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Sample records for ii nptii gene

  1. HIGH FREQUENCY GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF CICHORIUM INTYBUS L. USING nptII GENE AS A SELECTIVE MARKER.

    PubMed

    Matvieieva, N; Shakhovsky, A; Kvasko, O; Kuchuk, N

    2015-01-01

    Cichorium intybus L. is an important vegetable crop used as salad (leaf form) and for the production of coffee substitutes (root form). At the same time these plants can also be used in biotechnologies for synthesis of pharmaceutical proteins. Here we report the possibility of high frequency Agrobacterium rhizogenes- or A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation of C. intybus L. for construction of transgenic "hairy" roots and plants. The used plasmids contained target human interferonifn-α2b gene, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT6:Ag85B antigene esxA::fbpB(ΔTMD) fused gene and human telomerase reverse transcriptase h Tert gene. Using of nptII gene as a selective one was preferable to the bar gene for chicory. In this case the frequency of transgenic plants or "hairy" roots formation was significantly higher. Cultivation of explants on the medium with Basta in concentration 1-2 mg/l have led to plants death or to significant reduction of number of shoots formed. Frequency of "hairy" roots formation varied from 5.9 to 42.3% after A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation. Frequency of regeneration of transgenic plants varied from 10 to 86% after A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Both A. rhizogenes- and A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation frequency depended on the type of explants, roots or cotyledons, and vector used. Usage of A. tumefaciens carrying pCB064 plasmid (target esxA:fbpB(ΔTMD) fused gene and nptII selective gene) resulted in the most effective regeneration of transgenic plants with regeneration frequency up to 86%. In the case of chicory A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation the highest regeneration frequency up to 42.3% was demonstrated using p CB161 vector with ifn-α2b target gene and nptII selective gene. PMID:26419064

  2. Self-excision of the antibiotic resistance gene nptII using a heat inducible Cre-loxP system from transgenic potato.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Wilmer; Gaudin, Amélie; Solórzano, Dennis; Casas, Armando; Nopo, Luis; Chudalayandi, Prakash; Medrano, Giuliana; Kreuze, Jan; Ghislain, Marc

    2006-09-01

    Resistance to antibiotics mediated by selectable marker genes remains a powerful selection tool for transgenic event production. However, regulatory agencies and consumer concerns favor these to be eliminated from food crops. Several excision systems exist but none have been optimized or shown to be functional for clonally propagated crops. The excision of the nptII gene conferring resistance to kanamycin has been achieved here using a gene construct based on a heat-inducible cre gene producing a recombinase that eliminates cre and nptII genes flanked by two loxP sites. First-generation regenerants with the Cre-loxP system were obtained by selection on kanamycin media. Following a heat treatment, second generation regenerants were screened for excision by PCR using nptII, cre, and T-DNA borders primers. Excision efficiency appeared to be at 4.7% depending on the heat treatment. The footprint of the excision was shown by sequencing between T-DNA borders to correspond to a perfect recombination event. Selectable marker-free sprouts were also obtained from tubers of transgenic events when submitted to similar heat treatment at 4% frequency. Spontaneous excision was not observed out of 196 regenerants from untreated transgenic explants. Biosafety concerns are minimized because the expression of cre gene driven by the hsp70 promoter of Drosophila melanogaster was remarkably low even under heat activation and no functional loxP site were found in published Solanum sequence database. A new plant transformation vector pCIP54/55 was developed including a multiple cloning site and the self-excision system which should be a useful tool not only for marker genes in potato but for any gene or sequence removal in any plant. PMID:16912912

  3. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of commercially elite rice restorer line using nptII gene as a plant selection marker.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, M; Sairam Reddy, P; Laxmi Narasu, M; Krishna, Gaurav; Rana, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Transformation of commercially important indica cultivars remains challenging for the scientific community even though Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocols for a few indica rice lines have been well established. We report successful transformation of a commercially important restorer line JK1044R of indica rice hybrid JKRH 401. While following existing protocol, we optimized several parameters for callusing, regeneration and genetic transformation of JK1044R. Calli generated from the rice scutellum tissue were used for transformation by Agrobacterium harboring pCAMBIA2201. A novel two tire selection scheme comprising of Geneticin (G418) and Paramomycin were deployed for selection of transgenic calli as well as regenerated plantlets that expressed neomycin phosphotransferase-II gene encoded by the vector. One specific combination of G418 (30 mg l(-1)) and Paramomycin (70 mg l(-1)) was very effective for calli selection. Transformed and selected calli were detected by monitoring the expression of the reporter gene uidA (GUS). Regenerated plantlets were confirmed through PCR analysis of nptII and gus genes specific primers as well as dot blot using gus gene specific as probe. PMID:27186018

  4. Field performance of transgenic citrus trees: Assessment of the long-term expression of uidA and nptII transgenes and its impact on relevant agronomic and phenotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The future of genetic transformation as a tool for the improvement of fruit trees depends on the development of proper systems for the assessment of unintended effects in field-grown GM lines. In this study, we used eight transgenic lines of two different citrus types (sweet orange and citrange) transformed with the marker genes β-glucuronidase (uidA) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) as model systems to study for the first time in citrus the long-term stability of transgene expression and whether transgene-derived pleiotropic effects occur with regard to the morphology, development and fruit quality of orchard-grown GM citrus trees. Results The stability of the integration and expression of the transgenes was confirmed in 7-year-old, orchard-grown transgenic lines by Southern blot analysis and enzymatic assays (GUS and ELISA NPTII), respectively. Little seasonal variation was detected in the expression levels between plants of the same transgenic line in different organs and over the 3 years of analysis, confirming the absence of rearrangements and/or silencing of the transgenes after transferring the plants to field conditions. Comparisons between the GM citrus lines with their non-GM counterparts across the study years showed that the expression of these transgenes did not cause alterations of the main phenotypic and agronomic plant and fruit characteristics. However, when comparisons were performed between diploid and tetraploid transgenic citrange trees and/or between juvenile and mature transgenic sweet orange trees, significant and consistent differences were detected, indicating that factors other than their transgenic nature induced a much higher phenotypic variability. Conclusions Our results indicate that transgene expression in GM citrus remains stable during long-term agricultural cultivation, without causing unexpected effects on crop characteristics. This study also shows that the transgenic citrus trees expressing the

  5. Tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum) nuclear transgenics with high copy number can express NPTII driven by the chloroplast psbA promoter.

    PubMed

    Ye, G N; Pang, S Z; Sanford, J C

    1996-03-01

    A chloroplast expression vector containing the NPTII gene under the control of apsbA promoter (psbA-NPTII) was constructed, and was biolistically delivered into both suspension cells and leaf strips of tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum). Analyses of subsequently recovered kanamycin-resistant transgenic plants indicate that the psbA-NPTII gene was not located in the chloroplast, but was in the nucleus in very high copy number. This conclusion was based upon results from: (1) Southern hybridization analyses of chloroplast and nuclear DNAs using NPTII, chloroplast-marker, and nuclear-marker probes; (2) pulse-field gel electrophoresis; and (3) kanamycin screening of sexual progenies. This study suggests that the nuclear expression of the NPTII gene may have been associated with many copies of the psbA-NPTII construction. Very high copy number in the nucleus might either allow NPTII expression from the otherwise inadequate psbA promoter, or might increase the chance of recombining with upstream tobacco regulatory sequences. PMID:24178457

  6. A Universal Positive-Negative Selection System for Gene Targeting in Plants Combining an Antibiotic Resistance Gene and Its Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a useful technology for accurate genome engineering in plants. A reproducible approach based on a positive-negative selection system using hygromycin resistance and the diphtheria toxin A subunit gene as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, is now available. However, to date, this selection system has been applied exclusively in rice (Oryza sativa). To establish a universally applicable positive-negative GT system in plants, we designed a selection system using a combination of neomycin phosphotransferaseII (nptII) and an antisense nptII construct. The concomitant transcription of both sense and antisense nptII suppresses significantly the level of expression of the sense nptII gene, and transgenic calli and plants become sensitive to the antibiotic geneticin. In addition, we were able to utilize the sense nptII gene as a positive selection marker and the antisense nptII construct as a negative selection marker for knockout of the endogenous rice genes Waxy and 33-kD globulin through GT, although negative selection with this system is relatively less efficient compared with diphtheria toxin A subunit. The approach developed here, with some additional improvements, could be applied as a universal selection system for the enrichment of GT cells in several plant species. PMID:26143254

  7. Antibiotic resistance marker genes as environmental pollutants in GMO-pristine agricultural soils in Austria.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Zeinzinger, Josef; Gottsberger, Richard Alexander; Pascher, Kathrin; Hufnagl, Peter; Indra, Alexander; Fuchs, Reinhard; Hofrichter, Johannes; Kopacka, Ian; Korschineck, Irina; Schleicher, Corina; Schwarz, Michael; Steinwider, Johann; Springer, Burkhard; Allerberger, Franz; Nielsen, Kaare M; Fuchs, Klemens

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes may be considered as environmental pollutants if anthropogenic emission and manipulations increase their prevalence above usually occurring background levels. The prevalence of aph(3')-IIa/nptII and aph(3')-IIIa/nptIII - frequent marker genes in plant biotechnology conferring resistance to certain aminoglycosides - was determined in Austrian soils from 100 maize and potato fields not yet exposed to but eligible for GMO crop cultivation. Total soil DNA extracts were analysed by nptII/nptIII-specific TaqMan real time PCR. Of all fields 6% were positive for nptII (median: 150 copies/g soil; range: 31-856) and 85% for nptIII (1190 copies/g soil; 13-61600). The copy-number deduced prevalence of nptIII carriers was 14-fold higher compared to nptII. Of the cultivable kanamycin-resistant soil bacteria 1.8% (95% confidence interval: 0-3.3%) were positive for nptIII, none for nptII (0-0.8%). The nptII-load of the studied soils was low rendering nptII a typical candidate as environmental pollutant upon anthropogenic release into these ecosystems. PMID:26232739

  8. Efficient transformation and regeneration of transgenic cassava using the neomycin phosphotransferase gene as aminoglycoside resistance marker gene.

    PubMed

    Niklaus, Michael; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Vanderschuren, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important crops in the tropics. Its industrial use for starch and biofuel production is also increasing its importance for agricultural production in tropical countries. In the last decade cassava biotechnology has emerged as a valuable alternative to the breeding constraints of this highly heterozygous crop for improved trait development of cassava germplasm. Cassava transformation remains difficult and time-consuming because of limitations in selecting transgenic tissues and regeneration of transgenic plantlets. We have recently reported an efficient and robust cassava transformation protocol using the hygromycin phosphotransferase II (hptII) gene as selection marker and the aminoglycoside hygromycin at optimal concentrations to maximize the regeneration of transgenic plantlets. In the present work, we expanded the transformation protocol to the use of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) gene as selection marker. Several aminoglycosides compatible with the use of nptII were tested and optimal concentrations for cassava transformation were determined. Given its efficiency equivalent to hptII as selection marker with the described protocol, the use of nptII opens new possibilities to engineer transgenic cassava lines with multiple T-DNA insertions and to produce transgenic cassava with a resistance marker gene that is already deregulated in several commercial transgenic crops. PMID:22179195

  9. Elaboration of a reliable strategy based on real-time PCR to characterize genetically modified plantlets and to evaluate the efficiency of a marker gene removal in grape (Vitis spp.).

    PubMed

    Dalla Costa, Lorenza; Vaccari, Ilaria; Mandolini, Marco; Martinelli, Lucia

    2009-04-01

    We have developed an effective strategy based on real-time PCR assay for the molecular characterization of genetically modified grape and to quantify the efficiency of a marker gene removal. This research has been implemented in Vitis vinifera cv. Brachetto plantlets where exogenes were inserted during cocultures of embryogenic calli with Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the chemically inducible site-specific cre/loxP pX6 vector where the expression of the cre recombinase is regulated by 17-beta-estradiol. The neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) for the kanamycin resistance trait was inserted as part of the gene transfer protocol, and this exogene was employed as a case study for carrying out our research. The 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (nced2) and chalcone isomerase (chi) genes coding for two enzymes, involved respectively in abscisic acid and flavonoid biosynthesis, proved to be valuable reference endogenes for real-time PCR assays. Two types of duplo-target plasmids were exploited for building the standard curves: in one type (p-nptII/nced2) the nptII sequence is linked to the nced2 sequence; in the other (p-nptII/chi) it is linked to the chi. These calibrators were intended to simulate an ideal genetically modified plant carrying a homozygous single-copy exogene insertion. The repeatability test confirmed the suitability of both plasmid calibrators. Foreign gene stability can be monitored during long-term plant preservation, and the method proved to be suitable for quantifying the efficiency of nptII gene removal induced by 17-beta-estradiol. PMID:19265380

  10. Regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nancy M.; Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) genes are regulated at the level of transcription. Recent studies have shown that chromatin modification is critical for efficient transcription of these genes, and a number of chromatin modifying complexes recruited to MHC-II genes have been described. The MHC-II genes are segregated from each other by a series of chromatin elements, termed MHC-II insulators. Interactions between MHC-insulators and the promoters of MHC-II genes are mediated by the insulator factor CCCTC-binding protein and are critical for efficient expression. This regulatory mechanism provides a novel view of how the entire MHC-II locus is assembled architecturally and can be coordinately controlled. PMID:20970972

  11. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  12. Fasciclin II controls proneural gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    García-Alonso, L; VanBerkum, M F; Grenningloh, G; Schuster, C; Goodman, C S

    1995-01-01

    Fasciclin II (Fas II), an NCAM-like cell adhesion molecule in Drosophila, is expressed on a subset of embryonic axons and controls selective axon fasiculation. Fas II is also expressed in imaginal discs. Here we use genetic analysis to show that Fas II is required for the control of proneural gene expression. Clusters of cells in the eye-antennal imaginal disc express the achaete proneural gene and give rise to mechanosensory neurons; other clusters of cells express the atonal gene and give rise to ocellar photoreceptor neurons. In fasII loss-of-function mutants, the expression of both proneural genes is absent in certain locations, and, as a result, the corresponding sensory precursors fail to develop. In fasII gain-of-function conditions, extra sensory structures arise from this same region of the imaginal disc. Mutations in the Abelson tyrosine kinase gene show dominant interactions with fasII mutations, suggesting that Abl and Fas II function in a signaling pathway that controls proneural gene expression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7479828

  13. [Osteochondrodysplasia determined genetically by a collagen type II gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Czarny-Ratajczak, M; Rogala, P; Wolnik-Brzozowska, D; Latos-Bieleńska, A

    2001-01-01

    Chondrodysplasias are a heterogenous group of skeletal dysplasias, affecting the growing cartilage. The main part of chondrodysplasias is caused by mutations in various types of collagen genes. The current classification within this group of disorder relies on clinical, histological and radiographic features. Type II collagenopathies comprise part of chondrodysplasias, consisting of hereditary disorders caused by defects in the type II collagen. Collagen type II is coded by a large gene--COL2A1. The chromosomal location for the human COL2A1 gene is 12q13.11-q13.12. Defects in collagen type II are caused by point mutations in the COL2A1 gene. Type II collagenopathies form a wide spectrum of clinical severity ranging from lethal achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, through severe forms like spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia congenita, Marshall syndrome, to the mild forms--Stickler syndrome and early osteoarthritis. The pathological changes in the patients are observed in the growth plate, nucleus pulposus and vitreous body, where the abnormal collagen type II is distributed. This article presents the genetic background of collagenopathies type II and the results of current molecular studies of the patients. Both the molecular and the clinical studies may promise a better understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype. We present the patients, who were diagnosed at the Department of Medical Genetics and in the Orthopaedic Department in Poznań. PMID:11481990

  14. Norway spruce (Picea abies) genetic transformation with modified Cry3A gene of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Bříza, Jindřich; Pavingerová, Daniela; Vlasák, Josef; Niedermeierová, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Modified versions of the Cry3A gene of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) were transferred into Norway spruce (Picea abies). Both the biolistic approach and Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated procedure were employed for transformation of embryogenic tissue (ET) cultures. The latter method proved to be more efficient yielding 70 transgenic embryogenic tissue lines compared with 18 lines obtained by biolistics. The modified Cry3A genes were driven by a 35S promoter and the nptII screenable selection marker gene was used in all vectors. The transgenic ETs were molecularly characterized and converted into mature somatic embryos. Germinating embryos formed plantlets which were finally planted into perlite and their Cry3A gene transcription activities were demonstrated by RT-PCR. PMID:23888296

  15. Co-transformation of grapevine somatic embryos to produce transgenic plants free of marker genes.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Manjul; Li, Zhijian T; Dhekney, Sadanand A; Gray, Dennis J

    2012-01-01

    A cotransformation system using somatic embryos was developed to produce grapevines free of selectable marker genes. This was achieved by transforming Vitis vinifera L. "Thompson Seedless" somatic embryos with a mixture of two Agrobacterium strains. The first strain contained a binary plasmid with an egfp gene of interest between the T-DNA borders. The second strain harbored the neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) gene for positive selection and the cytosine deaminase (codA) gene for negative selection, linked together by a bidirectional dual promoter complex. Our technique included a short positive selection phase of cotransformed somatic embryos on liquid medium containing 100 mg/L kanamycin before subjecting cultures to prolonged negative selection on medium containing 250 mg/L 5-fluorocytosine. PMID:22351010

  16. Transcriptional Gene Silencing Mediated by a Plastid Inner Envelope Phosphoenolpyruvate/Phosphate Translocator CUE1 in Arabidopsis1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Ren, Xiaozhi; Cao, Rui; Liu, Jun; Gong, Zhizhong

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1) lead to the transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of ProRD29A:LUC (LUCIFERASE) and Pro35S:NPTII (Neomycin Phosphotransferase II) reporter genes. We performed a genetic screen to find suppressors of ros1 that identified two mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CHLOROPHYLL A/B BINDING PROTEIN UNDEREXPRESSED1 (CUE1) gene, which encodes a plastid inner envelope phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator. The cue1 mutations released the TGS of Pro35S:NPTII and the transcriptionally silent endogenous locus TRANSCRIPTIONAL SILENCING INFORMATION in a manner that was independent of DNA methylation but dependent on chromatin modification. The cue1 mutations did not affect the TGS of ProRD29A:LUC in ros1, which was dependent on RNA-directed DNA methylation. It is possible that signals from chloroplasts help to regulate the epigenetic status of a subset of genomic loci in the nucleus. PMID:19515789

  17. Cohesin regulates major histocompatibility complex class II genes through interactions with MHC-II insulators1

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    Cohesin is a multiprotein ringed complex that is most well known for its role in stabilizing the association of sister chromatids between S phase and M. More recently cohesin was found to be associated with transcriptional insulators, elements that are associated with the organization of chromatin into regulatory domains. The human major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) locuscontains ten intergenic elements, termed MHC-II insulators, which bind the transcriptional insulator protein CCCTC transcription factor (CTCF). MHC-II insulators interact with each other forming a base architecture of discrete loops and potential regulatory domains. When MHC-II genes are expressed, their proximal promoter regulatory regions reorganize to the foci established by the interacting MHC-II insulators. MHC-II insulators also bind cohesin, but the functional role of cohesin in regulating this system is not known. Here we show that the binding of cohesin to MHC-II insulators occurred irrespective of MHC-II expression but was required for optimal expression of the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ genes. In a DNA dependent manner, cohesin subunits interacted with CTCF and the MHC-II specific transcription factors RFX and CIITA. Intriguingly, cohesin subunits were important for DNA looping interactions between the HLA-DRA promoter region and a 5’ MHC-II insulator but were not required for interactions between the MHC-II insulators themselves. This latter observation introduces cohesin as a regulator of MHC-II expression by initiating or stabilizing MHC-II promoter regulatory element interactions with the MHC-II insulator elements; events which are required for maximal MHC-II transcription. PMID:21911605

  18. Group II Intron-Anchored Gene Deletion in Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kaizhi; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium plays an important role in commercial and medical use, for which targeted gene deletion is difficult. We proposed an intron-anchored gene deletion approach for Clostridium, which combines the advantage of the group II intron “ClosTron” system and homologous recombination. In this approach, an intron carrying a fragment homologous to upstream or downstream of the target site was first inserted into the genome by retrotransposition, followed by homologous recombination, resulting in gene deletion. A functional unknown operon CAC1493–1494 located in the chromosome, and an operon ctfAB located in the megaplasmid of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731 were successfully deleted by using this approach, without leaving antibiotic marker in the genome. We therefore propose this approach can be used for targeted gene deletion in Clostridium. This approach might also be applicable for gene deletion in other bacterial species if group II intron retrotransposition system is established. PMID:21304965

  19. Overview of BioCreative II gene normalization

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Alexander A; Lu, Zhiyong; Wang, Xinglong; Cohen, Aaron M; Fluck, Juliane; Ruch, Patrick; Divoli, Anna; Fundel, Katrin; Leaman, Robert; Hakenberg, Jörg; Sun, Chengjie; Liu, Heng-hui; Torres, Rafael; Krauthammer, Michael; Lau, William W; Liu, Hongfang; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Schuemie, Martijn; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Hirschman, Lynette

    2008-01-01

    Background: The goal of the gene normalization task is to link genes or gene products mentioned in the literature to biological databases. This is a key step in an accurate search of the biological literature. It is a challenging task, even for the human expert; genes are often described rather than referred to by gene symbol and, confusingly, one gene name may refer to different genes (often from different organisms). For BioCreative II, the task was to list the Entrez Gene identifiers for human genes or gene products mentioned in PubMed/MEDLINE abstracts. We selected abstracts associated with articles previously curated for human genes. We provided 281 expert-annotated abstracts containing 684 gene identifiers for training, and a blind test set of 262 documents containing 785 identifiers, with a gold standard created by expert annotators. Inter-annotator agreement was measured at over 90%. Results: Twenty groups submitted one to three runs each, for a total of 54 runs. Three systems achieved F-measures (balanced precision and recall) between 0.80 and 0.81. Combining the system outputs using simple voting schemes and classifiers obtained improved results; the best composite system achieved an F-measure of 0.92 with 10-fold cross-validation. A 'maximum recall' system based on the pooled responses of all participants gave a recall of 0.97 (with precision 0.23), identifying 763 out of 785 identifiers. Conclusion: Major advances for the BioCreative II gene normalization task include broader participation (20 versus 8 teams) and a pooled system performance comparable to human experts, at over 90% agreement. These results show promise as tools to link the literature with biological databases. PMID:18834494

  20. Characterization of Schizothorax prenanti cgnrhII gene: fasting affects cgnrhII expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Yuan, D; Zhou, C; Lin, F; Chen, H; Wu, H; Wei, R; Xin, Z; Liu, J; Gao, Y; Chen, D; Yang, S; Pu, Y; Li, Z

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the role of chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone II (cgnrhII) in feeding regulation was investigated in Schizothorax prenanti. First, the full-length S. prenanti cgnrhII cDNA consisted of 693 bp with an open reading frame of 261 bp encoding a protein of 86 amino acids. Next, cgnrhII was widely expressed in the central and peripheral tissues. Last, there were significant changes in cgnrhII mRNA expression in the fasted group compared to the fed group in the S. prenanti hypothalamus during 24 h fasting (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the cgnrhII gene expression presented a significant decrease in the fasted group compared with the fed group (P < 0.05) on days 3, 5 and 7, after re-feeding, there was no significant changes in cgnrhII mRNA expression level between refed and fed group on day 9 (P > 0.05). Thus, the results suggest that cGnRH II expression is influenced by fasting and the gene may be involved in feeding regulation in S. prenanti. PMID:24942636

  1. [Genetic transformation of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) with chimeric GFP-TUA6 gene for visualisation of microtubules].

    PubMed

    Shisha, E N; Korkhovoĭ, V I; Baer, G Ia; Guzenko, E V; Lemesh, V A; Kartel', N A; Emets, A I; Blium, Ia B

    2013-01-01

    The data of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of some Linum usitatissimum cultivars zoned on the territories of Belarus and Ukraine with the plasmid carrying chimeric GFP-TUA6 gene and nptII gene as selectable marker conferring resistance to kanamycin are presented in this study. Transformation was affected by a number of factors including optical density (OD600), time of inoculation of explants with Agrobacterium and co-culture conditions. Transgenic nature of obtained lines was confirmed by PCR analysis. Expression of GFP-TUA6 gene was detected with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The obtained transgenic lines can be used for further functional studies the role of microtubules in the processes of building the flax fibres and resistance to wind. PMID:23745358

  2. Evolution of chemical diversity by coordinated gene swaps in type II polyketide gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Hillenmeyer, Maureen E.; Vandova, Gergana A.; Berlew, Erin E.; Charkoudian, Louise K.

    2015-01-01

    Natural product biosynthetic pathways generate molecules of enormous structural complexity and exquisitely tuned biological activities. Studies of natural products have led to the discovery of many pharmaceutical agents, particularly antibiotics. Attempts to harness the catalytic prowess of biosynthetic enzyme systems, for both compound discovery and engineering, have been limited by a poor understanding of the evolution of the underlying gene clusters. We developed an approach to study the evolution of biosynthetic genes on a cluster-wide scale, integrating pairwise gene coevolution information with large-scale phylogenetic analysis. We used this method to infer the evolution of type II polyketide gene clusters, tracing the path of evolution from the single ancestor to those gene clusters surviving today. We identified 10 key gene types in these clusters, most of which were swapped in from existing cellular processes and subsequently specialized. The ancestral type II polyketide gene cluster likely comprised a core set of five genes, a roster that expanded and contracted throughout evolution. A key C24 ancestor diversified into major classes of longer and shorter chain length systems, from which a C20 ancestor gave rise to the majority of characterized type II polyketide antibiotics. Our findings reveal that (i) type II polyketide structure is predictable from its gene roster, (ii) only certain gene combinations are compatible, and (iii) gene swaps were likely a key to evolution of chemical diversity. The lessons learned about how natural selection drives polyketide chemical innovation can be applied to the rational design and guided discovery of chemicals with desired structures and properties. PMID:26499248

  3. The gene encoding topoisomerase II from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Cheesman, S; McAleese, S; Goman, M; Johnson, D; Horrocks, P; Ridley, R G; Kilbey, B J

    1994-01-01

    The gene for topoisomerase II has been isolated from genomic libraries of strain K1 of the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The sequence reveals an open reading frame of 4194 nucleotides which predicts a polypeptide of 1398 amino acids. There are apparently no introns. The sequence is present as a single copy which has an identity of 47.4% and a similarity of 65.4% with its human homologue. Sequences conserved in topoisomerase II from other species are present in Pftopoisomerase II but in addition it has two adjacent asparagine-rich insertions which are unique to it. We have also detected asparagine-rich regions in the gene for PfDNA polymerase alpha. The gene for Pftopoisomerase II has been localised to chromosome 14 and northern analysis reveals a transcript of 5.8 kb. Two independent antisera raised in mice against glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing the amino terminal portion of the malarial protein detect a weak band on western blots at about 160kDa, the expected size of the protein. Use of the same antisera for immunofluorescence analysis suggests that the protein is present at all stages of intraerythrocytic growth of the parasite. Images PMID:8041616

  4. Interactions between the Class II Transactivator and CREB Binding Protein Increase Transcription of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Jean, Dickson; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (class II) genes are regulated in a B-cell-specific and gamma interferon-inducible fashion. The master switch for the expression of these genes is the class II transactivator (CIITA). In this report, we demonstrate that one of the functions of CIITA is to recruit the CREB binding protein (CBP) to class II promoters. Not only functional but also specific binding interactions between CIITA and CBP were demonstrated. Moreover, a dominant negative form of CBP decreased the activity of class II promoters and levels of class II determinants on the surface of cells. Finally, the inhibition of class II gene expression by the glucocorticoid hormone could be attributed to the squelching of CBP by the glucocorticoid receptor. We conclude that CBP, a histone acetyltransferase, plays an important role in the transcription of class II genes. PMID:9858618

  5. Screening of three Usher syndrome type II candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemker, B.K.; Swaroop, A.; Kimberling, W.J.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome type II (US2) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa and congenital hearing loss. The disease affects approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals in the general population and is responsible for over 50% of all cases of deafness with blindness. The underlying US2 defect is unknown. The US2 gene has been localized to the 1q41 region of chromosome 1 by linkage studies. Three genes previously localized to 1q were analyzed to assess their candidacy as the US2 gene. These were evaluated by PCR assays using DNA from a YAC contig spanning the US2 region on chromosome 1. The first gene evaluated was the human choroideremia-like gene (hCHML), which had been mapped to chromosome 1q. The sequence on 1q is a homologue of the human choroideremia gene on chromosome X. Choroideremia is a degenerative disorder causing ocular pathology similar to that observed in US2 patients. Therefore, hCHML is a candidate for the US2 gene. Two cDNAs (A and B) from an enriched human retinal pigment epithelium library have been mapped to 1q41 by in situ hybridization. Both cDNAs are considered good candidates. The hCHML and cDNA A were ruled out as candidates for the US2 gene based on negative results from PCR assays performed on YACs spanning the US2 region. cDNA B could not be ruled out as a candidate for the US2 gene by these assays. Answers to many clinical questions regarding US2 will only be resolved after the gene is identified and characterized. Eventually, understanding the function and expression of the US2 gene will provide a basis for the development of therapy.

  6. Overview of BioCreative II gene mention recognition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Larry; Tanabe, Lorraine K; Ando, Rie Johnson nee; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chung, I-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Lin, Yu-Shi; Klinger, Roman; Friedrich, Christoph M; Ganchev, Kuzman; Torii, Manabu; Liu, Hongfang; Haddow, Barry; Struble, Craig A; Povinelli, Richard J; Vlachos, Andreas; Baumgartner, William A; Hunter, Lawrence; Carpenter, Bob; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Dai, Hong-Jie; Liu, Feng; Chen, Yifei; Sun, Chengjie; Katrenko, Sophia; Adriaans, Pieter; Blaschke, Christian; Torres, Rafael; Neves, Mariana; Nakov, Preslav; Divoli, Anna; Maña-López, Manuel; Mata, Jacinto; Wilbur, W John

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen teams presented results for the Gene Mention Task at the BioCreative II Workshop. In this task participants designed systems to identify substrings in sentences corresponding to gene name mentions. A variety of different methods were used and the results varied with a highest achieved F1 score of 0.8721. Here we present brief descriptions of all the methods used and a statistical analysis of the results. We also demonstrate that, by combining the results from all submissions, an F score of 0.9066 is feasible, and furthermore that the best result makes use of the lowest scoring submissions. PMID:18834493

  7. 40 CFR 174.521 - Neomycin phosphotransferase II; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT...; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) enzyme are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in all food commodities when used as a...

  8. 40 CFR 174.521 - Neomycin phosphotransferase II; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT...; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) enzyme are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in all food commodities when used as a...

  9. 40 CFR 174.521 - Neomycin phosphotransferase II; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT...; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) enzyme are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in all food commodities when used as a...

  10. 40 CFR 174.521 - Neomycin phosphotransferase II; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT...; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) enzyme are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in all food commodities when used as a...

  11. 40 CFR 174.521 - Neomycin phosphotransferase II; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT...; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) enzyme are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in all food commodities when used as a...

  12. Genetic transformation of genes for protein II in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Schwalbe, R S; Cannon, J G

    1986-01-01

    The protein II (PII) outer membrane proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae are a family of heat-modifiable proteins that are subject to phase variation, in which the synthesis of different PII species is turned on and off at a high frequency. Transformation of PII genes from a donor gonococcal strain into a recipient strain was detected with monoclonal antibodies specific for the PII proteins of the donor. Individual PII protein-expressing transformants generally bound only one donor-specific PII monoclonal antibody. Recovery of transformants expressing a donor-specific PII protein depended on the PII protein expression state of the donor: the transformed population bound only monoclonal antibodies specific for PII proteins that were expressed in the donor. Colony variants with an altered frequency of switching of PII protein expression were isolated, but the altered switch phenotype did not cotransform with the PII structural gene. These results provide genetic evidence that PII proteins are the products of different genes and that expressed and unexpressed forms of the PII gene are different from each other. Images PMID:3087951

  13. GOChase-II: correcting semantic inconsistencies from Gene Ontology-based annotations for gene products

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Gene Ontology (GO) provides a controlled vocabulary for describing genes and gene products. In spite of the undoubted importance of GO, several drawbacks associated with GO and GO-based annotations have been introduced. We identified three types of semantic inconsistencies in GO-based annotations; semantically redundant, biological-domain inconsistent and taxonomy inconsistent annotations. Methods To determine the semantic inconsistencies in GO annotation, we used the hierarchical structure of GO graph and tree structure of NCBI taxonomy. Twenty seven biological databases were collected for finding semantic inconsistent annotation. Results The distributions and possible causes of the semantic inconsistencies were investigated using twenty seven biological databases with GO-based annotations. We found that some evidence codes of annotation were associated with the inconsistencies. The numbers of gene products and species in a database that are related to the complexity of database management are also in correlation with the inconsistencies. Consequently, numerous annotation errors arise and are propagated throughout biological databases and GO-based high-level analyses. GOChase-II is developed to detect and correct both syntactic and semantic errors in GO-based annotations. Conclusions We identified some inconsistencies in GO-based annotation and provided software, GOChase-II, for correcting these semantic inconsistencies in addition to the previous corrections for the syntactic errors by GOChase-I. PMID:21342572

  14. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  15. cumA Multicopper Oxidase Genes from Diverse Mn(II)-Oxidizing and Non-Mn(II)-Oxidizing Pseudomonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Chris A.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2001-01-01

    A multicopper oxidase gene, cumA, required for Mn(II) oxidation was recently identified in Pseudomonas putida strain GB-1. In the present study, degenerate primers based on the putative copper-binding regions of the cumA gene product were used to PCR amplify cumA gene sequences from a variety of Pseudomonas strains, including both Mn(II)-oxidizing and non-Mn(II)-oxidizing strains. The presence of highly conserved cumA gene sequences in several apparently non-Mn(II)-oxidizing Pseudomonas strains suggests that this gene may not be expressed, may not be sufficient alone to confer the ability to oxidize Mn(II), or may have an alternative function in these organisms. Phylogenetic analysis of both CumA and 16S rRNA sequences revealed similar topologies between the respective trees, including the presence of several distinct phylogenetic clusters. Overall, our results indicate that both the cumA gene and the capacity to oxidize Mn(II) occur in phylogenetically diverse Pseudomonas strains. PMID:11526033

  16. Pausing of RNA polymerase II Disrupts DNA-specified Nucleosome Organization to Enable Precise Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Santos, Gilberto Dos; Fargo, David C.; Xie, Bin; Gao, Yuan; Li, Leping; Adelman, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Metazoan transcription is controlled either through coordinated recruitment of transcription machinery to the gene promoter, or through regulated pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in early elongation. We report that a striking difference between genes that use these distinct regulatory strategies lies in the “default” chromatin architecture specified by their DNA sequences. Pol II pausing is prominent at highly-regulated genes whose sequences inherently disfavor nucleosome formation within the gene, but favor occlusion of the promoter by nucleosomes. In contrast, housekeeping genes that lack pronounced Pol II pausing show higher nucleosome occupancy downstream, but their promoters are deprived of nucleosomes regardless of polymerase binding. Our results indicate that a key role of paused Pol II is to compete with nucleosomes for occupancy of highly-regulated promoters, thereby preventing the formation of repressive chromatin architecture to facilitate further or future gene activation. PMID:21074046

  17. Characterization and expression of MHC class II alpha and II beta genes in mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyan; Tan, Shangjin; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a key role in adaptive immunity by presenting foreign peptides to CD4(+) T cells and by triggering the adaptive immune response. While the structure and function of MHC class II have been well characterized in mammalian, limited research has been done on fishes. In this study, we characterized the gene structure and expression of MHC class II α (Lunar-DAA) and II β (Lunar-DAB) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus). Both genes shared, respectively, a high similarity and typical features with other vertebrate MHC class II α and II β. The phylogenetic analysis of the deduced peptides revealed that both Lunar-DAA and Lunar-DAB were located in the teleost subclass. Western blotting analyses indicated that both MHC class II α and II β were expressed ubiquitously in immune-related cells, tissues and organs, and that MHC class II α and II β chains existed mainly as heterodimers. While it was highly expressed in gills, thymus, head kidney (HK), spleen, head kidney macrophage and spleen leucocytes, MHC class II β chain was expressed with a low abundance in skin, intestine, stomach and heart. The highest expression of MHC class II β in thymus confirmed the conclusion that thymus is one of the primary lymphoid organs in fishes. The detection of MHC class II αβ dimers in HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes indicated that HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes play a critical role in the adaptive immunity in fishes. All these results provide valuable information for understanding the structure of MHC class II α and II β and their function in immune responses. PMID:26454477

  18. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase expression: transcriptional regulation of the type I and type II genes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, A; Gu, J J; Spychala, J; Mitchell, B S

    1996-01-01

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo guanine nucleotide synthetic pathway that catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP. Enzyme activity is accounted for by the expression of two distinct but closely related genes termed IMPDH I and II. Increased IMPDH activity has been linked to both cellular proliferation and neoplastic transformation and generally ascribed to an increase in the expression of the type II gene. We have characterized the type I and type II genes and identified elements important in the transcriptional regulation of both genes. The type II IMPDH gene contains a 466 bp 5' flanking region spanning the translation start site that contains several transcription factor binding sites and mediates increased transcription of a CAT reporter gene in peripheral blood T lymphocytes when these cells are induced to proliferate. The single functional IMPDH type I gene contains exon-intron boundaries and exon structures that are nearly identical to those in the type II gene. In contrast to the type II gene, however, it contains two putative promoter sites, each with the potential for transcriptional regulation. We conclude that these two genes most probably arose from an early gene duplication event and that their highly conserved structures and differential regulation at the transcriptional level argue strongly for a significant role for each gene in cellular metabolism, growth, and differentiation. PMID:8869741

  19. MHC evolution in three salmonid species: a comparison between class II alpha and beta genes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Daniela; Conejeros, Pablo; Marshall, Sergio H; Consuegra, Sofia

    2010-08-01

    The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are amongst the most variable in vertebrates and represent some of the best candidates to study processes of adaptive evolution. However, despite the number of studies available, most of the information on the structure and function of these genes come from studies in mammals and birds in which the MHC class I and II genes are tightly linked and class II alpha exhibits low variability in many cases. Teleost fishes are among the most primitive vertebrates with MHC and represent good organisms for the study of MHC evolution because their class I and class II loci are not physically linked, allowing for independent evolution of both classes of genes. We have compared the diversity and molecular mechanisms of evolution of classical MH class II alpha and class II beta loci in farm populations of three salmonid species: Oncorhynchus kisutch, Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo salar. We found single classical class II loci and high polymorphism at both class II alpha and beta genes in the three species. Mechanisms of evolution were common for both class II genes, with recombination and point mutation involved in generating diversity and positive selection acting on the peptide-binding residues. These results suggest that the maintenance of variability at the class IIalpha gene could be a mechanism to increase diversity in the MHC class II in salmonids in order to compensate for the expression of one single classical locus and to respond to a wider array of parasites. PMID:20521040

  20. Transformation of somatic embryos of Prunus incisa ‘February Pink’ with a visible reporter gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system was developed for the ornamental cherry species Prunus incisa. This system uses both an antibiotic resistance gene (NPTII) and a visible selectable marker, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), to select plants. Cells from leaf and root explants were tr...

  1. Evolution of the primate cytochrome c oxidase subunit II gene.

    PubMed

    Adkins, R M; Honeycutt, R L

    1994-03-01

    We examined the nucleotide and amino acid sequence variation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene from 25 primates (4 hominoids, 8 Old World monkeys, 2 New World monkeys, 2 tarsiers, 7 lemuriforms, 2 lorisiforms). Marginal support was found for three phylogenetic conclusions: (1) sister-group relationship between tarsiers and a monkey/ape clade, (2) placement of the aye-aye (Daubentonia) sister to all other strepsirhine primates, and (3) rejection of a sister-group relationship of dwarf lemurs (i.e., Cheirogaleus) with lorisiform primates. Stronger support was found for a sister-group relationship between the ring-tail lemur (Lemur catta) and the gentle lemurs (Hapalemur). In congruence with previous studies on COII, we found that the monkeys and apes have undergone a nearly two-fold increase in the rate of amino acid replacement relative to other primates. Although functionally important amino acids are generally conserved among all primates, the acceleration in amino acid replacements in higher primates is associated with increased variation in the amino terminal end of the protein. Additionally, the replacement of two carboxyl-bearing residues (glutamate and aspartate) at positions 114 and 115 may provide a partial explanation for the poor enzyme kinetics in cross-reactions between the cytochromes c and cytochrome c oxidases of higher primates and other mammals. PMID:8006990

  2. TM6, a Novel Nuclear Matrix Attachment Region, Enhances Its Flanking Gene Expression through Influencing Their Chromatin Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lusha; Xu, Rui; Lu, Longtao; Zhang, Jiedao; Yang, Guodong; Huang, Jinguang; Wu, Changai; Zheng, Chengchao

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs) regulate the higher-order organization of chromatin and affect the expression of their flanking genes. In this study, a tobacco MAR, TM6, was isolated and demonstrated to remarkably increase the expression of four different promoters that drive gusA gene and adjacent nptII gene. In turn, this expression enhanced the transformation frequency of transgenic tobacco. Deletion analysis of topoisomerase II-binding site, AT-rich element, and MAR recognition signature (MRS) showed that MRS has the highest contribution (61.7%) to the TM6 sequence-mediated transcription activation. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) accessibility assay showed that 35S and NOS promoter regions with TM6 are more sensitive than those without TM6. The analysis also revealed that TM6 reduces promoter DNA methylation which can affect the gusA expression. In addition, two tobacco chromatin-associated proteins, NtMBP1 and NtHMGB, isolated using a yeast one-hybrid system, specifically bound to the TM6II-1 region (761 bp to 870 bp) and to the MRS element in the TM6II-2 (934 bp to 1,021 bp) region, respectively. We thus suggested that TM6 mediated its chromatin opening and chromatin accessibility of its flanking promoters with consequent enhancement of transcription. PMID:23852133

  3. Close association of RNA polymerase II and many transcription factors with Pol III genes.

    PubMed

    Raha, Debasish; Wang, Zhong; Moqtaderi, Zarmik; Wu, Linfeng; Zhong, Guoneng; Gerstein, Mark; Struhl, Kevin; Snyder, Michael

    2010-02-23

    Transcription of the eukaryotic genomes is carried out by three distinct RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whereby each polymerase is thought to independently transcribe a distinct set of genes. To investigate a possible relationship of RNA polymerases II and III, we mapped their in vivo binding sites throughout the human genome by using ChIP-Seq in two different cell lines, GM12878 and K562 cells. Pol III was found to bind near many known genes as well as several previously unidentified target genes. RNA-Seq studies indicate that a majority of the bound genes are expressed, although a subset are not suggestive of stalling by RNA polymerase III. Pol II was found to bind near many known Pol III genes, including tRNA, U6, HVG, hY, 7SK and previously unidentified Pol III target genes. Similarly, in vivo binding studies also reveal that a number of transcription factors normally associated with Pol II transcription, including c-Fos, c-Jun and c-Myc, also tightly associate with most Pol III-transcribed genes. Inhibition of Pol II activity using alpha-amanitin reduced expression of a number of Pol III genes (e.g., U6, hY, HVG), suggesting that Pol II plays an important role in regulating their transcription. These results indicate that, contrary to previous expectations, polymerases can often work with one another to globally coordinate gene expression. PMID:20139302

  4. A Caenorhabditis Elegans RNA Polymerase II Gene, Ama-1 Iv, and Nearby Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, T. M.; Riddle, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The amanitin-binding subunit of RNA polymerase II in Caenorhabditis elegans is encoded by the ama-1 gene, located approximately 0.05 map unit to the right of dpy-13 IV. Using the amanitin-resistant ama-1(m118) strain as a parent, we have isolated amanitin-sensitive mutants that carry recessive-lethal ama-1 alleles. Of the six ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants examined, two are arrested late in embryogenesis. One of these is a large deficiency, mDf9, but the second may be a novel point mutation. The four other mutants are hypomorphs, and presumably produce altered RNA polymerase II enzymes with some residual function. Two of these mutants develop into sterile adults at 20° but are arrested as larvae at 25°, and two others are fertile at 20° and sterile at 25°. Temperature-shift experiments performed with the adult sterile mutant, ama-1(m118m238ts), have revealed a temperature-sensitive period that begins late in gonadogenesis and is centered around the initiation of egg-laying. Postembryonic development at 25° is slowed by 30%. By contrast, the amanitin-resistant allele of ama-1 has very little effect on developmental rate or fertility. We have identified 15 essential genes in an interval of 4.5 map units surrounding ama-1, as well as four γ-ray-induced deficiencies and two duplications that include the ama-1 gene. The larger duplication, mDp1, may include the entire left arm of chromosome IV, and it recombines with the normal homologue at a low frequency. The smallest deficiency, mDf10, complements all but three identified genes: let-278, dpy-13 and ama-1, which define an interval of only 0.1 map unit. The terminal phenotype of mDf10 homozygotes is developmental arrest during the first larval stage, suggesting that there is sufficient maternal RNA polymerase II to complete embryonic development. PMID:8608933

  5. Molecular cloning, expression, and evolution analysis of type II CHI gene from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Shuzhen; Wang, Jiangshan; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Guan, Hongshan; Hou, Lei; Li, Changsheng; Xia, Han; Wang, Xingjun

    2015-01-01

    Chalcone isomerase (CHI) plays critical roles in plant secondary metabolism, which is important for the interaction between plants and the environment. CHI genes are widely studied in various higher plants. However, little information about CHI genes is available in peanut. Based on conservation of CHI gene family, we cloned the peanut type II CHI gene (AhCHI II) cDNA and genome sequence. The amino acid sequence of peanut CHI II was highly homologous to type II CHI from other plant species. qRT-PCR results showed that peanut CHI II is mainly expressed in roots; however, peanut CHI I is mainly expressed in tissues with high content of anthocyanin. Gene duplication and gene cluster analysis indicated that CHI II was derived from CHI I 65 million years ago approximately. Our gene structure analysis results are not in agreement with the previous hypothesis that CHI II was derived from CHI I by the insertion of an intron into the first exon. Moreover, no positive selection pressure was found in CHIs, while, 32.1 % of sites were under neutral selection, which may lead to mutation accumulation and fixation during great changes of environment. PMID:25608978

  6. Expression of endogenous and transfected apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin II genes in an estrogen responsive chicken liver cell line.

    PubMed

    Binder, R; MacDonald, C C; Burch, J B; Lazier, C B; Williams, D L

    1990-02-01

    A recently described chicken liver cell line, LMH, was characterized to evaluate responsiveness to estrogen. Expression of the endogenous apolipoprotein (apo) II gene was induced by 17 beta-estradiol when LMH cells were cultured with chicken serum. The response was low and yielded apoll mRNA at only 0.3% of the level seen in estrogenized rooster liver. Higher levels of apoll mRNA were achieved when LMH cells were transiently transfected with an expression plasmid for estrogen receptor. A transfected apoll gene was strongly expressed only when cotransfected with receptor. Expression of the endogenous vitellogenin (VTG) II gene was not detected. However, when cotransfected with a receptor expression plasmid, VTG II reporter plasmids were expressed in LMH cells in response to 17 beta-estradiol. These results suggest that estrogen responsiveness of LMH cells is limited by the availability of functional receptor. Low levels of estrogen receptor mRNA were detected in LMH cells, and receptor binding sites and mRNA were greatly increased following transient transfection with a receptor expression plasmid. Using this transient transfection protocol, several VTG II reporter plasmids were compared in LMH cells and chick embryo fibroblasts. A plasmid containing VTG II estrogen response elements linked to a heterologous promoter was regulated by estrogen in both cell types. In contrast, reporter plasmids containing the VTG II promoter were regulated by estrogen in LMH cells but were not expressed at all in chick embryo fibroblasts. These results suggest that regulation of the VTG II gene involves cell type-specific elements in addition to estrogen response elements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2330000

  7. Tissue-specific expression of the human type II collagen gene in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lovell-Badge, R H; Bygrave, A; Bradley, A; Robertson, E; Tilly, R; Cheah, K S

    1987-01-01

    Type II collagen is crucial to the development of form in vertebrates as it is the major protein of cartilage. To study the factors regulating its expression we introduced a cosmid containing the human type II collagen gene, including 4.5 kilobases of 5' and 2.2 kilobases of 3' flanking DNA, into embryonic stem cells in vitro. The transformed cells contribute to all tissues in chimeric mice allowing the expression of the exogenous gene to be studied in vivo. Human type II collagen mRNA is restricted to tissues showing transcription from the endogenous gene and human type II collagen is found in extracellular matrix surrounding chondrocytes in cartilage. The results indicate that the cis-acting requirements for correct temporal and spatial regulation of the gene are contained within the introduced DNA. Images PMID:3033664

  8. Chromosomal localization and structure of the human type II IMP dehydrogenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D.; Huberman, E. |; Collart, F.; Varkony, T.; Drabkin, H.

    1994-05-01

    We determined the chromosomal localization and structure of the gene encoding human type II inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, EC 1.1.1.205), an enzyme associated with cellular proliferation, malignant transformation, and differentiation. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers specific for type II IMPDH, we screened a panel of human-Chinese hamster cell somatic hybrids and a separate deletion panel of chromosome 3 hybrids and localized the gene to 3p21.1{yields}p24.2. Two overlapping yeast artificial chromosome clones containing the full gene for type II IMPDH were isolated and a physical map of 117 kb of human genomic DNA in this region of chromosome 3 was constructed. The gene for type II IMPDH was localized and oriented on this map and found to span no more than 12.5 kb.

  9. Angiotensin II and gene expression in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Klahr, S; Morrissey, J

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, has a key role in renal injury and in the progression of chronic renal disease of diverse causes. In vascular smooth muscle cells, angiotensin II modulates growth, which may lead to hypertrophy and also may inhibit mitogen-stimulated DNA synthesis. The effects of angiotensin II on responsive cells are mediated by two classes of receptors, AT-1 and AT-2. Information obtained in the last decade indicates that angiotensin II increases the production of several autocrine factors, including transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and platelet-derived growth factor A chain (PDGF). Angiotensin also increases the release of other growth factors such as endothelin, platelet-activating factor (PAF), and interleukin 6. In addition, it increases the "activity" of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and the synthesis of angiotensinogen. The emerging picture indicates that the actions of angiotensin II may be related to factors that are released or upregulated by angiotensin II, possibly through NF-kappaB activation. It appears likely that many of the effects of angiotensin II on renal disease may be mediated by TGF-beta1, TNF-alpha, and changes in the activity of NF-kappaB. The use of ACE inhibitors or antagonists of AT-1 or AT-2 receptors in experimental animals decreases the levels of angiotensin II or limits its action, thereby interfering with the production and effects of the factors described. PMID:9428470

  10. Organization of the human keratin type II gene cluster at 12q13

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.J.; LeBlanc-Straceski, J.; Krauter, K.

    1994-12-01

    Keratin proteins constitute intermediate filaments and are the major differentiation products of mammalian epithelial cells. The epithelial keratins are classified into two groups, type I and type II, and one member of each group is expressed in a given epithelial cell differentiation stage. Mutations in type I and type II keratin genes have now been implicated in three different human genetic disorders, epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma. Members of the type I keratins are mapped to human chromosome 17, and the type II keratin genes are mapped to chromosome 12. To understand the organization of the type II keratin genes on chromosome 12, we isolated several yeast artificial chromosomes carrying these keratin genes and examined them in detail. We show that eight already known type II keratin genes are located in a cluster at 12q13, and their relative organization reflects their evolutionary relationship. We also determined that a type I keratin gene, KRT8, is located next to its partner, KRT18, in this cluster. Careful examination of the cluster also revealed that there may be a number of additional keratin genes at this locus that have not been described previously. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Mapping of the gene specifying aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Okii, M; Iyobe, S; Mitsuhashi, S

    1983-01-01

    We examined the aminoglycoside inactivation enzymes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, seven clinical isolates and seven laboratory strains without plasmids. All strains were found to possess the enzyme aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II [APH(3')-II]. We isolated an APH(3')-II-deficient mutant from a PAO strain by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. By plasmid (FP5 or R68.45)-mediated conjugation, we determined the locus of the gene specifying the APH(3')-II between trp-6 and pro-82 on the PAO chromosome and designated this gene aphA. It was concluded that the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to kanamycins, neomycins, paromomycins, ribostamycin, and butirosins was due to this newly determined gene. PMID:6307974

  12. Bacterial Suppression of RNA Polymerase II-Dependent Host Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ambite, Ines; Lutay, Nataliya; Stork, Christoph; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a bacterial carrier state in the urinary tract that resembles commensalism at other mucosal sites. ABU strains often lack the virulence factors that characterize uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains and therefore elicit weak innate immune responses in the urinary tract. In addition, ABU strains are active modifiers of the host environment, which they influence by suppressing RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent host gene expression. In patients inoculated with the ABU strain E. coli 83972, gene expression was markedly reduced after 24 h (>60% of all regulated genes). Specific repressors and activators of Pol II-dependent transcription were modified, and Pol II Serine 2 phosphorylation was significantly inhibited, indicating reduced activity of the polymerase. This active inhibition included disease-associated innate immune response pathways, defined by TLR4, IRF-3 and IRF-7, suggesting that ABU strains persist in human hosts by active suppression of the antibacterial defense. In a search for the mechanism of inhibition, we compared the whole genome sequences of E. coli 83972 and the uropathogenic strain E. coli CFT073. In addition to the known loss of virulence genes, we observed that the ABU strain has acquired several phages and identified the lytic Prophage 3 as a candidate Pol II inhibitor. Intact phage particles were released by ABU during in vitro growth in human urine. To address if Prophage 3 affects Pol II activity, we constructed a Prophage 3 negative deletion mutant in E. coli 83972 and compared the effect on Pol II phosphorylation between the mutant and the E. coli 83972 wild type (WT) strains. No difference was detected, suggesting that the Pol II inhibitor is not encoded by the phage. The review summarizes the evidence that the ABU strain E. coli 83972 modifies host gene expression by inhibition of Pol II phosphorylation, and discusses the ability of ABU strains to actively create an environment that

  13. Functional Bradyrhizobium japonicum NifA expression under a hybrid nptII-nifH promoter in E. coli and Acetobacter diazotrophicus SRT4.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, C; Selman-Housein, G; Arrieta, J G; Coego, A; Hernández, L

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid promoter consisting of the in tandem fusion of the Tn5 nptII and the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifH promoters was constructed to study the functionality of the nif genes transcriptional activator NifA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum in two different host bacteria. beta-galactosidase experiments in E. coli revealed that the hybrid nptII-nifH promoter can behave as a constitutive or a NifA-inducible promoter depending on the aeration conditions. Expression of the B. japonicum NifA from the hybrid nptII-nifH promoter (plasmid pBPF204) induced "in trans" lacZ transcription from the Azotobacter chroococcum nifH promoter in E. coli and A. diazotrophicus cells grown at low pO2. Similarly, the plasmid pBPF204 increased nitrogenase activity in A. diazotrophicus cells grown under microaerobic conditions. Based on these results, we suggest that the B. japonicum NifA could function as an efficient O2-sensitive transcriptional activator of nif genes in genetically distant diazotrophic bacteria. PMID:10932742

  14. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse-effects of selection and gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Minias, P; Bateson, Z W; Whittingham, L A; Johnson, J A; Oyler-McCance, S; Dunn, P O

    2016-05-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens. PMID:26860199

  15. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  16. Differential gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus exposed to Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongmiao; Xu, Joshua; Kweon, Oh-Gew; Zou, Wen; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2015-05-01

    We previously demonstrated the effects of azo dyes and their reduction metabolites on bacterial cell growth and cell viability. In this report, the effects of Orange II and Sudan III on gene expression profiling in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were analyzed using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR technology. Upon exposure to 6 μg/ml Orange II for 18 h, 21 genes were found to be differently expressed. Among them, 8 and 13 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve stress response caused by drug metabolism, oxidation, and alkaline shock indicating that S. aureus could adapt to Orange II exposure through a balance between up and down regulated gene expression. Whereas, after exposure to 6 μg/ml Sudan III for 18 h, 57 genes were differentially expressed. In which, 51 genes were up-regulated and 6 were down-regulated. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve in cell wall/membrane biogenesis and biosynthesis, nutrient uptake, transport and metabolite, and stress response, suggesting that Sudan III damages the bacterial cell wall or/and membrane due to binding of the dye. Further analysis indicated that all differentially expressed genes encoded membrane proteins were up-regulated and most of them serve as transporters. The result suggested that these genes might contribute to survival, persistence and growth in the presence of Sudan III. Only one gene msrA, which plays an important role in oxidative stress resistance, was found to be down-regulated after exposure to both Orange II and Sudan III. The present results suggested that both these two azo dyes can cause stress in S. aureus and the response of the bacterium to the stress is mainly related to characteristics of the azo dyes. PMID:25720844

  17. Horticultural characteristics of transgenic tobacco expressing the rolC gene from Agrobacterium rhizogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, R.; Zimmerman, T.W.; Cordts, J.M.; Footen, K.J. ); Ravelonandro, M. . Station de Pathologie Vegetale)

    1994-09-01

    Wisconsin 38 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf discs were transformed with the disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 101 carrying the rolC gene from A. rhizogenes and NPT II and GUS genes. Shoots that regenerated on kanamycin-containing medium were confirmed as transgenic through GUS assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analyses, and transmission of the foreign genes through the sexual cycle. Transgenic plants were as short as half the height of control plants; were earlier flowering by up to 35 days; and had smaller leaves, shorter internodes, smaller seed capsules, fewer seeds, smaller flowers, and reduced pollen viability. The number of seed capsules, leaf number, and specific root length were similar between transgenic and control plants. Transgenic clones varied in the expression of the rolC-induced growth alterations as did the first generation of seedlings from these clones. Such differences suggested the potential for selecting for different levels of expression. Transformation with the rolC gene presents a potentially useful method of genetically modifying horticultural crops, particularly for flowering date, height, and leaf and flower size. Chemical names used: neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS).

  18. The Arabidopsis homeodomain-leucine zipper II gene family: diversity and redundancy.

    PubMed

    Ciarbelli, Angela Raffaella; Ciolfi, Andrea; Salvucci, Samanta; Ruzza, Valentino; Possenti, Marco; Carabelli, Monica; Fruscalzo, Alberto; Sessa, Giovanna; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-11-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains 10 genes belonging to the HD-Zip II family including ATHB2 and HAT2. Previous work has shown that ATHB2 is rapidly and strongly induced by light quality changes that provoke the shade avoidance response whereas HAT2 expression responds to auxin. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the HD-Zip II family. Phylogeny reconstruction revealed that almost all of the HD-Zip II genes can be subdivided into 4 clades (alpha-delta), each clade comprising 2-3 paralogs. Gene expression studies demonstrated that all the gamma and delta genes are regulated by light quality changes. Kinetics of induction, low R/FR/high R/FR reversibility and auxin response analyses strongly suggested that HAT1, HAT3 and ATHB4, as ATHB2, are under the control of the phytochrome system whereas HAT2 is up-regulated by low R/FR as a consequence of the induction of the auxin signaling pathway provoked by FR-rich light. Root and shoot digital in situ revealed that gamma and delta genes are also tightly regulated during plant development with both distinct and overlapping patterns. Phenotypes of gain of function and dominant negative lines demonstrated that one or more of the HD-Zip II gamma genes negatively regulate cell proliferation during leaf development in a high R/FR light environment. Finally, target gene analysis using a chimeric transcription factor (HD-Zip2-V-G), known to activate ATHB2 target genes in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner, revealed that all the 10 HD-Zip II genes can be recognized by the HD-Zip 2 domain in vivo, implying an intricate negative feedback network. PMID:18758690

  19. Synthetic gene transfer vectors II: back to the future.

    PubMed

    Behr, Jean-Paul

    2012-07-17

    The discovery of RNA interference has given a new lease on life to both the chemistry of oligonucleotides and chemical approaches for the intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. In particular, delivery of siRNA, whether in vitro for screening and target validation purposes or in humans as a new class of drugs, may revolutionize our approach to therapy. Their impact could equal that of the bioproduction and various uses of monoclonal antibodies today. Unfortunately, global pharmaceutical companies again seem to be waiting to buy the next Genentech or Genzyme of gene silencing rather than investing research and development into this promising area of research. Gene silencing encounters barriers similar to gene addition and hence may benefit from the extra decade of experience brought by gene therapy. "Chemical" transfection of cells in culture has become routine, and this Account discusses some of the reasons this success has not extended to nonviral gene therapy trials, most of which do not progress beyond the phase 2 stage. The author also discusses a (much debated) mechanism of nucleic acid cell entry and subsequent release of the polycationic particles into the cytoplasm. Both topics should be useful to those interested in delivery of siRNA. The move from gene therapy toward siRNA as an oligonucleotide-based therapy strategy provides a much wider range of druggable targets. Even though these molecules are a hundredfold smaller than a gene, they are delivered via similar cellular mechanisms. Their complexes with cationic polymers are less stable than those with a higher number of phosphate groups, which may be compensated by siRNA concatemerization or by chemical conjugation with the cationic carrier. Thus chemistry is again desperately needed. PMID:22311735

  20. Cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene in mitochondria of Oenothera has no intron

    PubMed Central

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Brennicke, Axel

    1983-01-01

    The cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene has been localized in the mitochondrial genome of Oenothera berteriana and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The coding sequence contains 777 bp and, unlike the corresponding gene in Zea mays, is not interrupted by an intron. No TGA codon is found within the open reading frame. The codon CGG, as in the maize gene, is used in place of tryptophan codons of corresponding genes in other organisms. At position 742 in the Oenothera sequence the TGG of maize is changed into a CGG codon, where Trp is conserved as the amino acid in other organisms. Homologous sequences occur more than once in the mitochondrial genome as several mitochondrial DNA species hybridize with DNA probes of the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:16453484

  1. Gene Expression of Rat Alveolar Type II Cells during Hyperoxia Exposure and Early Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongming; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Guo, Yujie; Bhaskaran, Manoj; Chen, Jiwang; Gao, Li; Jin, Nili; Weng, Tingting; Liu, Lin

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury and repair during hyperoxia exposure and recovery have been investigated for decades, but the molecular mechanisms of these processes are not clear. To identify potentially important genes involved in lung injury and repair, we studied the gene expression profiles of isolated AEC II from control, 48-hour hyperoxia-exposed (>95% O2) and 1-7 day recovering rats using a DNA microarray containing 10,000 genes. Fifty genes showed significant differential expression between two or more time points (p<0.05, fold change >2). These genes can be classified into 8 unique gene expression patterns. Real-time PCR verified 14 selected genes in three patterns related to hyperoxia exposure and early recovery. The change in the protein level for two of the selected genes, bmp-4 and retnla, paralleled that of the mRNA level. Many of these genes were found to be involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. In an in vitro AEC trans-differentiation culture model using AEC II isolated from control and 48 hrs hyperoxia-exposed rats, the expression of the cell proliferation and differentiation genes identified above were consistent with their predicted roles in the trans-differentiation of AEC. These data indicate that a coordinated mechanism may control AEC differentiation during in vivo hyperoxia exposure and recovery as well as during in vitro AEC culture. PMID:17640573

  2. Organization of genes required for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde in three type II methylotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, C.; Machlin, S.; Zhang, Y.; Donaldson, K.; Hanson, R.S. )

    1989-12-01

    Restriction maps of genes required for the synthesis of active methanol dehydrogenase in Methylobacterium organophilum XX and Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1 have been completed and compared. In these two species of pink-pigmented, type II methylotrophs, 15 genes were identified that were required for the expression of methanol dehydrogenase activity. None of these genes were required for the synthesis of the prosthetic group of methanol dehydrogenase, pyrroloquinoline quinone. The structural gene required for the synthesis of cytochrome c{sub L}, an electron acceptor uniquely required for methanol dehydrogenase, and the genes encoding small basic peptides that copurified with methanol dehydrogenases were closely linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. A cloned 22-kilobase DNA insert from Methylsporovibrio methanica 81Z, an obligate type II methanotroph, complemented mutants that contained lesions in four genes closely linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. The methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c{sub L} structural genes were found to be transcribed independently in M. organophilum XX. Only two of the genes required for methanol dehydrogenase synthesis in this bacterium were found to be cotranscribed.

  3. Detection of Gene Expression in Genetically Engineered Microorganisms and Natural Phytoplankton Populations in the Marine Environment by mRNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Scott L; Paul, John H

    1991-06-01

    A simple method that combines guanidinium isothiocyanate RNA extraction and probing with antisense and sense RNA probes is described for analysis of microbial gene expression in planktonic populations. Probing of RNA sample extracts with sense-strand RNA probes was used as a control for nonspecific hybridization or contamination of mRNA with target DNA. This method enabled detection of expression of a plasmid-encoded neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) in as few as 10Vibrio cells per ml in 100 ml of seawater. We have used this method to detect expression of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large-subunit gene (rbcL) in Synechococcus cultures and natural phytoplankton populations in the Dry Tortugas, Florida. During a 36-h diel study, rbcL expression of the indigenous phytoplankton was greatest in the day, least at night (1100, 0300, and 0100 h), and variable at dawn or dusk (0700 and 1900 h). These results are the first report of gene expression in natural populations by mRNA isolation and probing. This methodology should be useful for the study of gene expression in microorganisms released into the environment for agricultural or bioremediation purposes and indigenous populations containing highly conserved target gene sequences. PMID:16348507

  4. Base J represses genes at the end of polycistronic gene clusters in Leishmania major by promoting RNAP II termination.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, David L; Hofmeister, Brigitte T; Cliffe, Laura; Siegel, T Nicolai; Anderson, Britta A; Beverley, Stephen M; Schmitz, Robert J; Sabatini, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of kinetoplastids are organized into polycistronic gene clusters that are flanked by the modified DNA base J. Previous work has established a role of base J in promoting RNA polymerase II termination in Leishmania spp. where the loss of J leads to termination defects and transcription into adjacent gene clusters. It remains unclear whether these termination defects affect gene expression and whether read through transcription is detrimental to cell growth, thus explaining the essential nature of J. We now demonstrate that reduction of base J at specific sites within polycistronic gene clusters in L. major leads to read through transcription and increased expression of downstream genes in the cluster. Interestingly, subsequent transcription into the opposing polycistronic gene cluster does not lead to downregulation of sense mRNAs. These findings indicate a conserved role for J regulating transcription termination and expression of genes within polycistronic gene clusters in trypanosomatids. In contrast to the expectations often attributed to opposing transcription, the essential nature of J in Leishmania spp. is related to its role in gene repression rather than preventing transcriptional interference resulting from read through and dual strand transcription. PMID:27125778

  5. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  6. DNA sequence of the Peromyscus leucopus MHC class II gene Aa (MhcPeleAa)

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, M.D.; Bates, L.M.

    1996-09-01

    The genus Peromyscus has been extensively studied by populations biologists and ecologists for over eighty years, with P. leucopus (the white-footed mouse) being one of the most intensively investigated species. Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes have proven useful in population genetic studies and might be helpful in understanding the population dynamics of Peromyscus species which are ubiquitously distributed over North and Central America. Polymorphism of P. leucopus MHC (MhcPele) class II genes was evident by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses using human and mouse probes and Pele class II loci exhibited degrees of polymorphism similar to H2 class II genes (A-like>E-like). 8 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-06-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  8. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy Corrects Neuropathic Phenotype in Murine Model of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Taichi; Shimada, Yohta; Akiyama, Kazumasa; Higuchi, Takashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Eto, Yoshikatsu; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya

    2015-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a neuropathic lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), which leads to the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). We demonstrated that biochemical alterations in the brains of MPS II mice are not corrected by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or enzyme replacement therapy, although BMT has been shown to be effective for other neurodegenerative MPSs, such as Hurler syndrome. In this study, we demonstrated that lentiviral isogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy corrected neuronal manifestations by ameliorating lysosomal storage and autophagic dysfunction in the brains of MPS II mice. IDS-transduced HSCs increased enzyme activity both in various visceral organs and the CNS. Decreased levels of GAGs were observed in many organs, including cerebra, after transplantation of IDS-transduced HSCs. In addition, lentiviral HSC gene therapy normalized the secondary accumulation of autophagic substrates, such as p62 and ubiquitin-protein conjugates, in cerebra. Furthermore, in contrast to naive MPS II mice, there was no deterioration of neuronal function observed in transplant recipients. These results indicated that lentiviral HSC gene therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of CNS lesions in MPS II. PMID:25761450

  10. In vivo footprinting of the estrogen-inducible vitellogenin II gene from chicken.

    PubMed Central

    Philipsen, J N; Hennis, B C; Ab, G

    1988-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions in the promoter region of the chicken vitellogenin II gene were analyzed by in vivo dimethylsulphate footprinting with expressing and non-expressing tissues. The reactivity of G-residues is essentially the same in erythrocytes, oviduct and control liver, not expressing the gene. In the expressing estrogen-induced liver we find a number of G-residues with altered reactivities. These G's are located within distinct sequences: the estrogen responsive elements, a sequence resembling the NF-1 recognition motive, and several elements which are conserved between yolk protein genes. The expression-dependent binding of proteins to these sites was confirmed by DNaseI footprinting applied to nuclei isolated from estrogen-induced and control liver. Estradiol appears to establish a transcription complex comprising a number of distinct proteins bound to different sites in the 5' flanking region of the vitellogenin II gene. Images PMID:3186442

  11. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerase II alpha gene expression by the p53 tumor suppressor.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Zambetti, G P; Suttle, D P

    1997-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) is an essential nuclear enzyme involved in major cellular functions such as DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and mitosis. While an elevated level of topo II alpha is associated with cell proliferation, wild-type (wt) p53 inhibits the expression of various growth-stimulatory genes. To determine if p53 downregulates topo II alpha gene expression, a murine cell line, (10)1val, that expresses a temperature-sensitive p53 was utilized. The (10)1val cells had significantly lower levels of topo II alpha mRNA and protein following incubation for 24 h at 32 degrees C (p53 with wt conformation) than at 39 degrees C (p53 with mutant conformation). The effect of p53 on the human topo II alpha gene promoter was determined by using luciferase reporter plasmids containing varying lengths of the topo II alpha promoter transiently cotransfected into p53-deficient (10)1 cells together with wt or mutant p53 expression plasmids. Transcription from the full-length (bp -557 to +90) topo II alpha promoter was decreased 15-fold by wt p53 in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas mutant p53 exerted much weaker inhibition. Consecutive deletion of the five inverted CCAAT elements (ICEs) from the topo II alpha promoter reduced both the basal promoter activity and wt p53-induced suppression. Transcription of the minimal promoter (-32 to +90), which contains no ICE, was slightly stimulated by wt or mutant p53 expression. When point mutations were introduced into the most proximal ICE (-68), the inhibitory effect of wt p53 was alleviated and stimulation of topo II alpha expression resulted. Our study suggests that wt p53 functions as a transcriptional repressor of topo II alpha gene expression, possibly through a functional interaction with specific ICEs. Inactivation of wt p53 may reduce normal regulatory suppression of topo II alpha and contribute to abortive cell cycle checkpoints, accelerated cell proliferation, and alterations in genomic

  12. Basic mechanisms of RNA polymerase II activity and alteration of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2013-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation. PMID:23022618

  13. Expression of chimeric genes by the light-regulated cabII-1 promoter in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a cabII-1/nit1 gene functions as a dominant selectable marker in a nit1- nit2- strain.

    PubMed Central

    Blankenship, J E; Kindle, K L

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, expression of the cabII-1 gene increases dramatically in response to light (cabII-1 encodes one of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins of photosystem II). We have used a region upstream of the cabII-1 gene in translational fusions to the bacterial uidA gene (encodes beta-glucuronidase) and transcriptional fusions to the Chlamydomonas nitrate reductase gene (nit1). Chlamydomonas transformants carrying intact copies of the chimeric uidA gene do not express beta-glucuronidase at the level of enzyme activity or mRNA accumulation. Methylation in the cabII-1 promoter region of the introduced gene is extensive in these strains, suggesting that newly introduced foreign genes may be recognized and silenced by a cellular mechanism that is correlated with increased methylation. Transformants that express the chimeric cabII-1/nit1 gene have been recovered. In contrast to the endogenous nit1 gene, the chimeric cabII-1/nit1 gene is expressed in ammonium-containing medium. Moreover, nit1 mRNA accumulation is dramatically stimulated by light, with a time course that is indistinguishable from that of the endogenous cabII-1 gene. The cabII-1/nit1 gene has been used to select transformants in a nit1- nit2- Chlamydomonas strain (CC400G) and should be useful for transformation of the large number of mutants in the Ebersold-Levine lineage, which carry the same mutations. Images PMID:1406696

  14. Combining a regeneration-promoting ipt gene and site-specific recombination allows a more efficient apricot transformation and the elimination of marker genes.

    PubMed

    López-Noguera, Sonia; Petri, César; Burgos, Lorenzo

    2009-12-01

    The presence of marker genes conferring antibiotic resistance in transgenic plants represents a serious obstacle for their public acceptance and future commercialization. In addition, their elimination may allow gene stacking by the same selection strategy. In apricot, selection using the selectable marker gene nptII, that confers resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics, is relatively effective. An attractive alternative is offered by the MAT system (multi-auto-transformation), which combines the ipt gene for positive selection with the recombinase system R/RS for removal of marker genes from transgenic cells after transformation. Transformation with an MAT vector has been attempted in the apricot cultivar 'Helena'. Regeneration from infected leaves with Agrobacterium harboring a plasmid containing the ipt gene was significantly higher than that from non-transformed controls in a non-selective medium. In addition, transformation efficiencies were much higher than those previously reported using antibiotic selection, probably due to the integration of the regeneration-promoting ipt gene. However, the lack of an ipt expression-induced differential phenotype in apricot made difficult in detecting the marker genes excision and plants had to be evaluated at different times. PCR analysis showed that cassette excision start occurring after 6 months approximately and 1 year in culture was necessary for complete elimination of the cassette in all the transgenic lines. Excision was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. We report here for the first time in a temperate fruit tree that the MAT vector system improves regeneration and transformation efficiency and would allow complete elimination of marker genes from transgenic apricot plants by site-specific recombination. PMID:19820947

  15. Genetic polymorphism of estrogen receptor alpha gene in Egyptian women with type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Motawi, Tarek M.K.; El-Rehany, Mahmoud A.; Rizk, Sherine M.; Ramzy, Maggie M.; el-Roby, Doaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen might play an important role in type 2 diabetes mellitus pathogenesis. A number of polymorphisms have been reported in the estrogen receptor alpha gene including the XbaI and PvuII restriction enzyme polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to determine if ESRα gene polymorphisms are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and correlated with lipid profile. Ninety diabetic Egyptian patients were compared with forty healthy controls. ESRα genotyping of PvuII and XbaI was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Our study showed that there is more significant difference in the frequency of C and G polymorphic allele between patients and control groups in PvuII and XbaI respectively. Also carriers of minor C and G alleles of PvuII and XbaI gene polymorphisms were associated with increased fasting blood glucose and disturbance in lipid profile as there is an increase in total cholesterol, triglycerides and Low density lipoprotein. So findings of present study suggest the possibility that PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms in ERα are related to T2DM and with increased serum lipids among Egyptian population. PMID:26401488

  16. Gene and MicroRNA Transcriptional Signatures of Angiotensin II in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Jawahar L.; Mercanti, Federico; Stone, Annjannette; Wang, Xianwei; Ding, Zufeng; Romeo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Growth of atherosclerotic plaque requires neovascularization (angiogenesis). To elucidate the involvement of angiotensin II (Ang II) in angiogenesis, we performed gene microarray and microRNA (miRNA) polymerase chain reaction array analyses on human coronary artery endothelial cells exposed to moderate concentration of Ang II for 2 and 12 hours. At 12, but not 2, hours, cultures treated with Ang II exhibited shifts in transcriptional activity involving 267 genes (>1.5-fold difference; P < 0.05). Resulting transcriptome was most significantly enriched for genes associated with blood vessel development, angiogenesis, and regulation of proliferation. Majority of upregulated genes implicated in angiogenesis shared a commonality of being either regulators (HES1, IL-18, and CXCR4) or targets (ADM, ANPEP, HES1, KIT, NOTCH4, PGF, and SOX18) of STAT3. In line with these findings, STAT3 inhibition attenuated Ang II–dependent stimulation of tube formation in Matrigel assay. Expression analysis of miRNAs transcripts revealed that the pattern of differential expression for miRNAs was largely consistent with proangiogenic response with a prominent theme of upregulation of miRs targeting PTEN (miR-19b-3p, miR-21-5p, 23b-3p, and 24-3p), many of which are directly or indirectly STAT3 dependent. We conclude that STAT3 signaling may be an intrinsic part of Ang II–mediated proangiogenic response in human endothelial cells. PMID:24853489

  17. Evidence that the Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitin lyase II gene is adjacent to the chondro-4-sulfatase gene and may be part of the same operon.

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, E P; Salyers, A A

    1987-01-01

    The chondroitin lyase II gene from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron has previously been cloned in Escherichia coli on a 7.8-kilobase (kb) fragment (pA818). In E. coli, the chondroitin lyase II gene appeared to be expressed from a promoter that was about 0.5 kb from the beginning of the gene. However, when a subcloned 5-kb fragment from pA818 which contained the chondroitin lyase II gene and the promoter from which the gene is expressed in E. coli was introduced into B. thetaiotaomicron on a multicopy plasmid (pEG800), the chondroitin lyase specific activity of B. thetaiotaomicron was not altered. Further evidence that the promoter that is recognized in E. coli may not be the promoter from which the chondroitin lyase II gene is transcribed in B. thetaiotaomicron was obtained by making an insertion in the B. thetaiotaomicron chromosome at a point which is 1 kb upstream from the chondroitin lyase II gene. This insertion stopped synthesis of the chondroitin lyase II gene product, as would be predicted if the gene was part of an operon and was transcribed in B. thetaiotaomicron from a promoter that was at least 1 kb upstream from the chondroitin lyase II gene. A region of pA818 which was adjacent to the chondroitin lyase II gene and which included the region used to make the insertional mutation was found to code for chondro-4-sulfatase, an enzyme that breaks down one of the products of the chondroitin lyase reaction. The upstream insertion mutant of B. thetaiotaomicron which stopped synthesis of chondroitin lyase II had no detectable chondro-4-sulfatase activity. This mutant was still able to grow on chondroitin sulfate, although the rate of growth was slower than that of the wild type. Images PMID:3029024

  18. DNA Topoisomerase II Is Involved in Regulation of Cyst Wall Protein Genes and Differentiation in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bo-Chi; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Chan, Nei-Li; Li, Tsai-Kun; Wang, Hsin-Chih; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia differentiates into infectious cysts within the human intestinal tract for disease transmission. Expression of the cyst wall protein (cwp) genes increases with similar kinetics during encystation. However, little is known how their gene regulation shares common mechanisms. DNA topoisomerases maintain normal topology of genomic DNA. They are necessary for cell proliferation and tissue development as they are involved in transcription, DNA replication, and chromosome condensation. A putative topoisomerase II (topo II) gene has been identified in the G. lamblia genome. We asked whether Topo II could regulate Giardia encystation. We found that Topo II was present in cell nuclei and its gene was up-regulated during encystation. Topo II has typical ATPase and DNA cleavage activity of type II topoisomerases. Mutation analysis revealed that the catalytic important Tyr residue and cleavage domain are important for Topo II function. We used etoposide-mediated topoisomerase immunoprecipitation assays to confirm the binding of Topo II to the cwp promoters in vivo. Interestingly, Topo II overexpression increased the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Microarray analysis identified up-regulation of cwp and specific vsp genes by Topo II. We also found that the type II topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide has growth inhibition effect on Giardia. Addition of etoposide significantly decreased the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Our results suggest that Topo II has been functionally conserved during evolution and that Topo II plays important roles in induction of the cwp genes, which is key to Giardia differentiation into cysts. PMID:23696909

  19. Basic Mechanisms of RNA Polymerase II Activity and Alteration of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Craig D.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23022618

  20. Expression Regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I and Class II Encoding Genes

    PubMed Central

    van den Elsen, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I and MHC-II molecules play an essential role in the immune response to pathogens by virtue of their ability to present peptides to CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, respectively. Given this critical role, MHC-I and MHC-II genes are regulated in a tight fashion at the transcriptional level by a variety of transcription factors that interact with conserved cis-acting regulatory promoter elements. In addition to the activities of these regulatory factors, modification of chromatin also plays an essential role in the efficient transcription of these genes to meet with local requirement for an effective immune response. The focus of this review is on the transcription factors that interact with conserved cis-acting promoter elements and the epigenetic mechanisms that modulate induced and constitutive expression of these MHC genes. PMID:22566838

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.; Yang, H.; Targan, S.

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CI (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.

  2. Dentin phosphoprotein gene locus is not associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, M.; Zeichner-David, M.; Davis, A.; Slavkin, H. ); Murray, J. ); Crall, M. )

    1992-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is an autosomal dominant inherited dental disease which affects dentin production and mineralization. Genetic linkage studies have been performed on several multigeneration informative kindreds. These studies determined linkage between DGI types II and III and group-specific component (vitamin D-binding protein). This gene locus has been localized to the long arm of human chromosome 4 in the region 4q11-q21. Although this disease has been mapped to chromosome 4, the defective gene product is yet to be determined. Biochemical studies have suggested abnormal levels of dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) associated with DGI type II. This highly acidic protein is the major noncollagenous component of dentin, being solely expressed by the ectomesenchymal derived odontoblast cells of the tooth. The purpose of the present study was to establish whether DPP is associated with DGI types II and III, by using molecular biology techniques. The results indicated that DPP is not localized to any region of human chromosome 4, thus suggesting that the DPP gene is not directly associated with DGI type II or DGI type III. The data do not exclude the possibility that other proteins associated with DPP posttranslational modifications might be responsible for this genetic disease.

  3. Differential expression of CaMK-II genes during early zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Sarah C; Lister, James A; Tombes, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    CaMK-II is a highly conserved Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expressed throughout the lifespan of all vertebrates. During early development, CaMK-II regulates cell cycle progression and "non-canonical" Wnt-dependent convergent extension. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, CaMK-II activity rises within 2 hr after fertilization. At the time of somite formation, zygotic expression from six genes (camk2a1, camk2b1, camk2g1, camk2g2, camk2d1, camk2d2) results in a second phase of increased activity. Zebrafish CaMK-II genes are 92-95% identical to their human counterparts in the non-variable regions. During the first three days of development, alternative splicing yields at least 20 splice variants, many of which are unique. Whole-mount in situ hybridization reveals that camk2g1 comprises the majority of maternal expression. All six genes are expressed strongly in ventral regions at the 18-somite stage. Later, camk2a1 is expressed in anterior somites, heart, and then forebrain. Camk2b1 is expressed in somites, mid- and forebrain, gut, retina, and pectoral fins. Camk2g1 appears strongly along the midline and then in brain, gut, and pectoral fins. Camk2g2 is expressed early in the midbrain and trunk and exhibits the earliest retinal expression. Camk2d1 is elevated early at somite boundaries, then epidermal tissue, while camk2d2 is expressed in discrete anterior locations, steadily increasing along either side of the dorsal midline and then throughout the brain, including the retina. These findings reveal a complex pattern of CaMK-II gene expression consistent with pleiotropic roles during development. PMID:17103413

  4. Molecular organization of the 5S rDNA gene type II in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Castro, Sergio I; Hleap, Jose S; Cárdenas, Heiber; Blouin, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The 5S rDNA gene is a non-coding RNA that can be found in 2 copies (type I and type II) in bony and cartilaginous fish. Previous studies have pointed out that type II gene is a paralog derived from type I. We analyzed the molecular organization of 5S rDNA type II in elasmobranchs. Although the structure of the 5S rDNA is supposed to be highly conserved, our results show that the secondary structure in this group possesses some variability and is different than the consensus secondary structure. One of these differences in Selachii is an internal loop at nucleotides 7 and 112. These mutations observed in the transcribed region suggest an independent origin of the gene among Batoids and Selachii. All promoters were highly conserved with the exception of BoxA, possibly due to its affinity to polymerase III. This latter enzyme recognizes a dT4 sequence as stop signal, however in Rajiformes this signal was doubled in length to dT8. This could be an adaptation toward a higher efficiency in the termination process. Our results suggest that there is no TATA box in elasmobranchs in the NTS region. We also provide some evidence suggesting that the complexity of the microsatellites present in the NTS region play an important role in the 5S rRNA gene since it is significantly correlated with the length of the NTS. PMID:26488198

  5. Isolation, characterization, and chromosomal localization of mouse and human COUP-TF I and II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Y.; Krishnan, V.; Zeng, Z.

    1995-09-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factors (COUP-TFs) are orphan members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. COUP-TF homologues have been cloned in many species, from Drosophila to human. The protein sequences of COUP-TFs are highly homologous across species, suggesting functional conservation. Two COUP-TF genes have been cloned from human, and their genomic organizations have been characterized. To determine whether the genomic organization is conserved between human and mouse, we isolated two mouse COUP-TF genes (I and II) and characterized their genomic structures. Both genes have relatively simple structures that are similar to those of their human counterparts. In addition, we mapped mouse COUP-TF I to the distal region of chromosome 13 and COUP-TF II to the central region of chromosome 7. Furthermore, we mapped human COUP-TF I to 5q14 of chromosome 5 and COUP-TF II to 15q26 of chromosome 15. The results demonstrate that COUP-TF genes are located in chromosomal regions that are syntenic between mouse and human. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  6. ATTED-II: a database of co-expressed genes and cis elements for identifying co-regulated gene groups in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Obayashi, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakai, Kenta; Shibaoka, Masayuki; Hayashi, Shinpei; Saeki, Motoshi; Shibata, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    Publicly available database of co-expressed gene sets would be a valuable tool for a wide variety of experimental designs, including targeting of genes for functional identification or for regulatory investigation. Here, we report the construction of an Arabidopsis thaliana trans-factor and cis-element prediction database (ATTED-II) that provides co-regulated gene relationships based on co-expressed genes deduced from microarray data and the predicted cis elements. ATTED-II () includes the following features: (i) lists and networks of co-expressed genes calculated from 58 publicly available experimental series, which are composed of 1388 GeneChip data in A.thaliana; (ii) prediction of cis-regulatory elements in the 200 bp region upstream of the transcription start site to predict co-regulated genes amongst the co-expressed genes; and (iii) visual representation of expression patterns for individual genes. ATTED-II can thus help researchers to clarify the function and regulation of particular genes and gene networks. PMID:17130150

  7. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia. PMID:23031405

  8. [Genetic transformation of OSISAP1 gene to onion (Allium cepa L.) mediated by amicroprojectile bombardment].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi-Jiang; Cui, Cheng-Ri

    2007-06-01

    Microprojectile bombardment-mediated transformation method has been developed for onion (Allium cepa L.) using embryogenic calli, induced from stem discs, as target tissue. Zinc-finger protein gene OSISAP1 (Oryza sative subspecies indica stress-associated protein gene) was introduced into the open-pollinated onion cultivar (subs.) 'HG400B'. Bombardment parameters were optimized as: the pressure is 1,100 psi, the distance is 6 cm, two times, the ratio of mass between plasmid DNA and golden particles is 1:320. An efficient microprojectile bombardment-mediated transformation system of onion (Allium cepa L.) callus has been established. The binary vector used carried the nptII gene for kanamycin resistance and the GUS reporter gene. Transgenic cultures were screened for their ability to express the GUS reporter gene and to grow in the presence of kanamycin (150 mg/L). Transient expression of GUS reporter gene was observed through histochemical staining of embryogenic callus transformed by microprojectile bombardment. The putative transgenic plants were analysed at the molecular level using PCR, southern hybridization, and RT-PCR. The results confirmed that the OSISAP1 gene was integrated as one copy into the genome of onion and expression. Transgenic plants were produced efficiently with a transformation frequency of about 10%. Test of salinity-alkali stress showed that sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate at 200 mmol/L effectively killed non-transgenic plants within 1 week of irrigation, while the transgenic plants were completely unaffected by salinity of 400 mmol/L. So transformation with the OSISAP1 gene raised the salinity-alkali-tolerance of the transgenic plants to a high level. PMID:17556805

  9. Involvement of aph(3')-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3')-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3')-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99-100% sequence identity with aph(3')-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3')-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3')-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  10. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Latron, F; Jotterand-Bellomo, M; Maffei, A; Scarpellino, L; Bernard, M; Strominger, J L; Accolla, R S

    1988-01-01

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class II-negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids. Images PMID:3127829

  11. Functional analysis of the 3' control region of the potato wound-inducible proteinase inhibitor II gene.

    PubMed Central

    An, G; Mitra, A; Choi, H K; Costa, M A; An, K; Thornburg, R W; Ryan, C A

    1989-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitor genes are expressed strongly in specific plant tissues under both developmental and environmental regulation. We have studied the role of the 3' control region of the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (PI-II) that is inducible in leaves in response to herbivore attacks or other severe wounding. Comparison of the terminator from the PI-II gene with two different terminators from the 6b and 7 genes, driven by a common PI-II promoter-cat fusion molecule, indicated that the PI-II terminator provided the most efficient expression of cat. The PI-II terminator also caused a significantly elevated cat gene expression driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The increase in the level of expression is probably not due to the presence of an enhancer element in the PI-II terminator region, but to cis-acting elements involved in mRNA processing or stability. Both transient and stable transformation analyses of the deletion mutants in the 3'-flanking sequence indicated that about a 100-base pair DNA fragment surrounding the polyadenylation site is essential for the efficient gene expression. This region seems to consist of several regulatory elements, including the conserved sequence, CGTGTCTT, which is located 9 bases downstream from the polyadenylation site. The elements appear to contribute to the increased stability of mRNAs containing the PI-II terminator. PMID:2535459

  12. Widely distributed mutations in the COL2A1 gene produce achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Körkkö, J; Cohn, D H; Ala-Kokko, L; Krakow, D; Prockop, D J

    2000-05-15

    The COL2A1 gene was assayed for mutations in genomic DNA from 12 patients with achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis. The exons and flanking sequences of the 54 exons in the COL2A1 gene were amplified by a series of specific primers using PCR. The PCR products were scanned for mutations by conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis, and PCR products that generated heteroduplex bands were then sequenced. Mutations in the COL2A1 gene were found in all 12 patients. Ten of the mutations were single base substitutions that converted a codon for an obligate glycine to a codon for an amino acid with a bulkier side chain. One of the mutations was a change in a consensus RNA splice site. Another was an 18-base pair deletion of coding sequences. The results confirmed previous indications that conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis is highly sensitive for detection of mutations in large and complex genes. They also demonstrate that most, if not all, patients with achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis have mutations in the COL2A1 gene. PMID:10797431

  13. AIRE gene analysis in children with autoimmune hepatitis type I or II.

    PubMed

    Lankisch, Tim O; Mourier, Olivia; Sokal, Etienne M; Habes, Dalila; Lacaille, Florence; Bridoux-Henno, Laure; Hermeziu, Bogdan; Lenaerts, Catherine; Strassburg, Christian P; Jacquemin, Emmanuel

    2009-04-01

    The present report describes AIRE gene analysis in 25 children with autoimmune hepatitis type I or II. The heterozygous transversion c.961C > G (p.Ser278Arg) located in exon 7 was identified in 4 patients with autoimmune hepatitis type I, and mostly in those presenting with a positive family history for autoimmune diseases. In this subgroup of patients, the allelic frequency of this polymorphic variant was at least 3-fold higher than in healthy controls. These results suggest that heterozygous AIRE gene mutation may represent a genetic predisposition to childhood autoimmune hepatitis type I. PMID:19322061

  14. Reactivation of apolipoprotein II gene transcription by cycloheximide reveals two steps in the deactivation of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Sensel, M G; Binder, R; Lazier, C B; Williams, D L

    1994-03-01

    In this report, we describe apolipoprotein II (apoII) gene expression in cell lines derived by stable expression of the chicken estrogen receptor in LMH chicken hepatoma cells. In cell lines expressing high levels of receptor (LMH/2A), apoII gene expression is increased by estrogen 300-fold compared with levels in the receptor-deficient parent LMH line. LMH/2A cells show apoII mRNA induction and turnover kinetics similar to those in chicken liver. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide (CHX) or puromycin following estrogen withdrawal superinduces apoII mRNA without affecting apoII mRNA stability. Superinduction is due to an estrogen-independent reactivation of apoII gene transcription. The apoII gene can be reactivated by CHX for up to 24 h following hormone withdrawal, suggesting that the gene is in a repressed yet transcriptionally competent state. These results reveal two distinct events necessary for termination of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription. The first event, removal of hormone, is sufficient to stop transcription when translation is ongoing. The second event is revealed by the CHX-induced superinduction of apoII mRNA following hormone withdrawal. This superinduction suggests that deactivation of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription requires a labile protein. Furthermore, reactivation of apoII gene expression by CHX and estrogen is additive, suggesting that estrogen is unable to overcome repression completely. Thus, a labile protein may act to repress estrogen receptor-mediated transcription of the apoII gene. PMID:8114707

  15. Glutaric acidemia type II: gene structure and mutations of the electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) gene.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Stephen I; Binard, Robert J; Woontner, Michael R; Frerman, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II is a human inborn error of metabolism which can be due to defects in either subunit of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or in ETF:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO), but few disease-causing mutations have been described. The ETF:QO gene is located on 4q33, and contains 13 exons. Primers to amplify these exons are presented, together with mutations identified by molecular analysis of 20 ETF:QO-deficient patients. Twenty-one different disease-causing mutations were identified on 36 of the 40 chromosomes. PMID:12359134

  16. Cloning DPB3, the gene encoding the third subunit of DNA polymerase II of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Araki, H; Hamatake, R K; Morrison, A; Johnson, A L; Johnston, L H; Sugino, A

    1991-01-01

    DNA polymerase II purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of greater than 200, 80, 34, 30 and 29 kDa, the two largest of which (subunits A and B) are encoded by the essential genes POL2 and DPB2. By probing a lambda gt11 expression library of yeast DNA with antiserum against DNA polymerase II, we isolated a single gene, DPB3, that encodes both the 34- and 30-kDa polypeptides (subunit C and C'). The nucleotide sequence of DPB3 contained an open reading frame encoding a 23-kDa protein, significantly smaller than the observed molecular masses, 34- or 30-kDa, which might represent post-translationally modified forms of the DPB3 product. The predicted amino acid sequence contained a possible NTP-binding motif and a glutamate-rich region. NTP-binding motif and a glutamate-rich region. A dpb3 deletion mutant (dpb3 delta) was viable and yielded a DNA polymerase II lacking the 34- and 30-kDa polypeptides. dpb3 delta strains exhibited an increased spontaneous mutation rate, suggesting that the DPB3 product is required to maintain fidelity of chromosomal replication. Since a fifth, 29-kDa polypeptide was present in DNA polymerase II preparations from wild-type cell extracts throughout purification, the subunit composition appears to be A, B, C (or C and C') and D. The 5' nontranscribed region of DPB3 contained the MulI-related sequence ACGCGA, while the 0.9-kb DPB3 transcript accumulated periodically during the cell cycle and peaked at the G1/S boundary. The level of DPB3 transcript thus appears to be under the same cell cycle control as those of POL2, DPB2 and other DNA replication genes. DPB3 was mapped to chromosome II, 30 cM distal to his7. Images PMID:1923754

  17. The Riia Gene of Bacteriophage T4. II. Regulation of Its Messenger RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Daegelen, P.; Brody, E.

    1990-01-01

    When the rII genes are first introduced into cells which had been previously infected by T4 phage deleted for these genes, the kinetics of synthesis of rIIA and rIIB RNA are rapid and identical. We show that this rapid synthesis depends on a functional motA gene for rIIB, but not for rIIA, RNA synthesis. By primer-extension mapping of T4 messenger RNA, we find three promoters close to the rIIA gene. One of them is an early promoter just before the rIIA.1 gene; it is used under all conditions tested. Another is in the coding portion of the rIIA.1 gene; it is weak, primarily because of a 19-bp spacing between the -10 and -35 elements, and its use is stimulated by T4 functions. The third is a motA-dependent (middle) promoter which has an unusual CCCGCTT box at -33. We present results which suggest that none of these promoters is likely to be the site at which the motB and motC gene products exercise their major influence on rIIA RNA synthesis. PMID:2379818

  18. RolB gene-induced production of isoflavonoids in transformed Maackia amurensis cells.

    PubMed

    Grishchenko, O V; Kiselev, K V; Tchernoded, G K; Fedoreyev, S A; Veselova, M V; Bulgakov, V P; Zhuravlev, Y N

    2016-09-01

    Maackia amurensis Rupr. et Maxim is a valuable leguminous tree grown in the Russian Far East, in China, and in Korea. Polyphenols from the heartwood of this species (primarily stilbenes and isoflavonoids) possess strong hepatoprotective activity. Callus culture of M. amurensis produced isoflavonoids and their derivatives. In pharmacological experiments, the callus complex was at least as effective, as the plant complex. To increase the yield of isoflavonoids, calli were transformed with the rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) gene was used for transgenic cell selection. Three rolB transgenic callus lines with different levels of the rolB gene expression were established. Insertion of the rolB gene caused alterations in callus structure, growth, and isoflavonoid production, and stronger alterations were observed with higher expression levels. MB1, MB2, and MB4 cultures accumulated 1.4, 1.5, and 2.1 % of dry weight (DW) isoflavonoids, respectively. In contrast, the empty vector-transformed MV culture accumulated 1.22 % DW. Isoflavonoid productivity of the obtained MB1, MB2, and MB4 cultures was equal to 117, 112, and 199 mg/L of medium, respectively, comparing to 106 mg/L for the MV culture. High level of expression of the rolB gene in MB4 culture led to a 2-fold increase in the isoflavonoid content and productivity and reliably increased dry biomass accumulation. Lower expression levels of the rolB gene in MB1 and MB2 calli did not significantly enhance biomass accumulation and isoflavonoid content, although the rolB gene activated isoflavonoid biosynthesis during the early growth stages and caused the increased content of several distinct compounds. PMID:27063013

  19. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse.

    PubMed

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah A; Tan, Tuan Zea; Marafie, Makia J; Thiery, Jean Paul; Quirke, Philip; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts) associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO), which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:27136531

  20. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah A.; Tan, Tuan Zea; Marafie, Makia J.; Thiery, Jean Paul; Quirke, Philip; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts) associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO), which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:27136531

  1. Suppressors of Mutations in the rII Gene of Bacteriophage T4 Affect Promoter Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Dwight H.; Snyder, Ronald D.

    1981-01-01

    Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) have described T4 mutants, called sip, that partially suppress the inability of T4rII mutants to grow in λ lysogens. We have found that mutants sip1 and sip2 are resistant to folate analogs and overproduce FH2 reductase. The results of recombination and complementation studies indicate that sip mutations are in the mot gene. Like other mot mutations (Mattson, Richardson and Goodin 1974; Chace and Hall 1975; Sauerbier, Hercules and Hall 1976), the sip2 mutation affects the expression of many genes and appears to affect promoter utilization. The mot gene function is not required for T4 growth on most hosts, but we have found that it is required for good growth on E. coli CTr5X. Homyk, Rodriguez and Weil (1976) also described L mutations that reverse the effects of sip mutations. L2 decreases the folate analog resistance and the inability of sip2 to grow on CTr5X. L2 itself is partially resistant to a folate analog, and appears to reverse the effects of sip2 on gene expression. These results suggest that L2 affects another regulatory gene related to the mot gene. PMID:7262547

  2. Cloning, characterization and expression analysis of coagulation factor II gene in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Xu, B H; Chen, K J; Yao, Y B; Liu, Q L; Xiao, T Y; Su, J M; Peng, H Z

    2015-01-01

    Here, we characterized the structure and function of the coagulation factor II (FII) gene in grass carp and determined its role in coagulation mechanisms. The FII gene EST was obtained using a constructed splenic transcriptome database; the full-length FII gene sequence was obtained by 3' and 5' RACE. The open reading frame (ORF) of FII was cloned and the full-length gene was found to be 1718 bp, with an ORF of 1572 bp; the gene contained a 25 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and 108 bp 3'-UTR. The ORF encoded 524 amino acids, including 74 alkaline amino acids (arginine and lysine) and 69 acidic amino acids (aspartic acid and glutamic acid). The theoretical pI was 6.22. The calculated instability index (II) was 39.81, indicating that FII was a stable protein; the half-life period was predicted to be approximately 30 h. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicated that grass carp FII showed most similarity (71%) to FII of Takifugu rubripes, followed by Oplegnathus fasciatus (48% similarity) and Larimichthys crocea (47% similarity). A real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that under normal circumstances, FII was most highly expressed in the liver, followed by the gill, spleen, thymus, and head-kidney (P < 0.001). After injection of the grass carp reovirus 873 (GCRV873), the pattern of FII expression was significantly altered (P < 0.001); gene expression was high after injection, suggesting a response involving the initiation of the coagulation system and defense of the body in combination with the platelet and complement system. PMID:26535692

  3. A class II KNOX gene, KNOX4, controls seed physical dormancy.

    PubMed

    Chai, Maofeng; Zhou, Chuanen; Molina, Isabel; Fu, Chunxiang; Nakashima, Jin; Li, Guifen; Zhang, Wenzheng; Park, Jongjin; Tang, Yuhong; Jiang, Qingzhen; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2016-06-21

    Physical dormancy of seed is an adaptive trait that widely exists in higher plants. This kind of dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable layer that blocks water and oxygen from the surrounding environment and keeps embryos in a viable status for a long time. Most of the work on hardseededness has focused on morphological structure and phenolic content of seed coat. The molecular mechanism underlying physical dormancy remains largely elusive. By screening a large number of Tnt1 retrotransposon-tagged Medicago truncatula lines, we identified nondormant seed mutants from this model legume species. Unlike wild-type hard seeds exhibiting physical dormancy, the mature mutant seeds imbibed water quickly and germinated easily, without the need for scarification. Microscopic observations of cross sections showed that the mutant phenotype was caused by a dysfunctional palisade cuticle layer in the seed coat. Chemical analysis found differences in lipid monomer composition between the wild-type and mutant seed coats. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that a class II KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOXII) gene, KNOX4, was responsible for the loss of physical dormancy in the seeds of the mutants. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identified CYP86A, a gene associated with cutin biosynthesis, as one of the downstream target genes of KNOX4 This study elucidated a novel molecular mechanism of physical dormancy and revealed a new role of class II KNOX genes. Furthermore, KNOX4-like genes exist widely in seed plants but are lacking in nonseed species, indicating that KNOX4 may have diverged from the other KNOXII genes during the evolution of seed plants. PMID:27274062

  4. A class II KNOX gene, KNOX4, controls seed physical dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Maofeng; Zhou, Chuanen; Molina, Isabel; Fu, Chunxiang; Nakashima, Jin; Li, Guifen; Zhang, Wenzheng; Park, Jongjin; Tang, Yuhong; Jiang, Qingzhen

    2016-01-01

    Physical dormancy of seed is an adaptive trait that widely exists in higher plants. This kind of dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable layer that blocks water and oxygen from the surrounding environment and keeps embryos in a viable status for a long time. Most of the work on hardseededness has focused on morphological structure and phenolic content of seed coat. The molecular mechanism underlying physical dormancy remains largely elusive. By screening a large number of Tnt1 retrotransposon-tagged Medicago truncatula lines, we identified nondormant seed mutants from this model legume species. Unlike wild-type hard seeds exhibiting physical dormancy, the mature mutant seeds imbibed water quickly and germinated easily, without the need for scarification. Microscopic observations of cross sections showed that the mutant phenotype was caused by a dysfunctional palisade cuticle layer in the seed coat. Chemical analysis found differences in lipid monomer composition between the wild-type and mutant seed coats. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that a class II KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOXII) gene, KNOX4, was responsible for the loss of physical dormancy in the seeds of the mutants. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identified CYP86A, a gene associated with cutin biosynthesis, as one of the downstream target genes of KNOX4. This study elucidated a novel molecular mechanism of physical dormancy and revealed a new role of class II KNOX genes. Furthermore, KNOX4-like genes exist widely in seed plants but are lacking in nonseed species, indicating that KNOX4 may have diverged from the other KNOXII genes during the evolution of seed plants. PMID:27274062

  5. Development of an efficient transformation method by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and high throughput spray assay to identify transgenic plants for woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) using NPTII selection.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Christopher J; Fisk, Sarah; Mills, Kerri; Flinn, Barry S; Shulaev, Vladimir; Veilleux, Richard E; Dan, Yinghui

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : We developed an efficient Agrobacterium -mediated transformation method using an Ac/Ds transposon tagging construct for F. vesca and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to identify its transformants for strawberry functional genomics. Genomic resources for Rosaceae species are now readily available, including the Fragaria vesca genome, EST sequences, markers, linkage maps, and physical maps. The Rosaceae Genomic Executive Committee has promoted strawberry as a translational genomics model due to its unique biological features and transformability for fruit trait improvement. Our overall research goal is to use functional genomic and metabolic approaches to pursue high throughput gene discovery in the diploid woodland strawberry. F. vesca offers several advantages of a fleshy fruit typical of most fruit crops, short life cycle (seed to seed in 12-16 weeks), small genome size (206 Mbb/C), small plant size, self-compatibility, and many seeds per plant. We have developed an efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated strawberry transformation method using kanamycin selection, and high throughput paromomycin spray assay to efficiently identify transgenic strawberry plants. Using our kanamycin transformation method, we were able to produce up to 98 independent kanamycin resistant insertional mutant lines using a T-DNA construct carrying an Ac/Ds transposon Launchpad system from a single transformation experiment involving inoculation of 22 leaf explants of F. vesca accession 551572 within approx. 11 weeks (from inoculation to soil). Transgenic plants with 1-2 copies of a transgene were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Using our paromomycin spray assay, transgenic F. vesca plants were rapidly identified within 10 days after spraying. PMID:23160638

  6. Involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M.

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3′)-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3′)-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99–100% sequence identity with aph(3′)-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3′)-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3′)-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  7. Persistent Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection occurs in the absence of functional major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganta, Roman Reddy; Wilkerson, Melinda J.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Rokey, Aaron M.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is an emerging tick-borne disease caused by the rickettsia Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We investigated the impact of two genes that control macrophage and T-cell function on murine resistance to E. chaffeensis. Congenic pairs of wild-type and toll-like receptor 4 (tlr4)- or major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-deficient mice were used for these studies. Wild-type mice cleared the infection within 2 weeks, and the response included macrophage activation and the synthesis of E. chaffeensis-specific Th1-type immunoglobulin G response. The absence of a functional tlr4 gene depressed nitric oxide and interleukin 6 secretion by macrophages and resulted in short-term persistent infections for > or =30 days. In the absence of MHC-II alleles, E. chaffeensis infections persisted throughout the entire 3-month evaluation period. Together, these data suggest that macrophage activation and cell-mediated immunity, orchestrated by CD4(+) T cells, are critical for conferring resistance to E. chaffeensis.

  8. Expression of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II genes during development in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Thumelin, S; Esser, V; Charvy, D; Kolodziej, M; Zammit, V A; McGarry, D; Girard, J; Pegorier, J P

    1994-01-01

    The enzyme activity and the expression (protein and mRNA concentrations) of genes encoding for hepatic carnitine palmitoyl-transferases (CPT) I and II were studied during neonatal development, in response to nutritional state at weaning and during the fed-starved transition in adult rats. The activity, the protein concentration and the level of mRNA encoding CPT I are low in foetal-rat liver and increase 5-fold during the first day of extra-uterine life. The activity and gene expression of CPT I are high during the entire suckling period, in the liver of 30-day-old rats weaned at 20 days on to a high-fat diet and in the liver of 48 h-starved adult rats. The activity and CPT I gene expression are markedly decreased in the liver of rats weaned on to a high-carbohydrate diet. By contrast, the activity, the protein concentration and the level of mRNA encoding CPT II are already high in the liver of term foetuses and remain at this level throughout the suckling period, irrespective of the nutritional state of the animals either at weaning or in the adult. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8002965

  9. HLA class II genes in chronic hepatitis C virus-infection and associated immunological disorders.

    PubMed

    Congia, M; Clemente, M G; Dessi, C; Cucca, F; Mazzoleni, A P; Frau, F; Lampis, R; Cao, A; Lai, M E; De Virgiliis, S

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the factors that may confer susceptibility or protection to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and to HCV-associated immunological disorders, we designed two studies on 420 Sardinian transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients followed in our department in Cagliari since 1974. The first one was an epidemiological survey aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HCV infection and HCV-associated immunological disorders. In the second study, the distribution of different HLA class II genes was examined by DNA analysis in 116 HCV positive patients, 30 HCV negative patients, and 606 healthy controls. Three hundred fourteen patients became infected with HCV (74.7%) after 5.6 +/- 2.8 years of regular transfusion program. Mixed cryoglobulinemia, purpura, arthritis, proteinuria, decreased complement levels, rheumatoid factor and anti-GOR, smooth muscle antibody (SMA), anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), and liver, kidney microsome (LKM) autoantibodies were significantly more represented in HCV positive patients than in negative ones (P < .05). A significant increase of HLA class II DR2 subtype (DRB1*1601,DQB1*0502) was observed in a group of 30 HCV negative patients who despite 10.3 +/- 2.2 years in a regular blood transfusion program did not show any evidence of HCV infection (Pc < .0092). Our results represent clear evidence for a relationship between HCV infection and immune extrahepatic abnormalities. A gene(s) located in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region may play an important role in conferring protection against HCV infection. PMID:8938157

  10. pSiM24 is a novel versatile gene expression vector for transient assays as well as stable expression of foreign genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Dey, Nrisingha; Maiti, Indu Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed a small and highly efficient binary Ti vector pSiM24 for plant transformation with maximum efficacy. In the pSiM24 vector, the size of the backbone of the early binary vector pKYLXM24 (GenBank Accession No. HM036220; a derivative of pKYLX71) was reduced from 12.8 kb to 7.1 kb. The binary vector pSiM24 is composed of the following genetic elements: left and right T-DNA borders, a modified full-length transcript promoter (M24) of Mirabilis mosaic virus with duplicated enhancer domains, three multiple cloning sites, a 3'rbcsE9 terminator, replication functions for Escherichia coli (ColE1) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (pRK2-OriV) and the replicase trfA gene, selectable marker genes for kanamycin resistance (nptII) and ampicillin resistance (bla). The pSiM24 plasmid offers a wide selection of cloning sites, high copy numbers in E. coli and a high cloning capacity for easily manipulating different genetic elements. It has been fully tested in transferring transgenes such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) both transiently (agro-infiltration, protoplast electroporation and biolistic) and stably in plant systems (Arabidopsis and tobacco) using both agrobacterium-mediated transformation and biolistic procedures. Not only reporter genes, several other introduced genes were also effectively expressed using pSiM24 expression vector. Hence, the pSiM24 vector would be useful for various plant biotechnological applications. In addition, the pSiM24 plasmid can act as a platform for other applications, such as gene expression studies and different promoter expressional analyses. PMID:24897541

  11. pSiM24 Is a Novel Versatile Gene Expression Vector for Transient Assays As Well As Stable Expression of Foreign Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Dey, Nrisingha; Maiti, Indu Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed a small and highly efficient binary Ti vector pSiM24 for plant transformation with maximum efficacy. In the pSiM24 vector, the size of the backbone of the early binary vector pKYLXM24 (GenBank Accession No. HM036220; a derivative of pKYLX71) was reduced from 12.8 kb to 7.1 kb. The binary vector pSiM24 is composed of the following genetic elements: left and right T-DNA borders, a modified full-length transcript promoter (M24) of Mirabilis mosaic virus with duplicated enhancer domains, three multiple cloning sites, a 3′rbcsE9 terminator, replication functions for Escherichia coli (ColE1) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens (pRK2-OriV) and the replicase trfA gene, selectable marker genes for kanamycin resistance (nptII) and ampicillin resistance (bla). The pSiM24 plasmid offers a wide selection of cloning sites, high copy numbers in E. coli and a high cloning capacity for easily manipulating different genetic elements. It has been fully tested in transferring transgenes such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) both transiently (agro-infiltration, protoplast electroporation and biolistic) and stably in plant systems (Arabidopsis and tobacco) using both agrobacterium-mediated transformation and biolistic procedures. Not only reporter genes, several other introduced genes were also effectively expressed using pSiM24 expression vector. Hence, the pSiM24 vector would be useful for various plant biotechnological applications. In addition, the pSiM24 plasmid can act as a platform for other applications, such as gene expression studies and different promoter expressional analyses. PMID:24897541

  12. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns. PMID:24214997

  13. Dual requirement for the yeast MMS19 gene in DNA repair and RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Lauder, S; Bankmann, M; Guzder, S N; Sung, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1996-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have indicated the involvement of a large number of protein factors in nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-damaged DNA. However, how MMS19 affects this process has remained unclear. Here, we report on the isolation of the MMS19 gene and the determination of its role in NER and other cellular processes. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that besides its function in NER, MMS19 also affects RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription. mms19delta cells do not grow at 37 degrees C, and mutant extract exhibits a thermolabile defect in Pol II transcription. Thus, Mms19 protein resembles TFIIH in that it is required for both transcription and DNA repair. However, addition of purified Mms19 protein does not alleviate the transcriptional defect of the mms19delta extract, nor does it stimulate the incision of UV-damaged DNA reconstituted from purified proteins. Interestingly, addition of purified TFIIH corrects the transcriptional defect of the mms19delta extract. Mms19 is, however, not a component of TFIIH or of Pol II holoenzyme. These and other results suggest that Mms19 affects NER and transcription by influencing the activity of TFIIH as an upstream regulatory element. It is proposed that mutations in the human MMS19 counterpart could result in syndromes in which both NER and transcription are affected. PMID:8943333

  14. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex class II B genes in cranes.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Akiyama, Takuya; Nishida, Chizuko; Takami, Kazutoshi; Onuma, Manabu; Momose, Kunikazu; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in cranes. Genomic sequences spanning exons 1 to 4 were amplified and determined in 13 crane species and three other species closely related to cranes. In all, 55 unique sequences were identified, and at least two polymorphic MHC class II B loci were found in most species. An analysis of sequence polymorphisms showed the signature of positive selection and recombination. A phylogenetic reconstruction based on exon 2 sequences indicated that trans-species polymorphism has persisted for at least 10 million years, whereas phylogenetic analyses of the sequences flanking exon 2 revealed a pattern of concerted evolution. These results suggest that both balancing selection and recombination play important roles in the crane MHC evolution. PMID:26452363

  15. Mutations in exons of the CYP17-II gene affect sex steroid concentration in male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruiqin; He, Feng; Wen, Haishen; Li, Jifang; Shi, Bao; Shi, Dan; Liu, Miao; Mu, Weijie; Zhang, Yuanqing; Hu, Jian; Han, Weiguo; Zhang, Jianan; Wang, Qingqing; Yuan, Yuren; Liu, Qun

    2012-03-01

    As a specific gene of fish, cytochrome P450c17-II ( CYP17-II) gene plays a key role in the growth, development an reproduction level of fish. In this study, the single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to characterize polymorphisms within the coding region of CYP17-II gene in a population of 75 male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus). Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in CYP17-II gene of Japanese flounder. They were c.G594A (p.G188R), c.G939A and c.G1502A (p.G490D). SNP1 (c.G594A), located in exon 4 of CYP17-II gene, was significantly associated with gonadosomatic index (GSI). Individuals with genotype GG of SNP1 had significantly lower GSI ( P < 0.05) than those with genotype AA or AG. SNP2 (c.G939A) located at the CpG island of CYP17-II gene. The mutation changed the methylation of exon 6. Individuals with genotype AA of SNP2 had significantly lower serum testosterone (T) level and hepatosomatic index (HSI) compared to those with genotype GG. The results suggested that SNP2 could influence the reproductive endocrine of male Japanese flounder. However, the SNP3 (c.G1502A) located in exon 9 did not affect the four measured reproductive traits. This study showed that CYP17-II gene could be a potentially useful candidate gene for the research of genetic breeding and physiological aspects of Japanese flounder.

  16. A new point mutation in the ND1 mitochondrial gene identified in a type II diabetic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, V.N.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1995-08-01

    A novel mutation in a mitochondrial gene was identified in a patient with type II diabetes mellitus. G-to-A transition was localized at the nt3316 position of gene ND1 and resulted in alanine threonine replacement at position 4 of mitochondrial NAD-H-dehydrogenase. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Two novel mutations of CLCN7 gene in Chinese families with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (type II).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Shao, Chong; Zheng, Yan; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed "probably damaging" with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense

  18. Expressed MHC class II genes in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from geographically disparate populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, L.; Aldridge, B.M.; Miles, A.K.; Stott, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is central to maintaining the immunologic vigor of individuals and populations. Classical MHC class II genes were targeted for partial sequencing in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from populations in California, Washington, and Alaska. Sequences derived from sea otter peripheral blood leukocyte mRNAs were similar to those classified as DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB in other species. Comparisons of the derived amino acid compositions supported the classification of these as functional molecules from at least one DQA, DQB, and DRA locus and at least two DRB loci. While limited in scope, phylogenetic analysis of the DRB peptide-binding region suggested the possible existence of distinct clades demarcated by geographic region. These preliminary findings support the need for additional MHC gene sequencing and expansion to a comprehensive study targeting additional otters. ?? 2006 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  19. Molecular evolution of the capsid gene in human norovirus genogroup II

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Miho; Matsushima, Yuki; Motoya, Takumi; Sakon, Naomi; Shigemoto, Naoki; Okamoto-Nakagawa, Reiko; Nishimura, Koichi; Yamashita, Yasutaka; Kuroda, Makoto; Saruki, Nobuhiro; Ryo, Akihide; Saraya, Takeshi; Morita, Yukio; Shirabe, Komei; Ishikawa, Mariko; Takahashi, Tomoko; Shinomiya, Hiroto; Okabe, Nobuhiko; Nagasawa, Koo; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Capsid protein of norovirus genogroup II (GII) plays crucial roles in host infection. Although studies on capsid gene evolution have been conducted for a few genotypes of norovirus, the molecular evolution of norovirus GII is not well understood. Here we report the molecular evolution of all GII genotypes, using various bioinformatics techniques. The time-scaled phylogenetic tree showed that the present GII strains diverged from GIV around 1630CE at a high evolutionary rate (around 10−3 substitutions/site/year), resulting in three lineages. The GII capsid gene had large pairwise distances (maximum > 0.39). The effective population sizes of the present GII strains were large (>102) for about 400 years. Positive (20) and negative (over 450) selection sites were estimated. Moreover, some linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were found in the deduced GII capsid protein. These results suggested that norovirus GII strains rapidly evolved with high divergence and adaptation to humans. PMID:27384324

  20. Cdk12 Is A Gene-Selective RNA Polymerase II Kinase That Regulates a Subset of the Transcriptome, Including Nrf2 Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Spirohn, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael; Bohmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The Nrf2 transcription factor is well conserved throughout metazoan evolution and serves as a central regulator of adaptive cellular responses to oxidative stress. We carried out an RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells to better understand the regulatory mechanisms governing Nrf2 target gene expression. This paper describes the identification and characterization of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) kinase Cdk12 as a factor that is required for Nrf2 target gene expression in cell culture and in vivo. Cdk12 is, however, not essential for bulk mRNA transcription and cells lacking CDK12 function are viable and able to proliferate. Consistent with previous findings on the DNA damage and heat shock responses, it emerges that Cdk12 may be specifically required for stress activated gene expression. Transcriptome analysis revealed that antioxidant gene expression is compromised in flies with reduced Cdk12 function, which makes them oxidative stress sensitive. In addition to supporting Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) induced gene activation, Cdk12 suppresses genes that support metabolic functions in stressed conditions. We suggest that Cdk12 acts as a gene-selective Pol II kinase that engages a global shift in gene expression to switch cells from a metabolically active state to “stress-defence mode” when challenged by external stress. PMID:26911346

  1. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species. PMID:27602045

  2. Association analysis of class II cytokine and receptor genes in vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Traks, Tanel; Karelson, Maire; Reimann, Ene; Rätsep, Ranno; Silm, Helgi; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli

    2016-05-01

    The loss of melanocytes in vitiligo is mainly attributed to defective autoimmune mechanisms and lately autoinflammatory mediators have become more emphasized. Among these, a number of class II cytokines and their receptors have displayed altered expression patterns in vitiligo. Thus, we selected 30 SNPs from the regions of respective genes to be genotyped in Estonian case-control sample (109 and 328 individuals, respectively). For more precise analyses, patients were divided into subgroups based on vitiligo progression activity, age of onset, sex, occurrence of vitiligo among relatives, extent of depigmented areas, appearance of Köbner's phenomenon, existence of halo nevi, occurrence of spontaneous repigmentation, and amount of thyroid peroxidase antibodies. No associations appeared in whole vitiligo group. In subgroups, several allelic and haplotype associations were found. The strongest involved SNPs rs12301088 (near IL26 gene), that was associated with familial vitiligo and existence of halo nevi, and rs2257167 (IFNAR1 gene), that was associated with female vitiligo. Additionally, haplotypes consisting of rs12301088 and rs12321603 alleles (IL26-IL22 genes), that were associated with familial vitiligo and existence of halo nevi. In conclusion, several genetic associations with vitiligo subphenotypes were revealed and functional explanations to these remain to be determined in respective studies. PMID:26429320

  3. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species. PMID:27602045

  4. Efficient transcription of the human angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene requires intronic sequence elements.

    PubMed Central

    Warnecke, C; Willich, T; Holzmeister, J; Bottari, S P; Fleck, E; Regitz-Zagrosek, V

    1999-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms of human angiotensin II type 2 receptor (hAT2) gene regulation we functionally characterized the promoter and downstream regions of the gene. 5'-Terminal deletion mutants from -1417/+100 to -46/+100 elicited significant but low functional activity in luciferase reporter gene assays with PC12W cells. Inclusion into the promoter constructs of intron 1 and the transcribed region of the hAT2 gene up to the translation start enhanced luciferase activity 6.7+/-1.6-fold and 11.6+/-1.7-fold (means+/-S.E.M.) respectively, whereas fusion of the promoter to the spliced 5' untranslated region of hAT2 cDNA did not, which indicated an enhancement caused by intronic sequence elements. Reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR confirmed that the chimaeric hAT2-luciferase mRNA was regularly spliced in PC12W cells. A Northern blot analysis of transfected cells showed levels of luciferase mRNA expression consistent with the respective enzyme activities. Mapping of intron 1 revealed that a 12 bp sequence in the centre of the intron was required for the increase in promoter activity, whereas the 5' adjacent intronic region mediated a decrease in luciferase activity. Mutation of the 12 bp region led to altered protein binding and markedly decreased luciferase activity. Cloned into a promoterless luciferase vector, a 123 bp intron 1 fragment was able to direct reporter gene expression to the same activity as occurred in conjunction with the 5' flanking region. These results indicate that sequence elements in intron 1 are necessary for efficient transcription of hAT2. In reporter gene assays, intron 1 might by itself function as a promoter and initiate transcription from an alternative start point. PMID:10229654

  5. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    SciTech Connect

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W.

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Molecular cloning of the cowpea leghemoglobin II gene and expression of its cDNA in Escherichia coli. Purification and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, R; Moran, J F; Sarath, G; Luan, P; Klucas, R V

    1997-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) nodules contain three leghemoglobins (LbI, LbII, and LbIII) that are encoded by at least two genes. We have cloned and sequenced the gene that encodes for LbII (lbII), the most abundant Lb in cowpea nodules, using total DNA as the template for PCR. Primers were designed using the sequence of the soybean lbc gene. The lbII gene is 679 bp in length and codes for a predicted protein of 145 amino acids. Using sequences of the cowpea lbII gene for the synthesis of primers and total nodule RNA as the template, we cloned a cDNA for LbII into a constitutive expression vector (pEMBL19+) and then expressed it in Escherichia coli. Recombinant LbII (rLbII) and native LbII (nLbII) from cowpea nodules were purified to homogeneity using standard techniques. Properties of rLbII were compared with nLbII by partially sequencing the proteins and by sodium dodecyl sulfate- and isoelectric focusing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western-blot analysis using anti-soybean Lba antibodies, tryptic and chymotryptic mapping, and spectrophotometric techniques. The data showed that the structural and spectral characteristics of rLbII and nLbII were similar. The rLbII was reversibly oxygenated/deoxygenated, showing that it is a functional hemoglobin. PMID:9193085

  7. MHC II gene knockout in tissue engineering may prevent immune rejection of transplants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miaomiao; Liu, Lei

    2008-01-01

    The repair and reconstruction of tissue defects and organ loss are severe problems, and many patients are eager to find avenues to these matters. Up until now, the number of methods used to repair tissue defects has increased, but all of these have their own advantages and inconveniences, and do not seem to have been optimized. The development of tissue engineering offers new hopes to patients with tissue defects. To regenerate tissues and organs, we first need a source of seed cells. However, the sources of autologous cells are restricted, cell number is small, and xenogenic cells result in immunological rejections. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism is a key factor in tissue grafts. MHC II, in particular, is associated with allogeneic transplantation. We hypothesize that if we knock-out the MHC II gene of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro, these cells would not express MHC II molecules, and rejection problems will be solved. Accordingly, the industrialization of tissue engineering will be feasible, and products of tissue engineering will be utilized widely for any clinical treatments. PMID:17904760

  8. Nucleotide sequence of the Dpn II DNA methylase gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its relationship to the dam gene of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Mannarelli, B.M.; Balganesh, T.S.; Greenberg, B.; Springhorn, S.S.; Lacks, S.A.

    1985-07-01

    The structural gene (dpnM) for the Dpn II DNA methylase of Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is part of the Dpn II restriction system and methylates adenine in the sequence 5'-G-A-T-C-3', was identified by subcloning fragments of a chromosomal segment from a Dpn II-producing strain in an S. pneumoniae host/vector cloning system and demonstrating function of the gene also in Bacillus subtilis. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the gene and adjacent DNA indicates that it encodes a polypeptide of 32,903 daltons. A putative promoter for transcription of the gene lies within a hundred nucleotides of the polypeptide start codon. Comparison of the coding sequence to that of the dam gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes a similar methylase, revealed 30% of the amino acid residues in the two enzymes to be identical. This homology presumably reflects a common origin of the two genes prior to the divergence of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It is suggested that the restriction function of the gene is primitive, and that the homologous restriction system in E. coli has evolved to play an accessory role in heteroduplex DNA base mismatch repair.

  9. Early diagnosis of and surgical strategy for adrenal medullary disease in MEN II gene carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, S.; Tisell, L.E.; Fjaelling, M.L.; Lindberg, S.; Jacobsson, L.; Zachrisson, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen multiple endocrine neoplasia type II (MEN II) gene carriers--12 who had undergone thyroidectomy because of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and 4 whose thyroid glands had been removed because of C cell hyperplasia--were examined for the presence of pheochromocytomas. No patient had sought medical advice for pheochromocytoma symptoms. Fourteen patients had MEN IIa syndromes, one patient had a MEN IIb and another patient had a mixed syndrome of von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis and MEN II. Eight patients had undergone unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma 11 +/- 4 years before. The patients underwent clinical examination, determination of the urinary excretion of catecholamines and metabolites, and /sup 131/I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I-MIBG) and CAT scans. /sup 131/I-MIBG scanning was performed with images 1, 4, and 7 days after the radionuclide injection. In seven of eight patients who had undergone unilateral adrenalectomies, the /sup 131/I-MIBG scans showed accumulation of the radionuclide in the remaining adrenal gland. Bilateral adrenal accumulation of the radionuclide was demonstrated in seven of eight MEN IIa gene carriers who had not undergone adrenalectomy. Five patients, two of whom had undergone adrenalectomy, were found to have unilateral pheochromocytomas less than 2 cm in diameter. Only one of these five patients had an elevated excretion of urinary catecholamines. Between day 4 and day 7 after /sup 131/I-MIBG injection, adrenal glands with pheochromocytomas increased their relative accumulation of the radionuclide significantly more (p less than 0.02) than did adrenal glands without any demonstrable pheochromocytomas. All the pheochromocytomas were viewed by means of CAT scans.

  10. RNA polymerase II interacts with the promoter region of the noninduced hsp70 gene in Drosophila melanogaster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, D.S.; Lis, J.T.

    1986-11-01

    By using a protein-DNA cross-linking method, we examined the in vivo distribution of RNA polymerase II on the hsp70 heat shock gene in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 cells. In heat shock-induced cells, a high level of RNA polymerase II was detected on the entire gene, while in noninduced cells, the RNA polymerase II was confined to the 5' end of the hsp70 gene, predominantly between nucleotides -12 and +65 relative to the start of transcription. This association of RNA polymerase II was apparent whether the cross-linking was performed by a 10-min UV irradiation of chilled cells with mercury vapor lamps or by a 40-microsecond irradiation of cells with a high-energy xenon flash lamp. We hypothesize that RNA polymerase II has access to, and a high affinity for, the promoter region of this gene before induction, and this poised RNA polymerase II may be critical in the mechanism of transcription activation.

  11. Structure, expression and function of Allomyces arbuscula CDP II (metacaspase) gene.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Mukti; Cattaneo, Arlette; Hugh, Séverine; Pawlowski, Jan; Cox, Jos A

    2010-06-01

    Allomyces arbuscula, a primitive chytridiomycete fungus, has two Ca(2+)-dependent cysteine proteases, the CDP I and CDP II. We have cloned and analyzed the nucleotide sequence of CDP II gene and domain structure of the protein. Blast analysis of the sequence has shown that the protein belongs to a newly described member of caspase superfamily protein, the metacaspase, a CD clan of C14 family cysteine protease, we hence-forth name it as AMca 2 (Allomyces metacaspase 2). Southern hybridization studies have shown that the gene exists in a single copy per genome. The transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization has confirmed our previous results that the protein is developmentally regulated, i.e. present in active growth phase but disappears during nutritional stress which also induces reproductive differentiation, indicating that the protein promotes cell growth, not death. The recombinant gene product expressed in Escherichiacoli has all the catalytic properties of native enzyme, i.e. sensitivity to protease inhibitors and substrate specificity. There is an absolute requirement of Ca(2+) for the activation of catalytic activity and the presence of R residue at the cleavage site (P1 position) in the substrate. The presence of a second basic residue, either R or K, in the P2 position strongly inhibits the catalytic activity which is stimulated by the presence of P and to a lesser extent G at this site. Peptide substrates with D at the cleavage site are not recognised and therefore not cleaved. The enzyme activity is inhibited by EDTA-EGTA, cysteine protease inhibitors and a specific peptide inhibitor Ac GVRCHCL TFA, but not by E64, although a potent inhibitor of cysteine proteases. PMID:20214955

  12. Major histocompatibility complex class II A genes in cichlid fishes: identification, expression, linkage relationships, and haplotype variation.

    PubMed

    Murray, B W; Shintani, S; Sültmann, H; Klein, J

    2000-06-01

    Two cichlid species, the haplochromine Aulonocara hansbaenschi and the tilapiine Oreochromis niloticus, were used to study the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II A variation within this group. Multiple class II A sequences were recovered from A. hansbaenschi and O. niloticus cDNA libraries and three sequence families, DAA, DBA, and DCA, were identified. Sets of O. niloticus haploid embryo families were used to determine the linkage relationships of these genes. Two independently assorting linkage groups were detected, DAA and DBA/DCA, neither of which is linked to the previously described Mhc class I gene cluster. Three DCA genes and up to four DBA genes were found to segregate in different haplotypes, whereas DAA occurred as a single locus. Four DBA haplotypes, DBA*H1-H4, were identified and shown to co-segregate with the previously described class II B haplotypes. Four DCA haplotypes, DCA*H1-H4, were found at a distance of 37 cM from the DBA/class II B cluster; in one DCA haplotype, DCA*H5, the genes were tightly linked to the DBA/class II B clusters. Transcripts of DAA and DBA genes were found in O. niloticus hepatopancreas and spleen; transcripts of DCA genes were detected in the A. hansbaenschi cDNA library, but not in O. niloticus. These findings provide a basis for using class II haplotypes as markers in the study of adaptive radiation in the cichlid species flocks of the East African Great Lakes. PMID:10912508

  13. Origin of the autoreactive anti-type II collagen response. II. Specificities, antibody isotypes and usage of V gene families of anti-type II collagen B cells.

    PubMed

    Holmdahl, R; Bailey, C; Enander, I; Mayer, R; Klareskog, L; Moran, T; Bona, C

    1989-03-15

    Autoantibodies play an important role in the pathogenesis of type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice. We have earlier reported a high frequency of cells producing anti-CII autoantibodies and a low frequency of cells producing multispecific antibodies, in regional lymph nodes 9 to 11 days after primary immunization with CII. It is shown here that anti-CII antibodies produced during primary immune response are IgG-antibodies mainly of IgG2a, IgG1 and IgG2b subclasses while IgM antibodies dominate primary responses elicited by OVA and denatured CII as analyzed with a large panel of hybridomas. Anti-CII antibodies generated during the primary response recognize at least five different epitopes on the CII molecule. The specificities of these antibodies for various epitopes result from combinational association of products encoded by genes derived from various VH and VK families and/or by the occurrence of somatic mutations. It is suggested that the primary anti-CII autoantibody response involves activation of memory B cells and is in this aspect different from the origin of "natural" autoantibodies. PMID:2493500

  14. Interactions between DNA and gemini surfactant: impact on gene therapy: part II.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Taksim; Kamel, Amany O; Wettig, Shawn D

    2016-02-01

    Nonviral gene delivery, provides distinct treatment modalities for the inherited and acquired diseases, relies upon the encapsulation of a gene of interest, which is then ideally delivered to the target cells. Variations in the chemical structure of gemini surfactants and subsequent physicochemical characteristics of the gemini-based lipoplexes and their impact on efficient gene transfection were assessed in part I, which was published in first March 2016 issue of Nanomedicine (1103). In order to design an efficient vector using gemini surfactants, the interaction of the surfactant with DNA and other components of the delivery system must be characterized, and more critically, well understood. Such studies will help to understand how nonviral transfection complexes, in general, overcome various cellular barriers. The Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer studies, atomic force microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry, small-angle x-ray scattering, are extensively used to evaluate the interaction behavior of gemini surfactants with DNA and other vector components. Part II of this review focuses on the use of these unique techniques to understand their interaction with DNA. PMID:26784450

  15. Evolutionary diversification and characterization of the eubacterial gene family encoding DXR type II, an alternative isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoprenoids constitute a vast family of natural compounds performing diverse and essential functions in all domains of life. In most eubacteria, isoprenoids are synthesized through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The production of MEP is usually catalyzed by deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR-I) but a few organisms use an alternative DXR-like enzyme (DXR-II). Results Searches through 1498 bacterial complete proteomes detected 130 sequences with similarity to DXR-II. Phylogenetic analysis identified three well-resolved clades: the DXR-II family (clustering 53 sequences including eleven experimentally verified as functional enzymes able to produce MEP), and two previously uncharacterized NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductase families (designated DLO1 and DLO2 for DXR-II-like oxidoreductases 1 and 2). Our analyses identified amino acid changes critical for the acquisition of DXR-II biochemical function through type-I functional divergence, two of them mapping onto key residues for DXR-II activity. DXR-II showed a markedly discontinuous distribution, which was verified at several levels: taxonomic (being predominantly found in Alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes), metabolic (being mostly found in bacteria with complete functional MEP pathways with or without DXR-I), and phenotypic (as no biological/phenotypic property was found to be preferentially distributed among DXR-II-containing strains, apart from pathogenicity in animals). By performing a thorough comparative sequence analysis of GC content, 3:1 dinucleotide frequencies, codon usage and codon adaptation indexes (CAI) between DXR-II sequences and their corresponding genomes, we examined the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), as opposed to an scenario of massive gene loss, in the evolutionary origin and diversification of the DXR-II subfamily in bacteria. Conclusions Our analyses support a single origin of the DXR-II family through functional divergence, in which constitutes

  16. Sequence homology requirements for transcriptional silencing of 35S transgenes and post-transcriptional silencing of nitrite reductase (trans)genes by the tobacco 271 locus.

    PubMed

    Thierry, D; Vaucheret, H

    1996-12-01

    The transgene locus of the tobacco plant 271 (271 locus) is located on a telomere and consists of multiple copies of a plasmid carrying an NptII marker gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 19S promoter and the leaf-specific nitrite reductase Nii1 cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Previous analysis of gene expression in leaves has shown that this locus triggers both post-transcriptional silencing of the host leaf-specific Nii genes and transcriptional silencing of transgenes driven by the 19S or 35S promoter irrespective of their coding sequence and of their location in the genome. In this paper we show that silencing of transgenes carrying Nii1 sequences occurs irrespective of the promoter driving their expression and of their location within the genome. This phenomenon occurs in roots as well as in leaves although root Nii genes share only 84% identity with leaf-specific Nii1 sequences carried by the 271 locus. Conversely, transgenes carrying the bean Nii gene (which shares 76% identity with the tobacco Nii1 gene) escape silencing by the 271 locus. We also show that transgenes driven by the figwort mosaic virus 34S promoter (which shares 63% identity with the 35S promoter) also escape silencing by the 271 locus. Taken together, these results indicate that a high degree of sequence similarity is required between the sequences of the silencing locus and of the target (trans)genes for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing. PMID:9002606

  17. Development of genome-specific primers for homoeologous genes in allopolyploid species: the waxy and starch synthase II genes in allohexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as examples

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In allopolypoid crops, homoeologous genes in different genomes exhibit a very high sequence similarity, especially in the coding regions of genes. This makes it difficult to design genome-specific primers to amplify individual genes from different genomes. Development of genome-specific primers for agronomically important genes in allopolypoid crops is very important and useful not only for the study of sequence diversity and association mapping of genes in natural populations, but also for the development of gene-based functional markers for marker-assisted breeding. Here we report on a useful approach for the development of genome-specific primers in allohexaploid wheat. Findings In the present study, three genome-specific primer sets for the waxy (Wx) genes and four genome-specific primer sets for the starch synthase II (SSII) genes were developed mainly from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and/or insertions or deletions (Indels) in introns and intron-exon junctions. The size of a single PCR product ranged from 750 bp to 1657 bp. The total length of amplified PCR products by these genome-specific primer sets accounted for 72.6%-87.0% of the Wx genes and 59.5%-61.6% of the SSII genes. Five genome-specific primer sets for the Wx genes (one for Wx-7A, three for Wx-4A and one for Wx-7D) could distinguish the wild type wheat and partial waxy wheat lines. These genome-specific primer sets for the Wx and SSII genes produced amplifications in hexaploid wheat, cultivated durum wheat, and Aegilops tauschii accessions, but failed to generate amplification in the majority of wild diploid and tetraploid accessions. Conclusions For the first time, we report on the development of genome-specific primers from three homoeologous Wx and SSII genes covering the majority of the genes in allohexaploid wheat. These genome-specific primers are being used for the study of sequence diversity and association mapping of the three homoeologous Wx and SSII genes in natural

  18. ZBTB32 is an early repressor of the class II transactivator and MHC class II gene expression during B cell differentiation to plasma cells1

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyesuk; Scharer, Christopher D.; Majumder, Parimal; Davis, Carl W.; Butler, Royce; Zinzow-Kramer, Wendy; Skountzou, Ioanna; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G.; Ahmed, Rafi; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    The MHC class II transactivator (CIITA) and MHC class II expression is silenced during the differentiation of B cells to plasma cells. When B cell differentiation is carried out ex vivo, CIITA silencing occurs rapidly but the factors contributing to this event are not known. ZBTB32, also known as repressor of GATA3, was identified as an early repressor of CIITA in an ex vivo plasma cell differentiation model. ZBTB32 activity occurred at a time when Blimp-1, the regulator of plasma cell fate and suppressor of CIITA, was minimally induced. Ectopic expression of ZBTB32 suppressed CIITA and I-A gene expression in B cells. ShRNA depletion of ZBTB32 in a plasma cell line resulted in reexpression of CIITA and I-A. Compared to conditional Blimp-1 knock out and wild-type B cells, B cells from ZBTB32/ROG-knock out mice displayed delayed kinetics in silencing CIITA during ex vivo plasma cell differentiation. ZBTB32 was found to bind to the CIITA gene, suggesting that ZBTB32 directly regulates CIITA. Lastly, ZBTB32 and Blimp-1 coimmunoprecipitated, suggesting that the two repressors may ultimately function together to silence CIITA expression. These results introduce ZBTB32 as a novel regulator of MHC-II gene expression and a potential regulatory partner of Blimp-1 in repressing gene expression. PMID:22851713

  19. Coordinated changes of histone modifications and HDAC mobilization regulate the induction of MHC class II genes by Trichostatin A

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) induces the transcription of the Major Histocompatibility Class II (MHC II) DRA gene in a way independent of the master coactivator CIITA. To analyze the molecular mechanisms by which this epigenetic regulator stimulates MHC II expression, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to monitor the alterations in histone modifications that correlate with DRA transcription after TSA treatment. We found that a dramatic increase in promoter linked histone acetylation is followed by an increase in Histone H3 lysine 4 methylation and a decrease of lysine 9 methylation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments showed that TSA increases the mobility of HDAC while decreasing the mobility of the class II enhanceosome factor RFX5. These data, in combination with ChIP experiments, indicate that the TSA-mediated induction of DRA transcription involves HDAC relocation and enhanceosome stabilization. In order to gain a genome-wide view of the genes responding to inhibition of deacetylases, we compared the transcriptome of B cells before and after TSA treatment using Affymetrix microarrays. This analysis showed that in addition to the DRA gene, the entire MHC II family and the adjacent histone cluster that are located in chromosome 6p21-22 locus are strongly induced by TSA. A complex pattern of gene reprogramming by TSA involves immune recognition, antiviral, apoptotic and inflammatory pathways and extends the rationale for using Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi) to modulate the immune response. PMID:16452299

  20. Two distinct genetic loci regulating class II gene expression are defective in human mutant and patient cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Accolla, R S; Pious, D; Zegers, B J; Strominger, J L

    1988-01-01

    Heterokaryons were prepared and analyzed shortly after cell fusion using two mutant class-II-negative human B cell lines (RJ 2.2.5 and 6.1.6) and a cell line (TF) from a patient with a class-II-negative Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome. The resulting transient heterokaryons were analyzed by using an anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibody to assess the cell surface expression of HLA-DR (the major subtype of class II antigens) by immunofluorescence microscopy and by using uniformly 32P-labeled SP6 RNA probes in Northern blots and RNase protection assays to assess mRNA synthesis. We find that class II gene expression in a B cell line from a Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome patient (TF) is rescued by a B cell line which expresses class II antigens indicating that this disease, at least in part, is caused by a defect(s) in a genetic locus encoding a factor(s) necessary for class II gene expression. Secondly, reciprocal genetic complementation was demonstrated in the heterokaryons 6.1.6 x RJ 2.2.5 and TF x RJ 2.2.5 (but not in TF x 6.1.6) by detection of cell surface DR by immunofluorescence microscopy and by a novel class II mRNA typing technique which allows characterization of distinct class II alleles. Thus, the two mutants generated in vitro have defects at two different genetic loci encoding specific regulatory factors necessary for human class II gene expression. One of these mutant cell lines, but not the other, complements the defect in the patient cell line, TF. Images PMID:2458252

  1. Promoter Structure of the RNA Polymerase II Large Subunit Gene in Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae

    PubMed Central

    Bird, D. McK.; Kaloshian, I.; Molinari, S.

    1997-01-01

    The 5'-end of the Caenorhabditis elegans ama-1 gene transcript, which encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, was cloned. Sequencing revealed that the message is trans-spliced. To characterize the Ce-ama-1 promoter, DNA sequence spanning 3 kb upstream from the initiation codon was determined. Typical elements, such as TATA and Spl sites, were absent. The homologue of ama-1 in C. briggsae, Cb-ama-1, was isolated and its 5' flanking sequence compared with that of Ce-ama-1, revealing only limited similarity, although both sequences included a potential initiator-class transcriptional regulator and phased repeats of an AT₃C motif. The latter elements are postulated to facilitate DNA bending and may play a role in transcription regulation. PMID:19274143

  2. Impact of angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism on insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Mesallamy, H; El-Refaie, T; El-Razek, R A

    2013-04-01

    Insulin resistance is allegedly a target pathophysiological mechanism in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome. Moreover, this metabolic alteration is possibly genetically determined. In view of the recent evidence implicating genetic variants of the renin-angiotensin system as candidates in several metabolic disorders, we investigated the allele and genotype frequencies of the A1166 C polymorphism of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor in relation with various metabolic and biochemical parameters in affected females trying to asses its role in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. The study was conducted on 83 females of which 39 females served as the control group. The participants were matched for age, body mass index and degree of obesity. For all subjects biochemical parameters were assayed including soluble CD40 ligand together with fasting glucose and insulin which were used for calculation of insulin resistance indices, Genotyping performed using real time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the C allele frequency and the AC genotype were less frequently observed in patients compared to controls, however this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.146). Lack of the C allele was associated with adverse metabolic parameters including higher rate of insulin resistance as well as solubes CD40 ligand in the patients group. Results of the current study support a causative role for the A1166 C polymorphism of the angiotensin II type 1 gene polymorphism in the pathogenesis or phenotypic expression of polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:23564192

  3. Btn2a2, a T cell immunomodulatory molecule coregulated with MHC class II genes

    PubMed Central

    Sarter, Kerstin; Leimgruber, Elisa; Gobet, Florian; Agrawal, Vishal; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Barras, Emmanuèle; Mastelic-Gavillet, Béatris; Kamath, Arun; Fontannaz, Paola; Guéry, Leslie; Duraes, Fernanda do Valle; Lippens, Carla; Ravn, Ulla; Santiago-Raber, Marie-Laure; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Hugues, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that butyrophilins, which are members of the extended B7 family of co-stimulatory molecules, have diverse functions in the immune system. We found that the human and mouse genes encoding butyrophilin-2A2 (BTN2A2) are regulated by the class II trans-activator and regulatory factor X, two transcription factors dedicated to major histocompatibility complex class II expression, suggesting a role in T cell immunity. To address this, we generated Btn2a2-deficient mice. Btn2a2−/− mice exhibited enhanced effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, impaired CD4+ regulatory T cell induction, potentiated antitumor responses, and exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Altered immune responses were attributed to Btn2a2 deficiency in antigen-presenting cells rather than T cells or nonhematopoietic cells. These results provide the first genetic evidence that BTN2A2 is a co-inhibitory molecule that modulates T cell–mediated immunity. PMID:26809444

  4. Mutation Update for COL2A1 Gene Variants Associated with Type II Collagenopathies.

    PubMed

    Barat-Houari, Mouna; Sarrabay, Guillaume; Gatinois, Vincent; Fabre, Aurélie; Dumont, Bruno; Genevieve, David; Touitou, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the COL2A1 gene cause a spectrum of rare autosomal-dominant conditions characterized by skeletal dysplasia, short stature, and sensorial defects. An early diagnosis is critical to providing relevant patient care and follow-up, and genetic counseling to affected families. There are no recent exhaustive descriptions of the causal mutations in the literature. Here, we provide a review of COL2A1 mutations extracted from the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) that we updated with data from PubMed and our own patients. Over 700 patients were recorded, harboring 415 different mutations. One-third of the mutations are dominant-negative mutations that affect the glycine residue in the G-X-Y repeats of the alpha 1 chain. These mutations disrupt the collagen triple helix and are common in achondrogenesis type II and hypochondrogenesis. The mutations resulting in a premature stop codon are found in less severe phenotypes such as Stickler syndrome. The p.(Arg275Cys) substitution is found in all patients with COL2A1-associated Czech dysplasia. LOVD-COL2A1 provides support and potential collaborative material for scientific and clinical projects aimed at elucidating phenotype-genotype correlation and differential diagnosis in patients with type II collagenopathies. PMID:26443184

  5. Interfacial stress affects rat alveolar type II cell signaling and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hobi, Nina; Ravasio, Andrea; Haller, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Previous work from our group (Ravasio A, Hobi N, Bertocchi C, Jesacher A, Dietl P, Haller T. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 300: C1456-C1465, 2011.) showed that contact of alveolar epithelial type II cells with an air-liquid interface (I(AL)) leads to a paradoxical situation. It is a potential threat that can cause cell injury, but also a Ca(2+)-dependent stimulus for surfactant secretion. Both events can be explained by the impact of interfacial tensile forces on cellular structures. Here, the strength of this mechanical stimulus became also apparent in microarray studies by a rapid and significant change on the transcriptional level. Cells challenged with an I(AL) in two different ways showed activation/inactivation of cellular pathways involved in stress response and defense, and a detailed Pubmatrix search identified genes associated with several lung diseases and injuries. Altogether, they suggest a close relationship of interfacial stress sensation with current models in alveolar micromechanics. Further similarities between I(AL) and cell stretch were found with respect to the underlying signaling events. The source of Ca(2+) was extracellular, and the transmembrane Ca(2+) entry pathway suggests the involvement of a mechanosensitive channel. We conclude that alveolar type II cells, due to their location and morphology, are specific sensors of the I(AL), but largely protected from interfacial stress by surfactant release. PMID:22610352

  6. Interfacial stress affects rat alveolar type II cell signaling and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Hobi, Nina; Ravasio, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Previous work from our group (Ravasio A, Hobi N, Bertocchi C, Jesacher A, Dietl P, Haller T. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 300: C1456–C1465, 2011.) showed that contact of alveolar epithelial type II cells with an air-liquid interface (IAL) leads to a paradoxical situation. It is a potential threat that can cause cell injury, but also a Ca2+-dependent stimulus for surfactant secretion. Both events can be explained by the impact of interfacial tensile forces on cellular structures. Here, the strength of this mechanical stimulus became also apparent in microarray studies by a rapid and significant change on the transcriptional level. Cells challenged with an IAL in two different ways showed activation/inactivation of cellular pathways involved in stress response and defense, and a detailed Pubmatrix search identified genes associated with several lung diseases and injuries. Altogether, they suggest a close relationship of interfacial stress sensation with current models in alveolar micromechanics. Further similarities between IAL and cell stretch were found with respect to the underlying signaling events. The source of Ca2+ was extracellular, and the transmembrane Ca2+ entry pathway suggests the involvement of a mechanosensitive channel. We conclude that alveolar type II cells, due to their location and morphology, are specific sensors of the IAL, but largely protected from interfacial stress by surfactant release. PMID:22610352

  7. The human HLA class II alpha chain gene DZ alpha is distinct from genes in the DP, DQ and DR subregions.

    PubMed Central

    Trowsdale, J; Kelly, A

    1985-01-01

    A new human HLA class II alpha gene DZ alpha was sequenced. The structure and organisation of the gene was similar to other alpha chain genes except for a particularly small intron (95 bp) after the exon encoding the alpha 2 domain, and the position of the stop codon, which was on a different exon to that encoding the cytoplasmic portion of the molecule. Comparison of the DZ alpha sequence with other class II genes showed that the gene is about as distantly related to alpha chain genes in the DP, DQ and DR subregions as they are to each other. The DZ alpha gene results in an unusually large mRNA transcript of greater than 3.0 kb, detected on Northern blots of B cell lines. From the sequence, there are no obvious features that would render DZ alpha a pseudogene, except for an unusual poly(A)+ addition signal, ACTAAA. Analysis of Northern blots shows that sequences downstream (3') of this signal are present in mature mRNA. The large transcripts are probably due to defects in the signals for processing of the mRNA transcript at the 3' end. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3000765

  8. Point mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene in tyrosinemia type II.

    PubMed Central

    Natt, E; Kida, K; Odievre, M; Di Rocco, M; Scherer, G

    1992-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome, RHS) is a disease of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease results from deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT; L-tyrosine:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.5), a 454-amino acid protein encoded by a gene with 12 exons. To identify the causative mutations in five TAT alleles cloned from three RHS patients, chimeric genes constructed from normal and mutant TAT alleles were tested in directing TAT activity in a transient expression assay. DNA sequence analysis of the regions identified as nonfunctional revealed six different point mutations. Three RHS alleles have nonsense mutations at codons 57, 223, and 417, respectively. One "complex" RHS allele carries a GT----GG splice donor mutation in intron 8 together with a Gly----Val substitution at amino acid 362. A new splice acceptor site in intron 2 of the fifth RHS allele leads to a shift in reading frame. Images PMID:1357662

  9. Molecular evolution of the capsid gene in human norovirus genogroup II.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Miho; Matsushima, Yuki; Motoya, Takumi; Sakon, Naomi; Shigemoto, Naoki; Okamoto-Nakagawa, Reiko; Nishimura, Koichi; Yamashita, Yasutaka; Kuroda, Makoto; Saruki, Nobuhiro; Ryo, Akihide; Saraya, Takeshi; Morita, Yukio; Shirabe, Komei; Ishikawa, Mariko; Takahashi, Tomoko; Shinomiya, Hiroto; Okabe, Nobuhiko; Nagasawa, Koo; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Capsid protein of norovirus genogroup II (GII) plays crucial roles in host infection. Although studies on capsid gene evolution have been conducted for a few genotypes of norovirus, the molecular evolution of norovirus GII is not well understood. Here we report the molecular evolution of all GII genotypes, using various bioinformatics techniques. The time-scaled phylogenetic tree showed that the present GII strains diverged from GIV around 1630CE at a high evolutionary rate (around 10(-3) substitutions/site/year), resulting in three lineages. The GII capsid gene had large pairwise distances (maximum > 0.39). The effective population sizes of the present GII strains were large (>10(2)) for about 400 years. Positive (20) and negative (over 450) selection sites were estimated. Moreover, some linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were found in the deduced GII capsid protein. These results suggested that norovirus GII strains rapidly evolved with high divergence and adaptation to humans. PMID:27384324

  10. Mutations in the gene encoding starch synthase II profoundly alter amylopectin structure in pea embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J; Lloyd, J R; Tomlinson, K; Barber, L; Edwards, A; Wang, T L; Martin, C; Hedley, C L; Smith, A M

    1998-01-01

    Mutations at the rug5 (rugosus5) locus have been used to elucidate the role of the major soluble isoform of starch synthase II (SSII) in amylopectin synthesis in the developing pea embryo. The SSII gene maps to the rug5 locus, and the gene in one of three rug5 mutant lines has been shown to carry a base pair substitution that introduces a stop codon into the open reading frame. All three mutant alleles cause a dramatic reduction or loss of the SSII protein. The mutations have pleiotropic effects on the activities of other isoforms of starch synthase but apparently not on those of other enzymes of starch synthesis. These mutations result in abnormal starch granule morphology and amylopectin structure. Amylopectin contains fewer chains of intermediate length (B2 and B3 chains) and more very short and very long chains than does amylopectin from wild-type embryos. The results suggest that SSII may play a specific role in the synthesis of B2 and B3 chains of amylopectin. The extent to which these findings can be extrapolated to other species is discussed. PMID:9501114

  11. Incomplete synthesis of N-glycans in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II caused by a defect in the gene encoding. alpha. -mannosidase II

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.N.; Masri, K.A. ); Dell, A. ); Luzzatto, L. ); Moremen, K.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with a positive acidified-serum-lysis test (HEMPAS), is a genetic anemia in humans inherited by an autosomally recessive mode. The enzyme defect in most HEMPAS patients has previously been proposed as a lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, resulting in a lack of polylactosamine on proteins and leading to the accumulation of polylactosaminyl lipids. A recent HEMPAS case, G.C., has now been analyzed by cell-surface labeling, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of glycopeptides, and activity assay of glycosylation enzymes. Significantly decreased glycosylation of polylactosaminoglycan proteins and incompletely processed asparagine-linked oligosaccharides were detected in the erythrocyte membranes of G.C. These results suggest that G.C. cells contain a mutation in {alpha}-ManII-encoding gene that results in inefficient expression of {alpha}-ManII mRNA, either through reduced transcription or message instability. This report demonstrates that HEMPAS is caused by a defective gene encoding an enzyme necessary for the synthesis of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides.

  12. Trans-species polymorphism and selection in the MHC class II DRA genes of domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Ballingall, Keith T; Rocchi, Mara S; McKeever, Declan J; Wright, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Highly polymorphic genes with central roles in lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance are grouped together in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in higher vertebrates. Generally, across vertebrate species the class II MHC DRA gene is highly conserved with only limited allelic variation. Here however, we provide evidence of trans-species polymorphism at the DRA locus in domestic sheep (Ovis aries). We describe variation at the Ovar-DRA locus that is far in excess of anything described in other vertebrate species. The divergent DRA allele (Ovar-DRA*0201) differs from the sheep reference sequences by 20 nucleotides, 12 of which appear non-synonymous. Furthermore, DRA*0201 is paired with an equally divergent DRB1 allele (Ovar-DRB1*0901), which is consistent with an independent evolutionary history for the DR sub-region within this MHC haplotype. No recombination was observed between the divergent DRA and B genes in a range of breeds and typical levels of MHC class II DR protein expression were detected at the surface of leukocyte populations obtained from animals homozygous for the DRA*0201, DRB1*0901 haplotype. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis groups Ovar-DRA*0201 with DRA sequences derived from species within the Oryx and Alcelaphus genera rather than clustering with other ovine and caprine DRA alleles. Tests for Darwinian selection identified 10 positively selected sites on the branch leading to Ovar-DRA*0201, three of which are predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen. As the Ovis, Oryx and Alcelaphus genera have not shared a common ancestor for over 30 million years, the DRA*0201 and DRB1*0901 allelic pair is likely to be of ancient origin and present in the founding population from which all contemporary domestic sheep breeds are derived. The conservation of the integrity of this unusual DR allelic pair suggests some selective advantage which is likely to be associated with the presentation of pathogen antigen to T-cells and the

  13. Trans-Species Polymorphism and Selection in the MHC Class II DRA Genes of Domestic Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Ballingall, Keith T.; Rocchi, Mara S.; McKeever, Declan J.; Wright, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Highly polymorphic genes with central roles in lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance are grouped together in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in higher vertebrates. Generally, across vertebrate species the class II MHC DRA gene is highly conserved with only limited allelic variation. Here however, we provide evidence of trans-species polymorphism at the DRA locus in domestic sheep (Ovis aries). We describe variation at the Ovar-DRA locus that is far in excess of anything described in other vertebrate species. The divergent DRA allele (Ovar-DRA*0201) differs from the sheep reference sequences by 20 nucleotides, 12 of which appear non-synonymous. Furthermore, DRA*0201 is paired with an equally divergent DRB1 allele (Ovar-DRB1*0901), which is consistent with an independent evolutionary history for the DR sub-region within this MHC haplotype. No recombination was observed between the divergent DRA and B genes in a range of breeds and typical levels of MHC class II DR protein expression were detected at the surface of leukocyte populations obtained from animals homozygous for the DRA*0201, DRB1*0901 haplotype. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis groups Ovar-DRA*0201 with DRA sequences derived from species within the Oryx and Alcelaphus genera rather than clustering with other ovine and caprine DRA alleles. Tests for Darwinian selection identified 10 positively selected sites on the branch leading to Ovar-DRA*0201, three of which are predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen. As the Ovis, Oryx and Alcelaphus genera have not shared a common ancestor for over 30 million years, the DRA*0201 and DRB1*0901 allelic pair is likely to be of ancient origin and present in the founding population from which all contemporary domestic sheep breeds are derived. The conservation of the integrity of this unusual DR allelic pair suggests some selective advantage which is likely to be associated with the presentation of pathogen antigen to T-cells and the

  14. Growth habit and photo-synthetic activity of shoot cultures of Medicago sativa L. transformed with the oryzacystatin II gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In vitro maintained shoot cultures of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Zajeÿarska 83) that were transformed with the oryzacystatin II (OCII) gene and propagated on growth regulator-free medium were subjected to analysis of morphological characteristics and photosynthetic activity. The most striking f...

  15. Phylogenetic relationships and protein modelling revealed two distinct subfamilies of group II HKT genes between crop and model grasses.

    PubMed

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Francki, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    Molecular evolution of large protein families in closely related species can provide useful insights on structural functional relationships. Phylogenetic analysis of the grass-specific group II HKT genes identified two distinct subfamilies, I and II. Subfamily II was represented in all species, whereas subfamily I was identified only in the small grain cereals and possibly originated from an ancestral gene duplication post divergence from the coarse grain cereal lineage. The core protein structures were highly analogous despite there being no more than 58% amino acid identity between members of the two subfamilies. Distinctly variable regions in known functional domains, however, indicated functional divergence of the two subfamilies. The subsets of codons residing external to known functional domains predicted signatures of positive Darwinian selection potentially identifying new domains of functional divergence and providing new insights on the structural function and relationships between protein members of the two subfamilies. PMID:27203707

  16. Selection and trans-species polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in the order Crocodylia.

    PubMed

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Miles, Lee G; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes encode for molecules that aid in the presentation of antigens to helper T cells. MHC characterisation within and between major vertebrate taxa has shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the diversity within this genomic region, though little characterisation has been performed within the Order Crocodylia. Here we investigate the extent and effect of selective pressures and trans-species polymorphism on MHC class II α and β evolution among 20 extant species of Crocodylia. Selection detection analyses showed that diversifying selection influenced MHC class II β diversity, whilst diversity within MHC class II α is the result of strong purifying selection. Comparison of translated sequences between species revealed the presence of twelve trans-species polymorphisms, some of which appear to be specific to the genera Crocodylus and Caiman. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered MHC class II α sequences into two major clades representing the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae. However, no further subdivision within these clades was evident and, based on the observation that most MHC class II α sequences shared the same trans-species polymorphisms, it is possible that they correspond to the same gene lineage across species. In contrast, phylogenetic analyses of MHC class II β sequences showed a mixture of subclades containing sequences from Crocodilidae and/or Alligatoridae, illustrating orthologous relationships among those genes. Interestingly, two of the subclades containing sequences from both Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae shared specific trans-species polymorphisms, suggesting that they may belong to ancient lineages pre-dating the divergence of these two families from the common ancestor 85-90 million years ago. The results presented herein provide an immunogenetic resource that may be used to further assess MHC diversity and functionality in Crocodylia. PMID:24503938

  17. Selection and Trans-Species Polymorphism of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes in the Order Crocodylia

    PubMed Central

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R.; Higgins, Damien P.; Miles, Lee G.; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes encode for molecules that aid in the presentation of antigens to helper T cells. MHC characterisation within and between major vertebrate taxa has shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the diversity within this genomic region, though little characterisation has been performed within the Order Crocodylia. Here we investigate the extent and effect of selective pressures and trans-species polymorphism on MHC class II α and β evolution among 20 extant species of Crocodylia. Selection detection analyses showed that diversifying selection influenced MHC class II β diversity, whilst diversity within MHC class II α is the result of strong purifying selection. Comparison of translated sequences between species revealed the presence of twelve trans-species polymorphisms, some of which appear to be specific to the genera Crocodylus and Caiman. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered MHC class II α sequences into two major clades representing the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae. However, no further subdivision within these clades was evident and, based on the observation that most MHC class II α sequences shared the same trans-species polymorphisms, it is possible that they correspond to the same gene lineage across species. In contrast, phylogenetic analyses of MHC class II β sequences showed a mixture of subclades containing sequences from Crocodilidae and/or Alligatoridae, illustrating orthologous relationships among those genes. Interestingly, two of the subclades containing sequences from both Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae shared specific trans-species polymorphisms, suggesting that they may belong to ancient lineages pre-dating the divergence of these two families from the common ancestor 85–90 million years ago. The results presented herein provide an immunogenetic resource that may be used to further assess MHC diversity and functionality in Crocodylia. PMID:24503938

  18. Structure of the gene encoding the 14.5 kDa subunit of human RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Acker, J; Wintzerith, M; Vigneron, M; Kedinger, C

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the gene encoding the 14.5 kDa subunit of the human RNA polymerase II (or B) has been elucidated. The gene consists of six exons, ranging from 52 to over 101 bp, interspaced with five introns ranging from 84 to 246 bp. It is transcribed into three major RNA species, present at low abundance in exponentially growing HeLa cells. The corresponding messenger RNAs contain the same open reading frame encoding a 125 amino acid residue protein, with a calculated molecular weight of 14,523 Da. This protein (named hRPB14.5) shares strong homologies with the homologous polymerase subunits encoded by the Drosophila (RpII15) and yeast (RPB9) genes. Cysteines characteristic of two zinc fingers are conserved in all three corresponding sequences and, like the yeast protein, the hRPB14.5 subunit exhibits zinc-binding activity. Images PMID:8265347

  19. Biosynthesis of riboflavin: cloning, sequencing, mapping, and expression of the gene coding for GTP cyclohydrolase II in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, G; Ritz, H; Katzenmeier, G; Volk, R; Kohnle, A; Lottspeich, F; Allendorf, D; Bacher, A

    1993-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase II catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of riboflavin. The gene coding for this enzyme in Escherichia coli has been cloned by marker rescue. Sequencing indicated an open reading frame of 588 bp coding for a 21.8-kDa peptide of 196 amino acids. The gene was mapped to a position at 28.2 min on the E. coli chromosome and is identical with ribA. GTP cyclohydrolase II was overexpressed in a recombinant strain carrying a plasmid with the cloned gene. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity from the recombinant strain. The N-terminal sequence determined by Edman degradation was identical to the predicted sequence. The sequence is homologous to the 3' part of the central open reading frame in the riboflavin operon of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:8320220

  20. RNA polymerase II pauses at the 5 prime end of the transcriptionally induced Drosophila hsp70 gene

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, T.; Lis, J.T. )

    1991-10-01

    An RNA polymerase II molecule is associated with the 5{prime} end of the Drosophila melanogaster hsp70 gene under non-heat shock conditions. This polymerase is engaged in transcription but has paused, or arrested, after synthesizing about 25 nucleotides. Resumption of elongation by this paused polymerase appears to be the rate-limiting step in hsp70 transcription in uninduced cells. Here the authors report results of nuclear run-on assays that measure the distribution of elongating and paused RNA polymerase molecules on the hsp70 gene in induced cells. Pausing of polymerase was detected at the 5{prime} end of hsp70 was transcribed approximately five times during the 25-min heat shock that they used. Therefore, once the hsp70 gene is induced to an intermediate level, initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II remains more rapid than the resumption of elongation by a paused polymerase molecule.

  1. Resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus in Gladiolus plants transformed with either a defective replicase of coat protein subgroup II gene from Cucumber mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic Gladiolus plants that contain either Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup I coat protein, CMV subgroup II coat protein, CMV replicase, a combination of the CMV subgroups I and II coat proteins, or a combination of the CMV subgroup II coat protein and replicase genes were developed. These...

  2. merA gene expression in aquatic environments measured by mRNA production and Hg(II) volatilization.

    PubMed Central

    Nazaret, S; Jeffrey, W H; Saouter, E; Von Haven, R; Barkay, T

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of merA gene expression (specifying the enzyme mercuric reductase) to mercury volatilization in aquatic microbial communities was investigated with samples collected at a mercury-contaminated freshwater pond, Reality Lake, in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Levels of merA mRNA transcripts and the rate of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] volatilization were related to the concentration of mercury in the water and to heterotrophic activity in field samples and laboratory incubations of pond water in which microbial heterotrophic activity and Hg(II) concentration were manipulated. Levels of merA-specific mRNA and Hg(II) volatilization were influenced more by microbial metabolic activity than by the concentration of mercury. merA-specific transcripts were detected in some samples which did not reduce Hg(II), suggesting that rates of mercury volatilization in environmental samples may not always be proportional to merA expression. PMID:7527625

  3. Feature Selection and Classification of MAQC-II Breast Cancer and Multiple Myeloma Microarray Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingzhong; Sung, Andrew H.; Chen, Zhongxue; Liu, Jianzhong; Huang, Xudong; Deng, Youping

    2009-01-01

    Microarray data has a high dimension of variables but available datasets usually have only a small number of samples, thereby making the study of such datasets interesting and challenging. In the task of analyzing microarray data for the purpose of, e.g., predicting gene-disease association, feature selection is very important because it provides a way to handle the high dimensionality by exploiting information redundancy induced by associations among genetic markers. Judicious feature selection in microarray data analysis can result in significant reduction of cost while maintaining or improving the classification or prediction accuracy of learning machines that are employed to sort out the datasets. In this paper, we propose a gene selection method called Recursive Feature Addition (RFA), which combines supervised learning and statistical similarity measures. We compare our method with the following gene selection methods: Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination (SVMRFE)Leave-One-Out Calculation Sequential Forward Selection (LOOCSFS)Gradient based Leave-one-out Gene Selection (GLGS) To evaluate the performance of these gene selection methods, we employ several popular learning classifiers on the MicroArray Quality Control phase II on predictive modeling (MAQC-II) breast cancer dataset and the MAQC-II multiple myeloma dataset. Experimental results show that gene selection is strictly paired with learning classifier. Overall, our approach outperforms other compared methods. The biological functional analysis based on the MAQC-II breast cancer dataset convinced us to apply our method for phenotype prediction. Additionally, learning classifiers also play important roles in the classification of microarray data and our experimental results indicate that the Nearest Mean Scale Classifier (NMSC) is a good choice due to its prediction reliability and its stability across the three performance measurements: Testing accuracy, MCC values, and AUC errors. PMID

  4. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes in Taq polymerases and a decontamination method applied to the detection of genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Perron, André; Raymond, Philippe; Simard, Robin

    2006-03-01

    Different antibiotic resistance (AR) genes, such as Bla, Tet and NPTII, contaminate commercially available Taq polymerases. The specificity of the AR gene PCR can be increased when using a restriction enzyme-based decontamination of polymerase. The elimination of Taq polymerase contamination allows the use of PCR tests to screen seeds (corn) and processed food for the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMO) based on the detection of AR genes. Without a decontamination procedure for AR genes, PCR screening tests should be interpreted with caution. PMID:16614919

  5. Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 p30II alters cellular gene expression to selectively enhance signaling pathways that activate T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M; Hiraragi, Hajime; Shen, Lei; Feuer, Gerold; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen; Lairmore, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in the virus life cycle or HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Proviral clones of the virus with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. Exogenous expression of p30II differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and represses tax/rex RNA nuclear export. Results Herein, we further characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression, using stable p30II expression system employing lentiviral vectors to test cellular gene expression with Affymetrix U133A arrays, representing ~33,000 human genes. Reporter assays in Jurkat T cells and RT-PCR in Jurkat and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes were used to confirm selected gene expression patterns. Our data reveals alterations of interrelated pathways of cell proliferation, T-cell signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle in p30II expressing Jurkat T cells. In all categories, p30II appeared to be an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively increasing the expression of certain key regulatory genes. Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that p30II, while repressing the expression of many genes, selectively activates key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Collectively, our data suggests that this complex retrovirus, associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, relies upon accessory gene products to modify cellular environment to promote clonal expansion of the virus genome and thus maintain proviral loads in vivo. PMID:15560845

  6. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Heleen M; Bünger, Meike; de Groot, Philip J; van der Meijde, Jolanda; Hooiveld, Guido JEJ; Müller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPARα may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1) and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1). Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2), formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1), or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8). Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a) increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b) increased cholesterol secretion, c) increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d) reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance for e.g. pre

  7. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  8. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingguang; He, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF) prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83-0.91]). The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17-26.8]; P < 0.001) than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively). Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response. PMID:26989635

  9. A Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein regulates the sirodesmin PL biosynthetic gene cluster in Leptosphaeria maculans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ellen M.; Gardiner, Donald M.; Keller, Nancy P.; Howlett, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    A gene, sirZ, encoding a Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein is present in a cluster of genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the epipolythiodioxopiperazine (ETP) toxin, sirodesmin PL in the ascomycete plant pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans. RNA-mediated silencing of sirZ gives rise to transformants that produce only residual amounts of sirodesmin PL and display a decrease in the transcription of several sirodesmin PL biosynthetic genes. This indicates that SirZ is a major regulator of this gene cluster. Proteins similar to SirZ are encoded in the gliotoxin biosynthetic gene cluster of Aspergillus fumigatus (gliZ) and in an ETP-like cluster in Penicillium lilacinoechinulatum (PlgliZ). Despite its high level of sequence similarity to gliZ, PlgliZ is unable to complement the gliotoxin-deficiency of a mutant of gliZ in A. fumigatus. Putative binding sites for these regulatory proteins in the promoters of genes in these clusters were predicted using bioinformatic analysis. These sites are similar to those commonly bound by other proteins with Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding domains. PMID:18023597

  10. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF) prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]). The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001) than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively). Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response. PMID:26989635

  11. Three Classes of Plasmid (47–63 kb) Carry the Type B Neurotoxin Gene Cluster of Group II Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Austin, John W.; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Corbett, Cindi; Peck, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis of 26 strains of Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B4 showed that 23 strains carried their neurotoxin gene cluster on a 47–63 kb plasmid (three strains lacked any hybridization signal for the neurotoxin gene, presumably having lost their plasmid). Unexpectedly, no neurotoxin genes were found on the chromosome. This apparent constraint on neurotoxin gene transfer to the chromosome stands in marked contrast to Group I C. botulinum, in which neurotoxin gene clusters are routinely found in both locations. The three main classes of type B4 plasmid identified in this study shared different regions of homology, but were unrelated to any Group I or Group III plasmid. An important evolutionary aspect firmly links plasmid class to geographical origin, with one class apparently dominant in marine environments, whereas a second class is dominant in European terrestrial environments. A third class of plasmid is a hybrid between the other two other classes, providing evidence for contact between these seemingly geographically separated populations. Mobility via conjugation has been previously demonstrated for the type B4 plasmid of strain Eklund 17B, and similar genes associated with conjugation are present in all type B4 plasmids now described. A plasmid toxin–antitoxin system pemI gene located close to the neurotoxin gene cluster and conserved in each type B4 plasmid class may be important in understanding the mechanism which regulates this unique and unexpected bias toward plasmid-borne neurotoxin genes in Group II C. botulinum type B4. PMID:25079343

  12. Cloning and sequencing of the metallothioprotein beta-lactamase II gene of Bacillus cereus 569/H in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M; Carlino, A; Madonna, M J; Lampen, J O

    1985-01-01

    The structural gene for beta-lactamase II (EC 3.5.2.6), a metallothioenzyme, from Bacillus cereus 569/H (constitutive for high production of the enzyme) was cloned in Escherichia coli, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. This is the first class B beta-lactamase whose primary structure has been reported. The amino acid sequence of the exoenzyme form, deduced from the DNA, indicates that beta-lactamase II, like other secreted proteins, is synthesized as a precursor with a 30-amino acid N-terminal signal peptide. The pre-beta-lactamase II (Mr, 28,060) is processed in E. coli and in B. cereus to a single mature protein (Mr, 24,932) which is totally secreted by B. cereus but in E. coli remains intracellular, probably in the periplasm. The expression of the gene in E. coli RR1 on the multicopy plasmid pRWHO12 was comparable to that in B. cereus, where it is presumably present as a single copy. The three histidine residues that are involved (along with the sole cysteine of the mature protein) in Zn(II) binding and hence in enzymatic activity against beta-lactams were identified. These findings will help to define the secondary structure, mechanism of action, and evolutionary lineage of B. cereus beta-lactamase II and other class B beta-lactamases. Images PMID:3930467

  13. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation

    PubMed Central

    George, Amee J.; Purdue, Brooke W.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Thomas, Daniel W.; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A.; Morgan, Kylie A.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Thomas, Walter G.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R–EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R–EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R–EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR–EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  14. A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation.

    PubMed

    George, Amee J; Purdue, Brooke W; Gould, Cathryn M; Thomas, Daniel W; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A; Morgan, Kylie A; Simpson, Kaylene J; Thomas, Walter G; Hannan, Ross D

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R-EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R-EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R-EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR-EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

  15. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Localization of an alpha-amanitin resistance mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of mouse RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomei, M S; Corden, J L

    1987-01-01

    RNA polymerase II is inhibited by the mushroom toxin alpha-amanitin. A mouse BALB/c 3T3 cell line was selected for resistance to alpha-amanitin and characterized in detail. This cell line, designated A21, was heterozygous, possessing both amanitin-sensitive and -resistant forms of RNA polymerase II; the mutant form was 500 times more resistant to alpha-amanitin than the sensitive form. By using the wild-type mouse RNA polymerase II largest subunit (RPII215) gene (J.A. Ahearn, M.S. Bartolomei, M. L. West, and J. L. Corden, submitted for publication) as the probe, RPII215 genes were isolated from an A21 genomic DNA library. The mutant allele was identified by its ability to transfer amanitin resistance in a transfection assay. Genomic reconstructions between mutant and wild-type alleles localized the mutation to a 450-base-pair fragment that included parts of exons 14 and 15. This fragment was sequenced and compared with the wild-type sequence; a single AT-to-GC transition was detected at nucleotide 6819, corresponding to an asparagine-to-aspartate substitution at amino acid 793 of the predicted protein sequence. Knowledge of the position of the A21 mutation should facilitate the study of the mechanism of alpha-amanitin resistance. Furthermore, the A21 gene will be useful for studying the phenotype of site-directed mutations in the RPII215 gene. Images PMID:3821724

  17. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Can Enhance Baculovirus-Mediated Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells through the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Kun; Lin, Jhe-Jhih; Chen, Chung-Yung; Kuo, Szu-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Tzong Yuan

    2016-01-01

    BacMam is an insect-derived recombinant baculovirus that can deliver genes into mammalian cells. BacMam vectors carrying target genes are able to enter a variety of cell lines by endocytosis, but the level of expression of the transgene depends on the cell line and the state of the transduced cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the DNA damage response (DDR) could act as an alternative pathway to boost the transgene(s) expression by BacMam and be comparable to the inhibitors of histone deacetylase. Topoisomerase II (Top II) inhibitor-induced DDR can enhance the CMV-IE/enhancer mediated gene expression up to 12-fold in BacMam-transduced U-2OS cells. The combination of a Top II inhibitor, VM-26, can also augment the killing efficiency of a p53-expressing BacMam vector in U-2OS osteosarcoma cells. These results open a new avenue to facilitate the application of BacMam for gene delivery and therapy. PMID:27314325

  18. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Can Enhance Baculovirus-Mediated Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells through the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Kun; Lin, Jhe-Jhih; Chen, Chung-Yung; Kuo, Szu-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Tzong Yuan

    2016-01-01

    BacMam is an insect-derived recombinant baculovirus that can deliver genes into mammalian cells. BacMam vectors carrying target genes are able to enter a variety of cell lines by endocytosis, but the level of expression of the transgene depends on the cell line and the state of the transduced cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the DNA damage response (DDR) could act as an alternative pathway to boost the transgene(s) expression by BacMam and be comparable to the inhibitors of histone deacetylase. Topoisomerase II (Top II) inhibitor-induced DDR can enhance the CMV-IE/enhancer mediated gene expression up to 12-fold in BacMam-transduced U-2OS cells. The combination of a Top II inhibitor, VM-26, can also augment the killing efficiency of a p53-expressing BacMam vector in U-2OS osteosarcoma cells. These results open a new avenue to facilitate the application of BacMam for gene delivery and therapy. PMID:27314325

  19. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II gene expression in the human frontal and temporal lobe in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Subroto; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Colvin, Sarah M; Coyle, Joseph T; Herman, Mary M; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E

    2004-01-01

    There is decreased activity of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and hippocampus of patients with schizophrenia. GCP II hydrolzses N-acetyl-alpha L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG), a peptide in the mammalian brain that binds to the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and a group II metabotropic glutamate receptor, both of which have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We examined the expression of GCP II mRNA in the DLPFC, entorhinal cortex (ERC), and hippocampus in postmortem samples from patients with schizophrenia and normal controls using in situ hybridization followed by silver grain detection. GCP II mRNA was detected in glial cells. Glial-rich regions, specifically the DLPFC and ERC white matter and the molecular and polymorphic layers in the hippocampus, express high levels of GCP II mRNA. Given the earlier finding of decreased GCP II activity in brains of subjects with schizophrenia, we expected to find lower GCP II mRNA levels in schizophrenia. Contrary to this expectation, we found a significantly higher expression of GCP II mRNA in one of the brain areas examined, the hippocampal CA3 polymorphic region. This may reflect a compensatory increase to correct for the decreased activity of GCP II activity. Our findings support the notion that the hydrolysis of NAAG is disrupted in schizophrenia and that specific anatomical regions may show discrete abnormalities in GCP II synthesis. PMID:14560319

  20. Estrogen and progesterone receptor-binding sites on the chicken vitellogenin II gene: synergism of steroid hormone action.

    PubMed Central

    Cato, A C; Heitlinger, E; Ponta, H; Klein-Hitpass, L; Ryffel, G U; Bailly, A; Rauch, C; Milgrom, E

    1988-01-01

    The chicken vitellogenin II gene is transcriptionally activated by estrogens. In transient transfection experiments in human T47D cells that contain receptors for various steroids, we showed estradiol, progestin, and androgen responses of a chimeric chicken vitellogenin II construct. This construct consists of DNA sequences from -626 to -590 upstream of the start of transcription of the chicken vitellogenin gene linked to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter driving the transcription of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Treatment of the transfected T47D cells with a combination of estradiol and the progestin R5020 led to a superinduction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity, showing a synergistic action of these two steroids. This synergism was not observed upon treatment of the transfected cells with estradiol and the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Using point mutations in the vitellogenin gene fragment, we showed in functional and in in vitro DNase I footprinting assays with a purified progesterone receptor that, for the synergistic action of estradiol and R5020 to occur, the progesterone receptor must be bound to the vitellogenin gene fragment. The progesterone receptor-binding site was localized at -610 to -590, close to the consensus sequence (-626 to -613) for estrogen receptor binding and function. We therefore demonstrate here that two different steroid hormones can be functionally synergistic through the interaction of their corresponding receptors with two different binding sites adjacent to one another. Images PMID:3244357

  1. Close linkage of genes encoding glutamine synthetases I and II in Frankia alni CpI1.

    PubMed

    Hosted, T J; Rochefort, D A; Benson, D R

    1993-06-01

    Frankia alni CpI1 has two glutamine synthetases (GSs), GSI and GSII. The GSI gene (glnA) was isolated from a cosmid library of F. alni CpI1 DNA by heterologous probing with glnA from Streptomyces coelicolor. The glnA gene was shown to be located upstream of the GSII gene (glnII) by DNA-DNA hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the 1,422-bp CpI1 glnA gene and of the 449-bp intervening region between glnA and glnII were determined, and the glnA amino acid sequence was deduced. In common with GSIs from other organisms, CpI1 GSI contains five conserved regions near the active site and a conserved tyrosine at the adenylylation site. F. alni CpI1 glnA complemented the glutamine growth requirement of the Escherichia coli glnA deletion strain YMC11 but only when expressed from an E. coli lac promoter. While the functional significance of maintaining two GSs adjacent to one another remains unclear, this arrangement in F. alni provides support for the recently proposed origin of GSI and GSII as resulting from a gene duplication early in the evolution of life. PMID:8099074

  2. Estrogen and progesterone receptor-binding sites on the chicken vitellogenin II gene: synergism of steroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Cato, A C; Heitlinger, E; Ponta, H; Klein-Hitpass, L; Ryffel, G U; Bailly, A; Rauch, C; Milgrom, E

    1988-12-01

    The chicken vitellogenin II gene is transcriptionally activated by estrogens. In transient transfection experiments in human T47D cells that contain receptors for various steroids, we showed estradiol, progestin, and androgen responses of a chimeric chicken vitellogenin II construct. This construct consists of DNA sequences from -626 to -590 upstream of the start of transcription of the chicken vitellogenin gene linked to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter driving the transcription of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Treatment of the transfected T47D cells with a combination of estradiol and the progestin R5020 led to a superinduction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity, showing a synergistic action of these two steroids. This synergism was not observed upon treatment of the transfected cells with estradiol and the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Using point mutations in the vitellogenin gene fragment, we showed in functional and in in vitro DNase I footprinting assays with a purified progesterone receptor that, for the synergistic action of estradiol and R5020 to occur, the progesterone receptor must be bound to the vitellogenin gene fragment. The progesterone receptor-binding site was localized at -610 to -590, close to the consensus sequence (-626 to -613) for estrogen receptor binding and function. We therefore demonstrate here that two different steroid hormones can be functionally synergistic through the interaction of their corresponding receptors with two different binding sites adjacent to one another. PMID:3244357

  3. L-asparaginase II of Escherichia coli K-12: cloning, mapping and sequencing of the ansB gene.

    PubMed

    Bonthron, D T

    1990-07-01

    The Escherichia coli gene ansB, encoding the chemotherapeutic enzyme L-asparaginase II, has been cloned, using a strategy based on the polymerase chain reaction, and sequenced. The amino acid (aa) sequence differs in eleven positions from the data previously derived by direct aa sequencing. A cleavable secretory signal peptide precedes the N terminus of the mature protein. The ansB gene maps to position 3114 kb on the physical map of E. coli [Kohara et al., Cell 50 (1987) 495-508], corresponding to approx. 63.8 min on the genetic map. PMID:2144836

  4. HLA non-class II genes may confer type I diabetes susceptibility in a Mapuche (Amerindian) affected family.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Jose M; Moscoso, Juan; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Zamora, Jorge; Asenjo, Silvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of type I diabetes is studied in an Amerindian (Mapuche) family from Chile, analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet-cell autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. The affected sib is the only one that has one specific HLA haplotype combination that differs from the other sibs only in the HLA class I genes. It is concluded that HLA diabetes susceptibility factors may be placed outside the class II region or even that susceptibility factors do not exist in the HLA region in this Amerindian family. PMID:16473308

  5. Transcriptional Network Analysis Reveals that AT1 and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptors Are Both Involved in the Regulation of Genes Essential for Glioma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Fujita, André; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Iamashita, Priscila; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive primary brain tumors with high infiltrative potential. The expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors has been associated with poor prognosis in human astrocytomas, the most common type of glioma. In this study, we investigated the role of Angiotensin II in glioma malignancy through transcriptional profiling and network analysis of cultured C6 rat glioma cells exposed to Ang II and to inhibitors of its membrane receptor subtypes. C6 cells were treated with Ang II and specific antagonists of AT1 and AT2 receptors. Total RNA was isolated after three and six hours of Ang II treatment and analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology. Gene expression data was evaluated through transcriptional network modeling to identify how differentially expressed (DE) genes are connected to each other. Moreover, other genes co-expressing with the DE genes were considered in these analyses in order to support the identification of enriched functions and pathways. A hub-based network analysis showed that the most connected nodes in Ang II-related networks exert functions associated with cell proliferation, migration and invasion, key aspects for glioma progression. The subsequent functional enrichment analysis of these central genes highlighted their participation in signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated in gliomas such as ErbB, MAPK and p53. Noteworthy, either AT1 or AT2 inhibitions were able to down-regulate different sets of hub genes involved in protumoral functions, suggesting that both Ang II receptors could be therapeutic targets for intervention in glioma. Taken together, our results point out multiple actions of Ang II in glioma pathogenesis and reveal the participation of both Ang II receptors in the regulation of genes relevant for glioma progression. This study is the first one to provide systems-level molecular data for better understanding the protumoral effects of Ang II in the proliferative and infiltrative behavior of

  6. Interaction of DRD2TaqI, COMT, and ALDH2 genes associated with bipolar II disorder comorbid with anxiety disorders in Han Chinese in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Chuan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Chen-Lin; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-06-01

    It is hypothesized that dopaminergic genes-dopamine type-2 receptor (DRD2), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-are associated with bipolar disorder (BP) and anxiety disorder (AD). Bipolar II (BP-II) is reported to be highly comorbid with AD. We examined whether interactions among these three genes are susceptibility factors in BP-II with AD (BP-II(+AD)) and without AD (BP-II(-AD)). In this study, we hypothesize that the interaction of the dopaminergic genes between BP-II(+AD) and BP-II(-AD) is significant different. We recruited 1260 participants: 495 with BP-II(-AD), 170 with BP-II(+AD), and 595 healthy controls without BP-II or AD. Genotyping was done using polymerase chain reactions plus restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Genotypic frequencies of the DRD2TaqIA, COMT, and ALDH2 polymorphisms between the two BP-II groups were nonsignificant. In logistic regression, the ALDH2 and DRD2TaqIA genes showed a main effect that was protective against BP-II(-AD) (odds ratio [OR] = 0.497, p = 0.010, and OR = 0.415, p = 0.017, respectively). The interaction of DRD2TaqIA A1/A1 and ALDH2*1/*1 had a significant risk effect on the BP-II(-AD) group (OR = 7.177, p < 0.001). However, the interaction of DRD2TaqIA A1/A1, ALDH2*1/*1, and COMTMet/Met&Val/Met become a weak protective factor against BP-II(-AD) (OR = 0.205, p = 0.047). All of the significant results described above are found only in BP-II(-AD). This study supports the hypothesis the interaction of the dopaminergic genes between BP-II(+AD) and BP-II(-AD) is significant different,, and provides additional evidence that the DRD2TaqIA A1/A1, ALDH2*1/*1 and COMT genes interact in BP-II(-AD) but not in BP-II(+AD). PMID:25430946

  7. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockout strains enable functional analysis of genes required for cyst development and latent infection.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Weiss, Louis M; Bzik, David J

    2011-09-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we targeted the deletion of four parasite antigen genes (GRA4, GRA6, ROP7, and tgd057) that encode characterized CD8(+) T cell epitopes that elicit corresponding antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell populations associated with control of infection. Cyst development in these type II mutant strains was not found to be strictly dependent on antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell host responses. In contrast, a significant biological role was revealed for the dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 in cyst development since brain tissue cyst burdens were drastically reduced specifically in mutant strains with GRA4 and/or GRA6 deleted. Complementation of the Δgra4 and Δgra6 mutant strains using a functional allele of the deleted GRA coding region placed under the control of the endogenous UPRT locus was found to significantly restore brain cyst burdens. These results reveal that GRA proteins play a functional role in establishing cyst burdens and latent infection. Collectively, our results suggest that a type II Δku80 Δhxgprt genetic background enables a higher-throughput functional analysis of the parasite genome to reveal fundamental aspects of parasite biology controlling virulence, pathogenesis, and transmission. PMID:21531875

  8. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, S N; Miyasaka, T; Polat, M; Kikuya, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mingala, C N; Villanueva, M A; Salces, A J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2014-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle. PMID:25606401

  9. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, S.N.; Miyasaka, T.; Polat, M.; Kikuya, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Mingala, C.N.; Villanueva, M.A.; Salces, A.J.; Onuma, M.; Aida, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle. PMID:25606401

  10. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A R; Wagner, R; Khatri, K; Notani, G; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A; Yunis, E J

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes in 25 non-Jewish PV patients, DR4, DQw8 was found in 12 of the patients and DRw6, DQw5 was found in 15. Only 3 patients had neither. Only 1 of the DR4, DQw8 haplotypes was [HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8] and 2 were HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8; most were the presumed fragments (SC31, DR4, DQw8) or (SC21, DR4, DQw8) or DR4, DQw8 with some other complotype. Of the patients with DRw6, DQw5, all were DRw14, DQw5, and 6 had a rare Caucasian haplotype, HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5. Four of 6 of these were found in patients of Italian extraction, as was the 1 normal example. The non-Jewish patients were of more Southern European extraction than our controls. This suggests that there are two major MHC susceptibility alleles in American patients with PV. The more ancient apparently arose on a haplotype in the Jews, HLA-B38(35), SC21(SC31), DR4, DQw8, and spread to other populations largely as D-region segments. The other arose in or near Italy on the haplotype HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5 and has also partially fragmented so that many patients carry only DRw14, DQw5. The available data do not permit the specific localization of either the DR4, DQw8- or the DRw14, DQw5-linked susceptibility genes. Images PMID:1675792

  11. Characterization of a type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation identified in cultured chondrocytes from human hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Ellard, J; Campbell, D; Bartley, J; Ramirez, F; Vitale, E; Lee, B

    1992-01-01

    A subtle mutation in the type II collagen gene COL2A1 was detected in a case of human hypochondrogenesis by using a chondrocyte culture system and PCR-cDNA scanning analysis. Chondrocytes obtained from cartilage biopsies were dedifferentiated and expanded in monolayer culture and then redifferentiated by culture over agarose. Single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing analysis identified a G----A transition, resulting in a glycine substitution at amino acid 574 of the pro alpha 1(II) collagen triple-helical domain. Morphologic assessment of cartilage-like structures produced in culture and electrophoretic analysis of collagens synthesized by the cultured chondrocytes suggested that the glycine substitution interferes with conversion of type II procollagen to collagen, impairs intracellular transport and secretion of the molecule, and disrupts collagen fibril assembly. This experimental approach has broad implications for the investigation of human chondrodysplasias as well as human chondrocyte biology. Images PMID:1374906

  12. Dominant mutations in the type II collagen gene, COL2A1, produce spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Strudwick type.

    PubMed

    Tiller, G E; Polumbo, P A; Weis, M A; Bogaert, R; Lachman, R S; Cohn, D H; Rimoin, D L; Eyre, D R

    1995-09-01

    The chondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal growth or development of cartilage. Current classification is based on mode of inheritance as well as clinical, histologic, and/or radiographic features. A clinical spectrum of chondrodysplasia phenotypes, ranging from mild to perinatal lethal, is due to defects in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. This spectrum includes Stickler syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), achondrogenesis type II, and hypochondrogenesis. Individuals affected with these disorders exhibit abnormalities of the growth plate, nucleus pulposus, and vitreous humor, which are tissues that contain type II collagen. The Strudwick type of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) is characterized by disproportionate short stature, pectus carinatum, and scoliosis, as well as dappled metaphyses (which are not seen in SEDC). The phenotype was first described by Murdoch and Walker in 1969, and a series of 14 patients was later reported by Anderson et al. The observation of two affected sibs born to unaffected parents led to the classification of SEMD Strudwick as an autosomal recessive disorder. We now describe the biochemical characterization of defects in alpha 1(II) collagen in three unrelated individuals with SEMD Strudwick, each of which is due to heterozygosity for a unique mutation in COL2A1. Our data support the hypothesis that some cases, if not all cases, of this distinctive chondrodysplasia result from dominant mutations in COL2A1, thus expanding the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with this gene. PMID:7550321

  13. A novel splice site mutation in the GNPTAB gene in an Iranian patient with mucolipidosis II α/β.

    PubMed

    Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Salehpour, Shadab; Yassaee, Vahid Reza; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Mucolipidosis type II α/β (ML II α/β) and mucolipidosis type III α/β (ML III α/β) have been shown to be caused by an absence or reduced level of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase enzyme (EC 2.7.8.17) activity, respectively. Both disorders are caused by mutations in the GNPTAB gene and are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Here we report a 2-year-old female patient being diagnosed as a case of ML II α/β due to coarse face, severe developmental delay, multiple dysostosis, noticeable increase of multiple lysosomal enzymes activity in plasma and normal acid mucopolysaccharides in urine. Mutational analysis of the GNPTAB gene has revealed a novel homozygous mutation in the patient (c.3250-2A>G) with both parents being heterozygote. Transcript analyses showed that this novel splice site mutation leads to exon 17 skipping and a frameshift afterwards (p.P1084_R1112del F1113Vfs*1). Consequently, we confirmed the association of this mutation with ML II α/β. Our finding expands the number of reported cases of this rare metabolic disorder and adds to the GNPTAB mutation database. PMID:27180337

  14. Nucleotide polymorphism at the RpII215 gene in Drosophila subobscura. Weak selection on synonymous mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Llopart, A; Aguadé, M

    2000-01-01

    Nucleotide variation in an 8.1-kb fragment encompassing the RpII215 gene, which encodes the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II complex, is analyzed in a sample of 11 chromosomes from a natural population of Drosophila subobscura. No amino acid polymorphism was detected among the 157 segregating sites. The observed numbers of preferred and unpreferred derived synonymous mutations can be explained by neutral mutational processes. In contrast, preferred mutations segregate at significantly higher frequency than unpreferred mutations, suggesting the action of natural selection. The polymorphism to divergence ratio is different for preferred and unpreferred changes, in agreement with their beneficial and deleterious effects on fitness, respectively. Preferred and unpreferred codons are nonrandomly distributed in the RpII215 gene, leading to a heterogeneous distribution of polymorphic to fixed synonymous differences across this coding region. This intragenic variation of the polymorphism/divergence ratio cannot be explained by different patterns of gene expression, mutation, or recombination rates, and therefore it indicates that selection coefficients for synonymous mutations can vary extensively across a coding region. The application of nucleotide composition stationarity tests in coding and flanking noncoding regions, assumed to behave neutrally, allows the detection of the action of natural selection when stationarity holds in the noncoding region. PMID:10880485

  15. Phylogenetic relationships of Brazilian isolates of Pythium insidiosum based on ITS rDNA and cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, M I; Botton, S A; Pereira, D I B; Robe, L J; Jesus, F P K; Mahl, C D; Costa, M M; Alves, S H; Santurio, J M

    2012-09-14

    Pythium insidiosum is an aquatic oomycete that is the causative agent of pythiosis. Advances in molecular methods have enabled increased accuracy in the diagnosis of pythiosis, and in studies of the phylogenetic relationships of this oomycete. To evaluate the phylogenetic relationships among isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil, and also regarding to other American and Thai isolates, in this study a total of thirty isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil was used and had their ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2 rDNA (ITS) region and the partial sequence of cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) gene sequenced and analyzed. The outgroup consisted of six isolates of other Pythium species and one of Lagenidium giganteum. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and COX II genes were conducted, both individually and in combination, using four different methods: Maximum parsimony (MP); Neighbor-joining (NJ); Maximum likelihood (ML); and Bayesian analysis (BA). Our data supported P. insidiosum as monophyletic in relation to the other Pythium species, and COX II showed that P. insidiosum appears to be subdivided into three major polytomous groups, whose arrangement provides the Thai isolates as paraphyletic in relation to the Brazilian ones. The molecular analyses performed in this study suggest an evolutionary proximity among all American isolates, including the Brazilian and the Central and North America isolates, which were grouped together in a single entirely polytomous clade. The COX II network results presented signals of a recent expansion for the American isolates, probably originated from an Asian invasion source. Here, COX II showed higher levels bias, although it was the source of higher levels of phylogenetic information when compared to ITS. Nevertheless, the two markers chosen for this study proved to be entirely congruent, at least with respect to phylogenetic relationships between different isolates of P. insidiosum. PMID:22483240

  16. Transcriptome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of Putative Chrysanthemum HD-Zip I and II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Xin, Jingjing; Chen, Sumei; Zhao, Kunkun; Wu, Dan; Fan, Qingqing; Gao, Tianwei; Chen, Fadi; Guan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factor family is a key transcription factor family and unique to the plant kingdom. It consists of a homeodomain and a leucine zipper that serve in combination as a dimerization motif. The family can be classified into four subfamilies, and these subfamilies participate in the development of hormones and mediation of hormone action and are involved in plant responses to environmental conditions. However, limited information on this gene family is available for the important chrysanthemum ornamental species (Chrysanthemum morifolium). Here, we characterized 17 chrysanthemum HD-Zip genes based on transcriptome sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 17 CmHB genes were distributed in the HD-Zip subfamilies I and II and identified two pairs of putative orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum and four pairs of paralogous proteins in chrysanthemum. The software MEME was used to identify 7 putative motifs with E values less than 1e-3 in the chrysanthemum HD-Zip factors, and they can be clearly classified into two groups based on the composition of the motifs. A bioinformatics analysis predicted that 8 CmHB genes could be targeted by 10 miRNA families, and the expression of these 17 genes in response to phytohormone treatments and abiotic stresses was characterized. The results presented here will promote research on the various functions of the HD-Zip gene family members in plant hormones and stress responses. PMID:27196930

  17. Transcriptome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of Putative Chrysanthemum HD-Zip I and II Genes.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Xin, Jingjing; Chen, Sumei; Zhao, Kunkun; Wu, Dan; Fan, Qingqing; Gao, Tianwei; Chen, Fadi; Guan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factor family is a key transcription factor family and unique to the plant kingdom. It consists of a homeodomain and a leucine zipper that serve in combination as a dimerization motif. The family can be classified into four subfamilies, and these subfamilies participate in the development of hormones and mediation of hormone action and are involved in plant responses to environmental conditions. However, limited information on this gene family is available for the important chrysanthemum ornamental species (Chrysanthemum morifolium). Here, we characterized 17 chrysanthemum HD-Zip genes based on transcriptome sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 17 CmHB genes were distributed in the HD-Zip subfamilies I and II and identified two pairs of putative orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum and four pairs of paralogous proteins in chrysanthemum. The software MEME was used to identify 7 putative motifs with E values less than 1e-3 in the chrysanthemum HD-Zip factors, and they can be clearly classified into two groups based on the composition of the motifs. A bioinformatics analysis predicted that 8 CmHB genes could be targeted by 10 miRNA families, and the expression of these 17 genes in response to phytohormone treatments and abiotic stresses was characterized. The results presented here will promote research on the various functions of the HD-Zip gene family members in plant hormones and stress responses. PMID:27196930

  18. Stable integration and expression of wasabi defensin gene in "Egusi" melon (Colocynthis citrullus L.) confers resistance to Fusarium wilt and Alternaria leaf spot.

    PubMed

    Ntui, Valentine Otang; Thirukkumaran, Gunaratnam; Azadi, Pejman; Khan, Raham Sher; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2010-09-01

    Production of "Egusi" melon (Colocynthis citrullus L.) in West Africa is limited by fungal diseases, such as Alternaria leaf spot and Fusarium wilt. In order to engineer "Egusi" resistant to these diseases, cotyledonary explants of two "Egusi" genotypes, 'Ejagham' and NHC1-130, were transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 harbouring wasabi defensin gene (isolated from Wasabia japonica L.) in a binary vector pEKH1. After co-cultivation for 3 days, infected explants were transferred to MS medium containing 100 mg l(-l) kanamycin to select transformed tissues. After 3 weeks of culture, adventitious shoots appeared directly along the edges of the explants. As much as 19 out of 52 (36.5%) and 25 out of 71 (35.2%) of the explants in genotype NHC1-130 and 'Ejagham', respectively, formed shoots after 6 weeks of culture. As much as 74% (14 out of 19) of the shoots regenerated in genotype NHC1-130 and 72% (18 out of 25) of those produced in genotype 'Ejagham' were transgenic. A DNA fragment corresponding to the wasabi defensin gene or the selection marker nptII was amplified by PCR from the genomic DNA of all regenerated plant clones rooted on hormone-free MS medium under the same selection pressure, suggesting their transgenic nature. Southern blot analysis confirmed successful integration of 1-5 copies of the transgene. RT-PCR, northern and western blot analyses revealed that wasabi defensin gene was expressed in transgenic lines. Transgenic lines showed increased levels of resistance to Alternaria solani, which causes Alternaria leaf spot and Fusarium oxysporum, which causes Fusarium wilt, as compared to that of untransformed plants. PMID:20552202

  19. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated silencing of one abolished the other. Angiotensin II promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation whose inhibition attenuated Angiotensin II-stimulation of collagen but not DDR2. Furthermore, DDR2 knockdown prevented Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that DDR2-dependent ERK1/2 activation enhances collagen expression in cells exposed to Angiotensin II. DDR2 knockdown was also associated with compromised wound healing response to Angiotensin II. To conclude, Angiotensin II promotes NF-κB activation that up-regulates DDR2 transcription. A reciprocal regulatory relationship between DDR2 and collagen, involving cross-talk between the GPCR and RTK pathways, is central to Angiotensin II-induced increase in collagen expression in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:26674152

  20. A new polymorphism in the type II deiodinase gene is associated with circulating thyroid hormone parameters.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Robin P; van den Beld, Annewieke W; Attalki, Hayat; Toor, Hans van; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Kuiper, George G J M; Lamberts, Steven W J; Janssen, Joop A M J L; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Visser, Theo J

    2005-07-01

    Type II deiodinase (D2) is important in the regulation of local thyroid hormone bioactivity in certain tissues. D2 in skeletal muscle may also play a role in serum triiodothyronine (T(3)) production. In this study, we identified a polymorphism in the 5'-UTR of the D2 gene (D2-ORFa-Gly3Asp). We investigated the association of D2-ORFa-Gly3Asp, and of the previously identified D2-Thr92Ala polymorphism, with serum iodothyronine levels. D2-ORFa-Gly3Asp was identified by sequencing the 5'-UTR of 15 randomly selected individuals. Genotypes for D2-ORFa-Gly3Asp were determined in 156 healthy blood donors (age 46.3 +/- 12.2 yr) and 349 ambulant elderly men (age 77.7 +/- 3.5 yr) and related to serum iodothyronine and TSH levels. D2-ORFa-Asp(3) had an allele frequency of 33.9% in blood bank donors and was associated with serum thyroxine (T(4); Gly/Gly vs. Gly/Asp vs. Asp/Asp = 7.06 +/- 0.14 vs. 6.74 +/- 0.15 vs. 6.29 +/- 0.27 microg/dl, P = 0.01), free T(4) (1.22 +/- 0.02 vs. 1.16 +/- 0.02 vs. 1.06 +/- 0.04 ng/dl, P = 0.001), reverse T(3) (P = 0.01), and T(3)/T(4) ratio (P = 0.002) in a dose-dependent manner, but not with serum T(3) (P = 0.59). In elderly men, D2-ORFa-Asp(3) had a similar frequency but was not associated with serum iodothyronine levels. This new polymorphism in the 5'-UTR of D2 is associated with iodothyronine levels in blood donors but not in elderly men. We hypothesize that this might be explained by the decline in skeletal muscle size during aging, resulting in a relative decrease in the contribution of D2 to serum T(3) production. PMID:15727947

  1. The pseudorabies virus gII gene is closely related to the gB glycoprotein gene of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, A K; Dorney, D J; Wathen, M W; Whealy, M E; Gold, C; Watson, R J; Holland, L E; Weed, S D; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C

    1987-01-01

    We have looked for conserved DNA sequences between four herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein genes encoding gB, gC, gD, and gE and pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA, HSV-1 DNA fragments representing these four glycoprotein-coding sequences were hybridized to restriction enzyme fragments of PRV DNA by the Southern blot procedure. Specific hybridization was observed only when HSV-1 gB DNA was used as probe. This region of hybridization was localized to a 5.2-kilobase (kb) region mapping at approximately 0.15 map units on the PRV genome. Northern blot (RNA blot) analysis, with a 1.2-kb probe derived from this segment, revealed a predominant hybridizing RNA species of approximately 3 kb in PRV-infected PK15 cells. DNA sequence analysis of the region corresponding to this RNA revealed a single large open reading frame with significant nucleotide homology with the gB gene of HSV-1 KOS 321. In addition, the beginning of the sequenced PRV region also contained the end of an open reading frame with amino acid homology to HSV-1 ICP 18.5, a protein that may be involved in viral glycoprotein transport. This sequence partially overlaps the PRV gB homolog coding sequence. We have shown that the PRV gene with homology to HSV-1 gB encoded the gII glycoprotein gene by expressing a 765-base-pair segment of the PRV open reading frame in Escherichia coli as a protein fused to beta-galactosidase. Antiserum, raised in rabbits, against this fusion protein immunoprecipitated a specific family of PRV glycoproteins of apparent molecular mass 110, 68, and 55 kilodaltons that have been identified as the gII family of glycoproteins. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence indicated that the PRV gII protein shares 50% amino acid homology with the aligned HSV-1 gB protein. All 10 cysteine residues located outside of the signal sequence, as well as 4 of 6 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, were conserved between the two proteins. The primary protein sequence for HSV-1 gB regions

  2. Evolutionary dynamics of the mS952 intron: a novel mitochondrial group II intron encoding a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene.

    PubMed

    Mullineux, Sahra-Taylor; Willows, Karla; Hausner, Georg

    2011-06-01

    Examination of the mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA (rns) gene of five species of the fungal genus Leptographium revealed that the gene has been invaded at least once at position 952 by a group II intron encoding a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene. Phylogenetic analyses of the intron and homing endonuclease sequences indicated that each element in Leptographium species forms a single clade and is closely related to the group II intron/homing endonuclease gene composite element previously reported at position 952 of the mitochondrial rns gene of Cordyceps species and of Cryphonectria parasitica. The results of an intron survey of the mt rns gene of Leptographium species superimposed onto the phylogenetic analysis of the host organisms suggest that the composite element was transmitted vertically in Leptographium lundbergii. However, its stochastic distribution among strains of L. wingfieldii, L. terebrantis, and L. truncatum suggests that it has been horizontally transmitted by lateral gene transfer among these species, although the random presence of the intron may reflect multiple random loss events. A model is proposed describing the initial invasion of the group II intron in the rns gene of L. lundbergii by a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene and subsequent evolution of this gene to recognize a novel DNA target site, which may now promote the mobility of the intron and homing endonuclease gene as a composite element. PMID:21479820

  3. Resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus in Gladiolus plants transformed with either a defective replicase or coat protein subgroup II gene from Cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Kathryn; Jordan, Ramon; Guaragna, Mary Ann; Hsu, Hei-Ti; Ueng, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Transgenic Gladiolus plants that contain either Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup I coat protein, CMV subgroup II coat protein, CMV replicase, a combination of the CMV subgroups I and II coat proteins, or a combination of the CMV subgroup II coat protein and replicase genes were developed. These plants were multiplied in vitro and challenged with purified CMV isolated from Gladiolus using a hand-held gene gun. Three out of 19 independently transformed plants expressing the replicase gene under control of the duplicated CaMV 35S promoter were found to be resistant to CMV subgroup I. Three out of 21 independently transformed plants with the CMV subgroup II coat protein gene under control of the Arabidopsis UBQ3 promoter were resistant to CMV subgroup II. Eighteen independently transformed plants with either the CMV subgroup I coat protein or a combination of CMV subgroups I and II coat proteins were challenged and found to be susceptible to both CMV subgroups I or II. Virus resistant plants with the CMV replicase transgene expressed much lower RNA levels than resistant plants expressing the CMV subgroup II coat protein. This work will facilitate the evaluation of virus resistance in transgenic Gladiolus plants to yield improved floral quality and productivity. PMID:20411391

  4. Mutations in the COL5A1 gene are causal in the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    De Paepe, A.; Nuytinck, L.; Naeyaert, J.M.

    1997-03-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous connective-tissue disorder of which at least nine subtypes are recognized. Considerable clinical overlap exists between the EDS I and II subtypes, suggesting that both are allelic disorders. Recent evidence based on linkage and transgenic mice studies suggest that collagen V is causally involved in human EDS. Collagen V forms heterotypic fibrils with collagen I in many tissues and plays an important role in collagen I fibrillogenesis. We have identified a mutation in COL5A1, the gene encoding the pro{alpha}1(V) collagen chain, segregating with EDS I in a four-generation family. The mutation causes the substitution of the most 5{prime} cysteine residue by a serine within a highly conserved sequence of the pro{alpha}1(V) C-propeptide domain and causes reduction of collagen V by preventing incorporation of the mutant pro{alpha}1 (V) chains in the collagen V trimers. In addition, we have detected splicing defects in the COL5A1 gene in a patient with EDS I and in a family with EDS II. These findings confirm the causal role of collagen V in at least a subgroup of EDS I, prove that EDS I and II are allelic conditions, and represent a, so far, unique example of a human collagen disorder caused by substitution of a highly conserved cysteine residue in the C-propeptide domain of a fibrillar collagen. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Mutations in the COL5A1 gene are causal in the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes I and II.

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, A; Nuytinck, L; Hausser, I; Anton-Lamprecht, I; Naeyaert, J M

    1997-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous connective-tissue disorder of which at least nine subtypes are recognized. Considerable clinical overlap exists between the EDS I and II subtypes, suggesting that both are allelic disorders. Recent evidence based on linkage and transgenic mice studies suggest that collagen V is causally involved in human EDS. Collagen V forms heterotypic fibrils with collagen I in many tissues and plays an important role in collagen I fibrillogenesis. We have identified a mutation in COL5A1, the gene encoding the pro(alpha)1(V) collagen chain, segregating with EDS I in a four-generation family. The mutation causes the substitution of the most 5' cysteine residue by a serine within a highly conserved sequence of the pro(alpha)1(V) C-propeptide domain and causes reduction of collagen V by preventing incorporation of the mutant pro(alpha)1(V) chains in the collagen V trimers. In addition, we have detected splicing defects in the COL5A1 gene in a patient with EDS I and in a family with EDS II. These findings confirm the causal role of collagen V in at least a subgroup of EDS I, prove that EDS I and II are allelic conditions, and represent a, so far, unique example of a human collagen disorder caused by substitution of a highly conserved cysteine residue in the C-propeptide domain of a fibrillar collagen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9042913

  6. Mucolipidosis types II and III and non-syndromic stuttering are associated with different variants in the same genes.

    PubMed

    Raza, M Hashim; Domingues, Carlos E F; Webster, Ronald; Sainz, Eduardo; Paris, Emily; Rahn, Rachel; Gutierrez, Joanne; Chow, Ho Ming; Mundorff, Jennifer; Kang, Chang-Soo; Riaz, Naveeda; Basra, Muhammad A R; Khan, Shaheen; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Braun, Allen; Drayna, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    Homozygous mutations in GNPTAB and GNPTG are classically associated with mucolipidosis II (ML II) alpha/beta and mucolipidosis III (ML III) alpha/beta/gamma, which are rare lysosomal storage disorders characterized by multiple pathologies. Recently, variants in GNPTAB, GNPTG, and the functionally related NAGPA gene have been associated with non-syndromic persistent stuttering. In a worldwide sample of 1013 unrelated individuals with non-syndromic persistent stuttering we found 164 individuals who carried a rare non-synonymous coding variant in one of these three genes. We compared the frequency of these variants with those in population-matched controls and genomic databases, and their location with those reported in mucolipidosis. Stuttering subjects displayed an excess of non-synonymous coding variants compared to controls and individuals in the 1000 Genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases. We identified a total of 81 different variants in our stuttering cases. Virtually all of these were missense substitutions, only one of which has been previously reported in mucolipidosis, a disease frequently associated with complete loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesize that rare non-synonymous coding variants in GNPTAB, GNPTG, and NAGPA may account for as much as 16% of persistent stuttering cases, and that variants in GNPTAB and GNPTG are at different sites and may in general, cause less severe effects on protein function than those in ML II alpha/beta and ML III alpha/beta/gamma. PMID:26130485

  7. Relationship between target antigens and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes in producing two pathogenic antibodies simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Zakka, L R; Keskin, D B; Reche, P; Ahmed, A R

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we present 15 patients with histological and immunopathologically proven pemphigus vulgaris (PV). After a mean of 80 months since the onset of disease, when evaluated serologically, they had antibodies typical of PV and pemphigoid (Pg). Similarly, 18 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP) and mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) were diagnosed on the basis of histology and immunopathology. After a mean of 60 months since the onset of disease, when their sera were evaluated they were found to have Pg and PV autoantibodies. In both groups of patients the diseases were characterized by a chronic course, which included several relapses and recurrences and were non-responsive to conventional therapy. The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes were studied in both groups of patients and phenotypes associated typically with them were observed. Hence, in 33 patients, two different pathogenic autoantibodies were detected simultaneously. The authors provide a computer model to show that each MHC II gene has relevant epitopes that recognize the antigens associated with both diseases. Using the databases in these computer models, the authors present the hypothesis that these two autoantibodies are produced simultaneously due to the phenomena of epitope spreading. PMID:21069937

  8. Chromatin features, RNA polymerase II and the comparative expression of lens genes encoding crystallins, transcription factors, and autophagy mediators

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Rockowitz, Shira; Chauss, Daniel; Wang, Ping; Kantorow, Marc; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Gene expression correlates with local chromatin structure. Our studies have mapped histone post-translational modifications, RNA polymerase II (pol II), and transcription factor Pax6 in lens chromatin. These data represent the first genome-wide insights into the relationship between lens chromatin structure and lens transcriptomes and serve as an excellent source for additional data analysis and refinement. The principal lens proteins, the crystallins, are encoded by predominantly expressed mRNAs; however, the regulatory mechanisms underlying their high expression in the lens remain poorly understood. Methods The formaldehyde-assisted identification of regulatory regions (FAIRE-Seq) was employed to analyze newborn lens chromatin. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data published earlier (GSE66961) have been used to assist in FAIRE-seq data interpretation. RNA transcriptomes from murine lens epithelium, lens fibers, erythrocytes, forebrain, liver, neurons, and pancreas were compared to establish the gene expression levels of the most abundant mRNAs versus median gene expression across other differentiated cells. Results Normalized RNA expression data from multiple tissues show that crystallins rank among the most highly expressed genes in mammalian cells. These findings correlate with the extremely high abundance of pol II all across the crystallin loci, including crystallin genes clustered on chromosomes 1 and 5, as well as within regions of “open” chromatin, as identified by FAIRE-seq. The expression levels of mRNAs encoding DNA-binding transcription factors (e.g., Foxe3, Hsf4, Maf, Pax6, Prox1, Sox1, and Tfap2a) revealed that their transcripts form “clusters” of abundant mRNAs in either lens fibers or lens epithelium. The expression of three autophagy regulatory mRNAs, encoding Tfeb, FoxO1, and Hif1α, was found within a group of lens preferentially expressed transcription factors compared to the E12.5 forebrain. Conclusions This study reveals novel features of

  9. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2007-11-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct. PMID:17683506

  10. Use of the computer-retargeted group II intron RmInt1 of Sinorhizobium meliloti for gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    M García-Rodríguez, Fernando; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Teresa; Díaz-Prado, Vanessa; Toro, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Gene-targeting vectors derived from mobile group II introns capable of forming a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex containing excised intron lariat RNA and an intron-encoded protein (IEP) with reverse transcriptase (RT), maturase, and endonuclease (En) activities have been described. RmInt1 is an efficient mobile group II intron with an IEP lacking the En domain. We performed a comprehensive study of the rules governing RmInt1 target site recognition based on selection experiments with donor and recipient plasmid libraries, with randomization of the elements of the intron RNA involved in target recognition and the wild-type target site. The data obtained were used to develop a computer algorithm for identifying potential RmInt1 targets in any DNA sequence. Using this algorithm, we modified RmInt1 for the efficient recognition of DNA target sites at different locations in the Sinorhizobium meliloti chromosome. The retargeted RmInt1 integrated efficiently into the chromosome, regardless of the location of the target gene. Our results suggest that RmInt1 could be efficiently adapted for gene targeting. PMID:24646865

  11. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor A1166C gene polymorphism and essential hypertension in Calabar and Uyo cities, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kooffreh, Mary Esien; Anumudu, Chiaka Ijeoma; Duke, Roseline; Okpako, Elza Cletus; Kumar, P. Lava

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The angiotensin II protein is a vasoconstrictor that exerts most of its influence through the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). Inconsistent association between the A1166C polymorphism of the AT1R gene and hypertension has been reported among various populations but not among the peoples of Calabar and Uyo. This study was designed to determine the frequency of the A1166C polymorphism of the AT1R gene and its association with hypertension in a sample population of Calabar and Uyo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A population-based case control design consisting of total of 1224 participants, 612 each of patients and controls were randomly recruited from hypertension clinics and the general population. Genotyping of the A1166C allele of the AT1R gene to identify variants was performed using polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion. Multiple regressions were applied to test whether the A1166 genotypes were predictors of hypertension. RESULTS: 99% of the study population had the wild type AA genotype, and 1% was AC heterozygous carriers of the A1166C polymorphism. CONCLUSION: The A1166C polymorphism was not a predictor of hypertension in the sample population of Calabar and Uyo. PMID:24019625

  12. Identification of a melanosomal membrane protein encoded by the pink-eyed dilution (type II oculocutaneous albinism) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rosemblat, S; Durham-Pierre, D; Gardner, J M; Nakatsu, Y; Brilliant, M H; Orlow, S J

    1994-01-01

    The pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in the mouse is critical to melanogenesis; mutations in the homologous locus in humans, P, are a cause of type II oculocutaneous albinism. Although a cDNA encoded by the p gene has recently been identified, nothing is known about the protein product of this gene. To characterize the protein encoded by the p gene, we performed immunoblot analysis of extracts of melanocytes cultured from wild-type mice with an antiserum from rabbits immunized with a peptide corresponding to amino acids 285-298 of the predicted protein product of the murine p gene. This antiserum recognized a 110-kDa protein. The protein was absent from extracts of melanocytes cultured from mice with two mutations (pcp and p) in which transcripts of the p gene are absent or greatly reduced. Introduction of the cDNA for the p gene into pcp melanocytes by electroporation resulted in expression of the 3.3-kb mRNA and the 110-kDa protein. Upon subcellular fractionation of cultured melanocytes, the 110-kDa protein was found to be present in melanosomes but absent from the vesicular fraction; phase separation performed with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 confirmed the predicted hydrophobic nature of the protein. These results demonstrate that the p gene encodes a 110-kDa integral melanosomal membrane protein and establish a framework by which mutations at this locus, which diminish pigmentation, can be analyzed at the cellular and biochemical levels. Images PMID:7991586

  13. Med8, a subunit of the mediator CTD complex of RNA polymerase II, directly binds to regulatory elements of SUC2 and HXK2 genes.

    PubMed

    Chaves, R S; Herrero, P; Moreno, F

    1999-01-19

    In a search to identify new factors required for expression of SUC2 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have partially purified a 27 kDa protein (p27) that bound both the DRSs of the HXK2 gene and the UASs of SUC2 gene. The amino terminal sequence of p27 identified the MED8 gene (open reading frame YBR193C), located in chromosome II of S. cerevisiae, as the gene coding for the protein. Disruption of this gene has demonstrated that is an essential gene for yeast growth. To determine whether the p27 protein represents the Med8 product, we expressed MED8 gene in E. coli and demonstrated that the heterologous synthesized protein specifically binds to both UASSUC2 and DRS2HXK2. This observation suggests that Med8 may be important for the coupling of the glucose repression pathway of SUC2 gene to the HXK2 gene expression. Med8 has been described as a mediator protein interacting with the CTD of the RNA polymerase II. Thus, the role of Med8 could be to act as coupling factor by linking activating and repressing transcription complexes to the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme transcriptional machinery. PMID:9918841

  14. Molecular characterization of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II genes in outbred pig populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune, disease and vaccine responses. Thus, understanding how SLA gene polymorphism affects immunity, especially in outbred pig populations with a diverse genetic background, requires accu...

  15. Estrogen-inducible and liver-specific expression of the chicken Very Low Density Apolipoprotein II gene locus in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wijnholds, J; Philipsen, S; Pruzina, S; Fraser, P; Grosveld, F; Ab, G

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the chicken Very Low Density Apolipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene locus in transgenic mice. A DNA fragment composed of the transcribed region, 16 kb of 5' flanking and 400 bp of 3' flanking sequences contained all the information sufficient for estrogen-inducible, liver-specific expression of the apoVLDL II gene. The far-upstream region contains a Negative Regulating Element coinciding with a DNaseI-hypersensitive site at -11 kb. In transgenic mice, the NRE at -11 kb is used for downregulating the expression to a lower maximum level. The NRE might be used for modulating apoVLDL II gene expression, and may be involved in the rapid shut-down of the expression after hormone removal. Images PMID:8479914

  16. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Trans-species polymorphism of the Mhc class II DRB-like gene in banded penguins (genus Spheniscus).

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Eri F; Tsuda, Tomi T; Sumiyama, Daisuke; Naruse, Taeko K; Fukuda, Michio; Kurita, Masanori; Wilson, Rory P; LeMaho, Yvon; Miller, Gary D; Tsuda, Michio; Murata, Koichi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2009-05-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc) class II DRB locus of vertebrates is highly polymorphic and some alleles may be shared between closely related species as a result of balancing selection in association with resistance to parasites. In this study, we developed a new set of PCR primers to amplify, clone, and sequence overlapping portions of the Mhc class II DRB-like gene from the 5'UTR end to intron 3, including exons 1, 2, and 3 and introns 1 and 2 in four species (20 Humboldt, six African, five Magellanic, and three Galapagos penguins) of penguin from the genus Spheniscus (Sphe). Analysis of gene sequence variation by the neighbor-joining method of 21 Sphe sequences and 20 previously published sequences from four other penguin species revealed overlapping clades within the Sphe species, but species-specific clades for the other penguin species. The overlap of the DRB-like gene sequence variants between the four Sphe species suggests that, despite their allopatric distribution, the Sphe species are closely related and that some shared DRB1 alleles may have undergone a trans-species inheritance because of balancing selection and/or recent rapid speciation. The new primers and PCR assays that we have developed for the identification of the DRB1 DNA and protein sequence variations appear to be useful for the characterization of the molecular evolution of the gene in closely related Penguin species and might be helpful for the assessment of the genetic health and the management of the conservation and captivity of these endangered species. PMID:19319519

  18. Characterization of MHC class I and II genes in a subantarctic seabird, the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes).

    PubMed

    Strandh, Maria; Lannefors, Mimi; Bonadonna, Francesco; Westerdahl, Helena

    2011-10-01

    The great polymorphism observed in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is thought to be maintained by pathogen-mediated selection possibly combined with MHC-disassortative mating, guided by MHC-determined olfactory cues. Here, we partly characterize the MHC class I and II B of the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes), a bird with significant olfactory abilities that lives under presumably low pathogen burdens in Subantarctica. Blue petrels are long-lived, monogamous birds which suggest the necessity of an accurate mate choice process. The species is ancestral to songbirds (Passeriformes; many MHC loci), although not to gamefowls (Galliformes; few MHC loci). Considering the phylogenetic relationships and the low subantarctic pathogen burden, we expected few rather than many MHC loci in the blue petrel. However, when we analysed partial MHC class I and class II B cDNA and gDNA sequences we found evidence for as many as at least eight MHC class I loci and at least two class II B loci. These class I and II B sequences showed classical MHC characteristics, e.g. high nucleotide diversity, especially in putative peptide-binding regions where signatures of positive selection was detected. Trans-species polymorphism was found between MHC class II B sequences of the blue petrel and those of thin-billed prion, Pachyptila belcheri, two species that diverged ∼25 MYA. The observed MHC allele richness in the blue petrel may well serve as a basis for mate choice, especially since olfactory discrimination of MHC types may be possible in this species. PMID:21607694

  19. Characterization of a class II pilin expression locus from Neisseria meningitidis: evidence for increased diversity among pilin genes in pathogenic Neisseria species.

    PubMed Central

    Aho, E L; Botten, J W; Hall, R J; Larson, M K; Ness, J K

    1997-01-01

    Strains of Neisseria meningitidis elaborate one of two classes of pili. Meningococcal class I pili have many features in common with pili produced by N. gonorrhoeae, including the ability to bind monoclonal antibody SM1 and a common gene and protein structure consisting of conserved, semivariable, and hypervariable regions. Class II pili are SM1 nonreactive and display smaller subunit molecular weights than do gonococcal or meningococcal class I pili. In this study, we have determined the N-terminal amino acid sequence for class II pilin and isolated the expression locus encoding class II pilin from N. meningitidis FAM18. Meningococcal class II pilin displays features typical of type IV pili and shares extensive amino acid identity with the N-terminal conserved regions of other neisserial pilin proteins. However, the deduced class II pilin sequence displays several unique features compared with previously reported meningococcal class I and gonococcal pilin sequences. Class II pilin lacks several conserved peptide regions found within the semivariable and hypervariable regions of other neisserial pilins and displays a large deletion in a hypervariable region of the protein believed to be exposed on the pilus face in gonococcal pili. DNA sequence comparisons within all three regions of the coding sequence also suggest that the meningococcal class II pilin gene is the most dissimilar of the three types of neisserial pilE loci. Additionally, the class II locus fails to display flanking-sequence homology to class I and gonococcal genes and lacks a downstream Sma/Cla repeat sequence, a feature present in all other neisserial pilin genes examined to date. These data indicate meningococcal class II pili represent a structurally distinct class of pili and suggest that relationships among pilin genes in pathogenic Neisseria do not necessarily follow species boundaries. PMID:9199428

  20. Characterization of class II β chain major histocompatibility complex genes in a family of Hawaiian honeycreepers: 'amakihi (Hemignathus virens).

    PubMed

    Jarvi, Susan I; Bianchi, Kiara R; Farias, Margaret Em; Txakeeyang, Ann; McFarland, Thomas; Belcaid, Mahdi; Asano, Ashley

    2016-07-01

    Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae) have evolved in the absence of mosquitoes for over five million years. Through human activity, mosquitoes were introduced to the Hawaiian archipelago less than 200 years ago. Mosquito-vectored diseases such as avian malaria caused by Plasmodium relictum and Avipoxviruses have greatly impacted these vulnerable species. Susceptibility to these diseases is variable among and within species. Due to their function in adaptive immunity, the role of major histocompatibility complex genes (Mhc) in disease susceptibility is under investigation. In this study, we evaluate gene organization and levels of diversity of Mhc class II β chain genes (exon 2) in a captive-reared family of Hawaii 'amakihi (Hemignathus virens). A total of 233 sequences (173 bp) were obtained by PCR+1 amplification and cloning, and 5720 sequences were generated by Roche 454 pyrosequencing. We report a total of 17 alleles originating from a minimum of 14 distinct loci. We detected three linkage groups that appear to represent three distinct haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed one variable cluster resembling classical Mhc sequences (DAB) and one highly conserved, low variability cluster resembling non-classical Mhc sequences (DBB). High net evolutionary divergence values between DAB and DBB resemble that seen between chicken BLB system and YLB system genes. High amino acid identity among non-classical alleles from 12 species of passerines (DBB) and four species of Galliformes (YLB) was found, suggesting that these non-classical passerine sequences may be related to the Galliforme YLB sequences. PMID:26971289

  1. Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection is associated with lower MHC class II gene expression in Apodemus flavicollis: indication for immune suppression?

    PubMed

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2011-12-01

    Due to their key role in recognizing foreign antigens and triggering the subsequent immune response the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) provide a potential target for parasites to attack in order to evade detection and expulsion from the host. A diminished MHC gene expression results in less activated T cells and might serve as a gateway for pathogens and parasites. Some parasites are suspected to be immune suppressors and promote co-infections of other parasites even in other parts of the body. In our study we found indications that the gut dwelling nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus might exert a systemic immunosuppressive effect in yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). The amount of hepatic MHC class II DRB gene RNA transcripts in infected mice was negatively associated with infection intensity with H. polygyrus. The hepatic expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10 was not associated with H. polygyrus infection. We did not find direct positive associations of H. polygyrus with other helminth species. But the prevalence and infection intensity of the nematodes Syphacia stroma and Trichuris muris were higher in multiple infected individuals. Furthermore, our data indicated antagonistic effects in the helminth community of A. flavicollis as cestode infection correlated negatively with H. polygyrus and helminth species richness. Our study shows that expression analyses of immune relevant genes can also be performed in wildlife, opening new aspects and possibilities for future ecological and evolutionary research. PMID:21983561

  2. Induced mutations in the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) genes increase amylose and resistant starch content in durum wheat

    PubMed Central

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Colasuonno, Pasqualina; Uauy, Cristobal; Beckles, Diane M.; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the largest component of the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain and consists of approximately 70-80% amylopectin and 20-30% amylose. Amylopectin is a highly-branched, readily digested polysaccharide, whereas amylose has few branches and forms complexes that resist digestion and mimic dietary fiber (resistant starch). Down-regulation of the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) gene by RNA interference (RNAi) was previously shown to increase amylose content in both hexaploid and tetraploid wheat. We generated ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) mutants for the SBEIIa-A and SBEIIa-B homoeologs in the tetraploid durum wheat variety Kronos (T. turgidum ssp. durum L.). Single-gene mutants showed non-significant increases in amylose and resistant starch content, but a double mutant combining a SBEIIa-A knock-out mutation with a SBEIIa-B splice-site mutation showed a 22% increase in amylose content (P<0.0001) and a 115% increase in resistant starch content (P<0.0001). In addition, we obtained mutants for the A and B genome copies of the paralogous SBEIIb gene, mapped them 1-2 cM from SBEIIa, and generated double SBEIIa-SBEIIb mutants to study the effect of the SBEIIb gene in the absence of SBEIIa. These mutants are available to those interested in increasing amylose content and resistant starch in durum wheat. PMID:26924849

  3. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene) in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weicai; Bei, Yongjian; Li, Hanhua

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB) exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae), which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation. PMID:25629763

  4. Lipophilic tetranuclear ruthenium(II) complexes as two-photon luminescent tracking non-viral gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bole; Ouyang, Cheng; Qiu, Kangqiang; Zhao, Jing; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-02-23

    Fluorescence detection is the most effective tool for tracking gene delivery in living cells. To reduce photodamage and autofluorescence and to increase deep penetration into cells, choosing appropriate fluorophores that are capable of two-photon activation under irradiation in the NIR or IR regions is an effective approach. In this work, we have developed six tetranuclear ruthenium(II) complexes, GV1-6, and have studied their one- and two-photon luminescence properties. DNA interaction studies have demonstrated that GV2-6, bearing hydrophobic alkyl ether chains, show more efficient DNA condensing ability but lower DNA binding constants than GV1. However, the hydrophobic alkyl ether chains also enhance the DNA delivery ability of GV2-6 compared with that of GV1. More importantly, we have applied GV1-6 as non-viral gene vectors for tracking DNA delivery in living cells by one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopies. In two-photon microscopy, a high signal-to-noise contrast was achieved by irradiation with an 830 nm laser. This is the first example of the use of transition-metal complexes for two-photon luminescent tracking of the cellular pathways of gene delivery and as DNA carriers. Our work provides new insights into improving real-time tracking during gene delivery and transfection as well as important information for the design of multifunctional non-viral vectors. PMID:25597394

  5. Elimination of Manganese(II,III) Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 by a Double Knockout of Two Putative Multicopper Oxidase Genes

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James K.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial manganese(II) oxidation impacts the redox cycling of Mn, other elements, and compounds in the environment; therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms of and enzymes responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. In several Mn(II)-oxidizing organisms, the identified Mn(II) oxidase belongs to either the multicopper oxidase (MCO) or the heme peroxidase family of proteins. However, the identity of the oxidase in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 has long remained unknown. To identify the P. putida GB-1 oxidase, we searched its genome and found several homologues of known or suspected Mn(II) oxidase-encoding genes (mnxG, mofA, moxA, and mopA). To narrow this list, we assumed that the Mn(II) oxidase gene would be conserved among Mn(II)-oxidizing pseudomonads but not in nonoxidizers and performed a genome comparison to 11 Pseudomonas species. We further assumed that the oxidase gene would be regulated by MnxR, a transcription factor required for Mn(II) oxidation. Two loci met all these criteria: PputGB1_2447, which encodes an MCO homologous to MnxG, and PputGB1_2665, which encodes an MCO with very low homology to MofA. In-frame deletions of each locus resulted in strains that retained some ability to oxidize Mn(II) or Mn(III); loss of oxidation was attained only upon deletion of both genes. These results suggest that PputGB1_2447 and PputGB1_2665 encode two MCOs that are independently capable of oxidizing both Mn(II) and Mn(III). The purpose of this redundancy is unclear; however, differences in oxidation phenotype for the single mutants suggest specialization in function for the two enzymes. PMID:23124227

  6. Carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome in a Belgian family is caused by a point mutation at an invariant histidine residue (107 His----Tyr): complete structure of the normal human CA II gene.

    PubMed Central

    Venta, P J; Welty, R J; Johnson, T M; Sly, W S; Tashian, R E

    1991-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), which has the highest turnover number and widest tissue distribution of any of the seven CA isozymes known in humans, is absent from the red blood cells and probably from other tissues of patients with CA II deficiency syndrome. We have sequenced the CA II gene in a patient from a consanguinous marriage in a Belgian family and identified the mutation that is probably the cause of the CA II deficiency in that family. The change is a C-to-T transition which results in the substitution of Tyr (TAT) for His (CAT) at position 107. This histidine is invariant in all amniotic CA isozymes sequenced to date, as well as the CAs from elasmobranch and algal sources and in a viral CA-related protein. His-107 appears to have a stabilizing function in the structure of all CA molecules, and its substitution by Tyr apparently disrupts the critical hydrogen bonding of His-107 to two other similarly invariant residues, Glu-117 and Tyr-194, resulting in an unstable CA II molecule. We have also completed the intron-exon structure of the normal human CA II gene, which has allowed us to prepare PCR primers for all exons. These primers will facilitate the determination of the mutations in other inherited CA II deficiencies. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1928091

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (P<0.05) in LXSN rats (23+/-1, 37+/-2, and 52+/-2 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng). Importantly, treating LSN-HHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli. PMID:15166181

  8. Studies of three genes encoding Cinnamomin (a type II RIP) isolated from the seeds of camphor tree and their expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; Liu, Ren-shui; Gong, Zhen-zhen; Liu, Wang-Yi

    2002-02-01

    Cinnamomin, which has three isoforms, is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) purified from the mature seeds of camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora). In a previous study, an incomplete cDNA that encoded the A- and B-chain of Cinnamomin but lacked signal peptide sequence was cloned. In the present paper, its full-length cDNA was obtained by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5'RACE). Subsequently, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of its genomic DNA was performed. Unexpectedly, sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed three cinnamomin genes with >98.0% sequence identity. One of them corresponded to the published cDNA and was designated as cinnamomin I, whereas the other two genes were named as cinnamomin II and cinnamomin III, respectively. RT-PCR amplification of the cDNAs of cinnamomin II and III manifested that these two genes were functional. The three genes have no intron. Three Cinnamomin precursors that were inferred from the cDNA sequence of three cinnamomin genes exhibited relatively high sequence homology with other type II RIPs. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the cinnamomin genes only expressed in cotyledons of C. camphora seeds and the acmes of expression emerged at 75-90 DAF when seeds were close to maturity. It is proposed that the three cinnamomin genes may encode three isoforms of Cinnamomin. The physiological function of Cinnamomin in C. camphora seeds is briefly discussed. PMID:11891062

  9. Three-dimensional morphology and gene expression in the Drosophila blastoderm at cellular resolution II: dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Keränen, Soile VE; Fowlkes, Charless C; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Sudar, Damir; Knowles, David W; Malik, Jitendra; Biggin, Mark D

    2006-01-01

    Background To accurately describe gene expression and computationally model animal transcriptional networks, it is essential to determine the changing locations of cells in developing embryos. Results Using automated image analysis methods, we provide the first quantitative description of temporal changes in morphology and gene expression at cellular resolution in whole embryos, using the Drosophila blastoderm as a model. Analyses based on both fixed and live embryos reveal complex, previously undetected three-dimensional changes in nuclear density patterns caused by nuclear movements prior to gastrulation. Gene expression patterns move, in part, with these changes in morphology, but additional spatial shifts in expression patterns are also seen, supporting a previously proposed model of pattern dynamics based on the induction and inhibition of gene expression. We show that mutations that disrupt either the anterior/posterior (a/p) or the dorsal/ventral (d/v) transcriptional cascades alter morphology and gene expression along both the a/p and d/v axes in a way suggesting that these two patterning systems interact via both transcriptional and morphological mechanisms. Conclusion Our work establishes a new strategy for measuring temporal changes in the locations of cells and gene expression patterns that uses fixed cell material and computational modeling. It also provides a coordinate framework for the blastoderm embryo that will allow increasingly accurate spatio-temporal modeling of both the transcriptional control network and morphogenesis. PMID:17184547

  10. Interplay among coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1, CBP, and CIITA in IFN-gamma-inducible MHC-II gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zika, Eleni; Fauquier, Lucas; Vandel, Laurence; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2005-11-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (MHC-II) genes are prototype targets of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma activates the expression of the non-DNA-binding master regulator of MHC-II, class II transactivator (CIITA), which is crucial for enhanceosome formation and gene activation. This report shows the importance of the histone methyltransferase, coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1/PRMT4), during IFN-gamma-induced MHC-II gene activation. It also demonstrates the coordinated regulation of CIITA, CARM1, and the acetyltransferase cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) during this process. CARM1 synergizes with CIITA in activating MHC-II transcription and synergy is abrogated when an arginine methyltransferase-defective CARM1 mutant is used. Protein-arginine methyltransferase 1 has much less effect on MHC-II transcription. Specific RNA interference reduced CARM1 expression as well as MHC-II expression. The recruitment of CARM1 to the promoter requires endogenous CIITA and results in methylation of histone H3-R17; hence, CIITA is an upstream regulator of histone methylation. Previous work has shown that CARM1 can methylate CBP at three arginine residues. Using wild-type CBP and a mutant of CBP lacking the CARM1-targeted arginine residues (R3A), we show that arginine methylation of CBP is required for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. A kinetic analysis shows that CIITA, CARM1, and H3-R17 methylation all precede CBP loading on the MHC-II promoter during IFN-gamma treatment. These results suggest functional and temporal relationships among CIITA, CARM1, and CBP for IFN-gamma induction of MHC-II. PMID:16254053

  11. Subunits of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe RNA polymerase II: enzyme purification and structure of the subunit 3 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Y; Yamagishi, M; Ishihama, A

    1993-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the structure and function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, we purified the enzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The highly purified RNA polymerase II contained more than eleven polypeptides. The sizes of the largest the second-, and the third-largest polypeptides as measured by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were about 210, 150, and 40 kilodaltons (kDa), respectively, and are similar to those of RPB1, 2, and 3 subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II. Using the degenerated primers designed after amino acid micro-sequencing of the 40 kDa third-largest polypeptide (subunit 3), we cloned the subunit 3 gene (rpb3) and determined its DNA sequence. Taken together with the sequence of parts of PCR-amplified cDNA, the predicted coding sequence of rpb3, interrupted by two introns, was found to encode a polypeptide of 297 amino acid residues in length with a molecular weight of 34 kDa. The S. pombe subunit 3 contains four structural domains conserved for the alpha-subunit family of RNA polymerase from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A putative leucine zipper motif was found to exist in the C-terminal proximal conserved region (domain D). Possible functions of the conserved domains are discussed. Images PMID:8367291

  12. Peripherin: an islet antigen that is cross-reactive with nonobese diabetic mouse class II gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Boitard, C; Villa, M C; Becourt, C; Gia, H P; Huc, C; Sempe, P; Portier, M M; Bach, J F

    1992-01-01

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, in which major histocompatibility complex genes may be involved in the susceptibility to diabetes, has been developed as a model of autoimmune diabetes. The NOD mouse expresses I-A-encoded class II major histocompatibility complex antigens, which differ from those of other mouse haplotypes by the presence of a serine at position 57 of the A beta chain. Identifying islet autoantigens may help elucidate the role of class II antigens in the activation of autoreactive T cells and, thus, in the development of diabetes. We have detected autoantibodies directed against a 58-kDa islet cell antigen in NOD mice but not in other strains, including lupus-prone mice. Apart from insulin-secreting cells, the 58-kDa antigen was only found to be expressed by neuroblastoma cells and was identified as peripherin, an intermediate filament protein previously characterized in well-defined neuronal populations. This autoantigen cross-reacted with I-Anod class II antigens, suggesting that it may contribute to defective self-tolerance of islet beta cells in the NOD mouse. Images PMID:1729686

  13. DNA topoisomerase II sites in the histone H4 gene during the highly synchronous cell cycle of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed Central

    Borde, V; Duguet, M

    1998-01-01

    The nearly perfect synchrony of nuclear division in a plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum provides a powerful system to analyze topoisomerase II cleavage sites in the course of the cell cycle. The histone H4 locus, whose schedule of replication and transcription is precisely known, was chosen for this analysis. Drug-induced topoisomerase II sites are clustered downstream of the histone H4 gene and appear highly dependent on cell cycle stage. They were only detected in mitosis and at the very beginning of S phase, precisely at the time of replication of the histone H4 region. The sites, which were absent in G2 phase, reappeared at the next mitosis. Remarkably, DNase I hypersensitive sites occurred in nearly the same location, but their schedule was totally different: they were absent in mitosis and present in G2. This schedule follows H4 transcription, which peaks in mid-S phase and in the second part of G2 phase and is off during mitosis. These results suggest that topoisomerase II may not be involved in transcription, but plays a role in remodeling chromatin structure, both during chromosome condensation in prophase/metaphase to allow their decatenation and during chromosome decondensation after metaphase to allow replication fork passage throughout the region. PMID:9547257

  14. Temporal Dissection of Rate Limiting Transcriptional Events Using Pol II ChIP and RNA Analysis of Adrenergic Stress Gene Activation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Daniel P.; Lei, Beilei; Longo, Lawrence D.; Bomsztyk, Karol; Schwinn, Debra A.; Michelotti, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, increasing evidence supports mechanisms of co-transcriptional gene regulation and the generality of genetic control subsequent to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment. In this report, we use Pol II Chromatin Immunoprecipitation to investigate relationships between the mechanistic events controlling immediate early gene (IEG) activation following stimulation of the α1a-Adrenergic Receptor expressed in rat-1 fibroblasts. We validate our Pol II ChIP assay by comparison to major transcriptional events assessable by microarray and PCR analysis of precursor and mature mRNA. Temporal analysis of Pol II density suggests that reduced proximal pausing often enhances gene expression and was essential for Nr4a3 expression. Nevertheless, for Nr4a3 and several other genes, proximal pausing delayed the time required for initiation of productive elongation, consistent with a role in ensuring transcriptional fidelity. Arrival of Pol II at the 3’ cleavage site usually correlated with increased polyadenylated mRNA; however, for Nfil3 and probably Gprc5a expression was delayed and accompanied by apparent pre-mRNA degradation. Intragenic pausing not associated with polyadenylation was also found to regulate and delay Gprc5a expression. Temporal analysis of Nr4a3, Dusp5 and Nfil3 shows that transcription of native IEG genes can proceed at velocities of 3.5 to 4 kilobases/min immediately after activation. Of note, all of the genes studied here also used increased Pol II recruitment as an important regulator of expression. Nevertheless, the generality of co-transcriptional regulation during IEG activation suggests temporal and integrated analysis will often be necessary to distinguish causative from potential rate limiting mechanisms. PMID:26244980

  15. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV) of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM) to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated) and 901 (CAM treated) THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold), eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold) between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the pathogen whether or not

  16. Expanding our Understanding of Sequence-Function Relationships of Type II Polyketide Biosynthetic Gene Clusters: Bioinformatics-Guided Identification of Frankiamicin A from Frankia sp. EAN1pec

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Yackley, Benjamin J.; Greenberg, Jacob A.; Rogelj, Snezna; Melançon, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    A large and rapidly increasing number of unstudied “orphan” natural product biosynthetic gene clusters are being uncovered in sequenced microbial genomes. An important goal of modern natural products research is to be able to accurately predict natural product structures and biosynthetic pathways from these gene cluster sequences. This requires both development of bioinformatic methods for global analysis of these gene clusters and experimental characterization of select products produced by gene clusters with divergent sequence characteristics. Here, we conduct global bioinformatic analysis of all available type II polyketide gene cluster sequences and identify a conserved set of gene clusters with unique ketosynthase α/β sequence characteristics in the genomes of Frankia species, a group of Actinobacteria with underexploited natural product biosynthetic potential. Through LC-MS profiling of extracts from several Frankia species grown under various conditions, we identified Frankia sp. EAN1pec as producing a compound with spectral characteristics consistent with the type II polyketide produced by this gene cluster. We isolated the compound, a pentangular polyketide which we named frankiamicin A, and elucidated its structure by NMR and labeled precursor feeding. We also propose biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for frankiamicin A based on comparative genomic analysis and literature precedent, and conduct bioactivity assays of the compound. Our findings provide new information linking this set of Frankia gene clusters with the compound they produce, and our approach has implications for accurate functional prediction of the many other type II polyketide clusters present in bacterial genomes. PMID:25837682

  17. Expanding our understanding of sequence-function relationships of type II polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters: bioinformatics-guided identification of Frankiamicin A from Frankia sp. EAN1pec.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Yackley, Benjamin J; Greenberg, Jacob A; Rogelj, Snezna; Melançon, Charles E

    2015-01-01

    A large and rapidly increasing number of unstudied "orphan" natural product biosynthetic gene clusters are being uncovered in sequenced microbial genomes. An important goal of modern natural products research is to be able to accurately predict natural product structures and biosynthetic pathways from these gene cluster sequences. This requires both development of bioinformatic methods for global analysis of these gene clusters and experimental characterization of select products produced by gene clusters with divergent sequence characteristics. Here, we conduct global bioinformatic analysis of all available type II polyketide gene cluster sequences and identify a conserved set of gene clusters with unique ketosynthase α/β sequence characteristics in the genomes of Frankia species, a group of Actinobacteria with underexploited natural product biosynthetic potential. Through LC-MS profiling of extracts from several Frankia species grown under various conditions, we identified Frankia sp. EAN1pec as producing a compound with spectral characteristics consistent with the type II polyketide produced by this gene cluster. We isolated the compound, a pentangular polyketide which we named frankiamicin A, and elucidated its structure by NMR and labeled precursor feeding. We also propose biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for frankiamicin A based on comparative genomic analysis and literature precedent, and conduct bioactivity assays of the compound. Our findings provide new information linking this set of Frankia gene clusters with the compound they produce, and our approach has implications for accurate functional prediction of the many other type II polyketide clusters present in bacterial genomes. PMID:25837682

  18. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} The sequences of -604 to -84 bp of the pUPII promoter contained the region of a putative negative cis-regulatory element. {yields} The core promoter was located in the 5F-1. {yields} Transcription factor HNF4 can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. {yields} These features of the pUPII promoter are fundamental to development of a target-specific vector. -- Abstract: Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)₂Cys₆ zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C

    2013-05-01

    Proteins with a Zn(II)₂Cys₆ domain, Cys-X₂-Cys-X₆-Cys-X₅₋₁₂-Cys-X₂-Cys-X₆₋₉-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overview of this family of genes. Annotation of this gene family in most fungal genomes is still far from perfect and refined bioinformatic algorithms are urgently needed. Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic soil fungus that can produce the carcinogenic aflatoxin. It is the second leading causative agent of invasive aspergillosis. The 37-Mb genome of A. flavus is predicted to encode 12,000 proteins. Two and a half percent of the total proteins are estimated to contain the C6 domain, more than twofold greater than those estimated for yeast, which is about 1 %. The variability in the spacing between cysteines, C₃-C₄ and C₅-C₆, in the zinc cluster enables classification of the domains into distinct subgroups, which are also well conserved in Aspergillus nidulans. Sixty-six percent (202/306) of the A. flavus C6 proteins contain a specific transcription factor domain, and 7 % contain a domain of unknown function, DUF3468. Two A. nidulans C6 proteins containing the DUF3468 are involved in asexual conidiation and another two in sexual differentiation. In the anamorphic A. flavus, a homolog of the latter lacks the C6 domain. A. flavus being heterothallic and reproducing mainly through conidiation appears to have lost some components involved in homothallic sexual development. Of the 55 predicted gene clusters thought to be involved in production of secondary metabolites, only about half have a C6-encoding gene in or near the gene clusters. The features revealed by the A. flavus C6 proteins likely are common for other ascomycete fungi. PMID:23563886

  20. Differential gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase and type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in basal ganglia, thalamus, and hypothalamus of the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.L.; Isackson, P.J.; Hendry, S.H.; Jones, E.G. )

    1991-06-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry, using cRNA probes, revealed a complementarity in the distributions of cells in the basal ganglia, basal nucleus of Meynert, thalamus, hypothalamus, and rostral part of the midbrain that showed gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or the alpha-subunit of type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAM II kinase-alpha). Cells in certain nuclei such as the thalamic reticular nucleus, globus pallidus, and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra show GAD gene expression only; others in nuclei such as the basal nucleus of Meynert, medial mamillary nuclei, and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei show CAM II kinase-alpha gene expression only. A few nuclei, for example, the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and the greater part of the subthalamic nucleus, display gene expression for neither GAD nor CAM II kinase-alpha. In other nuclei, notably those of the dorsal thalamus, and possibly in the striatum, GAD- and CAM II kinase-expressing cells appear to form two separate populations that, in most thalamic nuclei, together account for the total cell population. In situ hybridization reveals large amounts of CAM II kinase-alpha mRNA in the neuropil of most nuclei containing CAM II kinase-alpha-positive cells, suggesting its association with dendritic polyribosomes. The message may thus be translated at those sites, close to the synapses with which the protein is associated. The in situ hybridization results, coupled with those from immunocytochemical staining for CAM II kinase-alpha protein, indicate that CAM II kinase-alpha is commonly found in certain non-GABAergic afferent fiber systems but is not necessarily present in the postsynaptic cells on which they terminate. It appears to be absent from most GABAergic fiber systems but can be present in the cells on which they terminate.

  1. A Gene of the β3-Glycosyltransferase Family Encodes N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase II Function in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Damerow, Manuela; Graalfs, Frauke; Güther, M Lucia S; Mehlert, Angela; Izquierdo, Luis; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2016-06-24

    The bloodstream form of the human pathogen Trypanosoma brucei expresses oligomannose, paucimannose, and complex N-linked glycans, including some exceptionally large poly-N-acetyllactosamine-containing structures. Despite the presence of complex N-glycans in this organism, no homologues of the canonical N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I or II genes can be found in the T. brucei genome. These genes encode the activities that initiate the elaboration of the Manα1-3 and Manα1-6 arms, respectively, of the conserved trimannosyl-N-acetylchitobiosyl core of N-linked glycans. Previously, we identified a highly divergent T. brucei N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (TbGnTI) among a set of putative T. brucei glycosyltransferase genes belonging to the β3-glycosyltransferase superfamily (Damerow, M., Rodrigues, J. A., Wu, D., Güther, M. L., Mehlert, A., and Ferguson, M. A. (2014) J. Biol. Chem. 289, 9328-9339). Here, we demonstrate that TbGT15, another member of the same β3-glycosyltransferase family, encodes an equally divergent N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II (TbGnTII) activity. In contrast to multicellular organisms, where GnTII activity is essential, TbGnTII null mutants of T. brucei grow in culture and are still infectious to animals. Characterization of the large poly-N-acetyllactosamine containing N-glycans of the TbGnTII null mutants by methylation linkage analysis suggests that, in wild-type parasites, the Manα1-6 arm of the conserved trimannosyl core may carry predominantly linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains, whereas the Manα1-3 arm may carry predominantly branched poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains. These results provide further detail on the structure and biosynthesis of complex N-glycans in an important human pathogen and provide a second example of the adaptation by trypanosomes of β3-glycosyltransferase family members to catalyze β1-2 glycosidic linkages. PMID:27189951

  2. A Gene of the β3-Glycosyltransferase Family Encodes N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase II Function in Trypanosoma brucei*

    PubMed Central

    Damerow, Manuela; Graalfs, Frauke; Güther, M. Lucia S.; Mehlert, Angela; Izquierdo, Luis; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The bloodstream form of the human pathogen Trypanosoma brucei expresses oligomannose, paucimannose, and complex N-linked glycans, including some exceptionally large poly-N-acetyllactosamine-containing structures. Despite the presence of complex N-glycans in this organism, no homologues of the canonical N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I or II genes can be found in the T. brucei genome. These genes encode the activities that initiate the elaboration of the Manα1–3 and Manα1–6 arms, respectively, of the conserved trimannosyl-N-acetylchitobiosyl core of N-linked glycans. Previously, we identified a highly divergent T. brucei N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (TbGnTI) among a set of putative T. brucei glycosyltransferase genes belonging to the β3-glycosyltransferase superfamily (Damerow, M., Rodrigues, J. A., Wu, D., Güther, M. L., Mehlert, A., and Ferguson, M. A. (2014) J. Biol. Chem. 289, 9328–9339). Here, we demonstrate that TbGT15, another member of the same β3-glycosyltransferase family, encodes an equally divergent N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II (TbGnTII) activity. In contrast to multicellular organisms, where GnTII activity is essential, TbGnTII null mutants of T. brucei grow in culture and are still infectious to animals. Characterization of the large poly-N-acetyllactosamine containing N-glycans of the TbGnTII null mutants by methylation linkage analysis suggests that, in wild-type parasites, the Manα1–6 arm of the conserved trimannosyl core may carry predominantly linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains, whereas the Manα1–3 arm may carry predominantly branched poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains. These results provide further detail on the structure and biosynthesis of complex N-glycans in an important human pathogen and provide a second example of the adaptation by trypanosomes of β3-glycosyltransferase family members to catalyze β1–2 glycosidic linkages. PMID:27189951

  3. Multiple Sites of Type II Site Ligand (Luteolin and BMHPC) Regulation of Gene Expression in PC-3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Markaverich, Barry M; Vijjeswarapu, Mary

    2012-12-01

    Type II [(3)H]estradiol binding site ligands including luteolin (a naturally occurring bioflavonoid) and synthetic compounds such as 2,6-bis((3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)methylene)cyclohexanone (BMHPC) inhibit normal and malignant prostate cell (PC-3, LNCaP, DU-145) proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Type II sites represent a binding domain on histone H4 possibly involved in an epigenetic mechanism for controlling gene transcription. Treatment of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells with luteolin or BMHPC modulated the expression of a number of genes in the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway (EGFRSP) and cell cycle pathway (CCP). Pronounced stimulation (400-2000% of control) of c-FOS and p21 RNA expression was observed, suggesting that these were primary sites of action. Both compounds also caused irreversible G2/M arrest (p<0.001). siRNA's for c-FOS or p21 reduced the RNA expression of their respective targets by 85-95%, with minimal effects on cell proliferation. Furthermore, neither siRNA alone (single knockdown), or in combination (double knockdown), blocked luteolin or BMHPC inhibition of PC-3 cell proliferation. Thus, although c-FOS and p21 are known to modulate the expression of genes in the ESGRSP (EGFR, SOS, GRB2, JNK1, MKK4, RasGAP) and CCP (CCNA2, CCNE2, CDC25A, CDKN1A, CDKN1B, p27, PLK1) involved in the regulation of cell proliferation by luteolin and BMHPC, the c-FOS and p21 siRNA knockdown studies reported here suggest that c-FOS and p21 may be secondary bystanders in the overall response to these ligands in the regulation of PC-3 cell proliferation. PMID:23675277

  4. Loss of DNase II function in the gonad is associated with a higher expression of antimicrobial genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsiang; Lai, Huey-Jen; Lin, Tai-Wei; Chen, Chang-Shi; Lo, Szecheng J

    2015-08-15

    Three waves of apoptosis shape the development of Caenorhabditis elegans. Although the exact roles of the three DNase II genes (nuc-1, crn-6 and crn-7), which are known to mediate degradation of apoptotic DNA, in the embryonic and larval phases of apoptosis have been characterized, the DNase II acting in the third wave of germ cell apoptosis remains undetermined. In the present study, we performed in vitro and in vivo assays on various mutant nematodes to demonstrate that NUC-1 and CRN-7, but not CRN-6, function in germ cell apoptosis. In addition, in situ DNA-break detection and anti-phosphorylated ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) staining illustrated the sequential and spatially regulated actions of NUC-1 and CRN-7, at the pachytene zone of the gonad and at the loop respectively. In line with the notion that UV-induced DNA fragment accumulation in the gonad activates innate immunity responses, we also found that loss of NUC-1 and CRN-7 lead to up-regulation of antimicrobial genes (abf-2, spp-1, nlp-29, cnc-2, and lys-7). Our observations suggest that an incomplete digestion of DNA fragments resulting from the absence of NUC-1 or CRN-7 in the gonad could induce the ERK signalling, consequently activating antimicrobial gene expression. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that nuc-1 and crn-7 play a role in degrading apoptotic DNA in distinct sites of the gonad, and act as negative regulators of innate immunity in C. elegans. PMID:26251453

  5. Comprehensive analysis of cooperative gene mutations between class I and class II in de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yuichi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akane; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Tomonaga, Masao; Naoe, Tomoki

    2009-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been thought to be the consequence of two broad complementation classes of mutations: class I and class II. However, overlap-mutations between them or within the same class and the position of TP53 mutation are not fully analyzed. We comprehensively analyzed the FLT3, cKIT, N-RAS, C/EBPA, AML1, MLL, NPM1, and TP53 mutations in 144 newly diagnosed de novo AML. We found 103 of 165 identified mutations were overlapped with other mutations, and most overlap-mutations consisted of class I and class II mutations. Although overlap-mutations within the same class were found in seven patients, five of them additionally had the other class mutation. These results suggest that most overlap-mutations within the same class might be the consequence of acquiring an additional mutation after the completion both of class I and class II mutations. However, mutated genes overlapped with the same class were limited in N-RAS, TP53, MLL-PTD, and NPM1, suggesting the possibility that these irregular overlap-mutations might cooperatively participate in the development of AML. Notably, TP53 mutation was overlapped with both class I and class II mutations, and associated with morphologic multilineage dysplasia and complex karyotype. The genotype consisting of complex karyotype and TP53 mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor in entire AML patients, indicating this genotype generates a disease entity in de novo AML. These results collectively suggest that TP53 mutation might be a functionally distinguishable class of mutation. PMID:19309322

  6. (Analysis of cyanobacterial photosystem II genes by cloning and mutagenesis): Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The major goal of this current proposal was to isolate, clone, sequence and mutagenize specific proteins associated with the photosynthetic membrane and photosystem II (PSII) in cyanobacteria. We have made great progress toward most of our goals and we have also gone off in some important new directions. The analysis of photosystem II proteins led us to investigate the growth of cyanobacteria under iron-deficient conditions and to detect a number of new proteins involved in the photosynthetic membrane. In addition, this work led us to isolate proteins that are localized in the cytoplasmic membrane or in the cell wall membrane. These studies have tremendously enriched our knowledge of membrane structure and, at the same time, have enabled us to probe cyanobacterial membranes with increased precision. 11 refs.

  7. IGFBP-3 Gene Methylation in Primary Tumor Predicts Recurrence of Stage II Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tao; Pappou, Emmanouil P.; Guzzetta, Angela A.; de Freitas Calmon, Marilia; Sun, Lifeng; Herrera, Alexander; Li, Fan; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Tong, Weidong; Ahuja, Nita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the influence of IGFBP-3 methylation on recurrence in patients with stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) from 2 independent cohorts. Background The relationship between IGFBP-3 methylation in primary tumors (PTs) or lymph nodes (LNs) and risk of recurrence in patients with stage II CRC treated with surgery alone is unknown. Methods IGFBP-3 methylation of DNA from 115 PTs and 1641 LNs in patients with stage II CRC from 2 independent cohorts was analyzed. Forty patients developed recurrence, whereas 75 matched patients remained recurrence free for more than 2 years after surgery. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) of recurrence, adjusted for patient and tumor characteristics. Results Methylation of IGFBP-3 in PTs was identified to be significantly associated with risk of recurrence in the training set. The signature was tested in a validation set and classified 40.7% of patients as high risk. Five-year recurrence-free survival rates were 76.4% and 58.3% for low- and high-risk patients, respectively, with an HR of 2.21 (95% confidence interval, 1.04–4.68; P = 0.039). In multivariate analysis, the signature remained the most significant prognostic factor, with an HR of 2.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.10–5.25; P = 0.029). A combined analysis of 1641 LNs from the 2 sets identified IGFBP-3 methylation in LNs was not associated with risk of recurrence. Conclusions Detection of IGFBP-3 methylation in PTs, but not in LNs, provides a powerful tool for the identification of patients with stage II CRC at high risk of recurrence. PMID:25822686

  8. The association between type 1 diabetes and the ITPR3 gene polymorphism due to linkage disequilibrium with HLA class II.

    PubMed

    Qu, H-Q; Marchand, L; Szymborski, A; Grabs, R; Polychronakos, C

    2008-04-01

    A fine mapping study of the MHC region in a Swedish case-control population sample reported a novel type 1 diabetes (T1D) association from the inositol 1-, 4-, 5-trisphosphate receptor type 3 gene (ITPR3) in a case-control study, reportedly independent of the HLA class II effect. We attempted to replicate this novel association in a family-based study of 1120 T1D families with at least one affected child, an approach immune to population stratification. We found association of the ITPR3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2296336 with T1D but in a direction opposite to that reported. Moreover, rs2296336 was in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with specific alleles of the HLA DQB1 gene. Conditional regression showed that all of the ITPR3 SNP T1D association could be accounted for by the DQB1 effect. Therefore, our findings do not support an obvious role of genetic variation of the ITPR3 gene in T1D risk. PMID:18340361

  9. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Heather A; Tomaras, Georgia D; Geraghty, Daniel E; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H; Krebs, Shelly J; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; McElrath, M Juliana; Montefiori, David C; Bailer, Robert T; Koup, Richard A; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Gilbert, Peter B; Kim, Jerome H; Thomas, Rasmi

    2015-07-15

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD4(+) T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1-specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120-204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial. PMID:26180102

  10. Molecular phylogeny of Fusarium inferred from partial RNA polymerase II gene sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently there are no robust phylogenetic hypotheses for Fusarium based on large-scale sampling across the breadth of this important group of mycotoxigenic phytopathogens. Nucleotide variation within the second largest RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2) protein-coding gene, however, has clearly demonst...