad bases, but with considerably narrower widths of 1000-4500 km s{sup –1}. Estimating the extinction using the Balmer decrement and also the relationship in lower-z quasars between rest equivalent width and luminosity in the [O III] line, we find typical A{sub V} values of 0-2 mag, which naturally explains the attenuated C IV lines relative to Hα. We propose that our targets are moderately obscured quasars. We also describe one unusual object with three distinct velocity peaks in its [O III] spectrum.

  3. Design and modeling of InAs/GaSb type II superlattice based dual-band infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyawansa, Gamini; Grupen, Matt; Duran, Joshua M.; Scheihing, John E.; Nelson, Thomas R.; Eismann, Michael T.

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a credible analysis for predicting the spectral responsivity of InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattice (T2SL) based dual-band infrared photodetectors. An overview of the T2SL based design criteria is given and new dual-band detector architecture with a model dual-band detector structure designed to detect light in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) ranges is presented. The absorption coefficient is modeled empirically and the quantum efficiency spectra are calculated using a numerical model and Hovel's analytical expressions. The spectral cross-talk due to the response of the LWIR channel to residual MWIR light is also investigated. It is shown that the significance of this cross-talk primarily depends on the temperature of the target (scene) being detected. For MWIR/MWIR (two bands in the MWIR range) dual-band detectors, the spectral cross-talk becomes significant irrespective of the target temperature. Eliminating the spectral cross-talk in T2SL dual-band detectors presently remains a challenge.

  4. Infrared Spectroscopy of Pa(Beta) and [Fe II] Emission in NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, R. A.; Armus, L.; Larkin, J. E.; Mathews, K.; Shupe, D. L.; Soifer, B. T.

    1996-07-01

    We present spatially resolved 1.24-1.30 micron spectroscopy with a resolution of 240 km/s of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. Broad Paβ, narrow Paβ, and narrow [Fe II] (λ = 1.2567 microns) emission lines are identified in the spectrum. Additionally, a spatially unresolved narrow component probably due to [S IX] = (λ = 1.25235 microns) is observed on the nucleus. The narrow Paβ and [Fe II] lines are observed to be extended over a scale of 5". The spatial variation of the velocity centers of the Paβ and [Fe II] lines show remarkable similarity, and additionally show similarities to the velocity structure previously observed in ground based spectroscopy of [O III] emission in NGC 4151. This leads to the conclusion that the [Fe II] emission arises in clouds in the Seyfert narrow line region that are physically correlated with those narrow line clouds responsible for the optical emission. The [Fe II] emission line, however, is significantly wider than the Paβ emission line along the full spatial extent of the observed emission. This result suggests that despite the correlation between the bulk kinematics of Paβ and [Fe II], there is an additional process, perhaps fast shocks from a wind in the Seyfert nucleus, contributing to the [Fe II] emission.

  5. Infrared Spectroscopy of Pa-beta and [Fe II] Emission in NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knop, R. A.; Armus, L.; Larkin, J. E.; Matthews, K.; Shupe, D. L.; Soifer, B. T.

    1996-01-01

    We present spatially resolved 1.24-1.30 micron spectroscopy with a resolution of 240 km/s of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. Broad Pa-beta, narrow Pa-beta, and narrow [Fe II] (lambda = 1.2567 micron) emission lines are identified in the spectrum. Additionally, a spatially unresolved narrow component probably due to [S ix] (lambda = 1.25235 micron) is observed on the nucleus. The narrow Pa-beta and [Fe II] lines are observed to be extended over a scale of 5 sec. The spatial variation of the velocity centers of the Pa-beta and [Fe II] lines show remarkable similarity, and additionally show similarities to the velocity structure previously observed in ground based spectroscopy of [O III] emission in NGC 4151. This leads to the conclusion that the [Fe II] emission arises in clouds in the Seyfert narrow line region that are physically correlated with those narrow line clouds responsible for the optical emission. The [Fe II] emission line, however, is significantly wider than the Pa-beta emission line along the full spatial extent of the observed emission. This result suggests that despite the correlation between the bulk kinematics of Pa-beta and [Fe II], there is an additional process, perhaps fast shocks from a wind in the Seyfert nucleus, contributing to the [Fe II] emission.

  6. A possible WISE blazar counterpart of the faint INTEGRAL active galactic nucleus IGR J02341+0228

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.

    2012-05-01

    Following the Swift-XRT identification of the counterpart for the faint INTEGRAL active galactic nucleus IGR J02341+0228, associated with a new extragalactic source: QSO B0231+022 (ATEL #4102), we searched in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; Wright et al. 2010 AJ, 140, 1868) catalog at the position of the QSO B0231+022 source for an infrared counterpart.

  7. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. II. Multidimensional, Radiation-Hydrodynamics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton; Kallman, Tim; Bisno\\vatyiI-Kogan, Gennadyi

    2011-01-01

    We explore a detailed model in which the active galactic nucleus (AGN) obscuration results from the extinction of AGN radiation in a global ow driven by the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains. We assume that external illumination by UV and soft X-rays of the dusty gas located at approximately 1pc away from the supermassive black hole is followed by a conversion of such radiation into IR. Using 2.5D, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations in a ux-limited di usion approximation we nd that the external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via out ows driven by infrared radiation pressure in AGN with luminosities greater than 0:05 L(sub edd) and Compton optical depth, Tau(sub T) approx > & 1.

  8. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Astronomical Ices: II. Ethane and Ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Moore, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic observations have established the presence of hydrocarbon ices on Pluto and other TNOs, but the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate optical constants (n, k) and reference spectra. In this paper we present our recent measurements of near- and mid-infrared optical constants for ethane (C2H6) and ethylene (C2H4) in multiple ice phases and at multiple temperatures. As in our recent work on acetylene (C2H2), we also report new measurements of the index of refraction of each ice at 670 nm. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible, and electronic versions of our new results are made available.

  9. Infrared spectra and optical constants of astronomical ices: II. Ethane and ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. L.; Gerakines, P. A.; Moore, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopic observations have established the presence of hydrocarbon ices on Pluto and other TNOs, but the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate optical constants (n, k) and reference spectra. In this paper we present our recent measurements of near- and mid-infrared optical constants for ethane (C2H6) and ethylene (C2H4) in multiple ice phases and at multiple temperatures. As in our recent work on acetylene (C2H2), we also report new measurements of the index of refraction of each ice at 670 nm. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible, and electronic versions of our new results are made available.

  10. Variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds - II. The data and infrared properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ita, Yoshifusa; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Nakajima, Yasushi; Nagashima, Chie; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuji; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Nakada, Yoshikazu

    2004-09-01

    The data of 8852 and 2927 variable stars detected by the OGLE survey in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are presented. They are cross-identified with the SIRIUS JHK survey data, and their infrared properties are discussed. Variable red giants are well separated on the period-(J-K) plane, suggesting that it could be a good tool to distinguish their pulsation mode and type.

  11. Demonstration of dual-band infrared thermal imaging for bridge inspection. Phase II, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, P.F.; Del Grande, N.K.; Schaich, P.C.

    1996-03-01

    Developing and implementing methods of effective bridge rehabilitation is a major issue for the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The nation spends $5 billion annually to replace, rehabilitate or construct new bridges. According to the National Bridge Inventory, over 100,000 U.S. bridges are structurally deficient. About 40,000 of these bridges have advanced deck deterioration. The most common causes of serious deck deterioration is delamination. Delaminations result when steel reinforcements within the bridge deck corrode, creating gaps that separate the concrete into layers. A reliable inspection technology, capable of identifying delaminations, would represent a power new tool in bridge maintenance. To date, most bridge inspections rely on human interpretation of surface visual features of chain dragging. These methods are slow, disruptive, unreliable and raise serious safety concerns. Infrared thermal imaging detects subsurface delaminations and surface clutter, which is introduced by foreign material on the roadway. Typically, foreign material which is not always evident on a video tape image, produces a unique IR reflectance background unlike the thermal response of a subsurface delamination. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging to identify and remove nonthermal IR reflectance backgrounds from foreign material on the roadway. DBIR methods improve the performance of IR thermal imaging by a factor of ten, compared to single-band infrared (SBIR) methods. DBIR thermal imaging allows precise temperature measurement to reliably locate bridge deck delaminations and remove wavelength-dependent emissivity variations due to foreign material on the roadway.

  12. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Gomez, Juan; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2016-01-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the GEO orbital regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the size of the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small size of the field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude have been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The observed detections have a wide range in characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections with variations in brightness, flashers, during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected size times albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm. The data in this paper was collected over the last several years using Magellan's IMACS camera in f/2 mode. The analysis shows the brightness bins for the observed GEO population as well as the periodicity of the flashers. All objects presented are correlated with the catalog: the focus of the paper will be on the uncorrelated, optically faint, objects. The goal of this project is to better characterize the faint debris population in GEO that access to a 6.5-m optical telescope in a superb site can provide.

  13. Highly efficient near-infrared light-emitting diodes by using type-II CdTe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots as a phosphor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huaibin; Zheng, Ying; Wang, Hongzhe; Xu, Weiwei; Qian, Lei; Yang, Yixing; Titov, Alexandre; Hyvonen, Jake; Li, Lin Song

    2013-11-29

    In this paper, we present an innovative method for the synthesis of CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell structure quantum dots (QDs) using 'greener' chemicals. The PL of CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell structure QDs ranges from 600 to 820 nm, and the as-synthesized core/shell structures show narrow size distributions and stable and high quantum yields (50–75%). Highly efficient near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been demonstrated by employing the CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell QDs as emitters. The devices fabricated based on these type-II core/shell QDs show color-saturated near-infrared emission from the QD layers, a low turn-on voltage of 1.55 V, an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 1.59%, and a current density and maximum radiant emittance of 2.1 × 10(3) mA cm−2 and 17.7 mW cm−2 at 8 V; it is the first report to use type-II core/shell QDs as near-infrared emitters and these results may offer a practicable platform for the realization of near-infrared QD-based light-emitting diodes, night-vision-readable displays, and friend/foe identification system. PMID:24192490

  14. Highly efficient near-infrared light-emitting diodes by using type-II CdTe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots as a phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Huaibin; Zheng, Ying; Wang, Hongzhe; Xu, Weiwei; Qian, Lei; Yang, Yixing; Titov, Alexandre; Hyvonen, Jake; Li, Lin Song

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative method for the synthesis of CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell structure quantum dots (QDs) using ‘greener’ chemicals. The PL of CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell structure QDs ranges from 600 to 820 nm, and the as-synthesized core/shell structures show narrow size distributions and stable and high quantum yields (50-75%). Highly efficient near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been demonstrated by employing the CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell QDs as emitters. The devices fabricated based on these type-II core/shell QDs show color-saturated near-infrared emission from the QD layers, a low turn-on voltage of 1.55 V, an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 1.59%, and a current density and maximum radiant emittance of 2.1 × 103 mA cm-2 and 17.7 mW cm-2 at 8 V it is the first report to use type-II core/shell QDs as near-infrared emitters and these results may offer a practicable platform for the realization of near-infrared QD-based light-emitting diodes, night-vision-readable displays, and friend/foe identification system.

  15. Strong Infrared NLO Tellurides with Multifunction: CsX(II)4In5Te12 (X(II) = Mn, Zn, Cd).

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Liu-Jiang; Zhao, Hua-Jun; Chen, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Chalcogenides are the most promising mid- and far-infrared materials for nonlinear optical (NLO) applications. Yet, most of them are sulfides and selenides, and tellurides are still rare. Herein, we report three new KCd4Ga5S12-structure type NLO-active tellurides, CsX(II)4In5Te12 (X(II) = Mn, Zn, Cd), synthesized by solid-state reactions. The structure features a 3D diamond-like framework constructed by vertex-sharing asymmetric MTe4 tetrahedra that are stacked along the c-axis. CsCd4In5Te12 exhibits the strongest powder second-harmonic generation (SHG) intensity at 2050 nm (0.61 eV) among tellurides to date, 9 × benchmark AgGaS2 in the range of 46-74 μm particle size. The primary studies reveal the 1.42 eV direct band gap and high absorption coefficient in the visible spectral region for CsCd4In5Te12, suggesting it is a new potential solar cell absorber material. In addition, CsMn4In5Te12 also displays a spin-canted antiferromagnetic property below 50 K. PMID:27070041

  16. Spectroscopic surveys of faint blue stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Gary; Boley, Forrest I.; Swanson, Steven R.; Mcmahan, Robert K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopy of 450 faint blue stars obtained with the spectrograph and intensified Reticon scanner on the 1.3 m telescope at the McGraw Hill Observatory located at Kitt Peak are examined. The study is limited to objects brighter than V = 17.0 in magnitude. It is found that the relative numbers of objects such as white dwarfs, QSOs and CVs in the Kisco survey (Noguchi et al. 1980) is similar to that in the survey of Green et al., (1986).

  17. The formation of Jupiter's faint rings

    PubMed

    Burns; Showalter; Hamilton; Nicholson; de Pater I; Ockert-Bell; Thomas

    1999-05-14

    Observations by the Galileo spacecraft and the Keck telescope showed that Jupiter's outermost (gossamer) ring is actually two rings circumscribed by the orbits of the small satellites Amalthea and Thebe. The gossamer rings' unique morphology-especially the rectangular end profiles at the satellite's orbit and the enhanced intensities along the top and bottom edges of the rings-can be explained by collisional ejecta lost from the inclined satellites. The ejecta evolves inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. This mechanism may also explain the origin of Jupiter's main ring and suggests that faint rings may accompany all small inner satellites of the other jovian planets. PMID:10325220

  18. BIG FISH, LITTLE FISH: TWO NEW ULTRA-FAINT SATELLITES OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Belokurov, V.; Walker, M. G.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Irwin, M. J.; Koposov, S.; Watkins, L.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Just, D.; Olszewski, E.; Mateo, M. E-mail: walker@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2010-03-20

    We report the discovery of two new Milky Way satellites in the neighboring constellations of Pisces and Pegasus identified in data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Pisces II, an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy lies at the distance of {approx}180 kpc, some 15 deg. away from the recently detected Pisces I. Segue 3, an ultra-faint star cluster lies at the distance of 16 kpc. We use deep follow-up imaging obtained with the 4-m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory to derive their structural parameters. Pisces II has a half-light radius of {approx}60 pc, while Segue 3 is 20 times smaller at only 3 pc.

  19. Quantitative surface studies of protein adsorption by infrared spectroscopy. II. Quantification of adsorbed and bulk proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D.J.; Hutson, T.B.; Chittur, K.K.; Gendreau, R.M.

    1987-08-15

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra of surface-adsorbed proteins are correlated with concentration measurements determined by /sup 125/I-labeled proteins. This paper demonstrates that linear correlations between the intensity of the major bands of proteins and the quantity of proteins can be obtained for human albumin and immunoglobulin G up to surface concentrations of approximately 0.25 microgram/cm2. A poorer correlation was observed for human fibrinogen. A linear correlation was also observed between the concentration in the bulk solution and the major bands of albumin up to a concentration of 60 mg/ml.

  20. Resistor array infrared projector nonuniformity correction: search for performance improvement II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świerkowski, Leszek; Joyce, Robert A.; Williams, Owen M.

    2007-04-01

    Research leading towards the continued improvement in resistor array infrared projector nonuniformity correction (NUC) is reported, particularly at low drive levels relevant to thermal imager and FLIR test and evaluation applications. Moire fringes have been successfully compensated, as has the checkerboard effect seen in earlier flood NUC measurements. With these improvements, the residual nonuniformity associated with the random spatial noise has been reduced successfully to the 0.1-0.2% rms level, equivalent to 20-60 mK noise equivalent temperature differences. The random noise is accompanied, however, by a low spatial frequency fixed pattern, currently unexplained but possibly attributable to busbar robbing in the electronic backplane.

  1. Near infrared observations of galaxies in the Coma supercluster and in the Cancer cluster. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, G.; Trinchieri, G.; Boselli, A.

    1990-11-01

    New near infrared observations of 110 galaxies in the Coma/A1367 supercluster region, and 40 galaxies in the Cancer cluster are presented. These observations are part of an ongoing investigation of the properties of normal galaxies and of their near-IR emission, which aims at obtaining homogeneous, multifrequency data for a large sample of galaxies in different density environments. The addition of these observations to the sample presented in Gavazzi and Trinchieri (1989) raises the number of Coma/A1367 galaxies with near-IR data to 275. The measurements, together with data published by Bothun et al. (1985), give a sample of 45 spirals in the Cancer cluster.

  2. Stage-II-screening device for testing of heterogeneous catalysts in gas phase reactions with Fourier transform infrared analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüning, Rainer; Scholz, Peter; Ondruschka, Bernd

    2005-07-01

    The construction of a stage-II-screening device for heterogeneous catalysts in gas phase reactions under ambient pressure is described. The concentrations of the reaction products are determined by Fourier transform infrared analysis in combination with a chemometric interpretation of the obtained spectra. Thus, fast high-precision product analyses with complete mass balances are feasible, within the limits of accuracy of the measurements. The device is designed to screen up to 17 catalysts in one testing cycle. It is possible to determine temperature-conversion-selectivity dependencies as well as long-term measurements under constant conditions. With the help of the device described, the catalytic properties of new materials were parallel tested for the oxidative dehydrogenation of isopropanol.

  3. Carrier transport properties of Be-doped InAs/InAsSb type-II infrared superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Steenbergen, E. H. Mitchel, W. C.; Mou, Shin; Brown, G. J.; Elhamri, S.

    2014-01-06

    The InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattice materials studied to date for infrared detector applications have been residually n-type, but p-type absorber regions with minority carrier electrons can result in increased photodiode quantum efficiency, R{sub o}A, and detectivity. Therefore, Be-doped InAs/InAsSb superlattices were investigated to determine the p-type InAs/InAsSb superlattice material transport properties essential to developing high quality photodiode absorber materials. Hall measurements performed at 10 K revealed that the superlattice converted to p-type with Be-doping of 3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} and the hole mobility reached 24 400 cm{sup 2}/Vs. Photoresponse measurements at 10 K confirmed the 175 meV bandgap and material optical quality.

  4. Carrier transport properties of Be-doped InAs/InAsSb type-II infrared superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenbergen, E. H.; Elhamri, S.; Mitchel, W. C.; Mou, Shin; Brown, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    The InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattice materials studied to date for infrared detector applications have been residually n-type, but p-type absorber regions with minority carrier electrons can result in increased photodiode quantum efficiency, RoA, and detectivity. Therefore, Be-doped InAs/InAsSb superlattices were investigated to determine the p-type InAs/InAsSb superlattice material transport properties essential to developing high quality photodiode absorber materials. Hall measurements performed at 10 K revealed that the superlattice converted to p-type with Be-doping of 3 × 1016 cm-3 and the hole mobility reached 24 400 cm2/Vs. Photoresponse measurements at 10 K confirmed the 175 meV bandgap and material optical quality.

  5. Azadipyrromethene cyclometalation in neutral Ru(II) complexes: photosensitizers with extended near-infrared absorption for solar energy conversion applications.

    PubMed

    Bessette, André; Cibian, Mihaela; Ferreira, Janaina G; DiMarco, Brian N; Bélanger, Francis; Désilets, Denis; Meyer, Gerald J; Hanan, Garry S

    2016-06-28

    In the on-going quest to harvest near-infrared (NIR) photons for energy conversion applications, a novel family of neutral ruthenium(ii) sensitizers has been developed by cyclometalation of an azadipyrromethene chromophore. These rare examples of neutral ruthenium complexes based on polypyridine ligands exhibit an impressive panchromaticity achieved by the cyclometalation strategy, with strong light absorption in the 600-800 nm range that tails beyond 1100 nm in the terpyridine-based adducts. Evaluation of the potential for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) and Organic Photovoltaic (OPV) applications is made through rationalization of the structure-property relationship by spectroscopic, electrochemical, X-ray structural and computational modelization investigations. Spectroscopic evidence for photo-induced charge injection into the conduction band of TiO2 is also provided. PMID:27264670

  6. The spectral and spatial distribution of radiation from Eta Carinae. II High-resolution infrared maps of the Homunculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, A. R.; Robinson, G.; Mitchell, R. M.; Thomas, J. A.; Becklin, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    The spectral and spatial distribution of radiation from Eta Carinae II and high-resolution infrared maps of the Homunculus are presented. It is found that at the resolution of 1.1 arcsec the source is resolved into two intensity peaks at four wavelengths from 3.6 to 11.2 microns. The separation of the two peaks with wavelength is discussed, concluding that they are produced by an asymmetrical distribution of dust formed by extensive mass loss from the central source. The extension of the wings of the source at various wavelengths provide confirmatory evidence for an enrichment of a grain species such as corundum, relative to silicate material in the outer regions of the source.

  7. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION AROUND MID-INFRARED BUBBLES IN THE G8.14+0.23 H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chakraborti, S.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2012-09-10

    Mid-infrared shells or bubbles around expanding H II regions have received much attention due to their ability to initiate a new generation of star formation. We present multi-wavelength observations around two bubbles associated with a southern massive star-forming region G8.14+0.23, to investigate the triggered star formation signature on the edges of the bubbles by the expansion of the H II region. We have found observational signatures of the collected molecular and cold dust material along the bubbles and the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) velocity map reveals that the molecular gas in the bubbles is physically associated around the G8.14+0.23 region. We have detected 244 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region and about 37% of these YSOs occur in clusters. Interestingly, these YSO clusters are associated with the collected material on the edges of the bubbles. We have found good agreement between the dynamical age of the H II region and the kinematical timescale of bubbles (from the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) line data) with the fragmentation time of the accumulated molecular materials to explain possible 'collect and collapse' process around the G8.14+0.23 region. However, one cannot entirely rule out the possibility of triggered star formation by compression of the pre-existing dense clumps by the shock wave. We have also found two massive embedded YSOs (about 10 and 22 M{sub Sun }) which are associated with the dense fragmented clump at the interface of the bubbles. We conclude that the expansion of the H II region is also leading to the formation of these two young massive embedded YSOs in the G8.14+0.23 region.

  8. Luminosity function of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, KwangHo; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Ho, Shirley; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2015-11-01

    We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [O II] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 3.0 using the [O II] emission line luminosity L([O II]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. We show that the [O II] LF at z = 1.0 from the MBII shows good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([O II]) = 1043.0 erg s-1 while the low redshifts (z ≤ 0.3) show an excess in the prediction of bright [O II] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([O II]) = 1041.6 erg s-1. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [O II] galaxies at low redshift (z ≤ 1), we forecast the evolution of the [O II] LF at high redshift (z ≤ 3), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from -3 to -2 showing minima at z = 2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as (z + 1)-1 at z ≤ 2 while the faint end evolves as ˜3(z + 1)-1 at 0.6 ≤ z ≤ 2. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [O III] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets. Finally, we show that the auto-correlation function of [O II] and [O III] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z = 2 to 1.

  9. Infrared Multiple-Photon Dissociation spectroscopy of group II metal complexes with salicylate

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan P. Dain; Gary Gresham; Gary S. Groenewold; Jeffrey D. Steill; Jos Oomens; Michael J. van Stipdonk

    2011-07-01

    Ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation, and the combination of infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to characterize singly-charged, 1:1 complexes of Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ with salicylate. For each metal-salicylate complex, the CID pathways are: (a) elimination of CO2 and (b) formation of [MOH]+ where M=Ca2+, Sr2+ or Ba2+. DFT calculations predict three minima for the cation-salicylate complexes which differ in the mode of metal binding. In the first, the metal ion is coordinated by O atoms of the (neutral) phenol and carboxylate groups of salicylate. In the second, the cation is coordinated by phenoxide and (neutral) carboxylic acid groups. The third mode involves coordination by the carboxylate group alone. The infrared spectrum for the metal-salicylate complexes contains a number of absorptions between 1000 – 1650 cm-1, and the best correlation between theoretical and experimental spectra for the structure that features coordination of the metal ion by phenoxide and the carbonyl group of the carboxylic acid group, consistent with calculated energies for the respective species.

  10. Constraints on MACHO Dark Matter from Compact Stellar Systems in Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.

    2016-06-01

    I show that a recently discovered star cluster near the center of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Eridanus II provides strong constraints on massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) of ≳5 M ⊙ as the main component of dark matter. MACHO dark matter will dynamically heat the cluster, driving it to larger sizes and higher velocity dispersions until it dissolves into its host galaxy. The stars in compact ultra-faint dwarf galaxies themselves will be subject to the same dynamical heating; the survival of at least 10 such galaxies places independent limits on MACHO dark matter of masses ≳10 M ⊙. Both Eri II’s cluster and the compact ultra-faint dwarfs are characterized by stellar masses of just a few thousand M ⊙ and half-light radii of 13 pc (for the cluster) and ∼30 pc (for the ultra-faint dwarfs). These systems close the ∼20–100 M ⊙ window of allowed MACHO dark matter and combine with existing constraints from microlensing, wide binaries, and disk kinematics to rule out dark matter composed entirely of MACHOs from ∼10‑7 M ⊙ up to arbitrarily high masses.

  11. PMAS - Faint Object 3D Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M. M.; Becker, T.; Kelz, A.

    2002-01-01

    will describe PMAS (Potsdam Multiaperture Spectrophotometer) which was commissioned at the Calar Alto Observatory 3.5m Telescope on May 28-31, 2001. PMAS is a dedicated, highly efficient UV-visual integral field spectrograph which is optimized for the spectrophotometry of faint point sources, typically superimposed on a bright background. PMAS is ideally suited for the study of resolved stars in local group galaxies. I will present results of our preliminary work with MPFS at the Russian 6m Telescope in Selentchuk, involving the development of new 3D data reduction software, and observations of faint planetary nebulae in the bulge of M31 for the determination of individual chemical abundances of these objects. Using this data, it will be demonstrated that integral field spectroscopy provides superior techniques for background subtraction, avoiding the otherwise inevitable systematic errors of conventional slit spetroscopy. The results will be put in perspective of the study of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies with a new generation of Extremely Large Telescopes.

  12. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  13. A multifrequency radio continuum and IRAS faint source survey of markarian galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicay, M. D.; Kojoian, G.; Seal, J.; Dickinson, D. F.; Malkan, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from a multifrequency radio continumm survey of Markarian galaxies (MRKs) and are supplemented by IRAS infrared data from the Faint Source Survey. Radio data are presented for 899 MRKs observed at nu = 4.755 GHz with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)-Green Bank 300 foot (91 m) telescope, including nearly 88% of those objects in Markarian lists VI-XIV. In addition, 1.415 GHz measurements of 258 MRKs, over 30% of the MRKs accessible from the National Aeronomy and Ionosphere Center (NAIC)-Arecibo, are reported. Radio continuum observations of smaller numbers of MRKs were made at 10.63 GHz and at 23.1 GHz and are also presented. Infrared data from the IRAS Faint Source Survey (Ver. 2) are presented for 944 MRKs, with reasonably secure identifications extracted from the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. MRKs exhibit the same canonical infrared characteristics as those reported for various other galaxy samples, that is well-known enhancement of the 25 micrometer/60 micrometer color ratio among Seyfert MRKs, and a clear tendency for MRKs with warmer 60 micrometer/100 micrometer colors to also possess cooler 12 micrometer/25 micrometer colors. In addition, non-Seyfert are found to obey the well-documented infrared/radio luminosity correlation, with the tightest correlation seen for starburst MRKs.

  14. Novel type-II material system for laser applications in the near-infrared regime

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C. Möller, C.; Hens, P.; Fuchs, C.; Stolz, W.; Koch, S. W.; Ruiz Perez, A.

    2015-04-15

    The design and experimental realization of a type-II “W”-multiple quantum well heterostructure for emission in the λ > 1.2 μm range is presented. The experimental photoluminescence spectra for different excitation intensities are analyzed using microscopic quantum theory. On the basis of the good theory–experiment agreement, the gain properties of the system are computed using the semiconductor Bloch equations. Gain values comparable to those of type-I systems are obtained.

  15. Infrared spectroscopic study of copper(II) complexes with N-substituted tetrazoles1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarik, M. M.; Gaponik, P. N.; Naumenko, V. N.; Lesnikovich, A. I.; Nikanovich, M. V.

    The i.r. spectra (4000-200 cm -1) of N-alkyltetrazoles and their complexes with copper(II) salts CuCl 2 and Cu(NCS) 2 have been measured. Spectral criteria in the middle and far regions for the identification of tetrazole isomers and their complexes are proposed. The site of the coordination in a tetrazole molecule and supposed structure of complexes are being discussed.

  16. Probing carrier separation in a novel series of infrared type-II nanoheterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Lee, Doh C.; Robel, Istvan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2010-03-01

    Three-dimensional confinement of carriers within semiconductor nanocrystals gives rise to novel characteristics such as size-controlled energy gaps, but also increased Coulomb interactions between charge carriers that can hamper spatial separation of electrons and holes, such as in photovoltaic devices. One approach to efficient ``splitting'' of photogenerated excitons is through introduction of appropriate energy gradients within a heterostructured nanocrystal. Specifically, a type-II staggered alignment of electronic states can provide nearly complete separation of electrons and holes between different spatial regions of a nanoheterostructure. In this work, we use static and transient photoluminescence spectroscopies to examine the evolution of type-II behavior in PbSe/CdSe/CdS core/shell/shell heterostructured nanocrystals. We observe a marked red shift and a dramatic increase in radiative lifetimes (to >10 μs) with increasing CdS shell thickness, indicative of type-II carrier separation, at effective band gaps of 0.95 eV, the narrowest band gap of any such system to date. We will compare these measurement to those of a homologous ``tetrapod'' system that exhibits surprisingly high emission quantum yields, to further elucidate the effect of structure on carrier separation.

  17. Abundances of argon, sulfur, and neon in six galactic H II regions from infrared forbidden lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herter, T.; Helfer, H. L.; Forrest, W. J.; Mccarthy, J.; Houck, J. R.; Willner, S. P.; Puetter, R. C.; Rudy, R. J.; Soifer, B. T.; Pipher, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Airborne measurements of the Ar II (6.99 micron) and S III (18.71 micron) forbidden lines for six compact H II regions are presented, as well as ground-based 2-4 micron and 8-13 micron spectroscopy if not already published. From these data and radio data, lower limits to the elemental abundances of Ar, Ne, and S are deduced. G29.9-0.0, at 5 kpc from the galactic center, is overabundant in all these elements. The other five regions (at distances 6-13 kpc from the center) mainly appear to be consistent with standard abundances, with the exception of G75.84 + 0.4 at 10 kpc from the galactic center, which is overabundant in S. However, preliminary results on G12.8-0.2 at 6 kpc from the galactic center suggest a possible underabundance. A large statistical sample of H II regions is required in order to determine if there is a radial gradient in the heavy element abundances of the Galaxy.

  18. InAs/Ga(In)Sb type-II superlattices short/middle dual color infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanli; Hu, Rui; Deng, Gongrong; He, Wenjing; Feng, Jiangmin; Fang, Mingguo; Li, Xue; Deng, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Short wavelength and middle wavelength dual color infrared detector were designed and prepared with InAs/Ga(In)Sb type-II superlattices materials. The Crosslight software was used to calculate the relation between wavelength and material parameter such as thickness of InAs, GaSb, then energy strucutre of 100 periods 8ML/8ML InAs/GaSb and the absorption wavelength was calculated. After fixing InAs/GaSb thickness parameter, devices with nBn and pin structure were designed and prepared to compare performance of these two structures. Comparison results showed both structure devices were available for high temperature operation which black detectivity under 200K were 7.9×108cmHz1/2/W for nBn and 1.9×109cmHz1/2/W for pin respectively. Considering the simultaneous readout requirement for further FPAs application the NIP/PIN InAs/GaSb dual-color structure was grown by MBE method. Both two mesas and one mesa devices structure were designed and prepared to appreciate the short/middle dual color devices. Cl2-based ICP etching combined with phosphoric acid based chemicals were utilized to form mesas, silicon dioxide was deposited via PECVD as passivation layer. Ti/Au was used as metallization. Once the devices were finished, the electro-optical performance was measured. Measurement results showed that optical spectrum response with peak wavelength of 2.7μm and 4.3μm under 77K temperature was gained, the test results agree well with calculated results. Peak detectivity was measured as 2.08×1011cmHz1/2/W and 6.2×1010cmHz1/2/W for short and middle wavelength infrared detector respectively. Study results disclosed that InAs/Ga(In)Sb type-II SLs is available for both short and middle wavelength infrared detecting with good performance by simply altering the thickness of InAs layer and GaSb layer.

  19. Time-sliced perturbation theory II: baryon acoustic oscillations and infrared resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Diego; Garny, Mathias; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    We use time-sliced perturbation theory (TSPT) to give an accurate description of the infrared non-linear effects affecting the baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) present in the distribution of matter at very large scales. In TSPT this can be done via a systematic resummation that has a simple diagrammatic representation and does not involve uncontrollable approximations. We discuss the power counting rules and derive explicit expressions for the resummed matter power spectrum up to next-to leading order and the bispectrum at the leading order. The two-point correlation function agrees well with N-body data at BAO scales. The systematic approach also allows to reliably assess the shift of the baryon acoustic peak due to non-linear effects.

  20. Characterizing ultraviolet and infrared observational properties for galaxies. II. Features of attenuation law

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Ye-Wei; Kong, Xu; Lin, Lin E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Variations in the attenuation law have a significant impact on observed spectral energy distributions for galaxies. As one important observational property for galaxies at ultraviolet and infrared wavelength bands, the correlation between infrared-to-ultraviolet luminosity ratio and ultraviolet color index (or ultraviolet spectral slope), i.e., the IRX-UV relation (or IRX-β relation), offered a widely used formula for correcting dust attenuation in galaxies, but the usability appears to be in doubt now because of considerable dispersion in this relation found by many studies. In this paper, on the basis of spectral synthesis modeling and spatially resolved measurements of four nearby spiral galaxies, we provide an interpretation of the deviation in the IRX-UV relation with variations in the attenuation law. From both theoretical and observational viewpoints, two components in the attenuation curve, the linear background and the 2175 Å bump, are suggested to be the parameters in addition to the stellar population age (addressed in the first paper of this series) in the IRX-UV function; different features in the attenuation curve are diagnosed for the galaxies in our sample. Nevertheless, it is often difficult to ascertain the attenuation law for galaxies in actual observations. Possible reasons for preventing the successful detection of the parameters in the attenuation curve are also discussed in this paper, including the degeneracy of the linear background and the 2175 Å bump in observational channels, the requirement for young and dust-rich systems to study, and the difficulty in accurate estimates of dust attenuations at different wavelength bands.

  1. The infrared medium-deep survey. II. How to trigger radio AGNs? Hints from their environments

    SciTech Connect

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Chapman, Scott; Pak, Soojong; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-10

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ∼25 deg{sup 2} and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (M{sub u} – M{sub r} ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  2. EVOLVING STARBURST MODELING OF FAR-INFRARED/SUBMILLIMETER/MILLIMETER LINE EMISSION. II. APPLICATION TO M 82

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Lihong

    2009-11-01

    We present starburst models for far-infrared/sub-millimeter/millimeter line emission of molecular and atomic gas in an evolving starburst region, which is treated as an ensemble of noninteracting hot bubbles that drive spherical shells of swept-up gas into a surrounding uniform gas medium. These bubbles and shells are driven by stellar winds and supernovae within massive star clusters formed during an instantaneous starburst. The underlying stellar radiation from the evolving clusters affects the properties and structure of photodissociation regions (PDRs) in the shells, and hence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the molecular and atomic line emission from these swept-up shells and the associated parent giant molecular clouds contain a signature of the stage of evolution of the starburst. The physical and chemical properties of the shells and their structure are computed using a simple, well-known similarity solution for the shell expansion, a stellar population synthesis code, and a time-dependent PDR chemistry model. The SEDs for several molecular and atomic lines ({sup 12}CO and its isotope {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, C, O, and C{sup +}) are computed using a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line radiative transfer model. By comparing our models with the available observed data of nearby infrared bright galaxies, especially M 82, we constrain the models and in the case of M 82, we provide estimates for the ages (5-6 Myr, 10 Myr) of recent starburst activity. We also derive a total H{sub 2} gas mass of approx(2-3.4) x 10{sup 8} M {sub sun} for the observed regions of the central 1 kpc starburst disk of M 82.

  3. The Infrared Medium-Deep Survey. II. How to Trigger Radio AGNs? Hints from their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Chapman, Scott; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Yongjung; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Duho; Pak, Soojong; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin; Edge, Alastair

    2014-12-01

    Activity at the centers of galaxies, during which the central supermassive black hole is accreting material, is nowadays accepted to be rather ubiquitous and most probably a phase of every galaxy's evolution. It has been suggested that galactic mergers and interactions may be the culprits behind the triggering of nuclear activity. We use near-infrared data from the new Infrared Medium-Deep Survey and the Deep eXtragalactic Survey of the VIMOS-SA22 field and radio data at 1.4 GHz from the FIRST survey and a deep Very Large Array survey to study the environments of radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over an area of ~25 deg2 and down to a radio flux limit of 0.1 mJy and a J-band magnitude of 23 mag AB. Radio AGNs are predominantly found in environments similar to those of control galaxies at similar redshift, J-band magnitude, and (Mu - Mr ) rest-frame color. However, a subpopulation of radio AGNs is found in environments up to 100 times denser than their control sources. We thus preclude merging as the dominant triggering mechanism of radio AGNs. By fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution of radio AGNs in the least and most dense environments, we find that those in the least dense environments show higher radio-loudness, higher star formation efficiencies, and higher accretion rates, typical of the so-called high-excitation radio AGNs. These differences tend to disappear at z > 1. We interpret our results in terms of a different triggering mechanism for these sources that is driven by mass loss through winds of young stars created during the observed ongoing star formation.

  4. Protein secondary structure of the isolated photosystem II reaction center and conformational changes studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, W Z; Newell, W R; Haris, P I; Chapman, D; Barber, J

    1991-05-01

    The secondary structure of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center isolated from pea chloroplasts has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Spectra were recorded in aqueous buffers containing H2O or D2O; the detergent present for most measurements was dodecyl maltoside. The broad amide I and amide II bands were analyzed by using second-derivative and deconvolution procedures. Absorption bands were assigned to the presence of alpha-helices, beta-sheets, turns, or random structure. Quantitative analysis revealed that this complex contained a high proportion of alpha-helices (67%) and some antiparallel beta-sheets (9%) and turns (11%). An irreversible decrease in the intensity of the band associated with the alpha-helices occurs upon exposure of the isolated PSII reaction center to bright illumination. This loss of alpha-helical content gave rise to an increase in other secondary structures, particularly beta-sheets. After similar pretreatment with light, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveals lower mobility and solubility of constituent D1 and D2 polypeptides of the PSII reaction center. Some degradation of these polypeptides also occurs. In contrast, there is no change in the mobility of the two subunits of cytochrome b559. In the absence of illumination, the PSII reaction center exchanged into dodecyl maltoside shows good thermal stability as compared with samples in Triton X-100. Only at a temperature of about 60 degrees C do spectral changes take place that are indicative of denaturation. PMID:1850626

  5. Thermal and near-infrared light induced spin crossover in a mononuclear iron(ii) complex with a tetrathiafulvalene-fused dipyridophenazine ligand.

    PubMed

    Pointillart, F; Liu, X; Kepenekian, M; Le Guennic, B; Golhen, S; Dorcet, V; Roisnel, T; Cador, O; You, Z; Hauser, J; Decurtins, S; Ouahab, L; Liu, S-X

    2016-07-28

    A mononuclear Fe(ii) complex involving a tetrathiafulvalene-based ligand exhibits thermal spin-crossover (around 143 K) with pronounced hysteresis behaviour (48 K). The chromophoric and π-extended ligand allows Near-Infrared (NIR) sensitization for the light-induced excited spin-state trapping (LIESST) with T(LIESST) = 90 K. PMID:27358063

  6. Picosecond infrared study of intramolecular energy transfer in [(phen)(CO){sub 3}Re{sup I}(NC)Ru{sup II}(CN)(bpy){sub 2}]{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Peterson, K.A.; Gordon, K.C.; Woodruff, W.H.; Schoonover, J.R.; Meyer, T.J.; Bignozzi, C.A.

    1992-03-01

    The dynamics and mechanism of intramolecular energy transfer in [(phen)(CO){sub 3}Re{sup I}(NC)Ru{sup II}(CN)(bpy){sub 2}]+ following metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitation have been studied using picosecond infrared spectroscopy.

  7. Picosecond infrared study of intramolecular energy transfer in ((phen)(CO) sub 3 Re sup I (NC)Ru sup II (CN)(bpy) sub 2 ) sup +

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Peterson, K.A.; Gordon, K.C.; Woodruff, W.H. ); Schoonover, J.R.; Meyer, T.J. . Dept. of Chemistry); Bignozzi, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics and mechanism of intramolecular energy transfer in ((phen)(CO){sub 3}Re{sup I}(NC)Ru{sup II}(CN)(bpy){sub 2})+ following metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitation have been studied using picosecond infrared spectroscopy.

  8. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  9. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-01-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  10. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  11. Radial velocities and metallicities from infrared Ca ii triplet spectroscopy of open clusters. II. Berkeley 23, King 1, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, R.; Casamiquela, L.; Ospina, N.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Jordi, C.; Monteagudo, L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Open clusters are key to studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, there is a deficiency of radial velocity and chemical abundance determinations for open clusters in the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the number of determinations of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for open clusters. Methods: We acquired medium-resolution spectra (R ~ 8000) in the infrared region Ca ii triplet lines (~8500 Å) for several stars in five open clusters with the long-slit IDS spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain). Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation fitting techniques. The relationships available in the literature between the strength of infrared Ca ii lines and metallicity were also used to derive the metallicity for each cluster. Results: We obtain ⟨Vr⟩ = 48.6 ± 3.4, -58.4 ± 6.8, 26.0 ± 4.3, and -65.3 ± 3.2 km s-1 for Berkeley 23, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245, respectively. We found [ Fe/H ] = -0.25 ± 0.14 and -0.15 ± 0.18 for NGC 559 and NGC 7245, respectively. Berkeley 23 has low metallicity, [ Fe/H ] = -0.42 ± 0.13, which is similar to other open clusters in the outskirts of the Galactic disc. In contrast, we derived high metallicity ([ Fe/H ] = +0.43 ± 0.15) for NGC 6603, which places this system among the most metal-rich known open clusters. To our knowledge, this is the first determination of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for these clusters, except NGC 6603, for which radial velocities had been previously determined. We have also analysed ten stars in the line of sight to King 1. Because of the large dispersion obtained in both radial velocity and metallicity, we cannot be sure that we have sampled true cluster members. Based on observations made with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the

  12. Empirical calibration of the near-infrared CaII triplet - IV. The stellar population synthesis models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazdekis, A.; Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Cardiel, N.; Peletier, R. F.

    2003-04-01

    We present a new evolutionary stellar population synthesis model, which predicts spectral energy distributions for single-age single-metallicity stellar populations (SSPs) at resolution 1.5 Å (FWHM) in the spectral region of the near-infrared CaII triplet feature. The main ingredient of the model is a new extensive empirical stellar spectral library that has been recently presented by Cenarro et al., which is composed of more than 600 stars with an unprecedented coverage of the stellar atmospheric parameters. Two main products of interest for stellar population analysis are presented. The first is a spectral library for SSPs with metallicities -1.7 < [Fe/H] < +0.2, a large range of ages (0.1-18 Gyr) and initial mass function (IMF) types. They are well suited to modelling galaxy data, since the SSP spectra, with flux-calibrated response curves, can be smoothed to the resolution of the observational data, taking into account the internal velocity dispersion of the galaxy, allowing the user to analyse the observed spectrum in its own system. We also produce integrated absorption-line indices (namely CaT*, CaT and PaT) for the same SSPs in the form of equivalent widths. We find the following behaviour for the CaII triplet feature in old-aged SSPs: (i) the strength of the CaT* index does not change much with time for all metallicities for ages larger than ~3 Gyr; (ii) this index shows a strong dependence on metallicity for values below [M/H]~-0.5 and (iii) for larger metallicities this feature does not show a significant dependence either on age or on the metallicity, being more sensitive to changes in the slope of power-like IMF shapes. The SSP spectra have been calibrated with measurements for globular clusters by Armandroff & Zinn, which are well reproduced, probing the validity of using the integrated CaII triplet feature for determining the metallicities of these systems. Fitting the models to two early-type galaxies of different luminosities (NGC 4478 and 4365

  13. A Search For Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2011-09-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope ‘Walter Baade’ at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe preliminary results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r’ filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is measured to be fainter tan R = 21. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  14. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; ilha, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan 1 telescope Walter Baade at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is estimated to be fainter than 22. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  15. a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    La Silla, each covering a sky area of 5 o.5 x 5 o.5. When comparing plates of the same sky field obtained at time intervals of several years [1] , she was able to detect, among the hundreds of thousands of stellar images on the plates, a few faint ones whose positions had changed a little in the meantime. The search technique is based on the fact that such a shift is a good indicator of the object being relatively nearby. It must therefore also be intrinsically faint, i.e. a potential White Dwarf candidate. On every pair of plates, approximately twenty faint moving objects were detected with proper motions [2] of more than 0.25 arcsec per year. Indeed, follow-up spectroscopic observations showed that about 20 percent of these or about four per plate were White Dwarfs. Until now, a total of forty new White Dwarfs have been discovered during this very successful project, i.e. over ten times more than originally expected. And then - a Brown Dwarf! Caption to ESO PR Photo 11/97 [JPEG, 144k] ESO Press Photo 11/97 When checking two plates with a time inverval of 11 years, Maria Teresa Ruiz earlier this year discovered a very faint object in the southern constellation of Hydra (The Water-Snake), moving at 0.35 arcsec per year (cf. ESO Press Photo 11/97). In order to establish its true nature, she obtained its spectrum (in the visual to near-infrared region from wavelengths 450-1000 nm) on March 15 using the ESO 3.6-m telescope and the EFOSC1 spectrograph. Caption to ESO PR Photo 12/97 [GIF, 35k] ESO Press Photo 12/97 To her great surprise, the spectrum was of a type never seen before and certainly not that of a White Dwarf or any other easily identifiable type of star (cf. ESO Press Photo 12/97). In particular, there were no signs of spectral bands of titanium oxide (TiO) or vanadium oxide (VO) which are common in very cool stars, nor of the spectral lines seen in White Dwarfs. On the other hand, an absorption line of the short-lived element lithium was identified, as well

  16. DEEP NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE PIPE NEBULA. II. DATA, METHODS, AND DUST EXTINCTION MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.; Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco

    2010-12-20

    We present a new set of high-resolution dust extinction maps of the nearby and essentially starless Pipe Nebula molecular cloud. The maps were constructed from a concerted deep near-infrared imaging survey with the ESO-VLT, ESO-NTT, CAHA 3.5 m telescopes, and 2MASS data. The new maps have a resolution three times higher than the previous extinction map of this cloud by Lombardi et al. and are able to resolve structures down to 2600 AU. We detect 244 significant extinction peaks across the cloud. These peaks have masses between 0.1 and 18.4 M{sub sun}, diameters between 1.2 and 5.7 x 10{sup 4} AU (0.06 and 0.28 pc), and mean densities of about 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}, all in good agreement with previous results. From the analysis of the mean surface density of companions we find a well-defined scale near 1.4 x 10{sup 4} AU below which we detect a significant decrease in structure of the cloud. This scale is smaller than the Jeans length calculated from the mean density of the peaks. The surface density of peaks is not uniform but instead it displays clustering. Extinction peaks in the Pipe Nebula appear to have a spatial distribution similar to the stars in Taurus, suggesting that the spatial distribution of stars evolves directly from the primordial spatial distribution of high-density material.

  17. Subaru Near-Infrared Multicolor Images of Class II Young Stellar Object, RNO 91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayama, Satoshi; Tamura, Motohide; Hayashi, Masahiko; Itoh, Yoichi; Ishii, Miki; Fukagawa, Misato; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Oasa, Yumiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2007-12-01

    We conducted subarcsecond near-infrared imaging observations of RNO 91 with CIAO (Coronagraphic Imager with Adaptive Optics) mounted on the 8.2m Subaru telescope. We present our JHK band data along with optical images, which when considered together reveal a complex circumstellar structure. We examined the colors of associated nebulae and compared the geometry of the outflow/disk system suggested by our data with that already proposed on the basis of previous studies. Our K-band image shows bright circumstellar nebulosity detected within ˜ 2" around the central source, while it is less conspicuous at shorter wavelengths. PA and the size of this red color nebulosity agree with those of the previously detected polarization disk. Agreements among these data indicate that this bright nebulosity region, which follows the reddening law, might be attributed to a disklike structure. At J and optical wavelengths, several blue knotlike structures are detected around and beyond the bright circumstellar nebulosity. We suggest that these knotty reflection nebulae may represent disintegrating fragments of an infalling envelope. The three-color composite image has the appearance of arc-shaped nebulosity. We interpret these structures as being roots of a bipolar cavity opening toward the northeast and the southwest. The complex distribution of reflection nebulosity seen around RNO 91 appears to confirm the interpretation that this source is an object dispersing its molecular envelope while transitioning from protostar to T Tauri star.

  18. Midwave infrared type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice detectors with mixed interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plis, E.; Annamalai, S.; Posani, K. T.; Krishna, S.; Rupani, R. A.; Ghosh, S.

    2006-07-01

    We report the growth and fabrication of midwave infrared InAs/GaSb strain layer superlattice (SLS) detectors. Growth of alternate interfaces leads to a reduced strain between the GaSb buffer and SLS ({delta}a{sub parallel}/a=-5x10{sup -4}), enabling the growth of active regions up to 3 {mu}m (625 periods). The structural, optical, and electrical properties of the active region were characterized using x-ray crystallography and photoluminescence, respectively. p-i-n detectors were grown using 625 periods of 8 ML (monolayer) InAs/8 ML GaSb as the active region. The {lambda}{sub cutoff} for the detectors was 4.6 {mu}m with a conversion efficiency of 32% at V{sub b}=-0.2 V. Detectivity was obtained using noise power spectral density measurements under 300 K 2{pi} field of view illumination and was equal to 5.2x10{sup 10} and 3x10{sup 10} cm Hz{sup 1/2}/W (V{sub b}=-0.02 V, T=80 K) in the white noise and 1/f noise limit (at 50 Hz)

  19. ARE THE FAINT STRUCTURES AHEAD OF SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS REAL SIGNATURES OF DRIVEN SHOCKS?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Ok; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Kangjin; Lee, Jin-Yi; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Kim, Sujin E-mail: moonyj@khu.ac.kr

    2014-11-20

    Recently, several studies have assumed that the faint structures ahead of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are caused by CME-driven shocks. In this study, we have conducted a statistical investigation to determine whether or not the appearance of such faint structures depends on CME speeds. For this purpose, we use 127 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle Spectroscopic COronagraph (LASCO) front-side halo (partial and full) CMEs near the limb from 1997 to 2011. We classify these CMEs into two groups by visual inspection of CMEs in the LASCO-C2 field of view: Group 1 has the faint structure ahead of a CME and Group 2 does not have such a structure. We find the following results. (1) Eighty-seven CMEs belong to Group 1 and 40 CMEs belong to Group 2. (2) Group 1 events have much higher speeds (average = 1230 km s{sup –1} and median = 1199 km s{sup –1}) than Group 2 events (average = 598 km s{sup –1} and median = 518 km s{sup –1}). (3) The fraction of CMEs with faint structures strongly depends on CME speeds (V): 0.93 (50/54) for fast CMEs with V ≥ 1000 km s{sup –1}, 0.65 (34/52) for intermediate CMEs with 500 km s{sup –1} ≤ V < 1000 km s{sup –1}, and 0.14 (3/21) for slow CMEs with V < 500 km s{sup –1}. We also find that the fraction of CMEs with deca-hecto metric type II radio bursts is consistent with the above tendency. Our results indicate that the observed faint structures ahead of fast CMEs are most likely an enhanced density manifestation of CME-driven shocks.

  20. Faint object 3D spectroscopy with PMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Martin M.; Becker, Thomas; Kelz, Andreas; Bohm, Petra

    2004-09-01

    PMAS is a fiber-coupled lens array type of integral field spectrograph, which was commissioned at the Calar Alto 3.5m Telescope in May 2001. The optical layout of the instrument was chosen such as to provide a large wavelength coverage, and good transmission from 0.35 to 1 μm. One of the major objectives of the PMAS development has been to perform 3D spectrophotometry, taking advantage of the contiguous array of spatial elements over the 2-dimensional field-of-view of the integral field unit. With science results obtained during the first two years of operation, we illustrate that 3D spectroscopy is an ideal tool for faint object spectrophotometry.

  1. Orbital objects detection algorithm using faint streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Oda, Hiroshi; Hanada, Toshiya

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes an algorithm to detect orbital objects that are small or moving at high apparent velocities from optical images by utilizing their faint streaks. In the conventional object-detection algorithm, a high signal-to-noise-ratio (e.g., 3 or more) is required, whereas in our proposed algorithm, the signals are summed along the streak direction to improve object-detection sensitivity. Lower signal-to-noise ratio objects were detected by applying the algorithm to a time series of images. The algorithm comprises the following steps: (1) image skewing, (2) image compression along the vertical axis, (3) detection and determination of streak position, (4) searching for object candidates using the time-series streak-position data, and (5) selecting the candidate with the best linearity and reliability. Our algorithm's ability to detect streaks with signals weaker than the background noise was confirmed using images from the Australia Remote Observatory.

  2. Observing Faint Companions Close to Bright Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, Eugene

    2012-04-01

    Progress in a number of technical areas is enabling imaging and interferometric observations at both smaller angular separations from bright stars and at deeper relative contrast levels. Here we discuss recent progress in several ongoing projects at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First, extreme adaptive optics wavefront correction has recently enabled the use of very short (i.e., blue) wavelengths to resolve close binaries. Second, phase-based coronagraphy has recently allowed observations of faint companions to within nearly one diffraction beam width of bright stars. Finally, rotating interferometers that can observe inside the diffraction beam of single aperture telescopes are being developed to detect close-in companions and bright exozodiacal dust. This paper presents a very brief summary of the techniques involved, along with some illustrative results.

  3. Spectrum from Faint Galaxy IRAS F00183-7111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has detected the building blocks of life in the distant universe, albeit in a violent milieu. Training its powerful infrared eye on a faint object located at a distance of 3.2 billion light-years, Spitzer has observed the presence of water and organic molecules in the galaxy IRAS F00183-7111. With an active galactic nucleus, this is one of the most luminous galaxies in the universe, rivaling the energy output of a quasar. Because it is heavily obscured by dust (see visible-light image in the inset), most of its luminosity is radiated at infrared wavelengths.

    The infrared spectrograph instrument onboard Spitzer breaks light into its constituent colors, much as a prism does for visible light. The image shows a low-resolution spectrum of the galaxy obtained by the spectrograph at wavelengths between 4 and 20 microns. Spectra are graphical representations of a celestial object's unique blend of light. Characteristic patterns, or fingerprints, within the spectra allow astronomers to identify the object's chemical composition and to determine such physical properties as temperature and density.

    The broad depression in the center of the spectrum denotes the presence of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand) in the galaxy. An emission peak within the bottom of the trough is the chemical signature for molecular hydrogen. The hydrocarbons (orange) are organic molecules comprised of carbon and hydrogen, two of the most common elements on Earth. Since it has taken more than three billion years for the light from the galaxy to reach Earth, it is intriguing to note the presence of organics in a distant galaxy at a time when life is thought to have started forming on our home planet.

    Additional features in the spectrum reveal the presence of water ice (blue), carbon dioxide ice (green) and carbon monoxide (purple) in both gas and solid forms. The magenta peak corresponds to singly ionized neon gas, a spectral line often used by

  4. Searching for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Krisko, Paula; Silha, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    We report on results from a search for optically faint debris (defined as R > 20th magnitude, or smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175)) at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope "Walter Baade" at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to characterize the brightness distribution of debris to the faintest limiting magnitude possible. Our data was obtained during 6 hours of observing time during the photometric nights of 26 and 27 March 2011 with the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a field of view (fov) of 0.5 degrees in diameter. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter, and calibrated by observations of Landolt standard stars. Our primary objective was to search for optically faint objects from one of the few known fragmentations at GEO: the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for unknown objects on similar orbits but with different mean anomalies. To establish the bright end of the debris population, calibrated observations were acquired on the same field centers, telescope rates, and time period with a similar filter on the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will show the calibrated brightness distributions from both telescopes, and compare the observed brightness distributions with that predicted for various population models of debris of different sizes.

  5. Optical and near-IR observations of the faint and fast 2008ha-like supernova 2010ae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stritzinger, M. D.; Hsiao, E.; Valenti, S.; Taddia, F.; Rivera-Thorsen, T. J.; Leloudas, G.; Maeda, K.; Pastorello, A.; Phillips, M. M.; Pignata, G.; Baron, E.; Burns, C. R.; Contreras, C.; Folatelli, G.; Hamuy, M.; Höflich, P.; Morrell, N.; Prieto, J. L.; Benetti, S.; Campillay, A.; Haislip, J. B.; LaClutze, A. P.; Moore, J. P.; Reichart, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive set of optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and spectroscopy is presented for the faint and fast 2008ha-like supernova (SN) 2010ae. Contingent on the adopted value of host extinction, SN 2010ae reached a peak brightness of -13.8 > MV > -15.3 mag, while modeling of the UVOIR light curve suggests it produced 0.003-0.007 M⊙ of 56Ni, ejected 0.30-0.60 M⊙ of material, and had an explosion energy of 0.04-0.30 × 1051 erg. The values of these explosion parameters are similar to the peculiar SN 2008ha -for which we also present previously unpublished early phase optical and NIR light curves - and places these two transients at the faint end of the 2002cx-like SN population. Detailed inspection of the post-maximum NIR spectroscopic sequence indicates the presence of a multitude of spectral features, which are identified through SYNAPPS modeling to be mainly attributed to Co ii. Comparison with a collection of published and unpublished NIR spectra of other 2002cx-like SNe, reveals that a Co ii footprint is ubiquitous to this subclass of transients, providing a link to Type Ia SNe. A visual-wavelength spectrum of SN 2010ae obtained at +252 days past maximum shows a striking resemblance to a similar epoch spectrum of SN 2002cx. However, subtle differences in the strength and ratio of calcium emission features, as well as diversity among similar epoch spectra of other 2002cx-like SNe indicates a range of physical conditions of the ejecta, highlighting the heterogeneous nature of thispeculiar class of transients. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programs 082.A-0526, 084.D-0719, 088.D-0222, 184.D-1140, and 386.D-0966); the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Programs GS-2010A-Q-14 and GS-2010A-Q-38); the Magellan 6.5 m telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory; and the SOAR telescope.Tables 1-5 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http

  6. Theoretical Design and Material Growth of Type-II Antimonide-based Superlattices for Infrared Detection and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Binh-Minh

    The goal of this PhD thesis is to investigate quantum properties of the superlattice system, design appropriate device architectures and experimentally fabricate infrared detectors which can outperform currently existing devices. In parallel, efforts in material growth using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have resulted in higher material quality and vastly improved growth conditions of III-V compounds as compared to previous work. Superlattices as thick as 15mum were realized without growth defects or dislocations, narrow X-ray diffraction peaks and small surface roughness. Many ternary and quaternary layers such as InAsSb, AlAsSb, GaAlAsSb were routinely used in new design architectures to enhance the electrical performance of the devices. Advances in theoretical calculations and material growth have allowed this work to continue with comprehensive studies of photodetector device architectures. Fundamental parameters affecting the performance of infrared detectors were investigated. We have experimentally pointed out the difference in the collection of photocurrent generated in the n-type and p-type regions. By forcing the device's active region to have an appropriate p-doped concentration, and by assuring long diffusion carrier lengths with high material quality, the quantum efficiency of Type-II superlattice photodiodes have been demonstrated in excess 50% in front side illumination configuration and 75% in back side illumination configuration. In an attempt to optimize the electrical performance, basic mechanisms of the dark current have been thoroughly analyzed. By intentionally doping the active region, the diffusion and generation-recombination currents were reduced until they were overwhelmed by the tunneling current. The device performance was then further enhanced due to the suppression of the tunneling current using the hetero-design of the M-structure superlattice. This optimization scheme can be repeated iteratively to lower all bulk-components of the

  7. Thermal infrared properties of classical and type II Cepheids. Diffraction limited 10 μm imaging with VLT/VISIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, A.; Kervella, P.; Mérand, A.

    2012-02-01

    We present new thermal infrared (IR) photometry and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of eight classical Cepheids (type I) and three type II Cepheids, using VISIR thermal IR photometric measurements, supplemented with literature data. We used the BURST mode of the instrument to get diffraction-limited images at 8.59, 11.25, and 11.85 μm. The SEDs show a IR excess at wavelengths longer than 10 μm in ten of the eleven stars. We tentatively attribute these excesses to circumstellar emission created by mass loss from the Cepheids. On the basis of some hypotheses for the dust composition, we estimate a total mass of the envelope ranging from 10-10 to 10-8 M⊙. We also detect a spatially extended emission around AX Cir, X Sgr, W Sgr, Y Oph, and U Car, while we do not resolve the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of the other stars. The averaged circumstellar envelope brightnesses relative to the stellar photosphere are α(AX Cir) = 13.8 ± 2.5%,α(X Sgr) = 7.9 ± 1.4%,α(W Sgr) = 3.8 ± 0.6%,α(Y Oph) = 15.1 ± 1.4%, and α(U Car) = 16.3 ± 1.4% at 8.59 μm. With this study, we extend the number of classical Cepheids with detected CSEs from 9 to 14, confirming that at least a large fraction of all Cepheids are experiencing significant mass loss. The presence of these CSEs may also impact the future use of Cepheids as standard candles at near and thermal infrared wavelengths. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal observatory under program ID 081.D-0165(A).Table 2 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. First Results from the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolstencroft, R. D.; Wehrle, A. E.; Levine, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the first result from the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey (IIFGS), a program designed to obtain ISO observations of the most distant and luminous galaxies in the IRAS Faint Source Survey by filling short gaps in the ISO observing schedule with pairs of 12um ISOCAM AND 90um ISOPHOT observation.

  9. The Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Debris Disk Catalog. II. Silicate Feature Analysis of Unresolved Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Tushar; Chen, Christine H.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Manoj, P.; Sargent, Benjamin A.; Watson, Dan M.; Lisse, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, astronomers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates that have been compiled in the Spitzer IRS Debris Disk Catalog. We have discovered 10 and/or 20 μm silicate emission features toward 120 targets in the catalog and modeled the IRS spectra of these sources, consistent with MIPS 70 μm observations, assuming that the grains are composed of silicates (olivine, pyroxene, forsterite, and enstatite) and are located either in a continuous disk with power-law size and surface density distributions or thin rings that are well-characterized using two separate dust grain temperatures. For systems better fit by the continuous disk model, we find that (1) the dust size distribution power-law index is consistent with that expected from a collisional cascade, q = 3.5-4.0, with a large number of values outside this range, and (2) the minimum grain size, a min, increases with stellar luminosity, L *, but the dependence of a min on L * is weaker than expected from radiation pressure alone. In addition, we also find that (3) the crystalline fraction of dust in debris disks evolves as a function of time with a large dispersion in crystalline fractions for stars of any particular stellar age or mass, (4) the disk inner edge is correlated with host star mass, and (5) there exists substantial variation in the properties of coeval disks in Sco-Cen, indicating that the observed variation is probably due to stochasticity and diversity in planet formation.

  10. Nuclear and extended spectra of NGC 1068 - II. Near-infrared stellar population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Lucimara P.; Riffel, Rogério; Rodríguez-Ardila, Alberto; Gruenwald, Ruth; de Souza, Ronaldo

    2010-08-01

    We performed stellar population synthesis on the nuclear and extended regions of NGC 1068 by means of near-infrared spectroscopy to disentangle their spectral energy distribution components. This is the first time that such a technique is applied to the whole 0.8-2.4 μm wavelength interval in this galaxy. NGC 1068 is one of the nearest and probably the most studied Seyfert 2 galaxy, becoming an excellent laboratory to study the interaction between black holes, the jets that they can produce and the medium in which they propagate. Our main result is that traces of young stellar population are found at ~100 pc south of the nucleus. The contribution of a power-law continuum in the centre is about 25 per cent, which is expected if the light is scattered from a Seyfert 1 nucleus. We find peaks in the contribution of the featureless continuum about 100-150 pc from the nucleus on both sides. They might be associated with regions where the jet encounters dense clouds. Further support to this scenario is given by the peaks of hot dust distribution found around these same regions and the H2 emission-line profile, leading us to propose that the peaks might be associated to regions where stars are being formed. Hot dust also has an important contribution to the nuclear region, reinforcing the idea of the presence of a dense, circumnuclear torus in this galaxy. Cold dust appears mostly in the south direction, which supports the view that the south-west emission is behind the plane of the galaxy and is extinguished very likely by dust in the plane. Intermediate-age stellar population contributes significantly to the continuum, especially in the inner 200 pc.

  11. THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH DEBRIS DISK CATALOG. II. SILICATE FEATURE ANALYSIS OF UNRESOLVED TARGETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Tushar; Chen, Christine H.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Manoj, P.; Sargent, Benjamin A.; Watson, Dan M.; Lisse, Carey M.

    2015-01-10

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, astronomers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates that have been compiled in the Spitzer IRS Debris Disk Catalog. We have discovered 10 and/or 20 μm silicate emission features toward 120 targets in the catalog and modeled the IRS spectra of these sources, consistent with MIPS 70 μm observations, assuming that the grains are composed of silicates (olivine, pyroxene, forsterite, and enstatite) and are located either in a continuous disk with power-law size and surface density distributions or thin rings that are well-characterized using two separate dust grain temperatures. For systems better fit by the continuous disk model, we find that (1) the dust size distribution power-law index is consistent with that expected from a collisional cascade, q = 3.5-4.0, with a large number of values outside this range, and (2) the minimum grain size, a {sub min}, increases with stellar luminosity, L {sub *}, but the dependence of a {sub min} on L {sub *} is weaker than expected from radiation pressure alone. In addition, we also find that (3) the crystalline fraction of dust in debris disks evolves as a function of time with a large dispersion in crystalline fractions for stars of any particular stellar age or mass, (4) the disk inner edge is correlated with host star mass, and (5) there exists substantial variation in the properties of coeval disks in Sco-Cen, indicating that the observed variation is probably due to stochasticity and diversity in planet formation.

  12. Supermassive black holes and their host galaxies. II. The correlation with near-infrared luminosity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Läsker, Ronald; Van de Ven, Glenn; Ferrarese, Laura; Shankar, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We present an investigation of the scaling relations between supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses, M {sub •}, and their host galaxies' K-band bulge (L {sub bul}) and total (L {sub tot}) luminosities. The wide-field WIRCam imager at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope was used to obtain the deepest and highest resolution near-infrared images available for a sample of 35 galaxies with securely measured M {sub •}, selected irrespective of Hubble type. For each galaxy, we derive bulge and total magnitudes using a two-dimensional image decomposition code that allows us to account, if necessary, for large- and small-scale disks, cores, bars, nuclei, rings, envelopes, and spiral arms. We find that the present-day M {sub •}-L {sub bul} and M {sub •}-L {sub tot} relations have consistent intrinsic scatter, suggesting that M {sub •} correlates equally well with bulge and total luminosity of the host. Our analysis provides only mild evidence of a decreased scatter if the fit is restricted to elliptical galaxies. The log-slopes of the M {sub •}-L {sub bul} and M {sub •}-L {sub tot} relations are 0.75 ± 0.10 and 0.92 ± 0.14, respectively. However, while the slope of the M {sub •}-L {sub bul} relation depends on the detail of the image decomposition, the characterization of M {sub •}-L {sub tot} does not. Given the difficulties and ambiguities of decomposing galaxy images into separate components, our results indicate that L {sub tot} is more suitable as a tracer of SMBH mass than L {sub bul}, and that the M {sub •}-L {sub tot} relation should be used when studying the co-evolution of SMBHs and galaxies.

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ASYMMETRY ORIGIN OF GALAXIES IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS. II. NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Plauchu-Frayn, I.; Coziol, R. E-mail: rcoziol@astro.ugto.m

    2010-08-15

    In this second paper of two analyses, we present near-infrared (NIR) morphological and asymmetry studies performed in a sample of 92 galaxies found in different density environments: galaxies in compact groups (CGs; HCGs in the Hickson Catalog of Compact Groups of Galaxies), isolated pairs of galaxies (KPGs in Karachentsev's list of isolated pairs of galaxies), and isolated galaxies (KIGs in Karachentseva's Catalog of Isolated Galaxies). Both studies have proved useful for identifying the effect of interactions on galaxies. In the NIR, the properties of the galaxies in HCGs, KPGs, and KIGs are more similar than they are in the optical. This is because the NIR band traces the older stellar populations, which formed earlier and are more relaxed than the younger populations. However, we found asymmetries related to interactions in both KPG and HCG samples. In HCGs, the fraction of asymmetric galaxies is even higher than what we found in the optical. In the KPGs the interactions look like very recent events, while in the HCGs galaxies are more morphologically evolved and show properties suggesting they suffered more frequent interactions. The key difference seems to be the absence of star formation in the HCGs; while interactions produce intense star formation in the KPGs, we do not see this effect in the HCGs. This is consistent with the dry merger hypothesis; the interaction between galaxies in CGs is happening without the presence of gas. If the gas was spent in stellar formation (to build the bulge of the numerous early-type galaxies), then the HCGs possibly started interacting sometime before the KPGs. On the other hand, the dry interaction condition in CGs suggests that the galaxies are on merging orbits, and consequently such system cannot be that much older either. Cosmologically speaking, the difference in formation time between pairs of galaxies and CGs may be relatively small. The two phenomena are typical of the formation of structures in low

  14. SUBARU MID-INFRARED IMAGING OF THE QUADRUPLE LENSES. II. UNVEILING LENS STRUCTURE OF MG0414+0534 AND Q2237+030

    SciTech Connect

    Minezaki, Takeo; Chiba, Masashi; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Inoue, Kaiki Taro; Kataza, Hirokazu E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.jp E-mail: kinoue@phys.kindai.ac.jp

    2009-05-20

    We present mid-infrared imaging at 11.7 {mu}m for the quadruple lens systems, MG0414+0534 and Q2237+030, using the cooled mid-infrared camera and spectrometer attached on the Subaru telescope. MG0414+0534 is characterized by a bright pair of lensed images (A1, A2) and their optical flux ratio A2/A1 deviates significantly from the prediction of a smooth-lens model. Q2237+030 is 'the Einstein Cross' being comprised of four lensed images, which are significantly affected by microlensing in a foreground lensing galaxy. Our mid-infrared observations of these lensed images have revealed that the mid-infrared flux ratio for A2/A1 of MG0414+0534 is nearly unity (0.90 {+-} 0.04). We find that this flux ratio is systematically small, at 4-5{sigma} level, compared with the prediction of a best smooth-lens model (1.09) represented by a singular isothermal ellipsoid and external shear. The smooth-lens model, which also considers the additional lensing effect of the possible faint satellite, object X, still provides a large flux ratio of A2/A1=1.06, thereby suggesting the presence of more substructures that can explain our observational result. In contrast, for Q2237+030, our high signal-to-noise observation indicates that the mid-infrared flux ratios between all the four images of Q2237+030 are virtually consistent with the prediction of a smooth-lens model. Based on the size estimate of the dust torus surrounding the nuclei of these QSOs, we set limits on the mass of a substructure in these lens systems, which can cause anomalies in the flux ratios. For MG0414+0534, since the required mass of a substructure inside its Einstein radius is {approx}>360 M {sub sun}, millilensing by a cold dark matter substructure is most likely. If it is modeled as a singular isothermal sphere, the mass inside a radius of 100 pc is given as {approx}>1.0 x 10{sup 5} M {sub sun}. For Q2237+030, there is no significant evidence of millilensing, so the reported anomalous flux ratios in shorter

  15. MODELING THE NUCLEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE II ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Lira, Paulina; Videla, Liza; Wu, Yanling; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-20

    We present results from model fitting to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a homogeneous sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 {mu}m Galaxy Sample. Imaging and nuclear flux measurements are presented in an accompanying paper. Here we add Spitzer/IRS observations to further constrain the SEDs after careful subtraction of a starburst component. We use the library of CLUMPY torus models from Nenkova et al. and also test the two-phase models recently produced by Stalevski et al. We find that photometric and spectroscopic observations in the mid-IR ({lambda} {approx}> 5 {mu}m) are crucial to properly constrain the best-fit torus models. About half of our sources show clear near-IR excess of their SEDs above the best-fit models. This problem can be less severe when using the Stalevski et al. models. The nature of this emission is not clear since best-fitted blackbody temperatures are very high ({approx}1700-2500 K) and the Type II classification of our sources would correspond to a small probability to peer directly into the hottest regions of the torus. Crucially, the derived torus parameters are quite robust when using CLUMPY models, independently of whether or not the sources require an additional blackbody component. Our findings suggest that tori are characterized by N{sub 0}{approx}>5, {sigma} {approx}> 40, {tau} {approx}< 25, Angle i {approx}> 40 Degree-Sign , Y {approx}< 50, and A {sup los} {sub v} {approx} 100-300, where N{sub 0} is the number of clouds in the equatorial plane of the torus, {sigma} is the characteristic opening angle of the cloud distribution, {tau} is the opacity of a single cloud, Angle i is the line-of-sight orientation of the torus, Y is the ratio of the inner to the outer radii, and A {sup los} {sub v} is the total opacity along the line of sight. From these, we can determine typical torus sizes and masses of 0.1-5.0 pc and 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, respectively. We find tentative evidence that those nuclei with

  16. Type-II superlattice detector for long-wave infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, A.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Ilan, E.; Kahanov, E.; Klin, O.; Langof, L.; Livneh, Y.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shkedy, L.; Shtrichman, I.; Snapi, N.; Talmor, R.; Tuito, A.; Vaserman, S.; Weiss, E.

    2015-06-01

    When incorporated into the active layer of a "XBp" detector structure, Type II InAs/GaSb superlattices (T2SLs) offer a high quantum efficiency (QE) and a low diffusion limited dark current, close to MCT Rule 07. Using a simulation tool that was developed to predict the QE as a function of the T2SL period dimensions and active layer stack thickness, we have designed and fabricated a new focal plane array (FPA) T2SL XBp detector. The detector goes by the name of "Pelican-D LW", and has a format of 640 ×512 pixels with a pitch of 15 μm. The FPA has a QE of 50% (one pass), a cut-off of ~9.5 μm, and operates at 77K with a high operability, background limited performance and good stability. It uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit, and the integrated detector cooler assembly (IDCA) closely follows the configuration of SCD's Pelican-D MWIR detector.

  17. A HERSCHEL SURVEY OF THE [N II] 205 {mu}m LINE IN LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: THE [N II] 205 {mu}m EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION RATE INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yinghe; Gao Yu; Lu, Nanyao; Xu, C. Kevin; Lord, S.; Howell, J.; Appleton, P.; Mazzarella, J.; Schulz, B.; Isaak, K. G.; Charmandaris, V.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Evans, A.; Iwasawa, K.; Leech, J.; Petric, A. O.; Sanders, D. B.; Van der Werf, P. P.

    2013-03-01

    We present, for the first time, a statistical study of [N II] 205 {mu}m line emission for a large sample of local luminous infrared galaxies using Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE FTS) data. For our sample of galaxies, we investigate the correlation between the [N II] luminosity (L{sub [N{sub II]}}) and the total infrared luminosity (L{sub IR}), as well as the dependence of L{sub [N{sub II]}}/L{sub IR} ratio on L{sub IR}, far-infrared colors (IRAS f{sub 60}/f{sub 100}), and the [O III] 88 {mu}m to [N II] luminosity ratio. We find that L{sub [N{sub II]}} correlates almost linearly with L{sub IR} for non-active galactic nucleus galaxies (all having L{sub IR} < 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) in our sample, which implies that L{sub [N{sub II]}} can serve as a star formation rate tracer which is particularly useful for high-redshift galaxies that will be observed with forthcoming submillimeter spectroscopic facilities such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Our analysis shows that the deviation from the mean L{sub [N{sub II]}}-L{sub IR} relation correlates with tracers of the ionization parameter, which suggests that the scatter in this relation is mainly due to the variations in the hardness, and/or ionization parameter, of the ambient galactic UV field among the sources in our sample.

  18. Results and analyses of faint field galaxy surveys with the Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, D. W.

    1996-12-01

    A large collaboration at Caltech has been using the Keck and other telescopes to perform UBVRIKL imaging and take spectra of faint galaxies. The spectroscopic samples contain several hundred objects to K=20 mag or R=24 mag and the imaging samples contain thousands of sources to R~ 27. Faint field galaxies are found to be strongly clustered in velocity space; the angular coherence, masses and morphologies in configuration space of these structures are investigated. In cooperation with the University of Hawaii group, the luminosity function of galaxies is computed in the near-infrared; strong evolution is found in the number of low-luminosity galaxies to z~ 1, although the statistical properties of high-luminosity objects are relatively constant. A range of models for the faint galaxy counts are constructed, not on the basis of a priori information about galaxy properties (from, say, cosmogonic theory) but rather by ``inverting'' the data under a range of qualitatively distinct simplifying assumptions. Predictions are made for ongoing or future imaging and spectroscopy surveys which will clearly distinguish the models. The prospects for a ``meta-analysis'' of a large collection of heterogeneous surveys to create consistent galaxy evolution models from z=0 to the highest observed redshifts are discussed.

  19. Near-Infrared Emitters: Stepwise Assembly of Two Heteropolynuclear Clusters with Tunable Ag(I):Zn(II) Ratio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi; Zhuang, Gui-Lin; Deng, Yong-Kai; Feng, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Zhao-Zhen; Kurmoo, Mohamedally; Tung, Chen-Ho; Sun, Di

    2016-05-16

    Two 3d-4d heteropolynuclear clusters with Ag-Zn ratios of 9:2 and 9:4 were stepwise constructed from a robust nonanuclear silver cluster. Their crystal structures consist of a common bucket-shaped [Ag9(mba)9](9-) (H2mba = 2-mercaptobenzoic acid) core with different numbers of Zn(II) connected by different exo-oriented carboxylates. Most fascinating is the observation of emission (∼703 nm) in the near-infrared (NIR) region at 300 K that may be compared to the related Ag9Zn3 cluster with aliphatic polyamine as auxiliary ligand that emits from the visible (∼580 nm). The shift is associated with the change of ligand field of the 2,2'-bipyridine. The emission intensity and lifetime were dramatically enhanced along with the slight bathochromic shift upon cooling from 300 K to 80 K. The results raise two significant issues: (a) the structural and electronic effects of the secondary metal binding to the metalloligand and the factors influencing the heteropolynuclear cluster assembly and (b) the use of NIR fluorescence, introduced by integrating two luminophores into one heteropolynuclear entity, in detecting free-moving zinc in biological systems both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27110839

  20. Growth and electrical characterization of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices for midwave infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lixue; Sun, Weiguo; Xu, Yingqiang; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Liang; Si, Junjie

    2014-07-01

    Herein, we report a type II InAs/GaSb superlattice structure (SLS) grown on GaSb(1 0 0) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and its electrical characterization for mid-wavelength infrared detection. A GaSb buffer layer was grown under optimized SLS growth conditions, which can decrease the occurrence of defects for similar pyramidal structures. The complications associated with these conditions include oxide desorption of the substrate, growth temperature of the SLS, the V/III ratio during superlattice growth and the shutter sequence. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) shows the sixth satellite peak, and the period of the SLS was 52.9 Å. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) images indicated that the roughness was less than 2.8 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images indicated that the SLS contains few structural defects related to interface dislocations or strain relaxation during the growth of the superlattice layer. The photoresponse spectra indicated that the cutoff wavelength was 4.8 μm at 300 K. The SLS photodiode surface was passivated by a zinc sulfide (ZnS) coating after anodic sulfide.

  1. Star formation in the inner Galaxy - a far-infrared and radio study of two H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, D.F.; Dinerstein, H.L.; Harvey, P.M.; Evans, N.J. II; Werner, M.W.

    1985-09-01

    Far-infrared and radio continuum maps have been made of two inner-Galaxy H II region complexes, G30.8-0.0 and G25.4-0.2, along with radio and molecular line measurements at selected positions. The far-IR emission from each region is dominated by two sources. For both G25.4 and G30.8, the distribution of the emission is similar to that of the radio emission, indicating that OB stars provide most of the heating. There is evidence that extinction plays an important role in G30.8, even in the far-IR. A near-IR point source has been detected in G30.8 at the position of peak far-IR color temperature. This source may be the ionizing star for the core of G30.8. Measurement of forbidden S III 9532 A from G25.4SE indicates that the extinction toward this source is very low, which is difficult to reconcile with previously determined distance measurements to this source. 49 references.

  2. Is the faint young Sun paradox solved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, E. T.; Toon, O. B.

    2013-12-01

    How did the early Earth remain warm despite weak solar luminosity? The faint young Sun paradox has stubbornly resisted a self-consistent solution since it was first introduced by Sagan and Mullen [1] over four decades ago. However, recent revisions to expected paleo-ocean temperatures [2, 3] along with new results from three-dimensional climate models [4] may allow this long standing problem to be finally put to rest. Here we use a modified version of the Community Atmosphere Model version 3 from the National Center for Atmospheric Research to study early climate. We find that resolving the faint young Sun paradox becomes less problematic when viewing a full representation of the climate system. For the late Archean climate (80% solar constant), relatively modest amounts of CO2 (≤0.02 bar) and CH4 (0.001 bar) yield surface temperatures equal to the present day with no other alterations to climate. Cooler climates with large ice caps but with temperate tropical regions can be supported with considerably smaller greenhouse gas burdens. The incorporation of systematic climate system elements expected for the Archean such as fewer cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) [5], reduced land albedos [5], and an increased atmospheric inventory of N2 [6], can provide a combined 10 to 20 K of additional surface warming given reasonable assumptions. With the inclusion of 0.001 bar of CH4, 2 PAL of N2, reduced land albedos, and reduced CCN, present day mean surface temperatures can be maintained for the earliest Archean (75% solar constant) with only ~0.01 bar of CO2. However, lower requirements for atmospheric CO2 may imply that photochemical hazes were frequent during the Archean. [1] Sagan, C., & Mullen, G. Science 177, 52 (1972) [2] Hren, M.T., Tice, M.M., & Chamberlin, C.P. Nature 462, 205 (2009) [3] Blake. R.E., Chang, S.J., & Lepland, A. Nature 464, 1029 (2010) [4] Wolf, E.T., & Toon, O.B. Astrobiology 13(7), 1 (2013) [5] Rosing, M.T., Bird, D.K., Sleep, N.H., & Bjerrum, C

  3. No climate paradox under the faint early Sun.

    PubMed

    Rosing, Minik T; Bird, Dennis K; Sleep, Norman H; Bjerrum, Christian J

    2010-04-01

    Environmental niches in which life first emerged and later evolved on the Earth have undergone dramatic changes in response to evolving tectonic/geochemical cycles and to biologic interventions, as well as increases in the Sun's luminosity of about 25 to 30 per cent over the Earth's history. It has been inferred that the greenhouse effect of atmospheric CO(2) and/or CH(4) compensated for the lower solar luminosity and dictated an Archaean climate in which liquid water was stable in the hydrosphere. Here we demonstrate, however, that the mineralogy of Archaean sediments, particularly the ubiquitous presence of mixed-valence Fe(II-III) oxides (magnetite) in banded iron formations is inconsistent with such high concentrations of greenhouse gases and the metabolic constraints of extant methanogens. Prompted by this, and the absence of geologic evidence for very high greenhouse-gas concentrations, we hypothesize that a lower albedo on the Earth, owing to considerably less continental area and to the lack of biologically induced cloud condensation nuclei, made an important contribution to moderating surface temperature in the Archaean eon. Our model calculations suggest that the lower albedo of the early Earth provided environmental conditions above the freezing point of water, thus alleviating the need for extreme greenhouse-gas concentrations to satisfy the faint early Sun paradox. PMID:20360739

  4. FIRST SCIENCE RESULTS FROM SOFIA/FORCAST: THE MID-INFRARED VIEW OF THE COMPACT H II REGION W3A

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, F.; Berne, O.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Adams, J. D.; Herter, T. L.; Gull, G.; Schoenwald, J.; Keller, L. D.; De Buizer, J. M.; Vacca, W. D.; Becklin, E. E.; Shuping, R. Y.; Zinnecker, H.

    2012-04-20

    The massive star-forming region W3 was observed with the faint object infrared camera for the SOFIA telescope as part of the Short Science program. The 6.4, 6.6, 7.7, 19.7, 24.2, 31.5, and 37.1 {mu}m bandpasses were used to observe the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, very small grains, and big grains. Optical depth and color temperature maps of W3A show that IRS2 has blown a bubble devoid of gas and dust of {approx}0.05 pc radius. It is embedded in a dusty shell of ionized gas that contributes 40% of the total 24 {mu}m emission of W3A. This dust component is mostly heated by far-ultraviolet, rather than trapped Ly{alpha} photons. This shell is itself surrounded by a thin ({approx}0.01 pc) photodissociation region where PAHs show intense emission. The infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of three different zones located at 8'', 20'', and 25'' from IRS2 shows that the peak of the SED shifts toward longer wavelengths, when moving away from the star. Adopting the stellar radiation field for these three positions, DUSTEM model fits to these SEDs yield a dust-to-gas mass ratio in the ionized gas similar to that in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). However, the ratio of the IR-to-UV opacity of the dust in the ionized shell is increased by a factor of {approx_equal}3 compared to the diffuse ISM.

  5. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  6. Detection of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2014-01-01

    There have been extensive optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) conducted with meter-class telescopes, such as those conducted with MODEST (the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope, a 0.6-m telescope located at Cerro Tololo in Chile), and the European Space Agency's 1.0-m space debris telescope (SDT) in the Canary Islands. These surveys have detection limits in the range of 18th or 19th magnitude, which corresponds to sizes larger than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. All of these surveys reveal a substantial population of objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude that are not in the public U.S. Satellite Catalog. To detect objects fainter than 20th magnitude (and presumably smaller than 10 cm) in the visible requires a larger telescope and excellent imaging conditions. This combination is available in Chile. NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office has begun collecting orbital debris observations with the 6.5-m (21.3-ft diameter) "Walter Baade" Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The goal is to detect objects as faint as possible from a ground-based observatory and begin to understand the brightness distribution of GEO debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude.

  7. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectra, and AB initio calculations for cadmium(II)-cysteinate glycinate complex [Cd(Cys)(Gly)].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Joanna Maria; Faget O, Grisset; Felcman, Judith; Téllez S, Claudio A

    2008-12-15

    The cysteinate glycinate cadmium(II) complex was synthesized and structural analysis was carried out using the following methods: determination of the C, H, N, S and O contents, thermogravimetry, infrared and Raman spectra. The most probable structure for the complex at a minimum of energy was calculated by the density functional theory (DFT):B3LYP/3-21G quantum mechanical method. The infrared and Raman spectra were analyzed and bands assigned through the DFT procedures, the stabilization energy being equal to: E(RB+HF-LYP)= -6442.67784a.u. Features of the infrared and Raman spectra confirm theoretical structural prediction with respect to the metal-ligand bonds: Cd-O, Cd-S and Cd-N. Full assignment of the vibrational spectra was also supported by a carefully analysis of the distorted geometries generated by the normal modes. PMID:18534901

  8. Interlayer Transition and Infrared Photodetection in Atomically Thin Type-II MoTe2/MoS2 van der Waals Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kenan; Zhang, Tianning; Cheng, Guanghui; Li, Tianxin; Wang, Shuxia; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Xiaohao; Yu, Weiwei; Sun, Yan; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Dong; Zeng, Changgan; Wang, Xingjun; Hu, Weida; Fan, Hong Jin; Shen, Guozhen; Chen, Xin; Duan, Xiangfeng; Chang, Kai; Dai, Ning

    2016-03-22

    We demonstrate the type-II staggered band alignment in MoTe2/MoS2 van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures and an interlayer optical transition at ∼1.55 μm. The photoinduced charge separation between the MoTe2/MoS2 vdW heterostructure is verified by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) under illumination, density function theory (DFT) simulations and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Photoelectrical measurements of MoTe2/MoS2 vdW heterostructures show a distinct photocurrent response in the infrared regime (1550 nm). The creation of type-II vdW heterostructures with strong interlayer coupling could improve our fundamental understanding of the essential physics behind vdW heterostructures and help the design of next-generation infrared optoelectronics. PMID:26950255

  9. Transmission of holographic 3D images using infrared transmitter(II): on a study of transmission of holographic 3D images using infrared transmitter safe to medical equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Kunihiko; Muto, Kenji; Tian, Lan; Sato, Koki

    2007-09-01

    An infrared transmitting technique for 3D holographic images is studied. It seems to be very effective as a transmitting technique for 3D holographic images in the places where electric wave is prohibited to be used for transmission. In this paper, we first explain our infrared transmitting system for holograms and a display system for the presentation of holographic 3D images reconstructed from the received signal. Next, we make a report on the results obtained by infrared transmission of CGH and a comparison of the real and the reconstructed 3D images in our system. As this result, it is found that reconstructed holographic 3D images do not suffer a large deterioration in the quality and highly contrasted ones can be presented.

  10. Chemical abundances in the multiple sub-giant branch of 47 Tucanae: insights on its faint sub-giant branch component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Casagrande, L.; Collet, R.; Dotter, A.; Johnson, C. I.; Lind, K.; Bedin, L. R.; Jerjen, H.; Aparicio, A.; Sbordone, L.

    2016-06-01

    The globular cluster 47 Tuc exhibits a complex sub-giant branch (SGB) with a faint-SGB comprising only about the 10 per cent of the cluster mass and a bright-SGB hosting at least two distinct populations. We present a spectroscopic analysis of 62 SGB stars including 21 faint-SGB stars. We thus provide the first chemical analysis of the intriguing faint-SGB population and compare its abundances with those of the dominant populations. We have inferred abundances of Fe, representative light elements C, N, Na, and Al, α elements Mg and Si for individual stars. Oxygen has been obtained by co-adding spectra of stars on different sequences. In addition, we have analysed 12 stars along the two main RGBs of 47 Tuc. Our principal results are (i) star-to-star variations in C/N/Na among RGB and bright-SGB stars; (ii) substantial N and Na enhancements for the minor population corresponding to the faint-SGB; (iii) no high enrichment in C+N+O for faint-SGB stars. Specifically, the C+N+O of the faint-SGB is a factor of 1.1 higher than the bright-SGB, which, considering random (±1.3) plus systematic errors (±0.3), means that their C+N+O is consistent within observational uncertainties. However, a small C+N+O enrichment for the faint-SGB, similar to what predicted on theoretical ground, cannot be excluded. The N and Na enrichment of the faint-SGB qualitatively agrees with this population possibly being He-enhanced, as suggested by theory. The iron abundance of the bright and faint-SGB is the same to a level of ˜0.10 dex, and no other significant difference for the analysed elements has been detected.

  11. a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    La Silla, each covering a sky area of 5 o.5 x 5 o.5. When comparing plates of the same sky field obtained at time intervals of several years [1] , she was able to detect, among the hundreds of thousands of stellar images on the plates, a few faint ones whose positions had changed a little in the meantime. The search technique is based on the fact that such a shift is a good indicator of the object being relatively nearby. It must therefore also be intrinsically faint, i.e. a potential White Dwarf candidate. On every pair of plates, approximately twenty faint moving objects were detected with proper motions [2] of more than 0.25 arcsec per year. Indeed, follow-up spectroscopic observations showed that about 20 percent of these or about four per plate were White Dwarfs. Until now, a total of forty new White Dwarfs have been discovered during this very successful project, i.e. over ten times more than originally expected. And then - a Brown Dwarf! Caption to ESO PR Photo 11/97 [JPEG, 144k] ESO Press Photo 11/97 When checking two plates with a time inverval of 11 years, Maria Teresa Ruiz earlier this year discovered a very faint object in the southern constellation of Hydra (The Water-Snake), moving at 0.35 arcsec per year (cf. ESO Press Photo 11/97). In order to establish its true nature, she obtained its spectrum (in the visual to near-infrared region from wavelengths 450-1000 nm) on March 15 using the ESO 3.6-m telescope and the EFOSC1 spectrograph. Caption to ESO PR Photo 12/97 [GIF, 35k] ESO Press Photo 12/97 To her great surprise, the spectrum was of a type never seen before and certainly not that of a White Dwarf or any other easily identifiable type of star (cf. ESO Press Photo 12/97). In particular, there were no signs of spectral bands of titanium oxide (TiO) or vanadium oxide (VO) which are common in very cool stars, nor of the spectral lines seen in White Dwarfs. On the other hand, an absorption line of the short-lived element lithium was identified, as well

  12. Star formation in infrared bright and infrared faint starburst interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Susan A.; Bushouse, Howard A.; Towns, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Short wavelength IUE spectra of Arp 248b and UGC 8315N are combined with optical spectra and interpreted using a combination of spectrum synthesis and spectral diagnostics to place constraints on the massive star populations of the central regions of these galaxies and to deduce information about the star formation histories in the last 10(exp 8) years. The authors find that both galaxies have substantial fractions of their optical light coming from massive stars and that Arp 248b may be dominated in the UV by WR stars. The UV spectra are dominated by radiation from evolved massive stars and the authors place and age on the burst in Arp 248b of a few tens of millions of years.

  13. Faint solar radio structures from decametric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, C.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Melnik, V. N.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: Decameter radio observations of the solar corona reveal the presence of numerous faint frequency drifting emissions, similar to “solar S bursts” which are reported in the literature. We present a statistical analysis of the characteristics of these emissions and propose a mechanism to excite the Langmuir waves thought to be at the origin of these emissions. Methods: The observations were performed between 1998 and 2002 with the Digital Spectro Polarimeter (DSP) receivers operated at the UTR-2 and Nançay decameter radio telescopes in the frequency range 15-30 MHz. Our theoretical explanation is based on Vlasov-Ampère simulations. Results: Based on the frequency drift rate, three populations of structures can be identified. The largest population presents an average negative frequency drift of -0.9 MHz s-1 and a lifetime up to 11 s (median value of 2.72 s). A second population shows a very small frequency drift of -0.1 MHz s-1 and a short lifetime of about 1 s. The third population presents an average positive frequency drift of +0.95 MHz s-1 and a lifetime of up to 3 s. Also, the frequency drift as a function of frequency is consistent with the former results, which present results in higher frequency range. No specific relationship was found between the occurrence of these emissions and the solar cycle or presence of flares. Assuming that these emissions are produced by “electron clouds” propagating the solar corona, we deduce electron velocities of about 3-5 times the electron thermal velocity. As previously shown, a localized, time-dependent modulation of the electron distribution function (heating) leads to low velocity electron clouds (consistent with observations), which, in turn, can generate Langmuir waves and electromagnetic signals by nonlinear processes.

  14. Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldblatt, C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the role which clouds could play in resolving the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP). Lower solar luminosity in the past means that less energy was absorbed on Earth (a forcing of -50 W m-2 during the late Archean), but geological evidence points to the Earth having been at least as warm as it is today, with only very occasional glaciations. We perform radiative calculations on a single global mean atmospheric column. We select a nominal set of three layered, randomly overlapping clouds, which are both consistent with observed cloud climatologies and reproduced the observed global mean energy budget of Earth. By varying the fraction, thickness, height and particle size of these clouds we conduct a wide exploration of how changed clouds could affect climate, thus constraining how clouds could contribute to resolving the FYSP. Low clouds reflect sunlight but have little greenhouse effect. Removing them entirely gives a forcing of +25 W m-2 whilst more modest reduction in their efficacy gives a forcing of +10 to +15 W m-2. For high clouds, the greenhouse effect dominates. It is possible to generate +50 W m-2 forcing from enhancing these, but this requires making them 3.5 times thicker and 14 K colder than the standard high cloud in our nominal set and expanding their coverage to 100% of the sky. Such changes are not credible. More plausible changes would generate no more than +15 W m-2 forcing. Thus neither fewer low clouds nor more high clouds can provide enough forcing to resolve the FYSP. Decreased surface albedo can contribute no more than +5 W m-2 forcing. Some models which have been applied to the FYSP do not include clouds at all. These overestimate the forcing due to increased CO2 by 20 to 25% when pCO2 is 0.01 to 0.1 bar.

  15. Astronomical capabilities of the Faint Object Spectrograph on Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Examples of scientific observing programs planned with the Faint Object Spectrograph on Space Telescope are presented. An overview of the spectrograph design and operation is presented. The expected astronomical performance of the instrument is described in some detail.

  16. NASA Researches the 'FaINT' Side of Sonic Booms

    NASA Video Gallery

    As the latest in a continuing progression of NASA supersonics research projects aimed at reducing or mitigating the effect of sonic booms, the Farfield Investigation of No Boom Threshold, or FaINT,...

  17. A New Faint Milky Way Satellite Discovered in the Pan-STARRS1 3π Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bernard, Edouard J.; Bell, Eric F.; Sesar, Branimir; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Slater, Colin T.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus A.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lupton, Robert H.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Price, Paul A.; Tonry, John L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    We present the discovery of a faint Milky Way satellite, Laevens 2/Triangulum II, found in the Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System 3π imaging data and confirmed with follow-up wide-field photometry from the Large Binocular Cameras. The stellar system, with an absolute magnitude of MV = -1.8 ± 0.5, a heliocentric distance of 30-2+2 kpc, and a half-mass-radius of 34-8+9 pc, shows remarkable similarity to faint, nearby, small satellites such as Willman 1, Segue 1, Segue 2, and Boötes II. The discovery of Laevens 2/Triangulum II further populates the region of parameter space for which the boundary between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters becomes tenuous. Follow-up spectroscopy will ultimately determine the nature of this new satellite, whose spatial location hints at a possible connection with the complex Triangulum-Andromeda stellar structures. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Instituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  18. EXPLAINING THE [C II]157.7 {mu}m DEFICIT IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES-FIRST RESULTS FROM A HERSCHEL/PACS STUDY OF THE GOALS SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Howell, J. H.; Surace, J. A.; Charmandaris, V.; Murphy, E. J.; Haan, S.; Inami, H.; Malhotra, S.; Meijerink, R.; Stacey, G.; Petric, A. O.; Lu, N.; Veilleux, S.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Lord, S.; Appleton, P.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We present the first results of a survey of the [C II]157.7 {mu}m emission line in 241 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) comprising the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample, obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The [C II] luminosities, L{sub [C{sub II]}}, of the LIRGs in GOALS range from {approx}10{sup 7} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} L{sub Sun }. We find that LIRGs show a tight correlation of [C II]/FIR with far-IR (FIR) flux density ratios, with a strong negative trend spanning from {approx}10{sup -2} to 10{sup -4}, as the average temperature of dust increases. We find correlations between the [C II]/FIR ratio and the strength of the 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption feature as well as with the luminosity surface density of the mid-IR emitting region ({Sigma}{sub MIR}), suggesting that warmer, more compact starbursts have substantially smaller [C II]/FIR ratios. Pure star-forming LIRGs have a mean [C II]/FIR {approx} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, while galaxies with low polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) equivalent widths (EWs), indicative of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), span the full range in [C II]/FIR. However, we show that even when only pure star-forming galaxies are considered, the [C II]/FIR ratio still drops by an order of magnitude, from 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -3}, with {Sigma}{sub MIR} and {Sigma}{sub IR}, implying that the [C II]157.7 {mu}m luminosity is not a good indicator of the star formation rate (SFR) for most local LIRGs, for it does not scale linearly with the warm dust emission most likely associated to the youngest stars. Moreover, even in LIRGs in which we detect an AGN in the mid-IR, the majority (2/3) of galaxies show [C II]/FIR {>=} 10{sup -3} typical of high 6.2 {mu}m PAH EW sources, suggesting that most AGNs do not contribute significantly to the FIR emission. We provide an empirical relation between the [C II]/FIR and the specific SFR for star

  19. Near-infrared photometry of isolated spirals with and without an AGN --- II. Photometric properties of the host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, I.; Durret, F.; Masegosa, J.; Moles, M.; González Delgado, R. M.; Marrero, I.; Maza, J.; Pérez, E.; Roth, M.

    2000-08-01

    We present here the analysis of morphological and photometric properties of a sample of isolated spirals with (18) and without (11) an active nucleus, based on near-infrared imaging in the J and K' bands (Paper I). The aim of that comparative analysis is to find the differential properties that could be directly connected with the phenomenon of nuclear activity. We stress the importance of using isolated objects for that purpose. Our study shows that both sets of galaxies are similar in their global properties: they define the same Kormendy relation, their disk components share the same properties, the bulge and disk scale lengths are correlated in a similar way, bar strengths and lengths are similar for primary bars. Our results therefore indicate that hosts of isolated Seyfert galaxies have bulge and disk properties comparable to those of isolated non active spirals. Central colors (the innermost 200 pc) of active galaxies are redder than the centers of non active spirals, most probably due to AGN light being re-emitted by the hot dust and/or due to circumnuclear star formation, through the contribution of giants/supergiants. Central to our analysis is the study of the possible connection between bars and similar non axisymmetric structures with the nuclear fuelling. We note that only one of the Seyfert galaxies in our sample, namely ESO 139-12, does not present a primary bar. But bars are equally present in active and control objects. The same applies to secondary bars. Not all the active galaxies we have observed have them, and some control galaxies also present such central structures. Secondary central elongations (associated with secondary bars, lenses, rings or disks) may be somewhat different, but this result should be confirmed with larger samples. We note that numerical models indicate that such secondary bars are not strictly necessary to feed the central engine when a primary bar is present. Our results show that down to scales of 100-300 pc, there are

  20. Monitoring proton release during photosynthetic water oxidation in photosystem II by means of isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Sugiura, Miwa; Noguchi, Takumi

    2009-06-10

    In photosynthetic water oxidation performed in the water oxidizing center (WOC) of photosystem II (PSII), two water molecules are converted into one oxygen molecule and four protons through a light-driven cycle of intermediates called S states (S(0)-S(4)). To understand the molecular mechanism of water oxidation and the chemical nature of substrate intermediates, it is essential to determine the stoichiometry of proton release from substrate water at individual S-state transitions. In this study, we have monitored proton release during water oxidation by means of isotope-edited Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR difference spectra upon successive flash illumination were measured using PSII core complexes from a thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, which were suspended in a high concentration (200 mM) Mes buffer at pH 6.0. The spectra involved, in addition to protein bands, the bands of the Mes buffer that trapped virtually all protons from the WOC. Mes-only signals were extracted by subtracting the spectra measured in deuterated-Mes (Mes-d(12)). The flash-number dependence of the intensity increase of the isotope-edited Mes signal showed a clear period-four oscillation. By simulating the oscillation with different assumptions about miss factors, the proton release pattern was estimated to be 0.8-1.0:0.2-0.3:0.9-1.2:1.5-1.6 for the S(0)-->S(1)-->S(2)-->S(3)-->S(0) transitions. The effect of H/D exchange on the COOH region of proteins in FTIR difference spectra of the S-state cycle showed that protonation/deprotonation of carboxylic groups contributed little to the observed proton release pattern. Together with the present and previous FTIR results suggesting no involvement of also His and Cys side groups, it was concluded that proton release from substrate water takes place with a 1:0:1:2 stoichiometry, which is perturbed by partial protonation/deprotonation of side groups probably of Arg, Lys, or Tyr located nearby the WOC

  1. Low-frequency fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the oxygen-evolving and quinone acceptor complexes in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chu, H A; Gardner, M T; O'Brien, J P; Babcock, G T

    1999-04-01

    The low-frequency (<1000 cm-1) region of the IR spectrum has the potential to provide detailed structural and mechanistic insight into the photosystem II/oxygen evolving complex (PSII/OEC). A cluster of four manganese ions forms the core of the OEC and diagnostic manganese-ligand and manganese-substrate modes are expected to occur in the 200-900 cm-1 range. However, water also absorbs IR strongly in this region, which has limited previous Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the OEC to higher frequencies (>1000 cm-1). We have overcome the technical obstacles that have blocked FTIR access to low-frequency substrate, cofactor, and protein vibrational modes by using partially dehydrated samples, appropriate window materials, a wide-range MCT detector, a novel band-pass filter, and a closely regulated temperature control system. With this design, we studied PSII/OEC samples that were prepared by brief illumination of O2 evolving and Tris-washed preparations at 200 K or by a single saturating laser flash applied to O2 evolving and inhibited samples at 250 K. These protocols allowed us to isolate low-frequency modes that are specific to the QA-/QA and S2/S1 states. The high-frequency FTIR spectra recorded for these samples and parallel EPR experiments confirmed the states accessed by the trapping procedures we used. In the S2/S1 spectrum, we detect positive bands at 631 and 602 cm-1 and negative bands at 850, 679, 664, and 650 cm-1 that are specifically associated with these two S states. The possible origins of these IR bands are discussed. For the low-frequency QA-/QA difference spectrum, several modes can be assigned to ring stretching and bending modes from the neutral and anion radical states of the quinone acceptor. These results provide insight into the PSII/OEC and demonstrate the utility of FTIR techniques in accessing low-frequency modes in proteins. PMID:10194375

  2. Intercomparison of stratospheric water vapor observed by satellite experiments: Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II versus Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere and Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, E.W.; Larsen, J.C. ); McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R.; Chu, W.P. ); Rind, D. ); Oltmans, S. )

    1993-03-20

    This paper presents a comparison of the stratospheric water vapor measurements made by the satellite-borne sensors the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS), and the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment. LIMS obtained data for 7 months between November 1978 and May 1979; ATMOS was carried on Shuttle and observed eight profiles from April 30 to May 6, 1985 at approximately 30[degrees]N and 50[degrees]S; and, SAGE II continues to make measurements since its launch in October 1984. For both 30[degrees]N and 50[degrees]S in May, the comparisons between SAGE II and ATMOS show agreement within the estimated combined uncertainty of the two experiments. Several important features identified by LIMS observations have been confirmed by SAGE II: a well-developed hygropause in the lower stratosphere at low- to mid-latitudes, a poleward latitudinal gradient, increasing water vapor mixing ratios with altitude in the tropics, and the transport of dry lower stratospheric water vapor upward and southward in May, and upward and northward in November. A detailed comparative study also indicates that the two previously suggested corrections for LIMS, a correction in tropical lower stratosphere due to a positive temperature bias and the correction above 28 km based on improved emissivities will bring LIMS measurements much closer to those of SAGE II. The only significant difference occurs at high southern latitudes in May below 18 km, where LIMS measurements are 2-3 ppmv greater. It should be noted that LIMS observations are from 16 to 50 km, ATMOS from 14 to 86 km, and SAGE II from mid-troposphere to 40 km. With multiyear coverage, SAGE II observations should be useful for studying tropospheric-stratospheric exchange, for stratospheric transport, and for preparing water vapor climatologies for the stratosphere and the upper troposphere. 32 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF FIVE BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES: II Zw 40, Mrk 71, Mrk 930, Mrk 996, and SBS 0335-052E

    SciTech Connect

    Izotov, Yuri I.; Thuan, Trinh X. E-mail: txt@virginia.edu

    2011-06-20

    We present near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic observations of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies, II Zw 40, Mrk 71, Mrk 930, Mrk 996, and SBS 0335-052E. The NIR spectra which cover the 0.90-2.40 {mu}m wavelength range show hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, helium, sulfur, and iron emission lines. The NIR data for all BCDs have been supplemented by optical spectra. We found the extinction coefficient in all BCDs to be very similar in both the optical and NIR ranges. The NIR hydrogen emission lines do not reveal more star formation than seen in the optical. The same conclusion is reached from Spitzer data concerning the mid-infrared (MIR) emission lines. This implies that emission line spectra of low-metallicity BCDs in the {approx}0.36-25 {mu}m wavelength range are emitted by relatively transparent ionized gas. The large extinction derived from the MIR continuum emission in some BCDs implies that the latter arises not from the visible H II regions themselves, but from locations outside these H II regions. The H{sub 2} emission line fluxes can be accounted for by fluorescence. CLOUDY stellar photoinization models of all BCDs reproduce well the fluxes of most of the observed optical and NIR emission lines, except in Mrk 930 where shock ionization is needed to account for the [Fe II] emission lines. However, some contribution of shock ionization at the level of {approx}<10% that of stellar ionization is required to reproduce the observed fluxes of high ionization species, such as He II {lambda}0.469 {mu}m in the optical range and [O IV] {lambda}25.89 {mu}m in the MIR range.

  4. Is Solar Activity Once More Fainting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares Aguilar, C. E.; Schröder, K.-P.; Song, G.

    2013-04-01

    After an anomalously long and deep minimum, will the Sun now once again reach a period of weaker activity cycles, which would affect northern hemisphere winter climate? We here discuss the current state and outlook of solar activity, and we propose to monitor the solar Ca II K line emission “as a star”, as part of the regular observing schedule of the Hamburg robotic telescope, which is bound to move to Guanajuato this year (2012). In fact, the chromospheric Ca II K line emission is a good proxy for the solar far-ultraviolet flux, as both are generated at about the same plasma temperatures (12-15,000 K) and both originate from the same active regions (plages). The solar ultraviolet flux, in turn, warms the stratosphere by photo dissociation of ozone and other molecules and, consequently, affects the strength of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NOA).

  5. Time series photometry of faint cataclysmic variables with a CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Timothy Mark Cameron

    1992-08-01

    I describe a new hardware and software environment for the practice of time-series stellar photometry with the CCD systems available at McDonald Observatory. This instrument runs suitable CCD's in frame transfer mode and permits windowing on the CCD image to maximize the duty cycle of the photometer. Light curves may be extracted and analyzed in real time at the telescope and image data are stored for later, more thorough analysis. I describe a star tracking algorithm, which is optimized for a timeseries of images of the same stellar field. I explore the extraction of stellar brightness measures from these images using circular software apertures and develop a complete description of the noise properties of this technique. I show that scintillation and pixelization noise have a significant effect on high quality observations. I demonstrate that optimal sampling and profile fitting techniques are unnecessarily complex or detrimental methods of obtaining stellar brightness measures under conditions commonly encountered in timeseries CCD photometry. I compare CCD's and photomultiplier tubes as detectors for timeseries photometry using light curves of a variety of stars obtained simultaneously with both detectors and under equivalent conditions. A CCD can produce useful data under conditions when a photomultiplier tube cannot, and a CCD will often produce more reliable results even under photometric conditions. I prevent studies of the cataclysmic variables (CV's) AL Com, CP Eri, V Per, and DO Leo made using the time series CCD photometer. AL Com is a very faint CV at high Galactic latitude and a bona fide Population II CV. Some of the properties of AL Com are similar to the dwarf nova WZ Sge and others are similar to the intermediate polar EX Hya, but overall AL Com is unlike any other well-studied cataclysmic variable. CP Eri is shown to be the fifth known interacting binary white dwarf. V Per was the first CV found to have an orbital period near the middle of the

  6. A Search for Faint, Diffuse Halo Emission in Edge-On Galaxies with Spitzer/IRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Arendt, R. G.; Pipher, J. L.; Forrest, W. J.; Marengo, M.; Barmby, P.; Willner, S. P.; Stauffer, J. R.; Fazio, G. G.

    2006-12-01

    We present deep infrared mosaics of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 891, 4244, 4565, and 5907. These data were acquired at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns using the Infrared Array Camera aboard Spitzer as part of GTO program number 3. This effort is designed to detect the putative faint, diffuse emission from halos and thick disks of spiral galaxies in the near-mid infrared under the thermally stable, low-background conditions of space. These conditions in combination with the advantageous viewing angles presented by these well-known edge-on spirals provide arguably the best opportunity to characterize the halo/thick disk components of such galaxies in the infrared. In this contribution we describe our observations, data reduction techniques, corrections for artifacts in the data, and the modeling approach we applied to analyze this unique dataset. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech.

  7. FAINT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY COUNTS AT 450 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2013-01-10

    We present the results of SCUBA-2 observations at 450 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area >100 arcmin{sup 2} and 1{sigma} sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy beam{sup -1} at 450 and 850 {mu}m, respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 {mu}m and 26 sources at 850 {mu}m with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 {mu}m number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that {approx}47%-61% of the 450 {mu}m extragalactic background light resolved into individual sources with 450 {mu}m fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 {mu}m sources in the 4{sigma} sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcsec, while brighter sources (S/N >6{sigma}) are good to 1.4 arcsec. Using a deep radio map (1{sigma} {approx} 6 {mu}Jy) we find that the percentage of submillimeter sources having secure radio counterparts is 85% for 450 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >6 mJy and 67% for 850 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >4 mJy. We also find that 67% of the >4{sigma} 450 {mu}m sources are detected at 850 {mu}m, while the recovery rate at 450 {mu}m of >4{sigma} 850 {mu}m sources is 54%. Combined with the source redshifts estimated using millimetric flux ratios, the recovered rate is consistent with the scenario where both 450 {mu}m and 20 cm emission preferentially select lower redshift dusty sources, while 850 {mu}m emission traces a higher fraction of dusty sources at higher redshifts. We identify potential counterparts in various wavelengths from X-ray to mid-infrared and measure the multiwavelength photometry, which we then use to analyze the characteristics of the sources. We find three X-ray counterparts to our robust submillimeter sample (S/N > 5), giving an active galactic nucleus

  8. LIFTING THE DUSTY VEIL WITH NEAR- AND MID-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY. II. A LARGE-SCALE STUDY OF THE GALACTIC INFRARED EXTINCTION LAW

    SciTech Connect

    Zasowski, G.; Majewski, S. R.; Indebetouw, R. E-mail: srm4n@virginia.ed

    2009-12-10

    We combine near-infrared (Two Micron All Sky Survey) and mid-infrared (Spitzer-IRAC) photometry to characterize the IR extinction law (1.2-8 mum) over nearly 150 deg. of contiguous Milky Way midplane longitude. The relative extinctions in five passbands across these wavelength and longitude ranges are derived by calculating color excess ratios for G and K giant red clump stars in contiguous midplane regions and deriving the wavelength dependence of extinction in each one. Strong, monotonic variations in the extinction law shape are found as a function of angle from the Galactic center, symmetric on either side of it. These longitudinal variations persist even when dense interstellar regions, known a priori to have a shallower extinction curve, are removed. The increasingly steep extinction curves toward the outer Galaxy indicate a steady decrease in the absolute-to-selective extinction ratio (R{sub V} ) and in the mean dust grain size at greater Galactocentric angles. We note an increasing strength of the 8 mum extinction inflection at high Galactocentric angles and, using theoretical dust models, show that this behavior is consistent with the trend in R{sub V} . Along several lines of sight where the solution is most feasible, A {sub l}ambda/A{sub K{sub s}} as a function of Galactic radius (R {sub GC}) is estimated and shown to have a Galactic radial dependence. Our analyses suggest that the observed relationship between extinction curve shape and Galactic longitude is due to an intrinsic dependence of the extinction law on Galactocentric radius.

  9. The nature of faint emission-line galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetanka, John J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the results of faint galaxy redshift surveys is the increased fraction of galaxies which have strong emission-line spectra. These faint surveys find that roughly 50 percent of the galaxies have an equivalent width of (OII), W sub 3727, greater than 20 A while this fraction is less than 20 percent in the DARS survey. This has been interpreted as evidence for strong evolution in the galaxy population at redshifts less than 0.5. In order to further investigate the properties of the galaxies in faint redshift surveys, two important factors must be addressed. The first is the observed correlation between color, luminosity, and W sub 3727. There is a correlation between color and the strength of emission lines, bluer galaxies having stronger emission features, as evident for Markarian galaxies and for galaxies in Kennicutt's spectrophotometric atlas. This correlation also applies galaxies in faint redshift surveys. In addition, low luminosity galaxies have a larger average W sub 3727 (and bluer colors) than higher luminosity galaxies. This is illustrated for Kennicutt's low z late-type galaxies, for the Durham Faint Surveys, and for galaxies in SA68. The second factor which must be incorporated into any interpretation of the faint emission galaxies is the different luminosity functions for galaxies depending on color. This is usually modeled by varying M* for different color classes (or morphological types); however, the shape of the luminosity function is different for galaxies with different colors. Low luminosity, blue galaxies have a much larger number density than low luminosity, red galaxies. Furthermore, the low luminosity end of the blue galaxy luminosity function is not well fit by a Schechter function. These two factors have been included in a very simple, no-evolution, model for the galaxy population. This model uses the luminosity functions from Shanks (1990) and spectral energy distributions (SED's) from Bruzual (1988). W sub 3727 is predicted using

  10. Interband absorption strength in long-wave infrared type-II superlattices with small and large superlattice periods compared to bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurgaftman, I.; Belenky, G.; Lin, Y.; Donetsky, D.; Shterengas, L.; Kipshidze, G.; Sarney, W. L.; Svensson, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    The absorption spectra for the antimonide-based type-II superlattices (SLs) for detection in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) are calculated and compared to the measured data for SLs and bulk materials with the same energy gap (HgCdTe and InAsSb). We include the results for the metamorphic InAsSbx/InAsSby SLs with small periods as well as the more conventional strain-balanced InAs/Ga(In)Sb and InAs/InAsSb SLs on GaSb substrates. The absorption strength in small-period metamorphic SLs is similar to the bulk materials, while the SLs with an average lattice constant matched to GaSb have significantly lower absorption. This is because the electron-hole overlap in the strain-balanced type-II LWIR SLs occurs primarily in the hole well, which constitutes a relatively small fraction of the total thickness.

  11. Band gap tuning and optical absorption in type-II InAs/GaSb mid infrared short period superlattices: 14 bands K Dot-Operator p study

    SciTech Connect

    AbuEl-Rub, Khaled M.

    2012-09-06

    The MBE growth of short-period InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice structures, varied around 20.5 A InAs/24 A GaSb were [J. Applied physics, 96, 2580 (2004)] carried out by Haugan et al. These SLs were designed to produce devices with an optimum mid-infrared photoresponse and a sharpest photoresponse cutoff. We have used a realistic and reliable 14-band k.p formalism description of the superlattice electronic band structure to calculate the absorption coefficient in such short-period InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices. The parameters for this formalism are known from fitting to independent experiments for the bulk materials. The band-gap energies are obtained without any fitting parameters, and are in good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Chemical enrichment in Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Donatella

    2016-08-01

    Our view of the Milky Way's satellite population has radically changed after the discovery, ten years ago, of the first Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies (UFDs). These extremely faint, dark-matter dominated, scarcely evolved stellar systems are found in ever-increasing number in our cosmic neighbourhood and constitute a gold-mine for studies of early star formation conditions and early chemical enrichment pathways. Here we show what can be learned from the measurements of chemical abundances in UFD stars read through the lens of chemical evolution studies, point out the limitations of the classic approach, and discuss the way to go to improve the models.

  13. The VISTA Carina Nebula Survey. II. Spatial distribution of the infrared-excess-selected young stellar population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, P.; Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Roccatagliata, V.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a deep wide-field (6.76 sq. deg) near-infrared survey with the VISTA telescope that covers the entire extent of the Carina nebula complex (CNC). The point-source catalog created from these data contains around four million individual objects down to masses of 0.1 M⊙. We present a statistical study of the large-scale spatial distribution and an investigation of the clustering properties of infrared-excesses objects, which are used to trace disk-bearing young stellar objects (YSOs). A selection based on a near-infrared (J-H) versus (H-Ks) color-color diagram shows an almost uniform distribution over the entire observed area. We interpret this as a result of the very high degree of background contamination that arises from the Carina Nebula's location close to the Galactic plane. Complementing the VISTA near-infrared catalog with Spitzer IRAC mid-infrared photometry improves the situation of the background contamination considerably. We find that a (J-H) versus (Ks- [4.5]) color-color diagram is well suited to tracing the population of YSO-candidates (cYSOs) by their infrared excess. We identify 8781 sources with strong infrared excess, which we consider as cYSOs. This sample is used to investigate the spatial distribution of the cYSOs with a nearest-neighbor analysis. The surface density distribution of cYSOs agrees well with the shape of the clouds as seen in our Herschel far-infrared survey. The strong decline in the surface density of excess sources outside the area of the clouds supports the hypothesis that our excess-selected sample consists predominantly of cYSOs with a low level of background contamination. This analysis allows us to identify 14 groups of cYSOs outside the central area.Our results suggest that the total population of cYSOs in the CNC comprises about 164 000 objects, with a substantial fraction (~35%) located in the northern, still not well studied parts. Our cluster analysis suggests that roughly half of the cYSOs constitute a

  14. Homo- and Heterobimetallic Ruthenium(II) and Osmium(II) Complexes Based on a Pyrene-Biimidazolate Spacer as Efficient DNA-Binding Probes in the Near-Infrared Domain.

    PubMed

    Mardanya, Sourav; Karmakar, Srikanta; Mondal, Debiprasad; Baitalik, Sujoy

    2016-04-01

    We report in this work a new family of homo- and heterobimetallic complexes of the type [(bpy)2M(Py-Biimz)M'(II)(bpy)2](2+) (M = M' = Ru(II) or Os(II); M = Ru(II) and M' = Os(II)) derived from a pyrenyl-biimidazole-based bridge, 2-imidazolylpyreno[4,5-d]imidazole (Py-BiimzH2). The homobimetallic Ru(II) and Os(II) complexes were found to crystallize in monoclinic form with space group P21/n. All the complexes exhibit strong absorptions throughout the entire UV-vis region and also exhibit luminescence at room temperature. For osmium-containing complexes (2 and 3) both the absorption and emission band stretched up to the NIR region and thus afford more biofriendly conditions for probable applications in infrared imaging and phototherapeutic studies. Detailed luminescence studies indicate that the emission originates from the respective (3)MLCT excited state mainly centered in the [M(bpy)2](2+) moiety of the complexes and is only slightly affected by the pyrene moiety. The bimetallic complexes show two successive one-electron reversible metal-centered oxidations in the positive potential window and several reduction processes in the negative potential window. An efficient intramolecular electronic energy transfer is found to occur from the Ru center to the Os-based component in the heterometallic dyad. The binding studies of the complexes with DNA were thoroughly studied through different spectroscopic techniques such as UV-vis absorption, steady-state and time-resolved emission, circular dichroism, and relative DNA binding study using ethidium bromide. The intercalative mode of binding was suggested to be operative in all cases. Finally, computational studies employing DFT and TD-DFT were also carried out to interpret the experimentally observed absorption and emission bands of the complexes. PMID:27011117

  15. Revealing the Nature of Faint X-Ray Sources in the Giant Star-Forming Region NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteet, C.; Marchenko, S.; Corcoran, M.; Andersen, M.

    2004-12-01

    NGC 3603, an open cluster embedded in the largest Galactic H II region, contains some of the most luminous, massive stars known in the Galaxy. It may serve as a good analog of star-forming regions in external starburst galaxies. The recent deep (50 Ksec) {Chandra} imaging of NGC 3603 revealed that its X-Ray emission is dominated by the bright Wolf-Rayet and O stars in the cluster core. However, there are hundreds of extremely weak point-like X-ray sources surrounding the central region. They tend to concentrate towards the cluster's center, suggestive of real cluster membership. Studying this population, we find that absolute majority of the weak sources does not belong to the lists of known OB and WR cluster members. Practically all the 263 weak X-ray sources have faint near-IR counterparts in the deep J,H,K images obtained by the ISAAC instrument on the VLT. Around 50% of the X-ray sources can be considered as visual binaries, an additional ˜ 20% as multiple systems (up to six stars in a r=1.5" ˜ 3σ circle). The composite spectrum of these sources is quite hard (kT ˜ 6 keV) and fairly absorbed (NH ˜ 1022). There is no obvious line emission, in particular, no strong Fe XXV line, so presently we cannot distinguish between thermal and non-thermal emission. The JHK colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams of the X-ray selected sources indicate that the X-ray data are very efficient in discriminating between field stars and cluster members. The X-ray sources have similar near-infrared properties as the whole near-infrared sample of the known cluster members. Hence, the discovered population of weak X-ray sources provide an effective means to obtain a "clean" sample of pre-main sequence stars down to 1 M⊙ assuming the cluster is 1 Myr old.

  16. Predictive modeling of infrared radiative heating in tomato dry-peeling process: Part II. Model validation and sensitivity analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A predictive mathematical model was developed to simulate heat transfer in a tomato undergoing double sided infrared (IR) heating in a dry-peeling process. The aims of this study were to validate the developed model using experimental data and to investigate different engineering parameters that mos...

  17. 1. Dyea Dock looking south. Note faint evenly spaced circular ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Dyea Dock looking south. Note faint evenly spaced circular dark pieces of grass up through the middle of the picture indicating posts making up the pier. Photograph made from park service cherry picker. - Dyea Dock & Association (Ruins), Skagway, Skagway, AK

  18. CONFIRMATION OF FAINT DWARF GALAXIES IN THE M81 GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Tully, R. Brent; Karachentsev, Igor D. E-mail: bjacobs@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: ikar@luna.sao.ru

    2013-11-01

    We have followed up on the results of a 65 deg{sup 2} CFHT/MegaCam imaging survey of the nearby M81 Group searching for faint and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. The original survey turned up 22 faint candidate dwarf members. Based on two-color HST ACS/WFC and WFPC2 photometry, we now confirm 14 of these as dwarf galaxy members of the group. Distances and stellar population characteristics are discussed for each. To a completeness limit of M{sub r{sup '}}= -10, we find a galaxy luminosity function slope of –1.27 ± 0.04 for the M81 Group. In this region, there are now 36 M81 Group members known, including 4 blue compact dwarfs; 8 other late types including the interacting giants M81, NGC 3077, and M82; 19 early type dwarfs; and at least 5 potential tidal dwarf galaxies. We find that the dSph galaxies in M81 appear to lie in a flattened distribution, similar to that found for the Milky Way and M31. One of the newly discovered dSph galaxies has properties similar to the ultra-faint dwarfs being found in the Local Group with a size R{sub e} ∼ 100 pc and total magnitude estimates M{sub r{sup '}}= -6.8 and M{sub I} ∼ –9.1.

  19. Single-conformation infrared spectra of model peptides in the amide I and amide II regions: Experiment-based determination of local mode frequencies and inter-mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; James, William H.; Choi, Soo Hyuk; Guo, Li; Gellman, Samuel H.; Müller, Christian W.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2012-09-01

    Single-conformation infrared spectra in the amide I and amide II regions have been recorded for a total of 34 conformations of three α-peptides, three β-peptides, four α/β-peptides, and one γ-peptide using resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the jet-cooled, isolated molecules. Assignments based on the amide NH stretch region were in hand, with the amide I/II data providing additional evidence in favor of the assignments. A set of 21 conformations that represent the full range of H-bonded structures were chosen to characterize the conformational dependence of the vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities of the local amide I and amide II modes and their amide I/I and amide II/II coupling constants. Scaled, harmonic calculations at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory accurately reproduce the experimental frequencies and infrared intensities in both the amide I and amide II regions. In the amide I region, Hessian reconstruction was used to extract local mode frequencies and amide I/I coupling constants for each conformation. These local amide I frequencies are in excellent agreement with those predicted by DFT calculations on the corresponding 13C = 18O isotopologues. In the amide II region, potential energy distribution analysis was combined with the Hessian reconstruction scheme to extract local amide II frequencies and amide II/II coupling constants. The agreement between these local amide II frequencies and those obtained from DFT calculations on the N-D isotopologues is slightly worse than for the corresponding comparison in the amide I region. The local mode frequencies in both regions are dictated by a combination of the direct H-bonding environment and indirect, "backside" H-bonds to the same amide group. More importantly, the sign and magnitude of the inter-amide coupling constants in both the amide I and amide II regions is shown to be characteristic of the size of the H-bonded ring linking the two amide groups. These amide I/I and

  20. TODCOR: A New Two-Dimensional Correlation Technique to Analyze Stellar Spectra in Search for Faint Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazeh, T.; Zucker, S.; Smith, H.

    1993-12-01

    TODCOR is a new TwO-Dimensional CORrelation technique to measure radial velocities of two components of a spectroscopic binary (Zucker and Mazeh 1993, ApJ, in press). Assuming the spectra of the two components are known, the technique correlates an observed binary spectrum against a combination of the two spectra with different shifts. TODCOR measures simultaneously the radial velocities of the two stars by finding the maximum correlation. A few real single-line spectroscopic binaries already have been turned into double-line systems with TODCOR, demonstrating the power of the technique. One of the advantages of TODCOR is its ability to detect a very faint companion in a combined spectrum, and to measure its radial velocity. We present numerical tests in which we applied TODCOR to simulated spectra which were prepared as combinations of two observed infrared spectra with various luminosity ratios, together with random noise. These tests show that TODCOR can detect in principle a very faint secondary spectrum and measure correctly its velocity, provided the combined spectrum has adequate spectral coverage and S/N. Measuring the radial velocity of the faint secondary will enable us to estimate its mass, making the technique a very useful tool in the search for brown dwarfs and giant planets around nearby stars.

  1. Superconductivity applications for infrared and microwave devices II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 4, 5, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, Vernon O. (Editor); Bhasin, Kul B. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Topics discussed include thin-film technology, microwave transmission lines and resonators, microwave devices and circuits, infrared detectors and bolometers, and superconducting junctions. Papers are presented on possible enhancement in bolometric response using free-standing film of YBa2Cu3O(x), aging and surface instability in high-Tc superconductors, epitaxial Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 thin films on LaAlO3 and their microwave device properties, the performance of stripline resonators using sputtered YBCO films, and a coplanar waveguide microwave filter of YBa2Cu3O7. Attention is also given to the performance characteristics of Y-Ba-Cu-O microwave superconducting detectors, high-Tc bolometer developments for planetary missions, infrared detectors from YBaCuO thin films, high-temperature superconductor junction technology, and submillimeter receiver components using superconducting tunnel junctions.

  2. The Gas-rich Circumbinary Disk of HR 4049. II. A Detailed Study of the Near-infrared Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, S. E.; Cami, J.

    2014-10-01

    HR 4049 is a peculiar evolved binary surrounded by a circumbinary disk. Mid-infrared observations show that the disk is rich in molecular gas and radially extended. To study the properties of this disk, we re-analyzed a set of near-infrared observations at high spectral resolution obtained with Gemini-Phoenix. These data cover absorption lines originating from the first overtone of CO and from H2O in the 2.3 μm region as well as more complex emission-absorption profiles from H2O and the fundamental mode of CO near 4.6 μm. By using an excitation diagram and from modeling the spectrum, we find that most of the CO overtone and H2O absorption originates from hot gas (T ex ≈ 1000 K) with high column densities, consistent with the mid-infrared data. The strong emission in the wavelength range of the CO fundamental furthermore suggests that there is a significant quantity of gas in the inner cavity of the disk. In addition, there is a much colder component in the line of sight to the disk. A detailed analysis of the overtone line profiles reveals variations in the line widths that are consistent with a radially extended disk in Keplerian rotation with hotter gas closer to the central star. We estimate the mass of the primary to be ~0.34 M ⊙ and discuss the implications for its evolutionary status.

  3. the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies. II. Framework, strategy, and first result

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. T.; Griffith, R. L.; Sigurdsson, S.; Povich, M. S.; Mullan, B.

    2014-09-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although GAIA will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a zeroth order null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can extend our methodology to smaller waste heat luminosities, and potentially entirely rule out (or detect) both Kardashev Type III civilizations and new physics that allows for unlimited 'free' energy generation.

  4. The Ĝ Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Civilizations with Large Energy Supplies. II. Framework, Strategy, and First Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. T.; Griffith, R. L.; Sigurdsson, S.; Povich, M. S.; Mullan, B.

    2014-09-01

    We describe the framework and strategy of the Ĝ infrared search for extraterrestrial civilizations with large energy supplies, which will use the wide-field infrared surveys of WISE and Spitzer to search for these civilizations' waste heat. We develop a formalism for translating mid-infrared photometry into quantitative upper limits on extraterrestrial energy supplies. We discuss the likely sources of false positives, how dust can and will contaminate our search, and prospects for distinguishing dust from alien waste heat. We argue that galaxy-spanning civilizations may be easier to distinguish from natural sources than circumstellar civilizations (i.e., Dyson spheres), although GAIA will significantly improve our capability to identify the latter. We present a zeroth order null result of our search based on the WISE all-sky catalog: we show, for the first time, that Kardashev Type III civilizations (as Kardashev originally defined them) are very rare in the local universe. More sophisticated searches can extend our methodology to smaller waste heat luminosities, and potentially entirely rule out (or detect) both Kardashev Type III civilizations and new physics that allows for unlimited "free" energy generation.

  5. STELLAR ARCHEOLOGY IN THE GALACTIC HALO WITH ULTRA-FAINT DWARFS. VII. HERCULES

    SciTech Connect

    Musella, Ilaria; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Marconi, Marcella E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it; and others

    2012-09-10

    We present the first time-series study of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Hercules. Using a variety of telescope/instrument facilities we secured about 50 V and 80 B epochs. These data allowed us to detect and characterize 10 pulsating variable stars in Hercules. Our final sample includes six fundamental-mode (ab-type) and three first-overtone (c-type) RR Lyrae stars, and one Anomalous Cepheid. The average period of the ab-type RR Lyrae stars, (P{sub ab}) = 0.68 days ({sigma} = 0.03 days), places Hercules in the Oosterhoff II group, as found for almost the totality of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies investigated so far for variability. The RR Lyrae stars were used to obtain independent estimates of the metallicity, reddening, and distance to Hercules, for which we find [Fe/H] = -2.30 {+-} 0.15 dex, E(B - V) = 0.09 {+-} 0.02 mag, and (m - M){sub 0} = 20.6 {+-} 0.1 mag, in good agreement with the literature values. We have obtained a V, B - V color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Hercules that reaches V {approx} 25 mag and extends beyond the galaxy's half-light radius over a total area of 40' Multiplication-Sign 36'. The CMD and the RR Lyrae stars indicate the presence of a population as old and metal-poor as (at least) the Galactic globular cluster M68.

  6. Observations of the infrared fine-structure lines of S III at 18.71 and 33.47 microns in four H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herter, T.; Briotta, D. A., Jr.; Gull, G. E.; Shure, M. A.; Houck, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared fine-structure lines provide a particularly useful probe of ionized nebulae. The present investigation is concerned with measurements of the forbidden S III lines at 18.71 and 33.47 micrometers for four H II regions, S158A, S158G, G75.84+0.4, and W3 IRS 1. These lines are used to estimate densities, and comparisons are made with rms densities determined from radio observations to evaluate the importance of clumping. For the case of the optical H II region S158A, comparisons are made with both optical and forbidden O III line determinations of the density. The reported observations were made using a dual-grating, liquid-helium-cooled spectrometer containing a three-element Si:Sb detector array and a three-element Ge:Ga detector array. It is found that clumping is important in the cases of G75.84+0.4, W3 IRS 1, and M42. These three H II regions have filling factors of 0.024, 0.09, and 0.03, respectively.

  7. A WIDE AREA SURVEY FOR HIGH-REDSHIFT MASSIVE GALAXIES. II. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF BzK-SELECTED MASSIVE STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Masato; Daddi, Emanuele; Renzini, Alvio; Kong Xu; Cimatti, Andrea; Broadhurst, Tom; Alexander, Dave M.

    2010-05-20

    Results are presented from near-infrared spectroscopic observations of a sample of BzK-selected, massive star-forming galaxies (sBzKs) at 1.5 < z < 2.3 that were obtained with OHS/CISCO at the Subaru telescope and with SINFONI at the Very Large Telescope. Among the 28 sBzKs observed, H{alpha} emission was detected in 14 objects, and for 11 of them the [N II] {lambda}6583 flux was also measured. Multiwavelength photometry was also used to derive stellar masses and extinction parameters, whereas H{alpha} and [N II] emissions have allowed us to estimate star formation rates (SFRs), metallicities, ionization mechanisms, and dynamical masses. In order to enforce agreement between SFRs from H{alpha} with those derived from rest-frame UV and mid-infrared, additional obscuration for the emission lines (that originate in H II regions) was required compared to the extinction derived from the slope of the UV continuum. We have also derived the stellar mass-metallicity relation, as well as the relation between stellar mass and specific SFR (SSFR), and compared them to the results in other studies. At a given stellar mass, the sBzKs appear to have been already enriched to metallicities close to those of local star-forming galaxies of similar mass. The sBzKs presented here tend to have higher metallicities compared to those of UV-selected galaxies, indicating that near-infrared selected galaxies tend to be a chemically more evolved population. The sBzKs show SSFRs that are systematically higher, by up to {approx}2 orders of magnitude, compared to those of local galaxies of the same mass. The empirical correlations between stellar mass and metallicity, and stellar mass and SSFR are then compared with those of evolutionary population synthesis models constructed either with the simple closed-box assumption, or within an infall scenario. Within the assumptions that are built-in such models, it appears that a short timescale for the star formation ({approx_equal}100 Myr) and large

  8. Measuring Star Formation Rate and Far-infrared Color in High-redshift Galaxies Using the CO(7-6) and [N II] 205 μm Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Nanyao; Zhao, Yinghe; Xu, C. Kevin; Gao, Yu; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Inami, Hanae; Howell, Justin; Liu, Lijie; Armus, Lee; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Privon, George C.; Lord, Steven D.; Sanders, David B.; Schulz, Bernhard; van der Werf, Paul P.

    2015-03-01

    To better characterize the global star formation activity in a galaxy, one needs to know not only the star formation rate (SFR) but also the rest-frame, far-infrared color (e.g., the 60-100 μm color, C(60/100)) of the dust emission. The latter probes the average intensity of the dust heating radiation field and scales statistically with the effective SFR surface density in star-forming galaxies including (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs). To this end, here we exploit a new spectroscopic approach involving only two emission lines: CO(7-6) at 372 μm and [N ii] at 205 μm([N ii]205μm). For local (U)LIRGs, the ratios of the CO(7-6) luminosity (LCO(7-6)) to the total infrared luminosity (LIR; 8-1000 μm) are fairly tightly distributed (to within ˜0.12 dex) and show little dependence on C(60/100). This makes LCO(7-6) a good SFR tracer, which is less contaminated by active galactic nuclei than LIR and may also be much less sensitive to metallicity than LCO(1-0). Furthermore, the logarithmic [N ii]205μm/CO(7-6) luminosity ratio depends fairly strongly (at a slope of ˜ -1.4) on C(60/100), with a modest scatter (˜0.23 dex). This makes it a useful estimator on C(60/100) with an implied uncertainty of ˜0.15 (or ≲4 K in the dust temperature (Tdust) in the case of a graybody emission with Tdust ≳ 30 K and a dust emissivity index β ≥ 1). Our locally calibrated SFR and C(60/100) estimators are shown to be consistent with the published data of (U)LIRGs of z up to ˜6.5. Based on Herschel observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. Near-infrared radiation background, gravitational wave background, and star formation rate of Pop III and Pop II during cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. P.; Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The transition from Population III (Pop III) to Population II (Pop II) stars plays an important role in the history of the Universe. The huge amount of ionizing photons generated by Pop III stars begin to ionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) at the early stage of reionization. Meanwhile, the feedback from reionization and metal enrichment changes the evolution of different populations. The near-infrared radiation background (NIRB) and the stochastic background of gravitational waves (SBGWs) from these early stars will provide important information about the transition form Pop III to Pop II stars. Aims: We obtain the NIRB and SBGWs from the early stars, which are constrained by the observation of reionization and star formation rate (SFR). Methods: We studied the transition from Pop III to Pop II stars via the star formation model of different populations, which takes into account the reionization and the metal enrichment evolution. We calculated the two main metal pollution channels arising from the supernova-driven protogalactic outflows and genetic channel. We obtained the SFRs of Pop III and Pop II and their NIRB and SBGWs radiation. Results: We predict that the upper limit of metallicity in metal-enriched IGM (the galaxies that are polluted via the genetic channel) reaches Zcrit = 10-3.5 Z⊙ at z ~ 13 (z ~ 11), which is consistent with our star formation model. We constrain the SFR of Pop III stars from reionization observations. The peak intensity of NIRB is about 0.03 - 0.2 nWm-2 sr-1 at ~1 μm for z> 6. The predicted NIRB signal is consistent with the metallicity evolution. We also obtain the gravitational wave background from the black holes formed by these early stars. The predicted gravitational wave background has a peak amplitude of ΩGW ≃ 8 × 10-9 at ν = 158 Hz for Pop II star remnants. However, the background generated by Pop III.2 stars is much lower than that of Pop II stars, with a peak amplitude of ΩGW ≃ 1.2 × 10-11 at ν = 28

  10. The gas-rich circumbinary disk of HR 4049. II. A detailed study of the near-infrared spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, S. E.; Cami, J. E-mail: jcami@uwo.ca

    2014-10-20

    HR 4049 is a peculiar evolved binary surrounded by a circumbinary disk. Mid-infrared observations show that the disk is rich in molecular gas and radially extended. To study the properties of this disk, we re-analyzed a set of near-infrared observations at high spectral resolution obtained with Gemini-Phoenix. These data cover absorption lines originating from the first overtone of CO and from H{sub 2}O in the 2.3 μm region as well as more complex emission-absorption profiles from H{sub 2}O and the fundamental mode of CO near 4.6 μm. By using an excitation diagram and from modeling the spectrum, we find that most of the CO overtone and H{sub 2}O absorption originates from hot gas (T {sub ex} ≈ 1000 K) with high column densities, consistent with the mid-infrared data. The strong emission in the wavelength range of the CO fundamental furthermore suggests that there is a significant quantity of gas in the inner cavity of the disk. In addition, there is a much colder component in the line of sight to the disk. A detailed analysis of the overtone line profiles reveals variations in the line widths that are consistent with a radially extended disk in Keplerian rotation with hotter gas closer to the central star. We estimate the mass of the primary to be ∼0.34 M {sub ☉} and discuss the implications for its evolutionary status.

  11. Defect density reduction in InAs/GaSb type II superlattice focal plane array infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Rehm, Robert; Schmitz, Johannes; Niemasz, Jasmin; Rutz, Frank; Wörl, Andreas; Kirste, Lutz; Scheibner, Ralf; Wendler, Joachim; Ziegler, Johann

    2011-01-01

    InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices (SL) have proven their large potential for high performance focal plane array infrared detectors. Lots of interest is focused on the development of short-period InAs/GaSb SLs for mono- and bispectral infrared detectors between 3 - 30 μm. InAs/GaSb short-period superlattices can be fabricated with up to 1000 periods in the intrinsic region without revealing diffusion limited behavior. This enables the fabrication of InAs/GaSb SL camera systems with very high responsivity, comparable to state of the art CdHgTe and InSb detectors. The material system is also well suited for the fabrication of dual-color mid-wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb SL camera systems. These systems exhibit high quantum efficiency and offer simultaneous and spatially coincident detection in both spectral channels. An essential point for the performance of two-dimensional focal plane infrared detectors in camera systems is the number of defective pixel on the matrix detector. Sources for pixel outages are manifold and might be caused by the dislocation in the substrate, the epitaxial growth process or by imperfections during the focal plane array fabrication process. The goal is to grow defect-free epitaxial layers on a dislocation free large area GaSb substrate. Permanent improvement of the substrate quality and the development of techniques to monitor the substrate quality are of particular importance. To examine the crystalline quality of 3" and 4" GaSb substrates, synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXRT) was employed. In a comparative defect study of different 3" GaSb and 4" GaSb substrates, a significant reduction of the dislocation density caused by improvements in bulk crystal growth has been obtained. Optical characterization techniques for defect characterization after MBE growth are employed to correlate epitaxially grown defects with the detector performance after hybridization with the read-out integrated circuit.

  12. Collision-induced infrared spectra of H2-He pairs at temperatures from 18 to 7000 K. II. Overtone and hot bands

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, A.; Frommhold, L.; Texas Univ., Austin )

    1989-06-01

    The three lowest spectral moments of the collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of H2-He pairs have been computed from first principles for temperatures T from 18 to 7000 K for a number of hydrogen overtone and hot bands involving vibrational quantum numbers nu = 0, 1, 2, 3 yields nu-prime = 0, 1, 2, 3. The data are given in a form suitable for the computation of CIA spectra of H2-He as function of frequency and temperature, using simple computer codes and model line shapes. The work is of interest for the spectroscopy of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of stars that contain neutral molecular hydrogen and helium (late stars, white dwarfs, and Population II stars) in the infrared and visible region of the spectrum. 13 refs.

  13. High performance photodiodes based on InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices for very long wavelength infrared detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, A. M.; Chen, G.; Chevallier, R.; Haddadi, A.; Razeghi, M.

    2014-06-23

    Very long wavelength infrared photodetectors based on InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices are demonstrated on GaSb substrate. A heterostructure photodiode was grown with 50% cut-off wavelength of 14.6 μm. At 77 K, the photodiode exhibited a peak responsivity of 4.8 A/W, corresponding to a quantum efficiency of 46% at −300 mV bias voltage from front side illumination without antireflective coating. With the dark current density of 0.7 A/cm{sup 2}, it provided a specific detectivity of 1.4 × 10{sup 10} Jones. The device performance was investigated as a function of operating temperature, revealing a very stable optical response and a background limited performance below 50 K.

  14. A CCD survey for faint high-latitude carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Paul J.; Margon, Bruce; Anderson, Scott F.; Cook, Kem H.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a wide-area CCD survey to search for faint high-latitude carbon (FHLC) stars. Carbon giants provide excellent probes of the structure and kinematics of the outer Galactic halo. We use two-color photometric selection with large-format CCDs to cover 52 sq deg of sky to a depth of about V = 18. Of 94 faint C star candidates from our own CCD survey, one highly ranked V = 17 candidate was found to have a strong carbon and CN bands. We estimate that, to a depth of V = 18, the surface density of FHLC stars is 0.02 deg(exp -2). An updated FHLC sample is used to constrain halo kinematic and structural parameters. Although larger samples are needed, the effective radius of FHLC giants, assuming a de Vancouleurs law distribution, is larger than that for Galactic globular clusters.

  15. Infrared spectrum, DFT: pBP86/DN** and NCA vibrational calculations of 2-methylthiosemicarbazide copper(II) nitrate [Cu(2MeTSC) 2(NO 3) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Joanna Maria; Viana, Robson M.; Téllez S, Claudio A.; Pereira, Wagnyr C.; Izolani, Antônio O.; da Silva, Maria Isabel P.

    2006-10-01

    To elucidate tentative assignments of metal-ligand modes of thiosemicarbazide complexes, a structural study and a assignment of the normal vibrations of 2-methylthiosemicarbazide copper(II) nitrate, [Cu(2MeTSC) 2(NO 3) 2] have been done through the ab initio DFT: pBP86/DN** procedure, and through the normal coordinate analysis (NCA). In the vibrational calculations, the elongated Cu sbnd ONO 2 bonds of the nitrate groups were considered in the C dbnd S and C dbnd N tautomers of the complex. DFT calculations had revealed that the infrared spectra can be well interpreted through the C dbnd N tautomer, failing in the prediction of the -NO 2 group wavenumbers. A little difference stabilization energy for the tautomers were found: for the C dbnd N tautomer was E = -3487,36376 a.u., and for the C dbnd S tautomer, E = -3473,93598 a.u. The observed combination bands at 1763.0 and at 1754.0 cm -1 are an indicative that the -NO 3- groups acts as monodentate ligands. Calculations had confirmed the experimental assignment of the infrared spectrum.

  16. Anodic fluoride passivation of type II InAs/GaSb superlattice for short-wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li Xue; Sun, Wei Guo; Lv, Yan Qiu; Li, Mo; Ding, Jia Xin; Si, Jun Jie

    2015-02-01

    One of the major challenges of antimonide-based devices arises owing to the large number of surface states generated during fabrication processes. Surface passivation and subsequent capping of the surfaces are absolutely essential for any practical applicability of this material system. In this paper, we proposed a new passivation method (zinc sulfide coating after anodic fluoride) for InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detectors. InAs/GaSb superlattice short-wavelength infrared materials were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb (100) substrates. A GaSb buffer layer, which can decrease the occurrence of defects with similar pyramidal structure, was grown for optimized superlattice growth condition. High resolution X-ray diffraction indicated that the period of the superlattice corresponding to fourth satellite peak was 39.77 Å. The atomic force microscopy images show the roughness was below 1.7 nm. The result of photoresponse spectra shows that the cutoff wavelength was 3.05 μm at 300 K.

  17. Anodic fluoride passivation of type II InAs/GaSb superlattice for short-wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li Xue; Sun, Wei Guo; Lv, Yan Qiu; Li, Mo; Ding, Jia Xin; Si, Jun Jie

    2014-09-01

    One of the major challenges of antimonide-based devices arises owing to the large number of surface states generated during fabrication processes. Surface passivation and subsequent capping of the surfaces are absolutely essential for any practical applicability of this material system. In this paper, we proposed a new passivation method (zinc sulfide coating after anodic fluoride) for InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detectors. InAs/GaSb superlattice short-wavelength infrared materials were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb (100) substrates. A GaSb buffer layer, which can decrease the occurrence of defects with similar pyramidal structure, was grown for optimized superlattice growth condition. High resolution X-ray diffraction indicated that the period of the superlattice corresponding to fourth satellite peak was 39.77 Å. The atomic force microscopy images show the roughness was below 1.7 nm. The result of photoresponse spectra shows that the cutoff wavelength was 3.05 μm at 300 K.

  18. Application of Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Spectroscopy for the Study of Chiral Recognition in the Protonated Serine Clusters: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahori, Fumie X.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.; Xu, Yunjie; Yang, Guochun

    2011-06-01

    Serine is an amino acid which has long been known to form the magic-number serine octamer [Ser_8 + H]^+. It has been shown that the serine octamer exhibits strong preference for homochirality. Although a few possible structures for the homochiral serine octamer have been proposed, no definite conclusion has so far been drawn. Last year at this conference, we reported on the study of the protonated serine octamer and dimer as well as the chiral recognition in these clusters using infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopic technique coupled with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Here we present our latest results on the search for the infrared signatures of chiral recognition in the serine octamer and the dimer using a mixture of the deuterated 2,3,3-d_3-L-serine and normal D-serine solution. Using the isotopic labeled species, we could isolate the heterochiral species and obtain their IRMPD spectra which can be directly compared with those of the homochiral species. As an aid to interpret the observed spectra, molecular structures and vibrational frequencies of both homochiral and heterochiral octamer and dimer have been predicted by ab initio calculations. New insights into the hitherto undetermined structure of the serine octamer will be discussed. S. C. Nanita and R. G. Cooks Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 45, (554), 2006.

  19. Can waterbelt climates resolve the faint young Sun paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, E. T.; Toon, O. B.

    2012-12-01

    Ancient sediments indicate that liquid water and primitive life were ubiquitous on the Archean Earth despite the faint young Sun. However, energy balance and radiative-convective models require improbably high greenhouse gas abundances to obtain non-glacial climates, violating constraints from geochemical data. A self-consistent solution to the faint young Sun paradox has remained elusive. Here we use the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 3 with thermodynamic ocean and sea ice components to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago. To maintain present day surface temperatures, 0.06 bar of CO2 in a 1 bar atmosphere is required to compensate for a 20 percent reduction in the solar constant. However, waterbelt climates having stable low latitude sea ice margins can be maintained with as little as 500 ppm of CO2 and no additional trace greenhouse species. With 5000 ppm of CO2 nearly 60 percent of the planet remains free from ice. The early Earth is resistant to hard snowball glaciations instead favoring waterbelt climates. The coexistence of a faint young Sun and a weak greenhouse does not exclude the presence of liquid water at the Archean surface.

  20. Detection of O I and Si II far-infrared fine-structure emission from Alpha Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Glassgold, Alfred E.

    1993-01-01

    We have detected forbidden O I 63 micron and forbidden Si II 35 micron emission from the oxygen-rich, M2 lab supergiant, Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse). The forbidden O I line flux is 2.4 +/- 0.2 x 10 exp -18 W/sq cm, and the forbidden Si II line flux is 0.9 +/- 0.4 x 10 exp -18 W/sq cm. These fluxes are consistent with the thermal model of Rodgers and Glassgold (1991), which indicates that the emission arises in dense, warm gas in Alpha Ori's inner envelope and implies that nearly all of the available O and Si is in atomic form. This is the first reported detection of FIR, fine-structure emission from the inner or transition region of a circumstellar envelope, where molecules and dust are expected to form.

  1. ALMA Census of Faint 1.2 mm Sources Down to ~ 0.02 mJy: Extragalactic Background Light and Dust-poor, High-z Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Seiji; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ishigaki, Masafumi; Nagai, Hiroshi; Momose, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    We present statistics of 133 faint 1.2 mm continuum sources detected in about 120 deep Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) pointing data that include all the archival deep data available by 2015 June. We derive number counts of 1.2 mm continuum sources down to 0.02 mJy partly with the assistance of gravitational lensing, and find that the total integrated 1.2 mm flux of the securely identified sources is {22.9}-5.6+6.7 Jy deg-2 which corresponds to {104}-25+31% of the extragalactic background light (EBL) measured by Cosmic Background Explorer observations. These results suggest that the major 1.2 mm EBL contributors are sources with 0.02 mJy, and that very faint 1.2 mm sources with ≲0.02 mJy contribute negligibly to the EBL with the possible flattening and/or truncation of number counts in this very faint flux regime. To understand the physical origin of our faint ALMA sources, we measure the galaxy bias bg by the counts-in-cells technique, and place a stringent upper limit of bg < 3.5 that is not similar to bg values of massive distant red galaxies and submillimeter galaxies but comparable to those of UV-bright, star-forming BzK galaxies (sBzKs) and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). Moreover, in the optical and near-infrared (NIR) deep fields, we identify optical-NIR counterparts for 59% of our faint ALMA sources, the majority of which have luminosities, colors, and the IRX-β relation the same as sBzKs and LBGs. We thus conclude that about a half of our faint ALMA sources are dust-poor, high-z galaxies as known as sBzKs and LBGs in optical studies, and that these faint ALMA sources are not miniature (U)LIRGs simply scaled down with the infrared brightness.

  2. Herschel far-infrared observations of the Carina Nebula complex. II. The embedded young stellar and protostellar population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaczkowski, B.; Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Roccatagliata, V.; Ohlendorf, H.; Zinnecker, H.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The Carina Nebula represents one of the largest and most active star forming regions known in our Galaxy. It contains numerous very massive (M ≳ 40 M⊙) stars that strongly affect the surrounding clouds by their ionizing radiation and stellar winds. Aims: Our recently obtained Herschel PACS and SPIRE far-infrared maps cover the full area (≈8.7 deg2) of the Carina Nebula complex (CNC) and reveal the population of deeply embedded young stellar objects (YSOs), most of which are not yet visible in the mid- or near-infrared. Methods: We study the properties of the 642 objects that are independently detected as point-like sources in at least two of the five Herschel bands. For those objects that can be identified with apparently single Spitzer counterparts, we use radiative transfer models to derive information about the basic stellar and circumstellar parameters. Results: We find that about 75% of the Herschel-detected YSOs are Class 0 protostars. The luminosities of the Herschel-detected YSOs with SED fits are restricted to values of ≤5400 L⊙, their masses (estimated from the radiative transfer modeling) range from ≈1 M⊙ to ≈10 M⊙. Taking the observational limits into account and extrapolating the observed number of Herschel-detected protostars over the stellar initial mass function suggest that the star formation rate of the CNC is ~0.017 M⊙/year. The spatial distribution of the Herschel YSO candidates is highly inhomogeneous and does not follow the distribution of cloud mass. Rather, most Herschel YSO candidates are found at the irradiated edges of clouds and pillars. The far-infrared fluxes of the famous object η Car are about a factor of two lower than expected from observations with the Infrared Space Observatory obtained 15 years ago; this difference may be a consequence of dynamical changes in the circumstellar dust in the Homunculus Nebula around η Car. Conclusions: The currently ongoing star formation process forms only low

  3. Particle-based ablation model for faint meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2014-07-01

    Modeling the ablation of meteoroids as they enter the atmosphere is a way of determining their physical structure and elemental composition. This can provide insight into the structure of parent bodies when combined with an orbit computed from observations. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO) is a source of new, high-resolution observations of faint meteors [1]. These faint objects tend to have pre-atmospheric masses around 10^{-5} kg, corresponding to a radius of 1 mm. A wide-field camera with a 28° field of view provides guidance to a high-resolution camera that tracks meteors in flight with 1.5° field of view. Meteors are recorded with a scale of 4 m per pixel at a range of 135 km, at 110 frames per second, allowing us to investigate detailed meteor morphology. This serves as an important new constraint for ablation models, in addition to meteor brightness (lightcurves) and meteoroid deceleration. High-resolution observations of faint meteors have revealed that contemporary ablation models are not able to predict meteor morphology, even while matching the observed lightcurve and meteoroid deceleration [2]. This implies that other physical processes, in addition to fragmentation, must be considered for faint meteor ablation. We present a new, particle-based approach to modeling the ablation of small meteoroids. In this model, we simulate the collisions between atmospheric particles and the meteoroid to determine the rate of evaporation and deceleration. Subsequent collisions simulated between evaporated meteoroid particles and ambient atmospheric particles then produce light that would be observed by high-resolution cameras. Preliminary results show simultaneous agreement with meteor morphology, lightcurves, and decelerations recorded with CAMO. A sample comparison of simulated and observed meteor morphology is given in the attached figure. Several meteoroids are well-represented as solid, stony bodies, but some require modeling as a dustball [3

  4. Selective removal of natural occlusal caries by coupling near-infrared imaging with a CO II laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, You-Chen; Fried, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    Laser removal of dental hard tissue can be combined with optical, spectral or acoustic feedback systems to selectively ablate dental caries and restorative materials. Near-infrared (NIR) imaging has considerable potential for the optical discrimination of sound and demineralized tissue. Last year we successfully demonstrated that near-IR images can be used to guide a CO2 laser ablation system for the selective removal of artificial caries lesions on smooth surfaces. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that two-dimensional near-infrared images of natural occlusal caries can be used to guide a CO2 laser for selective removal. Two-dimensional NIR images were acquired at 1310-nm of extracted human molar teeth with occlusal caries. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) was also used to acquire depth-resolved images of the lesion areas. An imaging processing module was developed to analyze the NIR imaging output and generate optical maps that were used to guide a CO2 laser to selectively remove the lesions at a uniform depth. Post-ablation NIR images were acquired to verify caries removal. Based on the analysis of the NIR images, caries lesions were selectively removed with a CO2 laser while sound tissues were conserved. However, the removal rate varied markedly with the severity of decay and multiple passes were required for caries removal. These initial results are promising but indicate that the selective removal of natural caries is more challenging than the selective removal of artificial lesions due to varying tooth geometry, the highly variable organic/mineral ratio in natural lesions and more complicated lesion structure.

  5. GROUND-BASED, NEAR-INFRARED EXOSPECTROSCOPY. II. TENTATIVE DETECTION OF EMISSION FROM THE EXTREMELY HOT JUPITER WASP-12b

    SciTech Connect

    Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Barman, Travis

    2012-02-10

    We report the tentative detection of the near-infrared emission of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b with the low-resolution prism on Infrared Telescope Facility/SpeX. We find a K - H contrast color of 0.137% {+-} 0.054%, corresponding to a blackbody of temperature 2400{sup +1500}{sub -500} K and consistent with previous, photometric observations. We also revisit WASP-12b's energy budget on the basis of secondary eclipse observations: the dayside luminosity is a relatively poorly constrained (2.0-4.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1}, but this still allows us to predict a day/night effective temperature contrast of 200-1000 K (assuming A{sub B} = 0). Thus, we conclude that WASP-12b probably does not have both a low albedo and low recirculation efficiency. Our results show the promise and pitfalls of using single-slit spectrographs for characterization of extrasolar planet atmospheres, and we suggest future observing techniques and instruments which could lead to further progress. Limiting systematic effects include the use of too narrow a slit on one night-which observers could avoid in the future-and chromatic slit losses (resulting from the variable size of the seeing disk) and variations in telluric transparency-which observers cannot control. Single-slit observations of the type we present remain the best option for obtaining {lambda} > 1.7 {mu}m spectra of transiting exoplanets in the brightest systems. Further and more precise spectroscopy is needed to better understand the atmospheric chemistry, structure, and energetics of this, and other, intensely irradiated planet.

  6. Near-Infrared Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping With Indocyanine Green Using the VITOM II ICG Exoscope for Open Surgery for Gynecologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Buda, Alessandro; Dell'Anna, Tiziana; Vecchione, Francesca; Verri, Debora; Di Martino, Giampaolo; Milani, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping is emerging as an effective method for surgical staging of different gynecologic malignancies. Near-infrared (NIR) technology using a fluorescent dye such as indocyanine green (ICG) represents an interesting and feasible method for SLN mapping even in traditional open surgeries by applying video telescope operating microscope (VITOM) system technology. We report our preliminary experience in 12 women who underwent surgical nodal staging for early-stage vulvar and uterine or cervical cancer. Surgical and pathological outcomes are described, and the VITOM II ICG system's intraoperative image quality, handling and docking, and teaching value are assessed. The general impression of the surgical staff was that the VITOM II system is easy to use, and that the image quality of the anatomic structures is impressive. Traditional open SLN mapping with ICG appears to be easy to perform and reproducible, providing a new tool in the management of patients with gynecologic malignancies. Moreover, we believe that this technology has great potential as an operative teaching and learning modality for trainers for open surgical cases. Additional studies involving the VITOM system with a large sample size of patients are needed to confirm these promising results. PMID:26921484

  7. Far-infrared measurements of N/O in H II regions - Evidence for enhanced CN process nucleosynthesis in the inner Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. F.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Werner, M. W.; Watson, D. M.; Genzel, R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the far-infrared lines of forbidden O III 51.8 microns, 88.4 microns, and forbidden N III 57.3 microns are presented for 13 H II regions covering a wide range in Galactocentric distance. These lines are used to measure the variation of N(2+)/O(2+) with Galactic radius from the center out to 12 kpc. It is argued that this ratio is indicative of the elemental ratio N/O. It is shown that the line flux ratio 57.3 microns forbidden N III/51.7 microns forbidden O III is nearly equal to the N(2+)/O(2+) abundance ratio and is only weakly dependent on nebular conditions. The derived N(2+)/O(2+) values show an inverse correlation with distance from the Galactic center. N(2+)/O(2+) tends to increase as the H II region electron temperature decreases, a behavior consistent with a model of Galactic enrichment in which N-14 is secondary to primary O-16, a scenario that is the natural result of CN processing.

  8. Herschel Discovery of a New Class of Cold, Faint Debris Discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiroal, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mora, A.; Krivov, A. V.; Montesinos, B.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Arevalo, M.; Augereau, J.-Ch.; Bayo, A.; Danchi, W.; del Burgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Fridlund, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B. M.; Heras, A. M.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Maldonado, J.; Meeus, G.; Montes, D.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present Herschel PACS 100 and 160 micron observations of the solar-type stars alpha Men, HD 88230 and HD 210277, which form part of the FGK stars sample of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme (OTKP) DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars). Our observations show small infrared excesses at 160 m for all three stars. HD 210277 also shows a small excess at 100 micron, while the 100 micron fluxes of alpha Men and HD 88230 agree with the stellar photospheric predictions. We attribute these infrared excesses to a new class of cold, faint debris discs. alpha Men and HD 88230 are spatially resolved in the PACS 160 m images, while HD 210277 is point-like at that wavelength. The projected linear sizes of the extended emission lie in the range from approx 115 to <= 250 AU. The estimated black body temperatures from the 100 and 160 micron fluxes are approx < 22 K, while the fractional luminosity of the cold dust is L(sub dust) / L(*) approx 10 (exp 6) close to the luminosity of the Solar-System's Kuiper belt. These debris discs are the coldest and faintest discs discovered so far around mature stars and cannot easily be explained by invoking "classical" debris disc models.

  9. Herschel Discovery of a New class of Cold, Faint Debris Discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Mora, A.; Krivov, A. V.; Montesinos, B.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Arevalo, M.; Augereau, J. -Ch.; Bayo, A.; Danchi, W.; del Burgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Fridlund, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, B. M.; Heras, A. M.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Maldonado, J.; Meeus, G.; Montes, D.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present Herschel PACS 100 and 160 micron observations of the solar-type stars alpha Men, HD 88230 and HD 210277, which form part of the FGK stars sample of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme (OTKP) DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars). Our observations show small infrared excesses at 160 micron for all three stars. HD 210277 also shows a small excess at 100 micron. while the 100 micron fluxes of a Men and HD 88230 agree with the stellar photospheric predictions. We attribute these infrared excesses to a new class of cold, faint debris discs. alpha Men and HD 88230 are spatially resolved in the PACS 160 micron images, while HD 210277 is point-like at that wavelength. The projected linear sizes of the extended emission lie in the range from approximately 115 to <= 250 AU. The estimated black body temperatures from the 100 and 160 micron fluxes are approximately < 22 K, while the fractional luminosity of the cold dust is L(dust)/ L(star) approximates 10(exp -6), close to the luminosity of the Solar-System's Kuiper belt. These debris discs are the coldest and faintest discs discovered so far around mature stars and cannot easily be explained by invoking "classical" debris disc models.

  10. FAINT NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET/FAR-ULTRAVIOLET STANDARDS FROM SWIFT/UVOT, GALEX, AND SDSS PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Brown, Peter E-mail: hoversten@astro.psu.ed E-mail: brown@astro.psu.ed

    2010-12-10

    At present, the precision of deep ultraviolet photometry is somewhat limited by the dearth of faint ultraviolet standard stars. In an effort to improve this situation, we present a uniform catalog of 11 new faint (u {approx} 17) ultraviolet standard stars. High-precision photometry of these stars has been taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Galaxy Evolution Explorer archives and combined with new data from the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope to provide precise photometric measures extending from the near-infrared to the far-ultraviolet. These stars were chosen because they are known to be hot (20, 000 < T{sub eff} < 50, 000 K) DA white dwarfs with published Sloan spectra that should be photometrically stable. This careful selection allows us to compare the combined photometry and Sloan spectroscopy to models of pure hydrogen atmospheres to both constrain the underlying properties of the white dwarfs and test the ability of white dwarf models to predict the photometric measures. We find that the photometry provides good constraints on white dwarf temperatures, which demonstrates the ability of Swift/UVOT to investigate the properties of hot luminous stars. We further find that the models reproduce the photometric measures in all 11 passbands to within their systematic uncertainties. Within the limits of our photometry, we find the standard stars to be photometrically stable. This success indicates that the models can be used to calibrate additional filters to our standard system, permitting easier comparison of photometry from heterogeneous sources. The largest source of uncertainty in the model fitting is the uncertainty in the foreground reddening curve, a problem that is especially acute in the UV.

  11. The black hole mass of NGC 4151. II. Stellar dynamical measurement from near-infrared integral field spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Onken, Christopher A.; Ferrarese, Laura; Valluri, Monica; Brown, Jonathan S.; McGregor, Peter J.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W.; Bentz, Misty C.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Riffel, Rogemar A. E-mail: mvalluri@umich.edu

    2014-08-10

    We present a revised measurement of the mass of the central black hole (M{sub BH} ) in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. The new stellar dynamical mass measurement is derived by applying an axisymmetric orbit-superposition code to near-infrared integral field data obtained using adaptive optics with the Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS). When our models attempt to fit both the NIFS kinematics and additional low spatial resolution kinematics, our results depend sensitively on how χ{sup 2} is computed—probably a consequence of complex bar kinematics that manifest immediately outside the nuclear region. The most robust results are obtained when only the high spatial resolution kinematic constraints in the nuclear region are included in the fit. Our best estimates for the black hole mass and H-band mass-to-light ratio are M{sub BH} ∼ 3.76 ± 1.15 × 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉} (1σ error) and Y{sub H} ∼ 0.34 ± 0.03 M{sub ☉}/L{sub ☉} (3σ error), respectively (the quoted errors reflect the model uncertainties). Our black hole mass measurement is consistent with estimates from both reverberation mapping (3.57{sub −0.37}{sup +0.45}×10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}) and gas kinematics (3.0{sub −2.2}{sup +0.75}×10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}; 1σ errors), and our best-fit mass-to-light ratio is consistent with the photometric estimate of Y{sub H} = 0.4 ± 0.2 M{sub ☉}/L{sub ☉}. The NIFS kinematics give a central bulge velocity dispersion σ{sub c} = 116 ± 3 km s{sup –1}, bringing this object slightly closer to the M{sub BH}-σ relation for quiescent galaxies. Although NGC 4151 is one of only a few Seyfert 1 galaxies in which it is possible to obtain a direct dynamical black hole mass measurement—and thus, an independent calibration of the reverberation mapping mass scale—the complex bar kinematics makes it less than ideally suited for this purpose.

  12. A Spitzer Survey of Mid-infrared Molecular Emission from Protoplanetary Disks. II. Correlations and Local Thermal Equilibrium Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyk, C.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Blake, G. A.; Najita, J. R.; Carr, J. S.

    2011-04-01

    We present an analysis of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of H2O, OH, HCN, C2H2, and CO2 emission, and Keck-NIRSPEC observations of CO emission, from a diverse sample of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be circumstellar disks. We find that detections and strengths of most mid-IR molecular emission features are correlated with each other, suggesting a common origin and similar excitation conditions for this mid-infrared line forest. Aside from the remarkable differences in molecular line strengths between T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be, and transitional disks discussed in Pontoppidan et al., we note that the line detection efficiency is anti-correlated with the 13/30 μm spectral slope, which is a measure of the degree of grain settling in the disk atmosphere. We also note a correlation between detection efficiency and Hα equivalent width, and tentatively with accretion rate, suggesting that accretional heating contributes to line excitation. If detected, H2O line fluxes are correlated with the mid-IR continuum flux, and other co-varying system parameters, such as L sstarf. However, significant sample variation, especially in molecular line ratios, remains, and its origin has yet to be explained. Local thermal equilibrium (LTE) models of the H2O emission show that line strength is primarily related to the best-fit emitting area, and this accounts for most source-to-source variation in H2O emitted flux. Best-fit temperatures and column densities cover only a small range of parameter space, near ~1018 cm-2 and 450 K for all sources, suggesting a high abundance of H2O in many planet-forming regions. Other molecules have a range of excitation temperatures from ~500to1500 K, also consistent with an origin in planet-forming regions. We find molecular ratios relative to water of ~10-3 for all molecules, with the exception of CO, for which n(CO)/n(H2O) ~ 1. However, LTE fitting caveats and differences in the way thermo-chemical modeling results are reported make comparisons with

  13. A SPITZER SURVEY OF MID-INFRARED MOLECULAR EMISSION FROM PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. CORRELATIONS AND LOCAL THERMAL EQUILIBRIUM MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Salyk, C.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Blake, G. A.; Najita, J. R.; Carr, J. S.

    2011-04-20

    We present an analysis of Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph observations of H{sub 2}O, OH, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} emission, and Keck-NIRSPEC observations of CO emission, from a diverse sample of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be circumstellar disks. We find that detections and strengths of most mid-IR molecular emission features are correlated with each other, suggesting a common origin and similar excitation conditions for this mid-infrared line forest. Aside from the remarkable differences in molecular line strengths between T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be, and transitional disks discussed in Pontoppidan et al., we note that the line detection efficiency is anti-correlated with the 13/30 {mu}m spectral slope, which is a measure of the degree of grain settling in the disk atmosphere. We also note a correlation between detection efficiency and H{alpha} equivalent width, and tentatively with accretion rate, suggesting that accretional heating contributes to line excitation. If detected, H{sub 2}O line fluxes are correlated with the mid-IR continuum flux, and other co-varying system parameters, such as L{sub *}. However, significant sample variation, especially in molecular line ratios, remains, and its origin has yet to be explained. Local thermal equilibrium (LTE) models of the H{sub 2}O emission show that line strength is primarily related to the best-fit emitting area, and this accounts for most source-to-source variation in H{sub 2}O emitted flux. Best-fit temperatures and column densities cover only a small range of parameter space, near {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} and 450 K for all sources, suggesting a high abundance of H{sub 2}O in many planet-forming regions. Other molecules have a range of excitation temperatures from {approx}500to1500 K, also consistent with an origin in planet-forming regions. We find molecular ratios relative to water of {approx}10{sup -3} for all molecules, with the exception of CO, for which n(CO)/n(H{sub 2}O) {approx} 1. However, LTE

  14. The Infrared Hunter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    This image composite compares infrared and visible views of the famous Orion nebula and its surrounding cloud, an industrious star-making region located near the hunter constellation's sword. The infrared picture is from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, and the visible image is from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, headquartered in Tucson, Ariz.

    In addition to Orion, two other nebulas can be seen in both pictures. The Orion nebula, or M42, is the largest and takes up the lower half of the images; the small nebula to the upper left of Orion is called M43; and the medium-sized nebula at the top is NGC 1977. Each nebula is marked by a ring of dust that stands out in the infrared view. These rings make up the walls of cavities that are being excavated by radiation and winds from massive stars. The visible view of the nebulas shows gas heated by ultraviolet radiation from the massive stars.

    Above the Orion nebula, where the massive stars have not yet ejected much of the obscuring dust, the visible image appears dark with only a faint glow. In contrast, the infrared view penetrates the dark lanes of dust, revealing bright swirling clouds and numerous developing stars that have shot out jets of gas (green). This is because infrared light can travel through dust, whereas visible light is stopped short by it.

    The infrared image shows light captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Light with wavelengths of 8 and 5.8 microns (red and orange) comes mainly from dust that has been heated by starlight. Light of 4.5 microns (green) shows hot gas and dust; and light of 3.6 microns (blue) is from starlight.

  15. Assessment of plaque composition by intravascular ultrasound and near-infrared spectroscopy: from PROSPECT I to PROSPECT II.

    PubMed

    Brugaletta, Salvatore; Sabaté, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary artery disease (CAD), which is today the leading cause of death worldwide and will continue to be the first in the world in 2030. Vulnerable coronary plaques are usually characterized by a high content of necrotic core, a thin inflamed fibrous cap (intense accumulation of macrophages) and scarce presence of smooth muscle cells. None of these characteristics can be estimated by coronary angiography, which on the contrary underestimates the magnitude of atherosclerotic burden, particularly in earlier stage disease when positive vascular remodeling may allow "normal" lumen caliber despite substantial vascular wall plaque. The recognition of the ubiquity of substantial but non-flow limiting lesions that may be at high risk for subsequent plaque rupture has resulted in a paradigm shift in thinking about the pathophysiology of CAD, with the focus no longer solely on the degree of arterial luminal narrowing. This growing need for more information about coronary atherosclerosis in order to identify patients and lesions at risk for complications during PCI and for future adverse cardiac events has been the primary impetus for the development of novel intracoronary imaging methods able to detect plaque composition, in particular presence of a necrotic core/lipid pool, such as intravascular ultrasound virtual histology and near-infrared spectroscopy. These imaging technologies and their clinical and clinical/research applications are discussed in detail. PMID:24931516

  16. The Spitzer Mid-infrared AGN Survey. II. The Demographics and Cosmic Evolution of the AGN Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, M.; Ridgway, S. E.; Sajina, A.; Petric, A. O.; Gates, E. L.; Urrutia, T.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.

    2015-04-01

    We present luminosity functions derived from a spectroscopic survey of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from Spitzer Space Telescope imaging surveys. Selection in the mid-infrared is significantly less affected by dust obscuration. We can thus compare the luminosity functions of obscured and unobscured AGNs in a more reliable fashion than by using optical or X-ray data alone. We find that the AGN luminosity function can be well described by a broken power-law model in which the break luminosity decreases with redshift. At high redshifts (z\\gt 1.6), we find significantly more AGNs at a given bolometric luminosity than found by either optical quasar surveys or hard X-ray surveys. The fraction of obscured AGNs decreases rapidly with increasing AGN luminosity, but, at least at high redshifts, appears to remain at ≈ 50% even at bolometric luminosities ˜ {{10}14} {{L}⊙ }. The data support a picture in which the obscured and unobscured populations evolve differently, with some evidence that high luminosity obscured quasars peak in space density at a higher redshift than their unobscured counterparts. The amount of accretion energy in the universe estimated from this work suggests that AGNs contribute about 12% to the total radiation intensity of the universe, and a high radiative accretion efficiency ≈ 0.18-0.07+0.12 is required to match current estimates of the local mass density in black holes.

  17. Large Magellanic Cloud Near-infrared Synoptic Survey. II. The Wesenheit Relations and Their Application to the Distance Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anupam; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Macri, Lucas M.; Singh, Harinder P.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Wagner-Kaiser, R.; Sarajedini, Ata

    2016-04-01

    We present new near-infrared (NIR) Cepheid period-Wesenheit (P-W) relations in the LMC using time-series observations from the Large Magellanic Cloud NIR Synoptic Survey. We also derive optical+NIR P-W relations using V and I magnitudes from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. We employ our new JHKs data to determine an independent distance to the LMC of {μ }{{LMC}}\\=\\18.47+/- 0.07(statistical) mag, using an absolute calibration of the Galactic relations based on several distance determination methods and accounting for the intrinsic scatter of each technique. We also derive new NIR period-luminosity and Wesenheit relations for Cepheids in M31 using observations from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey. We use the absolute calibrations of the Galactic and LMC {W}J,H relations to determine the distance modulus of M31, {μ }{{M31}}\\=\\24.46+/- 0.20 mag. We apply a simultaneous fit to Cepheids in several Local Group galaxies covering a range of metallicities (7.7\\lt 12+{log}[{{O}}/{{H}}]\\lt 8.6 dex) to determine a global slope of -3.244 ± 0.016 mag dex-1 for the {W}J,{Ks} relation and obtain robust distance estimates. Our distances are in good agreement with recent TRGB based distance estimates and we do not find any evidence for a metallicity dependence in the NIR P-W relations.

  18. Investigations of quantum efficiency in type-II InAs/GaSb very long wavelength infrared superlattice detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaochao; Jiang, Dongwei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Wang, Dongbo; Yu, Qingjiang; Zhao, Liancheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the quantum efficiency (QE) of InAs/GaSb T2SL very long wavelength Infrared (VLWIR) photodetectors with 50% cutoff of 12.7 μm. Due to the small depletion width and similar absorption coefficient in the T2SL material system, the minority-carrier diffusion length was determined as the key element to improve the QE of VLWIR T2SL photodetectors. The minority-carrier diffusion length was estimated by a comparison of the experimental data with the Hovel model. Our result suggest that the short hole diffusion length (Lh ∼ 520 nm) and the large its ratio to the width of this region (xn/Lh) are considered against the photo-excited carrier collection in the T2SL photodetectors. In addition, the influence of surface recombination velocity (Sh) on the QE of the T2SL photodetectors is also studied. The change of QE with Sh is not so significant due to the relatively low absorption coefficient and short hole diffusion length in our photodetector.

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopy of 3:1 Kirkwood Gap asteroids II: Probable and plausible parent bodies; primitive and differentiated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieber-Beyer, Sherry K.; Gaffey, Michael J.

    2014-02-01

    The 3:1 Kirkwood Gap asteroids are a mineralogically diverse set of asteroids located in a region that delivers meteoroids into Earth-crossing orbits. Mineralogical characterizations of asteroids in/near the 3:1 Kirkwood Gap can be used as a tool to “map” conditions and processes in the early Solar System. The chronological studies of the meteorite types provide a “clock” for the relative timing of those events and processes. By identifying the source asteroids of particular meteorite types, the “map” and “clock” can be combined to provide a much more sophisticated understanding of the history and evolution of the late solar nebula and the early Solar System. A mineralogical assessment of twelve 3:1 Kirkwood Gap asteroids has been carried out using near-infrared spectral data obtained from 2010 to 2011 combined with visible spectral data (when available) to cover the spectral interval of 0.4-2.5 μm. Eight of these asteroids have surfaces with basaltic-type silicate assemblages, indicating at least partial melting within their parent bodies. Although HED-like mineralogies are present these objects exhibit subdued features indicating the presence of an additional phase (e.g., NiFe metal) or process (e.g., space weathering). Four of these asteroids appear to be ordinary chondrite assemblages. Three of these are plausibly linked to the probable H-chondrite parent body, (6) Hebe.

  20. Application of the transition semiconductor to semimetal in type II nanostructure superlattice for mid-infrared optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutramine, Abderrazak; Nafidi, Abdelhakim; Barkissy, Driss; Hannour, Abdelkrim; Elanique, Abdellatif; Gouti, Thami El

    2016-04-01

    The present work is devoted to the study of band structure and band gap in symmetric InAs (d 1 = 25 Å)/GaSb (d 2 = 25 Å) type II superlattice. Our calculations were performed in the envelope function formalism with the valence band offset Λ = 570 meV. We discussed the semiconductor to semimetal transition and the evolutions of the fundamental band gap, E g (Γ), as a function of d 1, Λ and the temperature. This study suggests that a wide range of wavelength can be reached by adjusting d 1. In addition, E g (Γ, T) decreases from 288.7 to 230 meV in the range of 4.2-300 K, corresponding to the cutoff wavelength ranging from 4.3 to 5.4 µm. These latter results explain the recent experimental ones realized by C. Cervera et al. for our Λ = 588 meV.

  1. A Spitzer Space Telescope Far-infrared Spectral Atlas of Compact Sources in the Magellanic Clouds. II. The Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jacco Th.; Oliveira, Joana M.; Gordon, Karl D.; Sloan, G. C.; Engelbracht, C. W.

    2010-04-01

    We present far-infrared spectra, λ = 52-93 μm, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope in the spectral energy distribution mode of its Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer instrument, of a selection of luminous compact far-infrared sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). These comprise nine young stellar objects (YSOs), the compact H II region N 81 and a similar object within N 84, and two red supergiants (RSGs). We use the spectra to constrain the presence and temperature of cool dust and the excitation conditions within the neutral and ionized gas, in the circumstellar environments and interfaces with the surrounding interstellar medium. We compare these results with those obtained in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The spectra of the sources in N 81 (of which we also show the Infrared Space Observatory-Long-wavelength Spectrograph spectrum between 50 and 170 μm) and N 84 both display strong [O I] λ63 μm and [O III] λ88 μm fine-structure line emission. We attribute these lines to strong shocks and photo-ionized gas, respectively, in a "champagne flow" scenario. The nitrogen content of these two H II regions is very low, definitely N(N)/N(O) < 0.04 but possibly as low as N(N)/N(O) < 0.01. Overall, the oxygen lines and dust continuum are weaker in star-forming objects in the SMC than in the LMC. We attribute this to the lower metallicity of the SMC compared to that of the LMC. While the dust mass differs in proportion to metallicity, the oxygen mass differs less; both observations can be reconciled with higher densities inside star-forming cloud cores in the SMC than in the LMC. The dust in the YSOs in the SMC is warmer (37-51 K) than in comparable objects in the LMC (32-44 K). We attribute this to the reduced shielding and reduced cooling at the low metallicity of the SMC. On the other hand, the efficiency of the photo-electric effect to heat the gas is found to be indistinguishable to that measured in the same manner in the LMC, ≈0

  2. Distribution of Faint Atomic Gas in Hickson Compact Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Yun, Min Su; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun; Braatz, James A.

    2015-10-01

    We present 21 cm H i observations of four Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H i emission in a region of 25‧ × 25‧ (140–650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of H i masses. In particular, we detected 65% more H i than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG 92. We also identify whether the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high surface brightness (HSB) H i features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the H i strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the H i observed with the GBT has a similar spatial distribution to the HSB structures in HCG 31 and HCG 68. Conversely, the observed H i distributions in HCG 44 and HCG 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG 44 lies to the northeast–southwest region and in HCG 92 lies in the northwest region of their respective groups. The spatial and dynamical similarities between the total (faint+HSB) and the HSB H i indicate that the faint gas is of tidal origin. We found that the gas will survive ionization by the cosmic UV background and the escaping ionizing photons from the star-forming regions and stay primarily neutral for at least 500 Myr.

  3. Spectral relationships for atmospheric correction. II. Improving NASA's standard and MUMM near infra-red modeling schemes.

    PubMed

    Goyens, C; Jamet, C; Ruddick, K G

    2013-09-01

    Spectral relationships, reflecting the spectral dependence of water-leaving reflectance, ρw(λ), can be easily implemented in current AC algorithms with the aim to improve ρw(λ) retrievals where the algorithms fail. The present study evaluates the potential of spectral relationships to improve the MUMM [Ruddick et al., 2006, Limnol. Oceanogr. 51, 1167-1179] and standard NASA [Bailey et al., 2010, Opt. Express 18, 7521-7527] near infra-red (NIR) modeling schemes included in the AC algorithm to account for non-zero ρw(λNIR), based on in situ coastal ρw(λ) and simulated Rayleigh corrected reflectance data. Two modified NIR-modeling schemes are investigated: (1) the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme is forced with bounding relationships in the red spectral domain and with a NIR polynomial relationship and, (2) the constant NIR ρw(λ) ratio used in the MUMM NIR-modeling scheme is replaced by a NIR polynomial spectral relationship. Results suggest that the standard NASA NIR-modeling scheme performs better for all turbidity ranges and in particular in the blue spectral domain (percentage bias decreased by approximately 50%) when it is forced with the red and NIR spectral relationships. However, with these new constraints, more reflectance spectra are flagged due to non-physical Chlorophyll-a concentration estimations. The new polynomial-based MUMM NIR-modeling scheme yielded lower ρw(λ) retrieval errors and particularly in extremely turbid waters. However, including the polynomial NIR relationship significantly increased the sensitivity of the algorithm to errors on the selected aerosol model from nearby clear water pixels. PMID:24103991

  4. Investigating the Near-Infrared Properties of Planetary Nebulae II. Medium Resolution Spectra. 2; Medium Resolution Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hora, Joseph L.; Latter, William B.; Deutsch, Lynne K.

    1998-01-01

    We present medium-resolution (R approximately 700) near-infrared (lambda = 1 - 2.5 micrometers) spectra of a sample of planetary nebulae (PNe). A narrow slit was used which sampled discrete locations within the nebulae; observations were obtained at one or more positions in the 41 objects included in the survey. The PN spectra fall into one of four general categories: H1 emission line-dominated PNe, H1 and H2 emission line PNe, H2 emission line-dominated PNe, and continuum-dominated PNe. These categories correlate with morphological type, with the elliptical PNe falling into the first group, and the bipolar PNe primarily in the H2 and continuum emission groups. The categories also correlate with C/O ratio, with the O-rich objects falling into the first group and the C-rich objects in the groups. Other spectral features were observed in all catagories, such as continuum emission from the central star, and warm dust continuum emission towards the long wavelength end of the spectra. H2 was detected in four PNe in this survey for the first time. An analysis was performed using the H2 line ratios in all of the PN spectra in the survey where a sufficient number of lines were observed to determine the ortho-to-para ratio and the rotational and vibrational excitation temperatures of the H-2 in those objects. One unexpected result from this analysis is that the H-2 is excited by absorption of ultraviolet photons in most of the PNe, although there are several PNe in which collisional excitation plays an important role. The correlation between bipolar morphology and H2 emission has been strengthened with the new detections of H2 in this survey.

  5. Stellar Ultraviolet Rocket Research Program. [faint object spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A 1/4 meter ultraviolet spectrometer, developed to measure the ultraviolet flux from several standard type stars was flown successfully on Aerobee rockets. The ultraviolet flux from alpha Lyr, eta U Ma, zeta Oph, delta Ori, alpha CMa, beta CMa, and alpha Leo were measured. These values agreed with the OAO data obtained by Code in the 1200 to 3400 A region to + or - 9%. The design and calibration of a faint object spectrometer for observing stars and nebula with a 3 A resolution and a 3% accuracy in a 60 second observation are discussed.

  6. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  7. The Faint Object Camera for the Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomae, K.-P.; Schmidt, G.

    1981-05-01

    The Faint Object Camera (FOC), one of the four axial scientific instruments located at the focal plane of the NASA Space Telescope, is described. The FOC has overall dimensions of approximately 0.9 x 0.9 x 2.2 cu m, a total weight of about 322 kg, and an average power consumption per orbit of less than 150 W. The FOC is made up of two complete and independent camera systems, each with its dedicated three mirrors optical relay and photon detector device operating in a wavelength range of 1200 A to 7000 A.

  8. Faint disks around classical T Tauri stars: Small but dense enough to form planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piétu, V.; Guilloteau, S.; Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Boehler, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Most Class II sources (of nearby star-forming regions) are surrounded by disks with weak millimeter continuum emission. These "faint" disks may hold clues to the disk dissipation mechanism. However, the physical properties of protoplanetary disks have been directly constrained by imaging only the brightest sources. Aims: We attempt to determine the characteristics of such faint disks around classical T Tauri stars and to explore the link between disk faintness and the proposed disk dispersal mechanisms (accretion, viscous spreading, photo-evaporation, planetary system formation). Methods: We performed high angular resolution (0.3'') imaging of a small sample of disks (9 sources) with low 1.3 mm continuum flux (mostly <30 mJy) with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and simultaneously searched for 13CO (or CO) J = 2-1 line emission. Using a simple parametric disk model, we determined characteristic sizes for the disks in dust and gas, and we constrained surface densities in the central 50 AU. Results: All disks are much smaller than the bright disks imaged so far, both in continuum and 13CO lines (5 detections). In continuum, half of the disks are very small, with characteristic radii less than 10 AU, but still have high surface density values. Small sizes appear to be the main cause of the low disk luminosity. Direct evidence for grain growth is found for the three disks that are sufficiently resolved. Low continuum opacity is attested in only two systems, but we cannot firmly distinguish between a low gas surface density and a lower dust emissivity resulting from grain growth. Finally, we report a tentative discovery of a ~20 AU radius cavity in DS Tau, which with the (unresolved) "transition" disk of CX Tau, brings the proportion of "transitional" disks to a similar value to that of brighter sources. The existence of cavities cannot by itself explain their observed low mm flux. Conclusions: This study highlights a category of very compact dust disks

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopy of M dwarfs. II. H2O molecule as an abundance indicator of oxygen†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Takashi; Nakajima, Tadashi; Takeda, Yoichi

    2015-04-01

    Based on the near-infrared spectra (R ≈ 20000) of M dwarfs, oxygen abundances are determined from the rovibrational lines of H2O. Although H2O lines in M dwarfs are badly blended with each other and the continuum levels are depressed appreciably by the collective effect of the numerous H2O lines themselves, quantitative analysis of H2O lines has been carried out by referring to the pseudo-continua, consistently defined on the observed and theoretical spectra. For this purpose, the pseudo-continuum on the theoretical spectrum has been evaluated accurately by the use of the recent high-precision H2O line-list. Then, we propose a simple and flexible method of analyzing the equivalent widths (EWs) of blended features (i.e., not necessarily limited to single lines) by the use of a mini-curve-of-growth (CG), which is a small portion of the usual CG around the observed EW. The mini-CG is generated by using the theoretical EWs evaluated from the synthetic spectrum in exactly the same way as the EWs are measured from the observed spectrum. The observed EW is converted to the abundance by the use of the mini-CG, and the process is repeated for all the observed EWs line-by-line or blend-by-blend. In cool M dwarfs, almost all the oxygen atoms left after CO formation are in stable H2O molecules, which suffer little change for the uncertainties due to imperfect modelling of the photospheres. Thus the numerous H2O lines are excellent abundance indicators of oxygen. The oxygen abundances are determined to be log AO (AO = NO/NH) between -3.5 and -3.0 in 38 M dwarfs, but cannot be determined in four early M dwarfs in which H2O lines are detected only marginally. The resulting log AO/AC values plotted against log AC appear to be systematically smaller in the carbon-rich M dwarfs, showing the different formation histories of oxygen and carbon in the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk. Also, AO/AFe ratios in most M dwarfs are closer to the solar AO/AFe ratio, based on the

  10. A JOINT MODEL OF X-RAY AND INFRARED BACKGROUNDS. II. COMPTON-THICK ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yong; Helou, George; Armus, Lee

    2013-11-01

    We estimate the abundance of Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) based on our joint model of X-ray and infrared backgrounds. At L{sub rest2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}, the CT AGN density predicted by our model is a few ×10{sup –4} Mpc{sup –3} from z = 0 up to z = 3. CT AGNs with higher luminosity cuts (>10{sup 43}, 10{sup 44}, and 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}) peak at higher redshift and show a rapid increase in number density from z = 0 to z ∼ 2-3. The CT AGN to all AGN ratio appears to be low (2%-5%) at f{sub 2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup –15} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} but rises rapidly toward fainter flux levels. The CT AGNs account for ∼38% of the total accreted supermassive black hole mass and contribute ∼25% of the cosmic X-ray background spectrum at 20 keV. Our model predicts that the majority (90%) of luminous and bright CT AGNs (L{sub rest2-10keV} > 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1} or f{sub 2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup –15} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}) have detectable hot dust 5-10 μm emission, which we associate with a dusty torus. The fraction drops for fainter objects, to around 30% at L{sub rest2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} or f{sub 2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup –17} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Our model confirms that heavily obscured AGNs (N{sub H{sub I}} > 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}) can be separated from unobscured and mildly obscured ones (N{sub H{sub I}} < 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}) in the plane of observed frame X-ray hardness versus mid-IR/X-ray ratio.

  11. Growth and fabrication of InAs/GaSb type II superlattice mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report our recent work on the growth and fabrication of InAs/GaSb type II superlattice photodiode detectors. The superlattice consists of 9 monolayer InAs/12 monolayer GaSb in each period. Lattice mismatch between the GaSb substrate and the superlattice is 1.5 × 10-4. The full width at half maximum of the first-order satellite peak from X-ray diffraction is 28 arc sec. The P-I-N photodiodes in which the absorption regions (I regions) have 600 periods of superlattice show a 50% cutoff wavelength of 4.3 μm. The current responsivity was measured at 0.48 A/W from blackbody radiation. The peak detectivity of 1.75 × 1011 cmHz1/2/W and the quantum efficiency of 41% at 3.6 μm were obtained. PACS: 85.60.-q; 85.60.Gz; 85.35.-Be. PMID:22192726

  12. A far-infrared study of the N/O abundance ratio in galactic H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. F.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Werner, M. W.; Watson, D. M.; Genzel, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    New measurements are presented for W43 (G30.8-0.0), Orion A, and G75.84+0.4, which are located at widely varying distances from the galactic center. The combination of the forbidden N III 57.3 microns and forbidden O III 88.4 and 51.8 microns yields measurements of N(++)/O(++) that are for the most part insensitive to electron temperature and density uncertainties and to clumping of the ionized gas. This is due to the similarity of the critical densities for these transitions. It is contended that for the observed nebulae, N(++)/O(++) should be indicative of N/O, a ratio that is of signal importance in nucleosynthesis theory. The measurements are compared with previous measurements of M17 and W51, which lie at intermediate galactocentric distances. For nebulae in the solar circle, it is found that N(++)/O(++) is greater than the N/O values derived from optical studies of N(+)/O(+) in low-ionization zones of the same nebulae. Possible sources of this discrepancy are considered. It is found that N(++)/O(++) in W43 is significantly higher than for the other H II regions in the sample. Since W43 is located at R = 5 kpc, which is the smallest galactocentric distance in the sample, the data are seen as consistent with the presence of a negative abundance gradient d(N/O)/dR.

  13. Stellar Archeology in the Galactic Halo with Ultra-faint Dwarfs. VII. Hercules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musella, Ilaria; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Marconi, Marcella; Clementini, Gisella; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Scowcroft, Victoria; Moretti, Maria Ida; Di Fabrizio, Luca; Greco, Claudia; Coppola, Giuseppina; Bersier, David; Catelan, Márcio; Grado, Aniello; Limatola, Luca; Smith, Horace A.; Kinemuchi, Karen

    2012-09-01

    We present the first time-series study of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Hercules. Using a variety of telescope/instrument facilities we secured about 50 V and 80 B epochs. These data allowed us to detect and characterize 10 pulsating variable stars in Hercules. Our final sample includes six fundamental-mode (ab-type) and three first-overtone (c-type) RR Lyrae stars, and one Anomalous Cepheid. The average period of the ab-type RR Lyrae stars, langP abrang = 0.68 days (σ = 0.03 days), places Hercules in the Oosterhoff II group, as found for almost the totality of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies investigated so far for variability. The RR Lyrae stars were used to obtain independent estimates of the metallicity, reddening, and distance to Hercules, for which we find [Fe/H] = -2.30 ± 0.15 dex, E(B - V) = 0.09 ± 0.02 mag, and (m - M)0 = 20.6 ± 0.1 mag, in good agreement with the literature values. We have obtained a V, B - V color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Hercules that reaches V ~ 25 mag and extends beyond the galaxy's half-light radius over a total area of 40' × 36'. The CMD and the RR Lyrae stars indicate the presence of a population as old and metal-poor as (at least) the Galactic globular cluster M68. Based on data collected at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain, at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope, Roche de los Muchachos, Canary Islands, Spain, at the 2.2 m ESO/MPI telescope, La Silla, Chile, Proposal 079.D-0587, at the 2 m Liverpool Telescope, Roche de los Muchachos, Canary Islands, Spain, and at the 2 m Faulkes Telescope North, Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, USA.

  14. Detectability of Ultra Faint Dwarf Galaxies with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, C.; Antoja, T.; Aguilar, L.; Figueras, F.; Brown, A.; Antiche, E.; Hernández-Pérez, F.; Valenzuela, O.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S.; Velázquez, H.

    2014-07-01

    We present a technique to detect Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxies (UFDs) in the Galactic Halo, using sky and proper motion information.The method uses wavelet transforms to detect peaks in the sky and proper motion planes, and to evaluate the probability of these being stochastic fluctuations. We aim to map thoroughly the detection limits of this technique. For this, we have produced a library of 15,000 synthetic UFDs, embedded in the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS) background (Robin et al. 2012), each at a different distance, different luminosity, half-light radius, velocity dispersion and center-of-mass velocity, varying in ranges that extend well beyond those spanned by known classical and ultra-faint dSphs. We use these synthetic UFDs as a benchmark to characterize the completeness and detection limits of our technique, and present our results as a function of different physical and observable parameters of the UFDs (see full poster for more details at https://gaia.ub.edu/Twiki/pub/GREATITNFC/ProgramFinalconference/Poster_UFGX_Bcn_C_Mateu.pdf).

  15. Faint Blue Objects in the Hubble Deep Field North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, M.; von Hippel, T.; Mendez, R. A.; Winget, D. E.

    2005-07-01

    Using the deepest and finest resolution images of the Universe acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope and a similar image taken 7 years later for the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, we have derived proper motions for the point sources in the Hubble Deep Field-North. Two faint blue objects, HDF2234 and HDF3072, are found to display significant proper motions, 10.0 ± 2.5 and 15.5 ± 3.8 mas yr-1. Photometric distances and tangential velocities for these stars are consistent with disk white dwarfs located at ≈500 pc. At least one of these two objects now appears spectroscopically to be a white dwarf (Kilic et al., in preparation). The faint blue objects analyzed by Ibata et al. (1999) and Mendez & Minniti (2000) do not show any significant proper motion; they are not halo white dwarfs and they do not contribute to the Galactic dark matter. These objects are likely to be distant AGN.

  16. Achieving near-infrared emission in platinum(ii) complexes by using an extended donor-acceptor-type ligand.

    PubMed

    Zhang, You-Ming; Meng, Fanyuan; Tang, Jian-Hong; Wang, Yafei; You, Caifa; Tan, Hua; Liu, Yu; Zhong, Yu-Wu; Su, Shijian; Zhu, Weiguo

    2016-03-15

    A series of C^N ligands with donor-acceptor (D-A) frameworks, i.e. TPA-BTPy, TPA-BTPy-Fl and Fl(TPA-BTPy)2, as well as their mono- and di-nuclear platinum(ii) complexes of (TPA-BTPy)Pt(pic), (TPA-BTPy-Fl)Pt(pic) and [Fl(TPA-BTPy)2]Pt2(pic)2 are respectively designed and synthesized, in which triphenylamine (TPA) and fluorene (Fl) are used as the D units, 4-(pyrid-2-yl)benzothiadiazole (BTPy) as the A unit, and the picolinate anion (pic) as the auxiliary ligand. Their thermal, photophysical and electrochemical characteristics were investigated. Compared to mono-nuclear platinum complexes and their free ligands, this dinuclear one of [Fl(TPA-BTPy)2]Pt2(pic)2 shows an obvious interaction from the platinum atom to ligand and dual emission peaks at 828 and 601 nm in thin films. Upon oxidation with antimony pentachloride in dichloromethane, charge transfer transitions between the platinum and ligand are observed for the three complexes. The single-emissive-layer polymer light-emitting devices doped with [Fl(TPA-BTPy)2]Pt2(pic)2 display a strong electroluminescence with dual emission peaks at 780 and 600 nm at a dopant concentration over 4 wt%. A maximum external quantum efficiency of 0.02% with a radiance of 59 μW cm(-2) is obtained in the device at 30 wt% dopant concentration. This work indicates that the use of an extended D-A-type ligand is an effective strategy to achieve NIR emission for platinum complexes in PLEDs. PMID:26880278

  17. The Molecular Gas in Luminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Extreme Physical Conditions and Their Effects on the X co Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; van der Werf, Paul; Xilouris, E.; Isaak, Kate G.; Gao, Yu

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we conclude the analysis of our CO line survey of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs: L IR >~ 1011 L ⊙) in the local universe (Paper I) by focusing on the influence of their average interstellar medium (ISM) properties on the total molecular gas mass estimates via the so-called X co = M(H2)/L co, 1-0 factor. One-phase radiative transfer models of the global CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) yield an X co distribution with langX corang ~ (0.6 ± 0.2) M ⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1 over a significant range of average gas densities, temperatures, and dynamic states. The latter emerges as the most important parameter in determining X co, with unbound states yielding low values and self-gravitating states yielding the highest ones. Nevertheless, in many (U)LIRGs where available higher-J CO lines (J = 3-2, 4-3, and/or J = 6-5) or HCN line data from the literature allow a separate assessment of the gas mass at high densities (>=104 cm-3) rather than a simple one-phase analysis, we find that near-Galactic X co ~ (3-6) M ⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1 values become possible. We further show that in the highly turbulent molecular gas in ULIRGs, a high-density component will be common and can be massive enough for its high X co to dominate the average value for the entire galaxy. Using solely low-J CO lines to constrain X co in such environments (as has been the practice up until now) may have thus resulted in systematic underestimates of molecular gas mass in ULIRGs, as such lines are dominated by a warm, diffuse, and unbound gas phase with low X co but very little mass. Only well-sampled high-J CO SLEDs (J = 3-2 and higher) and/or multi-J observations of heavy rotor molecules (e.g., HCN) can circumvent such a bias, and the latter type of observations may have actually provided early evidence of it in local ULIRGs. The only way that the global X co of such systems could be significantly lower than Galactic is if the average dynamic state of the dense gas is strongly

  18. Evidence for a defect level above the conduction band edge of InAs/InAsSb type-II superlattices for applications in efficient infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Prins, A. D.; Lewis, M. K.; Bushell, Z. L.; Sweeney, S. J.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.

    2015-04-27

    We report pressure-dependent photoluminescence (PL) experiments under hydrostatic pressures up to 2.16 GPa on a mid-wave infrared InAs/InAs{sub 0.86}Sb{sub 0.14} type-II superlattice (T2SL) structure at different pump laser excitation powers and sample temperatures. The pressure coefficient of the T2SL transition was found to be 93 ± 2 meV·GPa{sup −1}. The integrated PL intensity increases with pressure up to 1.9 GPa then quenches rapidly indicating a pressure induced level crossing with the conduction band states at ∼2 GPa. Analysis of the PL intensity as a function of excitation power at 0, 0.42, 1.87, and 2.16 GPa shows a clear change in the dominant photo-generated carrier recombination mechanism from radiative to defect related. From these data, evidence for a defect level situated at 0.18 ± 0.01 eV above the conduction band edge of InAs at ambient pressure is presented. This assumes a pressure-dependent energy shift of −11 meV·GPa{sup −1} for the valence band edge and that the defect level is insensitive to pressure, both of which are supported by an Arrhenius activation energy analysis.

  19. The SafeBoosC II randomized trial: treatment guided by near-infrared spectroscopy reduces cerebral hypoxia without changing early biomarkers of brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Plomgaard, Anne M.; van Oeveren, Wim; Petersen, Tue H.; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Franz, Axel; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Hagmann, Cornelia; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Lemmers, Petra; Pellicer, Adelina; Pichler, Gerhard; Winkel, Per; Greisen, Gorm

    2016-01-01

    Background: The SafeBoosC phase II multicentre randomized clinical trial investigated the benefits and harms of monitoring cerebral oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with an evidence-based treatment guideline vs. no NIRS data and treatment as usual in the control group during the first 72 h of life. The trial demonstrated a significant reduction in the burden of cerebral hypoxia in the experimental group. We now report the blindly assessed and analyzed treatment effects on electroencephalographic (EEG) outcomes (burst rate and spectral edge frequency 95% (SEF95)) and blood biomarkers of brain injury (S100β, brain fatty acid-binding protein, and neuroketal). Methods: One hundred and sixty-six extremely preterm infants were randomized to either experimental or control group. EEG was recorded at 64 h of age and blood samples were collected at 6 and 64 h of age. Results: One hundred and thirty-three EEGs were evaluated. The two groups did not differ regarding burst rates (experimental 7.2 vs. control 7.7 burst/min) or SEF95 (experimental 18.1 vs. control 18.0 Hz). The two groups did not differ regarding blood S100β, brain fatty acid-binding protein, and neuroketal concentrations at 6 and 64 h (n = 123 participants). Conclusion: Treatment guided by NIRS reduced the cerebral burden of hypoxia without affecting EEG or the selected blood biomarkers. PMID:26679155

  20. Mapping Large-Scale Gaseous Outflows in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies with Keck II ESI Spectra: Spatial Extent of the Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Crystal L.

    2006-08-01

    The kinematics of neutral gas and warm ionized gas have been mapped across ultraluminous starburst galaxies using the Na I λλ5890, 5896 absorption-line and Hα emission-line profiles, respectively, in Keck II ESI spectra. Blueshifted, interstellar absorption is found over extended regions, exceeding 15 kpc in several systems. An outflow diverging from the nuclear starburst would have to reach large heights to cover this area in projection. The scale height of the absorbing material could be lower, however, if the outflow emanates from a larger region of the galaxy. The large velocity gradient discovered across several outflows is inconsistent with a flow diverging from the nuclear starburst. Widespread star formation, triggered by the merger, probably drives these extended outflows via mechanical feedback from supernovae, although shocks generated by the galaxy-galaxy merger may also contribute to the formation of a hot wind. In a typical ULIG, the mass carried by the cool phase of the outflow is ~108 Msolar i.e., a few percent of the dynamical mass in the starburst region. Assuming the starburst activity has persisted for 10 Myr, the kinetic energy of the cool outflows is a few percent of the supernova energy. The cool wind is expected to be accelerated by momentum deposition, possibly from radiation pressure as well as the ram pressure of the hot, supernova-induced wind. The turnaround radii of the cool outflows are at least ~30-90 kpc, which presents a significant Na I absorption cross section. If most L>0.1L* galaxies pass through a luminous starburst phase, then relics of cool outflows will create a significant redshift-path density. Galaxy formation models should include this cool phase of the outflow in addition to a hot wind in feedback models. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: YSOVAR: infrared photometry in Lynds 1688 (Gunther+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunther, H. M.; Cody, A. M.; Covey, K. R.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Plavchan, P.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Wolk, S. J.; Allen, L.; Bayo, A.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Hora, J. L.; Meng, H. Y. A.; Morales-Calderon, M.; Parks, J. R.; Song, I.

    2014-11-01

    We present a Spitzer/IRAC monitoring campaign of the star-forming region L1688 in the mid-infrared. Lynds 1688 (L1688) is a subcloud of the {rho} Ophiuchus star-forming region. Three fields in L1688 were observed with Spitzer in four observing windows from 2010 April 12 to 2010 May 16 (visibility window 1), 2010 September 22 to 2010 October 27 (visibility window 2), 2011 April 20 to 2011 May 23 (visibility window 3), and 2011 October 1 to 2011 November 6 (visibility window 4). These windows are consecutive visibility periods dictated by the Spitzer orbit (Werner et al., 2004ApJS..154....1W). Table1 lists the time of each observation. They can be found under Program Identification number (PID) 61024 in the Spitzer Heritage Archive (http://sha.ipac.caltech.edu/applications/Spitzer/SHA). L1688 was observed by Chandra on 2000 April 13 for 100ks exposure time in the FAINT mode with the ACIS instrument (ObsID 635 in the Chandra Data Archive, http://cda.harvard.edu/chaser/). We found auxiliary data from the literature. L1688 was observed with Spitzer in the cryogenic mission phase with all four IRAC channels and the 24μm channel of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We augment our own Spitzer data reduction with values from the catalog published by the c2d project (c2d = "From Cores to Disks"; Evans et al. 2003, cat. II/332). Near-infrared data are taken from 2MASS (cat. II/246). Additionally, we take detections from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS; cat. II/319) Galactic cluster survey, data release 9. UKIDSS uses the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) Wide Field Camera. The YSOVAR data is also cross-matched with data from the SIMBAD (http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/simbad/) service to provide an identification with known objects from the literature. (4 data files).

  2. Ultra-light dark matter in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models struggle to match the observations at galactic scales. The tension can be reduced either by dramatic baryonic feedback effects or by modifying the particle physics of CDM. Here, we consider an ultra-light scalar field DM particle manifesting a wave nature below a DM particle mass-dependent Jeans scale. For DM mass m ˜ 10-22 eV, this scenario delays galaxy formation and avoids cusps in the centre of the dark matter haloes. We use new measurements of half-light mass in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Draco II and Triangulum II to estimate the mass of the DM particle in this model. We find that if the stellar populations are within the core of the density profile then the data are in agreement with a Wave Dark Matter model having a DM particle with m ˜ 3.7-5.6 × 10-22 eV. The presence of this extremely light particle will contribute to the formation of a central solitonic core replacing the cusp of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and bringing predictions closer to observations of cored central density in dwarf galaxies.

  3. Ultra-light dark matter in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models struggle to match the observations at galactic scales. The tension can be reduced either by dramatic baryonic feedback effects or by modifying the particle physics of CDM. Here, we consider an ultra-light scalar field DM particle manifesting a wave nature below a DM particle mass-dependent Jeans scale. For DM mass $m\\sim10^{-22}{\\rm eV}$, this scenario delays galaxy formation and avoids cusps in the center of the dark matter haloes. We use new measurements of half-light mass in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Draco II and Triangulum II to estimate the mass of the DM particle in this model. We find that if the stellar populations are within the core of the density profile then the data are in agreement with a wave dark matter model having a DM particle with $m\\sim 3.7-5.6\\times 10^{-22}{\\rm eV}$. The presence of this extremely light particle will contribute to the formation of a central solitonic core replacing the cusp of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and bringing predictions closer to observations of cored central density in dwarf galaxies.

  4. A New Synthetic Library of the Near-infrared Ca II Triplet Indices. I. Index Definition, Calibration, and Relations with Stellar Atmospheric Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, W.; Luo, A. L.; Zhao, Y. H.

    2012-02-01

    Adopting the SPECTRUM package, which is a stellar spectral synthesis program, we have synthesized a comprehensive set of 2890 near-infrared (NIR) synthetic spectra with a resolution and wavelength sampling similar to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the forthcoming Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectra. During the synthesis, we applied the "New grids of ATLAS9 Model Atmosphere" to develop a grid of local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres for effective temperatures (T eff) ranging from 3500 to 7500 K, for surface gravities (log g) from 0.5 to 5.0 dex, for metallicities ([Fe/H]) from -4.0 to 0.5 dex, and for solar ([α/Fe] = 0.0 dex) and non-solar ([α/Fe] = +0.4 dex) abundances. This synthetic stellar library is composed of 1350 solar scaled abundance (SSA) and 1530 non-solar scaled abundance (NSSA) spectra, grounding on which we have defined a new set of NIR Ca II triplet indices and an index CaT as the sum of the three. These defined indices were automatically measured on every spectrum of the synthetic stellar library and calibrated with the indices computed on the observational spectra from the INDO-U.S. stellar library. In order to check the effect of α-element enhancement on the so-defined Ca II indices, we compared indices measured on the SSA spectra with those on the NSSA ones at the same trine of stellar parameters (T eff, log g, [Fe/H]); luckily, little influences of α-element enhancement were found. Furthermore, comparisons of our synthetic indices with the observational ones from measurements on the INDO-U.S. stellar library, the SDSS-DR7 and SDSS-DR8 spectroscopic survey are presented, respectively, for dwarfs and giants in specific. For dwarfs, our synthetic indices could well reproduce the behaviors of the observational indices versus stellar parameters, which verifies the validity of our index definitions for dwarfs. For giants, the consistency between our synthetic indices and the observational

  5. A NEW SYNTHETIC LIBRARY OF THE NEAR-INFRARED Ca II TRIPLET INDICES. I. INDEX DEFINITION, CALIBRATION, AND RELATIONS WITH STELLAR ATMOSPHERIC PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Du, W.; Luo, A. L.; Zhao, Y. H. E-mail: lal@nao.cas.cn

    2012-02-15

    Adopting the SPECTRUM package, which is a stellar spectral synthesis program, we have synthesized a comprehensive set of 2890 near-infrared (NIR) synthetic spectra with a resolution and wavelength sampling similar to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the forthcoming Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectra. During the synthesis, we applied the 'New grids of ATLAS9 Model Atmosphere' to develop a grid of local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres for effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) ranging from 3500 to 7500 K, for surface gravities (log g) from 0.5 to 5.0 dex, for metallicities ([Fe/H]) from -4.0 to 0.5 dex, and for solar ([{alpha}/Fe] = 0.0 dex) and non-solar ([{alpha}/Fe] = +0.4 dex) abundances. This synthetic stellar library is composed of 1350 solar scaled abundance (SSA) and 1530 non-solar scaled abundance (NSSA) spectra, grounding on which we have defined a new set of NIR Ca II triplet indices and an index CaT as the sum of the three. These defined indices were automatically measured on every spectrum of the synthetic stellar library and calibrated with the indices computed on the observational spectra from the INDO-U.S. stellar library. In order to check the effect of {alpha}-element enhancement on the so-defined Ca II indices, we compared indices measured on the SSA spectra with those on the NSSA ones at the same trine of stellar parameters (T{sub eff}, log g, [Fe/H]); luckily, little influences of {alpha}-element enhancement were found. Furthermore, comparisons of our synthetic indices with the observational ones from measurements on the INDO-U.S. stellar library, the SDSS-DR7 and SDSS-DR8 spectroscopic survey are presented, respectively, for dwarfs and giants in specific. For dwarfs, our synthetic indices could well reproduce the behaviors of the observational indices versus stellar parameters, which verifies the validity of our index definitions for dwarfs. For giants, the consistency between our synthetic

  6. Emission Line Science in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS) Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark David; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Pharo, John; Rhoads, James E.; FIGS Team

    2016-01-01

    Emission lines can reveal a bounty of information about the processes occurring within a galaxy. Physical properties such as star formation rate and metallicity can be determined from ratios of emission line fluxes. The study of emission line galaxies (ELGs) through cosmic time gives insight into the processes by which galaxies evolve. Extreme emission line galaxies (EELGs), typified by strong nebular emission lines which dominate their spectra, are of interest because they are well known to be galaxies undergoing periods of intense star formation. Slitless grism spectroscopy offers a significant advantage to the study of ELGs and EELGs, allowing for measurement of the spectra of a large number of galaxies within a field. This allows for detection of ELGs and EELGs with few selection biases. Optical follow-up of FIGS-selected sources allows for analysis of star formation rate (SFR) through H-alpha measurements over the redshift range 0.3

  7. NEAR-INFRARED COUNTERPARTS TO CHANDRA X-RAY SOURCES TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER. II. DISCOVERY OF WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Muno, M. P.; Morris, M. R.; Cotera, A.

    2010-02-10

    We present new identifications of infrared counterparts to the population of hard X-ray sources near the Galactic center detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have spectroscopically confirmed 16 new massive stellar counterparts to the X-ray population, including nitrogen-type (WN) and carbon-type (WC) Wolf-Rayet stars, and O supergiants. These discoveries increase the total sample of massive stellar X-ray sources in the Galactic center region to 30 (possibly 31). For the majority of these sources, the X-ray photometry is consistent with thermal emission from plasma having temperatures in the range of kT = 1-8 keV or non-thermal emission having power-law indices in the range of -1 {approx}< GAMMA {approx}< 3, and X-ray luminosities in the range of L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 32}-10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} (0.5-8.0 keV). Several sources have exhibited X-ray variability of several factors between observations. These X-ray properties are not a ubiquitous feature of single massive stars but are typical of massive binaries, in which the high-energy emission is generated by the collision of supersonic winds, or by accretion onto a compact companion. However, without direct evidence for companions, the possibility of intrinsic hard X-ray generation from single stars cannot be completely ruled out. The spectral energy distributions of these sources exhibit significant infrared excess, attributable to free-free emission from ionized stellar winds, supplemented by hot dust emission in the case of the WC stars. With the exception of one object located near the outer regions of the Quintuplet cluster, most of the new stars appear isolated or in loose associations. Seven hydrogen-rich WN and O stars are concentrated near the Sagittarius B H II region, while other similar stars and more highly evolved hydrogen-poor WN and WC stars lie scattered within {approx}50 pc, in projection, of Sagitarrius A West. We discuss various mechanisms capable of generating the observed X

  8. Calibration and operation of the Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R.; Beaver, E.; Burbidge, E.; Hier, R.; Allen, R.; Angel, R.; Bartko, F.; Bohlin, R.; Ford, H.; Davidson, A.

    1984-01-01

    The design and basic performance characteristics of the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS), one of five instruments built for use on the Space Telescope observatory, is summarized briefly. The results of the recently completed instrument-level calibration are presented with special emphasis on issues affecting plans for FOS astronomical observations. Examples include such fundamental characteristics as: limiting magnitudes (system sensitivity and noise figures), spectral coverage and resolution, scattered light properties, and instrumental polarization and modulation efficiencies. Also gated toward intended users, a rather detailed description of FOS operating modes is given. The discussion begins with the difficulties anticipated during target acquisition and their hoped-for resolution. Both the 'normal' spectroscopic operating modes of the FOS and its 'exotic' features (e.g. spectropolarimetric, time-tagged, and time-resolved modes) are presented. The paper concludes with an overview of the activities to assure proper alignment and operation of the FOS within the entire Space Telescope system (orbital and ground-based).

  9. Very faint X-ray binaries with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2016-06-01

    A population of very faint X-ray binaries has been discovered in the last years thanks to the improvement in sensitivity and resolution of the new generations of X-ray missions. These systems show anomalously low luminosities, below 10^{36} ergs/sec, challenging our understanding of accretion physics and binary evolution models, and thereby opening new windows for both observational and theoretical work on accretion onto compact objects. XMM-Newton is playing a crucial role in the study of this dim family of objects thanks to its incomparable spectral capabilities at low luminosities. I will review the state-of-the-art of the field and present our XMM results in both black hole and neutron star objects. Finally, I will discuss the possibilities that the new generation of X-ray telescopes offer for this research line.

  10. A sample of Swift/SDSS faint blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bernardo; Giommi, Paolo; Turriziani, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We aim here to provide a complete sample of faint (fr ≳ 1 mJy, fx ≳ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1) blazars and blazar candidates serendipitously discovered in deep Swift images centered on Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By stacking all available images, we obtain exposures ranging from 104 to more than a million seconds. Since GRBs are thought to explode randomly across the sky, this set of deep fields can be considered as an unbiased survey of ≈ 12 square degrees of extragalactic sky, with sensitivities reaching a few 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band. We then derive the x-ray Log N Log S and show that, considering that our sample may be contaminated by sources other than blazars, we are in agreement with previous estimations based on data and simulations.

  11. The faint young sun-climate paradox - Continental influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Schatten, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    We examine the various mechanisms which have been proposed to compensate for the climatic effects of a 30% increase in the solar luminosity over the past 4 1/2 billion years. Although atmospheric greenhouse effects have received most attention, other mechanisms may have played a role of comparable importance. In particular, we note that the development of continents during the past 2 1/2 billion years could have had a significant secular effect on the atmosphere-ocean heat transport system. As a result, past climates may have been less susceptible to complete freeze-over. A simple energy balance model is used to demonstrate the magnitude of this effect. Because the CO2 greenhouse effect is not the only means of compensating for solar evolution, the faint-young-sun problem should not be used to infer past levels of atmospheric CO2.

  12. Mass influx obtained from LLLTV observations of faint meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Clifton, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    Since the advent of low light level television (LLLTV) systems, it has been recognized that such devices offer the ability to observe meteors as faint as 10th magnitude which allows the extension of optical meteor data to masses as small as 0.0001 grams. The Space Sciences Lab at Marshall Space Flight Center has been actively engaged in such observations using image orthicons and intensified SEC vidicons. The results of these observations are presented along with an interpretation in terms of mass-flux. This interpretation includes the development of a relationship between peak luminosity of a meteor and mass, velocity, and zenith angle that was derived from single body meteor theory and compares favorably with results obtained from the Artificial Program. Also included in the mass flux interpretation is an analysis of the observation response of a LLLTV system to fixed and moving point sources.

  13. Four QSOs found in a survey of faint objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. C.; Tritton, K. P.

    1982-02-01

    Four quasars with redshifts z = 0.6185, 0.6267, 0.850, and 1.665 have been found in the central 33.4 arcmin square of the field at 22h.05, -18deg.91 surveyed by Savage and Bolton (1979) and Krug et al. (1980). The first two quasars are separated by 6.8 arcmin and may be associated with groups of faint galaxies. The separation is well within the 20 Mpc or larger dimensions suggested by Oort et al. (1981) for superclusters, and the velocity difference is not unusual if the velocity dispersion is near the upper end of the range of 300-600 km/s

  14. Properties of galaxies at the faint end of the Hα luminosity function at z ~ 0.62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Guijarro, Carlos; Gallego, Jesús; Villar, Víctor; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Clément, Benjamin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    Context. Studies measuring the star formation rate density, luminosity function, and properties of star-forming galaxies are numerous. However, it exists a gap at 0.5 < z < 0.8 in Hα-based studies. Aims: Our main goal is to study the properties of a sample of faint Hα emitters at z ~ 0.62. We focus on their contribution to the faint end of the luminosity function and derived star formation rate density, characterising their morphologies and basic photometric and spectroscopic properties. Methods: We use a narrow-band technique in the near-infrared, with a filter centred at 1.06 μm. The data come from ultra-deep VLT/HAWK-I observations in the GOODS-S field with a total of 31.9 h in the narrow-band filter. In addition to our survey, we mainly make use of ancillary data coming from the CANDELS and Rainbow Cosmological Surveys Database, from the 3D-HST for comparison, and also spectra from the literature. We perform a visual classification of the sample and study their morphologies from structural parameters available in CANDELS. In order to obtain the luminosity function, we apply a traditional V/Vmax method and perform individual extinction corrections for each object to accurately trace the shape of the function. Results: Our 28 Hα-selected sample of faint star-forming galaxies reveals a robust faint-end slope of the luminosity function α = - 1.46-0.08+0.16 . The derived star formation rate density at z ~ 0.62 is ρSFR = 0.036-0.008+0.012 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 . The sample is mainly composed of disks, but an important contribution of compact galaxies with Sérsic indexes n ~ 2 display the highest specific star formation rates. Conclusions: The luminosity function at z ~ 0.62 from our ultra-deep data points towards a steeper α when an individual extinction correction for each object is applied. Compact galaxies are low-mass, low-luminosity, and starburst-dominated objects with a light profile in an intermediate stage from early to late types. Based on observations

  15. A spectroscopic search for faint secondaries in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vande Putte, D.; Smith, Robert Connon; Hawkins, N. A.; Martin, J. S.

    2003-06-01

    The secondary in cataclysmic variables (CVs) is usually detected by cross-correlation of the CV spectrum with that of a K or M dwarf template, to produce a radial velocity curve. Although this method has demonstrated its power, it has its limits in the case of noisy spectra, such as are found when the secondary is faint. A method of coadding spectra, called skew mapping, has been proposed in the past. Gradually, examples of its application are being published; none the less, so far no journal article has described the technique in detail. To answer this need, this paper explores in detail the capabilities of skew mapping when determining the amplitude of the radial velocity for faint secondaries. It demonstrates the power of the method over techniques that are more conventional, when the signal-to-noise ratio is poor. The paper suggests an approach to assessing the quality of results. This leads in the case of the investigated objects to a first tier of results, where we find K2= 127 +/- 23 km s-1 for SY Cnc, K2= 144 +/- 18 km s-1 for RW Sex and K2= 262 +/- 14 km s-1 for UX UMa. These we believe to be the first direct determinations of K2 for these objects. Furthermore, we also obtain K2= 263 +/- 30 km s-1 for RW Tri, close to a skew mapping result obtained elsewhere. In the first three cases, we use these results to derive the mass of the white dwarf companion. A second tier of results includes UU Aqr, EX Hya and LX Ser, for which we propose more tentative values of K2. Clear failures of the method are also discussed (EF Eri, VV Pup and SW Sex).

  16. MEASURING SIZES OF ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Ricardo R.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Geha, Marla

    2012-02-01

    The discovery of ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies in the halo of the Milky Way extends the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function to a few hundred solar luminosities. This extremely low luminosity regime poses a significant challenge for the photometric characterization of these systems. We present a suite of simulations aimed at understanding how different observational choices related to the properties of a low-luminosity system impact our ability to determine its true structural parameters such as half-light radius and central surface brightness. We focus on estimating half-light radii (on which mass estimates depend linearly) and find that these numbers can have up to 100% uncertainties when relatively shallow photometric surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, are used. Our simulations suggest that to recover structural parameters within 10% or better of their true values: (1) the ratio of the field of view to the half-light radius of the satellite must be greater than three, (2) the total number of stars, including background objects should be larger than 1000, and (3) the central to background stellar density ratio must be higher than 20. If one or more of these criteria are not met, the accuracy of the resulting structural parameters can be significantly compromised. In the context of future surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the latter condition will be closely tied to our ability to remove unresolved background galaxies. Assessing the reliability of measured structural parameters will become increasingly critical as the next generation of deep wide-field surveys detects UFDs beyond the reach of current spectroscopic limits.

  17. The Faint Counterparts of MAMBO Millimeter Sources near the New Technology Telescope Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannerbauer, H.; Lehnert, M. D.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.; Genzel, R.; Menten, K. M.

    2004-05-01

    We discuss identifications for 18 sources from our Max-Planck-Millimeter-Bolometer (MAMBO) 1.2 mm survey of the region surrounding the NTT Deep Field. We have obtained accurate positions from Very Large Array 1.4 GHz interferometry, and in a few cases IRAM millimeter interferometry, and have also made deep BVRIzJK imaging at ESO. We find thirteen 1.2 mm sources associated with optical/near-infrared objects in the magnitude range K=19.0-22.5, while five are blank fields at K>22. We argue from a comparison of optical/near-infrared photometric redshifts and radio/millimeter redshift estimates that two of the 13 optical/near-infrared objects are likely foreground objects distinct from the dust sources, one of them possibly lensing the millimeter source. The median redshift of the radio-identified millimeter sources is ~2.6 from the radio/millimeter estimator, and the median optical/near-infrared photometric redshifts for the objects with counterparts is ~2.1. This suggests that those radio-identified millimeter sources without optical/near-infrared counterparts tend to lie at higher redshifts than those with optical/near-infrared counterparts. Compared to published identifications of objects from 850 μm surveys of similar depth, the median K and I magnitudes of our counterparts are roughly 2 mag fainter, and the dispersion of I-K colors is less. Real differences in the median redshifts, residual misidentifications with bright objects, cosmic variance, and small-number statistics are likely to contribute to this significant difference, which also affects redshift measurement strategies. Some of the counterparts are red in J-K (>~20%), but the contribution of such millimeter objects to the recently studied population of near-infrared-selected (Js-Ks>2.3) high-redshift galaxies is only of order a few percent. The recovery rate of MAMBO sources by preselection of optically faint radio sources is relatively low (~25%), in contrast to some claims of a higher rate for

  18. Properties of Interstellar Medium In Infrared-bright QSOs Probed by [O i] 63 um and [C ii] 158 um Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yinghe; Yan, Lin; Tsai, Chao-Wei

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the host galaxies of nine QSOs at 0.1 < z < 0.2 with black hole masses of 3× {10}7 {M}ȯ to 3× {10}9 {M}ȯ based on the far-IR spectroscopy taken with Herschel Space Observatory. We detect the [O i] 63 μm ([C ii] 158 μm) emission in 6 (8) out of 8 (9) sources. Our QSO sample has far-infrared luminosities ({L}{{FIR}}) ˜ several times {10}11{L}ȯ . The observed line-to-{L}{{FIR}} ratios ({L}[{{O}{{I}}]63μ {{m}}}/{L}{{FIR}} and {L}[{{C}{{II}}]}/{L}{{FIR}}) are in the ranges of 2.6 × 10‑4 to 10‑2 and 2.8 × 10‑4 to 2 × 10‑3, respectively (including upper limits). These ratios are comparable to the values found in local ULIRGs, but higher than the average value published so far for z\\gt 1 IR-bright QSOs. One target, W0752+19, shows an additional broad velocity component (˜720 km s‑1) and exceptionally strong [O i] 63 μm emission with {L}[{{O}{{I}}]63μ {{m}}}/{L}{{FIR}} of 10‑2, an order of magnitude higher than the average value found among local (U)LIRGs. Combining with the analyses of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical spectra, we conclude that the [O i] 63 μm emission in these QSOs is unlikely excited by shocks. We infer that the broad [O i] 63 μm emission in W0752+19 could arise from the warm and dense ISM in the narrow-line region of the central active galactic nucleus. Another possible explanation is the existence of a dense gas outflow with {n}{{H}}˜ {10}4 cm‑3, where the corresponding broad [C ii] emission is suppressed. Based on the far-IR [O i] and [C ii] line ratios, we estimate constraints on the ISM density and UV radiation field intensity of {n}{{H}}≲ {10}3.3 cm‑3 and {10}3\\lt {G}0≲ {10}4.2, respectively. These values are consistent with those found in local Seyfert 1 ULIRGs. In contrast, the gas with broad velocity width in W0752+19 has {n}{{H}}≳ {10}4.3 cm‑3 and {G}0\\gt {10}4. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European

  19. Freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint: adaptationist perspectives on the acute stress response spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bracha, H Stefan

    2004-09-01

    This article reviews the existing evolutionary perspectives on the acute stress response habitual faintness and blood-injection-injury type-specific phobia (BIITS phobia). In this article, an alternative evolutionary perspective, based on recent advances in evolutionary psychology, is proposed. Specifically, that fear-induced faintness (eg, fainting following the sight of a syringe, blood, or following a trivial skin injury) is a distinct Homo sapiens-specific extreme-stress survival response to an inescapable threat. The article suggests that faintness evolved in response to middle paleolithic intra-group and inter-group violence (of con-specifics) rather than as a pan-mammalian defense response, as is presently assumed. Based on recent literature, freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint provides a more complete description of the human acute stress response sequence than current descriptions. Faintness, one of three primary physiological reactions involved in BIITS phobia, is extremely rare in other phobias. Since heritability estimates are higher for faintness than for fears or phobias, the author suggests that trait-faintness may be a useful complement to trait-anxiety as an endophenotype in research on the human fear circuitry. Some implications for the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as well as for clinical, health services, and transcriptomic research are briefly discussed. PMID:15337864

  20. Investigation of Variability of Faint Galactic Early-Type Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.; Kostandyan, G. R.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this poster, we discuss the nature of 66 faint carbon (C) stars which have been discovered by scrutinizing the plates of the First Byurakan Survey (FBS). These plates display low-resolution spectra of objects located at high Galactic latitudes and have a limiting magnitude of about V=16. Our sample of 66 confirmed spectroscopically to be C stars. These 66 objects are those which show early-type spectra. To better characterize these objects, medium-resolution CCD spectra were obtained and are exploited for them all, together with consideration of their 2MASS near-infrared (NIR) colors and their optical variability. We derive effective temperatures from photometry. Finally, the optical variability of our objects are studied by using the data of the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS). It is found that the vast majority does not display variability. However, for some of them, the phased light curve may indicate the presence of a secondary component.

  1. Deriving the Extinction to Young Stellar Objects using [Fe II] Near-infrared Emission Lines: Prescriptions from GIANO High-resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecchioli, T.; Sanna, N.; Massi, F.; Oliva, E.

    2016-07-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) emission lines of Fe+ at 1.257, 1.321, and 1.644 μm share the same upper level; their ratios can then be exploited to derive the extinction to a line emitting region once the relevant spontaneous emission coefficients are known. This is commonly done, normally from low-resolution spectra, in observations of shocked gas from jets driven by Young Stellar Objects. In this paper we review this method, provide the relevant equations, and test it by analyzing high-resolution (R ∼ 50,000) NIR spectra of two young stars, namely the Herbig Be star HD 200775 and the Be star V1478 Cyg, which exhibit intense emission lines. The spectra were obtained with the new GIANO echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Notably, the high-resolution spectra allowed checking the effects of overlapping telluric absorption lines. A set of various determinations of the Einstein coefficients are compared to show how much the available computations affect extinction derivation. The most recently obtained values are probably good enough to allow reddening determination within 1 visual mag of accuracy. Furthermore, we show that [Fe ii] line ratios from low-resolution pure emission-line spectra in general are likely to be in error due to the impossibility to properly account for telluric absorption lines. If low-resolution spectra are used for reddening determinations, we advice that the ratio 1.644/1.257, rather than 1.644/1.321, should be used, being less affected by the effects of telluric absorption lines.

  2. SMA observations on faint submillimeter galaxies with S {sub 850} < 2 mJy: Ultra dusty low-luminosity galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2014-07-01

    We obtained Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of eight faint (intrinsic 850 μm fluxes < 2 mJy) submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) discovered in SCUBA images of the massive lensing cluster fields A370, A2390, and A1689 and detected five. In total, we obtain five SMA detections, all of which have de-lensed fluxes <1 mJy with estimated total infrared luminosities 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, comparable to luminous infrared galaxies and normal star-forming galaxies. Based on the latest number counts, these galaxies contribute ∼70% of the 850 μm extragalactic background light and represent the dominant star-forming galaxy population in the dusty universe. However, only 40{sub −16}{sup +30}% of our faint SMGs would be detected in deep optical or near-infrared surveys, which suggests many of these sources are at high redshifts (z ≳ 3) or extremely dusty, and they are not included in current star formation history estimates.

  3. Serendipitous discovery of the faint solar twin Inti 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarza, Jhon Yana; Meléndez, Jorge; Cohen, Judith G.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Solar twins are increasingly the subject of many studies owing to their wide range of applications from testing stellar evolution models to the calibration of fundamental observables; these stars are also of interest because high precision abundances could be achieved that are key to investigating the chemical anomalies imprinted by planet formation. Furthermore, the advent of photometric surveys with large telescopes motivates the identification of faint solar twins in order to set the zero point of fundamental calibrations. Aims: We intend to perform a detailed line-by-line differential analysis to verify whether 2MASS J23263267-0239363 (designated here as Inti 1) is indeed a solar twin. Methods: We determine the atmospheric parameters and differential abundances using high-resolution (R ≈ 50 000), high signal-to-noise (S/N ≈ 110-240 per pixel) Keck/HIRES spectra for our solar twin candidate, the previously known solar twin HD 45184, and the Sun (using reflected light from the asteroid Vesta). Results: For the bright solar twin HD 45184, we found Teff = 5864 ± 9 K, log g = 4.45 ± 0.03 dex, vt = 1.11 ± 0.02 km s-1, and [Fe/H] = 0.04 ± 0.01 dex, which are in good agreement with previous works. Our abundances are in excellent agreement with a recent high-precision work, with an element-to-element scatter of only 0.01 dex. The star Inti 1 has atmospheric parameters Teff = 5837 ± 11 K, log g = 4.42 ± 0.03 dex, vt = 1.04 ± 0.02 km s-1, and [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.01 dex that are higher than solar. The age and mass of the solar twin HD 45184 (3 Gyr and 1.05 M⊙) and the faint solar twin Inti 1 (4 Gyr and 1.04 M⊙) were estimated using isochrones. The differential analysis shows that HD 45184 presents an abundance pattern that is similar to typical nearby solar twins; this means this star has an enhanced refractory relative to volatile elements, while Inti 1 has an abundance pattern closer to solar, albeit somewhat enhanced in refractories. The abundance

  4. Serendipitous discovery of the faint solar twin Inti 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarza, Jhon Yana; Meléndez, Jorge; Cohen, Judith G.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar twins are increasingly the subject of many studies owing to their wide range of applications from testing stellar evolution models to the calibration of fundamental observables; these stars are also of interest because high precision abundances could be achieved that are key to investigating the chemical anomalies imprinted by planet formation. Furthermore, the advent of photometric surveys with large telescopes motivates the identification of faint solar twins in order to set the zero point of fundamental calibrations. Aims: We intend to perform a detailed line-by-line differential analysis to verify whether 2MASS J23263267-0239363 (designated here as Inti 1) is indeed a solar twin. Methods: We determine the atmospheric parameters and differential abundances using high-resolution (R ≈ 50 000), high signal-to-noise (S/N ≈ 110-240 per pixel) Keck/HIRES spectra for our solar twin candidate, the previously known solar twin HD 45184, and the Sun (using reflected light from the asteroid Vesta). Results: For the bright solar twin HD 45184, we found Teff = 5864 ± 9 K, log g = 4.45 ± 0.03 dex, vt = 1.11 ± 0.02 km s-1, and [Fe/H] = 0.04 ± 0.01 dex, which are in good agreement with previous works. Our abundances are in excellent agreement with a recent high-precision work, with an element-to-element scatter of only 0.01 dex. The star Inti 1 has atmospheric parameters Teff = 5837 ± 11 K, log g = 4.42 ± 0.03 dex, vt = 1.04 ± 0.02 km s-1, and [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.01 dex that are higher than solar. The age and mass of the solar twin HD 45184 (3 Gyr and 1.05 M⊙) and the faint solar twin Inti 1 (4 Gyr and 1.04 M⊙) were estimated using isochrones. The differential analysis shows that HD 45184 presents an abundance pattern that is similar to typical nearby solar twins; this means this star has an enhanced refractory relative to volatile elements, while Inti 1 has an abundance pattern closer to solar, albeit somewhat enhanced in refractories. The abundance

  5. Faint Blue Galaxies and the Epoch of Dwarf Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babul, Arif; Ferguson, Henry C.

    1996-02-01

    Several independent lines of reasoning, both theoretical and observational, suggest that the very faint (B ≳ 24) galaxies seen in deep images of the sky are small low-mass galaxies that experienced a short starburst at redshifts 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 1 and have since faded into low-luminosity, low surface brightness (LSB) objects. We examine this hypothesis in detail in order to determine whether a model incorporating such dwarfs can account for the observed wavelength-dependent number counts, as well as redshift, color, and size distributions. Low-mass galaxies generically arise in large numbers in hierarchical clustering scenarios with realistic initial conditions. Generally, these galaxies are expected to form at high redshifts. Babul & Rees have argued that the formation epoch of these galaxies is, in fact, delayed until z ≲ 1 due to the photoionization of the gas by the metagalactic UV radiation at high redshifts. We combine these two elements, along with simple heuristic assumptions regarding star formation histories and efficiency, to construct our bursting dwarf model. The slope and the normalization of the mass function of the dwarf galaxies are derived from the initial conditions and are not adjusted to fit the data. We further augment the model with a phenomenological prescription for the formation and evolution of the locally observed population of galaxies (E, S0, Sab, Sbc, and Sdm types). We use spectral synthesis and Monte Carlo methods to generate realistic model galaxy catalogs for comparison with observations. We find that for reasonable choices of the star formation histories for the dwarf galaxies, the model results are in very good agreement with the results of the deep galaxy surveys. Such a dwarf-dominated model is also qualitatively supported by recent studies of faint galaxy gravitational lensing and clustering, by galaxy size distributions measured with the Hubble Space Telescope, and by the evidence for very modest evolution in regular galaxy

  6. A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion.

    PubMed

    Perets, H B; Gal-Yam, A; Mazzali, P A; Arnett, D; Kagan, D; Filippenko, A V; Li, W; Arcavi, I; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Moon, D-S; Sand, D J; Soderberg, A M; Anderson, J P; James, P A; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Ofek, E O; Bildsten, L; Nelemans, G; Shen, K J; Weinberg, N N; Metzger, B D; Piro, A L; Quataert, E; Kiewe, M; Poznanski, D

    2010-05-20

    Supernovae are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as type Ib/c and type II supernovae, and are associated with young stellar populations. In contrast, the thermonuclear detonation of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit, is thought to produce type Ia supernovae. Such supernovae are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report a faint type Ib supernova, SN 2005E, in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The 'old' environment near the supernova location, and the very low derived ejected mass ( approximately 0.3 solar masses), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin. Spectroscopic observations and analysis reveal high ejecta velocities, dominated by helium-burning products, probably excluding this as a subluminous or a regular type Ia supernova. We conclude that it arises from a low-mass, old progenitor, likely to have been a helium-accreting white dwarf in a binary. The ejecta contain more calcium than observed in other types of supernovae and probably large amounts of radioactive (44)Ti. PMID:20485429

  7. The Quenching of the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxies in the Reionization Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Geha, Marla; Simon, Joshua D.; Vargas, Luis C.; VandenBerg, Don A.; Kirby, Evan N.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Gennaro, Mario; Ferguson, Henry C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Renzini, Alvio

    2014-12-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of six ultra-faint dwarf galaxies: Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Our analysis employs a combination of high-precision photometry obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, medium-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph on the W. M. Keck Observatory, and updated Victoria-Regina isochrones tailored to the abundance patterns appropriate for these galaxies. The data for five of these Milky Way satellites are best fit by a star formation history where at least 75% of the stars formed by z ~ 10 (13.3 Gyr ago). All of the galaxies are consistent with 80% of the stars forming by z ~ 6 (12.8 Gyr ago) and 100% of the stars forming by z ~ 3 (11.6 Gyr ago). The similarly ancient populations of these galaxies support the hypothesis that star formation in the smallest dark-matter sub-halos was suppressed by a global outside influence, such as the reionization of the universe. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-12549.

  8. STAR FORMATION IN ULTRA-FAINT DWARFS: CONTINUOUS OR SINGLE-AGE BURSTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, David; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Sutherland, Ralph

    2015-01-30

    We model the chemical evolution of six ultra-faint dwarfs (UFDs): Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I based on their recently determined star formation histories. We show that two single-age bursts cannot explain the observed [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] distribution in these galaxies and that some self-enrichment is required within the first burst. An alternative scenario is modeled, in which star formation is continuous except for short interruptions when one or more supernovae temporarily blow the dense gas out from the center of the system. This model allows for self-enrichment and can reproduce the chemical abundances of the UFDs in which the second burst is only a trace population. We conclude that the most likely star formation history is one or two extended periods of star formation, with the first burst lasting for at least 100 Myr. As found in earlier work, the observed properties of UFDs can be explained by formation at a low mass (M{sub vir}∼10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}), rather than being stripped remnants of much larger systems.

  9. A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, H. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P. A.; Arnett, D.; Kagan, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Li, W.; Arcavi, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Fox, D. B.; Leonard, D. C.; Moon, D.-S.; Sand, D. J.; Soderberg, A. M.; Anderson, J. P.; James, P. A.; Foley, R. J.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Ofek, E. O.; Bildsten, L.; Nelemans, G.; Shen, K. J.; Weinberg, N. N.; Metzger, B. D.; Piro, A. L.; Quataert, E.; Kiewe, M.; Poznanski, D.

    2010-05-01

    Supernovae are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as type Ib/c and type II supernovae, and are associated with young stellar populations. In contrast, the thermonuclear detonation of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit, is thought to produce type Ia supernovae. Such supernovae are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report a faint type Ib supernova, SN 2005E, in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The `old' environment near the supernova location, and the very low derived ejected mass (~0.3 solar masses), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin. Spectroscopic observations and analysis reveal high ejecta velocities, dominated by helium-burning products, probably excluding this as a subluminous or a regular type Ia supernova. We conclude that it arises from a low-mass, old progenitor, likely to have been a helium-accreting white dwarf in a binary. The ejecta contain more calcium than observed in other types of supernovae and probably large amounts of radioactive 44Ti.

  10. The quenching of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies in the reionization era

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Gennaro, Mario; Ferguson, Henry C. E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu E-mail: avila@stsci.edu E-mail: gennaro@stsci.edu; and others

    2014-12-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of six ultra-faint dwarf galaxies: Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Our analysis employs a combination of high-precision photometry obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, medium-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph on the W. M. Keck Observatory, and updated Victoria-Regina isochrones tailored to the abundance patterns appropriate for these galaxies. The data for five of these Milky Way satellites are best fit by a star formation history where at least 75% of the stars formed by z ∼ 10 (13.3 Gyr ago). All of the galaxies are consistent with 80% of the stars forming by z ∼ 6 (12.8 Gyr ago) and 100% of the stars forming by z ∼ 3 (11.6 Gyr ago). The similarly ancient populations of these galaxies support the hypothesis that star formation in the smallest dark-matter sub-halos was suppressed by a global outside influence, such as the reionization of the universe.

  11. First results from the Faint Object Camera - Imaging the core of R Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, F.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Faint Object Camera on the HST was pointed toward the symbiotic long-period M7e Mira variable R Aquarii, and very high resolution images of the inner core, mainly in the ionized oxygen emission lines in the optical, are reported. Both images show bright arcs, knots, and filaments superposed on a fainter, diffuse nebulosity extending in a general SW-NE direction from the variable to the edge of the field at 10 arcsec distance. The core is resolved in forbidden O III 5007 A and forbidden O II 3727 A into at least two bright knots of emission whose positions and structures are aligned with PA = 50 deg. The central knots appear to be the source of a continuous, well-collimated, stream of material extending out to 3-4 arcsec in the northern sector corresponding to a linear distance of about 1000 AU. The northern stream seems to bend around an opaque obstacle and form a spiral before breaking up into wisps and knots. The southern stream is composed of smaller, discrete parcels of emitting gas curving to the SE.

  12. Abundance ratios of red giants in low-mass ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, P.; Monaco, L.; Bonifacio, P.; Moni Bidin, C.; Geisler, D.; Sbordone, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Low-mass dwarf spheroidal galaxies are key objects for our understanding of the chemical evolution of the pristine Universe and the Local Group of galaxies. Abundance ratios in stars of these objects can be used to better understand their star formation and chemical evolution. Aims: We report on the analysis of a sample of 11 stars belonging to five different ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UfDSph) that is based on X-Shooter spectra obtained at the VLT. Methods: Medium-resolution spectra have been used to determine the detailed chemical composition of their atmosphere. We performed a standard 1D LTE analysis to compute the abundances. Results: Considering all the stars as representative of the same population of low-mass galaxies, we found that the [α/Fe] ratios vs.s [Fe/H] decreases as the metallicity of the star increases in a way similar to that which is found for the population of stars that belong to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The main difference is that the solar [α/Fe] is reached at a much lower metallicity for the UfDSph than for the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We report for the first time the abundance of strontium in CVn II. The star we analyzed in this galaxy has a very high [Sr/Fe] and a very low upper limit of barium which makes it a star with an exceptionally high [Sr/Ba] ratio.

  13. Detection and Mapping of Decoupled Stellar and Ionized Gas Structures in the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 12112+0305.

    PubMed

    Colina; Arribas; Borne; Monreal

    2000-04-10

    Integral field optical spectroscopy with the INTEGRAL fiber-fed system and Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging are used to map the complex stellar and warm ionized gas structure in the ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 12112+0305. Images reconstructed from wavelength-delimited extractions of the integral field spectra reveal that the observed ionized gas distribution is decoupled from the stellar main body of the galaxy, with the dominant continuum and emission-line regions separated by projected distances of up to 7.5 kpc. The two optical nuclei are detected as apparently faint emission-line regions, and their optical properties are consistent with being dust-enshrouded weak [O i] LINERs. The brightest emission-line region is associated with a faint (mI=20.4), giant H ii region of 600 pc diameter, in which a young ( approximately 5 Myr) massive cluster of about 2x107 M middle dot in circle dominates the ionization. Internal reddening toward the line-emitting regions and the optical nuclei ranges from 1 to 8 mag in the visual. Taking the reddening into account, the overall star formation in IRAS 12112+0305 is dominated by starbursts associated with the two nuclei and corresponds to a star formation rate of 80 M middle dot in circle yr-1. PMID:10727379

  14. Results of a search for faint galaxies in voids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, B.; Hopp, U.; Elsaesser, H.

    1997-02-01

    We present the results of a search for intrinsically faint galaxies towards three regions with known voids and the Hercules supercluster. The intention was to identify galaxies of low luminosity in order to find possibly a galaxy population in the voids. Within these selected fields we increased the range of observations in comparison with the recent large field surveys which revealed the non-uniform spatial distribution of galaxies. The limiting magnitude was raised by about 5mag, the limiting surface brightness by 2mag/sq.arcsec, and the limiting diameter reduced to less than 1/3. The individual observational data of our sample are published in the previous PaperI (Hopp et al. 1995) which describes our search strategy and contains B and R magnitudes, apparent diameters, redshifts and galaxy types of about 200 newly identified objects. Their luminosity distribution demonstrates a relatively high percentage of dwarfish galaxies. As the essential result of our survey we have to point out that no clear indication of a void-population was found. The majority of our objects lie outside voids in regions where the already known galaxies are concentrated. Some are located in the middle or near the edges of voids. They appear to be rather isolated, their distances to the nearest neighbour are quite large. Only few of our objects seem to be real void galaxies. Even in the three nearest and rather well defined voids we do not find any hitherto unknown galaxy.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Cycling, Climate, Impacts, and the Faint Young Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Sleep, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    Evidence for relatively mild climates on ancient Earth and Mars has been a puzzle in light of the faint early sun. The geologic evidence, although far from conclusive, would appear to indicate that the surfaces of both planets were, if anything, warmer ca. 3-4 Ga than they are now. The astrophysical argument that the sun ought to have brightened approx. 30% since it reached the main sequence is hard to refute. There results a paradox between the icehouse we expect and the greenhouse we think we see. The usual fix has been to posit massive CO2 atmospheres, although reduced gases (e.g., NH3 or CH4 ) have had their partisans. Evidence against siderite in paleosols dated 2.2-2.75 Ga sets a rough upper limit of 30 PAL (present atmospheric levels) on pCO2 at that time. This is an order of magnitude short of what is needed to defeat the fainter sun. We present here an independent argument against high pCO2 on early Earth that applies not only to the Archean but yet more forcefully to the Hadean era. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Luminosity Function of Faint Globular Clusters in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Christopher Z.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Lauer, Tod R.; Baltz, Edward A.; Silk, Joseph; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-14

    We present the luminosity function to very faint magnitudes for the globular clusters in M87, based on a 30 orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 imaging program. The very deep images and corresponding improved false source rejection allow us to probe the mass function further beyond the turnover than has been done before. We compare our luminosity function to those that have been observed in the past, and confirm the similarity of the turnover luminosity between M87 and the Milky Way. We also find with high statistical significance that the M87 luminosity function is broader than that of the Milky Way. We discuss how determining the mass function of the cluster system to low masses can constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of globular cluster systems. Our mass function is consistent with the dependence of mass loss on the initial cluster mass given by classical evaporation, and somewhat inconsistent with newer proposals that have a shallower mass dependence. In addition, the rate of mass loss is consistent with standard evaporation models, and not with the much higher rates proposed by some recent studies of very young cluster systems. We also find that the mass-size relation has very little slope, indicating that there is almost no increase in the size of a cluster with increasing mass.

  17. THE PRIMEVAL POPULATIONS OF THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C. E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu E-mail: avila@stsci.edu; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, using deep photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A galaxy class recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the UFDs appear to be an extension of the classical dwarf spheroidals to low luminosities, offering a new front in efforts to understand the missing satellite problem. They are the least luminous, most dark-matter-dominated, and least chemically evolved galaxies known. Our HST survey of six UFDs seeks to determine if these galaxies are true fossils from the early universe. We present here the preliminary analysis of three UFD galaxies: Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Classical dwarf spheroidals of the Local Group exhibit extended star formation histories, but these three Milky Way satellites are at least as old as the ancient globular cluster M92, with no evidence for intermediate-age populations. Their ages also appear to be synchronized to within {approx}1 Gyr of each other, as might be expected if their star formation was truncated by a global event, such as reionization.

  18. ARE THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES JUST CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W.; Willman, Beth

    2011-01-20

    We develop a technique to investigate the possibility that some of the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way might be cusp caustics rather than gravitationally self-bound systems. Such cusps can form when a stream of stars folds, creating a region where the projected two-dimensional surface density is enhanced. In this work, we construct a Poisson maximum likelihood test to compare the cusp and exponential models of any substructure on an equal footing. We apply the test to the Hercules dwarf (d {approx} 113 kpc, M{sub V} {approx} -6.2, e {approx} 0.67). The flattened exponential model is strongly favored over the cusp model in the case of Hercules, ruling out at high confidence that Hercules is a cusp catastrophe. This test can be applied to any of the Milky Way dwarfs, and more generally to the entire stellar halo population, to search for the cusp catastrophes that might be expected in an accreted stellar halo.

  19. Infrared Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lascours, Jean; Albe, Virginie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a series of simple and nontraditional experiments that enable students to discover the properties of infrared radiation by studying the propagation, reflection, diffusion, and refraction of infrared. The experiments rely on two modules, an infrared transmitter and an infrared receiver. (SAH)

  20. Stratospheric aerosol optical depth: comparison of global model results with SAGE II and HALOE observations in the visible and near-, far-infrared channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitari, Giovanni; de Luca, Natalia; Mancini, Eva; Bekki, Slimane; Mills, Michael; Timmreck, Claudia; Weisenstein, Debra

    2010-05-01

    Stratospheric aerosol optical depth: comparison of global model results with SAGE II and HALOE observations in the visible and near-, far-infrared channels G. Pitari (1), N. De Luca (1), E. Mancini (1), S. Bekki (2), M. Mills (3), C. Timmreck (4), D. Weisenstein (5) (1) Università degli Studi de L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy (2) Université Pierre e Marie Curie, Paris, France (3) University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA (4) Max-Planck Institut für Meteorologie, Hamburg, Germany (5) Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Lexington, MA, USA Stratospheric aerosols have been recognized to play an important role in the global climate system by influencing the Earth radiative balance and by providing a surface for heterogeneous chemistry. The accurate modeling of the shape and characteristics of the stratospheric aerosol layer requires the knowledge of their microphysical properties and the atmospheric distribution of their tropospheric precursor gases (SO2, OCS). The background aerosol distribution in the stratosphere may be sporadically perturbed for a time period of about five years after major explosive volcanic eruptions, that may inject in the stratosphere large amounts of SO2 and H2S. The most extensive coverage of the stratospheric aerosol distribution has been made using instruments on board of satellites (SAGE and HALOE in particular). Here we compare the distribution of stratospheric aerosols calculated by five global models with aerosol modules on-line against satellite observations. The results of two 3-D models (MPI and ULAQ) and three 2-D models (AER, LASP, UPMC) are used for this comparison, for both non-volcanic and volcanically perturbed conditions. The comparison is made in terms of aerosol extinction and optical depth: these are calculated using Mie scattering programs where the model calculated aerosol mass distribution is used as input as a function of the particle radius. The size distribution calculated in the models is the final product of

  1. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALPHA ELEMENTS IN ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Luis C.; Geha, Marla; Kirby, Evan N.; Simon, Joshua D.

    2013-04-20

    The Milky Way ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies contain some of the oldest, most metal-poor stars in the universe. We present [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], [Ti/Fe], and mean [{alpha}/Fe] abundance ratios for 61 individual red giant branch stars across eight UFDs. This is the largest sample of alpha abundances published to date in galaxies with absolute magnitudes M{sub V} > -8, including the first measurements for Segue 1, Canes Venatici II, Ursa Major I, and Leo T. Abundances were determined via medium-resolution Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy and spectral synthesis. The sample spans the metallicity range -3.4 <[Fe/H] < -1.1. With the possible exception of Segue 1 and Ursa Major II, the individual UFDs show on average lower [{alpha}/Fe] at higher metallicities, consistent with enrichment from Type Ia supernovae. Thus, even the faintest galaxies have undergone at least a limited level of chemical self-enrichment. Together with recent photometric studies, this suggests that star formation in the UFDs was not a single burst, but instead lasted at least as much as the minimum time delay of the onset of Type Ia supernovae ({approx}100 Myr) and less than {approx}2 Gyr. We further show that the combined population of UFDs has an [{alpha}/Fe] abundance pattern that is inconsistent with a flat, Galactic halo-like alpha abundance trend, and is also qualitatively different from that of the more luminous CVn I dSph, which does show a hint of a plateau at very low [Fe/H].

  2. A Deeper Look at Faint Hα Emission in Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Janice C.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McDonald, Michael; Hilbert, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    We present deep Hα imaging of three nearby dwarf galaxies, carefully selected to optimize observations with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter (MMTF) on the Magellan 6.5 m telescope. An effective bandpass of ˜13 Å is used, and the images reach 3σ flux limits of ˜8 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2, which is about an order of magnitude lower than standard narrowband observations obtained by the most recent generation of local Hα galaxy surveys. The observations were originally motivated by the finding that the Hα/FUV flux ratio of galaxies systematically declines as global galactic properties such as the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass decrease. The three dwarf galaxies selected for study have SFRs that, when calculated from their Hα luminosities using standard conversion recipes, are ˜50% of those based on the FUV. Follow-up studies of many of the potential causes for the trends in the Hα/FUV flux ratio have been performed, but the possibility that previous observations have missed a non-negligible fraction of faint ionized emission in dwarf galaxies has not been investigated. The MMTF observations reveal both diffuse and structured Hα emission (filaments, shells, possible single-star H ii regions) spanning extents up to 2.5 times larger relative to previous observations. However, only up to an additional ˜5% of Hα flux is captured, which does not account for the trends in the Hα/FUV ratio. Beyond investigation of the Hα/FUV ratio, the impact of the newly detected extended flux on our understanding of star formation, the properties of H ii regions, and the propagation of ionizing photons warrant further investigation.

  3. Evolution of faint radio sources in the VIDEO-XMM3 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, K.; Jarvis, M. J.; Bonfield, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    It has been speculated that low-luminosity radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) have the potential to serve as an important source of AGN feedback, and may be responsible for suppressing star formation activity in massive elliptical galaxies at late times. As such the cosmic evolution of these sources is vitally important to understand the significance of such AGN feedback processes and their influence on the global star formation history of the Universe. In this paper, we present a new investigation of the evolution of faint radio sources out to z ˜ 2.5. We combine a 1 square degree Very Large Array radio survey, complete to a depth of 100 μJy, with accurate 10 band photometric redshifts from the following surveys: Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy Deep Extragalactic Observations and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. The results indicate that the radio population experiences mild positive evolution out to z ˜ 1.2 increasing their space density by a factor of ˜3, consistent with results of several previous studies. Beyond z = 1.2, there is evidence of a slowing down of this evolution. Star-forming galaxies drive the more rapid evolution at low redshifts, z < 1.2, while more slowly evolving AGN populations dominate at higher redshifts resulting in a decline in the evolution of the radio luminosity function at z > 1.2. The evolution is best fitted by pure luminosity evolution with star-forming galaxies evolving as (1 + z)2.47 ± 0.12 and AGN as (1 + z)1.18 ± 0.21.

  4. DISCOVERY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A FAINT STELLAR COMPANION TO THE A3V STAR zeta VIRGINIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Brenner, Douglas; Zimmerman, Neil; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Roberts, Lewis C.; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Burruss, Rick; Shao, Michael; Vasisht, Gautam; Parry, Ian R.; King, David L.; Soummer, Remi; Simon, Michal; Perrin, Marshall D.; Lloyd, James P.; Bouchez, Antonin; Dekany, Richard; Beichman, Charles

    2010-03-20

    Through the combination of high-order adaptive optics and coronagraphy, we report the discovery of a faint stellar companion to the A3V star zeta Virginis. This companion is {approx}7 mag fainter than its host star in the H band, and infrared imaging spanning 4.75 years over five epochs indicates this companion has common proper motion with its host star. Using evolutionary models, we estimate its mass to be 0.168{sup +0.012}{sub -0.016} M{sub sun}, giving a mass ratio for this system q = 0.082{sup +0.007}{sub -0.008}. Assuming the two objects are coeval, this mass suggests an M4V-M7V spectral type for the companion, which is confirmed through {integral} field spectroscopic measurements. We see clear evidence for orbital motion from this companion and are able to constrain the semimajor axis to be {approx}>24.9 AU, the period {approx}>124 yr, and eccentricity {approx}>0.16. Multiplicity studies of higher mass stars are relatively rare, and binary companions such as this one at the extreme low end of the mass ratio distribution are useful additions to surveys incomplete at such a low mass ratio. Moreover, the frequency of binary companions can help to discriminate between binary formation scenarios that predict an abundance of low-mass companions forming from the early fragmentation of a massive circumstellar disk. A system such as this may provide insight into the anomalous X-ray emission from A stars, hypothesized to be from unseen late-type stellar companions. Indeed, we calculate that the presence of this M-dwarf companion easily accounts for the X-ray emission from this star detected by ROSAT.

  5. On the Morphology of the HST Faint Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giavalisco, Mauro; Livio, Mario; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1996-08-01

    Deep imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has revealed a population of rapidly evolving galaxies, which account for < 50% of the total counts at I <~ 22.5, are well distinct from the passively evolving normal ellipticals and spirals, and have morphologies that elude the traditional Hubble classification scheme. This classification has been derived from the morphological properties of local galaxies observed at optical wavelengths. Since galaxy morphology is a function of the wavelength and of the localization and intensity of the star-formation activity, the appearance of galaxies at large redshifts is subject to k- correction and evolutionary effects of the stellar populations, even if the underlying dynamics does not change significantly. In addition, the strong dependence of the surface brightness on redshift as σ ~(1 +z)^-4^ implies that the observed morphology of distant galaxies is also affected by the limiting surface brightness that can be reached. This paper shows how local galaxies observed at UV wavelengths with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) would appear to HST if placed at cosmological distances, with the UV light redshifted to the optical wavelengths. The simulated distant galaxies have morphologies that are of later type or more irregular than their local (optical) counterparts, and some are in qualitative agreement with those revealed by the faint HST surveys, suggesting that dynamical evolution has played a minor role in the evolution of the majority of the galaxies over a large fraction of the Hubble time. However, the dependence of galaxy morphology on the star-formation activity and on the wavelength must be properly understood before any conclusion on the overall morphological evolution of galaxies can be derived.

  6. Faint Object Camera imaging and spectroscopy of NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boksenberg, A.; Catchpole, R. M.; Macchetto, F.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Crane, P.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.

    1995-01-01

    We describe ultraviolet and optical imaging and spectroscopy within the central few arcseconds of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151, obtained with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. A narrowband image including (O III) lambda(5007) shows a bright nucleus centered on a complex biconical structure having apparent opening angle approximately 65 deg and axis at a position angle along 65 deg-245 deg; images in bands including Lyman-alpha and C IV lambda(1550) and in the optical continuum near 5500 A, show only the bright nucleus. In an off-nuclear optical long-slit spectrum we find a high and a low radial velocity component within the narrow emission lines. We identify the low-velocity component with the bright, extended, knotty structure within the cones, and the high-velocity component with more confined diffuse emission. Also present are strong continuum emission and broad Balmer emission line components, which we attribute to the extended point spread function arising from the intense nuclear emission. Adopting the geometry pointed out by Pedlar et al. (1993) to explain the observed misalignment of the radio jets and the main optical structure we model an ionizing radiation bicone, originating within a galactic disk, with apex at the active nucleus and axis centered on the extended radio jets. We confirm that through density bounding the gross spatial structure of the emission line region can be reproduced with a wide opening angle that includes the line of sight, consistent with the presence of a simple opaque torus allowing direct view of the nucleus. In particular, our modelling reproduces the observed decrease in position angle with distance from the nucleus, progressing initially from the direction of the extended radio jet, through our optical structure, and on to the extended narrow-line region. We explore the kinematics of the narrow-line low- and high-velocity components on the basis of our spectroscopy and adopted model structure.

  7. Faint Object Spectrograph Instrument Handbook v. 6.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, C. D.; et al.

    1995-06-01

    This Handbook describes The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) and its use for Cycle 6 of the Hubble Space Telescope General Observer program. Many presentations have been updated from previous versions, especially those pertaining to target acquisition, brightness limits, and in- strumental sensitivities needed for exposure and S/N calculations. This Handbook draws upon dis- cussions from earlier versions of the Handbook, notably the Version 1.0 FOS Instrument Handbook (Ford 1985), the Supplement to the Version 1.0 Instrument Handbook (Hartig 1989), and the Version 5.0 Handbook (Kinney, 1994). Only the current document should be used for Cy- cle 6. The detectors are described in detail by Harms et al (1979) and Harms (1982). This version of the FOS Instrument Handbook is for the post-COSTAR refurbished tele- scope. The change in focal length introduced by the addition of COSTAR affects the aperture sizes as projected on the sky. However, the pre-COSTAR aperture designations used in the Remote Pro- posal Submission System, version 2 (RPS2) and in the Project Data Base (PDB) have not been changed. Apertures are referred to throughout this document by their size followed in parentheses by their RPS2 exposure level designation (in Courier typeface). Indeed, all RPS2 desig- nations, which are used for proposal preparation, will be denoted in Courier typeface in this Hand- book. For example, the largest circular aperture is referred to as the 0.9'' (1.0) aperture, while the smallest paired apertures are referred to as the 0.09'' paired (0.1-PAIR)apertures.

  8. Astrometric Follow-Up of Faint Near Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. (Technical Monitor); Spahr, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The observing program at Mt. Hopkins using the 48" reflector and funded by the Near- Earth Object Observation Program continues to excel. As in the past, all requested observing time was granted. Minor improvements continue to be made. For example, the telescope is set up to track and non-sidereal rates. This allows the user to track on the target object, rather than relying exclusively on the shift- and-stack technique. Other improvements made by the staff include automatic focus routines, automatic seeing-measurement routines, and improvement in dome seeing and mirror stabilization. The net result is better focus, better seeing, and the ability to expose longer in order to acquire the faintest and most important objects. During the proposal period, this program ranked again very high worldwide in terms of faint Near Earth Objects observed. During this latest proposal cycle, fewer objects were observed than previous cycles, but this was due to the strict targeting of only the faintest observable objects. The follow-up programs of observatory codes 926 (led by P. Holvorcem) and 291 (led by Dr. B. McMillan) have greatly increased their capacity, and as a result less bright objects are in urgent need of follow-up than in years past. Even with this new object selection and additional competition, code 696 still ranked second to code 291 in terms of objects observed fainter than V = 20. Minimal scripting is now in place to allow the telescope to run autonomously for 30-45 minutes at a time.

  9. A comparison between Nimbus 5 THIR and ITPR temperatures and derived winds with rawinsonde data obtained in the AVE II experiment. [Temperature-Humidity Infrared Radiometer and Infrared Temperature Profile Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. E.; Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    During the second Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II), atmospheric temperature profiles were computed from Nimbus 5 data, which comprised ITPR, NEMS, and SCR measurements. Rawinsonde data were obtained from NWS stations in the AVE II network and processed for each pressure contact; the soundings closest in space and time were interpolated to the Nimbus 5 sounding points for comparison purposes. Cross sections of thermal and geostrophic winds were computed from satellite-derived cross sections of temperature along the Nimbus orbital track.

  10. TESTING MASS LOSS IN LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD CEPHEIDS USING INFRARED AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS. II. PREDICTIONS AND TESTS OF THE OGLE-III FUNDAMENTAL-MODE CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Lester, John B.

    2010-06-20

    In this paper, we test the hypothesis that Cepheids have infrared excesses due to mass loss. We fit a model using the mass-loss rate and the stellar radius as free parameters to optical observations from the OGLE-III survey and infrared observations from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and SAGE data sets. The sample of Cepheids has predicted minimum mass-loss rates ranging from 0 to 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, where the rates depend on the chosen dust properties. We use the predicted radii to compute the period-radius relation for LMC Cepheids and to estimate the uncertainty caused by the presence of infrared excess for determining angular diameters with the infrared surface brightness technique. Finally, we calculate the linear and nonlinear period-luminosity (P-L) relations for the LMC Cepheids at VIJHK + IRAC wavelengths and find that the P-L relations are consistent with being nonlinear at infrared wavelengths contrary to previous results.

  11. Probing the Peak Epoch of Cosmic Star Formation (1Faint Star-forming Galaxies Behind the Lensing Clusters: UV Luminosity Function and the Dust Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian D.; Richard, Johan; Rafelski, Marc; Jauzac, Mathilde; Limousin, Marceau; Stark, Daniel; Teplitz, Harry I.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a complete census of cosmic star formation requires an understanding of faint star-forming galaxies that are far below the detection limits of current surveys. To search for the faint galaxies, we use the power of strong gravitational lensing from foreground galaxy clusters to boost the detection limits of HST to much fainter luminosities. Using the WFC3/UVIS on board the HST, we obtain deep UV images of 4 lensing clusters with existing deep optical and near-infrared data (three from Frontier Fields survey). Building multiband photometric catalogs and applying a photometric redshift selection, we uncover a large population of dwarf galaxies (-18.5faint magnitudes (MUV=-12.5). As an important implication of a steep faint-end slope LF, we show that the faint galaxies (-18.550%) at these redshifts. We use this unique sample to investigate further the various properties of dwarf galaxies as it is claimed to deviate from the trends seen for the more massive galaxies. Recent hydro-dynamical simulations and observations of local dwarfs show that these galaxies have episodic bursts of star formation on short time scales (< 10 Myr). We find that the bursty star formation histories (SFHs) cause a large intrinsic scatter in UV colors (β) at MUV > -16, comparing a sample of low mass galaxies from simulations with bursty SFHs with our comprehensive measurements of the observed β values. As this scatter can also be due to the dust extinction, we distinguish these two effects by measuring the dust attenuation using Balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ) ratios from our MOSFIRE/Keck spectroscopy.

  12. First results from the faint object camera - High-resolution observations of the central object R136 in the 30 Doradus nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigelt, G.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.; Crane, P.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.; Kamperman, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    R136 is the luminous central object of the giant H II region 30 Doradus in the LMC. The first high-resolution observations of R136 with the Faint Object Camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope are reported. The physical nature of the brightest component R136a has been a matter of some controversy over the last few years. The UV images obtained show that R136a is a very compact star cluster consisting of more than eight stars within 0.7 arcsec diameter. From these high-resolution images a mass upper limit can be derived for the most luminous stars observed in R136.

  13. Image Stacking Method Application for Low Earth Orbit Faint Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Kitazawa, Y.; Hanada, T.

    2013-09-01

    Space situational awareness is one of the most important actions for safe and sustainable space development and its utilization. Tracking and maintaining debris catalog are the basis of the actions. Current minimum size of objects in the catalog that routinely tracked and updated is approximately 10 cm in the Low Earth Orbit region. This paper proposes collaborative observation of space-based sensors and ground facilities to improve tracking capability in low Earth orbit. This observation geometry based on role-sharing idea. A space-based sensor has advantage in sensitivity and observation opportunity however, it has disadvantages in periodic observation which is essential for catalog maintenance. On the other hand, a ground facility is inferior to space-based sensors in sensitivity however; observation network composed of facilities has an advantage in periodic observation. Whole observation geometry is defined as follows; 1) space-based sensors conduct initial orbit estimation for a target 2) ground facility network tracks the target based on estimated orbit 3) the network observes the target periodically and updates its orbit information. The second phase of whole geometry is based on image stacking method developed by the Japan aerospace exploration agency and this method is verified for objects in geostationary orbit. This method enables to detect object smaller than a nominal size limitation by stacking faint light spot along archived time-series frames. The principle of this method is prediction and searching target's motion on the images. It is almost impossible to apply the method to objects in Low Earth Orbit without proper orbit information because Low Earth Orbit objects have varied orbital characteristics. This paper discusses whether or not initial orbit estimation results given by space-based sensors have enough accuracy to apply image stacking method to Low Earth Orbit objects. Ground-based observation procedure is assumed as being composed of

  14. Spitzer ultra faint survey program (surfs up). I. An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bradač, Maruša; Huang, Kuang-Han; Cain, Benjamin; Hall, Nicholas; Lubin, Lori; Ryan, Russell; Casertano, Stefano; Lemaux, Brian C.; Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Allen, Steve; Von der Linden, Anja; Gladders, Mike; Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-04-20

    Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program is a joint Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z ≳ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest-frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z ≳ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hr of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ∼30 hr exposure time in both 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm in the central 4' × 4' field and ∼15 hr in the flanking fields. This results in 3σ sensitivity limits of ∼26.6 and ∼26.2 AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z ≳ 7 sources (using a z = 9.5 galaxy behind MACS J1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical point-spread function models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.

  15. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging Survey (emph{IRSIS}) payload for an Indian satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. K.

    The Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging Survey (IRSIS) experiment, targeted for the Small Satellite Mission of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), will carry out spectroscopic measurements in the wavelength range 1.7 to 6.4 μm seamlessly for the first time, covering a large fraction (˜ 50%) of the sky (including the Galactic Plane), with a reasonable sensitivity (completeness at 2.2 μm, K = 14 mag.). The planned Spectral Resolution is ˜ 100. Primary science goals include : (i) Discovery & classification of Brown Dwarfs, M-L-T Dwarfs (faint end of Initial Mass Function); (ii) Large scale mapping in emission features; e.g. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) at 3.3 μm, 6.2 μm, etc. (Galactic Plane survey); (iii) Minor bodies of Solar System : Asteroids, Comets, Inter- Planetary Dust; Origin, evolution & types of Organics; History of Solar System; and (iv) Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), Red-Super-Giant (RSG), Carbon-rich stars; (Galactic Bulge survey). In addition, it will support studies of time critical phenomena like novae, comets etc, under Targets of Opportunity (ToO) observations. The IRSIS database is expected to provide better understanding of energetics and composition of the ISM, infrared characterisation of stars, and various types of Solar system bodies.

  16. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays. II. Faint Sources Detected with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, N. E.; Luna, G. J. M.; Pillitteri, I.; Mukai, K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the detection from four symbiotic stars that were not known to be X-ray sources. These four object show a ß-type X-ray spectrum, that is, their spectra can be modeled with an absorbed optically thin thermal emission with temperatures of a few million degrees. Photometric series obtained with the Optical Monitor on board XMM-Newton from V2416 Sgr and NSV 25735 support the proposed scenario where the X-ray emission is produced in a shock-heated region inside the symbiotic nebulae.

  17. Infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.C. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of problems in building systems. In instances where a building owner has several large buildings, an investment in a typical $30,000 infrared system may be cost effective. In most instances, however, the rental of an infrared system or the hiring of an infrared consulting service is a cost effective alternative. As can be seen from the several applications presented here, any mechanical problem manifesting itself in an atypical temperature pattern can usually be detected. The two primary savings generated from infrared analysis of building systems are maintenance and energy.

  18. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST: SHIRCO PILOT-SCALE INFRARED INCINERATION SYSTEM ROSE TOWNSHIP DEMODE ROAD SUPERFUND SITE - VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of the Shirco pilot-scale infrared thermal destruction system has been evaluated at the Rose Township, Demode Road Superfund Site and is presented in the report. The waste tested consisted of solvents, organics and heavy metals in an illegal dump site. Volume I gi...

  19. Searching for Faint Exozodiacal Disks: Keck Results and LBTI Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Hinz, P.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Skemer, A.; Bailey, V.; Rodigas, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The possible presence of dust in the habitable zone around nearby main-sequence stars is considered as a major hurdle toward the direct imaging of Earth-like extrasolar planets with future dedicated space-based telescopes (e.g., Roberge et al. 2012). In this context, NASA has funded two ground-based mid-infrared nulling interferometers to combine the large apertures available at the Keck Observatory and the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). In this poster, we present the preliminary results of the extended survey carried out with the Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN) between 2008 and 2011 and describe the forthcoming LBTI survey.

  20. Intercomparison of stratospheric water vapor observed by satellite experiments - Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II versus Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere and Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiou, E. W.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Larsen, J. C.; Rind, D.; Oltmans, S.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made of the stratospheric water vapor measurements made by the satellite sensors of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), the Nimbus-7 LIMS, and the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment. It was found that, despite differences in the measurement techniques, sampling bias, and observational periods, the three experiments have disclosed a generally consistent pattern of stratospheric water vapor distribution. The only significant difference occurs at high southern altitudes in May below 18 km, where LIMS measurements were 2-3 ppmv greater than those of SAGE II and ATMOS.

  1. The VVDS-VLA deep field. II. Optical and near infrared identifications of VLA S1.4 GHz > 80 μ Jy sources in the VIMOS VLT deep survey VVDS-02h field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciliegi, P.; Zamorani, G.; Bondi, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Gregorini, L.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Radovich, M.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Parma, P.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Merluzzi, P.; Paltani, S.; Pollo, A.; Zucca, E.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Gavignaud, I.; Pellò, R.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper we present the optical and near-infrared identifications of the 1054 radio sources detected in the 20 cm deep radio survey down to a 5σ flux limit of ~80 μJy obtained with the VLA in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey VVDS-02h deep field. Using U,B,V,R,I and K data, with limiting magnitudes of UAB˜25.4, BAB˜26.5, VAB˜26.2, RAB˜25.9 IAB˜25.0, JAB˜24.2, KAB˜23.9 (50% completeness) we identified 718 radio sources (~74% of the whole sample). The photometric redshift analysis shows that, in each magnitude bin, the radio sample has a higher median photometric redshift than the whole optical sample, while the median (V-I)AB color of the radio sources is redder than the median color of the whole optical sample. These results suggest that radio detection is preferentially selecting galaxies with higher intrinsic optical luminosity. From the analysis of the optical properties of the radio sources as function of the radio flux, we found that while about 35% of the radio sources are optically unidentified in the higher radio flux bin (S> 1.0 mJy), the percentage of unidentified sources decreases to about 25% in the faintest bins (S< 0.5 mJy). The median IAB magnitude for the total sample of radio sources, i.e. including also the unidentified ones, is brighter in the faintest radio bins than in the bin with higher radio flux. This suggests that most of the faintest radio sources are likely to be associated to relatively lower radio luminosity objects at relatively modest redshift, rather than radio-powerful, AGN type objects at high redshift. Using a classification in early-type and late-type galaxies based on the (B-I)AB color and the photometric redshift, we found that the majority of the radio sources below ~0.15 mJy are indeed late-type star forming galaxies. Finally, the radio sources without optical counterpart in our deep imaging have a median radio flux of 0.15 mJy, equal to that of identified sources. Given the very faint optical limits, these

  2. Detection of faint celestial objects by small telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanevich, Vadim; Bryukhovetskiy, Alexandr; Kozhukhov, Alexandr; Ivaschenko, Yuri; Velichko, Feodor

    an object from class of "Possible objects" by MAST at the multi-frame processing step; • identification of star pattern at the frame via star catalog, calculating rect-angular and angular coordinates of objects. • check-up the obtained measurements with MPC data base, discharge the known objects and forming the decision about new ones. Observations of asteroids were carried out with 60-cm Zeiss reflector at Andrushivka stronomical bservatory (MPC-code A50). Telescope was equipped by FLI PL9000 camera that has CCD array of 3056x3056 pixels. It was possible to detect objects no fainter then 20m of visual brightness for the exposure of 30 sec. It was confirmed, that the method has the reliability of detection of faint objects with nonzero visible motion close to the reliability of detection of motionless ones.

  3. PICASSO: an end-to-end image simulation tool for space and airborne imaging systems II. Extension to the thermal infrared: equations and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Stephen A.; Lomheim, Terrence S.; Florio, Christopher J.; Harbold, Jeffrey M.; Muto, B. Michael; Schoolar, Richard B.; Wintz, Daniel T.; Keller, Robert A.

    2011-10-01

    In a previous paper in this series, we described how The Aerospace Corporation's Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation SOftware (PICASSO) tool may be used to model space and airborne imaging systems operating in the visible to near-infrared (VISNIR). PICASSO is a systems-level tool, representative of a class of such tools used throughout the remote sensing community. It is capable of modeling systems over a wide range of fidelity, anywhere from conceptual design level (where it can serve as an integral part of the systems engineering process) to as-built hardware (where it can serve as part of the verification process). In the present paper, we extend the discussion of PICASSO to the modeling of Thermal Infrared (TIR) remote sensing systems, presenting the equations and methods necessary to modeling in that regime.

  4. Adaptive optics for high-contrast imaging of faint substellar companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, Katie M.

    Direct imaging of faint objects around bright stars is challenging because the primary star's diffracted light can overwhelm low-mass companions. Nevertheless, advances in adaptive optics (AO) and high-contrast imaging have revealed the first pictures of extrasolar planets. In this dissertation I employ today's high-contrast AO techniques to image brown dwarfs around stars in the nearby Hyades cluster. Furthermore, I prepare for the next generation of high-contrast AO instrumentation, by qualifying MEMS deformable mirrors for wavefront control in the Gemini Planet Imager. In Part I, I present discovery of 3 new brown dwarfs and 36 low-mass stellar companions to 85 stars in the Hyades, imaged with AO at Keck and Lick Observatories. The "locally-optimized combination of images" (LOCI) image-diversity technique filters out the primary star to reveal faint companions. This survey is complete to the hydrogen-burning limit at separations beyond 20 AU. In the complete sample, multiplicity increases as primary star mass decreases. Additionally, the brown dwarfs are at wide >150 AU separations. Finding this preference for low binding-energy systems is an unexpected result, as the Hyades is 625 Myr old and dynamically relaxed. Future work will continue to explore this trend to understand the dynamical and star formation history of the Hyades. The brown dwarfs are near interesting transition regimes for low-mass objects; therefore, characterizing their atmospheres with spectrophotometry will serve as an important benchmark for our understanding of these cool objects. In Part II, I demonstrate micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors for high-order wavefront control in the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). MEMS micromirrors have thousands of degrees of freedom and represent a significant cost efficiency over conventional glass deformable mirrors, making them ideal for high-contrast AO. In Chapter 7, I present experimental evidence that MEMS actuators function well

  5. History of infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  6. A Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic survey of faint Galactic satellites: searching for the least massive dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, N. F.; Ibata, R. A.; Chapman, S. C.; Irwin, M.; Lewis, G. F.

    2007-09-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic survey of the recently discovered faint Milky Way satellites Boötes, Ursa Major I, Ursa Major II and Willman 1 (Wil1). Using the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph mounted on the Keck II telescope, we have obtained samples that contain from ~15 to ~85 probable members of these satellites for which we derive radial velocities precise to a few kms-1 down to i ~ 21-22. About half of these stars are observed with a high enough signal-to-noise ratio to estimate their metallicity to within +/-0.2 dex. The characteristics of all the observed stars are made available, along with those of the Canes Venatici I dwarf galaxy that have been analysed in a companion paper. From this data set, we show that Ursa Major II is the only object that does not show a clear radial velocity peak. However, the measured systemic radial velocity (vr = 115 +/- 5kms-1) is in good agreement with simulations in which this object is the progenitor of the recently discovered Orphan Stream. The three other satellites show velocity dispersions that make them highly dark matter dominated systems (under the usual assumptions of symmetry and virial equilibrium). In particular, we show that despite its small size and faintness, the Wil1 object is not a globular cluster given its metallicity scatter over -2.0 <~ [Fe/H] <~ -1.0 and is therefore almost certainly a dwarf galaxy or dwarf galaxy remnant. We measure a radial velocity dispersion of only 4.3+2.3-1.3kms-1 around a systemic velocity of -12.3 +/- 2.3kms-1 which implies a mass-to-light ratio of ~700 and a total mass of ~5 × 105Msolar for this satellite, making it the least massive satellite galaxy known to date. Such a low mass could mean that the 107Msolar limit that had until now never been crossed for Milky Way and Andromeda satellite galaxies may only be an observational limit and that fainter, less massive systems exist within the Local Group. However, more modelling and an extended search for

  7. Black-to-Transmissive Electrochromism with Visible-to-Near-Infrared Switching of a Co(II)-Based Metallo-Supramolecular Polymer for Smart Window and Digital Signage Applications.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Yu; Zhang, Jian; Sato, Takashi; Moriyama, Satoshi; Higuchi, Masayoshi

    2015-08-26

    Black-to-transmissive electrochromism has been obtained with a Co(II)-based metallo-supramolecular polymer (polyCo). Thin films of polyCo, based on bisterpyridine ligand assembled with Co(II) metal ion, were constructed by spray casting the polymer onto ITO glass. With such simple fabricating means to form good-quality films, polyCo films show stable switching at the central metal ion of the Co(II)/Co(I) redox reaction when immersed in aqueous solution. With an increase in the pH of the aqueous electrolyte solution from neutral, the film exhibits a color response due to the interaction between the d-orbital electron and hydroxide ions affecting the d-d* transition. As a result, a nearly transparent-to-black electrochromic performance can be achieved with a transmittance difference at 550 nm of 74.3% (81.9-7.6%) in pH 13 solution. The light absorption of the film can be tuned over light regions from visible to near-infrared with a large attenuation. PMID:26225623

  8. Infrared detectors and lasers operating in the 3-12 μm range using band-gap engineered structures with type II band-gap alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Venkataraman; Little, John W.; Tober, Richard L.

    2006-02-01

    The Type II broken band-gap alignment in semiconductor structures wherein the conduction band minimum is in one semiconductor (e.g., InAs) and the valence band maximum is in another (e.g., GaInSb) offers certain unique advantages which can be utilized to realize band-gap engineered novel quantum electro-optic devices such as lasers and detectors. The advantages of the type II structures include reduced Auger recombination, extending the effective band-gap energy of materials wherein type I band-gap alignment would give rise to difficulties such as miscibility gap. In this paper we describe the work carried out at the Army Research Laboratory on type II semiconductor quantum electro-optic devices such as IR lasers and detectors operating in the 3-12 μm range. Specifically we will cover the progress made in GaSb based type II strained layer superlattice IR detectors and Interband Cascade IR Lasers. We will also present our recent work in self-assembled quantum dots which have type II band-gap alignment with the matrix material in which the dots are embedded.

  9. Determination of astrometry and photometry of faint companions in the presence of residual speckle noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Daniel; Devaney, Nicholas; Gladysz, Szymon

    In this paper we examine approaches to faint companion detection and estimation in multi-spectral images. We will employ the Hotelling observer which is the optimal linear algorithm for signal detection. We have shown how to use this observer to estimate faint object position and brightness in the presence of residual speckle which usually limit astrometric and photometric techniques. These speckles can be reduced by differential imaging techniques such as Angular Differential Imaging and Spectral Differential Imaging. Here we present results based on simulations of adaptive optics corrected images from an ELT which contain quasi-static speckle noise. The simulation includes Angular Differential Imaging to reduce the residual speckle and subsequent multi-wavelenght processing. We examine the feasibility of this approach on simulated ELT observations of faint companions.

  10. The Subaru High-z Quasar Survey: Discovery of Faint z ~ 6 Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Willott, Chris J.; Onoue, Masafusa; Im, Myungshin; Furusawa, Hisanori; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo; Niino, Yuu; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami; Hibon, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ~ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg2 utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-zB ) and (zB -zR ) colors, where zB and zR are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ~ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to zR < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M 1450 = -23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M 1450 = -22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s-1, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ~ 6.

  11. Faint Lyα Emitters, Star-forming Galaxies, and Damped Lyα Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, M.; Haehnelt, M.; Bunker, A.; Becker, G.; Marleau, F.; Graham, J.; Cristiani, S.; Jarvis, M.; Lacey, C.; Morris, S.; Peroux, C.; Roettgering, H.; Theuns, T.

    2008-10-01

    We have discovered a population of faint single line emitters, likely to be identified with faint z˜ 3 Lyα emitters and with the host galaxies of damped Lyman alpha systems. The objects appear to constitute the bulk of the star-forming galaxies detected so far from the ground, and are likely to provide the gaseous reservoir from which present-day Milky way type galaxies have formed. Unlike color-selected (yman break galaxies, these objects appear to have low star-formation rates, relatively strong Lyalpha emission, and low masses, metallicities, and dust content (s.a. arXiv:0711.1354).

  12. Digital image profilers for detecting faint sources which have bright companions, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Elena; Flint, Graham

    1991-01-01

    A breadboard image profiling system developed for the first phase of this project demonstrated the potential for detecting extremely faint optical sources in the presence of light companions. Experimental data derived from laboratory testing of the device supports the theory that image profilers of this type may approach the theoretical limit imposed by photon statistics. The objective of Phase 2 of this program is the development of a ground-based multichannel image profiling system capable of detecting faint stellar objects slightly displaced from brighter stars. We have finalized the multichannel image profiling system and attempted three field tests.

  13. Optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of the black hole GX 339-4 - II. The spectroscopic content in the low/hard and high/soft states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahoui, Farid; Coriat, Mickael; Lee, Julia C.

    2014-08-01

    As a complement to our optical and near-infrared study of the continuum properties of GX 339-4 in the two hard and one soft state observations made by the ESO/Very Large Telescope (VLT), FOcal Reducer and Spectrograph #2 (FORS2) and infrared spectrometer and array camera (ISAAC) in early 2010, we report here on the results of our spectral line analysis for the same observations. In the soft state, the presence of strong Balmer, Paschen and Brackett emission lines points to the optical and near-infrared spectra stemming from the irradiated chromosphere of the optically thick and geometrically thin accretion disc. Most of these H I features are still detected in emission in both hard states but are veiled by the compact jets continuum. We also confirm the presence of a broad Hβ absorption feature, prominent in the soft state and shallower in the first hard state, which we argue forms in the deep layers of the optically thick accretion disc. However, this trough is absent in the second hard state, a likely consequence of the formation of a geometrically thick extended envelope that arises above the disc plane and eventually enshrouds the region where the Hβ absorption feature forms. We detect this envelope through the presence of a broad Paβ emission line, which is constant during the first hard state but correlates with the underlying continuum during the second hard state, pointing to changing physical properties. We consider that this behaviour may be consistent with the launch of a thermally driven accretion disc wind during the second hard state.

  14. Near-Infrared Photoluminescence Enhancement in Ge/CdS and Ge/ZnS Core/Shell Nanocrystals: Utilizing IV/II-VI Semiconductor Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yijun; Rowland, Clare E; Schaller, Richard D; Vela, Javier

    2014-08-26

    Ge nanocrystals have a large Bohr radius and a small, size-tunable band gap that may engender direct character via strain or doping. Colloidal Ge nanocrystals are particularly interesting in the development of near-infrared materials for applications in bioimaging, telecommunications and energy conversion. Epitaxial growth of a passivating shell is a common strategy employed in the synthesis of highly luminescent II–VI, III–V and IV–VI semiconductor quantum dots. Here, we use relatively unexplored IV/II–VI epitaxy as a way to enhance the photoluminescence and improve the optical stability of colloidal Ge nanocrystals. Selected on the basis of their relatively small lattice mismatch compared with crystalline Ge, we explore the growth of epitaxial CdS and ZnS shells using the successive ion layer adsorption and reaction method. Powder X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy techniques, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction, clearly show the controllable growth of as many as 20 epitaxial monolayers of CdS atop Ge cores. In contrast, Ge etching and/or replacement by ZnS result in relatively small Ge/ZnS nanocrystals. The presence of an epitaxial II–VI shell greatly enhances the near-infrared photoluminescence and improves the photoluminescence stability of Ge. Ge/II–VI nanocrystals are reproducibly 1–3 orders of magnitude brighter than the brightest Ge cores. Ge/4.9CdS core/shells show the highest photoluminescence quantum yield and longest radiative recombination lifetime. Thiol ligand exchange easily results in near-infrared active, water-soluble Ge/II–VI nanocrystals. We expect this synthetic IV/II–VI epitaxial approach will lead to further studies into the optoelectronic behavior and practical applications of Si and Ge-based nanomaterials.

  15. Infrared studies of molecular shocks in the supernova remnant HB 21: II. Thermal admixture of shocked H2 gas in the south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Koo, Bon-Chul; Burton, Michael; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Moon, Dae-Sik

    2010-02-01

    We present near- and mid-infrared observations on the shock-cloud interaction region in the southern part of the supernova remnant HB 21, performed with the InfraRed Camera (IRC) aboard AKARI satellite and the Wide InfraRed Camera (WIRC) at the Palomar 5 m telescope. The IRC 4 μm (N4), 7 μm (S7), and 11 μm (S11) band images and the WIRC Hυ=1→0S(1) 2.12 μm image show similar diffuse features, around a shocked CO cloud. We analyzed the emission through comparison with the H2 line emission of several shock models. The IRC colors are well explained by the thermal admixture model of H2 gas - whose infinitesimal H2 column density has a power-law relation with the temperature T, dN˜T-dT - with n(H)˜3.9×104cm-3,b˜4.2, and N(H;T>100K)˜2.8×1021cm-2. We interpreted these parameters with several different pictures of the shock-cloud interactions - multiple planar C-shocks, bow shocks, and shocked clumps - and discussed their weaknesses and strengths. The observed Hυ=1→0S(1) intensity is four times greater than the prediction from the power-law admixture model, the same tendency as found in the northern part of HB 21 (Paper I). We also explored the limitation of the thermal admixture model with respect to the derived model parameters.

  16. Faint Luminescent Ring over Saturn’s Polar Hexagon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, Alberto; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; D’Aversa, Emiliano; Oliva, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico

    2015-07-01

    Springtime insolation is presently advancing across Saturn's north polar region. Early solar radiation scattered through the gaseous giant's atmosphere gives a unique opportunity to sound the atmospheric structure at its upper troposphere/lower stratosphere at high latitudes. Here, we report the detection of a tenuous bright structure in Saturn's northern polar cap corresponding to the hexagon equatorward boundary, observed by Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on 2013 June. The structure is spectrally characterized by an anomalously enhanced intensity in the 3610–3730 nm wavelength range and near 2500 nm, pertaining to relatively low opacity windows between strong methane absorption bands. Our first results suggest that a strong forward scattering by tropospheric clouds, higher in respect to the surrounding cloud deck, can be responsible for the enhanced intensity of the feature. This can be consistent with the atmospheric dynamics associated with the jet stream embedded in the polar hexagon. Further investigations at higher spectral resolution are needed to better assess the vertical distribution and microphysics of the clouds in this interesting region.

  17. Comparative Variable Temperature Studies of Polyamide II with a Benchtop Fourier Transform and a Miniature Handheld Near-Infrared Spectrometer Using 2D-COS and PCMW-2D Analysis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Miriam; Pfeifer, Frank; Siesler, Heinz W

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this communication is to compare the performance of a miniaturized handheld near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer with a benchtop Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectrometer. Generally, NIR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful analytical tool to study hydrogen-bonding changes of amide functionalities in solid and liquid materials and therefore variable temperature NIR measurements of polyamide II (PAII) have been selected as a case study. The information content of the measurement data has been further enhanced by exploiting the potential of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) and the perturbation correlation moving window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) evaluation technique. The data provide valuable insights not only into the changes of the hydrogen-bonding structure and the recrystallization of the hydrocarbon segments of the investigated PAII but also in their sequential order. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the 2D-COS and PCMW2D results derived from the spectra measured with the miniaturized NIR instrument are equivalent to the information extracted from the data obtained with the high-performance FT-NIR instrument. PMID:27287846

  18. High performance bias-selectable three-color Short-wave/Mid-wave/Long-wave Infrared Photodetectors based on Type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattices

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Anh Minh; Dehzangi, Arash; Adhikary, Sourav; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new approach in device architecture to realize bias-selectable three-color shortwave-midwave-longwave infrared photodetectors based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattices. The effect of conduction band off-set and different doping levels between two absorption layers are employed to control the turn-on voltage for individual channels. The optimization of these parameters leads to a successful separation of operation regimes; we demonstrate experimentally three-color photodiodes without using additional terminal contacts. As the applied bias voltage varies, the photodiodes exhibit sequentially the behavior of three different colors, corresponding to the bandgap of three absorbers. Well defined cut-offs and high quantum efficiency in each channel are achieved. Such all-in-one devices also provide the versatility of working as single or dual-band photodetectors at high operating temperature. With this design, by retaining the simplicity in device fabrication, this demonstration opens the prospect for three-color infrared imaging. PMID:27051979

  19. High performance bias-selectable three-color Short-wave/Mid-wave/Long-wave Infrared Photodetectors based on Type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattices.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Anh Minh; Dehzangi, Arash; Adhikary, Sourav; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new approach in device architecture to realize bias-selectable three-color shortwave-midwave-longwave infrared photodetectors based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattices. The effect of conduction band off-set and different doping levels between two absorption layers are employed to control the turn-on voltage for individual channels. The optimization of these parameters leads to a successful separation of operation regimes; we demonstrate experimentally three-color photodiodes without using additional terminal contacts. As the applied bias voltage varies, the photodiodes exhibit sequentially the behavior of three different colors, corresponding to the bandgap of three absorbers. Well defined cut-offs and high quantum efficiency in each channel are achieved. Such all-in-one devices also provide the versatility of working as single or dual-band photodetectors at high operating temperature. With this design, by retaining the simplicity in device fabrication, this demonstration opens the prospect for three-color infrared imaging. PMID:27051979

  20. High performance bias-selectable three-color Short-wave/Mid-wave/Long-wave Infrared Photodetectors based on Type-II InAs/GaSb/AlSb superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Anh Minh; Dehzangi, Arash; Adhikary, Sourav; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new approach in device architecture to realize bias-selectable three-color shortwave-midwave-longwave infrared photodetectors based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattices. The effect of conduction band off-set and different doping levels between two absorption layers are employed to control the turn-on voltage for individual channels. The optimization of these parameters leads to a successful separation of operation regimes; we demonstrate experimentally three-color photodiodes without using additional terminal contacts. As the applied bias voltage varies, the photodiodes exhibit sequentially the behavior of three different colors, corresponding to the bandgap of three absorbers. Well defined cut-offs and high quantum efficiency in each channel are achieved. Such all-in-one devices also provide the versatility of working as single or dual-band photodetectors at high operating temperature. With this design, by retaining the simplicity in device fabrication, this demonstration opens the prospect for three-color infrared imaging.

  1. Highly selective two-color mid-wave and long-wave infrared detector hybrid based on Type-II superlattices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edward Kwei-wei; Hoang, Minh-Anh; Chen, Guanxi; Ramezani-Darvish, Shaban; Haddadi, Abbas; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2012-11-15

    We report a two-color mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) co-located detector with 3 μm active region thickness per channel that is highly selective and can perform under high operating temperatures for the MWIR band. Under back-side illumination, a temperature evolution study of the MWIR detector's electro-optical performance found the 300 K background-limit with 2π field-of-view to be achieved below operating temperatures of 160 K, at which the temperature's 50% cutoff wavelength was 5.2 μm. The measured current reached the system limit of 0.1 pA at 110 K for 30 μm pixel-sized diodes. At 77 K, where the LWIR channel operated with a 50% cutoff wavelength at 11.2 μm, an LWIR selectivity of ~17% was achieved in the MWIR wave band between 3 and 4.7 μm, making the detector highly selective. PMID:23164899

  2. Mid-J CO shock tracing observations of infrared dark clouds. II. Low-J CO constraints on excitation, depletion, and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pon, A.; Johnstone, D.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Palau, A.; Butler, M. J.; Kaufman, M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Tan, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    Infrared dark clouds are kinematically complex molecular structures in the interstellar medium that can host sites of massive star formation. We present maps measuring 4 square arcminutes of the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O J = 3 to 2 lines from selected locations within the C and F (G028.37+00.07 and G034.43+00.24) infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), as well as single pointing observations of the 13CO and C18O J = 2 to 1 lines towards three cores within these clouds. We derive CO gas temperatures throughout the maps and find that CO is significantly frozen out within these IRDCs. We find that the CO depletion tends to be the highest near column density peaks with maximum depletion factors between 5 and 9 in IRDC F and between 16 and 31 in IRDC C. We also detect multiple velocity components and complex kinematic structure in both IRDCs. Therefore, the kinematics of IRDCs seem to point to dynamically evolving structures yielding dense cores with considerable depletion factors. Based on observations carried out with the JCMT and IRAM 30 m Telescopes. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).IRAM CO observations are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A96

  3. Solar Features Faint but Still Present in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cookson, Angela; Preminger, D.; Chapman, G.

    2009-05-01

    The San Fernando Observatory (SFO) full-disk photometric image archive spans twenty years and includes the cycle 22/23 minimum and the current cycle 23/24 extended minimum. We measure sunspot deficit, faculae/plage/network excess, and disk-integrated variability on red continuum (672.3 nm) and Ca II K-line (393.4 nm) images. A combined plage/network index shows excess remaining above zero as the cycle 23/24 minimum progresses while plage excess alone drops to zero, indicating an absence of large-scale bright regions but a continuing presence of diffuse network. We construct feature-based models of TSI variability and compare our models to the PMOD, ACRIM, and IRMB TSI Composites to determine whether our data reflect the extremely low TSI levels deduced from spacecraft measurements during the current extended solar minimum.

  4. A very faint core-collapse supernova in M85.

    PubMed

    Pastorello, A; Della Valle, M; Smartt, S J; Zampieri, L; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Mazzali, P A; Patat, F; Spiro, S; Turatto, M; Valenti, S

    2007-10-18

    An anomalous transient in the early Hubble-type (S0) galaxy Messier 85 (M85) in the Virgo cluster was discovered by Kulkarni et al. on 7 January 2006 that had very low luminosity (peak absolute R-band magnitude M(R) of about -12) that was constant over more than 80 days, red colour and narrow spectral lines, which seem inconsistent with those observed in any known class of transient events. Kulkarni et al. suggest an exotic stellar merger as the possible origin. An alternative explanation is that the transient in M85 was a type II-plateau supernova of extremely low luminosity, exploding in a lenticular galaxy with residual star-forming activity. This intriguing transient might be the faintest supernova that has ever been discovered. PMID:17943088

  5. On the origin of [Ne II] emission in young stars: mid-infrared and optical observations with the Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldovin-Saavedra, C.; Audard, M.; Carmona, A.; Güdel, M.; Briggs, K.; Rebull, L. M.; Skinner, S. L.; Ercolano, B.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The [Ne II] line 12.81 μm was proposed to be a good tracer of gas in the environments of proto-planetary disks; its origin is explained by different mechanisms: jets in outflows, photo-evaporative disk winds driven by stellar X-rays/EUV or by the X-ray irradiated proto-planetary disk atmosphere. Previous Spitzer studies gave hints toward the neon emitting mechanism by exploring correlations between the line luminosity and properties of the star-disk system. These studies concluded that the origin of the emission is likely related to accretion and outflows, with some influence from X-rays. Aims: We provide direct constraints on the origin of the [Ne II] emission using high-spatial and spectral resolution observations that allow us to study the kinematics of the emitting gas. In addition we compare the [Ne II] line with optical forbidden lines. Methods: We obtained high-resolution ground-based observations with VISIR-VLT for 15 stars and UVES-VLT for three of them. The stars were chosen for having bright neon emission lines detected with Spitzer/IRS. The velocity shifts and profiles are used to disentangle the different emitting mechanisms producing the [Ne II] line. A comparison between results from this study and previous high-resolution studies is also presented. Results: The [Ne II] line was detected in seven stars, among them the first confirmed detection of [Ne II] in a Herbig Be star, V892 Tau. In four cases, the large blueshifted lines indicate an origin in a jet. In two stars, the small shifts and asymmetric profiles indicate an origin in a photo-evaporative wind. CoKu Tau 1, seen close to edge-on, shows a spatially unresolved line centered at the stellar rest velocity, although cross-dispersion centroids move within 10 AU from one side of the star to the other as a function of wavelength. The line profile is symmetric with wings extending up to ~±80 km s-1. The origin of the [Ne II] line is unclear and could either be due to the bipolar jet or to

  6. ULTRA-DEEP MID-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES AT z{approx} 1 AND z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fadda, Dario; Yan Lin; Frayer, David T.; Helou, George; Lagache, Guilaine; Marcillac, Delphine; Sajina, Anna; Lutz, Dieter; Wuyts, Stijn; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Caputi, Karina; Spoon, Henrik W. W.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Blain, Andrew E-mail: lyan@ipac.caltech.ed

    2010-08-10

    We present ultra-deep mid-infrared spectra of 48 infrared-luminous galaxies in the GOODS-south field obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. These galaxies are selected among faint infrared sources (0.14-0.5 mJy at 24 {mu}m) in two redshift bins (0.76-1.05 and 1.75-2.4) to sample the major contributors to the cosmic infrared background at the most active epochs. We estimate redshifts for 92% of the sample using polycyclic aromatic (PAH) and Si absorption features obtaining, in particular, eight new redshifts difficult to measure from ground-based observations. Only a few of these galaxies (5% at z {approx} 1 and 12% at z {approx} 2) have their total infrared luminosity dominated by emission from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The averaged mid-IR spectrum of the z {approx} 1 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) is a very good match to the averaged spectrum of local starbursts. The averaged spectrum of the z {approx} 2 ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), because of a deeper Si absorption, is better fitted by the averaged spectrum of H II-like local ULIRGs. Combining this sample with other published data, we find that 6.2 {mu}m PAH equivalent widths (EW) reach a plateau of {approx} 1 {mu}m for L {sub 24{mu}m} {approx}< 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}. At higher luminosities, EW{sub 6.2{mu}m} anti-correlates with L{sub 24{mu}m}. Intriguingly, high-z ULIRGs and sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) lie above the local EW{sub 6.2{mu}m}-L{sub 24{mu}m} relationship suggesting that, at a given luminosity, high-z ULIRGs have AGN contributions to their dust emission lower than those of local counterparts. A quantitative analysis of their morphology shows that most of the luminous IR galaxies have morphologies similar to those of IR-quiet galaxies at the same redshift. All z {approx} 2 ULIRGs of our sample are IR-excess BzK galaxies and most of them have L{sub FIR}/L{sub 1600A} ratios higher than those of starburst galaxies at a given UV slope. The 'IR

  7. Ultra-deep Mid-infrared Spectroscopy of Luminous Infrared Galaxies at z ~ 1 and z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, Dario; Yan, Lin; Lagache, Guilaine; Sajina, Anna; Lutz, Dieter; Wuyts, Stijn; Frayer, David T.; Marcillac, Delphine; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Caputi, Karina; Spoon, Henrik W. W.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Blain, Andrew; Helou, George

    2010-08-01

    We present ultra-deep mid-infrared spectra of 48 infrared-luminous galaxies in the GOODS-south field obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. These galaxies are selected among faint infrared sources (0.14-0.5 mJy at 24 μm) in two redshift bins (0.76-1.05 and 1.75-2.4) to sample the major contributors to the cosmic infrared background at the most active epochs. We estimate redshifts for 92% of the sample using polycyclic aromatic (PAH) and Si absorption features obtaining, in particular, eight new redshifts difficult to measure from ground-based observations. Only a few of these galaxies (5% at z ~ 1 and 12% at z ~ 2) have their total infrared luminosity dominated by emission from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The averaged mid-IR spectrum of the z ~ 1 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) is a very good match to the averaged spectrum of local starbursts. The averaged spectrum of the z ~ 2 ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), because of a deeper Si absorption, is better fitted by the averaged spectrum of H II-like local ULIRGs. Combining this sample with other published data, we find that 6.2 μm PAH equivalent widths (EW) reach a plateau of ~ 1 μm for L 24 μm <~ 1011 L sun. At higher luminosities, EW6.2 μm anti-correlates with L 24 μm. Intriguingly, high-z ULIRGs and sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) lie above the local EW6.2 μm-L 24 μm relationship suggesting that, at a given luminosity, high-z ULIRGs have AGN contributions to their dust emission lower than those of local counterparts. A quantitative analysis of their morphology shows that most of the luminous IR galaxies have morphologies similar to those of IR-quiet galaxies at the same redshift. All z ~ 2 ULIRGs of our sample are IR-excess BzK galaxies and most of them have L FIR/L 1600 Å ratios higher than those of starburst galaxies at a given UV slope. The "IR excess" is mostly due to strong 7.7 μm PAH emission and underestimation of UV dust extinction. On the basis of

  8. Deep galaxy count predictions in the radio, infrared, and X-ray spectral bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treyer, Marie-Agnes; Silk, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The existence of a dominant population of strongly evolving starburst sources at moderate redshift is a plausible explanation for the excess number of faint blue galaxies detected in deep sky surveys. Multiwavelength observations at faint magnitudes would allow the existence of such a population to be confirmed. We use observed luminosity correlations and physical properties of known starburst galaxies to predict their contribution to the deep radio, infrared, and X-ray counts, as well as to the diffuse extragalactic background radiation in these various spectral bands.

  9. SN 2009ib: a Type II-P supernova with an unusually long plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takáts, K.; Pignata, G.; Pumo, M. L.; Paillas, E.; Zampieri, L.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Benetti, S.; Bufano, F.; Cappellaro, E.; Ergon, M.; Fraser, M.; Hamuy, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Smartt, S. J.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Haislip, J. B.; LaCluyze, A. P.; Moore, J. P.; Reichart, D.

    2015-07-01

    We present optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2009ib, a Type II-P supernova in NGC 1559. This object has moderate brightness, similar to those of the intermediate-luminosity SNe 2008in and 2009N. Its plateau phase is unusually long, lasting for about 130 d after explosion. The spectra are similar to those of the subluminous SN 2002gd, with moderate expansion velocities. We estimate the 56Ni mass produced as 0.046 ± 0.015 M⊙. We determine the distance to SN 2009ib using both the expanding photosphere method (EPM) and the standard candle method. We also apply EPM to SN 1986L, a Type II-P SN that exploded in the same galaxy. Combining the results of different methods, we conclude the distance to NGC 1559 as D = 19.8 ± 3.0 Mpc. We examine archival, pre-explosion images of the field taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, and find a faint source at the position of the SN, which has a yellow colour [(V - I)0 = 0.85 mag]. Assuming it is a single star, we estimate its initial mass as MZAMS = 20 M⊙. We also examine the possibility, that instead of the yellow source the progenitor of SN 2009ib is a red supergiant star too faint to be detected. In this case, we estimate the upper limit for the initial zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass of the progenitor to be ˜14-17 M⊙. In addition, we infer the physical properties of the progenitor at the explosion via hydrodynamical modelling of the observables, and estimate the total energy as ˜0.55 × 1051 erg, the pre-explosion radius as ˜400 R⊙, and the ejected envelope mass as ˜15 M⊙, which implies that the mass of the progenitor before explosion was ˜16.5-17 M⊙.

  10. Wavefunction engineering: From quantum wells to near-infrared type-II colloidal quantum dots synthesized by layer-by-layer colloidal epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Li, J Jack; Tsay, James M; Michalet, Xavier; Weiss, Shimon

    2005-11-15

    We review the concept and the evolution of bandgap and wavefunction engineering, the seminal contributions of Dr. Chemla to the understanding of the rich phenomena displayed in epitaxially grown quantum confined systems, and demonstrate the application of these concepts to the colloidal synthesis of high quality type-II CdTe/CdSe quantum dots using successive ion layer adsorption and reaction chemistry. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that CdTe/CdSe can be synthesized layer by layer, yielding particles of narrow size distribution. Photoluminescence emission and excitation spectra reveal discrete type-II transitions, which correspond to energy lower than the type-I bandgap. The increase in the spatial separation between photoexcited electrons and holes as a function of successive addition of CdSe monolayers was monitored by photoluminescence lifetime measurements. Systematic increase in lifetimes demonstrates the high level of wavefunction engineering and control in these systems. PMID:22865949

  11. Far-infrared lines from G45.13 + 0.14 A and K3-50 A - Density fluctuations in compact H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgan, Sean W. J.; Simpson, J. P.; Rubin, Robert H.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, M. R.; Wolf, Juergen

    1991-01-01

    Properties of two compact H II regions, K3-50 A and G45.13 + 0.14 A, were investigated by measuring FIR fluxes from forbidden O III 51.8 and 88.4 micron lines, forbidden N III 57.3 micron line, forbidden S III 33.5 micron line, and forbidden Ne III 36.0 micron line of these regions, using a cooled grating spectrometer on NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory. For both H II regions, the ratio of the two FIR O(2+) lines indicates an electron density of about 1000/cu cm, which for K3-50 A is a factor of 10 to 100 lower than the density determined from optical line observations of the lower excitation species S(+) and N(+) and than the peak rms density deduced from radio continuum measurements by Turner and Matthews (1984). Detailed spherically symmetric models of the two sources were constructed using all available measurements.

  12. THE [O III] NEBULA OF THE MERGER REMNANT NGC 7252: A LIKELY FAINT IONIZATION ECHO

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, Francois; Kelson, Daniel D.; Villanueva, Edward V.; Seitzer, Patrick; Walth, Gregory L.

    2013-08-20

    We present images and spectra of a {approx}10 kpc-sized emission-line nebulosity discovered in the prototypical merger remnant NGC 7252 and dubbed the ''[O III] nebula'' because of its dominant [O III] {lambda}5007 line. This nebula seems to yield the first sign of episodic active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity still occurring in the remnant, {approx}220 Myr after the coalescence of two gas-rich galaxies. Its location and kinematics suggest it belongs to a stream of tidal-tail gas falling back into the remnant. Its integrated [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosity is 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, and its spectrum features some high-excitation lines, including He II {lambda}4686. In diagnostic line-ratio diagrams, the nebula lies in the domain of Seyfert galaxies, suggesting that it is photoionized by a source with a power-law spectrum. Yet, a search for AGN activity in NGC 7252 from X-rays to radio wavelengths yields no detection, with the most stringent upper limit set by X-ray observations. The upper luminosity limit of L{sub 2-10{sub keV,0}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} estimated for the nucleus is {approx}10{sup 3} times lower than the minimum ionizing luminosity of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} necessary to excite the nebula. This large discrepancy suggests that the nebula is a faint ionization echo excited by a mildly active nucleus that has declined by {approx}3 orders of magnitude over the past 20,000-200,000 yr. In many ways this nebula resembles the prototypical ''Hanny's Voorwerp'' near IC 2497, but its size is 3 Multiplication-Sign smaller and its [O III] luminosity {approx}100 Multiplication-Sign lower. We propose that it be classified as an extended emission-line region (EELR). The [O III] nebula is then the lowest-luminosity ionization echo and EELR discovered so far, indicative of recent, probably sputtering AGN activity of Seyfert-like intensity in NGC 7252.

  13. A near-infrared interferometric survey of debris disc stars. II. CHARA/FLUOR observations of six early-type dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Absil, O.; di Folco, E.; Mérand, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Coudé du Foresto, V.; Defrère, D.; Kervella, P.; Aufdenberg, J. P.; Desort, M.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Montagnier, G.; Olofsson, J.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N. H.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: We aim at directly detecting the presence of optically thin circumstellar dust emission within the terrestrial planetary zone around main sequence stars known to harbour cold debris discs. The present study focuses on a sample of six bright A- and early F-type stars. Methods: High-precision interferometric observations have been obtained in the near-infrared K band with the FLUOR instrument installed on the CHARA Array. The measured squared visibilities are compared to the expected visibility of the stellar photospheres based on theoretical photospheric models taking into account rotational distortion. We search for potential visibility reduction at short baselines, a direct piece of evidence for resolved circumstellar emission. Results: Our observations bring to light the presence of resolved circumstellar emission around one of the six target stars (ζ Aql) at the 5σ level. The morphology of the emission source cannot be directly constrained because of the sparse spatial frequency sampling of our interferometric data. Using complementary adaptive optics observations and radial velocity measurements, we find that the presence of a low-mass companion is a likely origin for the excess emission. The potential companion is characterised by a K-band contrast of four magnitudes. It has a most probable mass of about 0.6~M⊙ and is expected to orbit between about 5.5 AU and 8 AU from its host star assuming a purely circular orbit. Nevertheless, by adjusting a physical debris disc model to the observed Spectral Energy Distribution of the ζ Aql system, we also show that the presence of hot dust within 10 AU from ζ Aql, producing a total thermal emission equal to 1.69 ± 0.31% of the photospheric flux in the K band, is another viable explanation for the observed near-infrared excess. Our re-interpretation of archival near- to far-infrared photometric measurements shows however that cold dust is not present around ζ Aql at the sensitivity limit of the IRS and MIPS

  14. Faints, fits, and fatalities from emotion in Shakespeare's characters: survey of the canon

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine how often Shakespeare's characters faint, fit, or die from extreme emotion; to assess Shakespeare's uniqueness in this regard; and to examine the plausibility of these dramatised events. Design Line by line search through modern editions of these late 16th and early 17th century works for accounts of characters fainting, fitting, or dying while under strong emotion and for no other apparent reason. Data sources All 39 canonical plays by Shakespeare and his three long narrative poems; 18 similar works by seven of Shakespeare's best known contemporaries. Results 10 deaths from strong emotion are recorded by Shakespeare (three occur on stage); all are due to grief, typically at the loss of a loved one. All but two of the deaths are in the playwright's late works. Some deaths are sudden. Another 29 emotion induced deaths are mentioned as possible, but the likelihood of some can be challenged. Transient loss of consciousness is staged or reported in 18 cases (sounding like epilepsy in two) and near fainting in a further 13. Extreme joy is sometimes depicted as a factor in these events. Emotional death and fainting also occur occasionally in works by Shakespeare's contemporaries. Conclusions These dramatic phenomena are part of the early modern belief system but are also plausible by modern understanding of physiology and disease. They teach us not to underestimate the power of the emotions to disturb bodily functions. PMID:17185734

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 72 faint CV candidates in CRTS (Breedt+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breedt, E.; Gansicke, B. T.; Drake, A. J.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Parsons, S. G.; Marsh, T. R.; Szkody, P.; Schreiber, M. R.; Djorgovski, S. G.

    2016-04-01

    We obtained identification spectra of a total of 72 faint CV candidates identified by the CRTS, using the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC; La Palma, Spain) and the Gemini telescopes (North: Mauna Kea, Hawaii and South: Cerro Pachon, Chile). The observations were carried out in service mode during 2010, 2011 and 2013. (5 data files).

  16. View of southeast side, faint "141" sign, Cranes P76 and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of southeast side, faint "141" sign, Cranes P-76 and P-71 are behind, view facing northwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 1, Latrine, Sixth Street, adjacent to Dry Dock No. 1, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Faint laser pulses versus a single-photon source in free space quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.; Potapova, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter we present estimates for the distance of secret key transmission through free space for three different protocols of quantum key distribution: for BB84 and phase time-coding protocols in the case of a strictly single-photon source, and for the relativistic quantum key distribution protocol in the case of faint laser pulses.

  18. VLT-VIMOS integral field spectroscopy of luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. II. Evidence for shock ionization caused by tidal forces in the extra-nuclear regions of interacting and merging LIRGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal-Ibero, A.; Arribas, S.; Colina, L.; Rodríguez-Zaurín, J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; García-Marín, M.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are an important class of objects in the low-z universe bridging the gap between normal spirals and the strongly interacting and starbursting ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). Since a large fraction of the stars in the Universe have been formed in these objects, LIRGs are also relevant in a high-z context. Studies of the two-dimensional physical properties of LIRGs are still lacking. Aims: We aim to understand the nature and origin of the ionization mechanisms operating in the extra-nuclear regions of LIRGs as a function of the interaction phase and infrared luminosity. Methods: This study uses optical integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data obtained with VIMOS. Our analysis is based on over 25 300 spectra of 32 LIRGs covering all types of morphologies (isolated galaxies, interacting pairs, and advanced mergers), and the entire 1011-1012 L⊙ infrared luminosity range. Results: We found strong evidence for shock ionization, with a clear trend with the dynamical status of the system. Specifically, we quantified the variation with interaction phase of several line ratios indicative of the excitation degree. While the [N ii]λ6584/Hα ratio does not show any significant change, the [S ii]λλ6717,6731/Hα and [O i]λ6300/Hα ratios are higher for more advanced interaction stages. Velocity dispersions are higher than in normal spirals and increase with the interaction class (medians of 37, 46, and 51 km s-1 for class 0-2, respectively). We constrained the main mechanisms causing the ionization in the extra-nuclear regions (typically for distances ranging from ~0.2-2.1 kpc to ~0.9-13.2 kpc) using diagnostic diagrams. Isolated systems are mainly consistent with ionization caused by young stars. Large fractions of the extra-nuclear regions in interacting pairs and more advanced mergers are consistent with ionization caused by shocks of vs ⪉ 200 km s-1. This is supported by the relation between the excitation degree and

  19. Eight-band k·p modeling of InAs/InGaAsSb type-II W-design quantum well structures for interband cascade lasers emitting in a broad range of mid infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Ryczko, K.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.

    2013-12-14

    Band structure properties of the type-II W-design AlSb/InAs/GaIn(As)Sb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells have been investigated theoretically in a systematic manner and with respect to their use in the active region of interband cascade laser for a broad range of emission in mid infrared between below 3 to beyond 10 μm. Eight-band k·p approach has been utilized to calculate the electronic subbands. The fundamental optical transition energy and the corresponding oscillator strength have been determined in function of the thickness of InAs and GaIn(As)Sb layers and the composition of the latter. There have been considered active structures on two types of relevant substrates, GaSb and InAs, introducing slightly modified strain conditions. Additionally, the effect of external electric field has been taken into account to simulate the conditions occurring in the operational devices. The results show that introducing arsenic as fourth element into the valence band well of the type-II W-design system, and then altering its composition, can efficiently enhance the transition oscillator strength and allow additionally increasing the emission wavelength, which makes this solution prospective for improved performance and long wavelength interband cascade lasers.

  20. Faint Radio Sources in the NOAO Boötes Field: VLBA Imaging and Optical Identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Taylor, G. B.; Rector, T. A.; Myers, S. T.; Fassnacht, C. D.

    2005-09-01

    As a step toward investigating the parsec-scale properties of faint extragalactic radio sources, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) was used at 5.0 GHz to obtain phase-referenced images of 76 sources in the NOAO Boötes field. These 76 sources were selected from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) catalog to have peak flux densities above 10 mJy at 5" resolution and deconvolved major diameters of less than 3" at 1.4 GHz. Of these faint radio sources, 57 were identified with accretion-powered radio galaxies and quasars brighter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band. On Very Large Array (VLA) scales at 1.4 GHz, a measure of the compactness of the faint sources (the ratio of the peak flux density from FIRST to the integrated flux density from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog) spans the full range of possibilities arising from source-resolution effects. Of the faint radio sources, 30, or 39+9-7%, were detected with the VLBA at 5.0 GHz with peak flux densities above 6 σ~2 mJy at 2 mas resolution. The VLBA detections occur through the full range of compactness ratios. The stronger VLBA detections can themselves serve as phase-reference calibrators, boding well for opening up much of the radio sky to VLBA imaging. For the adopted cosmology, the VLBA resolution corresponds to 17 pc or finer. Most VLBA detections are unresolved or slightly resolved, but one is diffuse and five show either double or core-jet structures; the properties of these latter six are discussed in detail. Three VLBA detections are unidentified and fainter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band; their properties are highlighted because they likely mark optically obscured active nuclei at high redshift.

  1. MID-INFRARED SELECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER. II. PROPERTIES OF WISE-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE NDWFS BOOeTES FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Assef, R. J.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Tsai, C.-W.; Kochanek, C. S.; Blain, A. W.; Brodwin, M.; Brown, M. J. I.; Donoso, E.; Jarrett, T. H.; Yan, L.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Stanford, S. A.; Wu, J.

    2013-07-20

    Stern et al. presented a study of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selection of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the 2 deg{sup 2} COSMOS field, finding that a simple criterion W1-W2 {>=} 0.8 provides a highly reliable and complete AGN sample for W2 < 15.05, where the W1 and W2 passbands are centered at 3.4 {mu}m and 4.6 {mu}m, respectively. Here we extend this study using the larger 9 deg{sup 2} NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field which also has considerably deeper WISE observations than the COSMOS field, and find that this simple color cut significantly loses reliability at fainter fluxes. We define a modified selection criterion combining the W1-W2 color and the W2 magnitude to provide highly reliable or highly complete AGN samples for fainter WISE sources. In particular, we define a color-magnitude cut that finds 130 {+-} 4 deg{sup -2} AGN candidates for W2 < 17.11 with 90% reliability. Using the extensive UV through mid-IR broadband photometry available in this field, we study the spectral energy distributions of WISE AGN candidates. We find that, as expected, the WISE AGN selection can identify highly obscured AGNs, but that it is biased toward objects where the AGN dominates the bolometric luminosity output. We study the distribution of reddening in the AGN sample and discuss a formalism to account for sample incompleteness based on the step-wise maximum-likelihood method of Efstathiou et al. The resulting dust obscuration distributions depend strongly on AGN luminosity, consistent with the trend expected for a receding torus. At L{sub AGN} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}, 29% {+-} 7% of AGNs are observed as Type 1, while at {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} the fraction is 64% {+-} 13%. The distribution of obscuration values suggests that dust in the torus is present as both a diffuse medium and in optically thick clouds.

  2. Why Infrared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses applications of techniques developed for the remote sensing of infrared radiation. In addition to military applications, remote sensing has become important in collecting environmental data and detecting ecological problems. (JR)

  3. HERSCHEL/PACS SURVEY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN TAURUS/AURIGA—OBSERVATIONS OF [O I] AND [C II], AND FAR-INFRARED CONTINUUM

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Christian D.; Sandell, Göran; Vacca, William D.; Duchêne, Gaspard; Mathews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Ménard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Thi, Wing-Fai; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Grady, Carol; Roberge, Aki; Kamp, Inga; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-10-10

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe ∼120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 μm, [O I] 145 μm, [C II] 158 μm, OH, H{sub 2}O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 μm. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 μm line and the 63 μm continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 μm is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 μm emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 μm to [O I] 145 μm are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 μm and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk.

  4. Herschel - PACS Survey Of Protoplanetary Disks In Taurus - Auriga Observations Of [O I] And [C Ii], And Far-Infrared Continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Christian; Sandell, Goeran; Vacca, William D.; Duchene, Gaspard; Matthews, Geoffrey; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Barbado, David; Dent, William R. F.; Eiroa, Carlos; Grady, Carol; Kamp, Inga; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Podio, Linda; Riviere-Marichalar, Pablo; Roberge, Aki; Thi,, Wing-Fai; Vicente, Silvia; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was used to observe approx. 120 pre-main-sequence stars in Taurus as part of the GASPS Open Time Key project. Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer was used to measure the continuum as well as several gas tracers such as [O I] 63 micron, [O I] 145 micron, [C II] 158, micron OH, H2O, and CO. The strongest line seen is [O I] at 63 micron. We find a clear correlation between the strength of the [O I] 63 micron line and the 63 micron continuum for disk sources. In outflow sources, the line emission can be up to 20 times stronger than in disk sources, suggesting that the line emission is dominated by the outflow. The tight correlation seen for disk sources suggests that the emission arises from the inner disk (<50 AU) and lower surface layers of the disk where the gas and dust are coupled. The [O I] 63 micron is fainter in transitional stars than in normal Class II disks. Simple spectral energy distribution models indicate that the dust responsible for the continuum emission is colder in these disks, leading to weaker line emission. [C II] 158 micron emission is only detected in strong outflow sources. The observed line ratios of [O I] 63 micron to [O I] 145 micron are in the regime where we are insensitive to the gas-to-dust ratio, neither can we discriminate between shock or photodissociation region emission. We detect no Class III object in [O I] 63 micron and only three in continuum, at least one of which is a candidate debris disk.

  5. A Near-Infrared Search for Hidden Broad-Line Regions in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain; Sanders, D. B.; Kim, D.-C.

    1997-07-01

    We report the results of a sensitive new near-infrared search for hidden broad-line regions (BLRs: ΔVFWHM >~ 2000 km s-1) in a sample of 25 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIGs) selected for their lack of BLRs at optical wavelengths. These objects constitute a representative subset of the (non-Seyfert 1) 1 Jy sample of 111 ULIGs (Kim & Sanders), both in terms of their redshift and infrared luminosity distributions. In contrast to previous studies of ULIGs at lower redshift, the redshifts for our current subsample (z ~ 0.1-0.2) allow us to search for broad-line emission from the strong Paα λ1.8751 μm and [Si VI] λ1.962 μm emission lines, two powerful AGN diagnostic lines which are generally inaccessible in lower redshift objects. Broad Paα emission is detected for the first time in two sources--PKS 1345+12, F23499+2423 (object names that begin with ``F'' are sources identified in the IRAS Faint Source Catalog, Version 2), and the presence of a hidden BLR is confirmed in two additional sources--F20460+1925, F23060+0505. Broad Paα emission may also be present in three other sources--F08559+1053, F17179+5444, F23233+2817--but new data are needed to make sure that H2 λλ1.8665, 1.8721 is not contributing to this excess emission. In addition, the [Si VI] feature appears to be present in three objects--F12072-0444, PKS 1345+12, F23233+2817--and perhaps also in F17179+5444. Combining our new data with previously published spectra for Mrk 463E, we find that all of the galaxies with evidence for a hidden BLR at near-infrared wavelengths present an optical Seyfert 2 spectrum. Overall, seven (and perhaps nine) of the 10 optical Seyfert 2 galaxies in our sample present either a BLR or strong [Si VI] emission. Also, galaxies with ``warm'' IRAS colors (f25/f60 > 0.2) (the quantities f25, f60 are the IRAS flux densities in Jy at 25 and 60 μm, respectively) show a tendency to harbor obscured BLRs in the near-infrared and to have large Paα-to-infrared luminosity ratios

  6. Characterization of optoelectronic properties of mercury cadmium telluride and zinc oxide II-VI semiconductors for infrared and ultraviolet detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazzami, Kaveh

    Infrared (IR) and Ultraviolet (UV) light detectors have numerous applications including thermal imaging and chemical and biological spectroscopy. In this work, key aspects of HgCdTe and ZnO semiconductor materials are studied in accordance to their importance to state of the art IR and UV detector technologies. The leading material technology for IR detectors today is the lattice matched HgCdTe alloy. The model for optical absorption in this material has not been reexamined after major improvements in HgCdTe material growth technology. Access to an accurate model for absorption coefficient of this material is important for understanding of detector behavior, where the degree of accuracy required continues to grow as detector structures continue to add complexity. In this work, the optical absorption coefficient of HgCdTe is studied in detail using theoretical bandstructure calculations, temperature dependent optical spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. A new model for the optical absorption coefficient of this material as a function of composition and temperature is presented based on a proposed empirical relationship. A significant improvement in the prediction of photovoltaic detector spectral response is observed based on this proposed model. ZnO is emerging as an important material for short wavelength optoelectronic devices, and may have a major impact on high-performance UV detectors. In this work, the steady-state and time-resolved response of ZnO photoconductors are studied. A sharp turn on is observed in the UV for these photodetectors, corresponding to the bandgap energy of 3.4eV for the ZnO material. Photoconductive decay transients show a fast (nanoseconds) and slow (milliseconds) time constant that are attributed to minority carrier relaxation and trapping processes, respectively. Persistent photoconductivity was observed, with time constant on the order of minutes, in response to both visible and UV excitation and is attributed to

  7. Faint recombination lines in Galactic PNe with a [WC] nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, J.; Peña, M.; Peimbert, A.

    2009-03-01

    Aims: We present spatially resolved high-resolution spectrophotometric data for the planetary nebulae PB 8, NGC 2867, and PB 6. We have analyzed two knots in NGC 2867 and PB 6 and one in PB 8. The three nebulae are ionized by [WC] type nuclei: early [WO] for PB 6 and NGC 2867 and [WC 5-6] in the case of PB 8. Our aim is to study the behavior of the abundance discrepancy problem (ADF) in this type of planetary nebula. Methods: We measured a large number of optical recombination (ORL) and collisionally excited lines (CEL), from different ionization stages (many more than in any previous work), thus, we were able to derive physical conditions from many different diagnostic procedures. We determined ionic abundances from the available collisionally excited and recombination lines. Based on both sets of ionic abundances, we derived total chemical abundances in the nebulae using suitable ionization correction factors. Results: From CELs, we have found abundances typical of Galactic disk planetary nebulae. Moderate ADF(O++) were found for PB 8 (2.57) and NGC 2867 (1.63). For NGC 2867, abundances from ORLs are higher but still consistent with Galactic disk planetary nebulae. On the contrary, PB 8 presents a very high O/H ratio from ORLs. A high C/O was obtained from ORLs for NGC 2867; this ratio is similar to C/O obtained from CELs and with the chemical composition of the wind of the central star, indicating that there was no further C-enrichment in the star, relative to O, after the nebular material ejection. On the contrary, we found C/O<1 in PB 8. Interestingly, we obtain (C/O)ORLs/(C/O)CELs < 1 in PB 8 and NGC 2867; this added to the similarity between the heliocentric velocities measured in [O iii] and O ii lines for our three objects argue against the presence of H-deficient metal-rich knots coming from a late thermal pulse event. Based on data obtained at Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institution. Table 3 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. The UDF05 Follow-up of the HUDF: I. The Faint-End Slope of the Lyman-Break Galaxy Population at zeta approx. 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oesch, P. A.; Stiavelli, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Bergeron, L. E.; Koekemoer, A.; Lucas, R. A.; Pavlovsky, C. M.; Trenti, M.; Lilly, S. J.; Beckwith, S. V. W.; Dahlen, T.; Ferguson, H. C.; Gardner, J. P.; Lacey, C.; Mobasher, B.; Panagia, N.; Rix, H.-W.

    2007-01-01

    We present the UDF05 project, a HST Large Program of deep ACS (F606W, F775W, F850LP, and NICMOS (Fll0W, Fl60W) imaging of three fields, two of which coincide with the NICP1-4 NICMOS parallel observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF). In this first paper we use the ACS data for the NICP12 field, as well as the original HUDF ACS data, to measure the UV Luminosity Function (LF) of z approximately 5 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) down to very faint levels. Specifically, based on a V - i, i - z selection criterion, we identify a sample of 101 and 133 candidate z approximately 5 galaxies down to z(sub 850) = 28.5 and 29.25 magnitudes in the NICP12 field and in the HUDF, respectively. Using an extensive set of Monte Carlo simulations we derive corrections for observational biases and selection effects, and construct the rest-frame 1400 Angstroms LBG LF over the range M(sub 1400) = [-22.2, -17.1], i.e. down to approximately 0.04 L(sub *) at z = 5. We show that: (i) Different assumptions for the SED distribution of the LBG population, dust properties and intergalactic absorption result in a 25% variation in the number density of LBGs at z = 5 (ii) Under consistent assumptions for dust properties and intergalactic absorption, the HUDF is about 30% under-dense in z = 5 LBGs relative to the NICP12 field, a variation which is well explained by cosmic variance; (iii) The faint-end slope of the LF is independent of the specific assumptions for the input physical parameters, and has a value of alpha approximately -1.6, similar to the faint-end slope of the LF that has been measured for LBGs at z = 3 and z = 6. Our study therefore supports no variation in the faint-end of the LBG LF over the whole redshift range z = 3 to z = 6. The comparison with theoretical predictions suggests that (a,) the majority of the stars in the z = 5 LBG population are produced with a Top-Heavy IMF in merger-driven starbursts, and that (b) possibly, either the fraction of stellar mass produced in

  9. THE EVOLUTION OF THE REST-FRAME V-BAND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM z = 4: A CONSTANT FAINT-END SLOPE OVER THE LAST 12 Gyr OF COSMIC HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2012-04-01

    We present the rest-frame V-band luminosity function (LF) of galaxies at 0.4 {<=} z < 4.0, measured from a near-infrared selected sample constructed from the NMBS, the FIRES, the FIREWORKS, and the ultra-deep NICMOS and WFC3 observations in the HDFN, HUDF, and GOODS-CDFS, all having high-quality optical-to-mid-infrared data. This unique sample combines data from surveys with a large range of depths and areas in a self-consistent way, allowing us to (1) minimize the uncertainties due to cosmic variance; and (2) simultaneously constrain the bright and faint ends with unprecedented accuracy over the targeted redshift range, probing the LF down to 0.1L* at z {approx} 3.9. We find that (1) the faint end is fairly flat and with a constant slope from z = 4, with {alpha} = -1.27 {+-} 0.05; (2) the characteristic magnitude has dimmed by 1.3 mag from z {approx} 3.7 to z = 0.1; (3) the characteristic density has increased by a factor of {approx}8 from z {approx} 3.7 to z = 0.1, with 50% of this increase from z {approx} 4 to z {approx} 1.8; and (4) the luminosity density peaks at z Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5, increasing by a factor of {approx}4 from z = 4.0 to z Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5, and subsequently decreasing by a factor of {approx}1.5 by z = 0.1. We find no evidence for a steepening of the faint-end slope with redshift out to z = 4, in contrast with previous observational claims and theoretical predictions. The constant faint-end slope suggests that the efficiency of stellar feedback may evolve with redshift. Alternative interpretations are discussed, such as different masses of the halos hosting faint galaxies at low and high redshifts and/or environmental effects.

  10. Milky Way demographics with the VVV survey. II. Color transformations and near-infrared photometry for 136 million stars in the southern Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, M.; Barbá, R.; Gunthardt, G.; Minniti, D.; Lucas, P.; Majaess, D.; Irwin, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hempel, M.; Saito, R. K.; Gurovich, S.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Moni-Bidin, C.; Santucho, M. V.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R.; Toledo, I.; Geisler, D.; Dominguez, M.; Beamin, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    The new multi-epoch near-infrared VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) survey is sampling 562 deg2 of the Galactic bulge and adjacent regions of the disk. Accurate astrometry established for the region surveyed allows the VVV data to be merged with overlapping surveys (e.g., GLIMPSE, WISE, 2MASS, etc.), thereby enabling the construction of longer baseline spectral energy distributions for astronomical targets. However, in order to maximize use of the VVV data, a set of transformation equations are required to place the VVV JHKs photometry onto the 2MASS system. The impetus for this work is to develop those transformations via a comparison of 2MASS targets in 152 VVV fields sampling the Galactic disk. The transformation coefficients derived exhibit a reliance on variables such as extinction. The transformed data were subsequently employed to establish a mean reddening law of EJ-H/EH-Ks = 2.13 ± 0.04, which is the most precise determination to date and merely emphasizes the pertinence of the VVV data for determining such important parameters. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV, Programme ID 179.B-2002.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid methanol. II. Unified assignment of infrared, raman, and sum frequency generation vibrational spectra in methyl C-H stretching region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Sokolov, Vladimir V.; Morita, Akihiro

    2011-01-01

    Vibrational spectra of methyl C-H stretching region are notoriously complicated, and thus a theoretical method of systematic assignment is strongly called for in condensed phase. Here we develop a unified analysis method of the vibrational spectra, such as infrared (IR), polarized and depolarized Raman, and ssp polarized sum frequency generation (SFG), by flexible and polarizable molecular dynamics simulation. The molecular model for methanol has been developed by charge response kernel model to allow for analyzing the methyl C-H stretching vibrations. The complicated spectral structure by the Fermi resonance has been unraveled by empirically shifting potential parameters, which provides clear information on the coupling mechanism. The analysis confirmed that for the IR, polarized Raman, and SFG spectra, two-band structure at about 2830 and 2950 cm^{-1} results from the Fermi resonance splitting of the methyl C-H symmetric stretching and bending overtones. In the IR spectrum, the latter, higher-frequency band is overlapped with prominent asymmetric C-H stretching bands. In the depolarized Raman spectrum, the high frequency band at about 2980 cm^{-1} is assigned to the asymmetric C-H stretching mode. In the SFG spectrum, the two bands of the splitted symmetric C-H stretching mode have negative amplitudes of imaginary nonlinear susceptibility χ ^{(2)}, while the higher-frequency band is partly cancelled by positive imaginary components of asymmetric C-H stretching modes.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid methanol. II. Unified assignment of infrared, Raman, and sum frequency generation vibrational spectra in methyl C-H stretching region.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Sokolov, Vladimir V; Morita, Akihiro

    2011-01-14

    Vibrational spectra of methyl C-H stretching region are notoriously complicated, and thus a theoretical method of systematic assignment is strongly called for in condensed phase. Here we develop a unified analysis method of the vibrational spectra, such as infrared (IR), polarized and depolarized Raman, and ssp polarized sum frequency generation (SFG), by flexible and polarizable molecular dynamics simulation. The molecular model for methanol has been developed by charge response kernel model to allow for analyzing the methyl C-H stretching vibrations. The complicated spectral structure by the Fermi resonance has been unraveled by empirically shifting potential parameters, which provides clear information on the coupling mechanism. The analysis confirmed that for the IR, polarized Raman, and SFG spectra, two-band structure at about 2830 and 2950 cm(-1) results from the Fermi resonance splitting of the methyl C-H symmetric stretching and bending overtones. In the IR spectrum, the latter, higher-frequency band is overlapped with prominent asymmetric C-H stretching bands. In the depolarized Raman spectrum, the high frequency band at about 2980 cm(-1) is assigned to the asymmetric C-H stretching mode. In the SFG spectrum, the two bands of the splitted symmetric C-H stretching mode have negative amplitudes of imaginary nonlinear susceptibility χ(2), while the higher-frequency band is partly cancelled by positive imaginary components of asymmetric C-H stretching modes. PMID:21241123

  13. Connecting faint-end slopes of the Lyman α emitter and Lyman-break galaxy luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronke, M.; Dijkstra, M.; Trenti, M.; Wyithe, S.

    2015-05-01

    We predict Lyman α (Lyα) luminosity functions (LFs) of Lyα-selected galaxies (Lyα emitters, or LAEs) at z = 3-6 using the phenomenological model. This model combines observed UV-LFs of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs, or drop-out galaxies), with constraints on their distribution of Lyα line strengths as a function of UV-luminosity and redshift. Our analysis shows that while Lyα LFs of LAEs are generally not Schechter functions, these provide a good description over the luminosity range of log10(Lα/erg s-1) = 41-44. Motivated by this result, we predict Schechter function parameters at z = 3-6. Our analysis further shows that (i) the faint-end slope of the Lyα LF is steeper than that of the UV-LF of LBGs, (with a median αLyα < -2.0 at z ≳ 4), and (ii) a turnover in the Lyα LF of LAEs at Lyα luminosities 1040 ≲ Lα ≲ 1041 erg s-1 may signal a flattening of UV-LF of LBGs at -12 > MUV > -14. We discuss the implications of these results - which can be tested directly with upcoming surveys - for the Epoch of Reionization.

  14. A Hero’s Dark Horse: Discovery of an Ultra-faint Milky Way Satellite in Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwon; Jerjen, Helmut; Mackey, Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.; Milone, Antonino P.

    2015-05-01

    We report the discovery of an ultra-faint Milky Way satellite galaxy in the constellation of Pegasus. The concentration of stars was detected by applying our overdensity detection algorithm to the SDSS-DR 10 and confirmed with deeper photometry from the Dark Energy Camera at the 4 m Blanco telescope. Fitting model isochrones indicates that this object, Pegasus III, features an old and metal-poor stellar population ([Fe/H] ˜ -2.1) at a heliocentric distance of 205 ± 20 kpc. The new stellar system has an estimated half-light radius of {{r}h}=78-24+30 pc and a total luminosity of {{M}V}˜ -4.1+/- 0.5 that places it into the domain of dwarf galaxies on the size-luminosity plane. Pegasus III is spatially close to the MW satellite Pisces II. It is possible that the two might be physically associated, similar to the Leo IV and Leo V pair. Pegasus III is also well aligned with the Vast Polar Structure, which suggests a possible physical association.

  15. Optical phonon modes of III-V nanoparticles and indium phosphide/II-VI core-shell nanoparticles: A Raman and infrared study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia Speranta

    The prospects for realizing efficient nanoparticle light emitters in the visible/near IR for communications and bio-medical applications have benefited from progress in chemical fabrication of nanoparticles. III-V semiconductor nanopaticles such as GaP and InP are promising materials for the development of "blue" and "green" emitters, respectively, due to their large effective bandgaps. Enhanced emission efficiency has been achieved for core-shell nanoparticles, since inorganic shell materials increase electronic tunability and may decrease surface defects that often occur for nanoparticles capped with organic molecules. Also, the emission wavelength of InP nanoparticle cores can be tuned from green to red by changing the shell material in InP/II-VI core-shell nanoparticles. Investigations of phonon modes in nanocrystals are of both fundamental and applied interest. In the former case the optical phonon modes, such as surface/interface modes, are dependent on the nanoparticle dimensions, and also can provide information about dynamical properties of the nanoparticles and test the validity of various theoretical approaches. In the latter case the vibronic properties of nanoparticle emitters are controlled by confined phonons and modifications of the electron-phonon interaction by the confinement. Thus, the objective of the present thesis is the detailed study of the phonon modes of III-V nanoparticles (GaP and InP) and InP/II-VI core-shell nanoparticles by IR absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies, and an elucidation of their complex vibrational properties. With the exception of three samples (two GaP and one InP), all samples were synthesized by a novel colloidal chemistry method, which does not requires added surfactant, but rather treatment of the corresponding precursors in octadecene noncoordinative solvent. Sample quality was characterized by ED, TEM and X-ray diffraction. Based on a comparison with a dielectric continuum model, the observed features

  16. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo; Willott, Chris J.; Im, Myungshin; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Masami; Hibon, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  17. The Faint End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ~ 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glikman, Eilat; Bogosavljević, Milan; Djorgovski, S. G.; Stern, Daniel; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Mahabal, Ashish

    2010-02-01

    The evolution of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) is one of the basic cosmological measures providing insight into structure formation and mass assembly in the universe. We have conducted a spectroscopic survey to find faint quasars (-26.0 < M 1450 < -22.0) at redshifts z = 3.8-5.2 in order to measure the faint end of the QLF at these early times. Using available optical imaging data from portions of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey and the Deep Lens Survey, we have color-selected quasar candidates in a total area of 3.76 deg2. Thirty candidates have R <= 23 mag. We conducted spectroscopic follow-up for 28 of our candidates and found 23 QSOs, 21 of which are reported here for the first time, in the 3.74 < z < 5.06 redshift range. We estimate our survey completeness through detailed Monte Carlo simulations and derive the first measurement of the density of quasars in this magnitude and redshift interval. We find that the binned luminosity function (LF) is somewhat affected by the K-correction used to compute the rest-frame absolute magnitude at 1450 Å. Considering only our R <= 23 sample, the best-fit single power law (Φ vprop L β) gives a faint-end slope β = -1.6 ± 0.2. If we consider our larger, but highly incomplete sample going 1 mag fainter, we measure a steeper faint-end slope -2 < β < -2.5. In all cases, we consistently find faint-end slopes that are steeper than expected based on measurements at z ~ 3. We combine our sample with bright quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to derive parameters for a double-power-law LF. Our best fit finds a bright-end slope, α = -2.4 ± 0.2, and faint-end slope, β = -2.3 ± 0.2, without a well-constrained break luminosity. This is effectively a single power law, with β = -2.7 ± 0.1. We use these results to place limits on the amount of ultraviolet radiation produced by quasars and find that quasars are able to ionize the intergalactic medium at these redshifts. The data presented herein were obtained at the

  18. Flap monitoring using infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Alex; Wright, Leigh P.; Elmandjra, Mohamed; Mao, Jian-min

    2006-02-01

    We report results of clinical trials on flap monitoring in 65 plastic surgeries. Hemoglobin oxygen saturation of flap tissue (StO II) was monitored non-invasively by using ODISsey TM tissue oximeter, an infrared spectroscopic device. StO II measurements were conducted both intra-operatively and post-operatively. From the intra-operative measurements, we observed that StO II values dropped when the main blood vessels supplying the flap were clamped in surgery, and that StO II jumped after anastomosis to a value close to its pre-operative value. From post-operative monitoring measurements for the 65 flap cases, each lasted two days or so, we found that the StO II values approach to a level close to the baseline if the surgery was successful, and that the StO II value dropped to a value below 30% if there is a perfusion compromise, such as vascular thrombosis.

  19. Herschel far-infrared photometry of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope active galactic nuclei sample of the local universe - II. SPIRE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Koss, Michael J.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2016-03-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory's Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) for 313 nearby (z < 0.05) active galactic nuclei (AGN). We selected AGN from the 58 month Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue, the result of an all-sky survey in the 14-195 keV energy band, allowing for a reduction in AGN selection effects due to obscuration and host galaxy contamination. We find 46 per cent (143/313) of our sample is detected at all three wavebands and combined with our Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations represents the most complete FIR spectral energy distributions of local, moderate-luminosity AGN. We find no correlation among the 250, 350, and 500 μm luminosities with 14-195 keV luminosity, indicating the bulk of the FIR emission is not related to the AGN. However, Seyfert 1s do show a very weak correlation with X-ray luminosity compared to Seyfert 2s and we discuss possible explanations. We compare the SPIRE colours (F250/F350 and F350/F500) to a sample of normal star-forming galaxies, finding the two samples are statistically similar, especially after matching in stellar mass. But a colour-colour plot reveals a fraction of the Herschel-BAT AGN are displaced from the normal star-forming galaxies due to excess 500 μm emission (E500). Our analysis shows E500 is strongly correlated with the 14-195 keV luminosity and 3.4/4.6 μm flux ratio, evidence the excess is related to the AGN. We speculate these sources are experiencing millimetre excess emission originating in the corona of the accretion disc.

  20. Optical Constants of Silicon Carbide for Astrophysical Applications. II. Extending Optical Functions from Infrared to Ultraviolet Using Single-Crystal Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A. M.; Pitman, K. M.; Goncharov, A. F.; Speck, A. K.

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory measurements of unpolarized and polarized absorption spectra of various samples and crystal structures of silicon carbide (SiC) are presented from 1200-35000 cm-1 (λ ~ 8-0.28 μm) and used to improve the accuracy of optical functions (n and k) from the infrared (IR) to the ultraviolet (UV). Comparison with previous λ ~ 6-20 μm thin-film spectra constrains the thickness of the films and verifies that recent IR reflectivity data provide correct values for k in the IR region. We extract n and k needed for radiative transfer models using a new "difference method," which utilizes transmission spectra measured from two SiC single-crystals with different thicknesses. This method is ideal for near-IR to visible regions where absorbance and reflectance are low and can be applied to any material. Comparing our results with previous UV measurements of SiC, we distinguish between chemical and structural effects at high frequency. We find that for all spectral regions, 3C (β-SiC) and the \\vec{E}\\bot \\vec{c} polarization of 6H (a type of α-SiC) have almost identical optical functions that can be substituted for each other in modeling astronomical environments. Optical functions for \\vec{E} \\Vert \\vec{c} of 6H SiC have peaks shifted to lower frequency, permitting identification of this structure below λ ~ 4 μm. The onset of strong UV absorption for pure SiC occurs near 0.2 μm, but the presence of impurities redshifts the rise to 0.33 μm. Optical functions are similarly impacted. Such large differences in spectral characteristics due to structural and chemical effects should be observable and provide a means to distinguish chemical variation of SiC dust in space.

  1. Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive infrared camera that observes the blazing plumes from the Space Shuttle or expendable rocket lift-offs is capable of scanning for fires, monitoring the environment and providing medical imaging. The hand-held camera uses highly sensitive arrays in infrared photodetectors known as quantum well infrared photo detectors (QWIPS). QWIPS were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Space Microelectronics Technology in partnership with Amber, a Raytheon company. In October 1996, QWIP detectors pointed out hot spots of the destructive fires speeding through Malibu, California. Night vision, early warning systems, navigation, flight control systems, weather monitoring, security and surveillance are among the duties for which the camera is suited. Medical applications are also expected.

  2. Infrared Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Diatek Corporation, San Diego, CA and the Jet Propulsion Lab developed the Diatek Model 7000 aural thermometer which weighs only eight ounces, and measures temperature in less than two seconds using infrared astronomy technology to measure the amount of infrared energy emitted by the eardrum (the same way temperature of stars and planets is measured). This method avoids contact with mucous membranes, virtually eliminating the possibility of cross infection, and permits temperature measurement of newborn, critically ill, or incapacitated patients. Diatek Corporation was purchased by Welch Allyn Inc. The Diatek Model 7000 is now marketed as SureTemp.

  3. Infrared Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    United Scanning Technologies, Inc.'s Infrared thermography is a relatively new noncontact, nondestructive inspection and testing tool which makes temperatures visible to the human eye. Infrared scanning devices produce images that show, by color or black and white shading differences, heat losses through damaged or inadequately insulated walls or roofs. The MISS Aeroscan services are designed to take the guesswork out of industrial roof maintenance and provide companies big savings by identifying the location of moisture damage from roof leaks, effectively targeting maintenance attention.

  4. Infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Frederick; Houck, James; Bally, John; Becklin, Eric; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Draine, Bruce; Frogel, Jay; Gatley, Ian; Gehrz, Robert; Hildebrand, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The decade of 1990's presents an opportunity to address fundamental astrophysical issues through observations at IR wavelengths made possible by technological and scientific advances during the last decade. The major elements of recommended program are: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the IR Optimized 8-m Telescope (IRO), a detector and instrumentation program, the SubMilliMeter Mission (SMMM), the 2 Microns All Sky Survey (2MASS), a sound infrastructure, and technology development programs. Also presented are: perspective, science opportunities, technical overview, project recommendations, future directions, and infrastructure.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera calculated point-spread functions.

    PubMed

    Lyon, R G; Dorband, J E; Hollis, J M

    1997-03-10

    A set of observed noisy Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera point-spread functions is used to recover the combined Hubble and Faint Object Camera wave-front error. The low-spatial-frequency wave-front error is parameterized in terms of a set of 32 annular Zernike polynomials. The midlevel and higher spatial frequencies are parameterized in terms of set of 891 polar-Fourier polynomials. The parameterized wave-front error is used to generate accurate calculated point-spread functions, both pre- and post-COSTAR (corrective optics space telescope axial replacement), suitable for image restoration at arbitrary wavelengths. We describe the phase-retrieval-based recovery process and the phase parameterization. Resultant calculated precorrection and postcorrection point-spread functions are shown along with an estimate of both pre- and post-COSTAR spherical aberration. PMID:18250862

  6. Structural analysis of the PsbQ protein of photosystem II by Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroic spectroscopy and by bioinformatic methods.

    PubMed

    Balsera, Mónica; Arellano, Juan B; Gutiérrez, José R; Heredia, Pedro; Revuelta, José L; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2003-02-01

    The structure of PsbQ, one of the three main extrinsic proteins associated with the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of higher plants and green algae, is examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy and by computational structural prediction methods. This protein, together with two other lumenally bound extrinsic proteins, PsbO and PsbP, is essential for the stability and full activity of the OEC in plants. The FTIR spectra obtained in both H(2)O and D(2)O suggest a mainly alpha-helix structure on the basis of the relative areas of the constituents of the amide I and I' bands. The FTIR quantitative analyses indicate that PsbQ contains about 53% alpha-helix, 7% turns, 14% nonordered structure, and 24% beta-strand plus other beta-type extended structures. CD analyses indicate that PsbQ is a mainly alpha-helix protein (about 64%), presenting a small percentage assigned to beta-strand ( approximately 7%) and a larger amount assigned to turns and nonregular structures ( approximately 29%). Independent of the spectroscopic analyses, computational methods for protein structure prediction of PsbQ were utilized. First, a multiple alignment of 12 sequences of PsbQ was obtained after an extensive search in the public databases for protein and EST sequences. Based on this alignment, computational prediction of the secondary structure and the solvent accessibility suggest the presence of two different structural domains in PsbQ: a major C-terminal domain containing four alpha-helices and a minor N-terminal domain with a poorly defined secondary structure enriched in proline and glycine residues. The search for PsbQ analogues by fold recognition methods, not based on the secondary structure, also indicates that PsbQ is a four alpha-helix protein, most probably folding as an up-down bundle. The results obtained by both the spectroscopic and computational methods are in agreement, all indicating that PsbQ is mainly an alpha protein, and show

  7. Far-infrared to millimeter astrophysical dust emission. II. Comparison of the two-level systems (TLS) model with astronomical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, D.; Bernard, J.-P.; Mény, C.; Gromov, V.

    2011-10-01

    Aims: In a previous paper we proposed a new model for the emission by amorphous astronomical dust grains, based on solid-state physics. The model uses a description of the disordered charge distribution (DCD) combined with the presence of two-level systems (TLS) defects in the amorphous solid composing the grains. The goal of this paper is to compare this new model to astronomical observations of different Galactic environments in the far-infrared/submillimeter, in order to derive a set of canonical model parameters to be used as a Galactic reference to be compared to in future Galactic and extragalactic studies. Methods: We compare the TLS model with existing astronomical data. We consider the average emission spectrum at high latitudes in our Galaxy as measured with FIRAS and WMAP, as well as the emission from Galactic compact sources observed with the Archeops balloon experiment, for which an inverse relationship between the dust temperature and the emissivity spectral index has been shown. Results: We show that, unlike models previously proposed that often invoke two dust components at different temperatures, the TLS model successfully reproduces both the shape of the Galactic spectral energy distribution and its evolution with temperature as observed in the Archeops data. The best TLS model parameters indicate a charge coherence length of ≃13 nm and other model parameters in broad agreement with expectations from laboratory studies of dust analogs. We conclude that the millimeter excess emission, which is often attributed to the presence of very cold dust in the diffuse ISM, is very likely caused solely by TLS emission in disordered amorphous dust grains. We discuss the implications of the new model, in terms of mass determinations from millimeter continuum observations and the expected variations in the emissivity spectral index with wavelength and dust temperature. The implications for analyzing the Herschel and Planck satellite data are discussed. Table 5

  8. A Peculiar Faint Satellite in the Remote Outer Halo of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, A. D.; Huxor, A. P.; Martin, N. F.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Dotter, A.; McConnachie, A. W.; Ibata, R. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, G. F.; Sakari, C. M.; Tanvir, N. R.; Venn, K. A.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a newly discovered faint stellar system, PAndAS-48, in the outskirts of the M31 halo. Our photometry reveals this object to be comprised of an ancient and very metal-poor stellar population with age >~ 10 Gyr and [Fe/H] lsim -2.3. Our inferred distance modulus (m - M)0 = 24.57 ± 0.11 confirms that PAndAS-48 is most likely a remote M31 satellite with a three-dimensional galactocentric radius of 149^{+19}_{-8} kpc. We observe an apparent spread in color on the upper red giant branch that is larger than the photometric uncertainties should allow, and briefly explore the implications of this. Structurally, PAndAS-48 is diffuse, faint, and moderately flattened, with a half-light radius r_h=26^{+4}_{-3} pc, integrated luminosity MV = -4.8 ± 0.5, and ellipticity \\epsilon =0.30^{+0.08}_{-0.15}. On the size-luminosity plane it falls between the extended globular clusters seen in several nearby galaxies and the recently discovered faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way; however, its characteristics do not allow us to unambiguously classify it as either type of system. If PAndAS-48 is a globular cluster then it is among the most elliptical, isolated, and metal-poor of any seen in the Local Group, extended or otherwise. Conversely, while its properties are generally consistent with those observed for the faint Milky Way dwarfs, it would be a factor of ~2-3 smaller in spatial extent than any known counterpart of comparable luminosity. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO 12515.

  9. A PECULIAR FAINT SATELLITE IN THE REMOTE OUTER HALO OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, A. D.; Dotter, A.; Huxor, A. P.; Martin, N. F.; Ibata, R. A.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; McConnachie, A. W.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, G. F.; Sakari, C. M.; Venn, K. A.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2013-06-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a newly discovered faint stellar system, PAndAS-48, in the outskirts of the M31 halo. Our photometry reveals this object to be comprised of an ancient and very metal-poor stellar population with age {approx}> 10 Gyr and [Fe/H] {approx}< -2.3. Our inferred distance modulus (m - M){sub 0} = 24.57 {+-} 0.11 confirms that PAndAS-48 is most likely a remote M31 satellite with a three-dimensional galactocentric radius of 149{sup +19}{sub -8} kpc. We observe an apparent spread in color on the upper red giant branch that is larger than the photometric uncertainties should allow, and briefly explore the implications of this. Structurally, PAndAS-48 is diffuse, faint, and moderately flattened, with a half-light radius r{sub h}=26{sup +4}{sub -3} pc, integrated luminosity M{sub V} = -4.8 {+-} 0.5, and ellipticity {epsilon}=0.30{sup +0.08}{sub -0.15}. On the size-luminosity plane it falls between the extended globular clusters seen in several nearby galaxies and the recently discovered faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way; however, its characteristics do not allow us to unambiguously classify it as either type of system. If PAndAS-48 is a globular cluster then it is among the most elliptical, isolated, and metal-poor of any seen in the Local Group, extended or otherwise. Conversely, while its properties are generally consistent with those observed for the faint Milky Way dwarfs, it would be a factor of {approx}2-3 smaller in spatial extent than any known counterpart of comparable luminosity.

  10. On the faint-end of the high-z galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Bin; Ferrara, Andrea; Xu, Yidong

    2016-08-01

    Recent measurements of the Luminosity Function (LF) of galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR, zlower.5ex buildrel> over ˜ 6) indicate a very steep increase of the number density of low-mass galaxies populating the LF faint-end. However, as star formation in low-mass halos can be easily depressed or even quenched by ionizing radiation, a turnover is expected at some faint UV magnitudes. Using a physically-motivated analytical model, we quantify reionization feedback effects on the LF faint-end shape. We find that if reionization feedback is neglected, the power-law Schechter parameterization characterizing the LF faint-end remains valid up to absolute UV magnitude ˜-9. If instead radiative feedback is strong enough that quenches star formation in halos with circular velocity smaller than 50 km s-1, the LF starts to drop at absolute UV magnitude ˜-15, i.e. slightly below the detection limits of current (unlensed) surveys at z ˜ 5. The LFs may rise again at higher absolute UV magnitude, where, as a result of interplay between reionization process and galaxy formation, most of the galaxy light is from relic stars formed before the EoR. We suggest that the galaxy number counts data, particularly in lensed fields, can put strong constraints on reionization feedback. In models with stronger reionization feedback, stars in galaxies with absolute UV magnitude higher than ˜-13 and smaller than ˜-8 are typically older. Hence, the stellar age - UV magnitude relation can be used as an alternative feedback probe.

  11. Eight ultra-faint galaxy candidates discovered in year two of the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Drlica-Wagner, A.

    2015-11-04

    We report the discovery of eight new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidates in the second year of optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Six of these candidates are detected at high confidence, while two lower-confidence candidates are identified in regions of non-uniform survey coverage. The new stellar systems are found by three independent automated search techniques and are identified as overdensities of stars, consistent with the isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor simple stellar population. The new systems are faint (MV > -4.7 ) and span a range of physical sizes (17 pc < r1/2 < 181pc) and heliocentric distances (25 kpc < D < 214 kpc). All of the new systems have central surface brightnesses consistent with known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (μ 27.5 mag arcsec -2). Roughly half of the DES candidates are more distant, less luminous, and/or have lower surface brightnesses than previously known Milky Way satellite galaxies. Most of the candidates are found in the southern part of the DES footprint close to the Magellanic Clouds. We find that the DES data alone exclude (p < 10-3) a spatially isotropic distribution of Milky Way satellites and that the observed distribution can be well, though not uniquely, described by an association between several of the DES satellites and the Magellanic system. Furthermore, our model predicts that the full sky may hold ~100 ultra-faint galaxies with physical properties comparable to the DES satellites and that 20%–30% of these would be spatially associated with the Magellanic Clouds.

  12. Eight ultra-faint galaxy candidates discovered in year two of the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Drlica-Wagner, A.

    2015-11-04

    We report the discovery of eight new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidates in the second year of optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Six of these candidates are detected at high confidence, while two lower-confidence candidates are identified in regions of non-uniform survey coverage. The new stellar systems are found by three independent automated search techniques and are identified as overdensities of stars, consistent with the isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor simple stellar population. The new systems are faint (MV > -4.7 ) and span a range of physical sizes (17 pc < r1/2more » < 181pc) and heliocentric distances (25 kpc < D⊙ < 214 kpc). All of the new systems have central surface brightnesses consistent with known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (μ 27.5 mag arcsec -2). Roughly half of the DES candidates are more distant, less luminous, and/or have lower surface brightnesses than previously known Milky Way satellite galaxies. Most of the candidates are found in the southern part of the DES footprint close to the Magellanic Clouds. We find that the DES data alone exclude (p < 10-3) a spatially isotropic distribution of Milky Way satellites and that the observed distribution can be well, though not uniquely, described by an association between several of the DES satellites and the Magellanic system. Furthermore, our model predicts that the full sky may hold ~100 ultra-faint galaxies with physical properties comparable to the DES satellites and that 20%–30% of these would be spatially associated with the Magellanic Clouds.« less

  13. Eight Ultra-faint Galaxy Candidates Discovered in Year Two of the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drlica-Wagner, A.; Bechtol, K.; Rykoff, E. S.; Luque, E.; Queiroz, A.; Mao, Y.-Y.; Wechsler, R. H.; Simon, J. D.; Santiago, B.; Yanny, B.; Balbinot, E.; Dodelson, S.; Fausti Neto, A.; James, D. J.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Pieres, A.; Stringer, K.; Walker, A. R.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; Wester, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.; DES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery of eight new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidates in the second year of optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Six of these candidates are detected at high confidence, while two lower-confidence candidates are identified in regions of non-uniform survey coverage. The new stellar systems are found by three independent automated search techniques and are identified as overdensities of stars, consistent with the isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor simple stellar population. The new systems are faint (MV > -4.7 {mag}) and span a range of physical sizes (17 {pc} < r1/2 < 181 {pc}) and heliocentric distances (25 kpc < D⊙ < 214 kpc). All of the new systems have central surface brightnesses consistent with known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (μ ≳ 27.5 {mag} {arcsec}-2). Roughly half of the DES candidates are more distant, less luminous, and/or have lower surface brightnesses than previously known Milky Way satellite galaxies. Most of the candidates are found in the southern part of the DES footprint close to the Magellanic Clouds. We find that the DES data alone exclude (p < 10-3) a spatially isotropic distribution of Milky Way satellites and that the observed distribution can be well, though not uniquely, described by an association between several of the DES satellites and the Magellanic system. Our model predicts that the full sky may hold ˜100 ultra-faint galaxies with physical properties comparable to the DES satellites and that 20%-30% of these would be spatially associated with the Magellanic Clouds.

  14. Faint Radio Sources in the NOAO Bootes Field. VLBA Imaging And Optical Identifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J.M.; Taylor, Greg B.; Rector, T.A.; Myers, S.T.; Fassnacht, C.D.; /UC, Davis

    2005-06-13

    As a step toward investigating the parsec-scale properties of faint extragalactic radio sources, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) was used at 5.0 GHz to obtain phase-referenced images of 76 sources in the NOAO Booetes field. These 76 sources were selected from the FIRST catalog to have peak flux densities above 10 mJy at 5'' resolution and deconvolved major diameters of less than 3'' at 1.4 GHz. Fifty-five of these faint radio sources were identified with accretion-powered radio galaxies and quasars brighter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band. On VLA scales at 1.4 GHz, a measure of the compactness of the faint sources (the ratio of the peak flux density from FIRST to the integrated flux density from the NVSS catalog) spans the full range of possibilities arising from source-resolution effects. Thirty of the faint radio sources, or 39{sub -7}{sup +9}%, were detected with the VLBA at 5.0 GHz with peak flux densities above 6 {sigma} {approx} 2 mJy at 2 mas resolution. The VLBA detections occur through the full range of compactness ratios. The stronger VLBA detections can themselves serve as phase-reference calibrators, boding well for opening up much of the radio sky to VLBA imaging. For the adopted cosmology, the VLBA resolution corresponds to 17 pc or finer. Most VLBA detections are unresolved or slightly resolved but one is diffuse and five show either double or core-jet structures; the properties of these latter six are discussed in detail. Eight VLBA detections are unidentified and fainter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band; their properties are highlighted because they likely mark optically-obscured active nuclei at high redshift.

  15. Prognosis of glioblastoma with faint MGMT methylation-specific PCR product.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Yi; Ho, Hsiang-Ling; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Chang-Chien, Yi-Chun; Chen, Ming-Hsiung; Hsu, Sanford Ping-Chuan; Yen, Yu-Shu; Guo, Wan-You; Ho, Donald Ming-Tak

    2015-03-01

    Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) for the promoter methylation status of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltranferase (MGMT) gene theoretically provides a positive or negative result. However, the faint MSP product is difficult to interpret. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of faint MSP product in glioblastoma (GBM). Critical concentrations of methylated control DNA, i.e., 100, 1, 0.5 and 0 % were run parallel with 116 newly diagnosed GBMs in order to standardize the interpretation and to distinguish positive (+), equivocal (±), and negative (-; unmethylated) results. Cases with the faint MSP product and its intensity between those of 1 and 0.5 % DNA controls were considered equivocal (±). MGMT methylation quantifications were also determined by quantitative real-time MSP (qMSP) and pyrosequencing (PSQ), and protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. There were significant correlations between MSP and all the aforementioned studies. The concordance rates between the MSP+ and qMSP+ cases, as well as the MSP- and qMSP- cases were 100 %, and the MSP± cases comprised 76.5 % of qMSP+ cases and 23.5 % of qMSP- cases. PSQ study showed that heterogeneous methylation was more frequently encountered in the MSP± cases. Multivariate analyses disclosed that although the overall survival of the MSP± cases was indistinct from that of the MSP+ cases, its progression free survival was significantly worse and was indistinct from that of the MSP- cases. In conclusion, GBMs with faint MGMT MSP products should be distinguished from MSP+ cases as their behaviors were different. PMID:25575938

  16. Faint electric treatment-induced rapid and efficient delivery of extraneous hydrophilic molecules into the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mahadi; Nishimoto, Akinori; Ohgita, Takashi; Hama, Susumu; Kashida, Hiromu; Asanuma, Hiroyuki; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-04-28

    Effective delivery of extraneous molecules into the cytoplasm of the target cells is important for several drug therapies. Previously, we showed effective in vivo transdermal delivery of naked siRNA into skin cells induced by faint electric treatment (ET) iontophoresis, and significant suppression of target mRNA levels (Kigasawa et al., Int. J. Pharm., 2010). This result indicates that electricity promoted the delivery of siRNA into cytoplasm. In the present study, we analyzed the intracellular delivery of naked anti-luciferase siRNA by faint ET, and found that the luciferase activity of cells expressing luciferase was reduced by in vitro ET like in vivo iontophoresis. Cellular uptake of fluorescent-label siRNA was increased by ET, while low temperature exposure, macropinocytosis inhibitor amiloride and caveolae-mediated endocytosis inhibitor filipin significantly prevented siRNA uptake. These results indicate that the cellular uptake mechanism involved endocytosis. In addition, voltage sensitive fluorescent dye DiBAC4 (3) penetration was increased by ET, and the transient receptor potential channel inhibitor SKF96365 reduced siRNA uptake, suggesting that faint ET reduced membrane potentials by changing intracellular ion levels. Moreover, to analyze cytoplasmic delivery, we used in-stem molecular beacon (ISMB), which fluoresces upon binding to target mRNA in the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, cytoplasmic ISMB fluorescence appeared rapidly and homogeneously after ET, indicating that cytoplasmic delivery is markedly enhanced by ET. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that faint ET can enhance cellular uptake and cytoplasmic delivery of extraneous molecules. PMID:26944781

  17. A study of ultraviolet absorption lines through the complete Galactic halo by the analysis of HST faint object spectrograph spectra of active Galactic nuclei, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Geoffrey S.; Bartko, Frank; Shull, J. Michael; Stocke, John T.; Sachs, Elise R.; Burbidge, E. Margaret; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Harms, Richard J.; Massa, Derck

    1994-01-01

    The ultraviolet (1150 - 2850 A) spectra of a number of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) have been used to study the properties of the Galactic halo. The objects that served as probes are 3C 273, PKS 0454-220, Pg 1211+143, CSO 251, Ton 951, and PG 1351+640. The equivalent widths of certain interstellar ions have been measured, with special attention paid to the C IV/C II and Si IV/Si II ratios. These ratios have been intercompared, and the highest values are found in the direction of 3C 273, where C IV/C II = 1.2 and Si IV/Si II greater than 1. These high ratios may be due to a nearby supernova remnant, rather than to ionized gas higher up in the Galactic halo. Our data give some support to the notion that QSO metal-line systems may arise from intervening galaxies which contain high supernova rates, galactic fountains, and turbulent mixing layers.

  18. Construction of Identical [2 + 2] Schiff-Base Macrocyclic Ligands by Ln(III) and Zn(II) Template Ions Including Efficient Yb(III) Near-Infrared Sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Song; Hu, Yong; Zheng, Youxuan; Huang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Identical 34-membered [2 + 2] pendent-armed Schiff-base macrocyclic ligands (H4La and H4Lb) can be constructed via the condensation reactions between rigid o-phenylenediamine and extended dialdehydes (H2hpdd/H2pdd) in the presence of either Ln(III) or Zn(II) template with remarkable distinction on the ion radii and charge. X-ray single-crystal diffraction analyses reveal the formation of mononuclear Ln(III) complexes (1-4 and 7) and dinuclear Zn(II) complexes (5 and 6). It is noted that Ln(III) macrocyclic complexes have eight-coordinate sandwich-like mononuclear structures fully surrounded by flexible and large-sized macrocyclic ligands. Photophysical studies have demonstrated that both H4La and H4Lb can serve as effective sensitizers for the Yb(III) ion (2 and 7) exhibiting near-infrared emission at 974 nm with high quantum yields in solution (C2H5OH and CH3OH, ∼1%). Moreover, the quantum yields of two Yb(III) complexes 2 and 7 could be increased ∼15% in CH3OH under weak alkaline condition (pH = 8-9), while no significant changes are observed in C2H5OH by contrast. We think the unique sandwich-like macrocyclic structures of Yb(III) complexes 2 and 7 play important roles in simultaneously guaranteeing the effective match of the energy levels of Yb(III) centers as well as shielding from the solvent molecules and counterions. PMID:25955805

  19. Detection of faint BLR components in the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221 and measure of the central BH mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Franca, Fabio; Onori, Francesca; Ricci, Federica; Bianchi, Stefano; Marconi, Alessandro; Sani, Eleonora; Vignali, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, using single epoch virial based techniques in the optical band, it has been possible to measure the central black hole mass on large type 1 Active Galactive Nuclei (AGN) samples. However these measurements use the width of the broad line region as a proxy of the virial velocities and are therefore difficult to be carried out on those obscured (type 2) or low luminosity AGN where the nuclear component does not dominate in the optical. Here we present the optical and near infrared spectrum of the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221, observed with X-shooter/VLT. Previous observations of NGC 6221 in the X-ray band shows an absorbed (N_H=8.5 +/- 0.4 x 10^21 cm^-2) spectrum typical of a type 2 AGN with luminosity log(L_14-195/ erg s^-1) = 42.05, while in the optical band its spectrum is typical of a reddened (A_V=3) starburst. Our deep X-shooter/VLT observations have allowed us to detect faint broad emission in the H_alpha, HeI and Pa_beta lines (FWHM=1400-2300 km s^-1) confirming previous studies indicating that NGC 6221 is a reddened starbust galaxy which hosts an AGN. We use the measure of the broad components to provide a first estimate of its central black hole mass (M_BH = 10^6.6+/-0.3 Msol, lambda_Edd=0.01-0.03), obtained using recently calibrated virial relations suitable for moderately obscured (N_H<10^24 cm^-2) AGN.

  20. MEASURING THE UNDETECTABLE: PROPER MOTIONS AND PARALLAXES OF VERY FAINT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Dustin; Hogg, David W.; Jester, Sebastian; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2009-05-15

    The near future of astrophysics involves many large solid-angle, multi-epoch, multiband imaging surveys. These surveys will, at their faint limits, have data on a large number of sources that are too faint to be detected at any individual epoch. Here, we show that it is possible to measure in multi-epoch data not only the fluxes and positions, but also the parallaxes and proper motions of sources that are too faint to be detected at any individual epoch. The method involves fitting a model of a moving point source simultaneously to all imaging, taking account of the noise and point-spread function (PSF) in each image. By this method it is possible to measure the proper motion of a point source with an uncertainty close to the minimum possible uncertainty given the information in the data, which is limited by the PSF, the distribution of observation times (epochs), and the total signal-to-noise in the combined data. We demonstrate our technique on multi-epoch Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging of the SDSS Southern Stripe (SDSSSS). We show that with our new technique we can use proper motions to distinguish very red brown dwarfs from very high-redshift quasars in these SDSS data, for objects that are inaccessible to traditional techniques, and with better fidelity than by multiband imaging alone. We rediscover all 10 known brown dwarfs in our sample and present nine new candidate brown dwarfs, identified on the basis of significant proper motion.

  1. FAME Astrometry of Faint Objects and the Kinematics of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, S.; Gould, A.; Olling, R.

    2001-12-01

    We explore what the Full-Sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) can achieve by observing a ``small'' (< 106) sample of faint objects (R< ~18) in addition to its standard R<15 magnitude limited catalog of 40x 106 stars. Observing some 50,000 quasars will improve the accuracy of the reference frame from 16 micro-as/yr to 6 micro-as/yr, allowing proper motion of the Galactic center due to reflex of the Sun's motion to be determined with an accuracy of 0.1%. It will also permit very accurate proper motions of the Magellanic Clouds. Quasar observations also offer a powerful check on any unmodeled parallax systematics. Proper motions of 30,000 faint field blue horizontal branch stars will allow stellar halo rotation to be mapped to beyond 35 kpc. Halo substructures producing clumps in the velocity space will be detectable to 10 kpc. In addition to this, allowing inclusion of objects with R>15 will increase the number of good parallaxes of late M-dwarfs 30-fold, and provide distances of over 200 L-dwarfs. FAME could obtain good (10%) parallaxes for 3700 white dwarfs, a 10-fold increase over the R<15 sample. These parallaxes will yield precise mass and luminosity functions. Candidate quasars, BHB stars, and nearby stars will be selected from existing and planned surveys (SDSS, USNO, 2MASS, etc.) The total number of faint candidates should be about 500,000, a small fraction of the FAME input catalog.

  2. Evolution in the bias of faint radio sources to z ˜ 2.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, S. N.; Jarvis, M. J.; McAlpine, K.

    2014-05-01

    Quantifying how the baryonic matter traces the underlying dark matter distribution is key to both understanding galaxy formation and our ability to constrain the cosmological model. Using the cross-correlation function of radio and near-infrared galaxies, we present a large-scale clustering analysis of radio galaxies to z ˜ 2.2. We measure the angular auto-correlation function of Ks<23.5 galaxies in the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO-XMM3) field with photometric redshifts out to z = 4 using VIDEO and CFHTLS (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey) photometry in the near-infrared and optical. We then use the cross-correlation function of these sources with 766 radio sources at S1.4>90μJy to infer linear bias of radio galaxies in four redshift bins. We find that the bias evolves from b = 0.57 ± 0.06 at z ˜ 0.3 to 8.55 ± 3.11 at z ˜ 2.2. Furthermore, we separate the radio sources into subsamples to determine how the bias is dependent on the radio luminosity, and find a bias which is significantly higher than predicted by the simulations of Wilman et al., and consistent with the lower luminosity but more abundant FR-I population having a similar bias to the highly luminous but rare FR-IIs. Our results are suggestive of a higher mass, particularly for FR-I sources than assumed in simulations, especially towards higher redshift.

  3. Infrared telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Hendricks, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The development of the Infrared Telescope for Spacelab 2 is discussed. The design, development, and testing required to interface a stationary superfluid helium dewar with a scanning cryostate capable of operating in the zero-g environment in the space shuttle bay is described.

  4. Infrared Thermometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefers, John

    2006-01-01

    An infrared (IR) thermometer lab offers the opportunity to give science students a chance to measure surface temperatures, utilizing off-the-shelf technology. Potential areas of study include astronomy (exoplanets), electromagnetic spectrum, chemistry, evaporation rates, anatomy, crystal formation, and water or liquids. This article presents one…

  5. Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, B. A.

    1984-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopic analysis is reviewed. Applications to chemical analysis of preimpregnated carbon fiber materials, including polystyrene spectra, epoxy resin analysis, mineral loads analysis, determination of epoxy groups and identification of spurious organic materials are discussed. The advantages of the method for quality control are pointed out.

  6. Characterization of the low-temperature triplet state of chlorophyll in photosystem II core complexes: Application of phosphorescence measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, Alexey A; Neverov, Konstantin V; Krasnovsky, Alexander A; Shkuropatova, Valentina A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorescence measurements at 77 K and light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy at 95 K were applied to study of the triplet state of chlorophyll a ((3)Chl) in photosystem II (PSII) core complexes isolated from spinach. Using both methods, (3)Chl was observed in the core preparations with doubly reduced primary quinone acceptor QA. The spectral parameters of Chl phosphorescence resemble those in the isolated PSII reaction centers (RCs). The main spectral maximum and the lifetime of the phosphorescence corresponded to 955±1 nm and of 1.65±0.05 ms respectively; in the excitation spectrum, the absorption maxima of all core complex pigments (Chl, pheophytin a (Pheo), and β-carotene) were observed. The differential signal at 1667(-)/1628(+)cm(-1) reflecting a downshift of the stretching frequency of the 13(1)-keto C=O group of Chl was found to dominate in the triplet-minus-singlet FTIR difference spectrum of core complexes. Based on FTIR results and literature data, it is proposed that (3)Chl is mostly localized on the accessory chlorophyll that is in triplet equilibrium with P680. Analysis of the data suggests that the Chl triplet state responsible for the phosphorescence and the FTIR difference spectrum is mainly generated due to charge recombination in the reaction center radical pair P680(+)PheoD1(-), and the energy and temporal parameters of this triplet state as well as the molecular environment and interactions of the triplet-bearing Chl molecule are similar in the PSII core complexes and isolated PSII RCs. PMID:27040752

  7. Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-line Galaxies from Infrared Grism Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straughn, Amber N.; Kuntschner, Harald; Kümmel, Martin; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Cohen, Seth H.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Meurer, Gerhardt; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Calzetti, Daniela; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; Mutchler, Max; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Silk, Joseph I.; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Young, Erick T.; Xu, Chun

    2011-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6 to 1.6 μm from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 μm grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The Early Release Science (ERS) grism field was observed at a depth of two orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which is presented here. ELGs are studied via the Hα, [O III], and [O II] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 <~ z <~ 1.4, 1.2 <~ z <~ 2.2, and 2.0 <~ z <~ 3.3, respectively, in the G102 (0.8-1.1 μm R ~= 210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 μm R ~= 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m AB(F098M) ~= 25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts (Δz ~= 0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m AB(F098M)= 26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and redshifts to z >~ 2.

  8. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE: EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM INFRARED GRISM OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Straughn, Amber N.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Kuntschner, Harald; Kuemmel, Martin; Walsh, Jeremy R.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; O'Connell, Robert W.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Bond, Howard E.; Meurer, Gerhardt; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.

    2011-01-15

    We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6 to 1.6 {mu}m from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 {mu}m grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The Early Release Science (ERS) grism field was observed at a depth of two orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which is presented here. ELGs are studied via the H{alpha}, [O III], and [O II] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.4, 1.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.2, and 2.0 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.3, respectively, in the G102 (0.8-1.1 {mu}m; R {approx_equal} 210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 {mu}m; R {approx_equal} 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m A{sub B(F098M)} {approx_equal} 25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts ({Delta}z {approx_equal} 0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m{sub AB(F098M)}= 26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the

  9. The active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. II. Redox properties, light sensitivity and CO-ligand exchange as observed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roseboom, Winfried; De Lacey, Antonio L; Fernandez, Victor M; Hatchikian, E Claude; Albracht, Simon P J

    2006-01-01

    In [FeFe]-hydrogenases, the H cluster (hydrogen-activating cluster) contains a di-iron centre ([2Fe]H subcluster, a (L)(CO)(CN)Fe(mu-RS2)(mu-CO)Fe(CysS)(CO)(CN) group) covalently attached to a cubane iron-sulphur cluster ([4Fe-4S]H subcluster). The Cys-thiol functions as the link between one iron (called Fe1) of the [2Fe]H subcluster and one iron of the cubane subcluster. The other iron in the [2Fe]H subcluster is called Fe2. The light sensitivity of the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans enzyme in a variety of states has been studied with infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The aerobic inactive enzyme (H(inact) state) and the CO-inhibited active form (H(ox)-CO state) were stable in light. Illumination of the H(ox) state led to a kind of cannibalization; in some enzyme molecules the H cluster was destroyed and the released CO was captured by the H clusters in other molecules to form the light-stable H(ox)-CO state. Illumination of active enzyme under 13CO resulted in the complete exchange of the two intrinsic COs bound to Fe2. At cryogenic temperatures, light induced the photodissociation of the extrinsic CO and the bridging CO of the enzyme in the H(ox)-CO state. Electrochemical redox titrations showed that the enzyme in the H(inact) state converts to the transition state (H(trans)) in a reversible one-electron redox step (E (m, pH 7) = -75 mV). IR spectra demonstrate that the added redox equivalent not only affects the [4Fe-4S]H subcluster, but also the di-iron centre. Enzyme in the H(trans) state reacts with extrinsic CO, which binds to Fe2. The H(trans) state converts irreversibly into the H(ox) state in a redox-dependent reaction most likely involving two electrons (E (m, pH 7) = -261 mV). These electrons do not end up on any of the six Fe atoms of the H cluster; the possible destiny of the two redox equivalents is discussed. An additional reversible one-electron redox reaction leads to the H(red) state (E (m, pH 7) = -354 mV), where both Fe atoms of the [2Fe]H subcluster

  10. Calibrating the Cepheid period-luminosity relation from the infrared surface brightness technique. II. The effect of metallicity and the distance to the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, J.; Gieren, W.; Fouqué, P.; Barnes, T. G.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Nardetto, N.; Queloz, D.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The extragalactic distance scale builds directly on the Cepheid period-luminosity (PL) relation as delineated by the sample of Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). However, the LMC is a dwarf irregular galaxy, quite different from the massive spiral galaxies used for calibrating the extragalactic distance scale. Recent investigations suggest that not only the zero-point but also the slope of the Milky Way PL relation differ significantly from that of the LMC, casting doubts on the universality of the Cepheid PL relation. Aims: We want to make a differential comparison of the PL relations in the two galaxies by delineating the PL relations using the same method, the infrared surface brightness method (IRSB), and the same precepts. We furthermore extend the metallicity baseline for investigating the zero-point dependence, by applying the method to five SMC Cepheids as well. Methods: The IRSB method is a Baade-Wesselink type method to determine individual distances to Cepheids. We apply a newly revised calibration of the method as described in an accompanying paper (Paper I) to 36 LMC and five SMC Cepheids and delineate new PL relations in the V,I,J, & K bands as well as in the Wesenheit indices in the optical and near-IR. Results: We present 509 new and accurate radial velocity measurements for a sample of 22 LMC Cepheids, enlarging our earlier sample of 14 stars to include 36 LMC Cepheids. The new calibration of the IRSB method is directly tied to the recent HST parallax measurements to ten Milky Way Cepheids, and we find a LMC barycenter distance modulus of 18.45 ± 0.04 (random error only) from the 36 individual LMC Cepheid distances. In the J,K bands we find identical slopes for the LMC and Milky Way PL relations and only a weak letallicity effect on the zero points (consistent with a zero effect), metal poor stars being fainter. In the optical we find the Milky Way slopes are slightly shallower than the LMC slopes (but again consistent with no

  11. THE MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. II. EXTREME PHYSICAL CONDITIONS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE X{sub co} FACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Van der Werf, Paul; Xilouris, E.; Isaak, Kate G.; Gao, Yu E-mail: pvdwerf@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: kisaak@rssd.esa.int

    2012-05-20

    In this work, we conclude the analysis of our CO line survey of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs: L{sub IR} {approx}> 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }) in the local universe (Paper I) by focusing on the influence of their average interstellar medium (ISM) properties on the total molecular gas mass estimates via the so-called X{sub co} = M(H{sub 2})/L{sub co,1-0} factor. One-phase radiative transfer models of the global CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) yield an X{sub co} distribution with (X{sub co}) {approx} (0.6 {+-} 0.2) M{sub Sun} (K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1} over a significant range of average gas densities, temperatures, and dynamic states. The latter emerges as the most important parameter in determining X{sub co}, with unbound states yielding low values and self-gravitating states yielding the highest ones. Nevertheless, in many (U)LIRGs where available higher-J CO lines (J = 3-2, 4-3, and/or J = 6-5) or HCN line data from the literature allow a separate assessment of the gas mass at high densities ({>=}10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}) rather than a simple one-phase analysis, we find that near-Galactic X{sub co} {approx} (3-6) M{sub Sun} (K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1} values become possible. We further show that in the highly turbulent molecular gas in ULIRGs, a high-density component will be common and can be massive enough for its high X{sub co} to dominate the average value for the entire galaxy. Using solely low-J CO lines to constrain X{sub co} in such environments (as has been the practice up until now) may have thus resulted in systematic underestimates of molecular gas mass in ULIRGs, as such lines are dominated by a warm, diffuse, and unbound gas phase with low X{sub co} but very little mass. Only well-sampled high-J CO SLEDs (J = 3-2 and higher) and/or multi-J observations of heavy rotor molecules (e.g., HCN) can circumvent such a bias, and the latter type of observations may have actually provided early evidence of it in local ULIRGs. The only

  12. Submonolayer Uniformity of Type II InAs/GaInSb W-shaped Quantum Wells Probed by Full-Wafer Photoluminescence Mapping in the Mid-infrared Spectral Range.

    PubMed

    Dyksik, Mateusz; Motyka, Marcin; Sęk, Grzegorz; Misiewicz, Jan; Dallner, Matthias; Weih, Robert; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2015-12-01

    The spatial uniformity of GaSb- and InAs substrate-based structures containing type II quantum wells was probed by means of large-scale photoluminescence (PL) mapping realized utilizing a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The active region was designed and grown in a form of a W-shaped structure with InAs and GaInSb layers for confinement of electrons and holes, respectively. The PL spectra were recorded over the entire 2-in. wafers, and the parameters extracted from each spectrum, such as PL peak energy position, its linewidth and integrated intensity, were collected in a form of two-dimensional spatial maps. Throughout the analysis of these maps, the wafers' homogeneity and precision of the growth procedure were investigated. A very small variation of PL peak energy over the wafer indicates InAs quantum well width fluctuation of only a fraction of a monolayer and hence extraordinary thickness accuracy, a conclusion further supported by high uniformity of both the emission intensity and PL linewidth. PMID:26471481

  13. Effect of sidewall surface recombination on the quantum efficiency in a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivated gated type-II InAs/GaSb long-infrared photodetector array

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Hoang, A. M.; Bogdanov, S.; Haddadi, A.; Darvish, S. R.; Razeghi, M.

    2013-11-25

    Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} was applied to passivate a long-wavelength infrared type-II superlattice gated photodetector array with 50% cut-off wavelength at 11 μm, resulting in a saturated gate bias that was 3 times lower than in a SiO{sub 2} passivated array. Besides effectively suppressing surface leakage, gating technique exhibited its ability to enhance the quantum efficiency of 100 × 100 μm size mesa from 51% to 57% by suppressing sidewall surface recombination. At 77 K, the gated photodetector showed dark current density and resistance-area product at −300 mV of 2.5 × 10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2} and 1.3 × 10{sup 4} Ω cm{sup 2}, respectively, and a specific detectivity of 1.4 × 10{sup 12} Jones.

  14. Bias-selectable dual-band mid-/long-wavelength infrared photodetecto