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Sample records for ii nptii gene

  1. HIGH FREQUENCY GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF CICHORIUM INTYBUS L. USING nptII GENE AS A SELECTIVE MARKER.

    PubMed

    Matvieieva, N; Shakhovsky, A; Kvasko, O; Kuchuk, N

    2015-01-01

    Cichorium intybus L. is an important vegetable crop used as salad (leaf form) and for the production of coffee substitutes (root form). At the same time these plants can also be used in biotechnologies for synthesis of pharmaceutical proteins. Here we report the possibility of high frequency Agrobacterium rhizogenes- or A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation of C. intybus L. for construction of transgenic "hairy" roots and plants. The used plasmids contained target human interferonifn-?2b gene, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT6:Ag85B antigene esxA::fbpB(?TMD) fused gene and human telomerase reverse transcriptase h Tert gene. Using of nptII gene as a selective one was preferable to the bar gene for chicory. In this case the frequency of transgenic plants or "hairy" roots formation was significantly higher. Cultivation of explants on the medium with Basta in concentration 1-2 mg/l have led to plants death or to significant reduction of number of shoots formed. Frequency of "hairy" roots formation varied from 5.9 to 42.3% after A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation. Frequency of regeneration of transgenic plants varied from 10 to 86% after A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Both A. rhizogenes- and A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation frequency depended on the type of explants, roots or cotyledons, and vector used. Usage of A. tumefaciens carrying pCB064 plasmid (target esxA:fbpB(?TMD) fused gene and nptII selective gene) resulted in the most effective regeneration of transgenic plants with regeneration frequency up to 86%. In the case of chicory A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation the highest regeneration frequency up to 42.3% was demonstrated using p CB161 vector with ifn-?2b target gene and nptII selective gene. PMID:26419064

  2. Survival of plant seeds, their UV screens, and nptII DNA for 18 months outside the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Tepfer, David; Zalar, Andreja; Leach, Sydney

    2012-05-01

    The plausibility that life was imported to Earth from elsewhere can be tested by subjecting life-forms to space travel. Ultraviolet light is the major liability in short-term exposures (Horneck et al., 2001 ), and plant seeds, tardigrades, and lichens-but not microorganisms and their spores-are candidates for long-term survival (Anikeeva et al., 1990 ; Sancho et al., 2007 ; Jönsson et al., 2008 ; de la Torre et al., 2010 ). In the present study, plant seeds germinated after 1.5 years of exposure to solar UV, solar and galactic cosmic radiation, temperature fluctuations, and space vacuum outside the International Space Station. Of the 2100 exposed wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) seeds, 23% produced viable plants after return to Earth. Survival was lower in the Arabidopsis Wassilewskija ecotype and in mutants (tt4-8 and fah1-2) lacking UV screens. The highest survival occurred in tobacco (44%). Germination was delayed in seeds shielded from solar light, yet full survival was attained, which indicates that longer space travel would be possible for seeds embedded in an opaque matrix. We conclude that a naked, seed-like entity could have survived exposure to solar UV radiation during a hypothetical transfer from Mars to Earth. Chemical samples of seed flavonoid UV screens were degraded by UV, but their overall capacity to absorb UV was retained. Naked DNA encoding the nptII gene (kanamycin resistance) was also degraded by UV. A fragment, however, was detected by the polymerase chain reaction, and the gene survived in space when protected from UV. Even if seeds do not survive, components (e.g., their DNA) might survive transfer over cosmic distances. PMID:22680697

  3. A Universal Positive-Negative Selection System for Gene Targeting in Plants Combining an Antibiotic Resistance Gene and Its Antisense RNA1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a useful technology for accurate genome engineering in plants. A reproducible approach based on a positive-negative selection system using hygromycin resistance and the diphtheria toxin A subunit gene as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, is now available. However, to date, this selection system has been applied exclusively in rice (Oryza sativa). To establish a universally applicable positive-negative GT system in plants, we designed a selection system using a combination of neomycin phosphotransferaseII (nptII) and an antisense nptII construct. The concomitant transcription of both sense and antisense nptII suppresses significantly the level of expression of the sense nptII gene, and transgenic calli and plants become sensitive to the antibiotic geneticin. In addition, we were able to utilize the sense nptII gene as a positive selection marker and the antisense nptII construct as a negative selection marker for knockout of the endogenous rice genes Waxy and 33-kD globulin through GT, although negative selection with this system is relatively less efficient compared with diphtheria toxin A subunit. The approach developed here, with some additional improvements, could be applied as a universal selection system for the enrichment of GT cells in several plant species. PMID:26143254

  4. A Universal Positive-Negative Selection System for Gene Targeting in Plants Combining an Antibiotic Resistance Gene and Its Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Nonaka, Satoko; Osakabe, Keishi; Saika, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting (GT) is a useful technology for accurate genome engineering in plants. A reproducible approach based on a positive-negative selection system using hygromycin resistance and the diphtheria toxin A subunit gene as positive and negative selection markers, respectively, is now available. However, to date, this selection system has been applied exclusively in rice (Oryza sativa). To establish a universally applicable positive-negative GT system in plants, we designed a selection system using a combination of neomycin phosphotransferaseII (nptII) and an antisense nptII construct. The concomitant transcription of both sense and antisense nptII suppresses significantly the level of expression of the sense nptII gene, and transgenic calli and plants become sensitive to the antibiotic geneticin. In addition, we were able to utilize the sense nptII gene as a positive selection marker and the antisense nptII construct as a negative selection marker for knockout of the endogenous rice genes Waxy and 33-kD globulin through GT, although negative selection with this system is relatively less efficient compared with diphtheria toxin A subunit. The approach developed here, with some additional improvements, could be applied as a universal selection system for the enrichment of GT cells in several plant species. PMID:26143254

  5. Antibiotic resistance marker genes as environmental pollutants in GMO-pristine agricultural soils in Austria.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Zeinzinger, Josef; Gottsberger, Richard Alexander; Pascher, Kathrin; Hufnagl, Peter; Indra, Alexander; Fuchs, Reinhard; Hofrichter, Johannes; Kopacka, Ian; Korschineck, Irina; Schleicher, Corina; Schwarz, Michael; Steinwider, Johann; Springer, Burkhard; Allerberger, Franz; Nielsen, Kaare M; Fuchs, Klemens

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes may be considered as environmental pollutants if anthropogenic emission and manipulations increase their prevalence above usually occurring background levels. The prevalence of aph(3')-IIa/nptII and aph(3')-IIIa/nptIII - frequent marker genes in plant biotechnology conferring resistance to certain aminoglycosides - was determined in Austrian soils from 100 maize and potato fields not yet exposed to but eligible for GMO crop cultivation. Total soil DNA extracts were analysed by nptII/nptIII-specific TaqMan real time PCR. Of all fields 6% were positive for nptII (median: 150 copies/g soil; range: 31-856) and 85% for nptIII (1190 copies/g soil; 13-61600). The copy-number deduced prevalence of nptIII carriers was 14-fold higher compared to nptII. Of the cultivable kanamycin-resistant soil bacteria 1.8% (95% confidence interval: 0-3.3%) were positive for nptIII, none for nptII (0-0.8%). The nptII-load of the studied soils was low rendering nptII a typical candidate as environmental pollutant upon anthropogenic release into these ecosystems. PMID:26232739

  6. Evolution of chemical diversity by coordinated gene swaps in type II polyketide gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Vandova, Gergana A; Berlew, Erin E; Charkoudian, Louise K

    2015-11-10

    Natural product biosynthetic pathways generate molecules of enormous structural complexity and exquisitely tuned biological activities. Studies of natural products have led to the discovery of many pharmaceutical agents, particularly antibiotics. Attempts to harness the catalytic prowess of biosynthetic enzyme systems, for both compound discovery and engineering, have been limited by a poor understanding of the evolution of the underlying gene clusters. We developed an approach to study the evolution of biosynthetic genes on a cluster-wide scale, integrating pairwise gene coevolution information with large-scale phylogenetic analysis. We used this method to infer the evolution of type II polyketide gene clusters, tracing the path of evolution from the single ancestor to those gene clusters surviving today. We identified 10 key gene types in these clusters, most of which were swapped in from existing cellular processes and subsequently specialized. The ancestral type II polyketide gene cluster likely comprised a core set of five genes, a roster that expanded and contracted throughout evolution. A key C24 ancestor diversified into major classes of longer and shorter chain length systems, from which a C20 ancestor gave rise to the majority of characterized type II polyketide antibiotics. Our findings reveal that (i) type II polyketide structure is predictable from its gene roster, (ii) only certain gene combinations are compatible, and (iii) gene swaps were likely a key to evolution of chemical diversity. The lessons learned about how natural selection drives polyketide chemical innovation can be applied to the rational design and guided discovery of chemicals with desired structures and properties. PMID:26499248

  7. Evolution of chemical diversity by coordinated gene swaps in type II polyketide gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Hillenmeyer, Maureen E.; Vandova, Gergana A.; Berlew, Erin E.; Charkoudian, Louise K.

    2015-01-01

    Natural product biosynthetic pathways generate molecules of enormous structural complexity and exquisitely tuned biological activities. Studies of natural products have led to the discovery of many pharmaceutical agents, particularly antibiotics. Attempts to harness the catalytic prowess of biosynthetic enzyme systems, for both compound discovery and engineering, have been limited by a poor understanding of the evolution of the underlying gene clusters. We developed an approach to study the evolution of biosynthetic genes on a cluster-wide scale, integrating pairwise gene coevolution information with large-scale phylogenetic analysis. We used this method to infer the evolution of type II polyketide gene clusters, tracing the path of evolution from the single ancestor to those gene clusters surviving today. We identified 10 key gene types in these clusters, most of which were swapped in from existing cellular processes and subsequently specialized. The ancestral type II polyketide gene cluster likely comprised a core set of five genes, a roster that expanded and contracted throughout evolution. A key C24 ancestor diversified into major classes of longer and shorter chain length systems, from which a C20 ancestor gave rise to the majority of characterized type II polyketide antibiotics. Our findings reveal that (i) type II polyketide structure is predictable from its gene roster, (ii) only certain gene combinations are compatible, and (iii) gene swaps were likely a key to evolution of chemical diversity. The lessons learned about how natural selection drives polyketide chemical innovation can be applied to the rational design and guided discovery of chemicals with desired structures and properties. PMID:26499248

  8. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part II. Gene therapy strategies and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-09-01

    In Part I of this Review (Wang and Gao, 2014), we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene addition for complex disorders and infectious diseases, (3) gene expression alteration targeting RNA, and (4) gene editing to introduce targeted changes in host genome. Human gene therapy started with the simple idea that replacing a faulty gene with a functional copy can cure a disease. It has been a long and bumpy road to finally translate this seemingly straightforward concept into reality. As many disease mechanisms unraveled, gene therapists have employed a gene addition strategy backed by a deep knowledge of what goes wrong in diseases and how to harness host cellular machinery to battle against diseases. Breakthroughs in other biotechnologies, such as RNA interference and genome editing by chimeric nucleases, have the potential to be integrated into gene therapy. Although clinical trials utilizing these new technologies are currently sparse, these innovations are expected to greatly broaden the scope of gene therapy in the near future. PMID:25227756

  9. Screening of three Usher syndrome type II candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemker, B.K.; Swaroop, A.; Kimberling, W.J.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome type II (US2) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa and congenital hearing loss. The disease affects approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals in the general population and is responsible for over 50% of all cases of deafness with blindness. The underlying US2 defect is unknown. The US2 gene has been localized to the 1q41 region of chromosome 1 by linkage studies. Three genes previously localized to 1q were analyzed to assess their candidacy as the US2 gene. These were evaluated by PCR assays using DNA from a YAC contig spanning the US2 region on chromosome 1. The first gene evaluated was the human choroideremia-like gene (hCHML), which had been mapped to chromosome 1q. The sequence on 1q is a homologue of the human choroideremia gene on chromosome X. Choroideremia is a degenerative disorder causing ocular pathology similar to that observed in US2 patients. Therefore, hCHML is a candidate for the US2 gene. Two cDNAs (A and B) from an enriched human retinal pigment epithelium library have been mapped to 1q41 by in situ hybridization. Both cDNAs are considered good candidates. The hCHML and cDNA A were ruled out as candidates for the US2 gene based on negative results from PCR assays performed on YACs spanning the US2 region. cDNA B could not be ruled out as a candidate for the US2 gene by these assays. Answers to many clinical questions regarding US2 will only be resolved after the gene is identified and characterized. Eventually, understanding the function and expression of the US2 gene will provide a basis for the development of therapy.

  10. Close association of RNA polymerase II and many transcription factors with Pol III genes

    E-print Network

    , and 5.8S rDNA genes. Pol II transcribes protein coding genes and many noncoding RNA genes, and Pol IIIClose association of RNA polymerase II and many transcription factors with Pol III genes Debasish August 7, 2009) Transcription of the eukaryotic genomes is carried out by three distinct RNA polymerases

  11. Group II Intron-Based Gene Targeting Reactions in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    White, Travis B.; Zhuang, Fanglei; Vernon, Jamie; Matsuura, Manabu; Wallingford, John; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Mobile group II introns insert site-specifically into DNA target sites by a mechanism termed retrohoming in which the excised intron RNA reverse splices into a DNA strand and is reverse transcribed by the intron-encoded protein. Retrohoming is mediated by a ribonucleoprotein particle that contains the intron-encoded protein and excised intron RNA, with target specificity determined largely by base pairing of the intron RNA to the DNA target sequence. This feature enabled the development of mobile group II introns into bacterial gene targeting vectors (“targetrons”) with programmable target specificity. Thus far, however, efficient group II intron-based gene targeting reactions have not been demonstrated in eukaryotes. Methodology/Principal Findings By using a plasmid-based Xenopus laevis oocyte microinjection assay, we show that group II intron RNPs can integrate efficiently into target DNAs in a eukaryotic nucleus, but the reaction is limited by low Mg2+ concentrations. By supplying additional Mg2+, site-specific integration occurs in up to 38% of plasmid target sites. The integration products isolated from X. laevis nuclei are sensitive to restriction enzymes specific for double-stranded DNA, indicating second-strand synthesis via host enzymes. We also show that group II intron RNPs containing either lariat or linear intron RNA can introduce a double-strand break into a plasmid target site, thereby stimulating homologous recombination with a co-transformed DNA fragment at frequencies up to 4.8% of target sites. Chromatinization of the target DNA inhibits both types of targeting reactions, presumably by impeding RNP access. However, by using similar RNP microinjection methods, we show efficient Mg2+-dependent group II intron integration into plasmid target sites in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and into plasmid and chromosomal target sites in Drosophila melanogster embryos, indicating that DNA replication can mitigate effects of chromatinization. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide an experimental foundation for the development of group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. PMID:18769669

  12. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Conway, Tyrrell (Gainesville, FL)

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  13. From Gene Trees to Species Trees II: Species Tree Inference by Minimizing Deep

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Louxin

    From Gene Trees to Species Trees II: Species Tree Inference by Minimizing Deep Coalescence Events Louxin Zhang Abstract--When gene copies are sampled from various species, the resulting gene tree might disagree with the containing species tree. The primary causes of gene tree and species tree discord include

  14. A Caenorhabditis Elegans RNA Polymerase II Gene, Ama-1 Iv, and Nearby Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, T. M.; Riddle, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The amanitin-binding subunit of RNA polymerase II in Caenorhabditis elegans is encoded by the ama-1 gene, located approximately 0.05 map unit to the right of dpy-13 IV. Using the amanitin-resistant ama-1(m118) strain as a parent, we have isolated amanitin-sensitive mutants that carry recessive-lethal ama-1 alleles. Of the six ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants examined, two are arrested late in embryogenesis. One of these is a large deficiency, mDf9, but the second may be a novel point mutation. The four other mutants are hypomorphs, and presumably produce altered RNA polymerase II enzymes with some residual function. Two of these mutants develop into sterile adults at 20° but are arrested as larvae at 25°, and two others are fertile at 20° and sterile at 25°. Temperature-shift experiments performed with the adult sterile mutant, ama-1(m118m238ts), have revealed a temperature-sensitive period that begins late in gonadogenesis and is centered around the initiation of egg-laying. Postembryonic development at 25° is slowed by 30%. By contrast, the amanitin-resistant allele of ama-1 has very little effect on developmental rate or fertility. We have identified 15 essential genes in an interval of 4.5 map units surrounding ama-1, as well as four ?-ray-induced deficiencies and two duplications that include the ama-1 gene. The larger duplication, mDp1, may include the entire left arm of chromosome IV, and it recombines with the normal homologue at a low frequency. The smallest deficiency, mDf10, complements all but three identified genes: let-278, dpy-13 and ama-1, which define an interval of only 0.1 map unit. The terminal phenotype of mDf10 homozygotes is developmental arrest during the first larval stage, suggesting that there is sufficient maternal RNA polymerase II to complete embryonic development. PMID:8608933

  15. The nucleotide sequence of the sheep MHC class II DNA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.; Redmond, J.; Ballingall, K.T.; Wright, F.

    1995-01-11

    The human MHC class II DNA gene was identified and sequenced by Trowsdale and Kelly. When a molecular map of the HLA-D region became available, it was shown that the HLA-DNA gene was unusual in not having a B gene partner situated within a few kilobases (kb), the nearest B gene being HLA-DPB1. The nearest unpaired B gene is HLA-DOB which is approximately 160 kb telomeric of HLA-DNA. More recently, the mouse MHC class II genes H-20A and H-20B were shown to be equivalent to the HLA-DNA and HLA-DOB genes. Moreover, the mouse genes expressed an MHC class II protein whose tissue distribution was restricted to B cells and epithelial cell of the thymic medulla. No corresponding HLA-DN protein has been reported. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Genetic complexity of regulatory mutants defective for HLA class II gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, C.; Saraiya, C.; Osterweil, Z.; Fu, Y. Ping; Lee, J.S. )

    1992-03-01

    MHC (called HLA in man) class II genes play an essential role in cell-mediated immunity. Absence of HLA class II Ag on B lymphocytes is the basis of some congenital immunodeficiencies (CID). The authors have studied CID by generating transient heterokaryons from cell lines of such patients, and report that the mutations fall into four complementation groups. In addition, fusions with the HLA class II deletion mutant 721.180 indicate that the genetic defects for each group in HLA class II expression map outside the HLA class II region. A small HLA-DRA promoter fragment is sufficient to drive expression of a reporter gene in normal B cell lines, but expression from the same construct is clearly reduced in mutant cell lines representative of all four complementation groups. This confirms earlier results that indicate defective transcription of HLA class II genes in the class II[sup [minus

  17. Characterization and expression of MHC class II alpha and II beta genes in mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyan; Tan, Shangjin; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a key role in adaptive immunity by presenting foreign peptides to CD4(+) T cells and by triggering the adaptive immune response. While the structure and function of MHC class II have been well characterized in mammalian, limited research has been done on fishes. In this study, we characterized the gene structure and expression of MHC class II ? (Lunar-DAA) and II ? (Lunar-DAB) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus). Both genes shared, respectively, a high similarity and typical features with other vertebrate MHC class II ? and II ?. The phylogenetic analysis of the deduced peptides revealed that both Lunar-DAA and Lunar-DAB were located in the teleost subclass. Western blotting analyses indicated that both MHC class II ? and II ? were expressed ubiquitously in immune-related cells, tissues and organs, and that MHC class II ? and II ? chains existed mainly as heterodimers. While it was highly expressed in gills, thymus, head kidney (HK), spleen, head kidney macrophage and spleen leucocytes, MHC class II ? chain was expressed with a low abundance in skin, intestine, stomach and heart. The highest expression of MHC class II ? in thymus confirmed the conclusion that thymus is one of the primary lymphoid organs in fishes. The detection of MHC class II ?? dimers in HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes indicated that HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes play a critical role in the adaptive immunity in fishes. All these results provide valuable information for understanding the structure of MHC class II ? and II ? and their function in immune responses. PMID:26454477

  18. Major histocompatibility complex class II A gene polymorphism in the striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, J.J.; Godwin, U.; Benedetto, R.; McConnell, T.J.

    1995-02-01

    Adaptions of the polymerase chain reaction were used to isolate cDNA sequences encoding the Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II A gene(s) of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Four complete Mhc class II A genes were cloned and sequenced from a specimen originating on the Roanoke River, North Carolina, and another three A genes from a specimen originating from the Santee-Cooper Reservoir, South Carolina, identifying a total of seven unique sequences. The sequence suggests the presence of at least two Mhc class II A loci. The extensive sequence variability observed between the seven different Mhc class II clones was concentrated in the {alpha}1 encoding domain. The encoded {alpha}2, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic regions of all seven striped bass genes correlated well with those of known vertebrate Mhc class II proteins. Overall, the striped bass sequences showed greatest similarity to the Mhc class II A genes of the zebrafish. Southern blot analysis demonstrated extensive polymorphism in the Mhc class II A genes in members of a Roanoke river-caught population of striped bass versus a lesser degree of polymorphism in an aquacultured Santee-Cooper population of striped bass. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. ASTRAL-II: coalescent-based species tree estimation for hundreds of species and thousands of genes

    E-print Network

    Brendel, Volker

    ASTRAL-II: coalescent-based species tree estimation for hundreds of species and thousands of genes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1 #12;List of Figures S1 Characteristics of the simulation - gene tree estimation error of genes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

  20. Chromosomal localization and structure of the human type II IMP dehydrogenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D.; Huberman, E. |; Collart, F.; Varkony, T.; Drabkin, H.

    1994-05-01

    We determined the chromosomal localization and structure of the gene encoding human type II inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, EC 1.1.1.205), an enzyme associated with cellular proliferation, malignant transformation, and differentiation. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers specific for type II IMPDH, we screened a panel of human-Chinese hamster cell somatic hybrids and a separate deletion panel of chromosome 3 hybrids and localized the gene to 3p21.1{yields}p24.2. Two overlapping yeast artificial chromosome clones containing the full gene for type II IMPDH were isolated and a physical map of 117 kb of human genomic DNA in this region of chromosome 3 was constructed. The gene for type II IMPDH was localized and oriented on this map and found to span no more than 12.5 kb.

  1. An efficient and reproducible protocol for the production of salt tolerant transgenic wheat plants expressing the Arabidopsis AtNHX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Moghaieb, Reda E A; Sharaf, Ahmed N; Soliman, Mohamed H; El-Arabi, Nagwa I; Momtaz, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    We present an efficient method for the production of transgenic salt tolerant hexaploid wheat plants expressing the Arabidopsis AtNHX1 gene. Wheat mature zygotic embryos were isolated from two hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars (namely: Gemmeiza 9 and Gemmeiza 10) and were transformed with the A. tumefaciens LBA4404 harboring the pBI-121 vector containing the AtNHX1 gene. Transgenic wheat lines that express the gus intron was obtained and used as control. The results confirmed that npt-II gene could be transmitted and expressed in the T2 following 3:1 Mendelian segregation while the control plant couldn't. The data indicate that, the AtNHX1 gene was integrated in a stable manner into the wheat genome and the corresponding transcripts were expressed. The transformation efficiency was 5.7 and 7.5% for cultivars Gemmeiza 10 and Gemmeiza 9, respectively. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of AtNHX1 gene in wheat salt tolerance. The transgenic wheat lines could maintain high growth rate under salt stress condition (350 mM NaCl) while the control plant couldn't. The results confirmed that Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene AtNHX1 increased salt tolerance by increasing Na(+) accumulation and keeping K+/Na(+) balance. Thus, transgenic plants showed high tolerance to salt stress and can be considered as a new genetic resource in breeding programs. PMID:25007249

  2. Topoisomerase I deficiency causes RNA polymerase II accumulation and increases AID abundance in immunoglobulin variable genes.

    PubMed

    Maul, Robert W; Saribasak, Huseyin; Cao, Zheng; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2015-06-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) is a DNA cytosine deaminase that diversifies immunoglobulin genes in B cells. Recent work has shown that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) accumulation correlates with AID recruitment. However, a direct link between Pol II and AID abundance has not been tested. We used the DT40 B-cell line to manipulate levels of Pol II by decreasing topoisomerase I (Top1), which relaxes DNA supercoiling in front of the transcription complex. Top1 was decreased by stable transfection of a short hairpin RNA against Top1, which produced an accumulation of Pol II in transcribed genes, compared to cells transfected with sh-control RNA. The increased Pol II density enhanced AID recruitment to variable genes in the ? light chain locus, and resulted in higher levels of somatic hypermutation and gene conversion. It has been proposed by another lab that AID itself might directly suppress Top1 to increase somatic hypermutation. However, we found that in both AID(+/+) and AID(-/-) B cells from DT40 and mice, Top1 protein levels were identical, indicating that the presence or absence of AID did not decrease Top1 expression. Rather, our results suggest that the mechanism for increased diversity when Top1 is reduced is that Pol II accumulates and recruits AID to variable genes. PMID:25869824

  3. Coupling two mercury resistance genes in Eastern cottonwood enhances the processing of organomercury.

    PubMed

    Lyyra, Satu; Meagher, Richard B; Kim, Tehryung; Heaton, Andrew; Montello, Paul; Balish, Rebecca S; Merkle, Scott A

    2007-03-01

    Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) trees were engineered to express merA (mercuric ion reductase) and merB (organomercury lyase) transgenes in order to be used for the phytoremediation of mercury-contaminated soils. Earlier studies with Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum showed that this gene combination resulted in more efficient detoxification of organomercurial compounds than did merB alone, but neither species is optimal for long-term field applications. Leaf discs from in vitro-grown merA, nptII (neomycin phosphotransferase) transgenic cottonwood plantlets were inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58 carrying the merB and hygromycin resistance (hptII) genes. Polymerase chain reaction of shoots regenerated from the leaf discs under selection indicated an overall transformation frequency of 20%. Western blotting of leaves showed that MerA and MerB proteins were produced. In vitro-grown merA/merB plants were highly resistant to phenylmercuric acetate, and detoxified organic mercury compounds two to three times more rapidly than did controls, as shown by mercury volatilization assay. This indicates that these cottonwood trees are reasonable candidates for the remediation of organomercury-contaminated sites. PMID:17309680

  4. Structure of the chicken apo very low density lipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed

    Meijlink, F C; van het Schip, A D; Arnberg, A C; Wieringa, B; Ab, G; Gruber, M

    1981-09-25

    We describe two cloned genomic DNA fragments, both bearing the entire apo very low density lipoprotein II gene. Electron microscopy and restriction enzyme mapping showed that this gene is split into at least four coding sequences by three or more intervening sequences. A very short exon at the 5'-end of the gene is separated by a 1.5-kilobase intron from the second exon, which codes for the AUG initiation codon of the mRNA. PMID:6270096

  5. A cII-dependent promoter is located within the Q gene of bacteriophage lambda.

    PubMed

    Hoopes, B C; McClure, W R

    1985-05-01

    We have found a cII-dependent promoter, PaQ, within the Q gene of bacteriophage lambda. Transcription experiments and abortive initiation assays performed in vitro showed that the promoter strength and the cII affinity of PaQ were comparable to the other cII-dependent lambda promoters, PE and PI. The location and leftward direction of PaQ suggests a possible role in the delay of lambda late-gene expression by cII protein, a phenomenon that has been called cII-dependent inhibition. We have constructed a promoter down mutation, paq-1, by changing a single base pair in the putative cII binding site of the promoter by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis. The paq-1 mutant promoter required about 4-fold higher cII concentrations for maximal activation compared to the wild-type PaQ. We tested the hypothesis that PaQ is responsible in part for the delay of lambda late-gene expression by recombining the paq-1 mutation into a phage showing severe cII-dependent inhibition. We found that the paq-1 mutation relieved the cII-dependent growth defect of this phage. The paq-1 mutation (in combination with lambda cI857) resulted in a clear-plaque phenotype at the permissive temperature of 32 degrees C. The role of the PaQ-initiated antisense transcript in the control of lambda development is discussed. PMID:3159014

  6. Lack of cosegregation of the subgroup II antigens on genes 2 and 6 in porcine rotaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, L; Padilla-Noriega, L; Taniguchi, K; Greenberg, H B

    1990-01-01

    The rotavirus subgroup I and II specificities associated with gene 2 and 6 products (vp2 and vp6, respectively) were shown not to cosegregate in a number of porcine rotavirus strains. The porcine OSU rotavirus strain and OSU-vp7-like strains were all found to possess a subgroup II-specific region on vp2 and a subgroup I-specific region on vp6. Of interest is the observation that the subgroup II-specific epitope on vp2 appears to be present only in human and porcine rotavirus strains, suggesting a possible human-pig ancestral lineage for gene 2. Images PMID:1688386

  7. Figure 1: The weighting functions used in our simulation studies of dataset I. Dataset II: fine mapping of disease genes

    E-print Network

    Li, Jing

    mapping of disease genes The evolutionary model used in generating the dataset II was similar to the model was assumed known. 1 #12;Results on dataset II To illustrate the performance of HapMiner on gene fine mappingFigure 1: The weighting functions used in our simulation studies of dataset I. Dataset II: fine

  8. Cloning in Streptococcus pneumoniae of the gene for DpnII DNA methylase

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.; Springhorn, S.S.

    1984-03-01

    The gene coding for the pneumococcal DNA adenine methylase that recognizes the sequence 5'-GATC-3' was cloned in a strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae that lacked both restriction endonucleases DpnI and DpnII. The gene was cloned as a 3.7-kilobase fragment of chromosomal DNA from a DpnII-containing strain inserted in both possible orientations in the multicopy plasmid vector pMP5 to give recombinant plasmids pMP8 and pMP10. Recombinant plasmids were selected by their resistance to DpnII cleavage. Cells carrying the recombinant plasmids modified phage in vivo so that it was restricted by DpnI- but not DpnII-containing hosts. They also showed levels of DNA methylase activity five times higher than that in cells of the original DpnII strain. No DpnII activity was observed in the clones; therefore, it was concluded that the insert did not contain an intact DpnII endonuclease gene and that methylation of host DNA did not turn on a latent form of the gene. 16 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  9. Differential gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus exposed to Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongmiao; Xu, Joshua; Kweon, Oh-Gew; Zou, Wen; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2015-05-01

    We previously demonstrated the effects of azo dyes and their reduction metabolites on bacterial cell growth and cell viability. In this report, the effects of Orange II and Sudan III on gene expression profiling in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were analyzed using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR technology. Upon exposure to 6 ?g/ml Orange II for 18 h, 21 genes were found to be differently expressed. Among them, 8 and 13 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve stress response caused by drug metabolism, oxidation, and alkaline shock indicating that S. aureus could adapt to Orange II exposure through a balance between up and down regulated gene expression. Whereas, after exposure to 6 ?g/ml Sudan III for 18 h, 57 genes were differentially expressed. In which, 51 genes were up-regulated and 6 were down-regulated. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve in cell wall/membrane biogenesis and biosynthesis, nutrient uptake, transport and metabolite, and stress response, suggesting that Sudan III damages the bacterial cell wall or/and membrane due to binding of the dye. Further analysis indicated that all differentially expressed genes encoded membrane proteins were up-regulated and most of them serve as transporters. The result suggested that these genes might contribute to survival, persistence and growth in the presence of Sudan III. Only one gene msrA, which plays an important role in oxidative stress resistance, was found to be down-regulated after exposure to both Orange II and Sudan III. The present results suggested that both these two azo dyes can cause stress in S. aureus and the response of the bacterium to the stress is mainly related to characteristics of the azo dyes. PMID:25720844

  10. Organization of genes required for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde in three type II methylotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, C.; Machlin, S.; Zhang, Y.; Donaldson, K.; Hanson, R.S. )

    1989-12-01

    Restriction maps of genes required for the synthesis of active methanol dehydrogenase in Methylobacterium organophilum XX and Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1 have been completed and compared. In these two species of pink-pigmented, type II methylotrophs, 15 genes were identified that were required for the expression of methanol dehydrogenase activity. None of these genes were required for the synthesis of the prosthetic group of methanol dehydrogenase, pyrroloquinoline quinone. The structural gene required for the synthesis of cytochrome c{sub L}, an electron acceptor uniquely required for methanol dehydrogenase, and the genes encoding small basic peptides that copurified with methanol dehydrogenases were closely linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. A cloned 22-kilobase DNA insert from Methylsporovibrio methanica 81Z, an obligate type II methanotroph, complemented mutants that contained lesions in four genes closely linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. The methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c{sub L} structural genes were found to be transcribed independently in M. organophilum XX. Only two of the genes required for methanol dehydrogenase synthesis in this bacterium were found to be cotranscribed.

  11. The nucleotide sequence of the chicken apo very low density lipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed Central

    van het Schip, A D; Meijlink, F C; Strijker, R; Gruber, M; van Vliet, A J; van de Klundert, J A; Ab, G

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the chicken apo Very Low Density Lipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene and the regions immediately flanking the gene was determined. Nuclease S1 mapping showed that transcription is initiated at two sites, about 11 bp apart, of which the one lying downstream is used preferentially. Comparison of the 2918-base pair gene sequence with the earlier determined cDNA sequence [Wieringa et al. (1981) Nucleic Acids Research 9, 489-501] enabled us to identify the four exons which are 38 (or 49), 100, 160 and 358 bp long. One of the intron-exon junctions has an unusual sequence. In the 5' flanking region several palindromic sequences are observed. Sequences near the 5' and 3' ends show homologies with the ovalbumin gene. Images PMID:6856469

  12. The nucleotide sequence of the chicken apo very low density lipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed

    van het Schip, A D; Meijlink, F C; Strijker, R; Gruber, M; van Vliet, A J; van de Klundert, J A; Ab, G

    1983-05-11

    The nucleotide sequence of the chicken apo Very Low Density Lipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene and the regions immediately flanking the gene was determined. Nuclease S1 mapping showed that transcription is initiated at two sites, about 11 bp apart, of which the one lying downstream is used preferentially. Comparison of the 2918-base pair gene sequence with the earlier determined cDNA sequence [Wieringa et al. (1981) Nucleic Acids Research 9, 489-501] enabled us to identify the four exons which are 38 (or 49), 100, 160 and 358 bp long. One of the intron-exon junctions has an unusual sequence. In the 5' flanking region several palindromic sequences are observed. Sequences near the 5' and 3' ends show homologies with the ovalbumin gene. PMID:6856469

  13. In vivo footprinting of the estrogen-inducible vitellogenin II gene from chicken.

    PubMed Central

    Philipsen, J N; Hennis, B C; Ab, G

    1988-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions in the promoter region of the chicken vitellogenin II gene were analyzed by in vivo dimethylsulphate footprinting with expressing and non-expressing tissues. The reactivity of G-residues is essentially the same in erythrocytes, oviduct and control liver, not expressing the gene. In the expressing estrogen-induced liver we find a number of G-residues with altered reactivities. These G's are located within distinct sequences: the estrogen responsive elements, a sequence resembling the NF-1 recognition motive, and several elements which are conserved between yolk protein genes. The expression-dependent binding of proteins to these sites was confirmed by DNaseI footprinting applied to nuclei isolated from estrogen-induced and control liver. Estradiol appears to establish a transcription complex comprising a number of distinct proteins bound to different sites in the 5' flanking region of the vitellogenin II gene. Images PMID:3186442

  14. In vivo footprinting of the estrogen-inducible vitellogenin II gene from chicken.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, J N; Hennis, B C; Ab, G

    1988-10-25

    Protein-DNA interactions in the promoter region of the chicken vitellogenin II gene were analyzed by in vivo dimethylsulphate footprinting with expressing and non-expressing tissues. The reactivity of G-residues is essentially the same in erythrocytes, oviduct and control liver, not expressing the gene. In the expressing estrogen-induced liver we find a number of G-residues with altered reactivities. These G's are located within distinct sequences: the estrogen responsive elements, a sequence resembling the NF-1 recognition motive, and several elements which are conserved between yolk protein genes. The expression-dependent binding of proteins to these sites was confirmed by DNaseI footprinting applied to nuclei isolated from estrogen-induced and control liver. Estradiol appears to establish a transcription complex comprising a number of distinct proteins bound to different sites in the 5' flanking region of the vitellogenin II gene. PMID:3186442

  15. Involvement of aph(3')-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3')-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3')-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99-100% sequence identity with aph(3')-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3')-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3')-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  16. Involvement of aph(3?)-IIa in the formation of mosaic aminoglycoside resistance genes in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Kuffner, Melanie; Domingues, Sara; Nielsen, Kaare M.

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic recombination leading to mosaic gene formation is known to alter resistance profiles for particular genes and bacterial species. Few studies have examined to what extent aminoglycoside resistance genes undergo intragenic recombination. We screened the GenBank database for mosaic gene formation in homologs of the aph(3?)-IIa (nptII) gene. APH(3?)-IIa inactivates important aminoglycoside antibiotics. The gene is widely used as a selectable marker in biotechnology and enters the environment via laboratory discharges and the release of transgenic organisms. Such releases may provide opportunities for recombination in competent environmental bacteria. The retrieved GenBank sequences were grouped in three datasets comprising river water samples, duck pathogens and full-length variants from various bacterial genomes and plasmids. Analysis for recombination in these datasets was performed with the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4), and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection (GARD). From a total of 89 homologous sequences, 83% showed 99–100% sequence identity with aph(3?)-IIa originally described as part of transposon Tn5. Fifty one were unique sequence variants eligible for recombination analysis. Only a single recombination event was identified with high confidence and indicated the involvement of aph(3?)-IIa in the formation of a mosaic gene located on a plasmid of environmental origin in the multi-resistant isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA96. The available data suggest that aph(3?)-IIa is not an archetypical mosaic gene as the divergence between the described sequence variants and the number of detectable recombination events is low. This is in contrast to the numerous mosaic alleles reported for certain penicillin or tetracycline resistance determinants. PMID:26042098

  17. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  18. Cutis laxa type II with mutation in the pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Nayereh; Aryani, Omid; Nouri, Narges; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old Iranian boy with congenital cutis laxa and several other typical autosomal recessive type II features was examined. Mutation analysis of the pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 gene revealed a single-base deletion (c.345delC) in exon 4 leading to frame shift and premature termination of translation. PMID:23406396

  19. Genetic polymorphism of estrogen receptor alpha gene in Egyptian women with type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Motawi, Tarek M.K.; El-Rehany, Mahmoud A.; Rizk, Sherine M.; Ramzy, Maggie M.; el-Roby, Doaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen might play an important role in type 2 diabetes mellitus pathogenesis. A number of polymorphisms have been reported in the estrogen receptor alpha gene including the XbaI and PvuII restriction enzyme polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to determine if ESR? gene polymorphisms are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and correlated with lipid profile. Ninety diabetic Egyptian patients were compared with forty healthy controls. ESR? genotyping of PvuII and XbaI was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Our study showed that there is more significant difference in the frequency of C and G polymorphic allele between patients and control groups in PvuII and XbaI respectively. Also carriers of minor C and G alleles of PvuII and XbaI gene polymorphisms were associated with increased fasting blood glucose and disturbance in lipid profile as there is an increase in total cholesterol, triglycerides and Low density lipoprotein. So findings of present study suggest the possibility that PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms in ER? are related to T2DM and with increased serum lipids among Egyptian population. PMID:26401488

  20. Genetic polymorphism of estrogen receptor alpha gene in Egyptian women with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Motawi, Tarek M K; El-Rehany, Mahmoud A; Rizk, Sherine M; Ramzy, Maggie M; El-Roby, Doaa M

    2015-12-01

    Estrogen might play an important role in type 2 diabetes mellitus pathogenesis. A number of polymorphisms have been reported in the estrogen receptor alpha gene including the XbaI and PvuII restriction enzyme polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to determine if ESR? gene polymorphisms are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and correlated with lipid profile. Ninety diabetic Egyptian patients were compared with forty healthy controls. ESR? genotyping of PvuII and XbaI was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Our study showed that there is more significant difference in the frequency of C and G polymorphic allele between patients and control groups in PvuII and XbaI respectively. Also carriers of minor C and G alleles of PvuII and XbaI gene polymorphisms were associated with increased fasting blood glucose and disturbance in lipid profile as there is an increase in total cholesterol, triglycerides and Low density lipoprotein. So findings of present study suggest the possibility that PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms in ER? are related to T2DM and with increased serum lipids among Egyptian population. PMID:26401488

  1. Role of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum ntrC gene product in differential regulation of the glutamine synthetase II gene (glnII)

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.B.; Chapman, K.A.; Chelm, B.K. )

    1988-12-01

    We isolated the ntrC gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the endosymbiont of soybean (Glycine max), and examined its role in regulating nitrogen assimilation. Two independent ntrC mutants were constructed by gene replacement techniques. One mutant was unable to produce NtrC protein, while the other constitutively produced a stable, truncated NtrC protein. Both ntrC mutants were unable to utilize potassium nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. In contrast to wild-type B. japonicum, the NtrC null mutant lacked glnII transcripts in aerobic, nitrogen-starved cultures. However, the truncated-NtrC mutant expressed glnII in both nitrogen-starved and nitrogen-excess cultures. Both mutants expressed glnII under oxygen-limited culture conditions and in symbiotic cells. These results suggest that nitrogen assimilation in B. japonicum is regulated in response to both nitrogen limitation and oxygen limitation and that separate regulatory networks exist in free-living and symbiotic cells.

  2. Characterization of MHC class II genes from an ancient reptile lineage, Sphenodon (tuatara).

    PubMed

    Miller, Hilary C; Belov, Katherine; Daugherty, Charles H

    2005-12-01

    The organization and evolution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes vary considerably among vertebrate lineages. MHC genes have been well characterized in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish, but little is known about their organization in reptiles, despite the fact that reptiles occupy an important phylogenetic position for understanding the evolutionary history of both mammalian and avian MHC genes. Here we describe the characterization of the first MHC class II B cDNA sequences from a non-avian reptile, the tuatara (Sphenodon spp.). Three class II B sequences were isolated from a tuatara cDNA library, and four additional partial sequences were isolated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Six of these sequences appear to belong to the same gene family, which we have named SppuDAB. The remaining sequence (named SppuDBB) shares only 43.9% amino acid similarity with SppuDAB and thus appears to represent a separate gene family. SppuDBB may be a non-classical locus as it does not contain all the conserved residues expected of a classical MHC class II gene. Southern blot analysis indicates that only a single copy of SppuDBB exists in tuatara, but that multiple loci related to SppuDAB are present. The SppuDAB sequences have the highest amino acid similarity (57.2-62.4%) with class II B sequences from the spectacled caiman, but only 26.4-48.7% similarity with sequences from other vertebrates. The tuatara sequences do not strongly group with other reptile sequences on a phylogenetic tree, reflecting the antiquity of the Sphenodon lineage and the lack of closely related sequences for comparison. PMID:16261382

  3. KRAS and MAPK1 Gene Amplification in Type II Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mohammed Tanjimur; Nakayama, Kentaro; Rahman, Munmun; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Atsuko; Ishibashi, Tomoka; Ishikawa, Masako; Sato, Emi; Iida, Kouji; Nakayama, Naomi; Ishikawa, Noriyuki; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the clinical significance of KRAS and MAPK1 amplification and assessed whether these amplified genes were potential therapeutic targets in type II ovarian carcinoma. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and retrospectively collected clinical data, KRAS and MAPK1 amplifications were identified in 9 (13.2%) and 5 (7.4%) of 68 type II ovarian carcinoma tissue samples, respectively. Interestingly, co-amplification of KRAS and MAPK1 seemed to be absent in the type II ovarian carcinomas tested, except one case. Active phospho-ERK1/2 was identified in 26 (38.2%) out of 68 type II ovarian carcinomas and did not correlate with KRAS or MAPK1 amplification. There was no significant relationship between KRAS amplification and overall or progression-free survival in patients with type II ovarian carcinoma. However, patients with MAPK1 amplification had significantly poorer progression-free survival than patients without MAPK1 amplification. Moreover, type II ovarian carcinoma cells with concomitant KRAS amplification and mutation exhibited dramatic growth reduction following treatment with the MEK inhibitor PD0325901. These findings indicate that KRAS/MAPK1 amplification is critical for the growth of a subset of type II ovarian carcinomas. Additionally, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway-targeted therapy may benefit selected patients with type II ovarian carcinoma harboring KRAS/MAPK1 amplifications. PMID:23820584

  4. Evolution of Mhc class II B genes in Darwin's finches and their closest relatives: birth of a new gene.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Mayer, W E; Tichy, H; Grant, P R; Grant, B R; Klein, J

    2001-12-01

    The 15 extant species of Darwin's finches on the Galápagos and Cocos Islands are the products of an unfinished adaptive radiation from a founder flock of birds related to the South American species Tiaris obscura. Molecular characterization of their major histocompatibility complex ( Mhc) class II B genes has revealed the existence of several related groups of sequences (presumably encoded in distinct loci) from which one (group 5) stands out because of its low divergence over extended time periods. Analysis of group 5 exon 2 and intron 2 sequences has revealed that the encoding locus apparently arose 2-3 million years ago in the Tiaris group of South and Central American Thraupini. The locus shows no evidence of inactivation, but displays a very low degree of polymorphism, both in terms of number of alleles and genetic distances between alleles. Some of the polymorphism, however, appears to be trans-specific. All the observed intergenic differences can be explained by point mutations and most of the exon 2 changes represent non-synonymous substitutions, although the rate of non-synonymous and synonymous substitutions appears to be the same. The origin of the new locus is explained by the birth-and-death model of Mhc evolution with two important extensions. First, the ancestor of the group 5 genes may have arisen without new gene duplication and second, the birth of the new group may have been brought about by a switch from balancing to directional selection. The ancestor of the group 5 genes may have been a classical class II B allele (one of many) which directional selection fixed in the ancestral population and drove into the category of nonclassical genes. PMID:11862412

  5. Production of soft rot resistant calla lily by expressing a ferredoxin-like protein gene (pflp) in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Yip, Mei-Kuen; Huang, Hsiang-En; Ger, Mang-Jye; Chiu, Shih-Hua; Tsai, Yuh-Chih; Lin, Chin-I; Feng, Teng-Yung

    2007-04-01

    An efficient protocol for the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of calla lily (Zantedeschia elliottiana (W. Wats.) Engl. cultivar 'Florex Gold') is described. Shoot basal discs were co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens C58C1 carrying a plasmid containing neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and plant ferredoxin-like protein (pflp) genes. After Agrobacterium co-cultivation, the shoot basal discs were exposed to 100 mg l(-1) kanamycin for selection. Twenty-eight out of 260 discs (10.8%) were found to have survived and produced shoot clusters. Twenty-six of these were confirmed to contain the pflp transgene by PCR, ending up in 10% transformation efficiency. The disease resistance investigation revealed that 18 transgenic plants exhibited resistance to soft rot disease caused by Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. The presence of pflp gene was demonstrated by PCR, and its accumulation and activity was confirmed by Western blot and disease resistance assay. This was the first report to show the successful transformation and resistance to a bacterial pathogen in Zantedeschia. The protocol is useful for the quality improvement of calla lily through genetic transformation. PMID:17033825

  6. Molecular basis of iduronate-2-sulphatase gene mutations in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Li, P.; Bellows, A.; Thompson, J.

    1999-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome) is an X linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from heterogeneous mutations in the iduronate-2-sulphatase (IDS) gene. To detect IDS gene mutations, direct sequencing of IDS cDNA fragments coupled with assays on IDS genomic amplicons was applied to 18 unrelated patients with MPS II. Seventeen mutations were detected from the 18 patients including seven missense mutations (S71R, A82E, A85T, R88C, R468W, R468Q, and E521V), five deletions (?R95, 383delAT, 596delAACA, 1148delC, and 1216delCT), two insertions (208insC and 1063insA), two splicing mutations (1006+5g?c in intron 7, 1122C?T in exon 8), and an intragenic deletion of IDS exons 4, 5, 6, and 7. Nine of the small mutations were novel mutations. Mutation 596delAACA was detected in two unrelated patients. The mutation in intron 7 was found to cause aberrant splicing and resulted in a 22 bp insertion into its mRNA transcript. The intragenic deleted IDS gene expressed two aberrant mRNA transcripts consisting of exons 1-2-8-9 and 3-8-9. Analysis of mutations A85T, R88C, R468Q, R468W, and 438C/T found no polymorphism for the four missense mutations but about 36% heterozygosity for the 438C/T silent mutation. These results provide further evidence of mutational heterogeneity for MPS II. Also, underlying sequence directed mutagenesis mechanisms for some recurrent mutations in the IDS gene were proposed.???Keywords: mucopolysaccharidosis type II; Hunter syndrome; iduronate-2-sulphatase gene; mutation detection PMID:9950361

  7. Cloning, characterization, and regulation of the human type II IMP dehydrogenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D.A.; Huberman, E. |

    1997-01-01

    Human type II inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, EC 1.1.1.205) is the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. Regulated IMPDH activity is associated with cellular proliferation, transformation, and differentiation. The authors cloned and sequenced the entire gene for type II IMPDH and here provide details regarding the organization of the gene and the characterization of its promoter. The gene spans approximately 5 kb and is disrupted by 12 introns. The transcriptional start sites were determined by S1 nuclease mapping to be somewhat heterogeneous but predominated at 102 and 85 nucleotides from the translational initiation codon. Through the use of heterologous gene constructs and transient transfection assays, a minimal promoter from {minus}206 to {minus}85 was defined. This promoter is TATA-less and contains several transcription factor motifs including four potential Sp 1 binding sites. The minimal promoter is GC-rich (69%) and resembles a CpG island. Through the use of gel mobility shift assays, nuclear proteins were shown to specifically interact with this minimal promoter. Stable transfectants were used to demonstrate that the down-regulation of IMPDH gene expression in response to reduced cellular proliferation occurs by a transcriptional mechanism.

  8. DNA typing of HLA class II genes in native inhabitants of Chukotka

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, M.Yu.; Erdesz, S.; Alexeeva, L.I.

    1995-06-01

    Polymorphism of HLA class II genes was studied in native Chukotka inhabitants with the use of DNA oligotyping. The characteristics of the distribution of allelic variants of the loci HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, and -DPB1 were revealed; they were similar to those of other Subarctic Mongoloid populations and different from those for comparable populations of other climatic and geographic zones. Our data suggest that the specific features found for the distributions of some alleles of the loci examined are related to the geographic variation in the HLA gene system studied. 20 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Reactivation of apolipoprotein II gene transcription by cycloheximide reveals two steps in the deactivation of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sensel, M G; Binder, R; Lazier, C B; Williams, D L

    1994-01-01

    In this report, we describe apolipoprotein II (apoII) gene expression in cell lines derived by stable expression of the chicken estrogen receptor in LMH chicken hepatoma cells. In cell lines expressing high levels of receptor (LMH/2A), apoII gene expression is increased by estrogen 300-fold compared with levels in the receptor-deficient parent LMH line. LMH/2A cells show apoII mRNA induction and turnover kinetics similar to those in chicken liver. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide (CHX) or puromycin following estrogen withdrawal superinduces apoII mRNA without affecting apoII mRNA stability. Superinduction is due to an estrogen-independent reactivation of apoII gene transcription. The apoII gene can be reactivated by CHX for up to 24 h following hormone withdrawal, suggesting that the gene is in a repressed yet transcriptionally competent state. These results reveal two distinct events necessary for termination of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription. The first event, removal of hormone, is sufficient to stop transcription when translation is ongoing. The second event is revealed by the CHX-induced superinduction of apoII mRNA following hormone withdrawal. This superinduction suggests that deactivation of estrogen receptor-mediated transcription requires a labile protein. Furthermore, reactivation of apoII gene expression by CHX and estrogen is additive, suggesting that estrogen is unable to overcome repression completely. Thus, a labile protein may act to repress estrogen receptor-mediated transcription of the apoII gene. Images PMID:8114707

  10. Differential accumulation of Phytophthora cambivora cox II gene transcripts in infected chestnut tissue.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Andrea; Tomassini, Alessia; Bruni, Natalia; Vettraino, Anna M

    2014-04-01

    This study provides a novel qRT-PCR protocol for specific detection and proof of viability of Phytophthora in environmental samples based on differential accumulation of cox II transcripts. Chemical and physical treatments were tested for their ability to induce in vitro the accumulation of cytochrome oxidase genes encoding subunits II (cox II) transcripts in Phytophthora cambivora. Glucose 170 mM, KNO3 0.25 mM and K3 PO3 0.5 and 0.8 mM induced the transcription of cox II in P. cambivora living mycelium while no transcription was observed in mycelium previously killed with 0.5% (p/v) RidomilGold(®) R WG. Living chestnut tissue was artificially infected with P. cambivora and treated with inducers. In vivo experiments confirmed the ability of glucose to induce the accumulation of P. cambivora cox II transcripts. Based on these results, pretreatment of environmental samples with glucose prior to nucleic acid extraction increased the accumulation of specific cox II transcripts, and therefore the sensitivity of qRT-PCR assay for detection of P. cambivora in living tissues. Furthermore, differential accumulation of transcripts between treated and untreated samples represents an unequivocal proof of inoculum viability. PMID:24527950

  11. Genetic variation in V gene of class II Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huafang; Chen, Shengli; Liu, Peng; Ren, Shanhui; Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Xinglong; Zhang, Shuxia; Yang, Zengqi

    2016-01-01

    The genetic variation and molecular evolution of the V gene of the class II Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates with genotypes I-XVIII were determined using bioinformatics. Results indicated that low homology existed in different genotype viruses, whereas high homology often for the same genotypes, exception may be existed within genotypes I, V, VI, and XII. Sequence analysis showed that the genetic variation of V protein was consistent with virus genotype, and specific signatures on the V protein for nine genotypes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the phylogenetic trees were highly consistent between the V and F genes, with slight discrepancies in the sub-genotypes. Evolutionary rate analyses based on V and F genes revealed the evolution rates varied in genotypes. These data indicate that the genetic variation of V protein is genotype-related and will help in elucidating the molecular evolution of NDV. PMID:26527207

  12. Cloning, characterization and expression analysis of coagulation factor II gene in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Xu, B H; Chen, K J; Yao, Y B; Liu, Q L; Xiao, T Y; Su, J M; Peng, H Z

    2015-01-01

    Here, we characterized the structure and function of the coagulation factor II (FII) gene in grass carp and determined its role in coagulation mechanisms. The FII gene EST was obtained using a constructed splenic transcriptome database; the full-length FII gene sequence was obtained by 3' and 5' RACE. The open reading frame (ORF) of FII was cloned and the full-length gene was found to be 1718 bp, with an ORF of 1572 bp; the gene contained a 25 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and 108 bp 3'-UTR. The ORF encoded 524 amino acids, including 74 alkaline amino acids (arginine and lysine) and 69 acidic amino acids (aspartic acid and glutamic acid). The theoretical pI was 6.22. The calculated instability index (II) was 39.81, indicating that FII was a stable protein; the half-life period was predicted to be approximately 30 h. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicated that grass carp FII showed most similarity (71%) to FII of Takifugu rubripes, followed by Oplegnathus fasciatus (48% similarity) and Larimichthys crocea (47% similarity). A real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that under normal circumstances, FII was most highly expressed in the liver, followed by the gill, spleen, thymus, and head-kidney (P < 0.001). After injection of the grass carp reovirus 873 (GCRV873), the pattern of FII expression was significantly altered (P < 0.001); gene expression was high after injection, suggesting a response involving the initiation of the coagulation system and defense of the body in combination with the platelet and complement system. PMID:26535692

  13. Differential estrogen responsiveness of the vitellogenin and apo very low density lipoprotein II genes in the rooster liver.

    PubMed

    Noteborn, M H; Bakker, O; de Jonge, M A; Gruber, M; Ab, G

    1986-01-01

    The primary transcript of the chicken apo Very Low Density Lipoprotein II (apoVLDL-II) gene is formed almost immediately after a first estrogen administration, contrary to the appearance of the vitellogenin primary transcript which has a lag of at least 4 h. However, after a second estrogen administration the vitellogenin gene transcription shows no detectable lag (memory effect). After estrogen withdrawal, the primary transcripts of both genes rapidly decline to undetectably low levels. In the presence of estrogen, the half-lives of the mRNAs of apoVLDL-II and vitellogenin are 15 and at least 70 h, respectively, whereas in the absence of hormone they are only 3.5 and 5.5 h, respectively. Thus estrogen not only controls the transcription of both genes, but also the turnover of their mRNAs. In short, there appears to be a quantitative difference in the response of both genes. PMID:3634868

  14. The mouse insulin-like growth factor II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (IGF-II/MPR) receptor gene: Molecular cloning and genomic organization

    SciTech Connect

    Szebenyi, G.; Rotwein, P. )

    1994-01-01

    The mammalian insulin-like growth factor III/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (IGF-II/MPR) is a multifunctional protein that binds both IGF-II and ligands containing a mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker through distinct high-affinity sites. This receptor plays an integral part in lysosomal enzyme transport, has a potential role in growth factor maturation and clearance, and may mediate IGF-II-activated signal transduction through a G-protein-coupled mechanism. Recent studies have shown that production of IGF-II/MPR mRNA and protein begins in the mouse embryo soon after fertilization and have demonstrated that the receptor gene is on mouse chromosome 17 and is maternally imprinted. In this paper, the authors report the cloning and characterization of the mouse IGF-II/MPR gene. The gene is 93 kb long, is composed of 48 exons, and codes for a predicted protein of 2482 amino acids. The extracellular part of the receptor is encoded by exons 1-46, with each of 15 related repeating motifs being determined by parts of 3-5 exons. A single fibronectin type II-like element is found in exon 39. The transmembrane portion of the receptor also is encoded by exon 46, and the cytoplasmic region by exons 46-48. The positions of exon-intron splice junctions are conserved between several of the repeats in the IGF-II/MPR and the homologous extracellular region of the gene for the other known lysosomal sorting receptor, the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The gene duplications that gave rise to the modern IGF-II/MPR probably occurred before the divergence of mammals, since there is more extensive protein sequence conservation between receptors from different species than between any pair of repeating motifs within a single receptor. 55 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Isoform II Promotes Transcription Factor Recruitment To Activate Interferon Beta and Interferon-Responsive Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yixiang; Wright, Jordan; Meng, Xueqiong

    2015-01-01

    To trigger type I interferon (IFN) responses, pattern recognition receptors activate signaling cascades that lead to transcription of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein has been implicated in these responses, although its role has not been defined. Here, we show that PML isoform II (PML-II) is specifically required for efficient induction of IFN-? transcription and of numerous ISGs, acting at the point of transcriptional complex assembly on target gene promoters. PML-II associated with specific transcription factors NF-?B and STAT1, as well as the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), to facilitate transcriptional complex formation. The absence of PML-II substantially reduced binding of these factors and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) to IFN-? or ISGs promoters and sharply reduced gene activation. The unique C-terminal domain of PML-II was essential for its activity, while the N-terminal RBCC motif common to all PML isoforms was dispensable. We propose a model in which PML-II contributes to the transcription of multiple genes via the association of its C-terminal domain with relevant transcription complexes, which promotes the stable assembly of these complexes at promoters/enhancers of target genes, and that in this way PML-II plays a significant role in the development of type I IFN responses. PMID:25733689

  16. A new point mutation in the ND1 mitochondrial gene identified in a type II diabetic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, V.N.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1995-08-01

    A novel mutation in a mitochondrial gene was identified in a patient with type II diabetes mellitus. G-to-A transition was localized at the nt3316 position of gene ND1 and resulted in alanine threonine replacement at position 4 of mitochondrial NAD-H-dehydrogenase. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Mutations in exons of the CYP17-II gene affect sex steroid concentration in male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruiqin; He, Feng; Wen, Haishen; Li, Jifang; Shi, Bao; Shi, Dan; Liu, Miao; Mu, Weijie; Zhang, Yuanqing; Hu, Jian; Han, Weiguo; Zhang, Jianan; Wang, Qingqing; Yuan, Yuren; Liu, Qun

    2012-03-01

    As a specific gene of fish, cytochrome P450c17-II ( CYP17-II) gene plays a key role in the growth, development an reproduction level of fish. In this study, the single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to characterize polymorphisms within the coding region of CYP17-II gene in a population of 75 male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus). Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in CYP17-II gene of Japanese flounder. They were c.G594A (p.G188R), c.G939A and c.G1502A (p.G490D). SNP1 (c.G594A), located in exon 4 of CYP17-II gene, was significantly associated with gonadosomatic index (GSI). Individuals with genotype GG of SNP1 had significantly lower GSI ( P < 0.05) than those with genotype AA or AG. SNP2 (c.G939A) located at the CpG island of CYP17-II gene. The mutation changed the methylation of exon 6. Individuals with genotype AA of SNP2 had significantly lower serum testosterone (T) level and hepatosomatic index (HSI) compared to those with genotype GG. The results suggested that SNP2 could influence the reproductive endocrine of male Japanese flounder. However, the SNP3 (c.G1502A) located in exon 9 did not affect the four measured reproductive traits. This study showed that CYP17-II gene could be a potentially useful candidate gene for the research of genetic breeding and physiological aspects of Japanese flounder.

  18. CDK9 inhibitors define elongation checkpoints at both ends of RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes

    PubMed Central

    Laitem, Clélia; Zaborowska, Justyna; Isa, Nur F.; Kufs, Johann; Dienstbier, Martin; Murphy, Shona

    2015-01-01

    Transcription through early-elongation checkpoints requires phosphorylation of negative transcription elongation factors (NTEFs) by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)9. Using CDK9 inhibitors and global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq), we have mapped CDK9 inhibitor-sensitive checkpoints genome-wide in human (Homo sapiens) cells. Our data indicate that early-elongation checkpoints are a general feature of RNA polymerase (pol) II-transcribed human genes and occur independently of polymerase stalling. Pol II that has negotiated the early-elongation checkpoint can elongate in the presence of inhibitors but, remarkably, terminates transcription prematurely close to the terminal polyadenylation (poly(A)) site. Our analysis has revealed a hitherto-unsuspected poly(A)-associated elongation checkpoint, which has major implications for the regulation of gene expression. Interestingly, the pattern of modification of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of pol II terminated at this novel checkpoint largely mirrors the pattern normally found downstream of the poly(A) site, suggesting common mechanisms of termination. PMID:25849141

  19. Inhibition of T lymphocyte activation in mice heterozygous for loss of the IMPDH II gene

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jing Jin; Stegmann, Sander; Gathy, Karen; Murray, Robert; Laliberte, Josee; Ayscue, Lanier; Mitchell, Beverly S.

    2000-01-01

    Inosine 5?-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides, which are also synthesized from guanine by a salvage reaction catalyzed by the X chromosome–linked enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). Since inhibitors of IMPDH are in clinical use as immunosuppressive agents, we have examined the consequences of knocking out the IMPDH type II enzyme by gene targeting in a mouse model. Loss of both alleles of the gene encoding this enzyme results in very early embryonic lethality despite the presence of IMPDH type I and HPRT activities. Lymphocytes from IMPDH II+/– heterozygous mice are normal with respect to subpopulation distribution and respond normally to a variety of mitogenic stimuli. However, mice with an IMPDH II+/–, HPRT–/o genotype demonstrate significantly decreased lymphocyte responsiveness to stimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and show a 30% mean reduction in GTP levels in lymphocytes activated by these antibodies. Furthermore, the cytolytic activity of their T cells against allogeneic target cells is significantly impaired. These results demonstrate that a moderate decrease in the ability of murine lymphocytes to synthesize guanine nucleotides during stimulation results in significant impairment in T-cell activation and function. PMID:10953035

  20. Persistent Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection occurs in the absence of functional major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganta, Roman Reddy; Wilkerson, Melinda J.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Rokey, Aaron M.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is an emerging tick-borne disease caused by the rickettsia Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We investigated the impact of two genes that control macrophage and T-cell function on murine resistance to E. chaffeensis. Congenic pairs of wild-type and toll-like receptor 4 (tlr4)- or major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-deficient mice were used for these studies. Wild-type mice cleared the infection within 2 weeks, and the response included macrophage activation and the synthesis of E. chaffeensis-specific Th1-type immunoglobulin G response. The absence of a functional tlr4 gene depressed nitric oxide and interleukin 6 secretion by macrophages and resulted in short-term persistent infections for > or =30 days. In the absence of MHC-II alleles, E. chaffeensis infections persisted throughout the entire 3-month evaluation period. Together, these data suggest that macrophage activation and cell-mediated immunity, orchestrated by CD4(+) T cells, are critical for conferring resistance to E. chaffeensis.

  1. Regulation of gene transcription of angiotensin II receptor subtypes in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Nio, Y; Matsubara, H; Murasawa, S; Kanasaki, M; Inada, M

    1995-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that angiotensin II (AngII) acts as a modulator for ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction. Using competitive reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, nuclear runoff, and binding assays, we examined the regulation of AngII type 1a and 1b (AT1a-R and AT1b-R) and type 2 receptor (AT2-R) expression in the infarcted rat heart as well as the effects of AngII receptor antagonists. AT1a-R mRNA levels were increased in the infarcted (4.2-fold) and noninfarcted portions (2.2-fold) of the myocardium 7 d after myocardial infarction as compared with those in sham-operated controls, whereas AT1b-R mRNA levels were unchanged. The amount of detectable AT2-R mRNA increased in infarcted (3.1-fold) and noninfarcted (1.9-fold) portions relative to that in the control. The transcription rates for AT1a-R and AT2-R genes, determined by means of a nuclear runoff assay, were significantly increased in the infarcted heart. The AngII receptor numbers were elevated (from 12 to 35 fmol/mg protein) in the infarcted myocardium in which the increases in AT1-R and AT2-R were 3.2- and 2.3-fold, respectively, while the receptor affinity was unchanged. Therapy with AT1-R antagonist for 7 d reduced the increase in AT1-R and AT2-R expressions in the infarcted heart together with a decrease in blood pressure, whereas therapy with an AT2-R antagonist did not affect mRNA levels and blood pressure. Neither AT1-R nor AT2-R antagonists affected the infarct sizes. These results demonstrated that myocardial infarction causes an increase in the gene transcription and protein expression of cardiac AT1a-R and AT2-R, whereas the AT1b-R gene is unaffected, and that therapy with an AT1-R antagonist, but not with an AT2-R antagonist, is effective in reducing the increased expression of AngII receptor subtypes induced by myocardial infarction. Images PMID:7814645

  2. Efficient gene-targeting in rat embryonic stem cells by CRISPR/Cas and generation of human kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II) knock-in rat.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ooshima, Yuki; Nakata, Mitsugu; Yano, Takashi; Nishimura, Naoya; Nishigaki, Ryuuichi; Satomi, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Takeyama, Michiyasu

    2015-12-01

    The relative proportion of kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) I-IV activities in the brain is similar between humans and rats. Moreover, KAT II is considered to be the main enzyme for kynurenic acid production in the brain. Taken together, human KAT II knock-in (hKAT II KI) rats will become a valuable tool for the evaluation of KAT II targeted drugs as a human mimetic model. Although we initially tried the approach by conventional gene-targeting via embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to generate them, we had to give up the production because of no recombinant ESCs. Accordingly, we developed a method to improve the efficiency of homologous recombination (HR) in ESCs by the combination with the CRISPR/Cas system. Co-electroporation of Cas9 plasmid, single guide RNA plasmid and hKAT II KI vector increased the number of drug-resistant colonies and greatly enhanced the HR efficiency from 0 to 36 %. All the clones which we obtained showed the same sequence as designed. These recombinant clones resulted in chimeras that transmitted the hKAT II KI allele to their offspring. hKAT II KI rats showed no reduction of KATs mRNA expression and the amount of kynurenic acid was similar between the hKAT II KI rats and the wild type in their brains. These results indicate that the methodology presented in this report can overcome the problem encountered in conventional gene-targeting that prevented production of humanized rats. PMID:26454650

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the Dpn II DNA methylase gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae and its relationship to the dam gene of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Mannarelli, B.M.; Balganesh, T.S.; Greenberg, B.; Springhorn, S.S.; Lacks, S.A.

    1985-07-01

    The structural gene (dpnM) for the Dpn II DNA methylase of Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is part of the Dpn II restriction system and methylates adenine in the sequence 5'-G-A-T-C-3', was identified by subcloning fragments of a chromosomal segment from a Dpn II-producing strain in an S. pneumoniae host/vector cloning system and demonstrating function of the gene also in Bacillus subtilis. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the gene and adjacent DNA indicates that it encodes a polypeptide of 32,903 daltons. A putative promoter for transcription of the gene lies within a hundred nucleotides of the polypeptide start codon. Comparison of the coding sequence to that of the dam gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes a similar methylase, revealed 30% of the amino acid residues in the two enzymes to be identical. This homology presumably reflects a common origin of the two genes prior to the divergence of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It is suggested that the restriction function of the gene is primitive, and that the homologous restriction system in E. coli has evolved to play an accessory role in heteroduplex DNA base mismatch repair.

  4. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex class II B genes in cranes.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Akiyama, Takuya; Nishida, Chizuko; Takami, Kazutoshi; Onuma, Manabu; Momose, Kunikazu; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in cranes. Genomic sequences spanning exons 1 to 4 were amplified and determined in 13 crane species and three other species closely related to cranes. In all, 55 unique sequences were identified, and at least two polymorphic MHC class II B loci were found in most species. An analysis of sequence polymorphisms showed the signature of positive selection and recombination. A phylogenetic reconstruction based on exon 2 sequences indicated that trans-species polymorphism has persisted for at least 10 million years, whereas phylogenetic analyses of the sequences flanking exon 2 revealed a pattern of concerted evolution. These results suggest that both balancing selection and recombination play important roles in the crane MHC evolution. PMID:26452363

  5. Expressed MHC class II genes in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from geographically disparate populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, L.; Aldridge, B.M.; Miles, A.K.; Stott, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is central to maintaining the immunologic vigor of individuals and populations. Classical MHC class II genes were targeted for partial sequencing in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from populations in California, Washington, and Alaska. Sequences derived from sea otter peripheral blood leukocyte mRNAs were similar to those classified as DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB in other species. Comparisons of the derived amino acid compositions supported the classification of these as functional molecules from at least one DQA, DQB, and DRA locus and at least two DRB loci. While limited in scope, phylogenetic analysis of the DRB peptide-binding region suggested the possible existence of distinct clades demarcated by geographic region. These preliminary findings support the need for additional MHC gene sequencing and expansion to a comprehensive study targeting additional otters. ?? 2006 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  6. DMA and DMB are the only genes in the class II region of the human MHC needed for class II-associated antigen processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ceman, S.; Rudersdorf, R.A.; Petersen, J.M.

    1995-03-15

    Previous studies have shown that homozygous mutations between the LMP2 and DNA loci in the human MHC cause class II molecules to be abnormally conformed and unstable in the presence of SDS at low temperature, and impede class II-associated Ag processing and presentation. These abnormalities result from impaired ability to form intracellular class II/peptide complexes that predominate in normal cells. We show in this work that this defect results from deficient expression of either the DMA or the DMB gene. Human B-LCL.174 (DR3) cells, which have a deletion of all known expressible genes in the class II region, express transgene-encoded HLA-DR3, but have the abnormalities. Transfer of cosmid HA14, which contains the DMA and DMB genes, into .174 (DR3) cells restored normal DR3 conformation, stability in 0.4% SDS at 0{degrees}, and ability to process and present tetanus toxoid, but only when both DMA and DMB mRNAs were present. The requirement for both genetic expressions in engendering normal phenotypes was confirmed by transferring the cloned genes into .174 (DR3) cells separately or together. Because normal phenotypes were fully restored in transferent cells expressing DMA plus DMB, other genes in the {approximately} 1-mb homozygous class II region deletion in .174 (DR3) cells either do not participate in or are dispensable for apparently normal production of intracellular class II/peptide complexes. The properties of DM-deficient EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) suggest ways of identifying humans in whom DM deficiency contributes to congenital immunodeficiency and malignancy. 67 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Mapping mutations in genes encoding the two large subunits of Drosophila RNA polymerase II defines domains essential for basic transcription functions and for proper expression of developmental genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Weeks, J; Mortin, M A; Greenleaf, A L

    1993-07-01

    We have mapped a number of mutations at the DNA sequence level in genes encoding the largest (RpII215) and second-largest (RpII140) subunits of Drosophila melanogaster RNA polymerase II. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, we detected 12 mutations from 14 mutant alleles (86%) as mobility shifts in nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, thus localizing the mutations to the corresponding PCR fragments of about 350 bp. We then determined the mutations at the DNA sequence level by directly subcloning the PCR fragments and sequencing them. The five mapped RpII140 mutations clustered in a C-terminal portion of the second-largest subunit, indicating the functional importance of this region of the subunit. The RpII215 mutations were distributed more broadly, although six of eight clustered in a central region of the subunit. One notable mutation that we localized to this region was the alpha-amanitin-resistant mutation RpII215C4, which also affects RNA chain elongation in vitro. RpII215C4 mapped to a position near the sites of corresponding mutations in mouse and in Caenorhabditis elegans genes, reinforcing the idea that this region is involved in amatoxin binding and transcript elongation. We also mapped mutations in both RpII215 and RpII140 that cause a developmental defect known as the Ubx effect. The clustering of these mutations in each gene suggests that they define functional domains in each subunit whose alteration induces the mutant phenotype. PMID:8321225

  8. Mapping mutations in genes encoding the two large subunits of Drosophila RNA polymerase II defines domains essential for basic transcription functions and for proper expression of developmental genes.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Weeks, J; Mortin, M A; Greenleaf, A L

    1993-01-01

    We have mapped a number of mutations at the DNA sequence level in genes encoding the largest (RpII215) and second-largest (RpII140) subunits of Drosophila melanogaster RNA polymerase II. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, we detected 12 mutations from 14 mutant alleles (86%) as mobility shifts in nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, thus localizing the mutations to the corresponding PCR fragments of about 350 bp. We then determined the mutations at the DNA sequence level by directly subcloning the PCR fragments and sequencing them. The five mapped RpII140 mutations clustered in a C-terminal portion of the second-largest subunit, indicating the functional importance of this region of the subunit. The RpII215 mutations were distributed more broadly, although six of eight clustered in a central region of the subunit. One notable mutation that we localized to this region was the alpha-amanitin-resistant mutation RpII215C4, which also affects RNA chain elongation in vitro. RpII215C4 mapped to a position near the sites of corresponding mutations in mouse and in Caenorhabditis elegans genes, reinforcing the idea that this region is involved in amatoxin binding and transcript elongation. We also mapped mutations in both RpII215 and RpII140 that cause a developmental defect known as the Ubx effect. The clustering of these mutations in each gene suggests that they define functional domains in each subunit whose alteration induces the mutant phenotype. Images PMID:8321225

  9. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in the Barn owl (Aves: Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Burri, Reto; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène; Roulin, Alexandre; Fumagalli, Luca

    2008-09-01

    We isolated major histocompatibility complex class II B (MHCIIB) genes in the Barn owl (Tyto alba). A PCR-based approach combined with primer walking on genomic and complementary DNA as well as Southern blot analyses revealed the presence of two MHCIIB genes, both being expressed in spleen, liver, and blood. Characteristic structural features of MHCIIB genes as well as their expression and high non-synonymous substitution rates in the region involved in antigen binding suggest that both genes are functional. MHC organization in the Barn owl is simple compared to passerine species that show multiple duplications, and resembles the minimal essential MHC of chicken. PMID:18548243

  10. RNA polymerase II interacts with the promoter region of the noninduced hsp70 gene in Drosophila melanogaster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, D.S.; Lis, J.T.

    1986-11-01

    By using a protein-DNA cross-linking method, we examined the in vivo distribution of RNA polymerase II on the hsp70 heat shock gene in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 cells. In heat shock-induced cells, a high level of RNA polymerase II was detected on the entire gene, while in noninduced cells, the RNA polymerase II was confined to the 5' end of the hsp70 gene, predominantly between nucleotides -12 and +65 relative to the start of transcription. This association of RNA polymerase II was apparent whether the cross-linking was performed by a 10-min UV irradiation of chilled cells with mercury vapor lamps or by a 40-microsecond irradiation of cells with a high-energy xenon flash lamp. We hypothesize that RNA polymerase II has access to, and a high affinity for, the promoter region of this gene before induction, and this poised RNA polymerase II may be critical in the mechanism of transcription activation.

  11. Microarray analysis of altered gene expression in murine fibroblasts transformed by nickel(II) to nickel(II)-resistant malignant phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Kowara, Renata . E-mail: Renata.Kowara@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca; Karaczyn, Aldona; Cheng, Robert Y.S.; Salnikow, Konstantin; Kasprzak, Kazimierz S.

    2005-05-15

    B200 cells are Ni(II)-transformed mouse BALB/c-3T3 fibroblasts displaying a malignant phenotype and increased resistance to Ni(II) toxicity. In an attempt to find genes whose expression has been altered by the transformation, the Atlas Mouse Stress/Toxicology cDNA Expression Array (Clontech Laboratories, Inc., Palo Alto, CA) was used to analyze the levels of gene expression in both parental and Ni(II)-transformed cells. Comparison of the results revealed a significant up- or downregulation of the expression of 62 of the 588 genes present in the array (approximately 10.5%) in B200 cells. These genes were assigned to different functional groups, including transcription factors and oncogenes (9/14; fractions in parentheses denote the number of up-regulated versus the total number of genes assigned to this group), stress and DNA damage response genes (11/12), growth factors and hormone receptors (6/9), metabolism (7/7), cell adhesion (2/7), cell cycle (3/6), apoptosis (3/4), and cell proliferation (2/3). Among those genes, overexpression of beta-catenin and its downstream targets c-myc and cyclin D1, together with upregulated cyclin G, points at the malignant character of B200 cells. While the increased expression of glutathione (GSH) synthetase, glutathione-S-transferase A4 (GSTA4), and glutathione-S-transferase theta (GSTT), together with high level of several genes responding to oxidative stress, suggests the enforcement of antioxidant defenses in Ni-transformed cells.

  12. Early diagnosis of and surgical strategy for adrenal medullary disease in MEN II gene carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, S.; Tisell, L.E.; Fjaelling, M.L.; Lindberg, S.; Jacobsson, L.; Zachrisson, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen multiple endocrine neoplasia type II (MEN II) gene carriers--12 who had undergone thyroidectomy because of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and 4 whose thyroid glands had been removed because of C cell hyperplasia--were examined for the presence of pheochromocytomas. No patient had sought medical advice for pheochromocytoma symptoms. Fourteen patients had MEN IIa syndromes, one patient had a MEN IIb and another patient had a mixed syndrome of von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis and MEN II. Eight patients had undergone unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma 11 +/- 4 years before. The patients underwent clinical examination, determination of the urinary excretion of catecholamines and metabolites, and /sup 131/I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I-MIBG) and CAT scans. /sup 131/I-MIBG scanning was performed with images 1, 4, and 7 days after the radionuclide injection. In seven of eight patients who had undergone unilateral adrenalectomies, the /sup 131/I-MIBG scans showed accumulation of the radionuclide in the remaining adrenal gland. Bilateral adrenal accumulation of the radionuclide was demonstrated in seven of eight MEN IIa gene carriers who had not undergone adrenalectomy. Five patients, two of whom had undergone adrenalectomy, were found to have unilateral pheochromocytomas less than 2 cm in diameter. Only one of these five patients had an elevated excretion of urinary catecholamines. Between day 4 and day 7 after /sup 131/I-MIBG injection, adrenal glands with pheochromocytomas increased their relative accumulation of the radionuclide significantly more (p less than 0.02) than did adrenal glands without any demonstrable pheochromocytomas. All the pheochromocytomas were viewed by means of CAT scans.

  13. Genetic Diversity of the Flagellin Genes of Clostridium botulinum Groups I and II

    PubMed Central

    Woudstra, Cedric; Lambert, Dominic; Anniballi, Fabrizio; De Medici, Dario; Austin, John

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by phenotypically and genetically different Clostridium species, including Clostridium botulinum and some strains of Clostridium baratii (serotype F) and Clostridium butyricum (serotype E). BoNT-producing clostridia responsible for human botulism encompass strains of group I (secreting proteases, producing toxin serotype A, B, or F, and growing optimally at 37°C) and group II (nonproteolytic, producing toxin serotype E, B, or F, and growing optimally at 30°C). Here we report the development of real-time PCR assays for genotyping C. botulinum strains of groups I and II based on flaVR (variable region sequence of flaA) sequences and the flaB gene. Real-time PCR typing of regions flaVR1 to flaVR10 and flaB was optimized and validated with 62 historical and Canadian C. botulinum strains that had been previously typed. Analysis of 210 isolates of European origin allowed the identification of four new C. botulinum flaVR types (flaVR11 to flaVR14) and one new flaVR type specific to C. butyricum type E (flaVR15). The genetic diversity of the flaVR among C. botulinum strains investigated in the present study reveals the clustering of flaVR types into 5 major subgroups. Subgroups 1, 3, and 4 contain proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, subgroup 2 is made up of nonproteolytic C. botulinum only, and subgroup 5 is specific to C. butyricum type E. The genetic variability of the flagellin genes carried by C. botulinum and the possible association of flaVR types with certain geographical areas make gene profiling of flaVR and flaB promising in molecular surveillance and epidemiology of C. botulinum. PMID:23603687

  14. Genetic polymorphisms in ?-defensin II gene in Amazon sheep from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, B B; Barbosa, E M; Azevedo, J S N; Campelo, J E G; Rodrigues, L F S; Pinheiro, L M L; Silva, S C B; Schierholt, A S; Souza, P H; Gonçalves, E C; Silva Filho, E

    2015-01-01

    The northern region of Brazil produces a large number of sheep, with Pará being the largest sheep breeding state in the region. In the Amazon region, livestock production is a challenge due to the high diversity of pathogens affecting humans and animals. Defensins are antimicrobial peptides acting as a first barrier against micro-organisms and present high variation in different organisms. The objective of this study was to detect polymorphisms in exon II in ?-defensin II in Amazon sheep. The gene was amplified by PCR from DNA extracted from 47 sheep blood samples from the Santa Inês breed. Products were sequenced, aligned and analyzed. Three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) positions were observed with transition substitutions (A?G) at positions 1643, 1659, and 1750. The 1643 and 1750 SNPs showed a low variability and significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) (P < 0.05) meanwhile the SNP 1659 showed moderate absence of genetic variability and deviation from HWE (P > 0.05). Polymorphisms at 1643 and 1659 were predicted to modify amino acids in the peptide chain (isoleucine to valine and arginine to lysine, respectively) with no effects on protein function. Results from this study suggest that SNPs are important markers for ?-defensin II efficiency studies on the immune system of sheep in the Brazilian Amazon. PMID:26505431

  15. Changes in RNA polymerase II progression influence somatic hypermutation of Ig-related genes by AID

    PubMed Central

    Kodgire, Prashant; Mukkawar, Priyanka; Ratnam, Sarayu; Martin, Terence E.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) of Ig genes is initiated by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and requires target gene transcription. We previously proposed that AID may associate with the RNA polymerase II (Pol). Here, to determine aspects of the transcription process required for SHM, we knocked-in a transcription terminator into an Ig gene variable region in DT40 chicken B cell line. We found that the human ?-globin terminator was an efficient inhibitor of downstream transcription in these cells. The terminator reduced mutations downstream of the poly(A) signal, suggesting that the process of transcription is essential for efficient SHM and that AID has better access to its target when Pol is in the elongating rather than terminating mode. Mutations upstream of the poly(A) site were almost doubled in the active terminator clones compared with an inactivated terminator, and this region showed more single-stranded DNA, indicating that Pol pausing assists SHM. Moreover, the nontranscribed DNA strand was the preferred SHM target upstream of the active terminator. Pol pausing during poly(A) site recognition may facilitate persistence of negative supercoils, exposing the coding single strand and possibly allowing the nascent RNA intermittent reannealing with the template strand, for prolonged access of AID. PMID:23752228

  16. Depletion of REF/Aly alters gene expression and reduces RNA polymerase II occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Sarah H.; Conrad, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA processing is mechanistically linked to transcription with RNA pol II serving as a platform to recruit RNA processing factors to nascent transcripts. The TREX complex member, REF/Aly, has been suggested to play roles in transcription and nuclear RNA stability in addition to its more broadly characterized role in mRNA export. We employed RNA-seq to identify a subset of transcripts with decreased expression in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions upon REF/Aly knockdown, which implies that REF/Aly affects their expression upstream of its role in mRNA export. Transcription inhibition experiments and metabolic labeling assays argue that REF/Aly does not affect stability of selected candidate transcripts. Instead, ChIP assays and nuclear run-on analysis reveal that REF/Aly depletion diminishes the transcription of these candidate genes. Furthermore, we determined that REF/Aly binds directly to candidate transcripts, supporting a direct effect of REF/Aly on candidate gene transcription. Taken together, our data suggest that the importance of REF/Aly is not limited to RNA export, but that REF/Aly is also critical for gene expression at the level of transcription. Our data are consistent with the model that REF/Aly is involved in linking splicing with transcription efficiency. PMID:25477387

  17. Regeneration of multiple shoots from transgenic potato events facilitates the recovery of phenotypically normal lines: assessing a cry9Aa2 gene conferring insect resistance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The recovery of high performing transgenic lines in clonal crops is limited by the occurrence of somaclonal variation during the tissue culture phase of transformation. This is usually circumvented by developing large populations of transgenic lines, each derived from the first shoot to regenerate from each transformation event. This study investigates a new strategy of assessing multiple shoots independently regenerated from different transformed cell colonies of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Results A modified cry9Aa2 gene, under the transcriptional control of the CaMV 35S promoter, was transformed into four potato cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer using a nptII gene conferring kanamycin resistance as a selectable marker gene. Following gene transfer, 291 transgenic lines were grown in greenhouse experiments to assess somaclonal variation and resistance to potato tuber moth (PTM), Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller). Independently regenerated lines were recovered from many transformed cell colonies and Southern analysis confirmed whether they were derived from the same transformed cell. Multiple lines regenerated from the same transformed cell exhibited a similar response to PTM, but frequently exhibited a markedly different spectrum of somaclonal variation. Conclusions A new strategy for the genetic improvement of clonal crops involves the regeneration and evaluation of multiple shoots from each transformation event to facilitate the recovery of phenotypically normal transgenic lines. Most importantly, regenerated lines exhibiting the phenotypic appearance most similar to the parental cultivar are not necessarily derived from the first shoot regenerated from a transformed cell colony, but can frequently be a later regeneration event. PMID:21995716

  18. A new set of differentially expressed signaling genes is early expressed in coffee leaf rust race II incompatible interaction.

    PubMed

    Diola, Valdir; Brito, Giovani G; Caixeta, Eveline T; Pereira, Luiz F P; Loureiro, Marcelo E

    2013-08-01

    New races of coffee rust are overcoming resistance genes available in germplasm and cultivated cultivars and bringing recently some coffee-producing countries in severe economic challenge. The objective of this study was to identify the genes that are linked to host resistance to the major coffee rust race II. In our study, we have identified and studied a segregating population that has a single monogenic resistant gene to coffee rust. Coffee leaves of parents, resistant, and susceptible genotypes of the F2 generation plants were inoculated with pathogen spores. A differential analysis was performed by combined cDNA-AFLP and bulk segregant analysis (BSA) in pooled samples collected 48 and 72 h postinoculation, increasing the selectiveness for differential gene expression. Of 108 differential expressed genes, between 33,000 gene fragments analyzed, 108 differential expressed genes were identified in resistant plants. About 20 and 22 % of these resistant-correlated genes are related to signaling and defense genes, respectively. Between signaling genes, the major subclass corresponds to receptor and resistant homolog genes, like nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR), Pto-like, RLKs, Bger, and RGH1A, all not previously described in coffee rust responses. The second major subclass included kinases, where two mitogen-activated kinases (MAPK) are identified. Further gene expression analysis was performed for 21 selected genes by real-time PCR gene expression analysis at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postinoculation. The expression of genes involved in signaling and defense was higher at 24 and 72 h after inoculation, respectively. The NBS-LRR was the more differentially expressed gene between the signaling genes (four times more expressed in the resistant genotype), and thraumatin (PR5) was the more expressed between all genes (six times more expressed). Multivariate analysis reinforces the significance of the temporal separation of identified signaling and defense genes: early expression of signaling genes support the hypothesis that higher expression of the signaling components up regulates the defense genes identified. Additionally the increased gene expression of these two gene sets is associated with a single monogenic resistance trait to to leaf coffee rust in the interaction characterized here. PMID:23835851

  19. Evolutionary diversification and characterization of the eubacterial gene family encoding DXR type II, an alternative isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoprenoids constitute a vast family of natural compounds performing diverse and essential functions in all domains of life. In most eubacteria, isoprenoids are synthesized through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The production of MEP is usually catalyzed by deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR-I) but a few organisms use an alternative DXR-like enzyme (DXR-II). Results Searches through 1498 bacterial complete proteomes detected 130 sequences with similarity to DXR-II. Phylogenetic analysis identified three well-resolved clades: the DXR-II family (clustering 53 sequences including eleven experimentally verified as functional enzymes able to produce MEP), and two previously uncharacterized NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductase families (designated DLO1 and DLO2 for DXR-II-like oxidoreductases 1 and 2). Our analyses identified amino acid changes critical for the acquisition of DXR-II biochemical function through type-I functional divergence, two of them mapping onto key residues for DXR-II activity. DXR-II showed a markedly discontinuous distribution, which was verified at several levels: taxonomic (being predominantly found in Alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes), metabolic (being mostly found in bacteria with complete functional MEP pathways with or without DXR-I), and phenotypic (as no biological/phenotypic property was found to be preferentially distributed among DXR-II-containing strains, apart from pathogenicity in animals). By performing a thorough comparative sequence analysis of GC content, 3:1 dinucleotide frequencies, codon usage and codon adaptation indexes (CAI) between DXR-II sequences and their corresponding genomes, we examined the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), as opposed to an scenario of massive gene loss, in the evolutionary origin and diversification of the DXR-II subfamily in bacteria. Conclusions Our analyses support a single origin of the DXR-II family through functional divergence, in which constitutes an exceptional model of acquisition and maintenance of redundant gene functions between non-homologous genes as a result of convergent evolution. Subsequently, although old episodic events of HGT could not be excluded, the results supported a prevalent role of gene loss in explaining the distribution of DXR-II in specific pathogenic eubacteria. Our results highlight the importance of the functional characterization of evolutionary shortcuts in isoprenoid biosynthesis for screening specific antibacterial drugs and for regulating the production of isoprenoids of human interest. PMID:24004839

  20. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II (CDAII) is caused by mutations in the SEC23B gene.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Paola; Fermo, Elisa; Vercellati, Cristina; Boschetti, Carla; Barcellini, Wilma; Iurlo, Alessandra; Marcello, Anna Paola; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Zanella, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II (CDAII) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, hemolysis, erythroblast morphological abnormalities, and hypoglycosylation of some red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins. Recent studies indicated that CDAII is caused by a defect disturbing Golgi processing in erythroblasts. A linkage analysis located a candidate region on chromosome 20, termed the CDAN2 locus, in the majority of CDAII patients but the aberrant gene has not so far been elucidated. We used a proteomic-genomic approach to identify SEC23B as the candidate gene for CDAII by matching the recently published data on the cytoplasmic proteome of human RBCs with the chromosomic localization of CDAN2 locus. Sequencing analysis of SEC23B gene in 13 CDAII patients from 10 families revealed 12 different mutations: six missense (c.40C>T, c.325G>A, c.1043A>C, c.1489C>T, c.1808C>T, and c.2101C>T), two frameshift (c.428_428delAinsCG and c.1821delT), one splicing (c.689+1G>A), and three nonsense (c.568C>T, c.649C>T, and c.1660C>T). Mutations c.40C>T and c.325G>A were detected in unrelated patients. SEC23B is a member of the Sec23/Sec24 family, a component of the COPII coat protein complex involved in protein transport through membrane vesicles. Abnormalities in this gene are likely to disturb endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi trafficking, affecting different glycosylation pathways and ultimately accounting for the cellular phenotype observed in CDAII. PMID:19621418

  1. Type II Transmembrane Serine Protease Gene Variants Associate with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luostari, Kaisa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Tengström, Maria; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Kataja, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are related to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis in cancer. Genetic variants in these genes may alter their function, leading to cancer onset and progression, and affect patient outcome. Here, 464 breast cancer cases and 370 controls were genotyped for 82 single-nucleotide polymorphisms covering eight genes. Association of the genotypes was estimated against breast cancer risk, breast cancer–specific survival, and survival in different treatment groups, and clinicopathological variables. SNPs in TMPRSS3 (rs3814903 and rs11203200), TMPRSS7 (rs1844925), and HGF (rs5745752) associated significantly with breast cancer risk (Ptrend?=?0.008–0.042). SNPs in TMPRSS1 (rs12151195 and rs12461158), TMPRSS2 (rs2276205), TMPRSS3 (rs3814903), and TMPRSS7 (rs2399403) associated with prognosis (P?=?0.004–0.046). When estimating the combined effect of the variants, the risk of breast cancer was higher with 4–5 alleles present compared to 0–2 alleles (P?=?0.0001; OR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.39–3.94). Women with 6–8 survival-associating alleles had a 3.3 times higher risk of dying of breast cancer compared to women with 1–3 alleles (P?=?0.001; HR, 3.30; 95% CI, 1.58–6.88). The results demonstrate the combined effect of variants in TTSPs and their related genes in breast cancer risk and patient outcome. Functional analysis of these variants will lead to further understanding of this gene family, which may improve individualized risk estimation and development of new strategies for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25029565

  2. Type II transmembrane serine protease gene variants associate with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luostari, Kaisa; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Tengström, Maria; Palvimo, Jorma J; Kataja, Vesa; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti

    2014-01-01

    Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are related to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis in cancer. Genetic variants in these genes may alter their function, leading to cancer onset and progression, and affect patient outcome. Here, 464 breast cancer cases and 370 controls were genotyped for 82 single-nucleotide polymorphisms covering eight genes. Association of the genotypes was estimated against breast cancer risk, breast cancer-specific survival, and survival in different treatment groups, and clinicopathological variables. SNPs in TMPRSS3 (rs3814903 and rs11203200), TMPRSS7 (rs1844925), and HGF (rs5745752) associated significantly with breast cancer risk (Ptrend?=?0.008-0.042). SNPs in TMPRSS1 (rs12151195 and rs12461158), TMPRSS2 (rs2276205), TMPRSS3 (rs3814903), and TMPRSS7 (rs2399403) associated with prognosis (P?=?0.004-0.046). When estimating the combined effect of the variants, the risk of breast cancer was higher with 4-5 alleles present compared to 0-2 alleles (P?=?0.0001; OR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.39-3.94). Women with 6-8 survival-associating alleles had a 3.3 times higher risk of dying of breast cancer compared to women with 1-3 alleles (P?=?0.001; HR, 3.30; 95% CI, 1.58-6.88). The results demonstrate the combined effect of variants in TTSPs and their related genes in breast cancer risk and patient outcome. Functional analysis of these variants will lead to further understanding of this gene family, which may improve individualized risk estimation and development of new strategies for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25029565

  3. Expression of Intratumoral IGF-II Is Regulated by the Gene Imprinting Status in Triple Negative Breast Cancer from Vietnamese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Vinodh Kumar; Hernandez, Lorraine Christine; Anderson, Kendra; Tan, Qianwei; De León, Marino; De León, Daisy D.

    2015-01-01

    African American women suffer higher incidence and mortality of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) than Caucasian women. TNBC is very aggressive, causing the worst clinical outcome. We previously demonstrated that tumors from these patients express high IGF-II and exhibit high activation of the IGF signaling pathways. IGF-II gene expression is imprinted (monoallelic), promotes tumor progression, and metastasis and regulates Survivin, a TNBC prognostic marker. Since BC mortality has increased among young Vietnamese women, we analyzed 48 (paired) TNBC samples from Vietnamese patients to assess IGF-II expression. We analyzed all samples by qrtPCR for identification of IGF-II heterozygosity and to determine allelic expression of the IGF-II gene. We also analyzed the tissues for proIGF-II and Survivin by RT-PCR and Western blotting. A total of 28 samples displayed IGF-II heterozygosity of which 78% were biallelic. Tumors with biallelic IGF-II gene expression exhibited the highest levels of proIGF-II and Survivin. Although 100% of these tissues corresponding normal samples were biallelic, they expressed significantly lower levels of or no proIGF-II and Survivin. Thus, IGF-II biallelic gene expression is differentially regulated in normal versus tumor tissues. We propose that intratumoral proIGF-II is dependent on the IGF-II gene imprinting status and it will promote a more aggressive TNBC. PMID:26448747

  4. Interfacial stress affects rat alveolar type II cell signaling and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Hobi, Nina; Ravasio, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Previous work from our group (Ravasio A, Hobi N, Bertocchi C, Jesacher A, Dietl P, Haller T. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 300: C1456–C1465, 2011.) showed that contact of alveolar epithelial type II cells with an air-liquid interface (IAL) leads to a paradoxical situation. It is a potential threat that can cause cell injury, but also a Ca2+-dependent stimulus for surfactant secretion. Both events can be explained by the impact of interfacial tensile forces on cellular structures. Here, the strength of this mechanical stimulus became also apparent in microarray studies by a rapid and significant change on the transcriptional level. Cells challenged with an IAL in two different ways showed activation/inactivation of cellular pathways involved in stress response and defense, and a detailed Pubmatrix search identified genes associated with several lung diseases and injuries. Altogether, they suggest a close relationship of interfacial stress sensation with current models in alveolar micromechanics. Further similarities between IAL and cell stretch were found with respect to the underlying signaling events. The source of Ca2+ was extracellular, and the transmembrane Ca2+ entry pathway suggests the involvement of a mechanosensitive channel. We conclude that alveolar type II cells, due to their location and morphology, are specific sensors of the IAL, but largely protected from interfacial stress by surfactant release. PMID:22610352

  5. Haplotype distribution of class II MHC genes in Mexican patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Mendez, C; Yamamoto-Furusho, J K; Vargas-Alarcón, G; Ize-Ludlow, D; Alcocer-Varela, J; Granados, J

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the association of the DQA1*0501 allele in the susceptibility to develop systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Mexicans. Frequencies of generic MHC Class II genes (HLA-DR, DQA and DQB1) were determined by DNA typing in 58 Mexican mestizo SLE patients and 96 ethnically matched controls. Statistical analysis was performed by chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. The DQA1*0501 allele was found to be in linkage disequillibrium with H LA-DR3, DR11, and DR14. This explains the lack of association with the allele alone, and the evident strong association of SLE with the [HLA-DR3-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201] and [HLA-DR1-DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501] haplotypes. It was also found a significant decrease (protection) of the [HLA-DR8-DQA1*0401-DQB1*0402] haplotype which is known to be a characteristic haplotype among the indigenous population of Mexico. These data shows that the susceptibility to SLE in Mexicans is more strongly influenced by the MHC haplotypes than by single alleles. The suggestion that these genes do not act alone but in combination, makes the identification of haplotypes mandatory. PMID:9808402

  6. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, A.R. Center for Blood Research, Boston, MA American Red Cross Blood Services-Northeast Region, Dedham, MA ); Wagner, R.; Khatri, K.; Notani, G.; Awdeh, Z.; Alper, C.A. ); Yunis, E.J. American Red Cross Blood Services-Northeast Region, Dedham, MA )

    1991-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype (HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8) or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) halotypes in 25 non-Jewish PV patients, DR4, DQw8 was found in 12 of the patients and DRw6, DQw5 was found in 15. Only 3 patients had neither. The non-Jewish patients were of more Southern European extraction than our controls. This suggests that there are two major MHC susceptibility alleles in American patients with PV. The more ancient apparently arose on a haplotype in the Jews, HLA-B38(35), SC21(SC31), DR4, DQw8, and spread to other populations largely as D-region segments. The other arose in or near Italy on the haplotype HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5 amd has also partially fragmented so that many patients carry only DRw14, DQw5. The available data do not permit the specific localization of either the DR4, DQw8-or the DRw14, DQw5-linked susceptibility genes.

  7. The distribution of active RNA polymerase II along the transcribed region is gene-specific and controlled by elongation factors

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gil, Alfonso; García-Martínez, José; Pelechano, Vicent; Muñoz-Centeno, María de la Cruz; Geli, Vincent; Pérez-Ortín, José E.; Chávez, Sebastián

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the intragenic profiles of active transcription, we determined the relative levels of active RNA polymerase II present at the 3?- and 5?-ends of 261 yeast genes by run-on. The results obtained indicate that the 3?/5? run-on ratio varies among the genes studied by over 12 log2 units. This ratio seems to be an intrinsic characteristic of each transcriptional unit and does not significantly correlate with gene length, G + C content or level of expression. The correlation between the 3?/5? RNA polymerase II ratios measured by run-on and those obtained by chromatin immunoprecipitation is poor, although the genes encoding ribosomal proteins present exceptionally low ratios in both cases. We detected a subset of elongation-related factors that are important for maintaining the wild-type profiles of active transcription, including DSIF, Mediator, factors related to the methylation of histone H3-lysine 4, the Bur CDK and the RNA polymerase II subunit Rpb9. We conducted a more detailed investigation of the alterations caused by rpb9? to find that Rpb9 contributes to the intragenic profiles of active transcription by influencing the probability of arrest of RNA polymerase II. PMID:20385590

  8. IGF TYPE II RECEPTOR GENE EXPRESSION IN GRANULOSA AND THECA CELLS OF CATTLE SELECTED FOR TWIN OVULATIONS AND BIRTHS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regulation of multiple ovulations in monotocous species such as cattle is not well understood. Therefore, gene expression of the IGF type II receptor (IGF2R) and LH receptor (LHR) in granulosa (GC) and theca (TC) cells as well as estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) levels in follicular fluid (FF) ...

  9. Gene expression and biological processes influenced by deletion of Stat3 in pulmonary type II epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Ikegami, Machiko; Wang, Yanhua; Matsuzaki, Yohei; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2007-01-01

    Background The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mediates gene expression in response to numerous growth factors and cytokines, playing an important role in many cellular processes. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which Stat3 influences gene expression in the lung, the effect of pulmonary epithelial cell specific deletion of Stat3 on genome wide mRNA expression profiling was assessed. Differentially expressed genes were identified from Affymetrix Murine GeneChips analysis and subjected to gene ontology classification, promoter analysis, pathway mapping and literature mining. Results Total of 791 mRNAs were significantly increased and 314 mRNAs were decreased in response to the deletion of Stat3?/? in the lung. STAT is the most enriched cis-elements in the promoter regions of those differentially expressed genes. Deletion of Stat3 induced genes influencing protein metabolism, transport, chemotaxis and apoptosis and decreased the expression of genes mediating lipid synthesis and metabolism. Expression of Srebf1 and 2, genes encoding key regulators of fatty acid and steroid biosynthesis, was decreased in type II cells from the Stat3?/? mice, consistent with the observation that lung surfactant phospholipids content was decreased. Stat3 influenced both pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways that determine cell death or survival. Akt, a potential transcriptional target of Stat3, was identified as an important participant in Stat3 mediated pathways including Jak-Stat signaling, apoptosis, Mapk signaling, cholesterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Conclusion Deletion of Stat3 from type II epithelial cells altered the expression of genes regulating diverse cellular processes, including cell growth, apoptosis and lipid metabolism. Pathway analysis indicates that STAT3 regulates cellular homeostasis through a complex regulatory network that likely enhances alveolar epithelial cell survival and surfactant/lipid synthesis, necessary for the protection of the lung during injury. PMID:18070348

  10. Characterization of a novel mucopolysaccharidosis type II mouse model and recombinant AAV2/8 vector-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung-Chul; Park, Eun-Sook; Choi, Eun Nam; Kim, Chi Hwa; Kim, Su Jin; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2010-07-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II; Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked inherited disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), which results in the lysosomal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) such as dermatan and heparan sulfate. Here, we report the generation of IDS knockout mice, a model of human MPS II, and an analysis of the resulting phenotype. We also evaluated the effect of gene therapy with a pseudotyped, recombinant adeno-associated virus 2/8 vector encoding the human IDS gene (rAAV-hIDS) in IDS-deficient mice. IDS activity and GAG levels were measured in serum and tissues after therapy. Gene therapy completely restored IDS activity in plasma and tissue of the knockout mice. The rescued enzymatic activity completely cleared the accumulated GAGs in all the tissues analyzed. This model can be used to explore the therapeutic potential of IDS replacement and other strategies for the treatment of MPS II. Additionally, AAV2/8 vectors have promising future clinical applications for the treatment of patients with MPS II. PMID:20652491

  11. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2015-03-30

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  12. RNA polymerase II pauses at the 5 prime end of the transcriptionally induced Drosophila hsp70 gene

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, T.; Lis, J.T. )

    1991-10-01

    An RNA polymerase II molecule is associated with the 5{prime} end of the Drosophila melanogaster hsp70 gene under non-heat shock conditions. This polymerase is engaged in transcription but has paused, or arrested, after synthesizing about 25 nucleotides. Resumption of elongation by this paused polymerase appears to be the rate-limiting step in hsp70 transcription in uninduced cells. Here the authors report results of nuclear run-on assays that measure the distribution of elongating and paused RNA polymerase molecules on the hsp70 gene in induced cells. Pausing of polymerase was detected at the 5{prime} end of hsp70 was transcribed approximately five times during the 25-min heat shock that they used. Therefore, once the hsp70 gene is induced to an intermediate level, initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II remains more rapid than the resumption of elongation by a paused polymerase molecule.

  13. Feature Selection and Classification of MAQC-II Breast Cancer and Multiple Myeloma Microarray Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingzhong; Sung, Andrew H.; Chen, Zhongxue; Liu, Jianzhong; Huang, Xudong; Deng, Youping

    2009-01-01

    Microarray data has a high dimension of variables but available datasets usually have only a small number of samples, thereby making the study of such datasets interesting and challenging. In the task of analyzing microarray data for the purpose of, e.g., predicting gene-disease association, feature selection is very important because it provides a way to handle the high dimensionality by exploiting information redundancy induced by associations among genetic markers. Judicious feature selection in microarray data analysis can result in significant reduction of cost while maintaining or improving the classification or prediction accuracy of learning machines that are employed to sort out the datasets. In this paper, we propose a gene selection method called Recursive Feature Addition (RFA), which combines supervised learning and statistical similarity measures. We compare our method with the following gene selection methods: Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination (SVMRFE)Leave-One-Out Calculation Sequential Forward Selection (LOOCSFS)Gradient based Leave-one-out Gene Selection (GLGS) To evaluate the performance of these gene selection methods, we employ several popular learning classifiers on the MicroArray Quality Control phase II on predictive modeling (MAQC-II) breast cancer dataset and the MAQC-II multiple myeloma dataset. Experimental results show that gene selection is strictly paired with learning classifier. Overall, our approach outperforms other compared methods. The biological functional analysis based on the MAQC-II breast cancer dataset convinced us to apply our method for phenotype prediction. Additionally, learning classifiers also play important roles in the classification of microarray data and our experimental results indicate that the Nearest Mean Scale Classifier (NMSC) is a good choice due to its prediction reliability and its stability across the three performance measurements: Testing accuracy, MCC values, and AUC errors. PMID:20011240

  14. Incomplete synthesis of N-glycans in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II caused by a defect in the gene encoding. alpha. -mannosidase II

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.N.; Masri, K.A. ); Dell, A. ); Luzzatto, L. ); Moremen, K.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with a positive acidified-serum-lysis test (HEMPAS), is a genetic anemia in humans inherited by an autosomally recessive mode. The enzyme defect in most HEMPAS patients has previously been proposed as a lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, resulting in a lack of polylactosamine on proteins and leading to the accumulation of polylactosaminyl lipids. A recent HEMPAS case, G.C., has now been analyzed by cell-surface labeling, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of glycopeptides, and activity assay of glycosylation enzymes. Significantly decreased glycosylation of polylactosaminoglycan proteins and incompletely processed asparagine-linked oligosaccharides were detected in the erythrocyte membranes of G.C. These results suggest that G.C. cells contain a mutation in {alpha}-ManII-encoding gene that results in inefficient expression of {alpha}-ManII mRNA, either through reduced transcription or message instability. This report demonstrates that HEMPAS is caused by a defective gene encoding an enzyme necessary for the synthesis of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides.

  15. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Heleen M; Bünger, Meike; de Groot, Philip J; van der Meijde, Jolanda; Hooiveld, Guido JEJ; Müller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPAR? may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1) and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1). Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2), formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1), or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8). Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPAR?-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a) increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b) increased cholesterol secretion, c) increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d) reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance for e.g. pre-surgery regimen of patients. PMID:17683626

  16. Three Classes of Plasmid (47–63 kb) Carry the Type B Neurotoxin Gene Cluster of Group II Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Austin, John W.; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Corbett, Cindi; Peck, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis of 26 strains of Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B4 showed that 23 strains carried their neurotoxin gene cluster on a 47–63 kb plasmid (three strains lacked any hybridization signal for the neurotoxin gene, presumably having lost their plasmid). Unexpectedly, no neurotoxin genes were found on the chromosome. This apparent constraint on neurotoxin gene transfer to the chromosome stands in marked contrast to Group I C. botulinum, in which neurotoxin gene clusters are routinely found in both locations. The three main classes of type B4 plasmid identified in this study shared different regions of homology, but were unrelated to any Group I or Group III plasmid. An important evolutionary aspect firmly links plasmid class to geographical origin, with one class apparently dominant in marine environments, whereas a second class is dominant in European terrestrial environments. A third class of plasmid is a hybrid between the other two other classes, providing evidence for contact between these seemingly geographically separated populations. Mobility via conjugation has been previously demonstrated for the type B4 plasmid of strain Eklund 17B, and similar genes associated with conjugation are present in all type B4 plasmids now described. A plasmid toxin–antitoxin system pemI gene located close to the neurotoxin gene cluster and conserved in each type B4 plasmid class may be important in understanding the mechanism which regulates this unique and unexpected bias toward plasmid-borne neurotoxin genes in Group II C. botulinum type B4. PMID:25079343

  17. merA gene expression in aquatic environments measured by mRNA production and Hg(II) volatilization.

    PubMed Central

    Nazaret, S; Jeffrey, W H; Saouter, E; Von Haven, R; Barkay, T

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of merA gene expression (specifying the enzyme mercuric reductase) to mercury volatilization in aquatic microbial communities was investigated with samples collected at a mercury-contaminated freshwater pond, Reality Lake, in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Levels of merA mRNA transcripts and the rate of inorganic mercury [Hg(II)] volatilization were related to the concentration of mercury in the water and to heterotrophic activity in field samples and laboratory incubations of pond water in which microbial heterotrophic activity and Hg(II) concentration were manipulated. Levels of merA-specific mRNA and Hg(II) volatilization were influenced more by microbial metabolic activity than by the concentration of mercury. merA-specific transcripts were detected in some samples which did not reduce Hg(II), suggesting that rates of mercury volatilization in environmental samples may not always be proportional to merA expression. PMID:7527625

  18. Exonuclease III and the catalase hydroperoxidase II in Escherichia coli are both regulated by the katF gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Sak, B.D.; Eisenstark, A.; Touati, D.

    1989-05-01

    The levels of both exonuclease III (exo III, product of xthA) and hydroperoxidase II (HP-II, product of katE) activity in Escherichia coli were influenced by a functional katF gene. The katF gene product is also necessary for synthesis of HP-II. Mutations in either katF or xthA, but not katE, result in sensitivity to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and near-UV (300-400 nm) radiation. Exo III, encoded by the xthA locus, recognizes and removes nucleoside 5'-monophosphates near apurinic and apyrimidinic sites in damaged DNA. Extracts of katF mutant strains had little detectable exo III activity. When a katF+ plasmid was introduced into the katF mutant, exo III activity exceeded wild-type levels. We propose that the katF gene is a trans-acting positive regulator of exo III and HP-II enzymes, both of which are involved in cellular recovery from oxidative damage.

  19. Regulatory elements and DNA-binding proteins mediating transcription from the chicken very-low-density apolipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed

    Beekman, J M; Wijnholds, J; Schippers, I J; Pot, W; Gruber, M; Ab, G

    1991-10-11

    The chicken Very-Low-Density Apolipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene is specifically expressed in liver in response to estrogen. In this study, we performed a functional analysis of the 300-base pair region immediately 5' to the gene by gene transfer of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) constructs into chicken embryonic hepatocytes (CEH). Two estrogen response elements (EREs) could be distinguished which together form a potent estrogen response unit. Stimulation of transient expression by co-transfection with a plasmid expressing rat C/EBP confirmed that a similar protein in chicken liver may be involved in apoVLDL II transcription. In vitro DNaseI footprinting and band-shift analysis with liver, oviduct and spleen nuclear extract revealed the tissue distribution of the proteins binding to the promoter region. A liver-specific protein bound to multiple sites of which some resembled the recognition sequence of the CCAAT/Enhancer binding protein, C/EBP. Of the other proteins binding to the apoVLDL II promoter, one was identified as the liver-specific LF-A1 by mobility shift analysis, using purified bovine LF-A1, and another as the general COUP-transcription factor, using an antiserum against the human COUP-TF. PMID:1923821

  20. Regulatory elements and DNA-binding proteins mediating transcription from the chicken very-low-density apolipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed Central

    Beekman, J M; Wijnholds, J; Schippers, I J; Pot, W; Gruber, M; Ab, G

    1991-01-01

    The chicken Very-Low-Density Apolipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene is specifically expressed in liver in response to estrogen. In this study, we performed a functional analysis of the 300-base pair region immediately 5' to the gene by gene transfer of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) constructs into chicken embryonic hepatocytes (CEH). Two estrogen response elements (EREs) could be distinguished which together form a potent estrogen response unit. Stimulation of transient expression by co-transfection with a plasmid expressing rat C/EBP confirmed that a similar protein in chicken liver may be involved in apoVLDL II transcription. In vitro DNaseI footprinting and band-shift analysis with liver, oviduct and spleen nuclear extract revealed the tissue distribution of the proteins binding to the promoter region. A liver-specific protein bound to multiple sites of which some resembled the recognition sequence of the CCAAT/Enhancer binding protein, C/EBP. Of the other proteins binding to the apoVLDL II promoter, one was identified as the liver-specific LF-A1 by mobility shift analysis, using purified bovine LF-A1, and another as the general COUP-transcription factor, using an antiserum against the human COUP-TF. Images PMID:1923821

  1. Assignment of genes encoding metallothioneins I and II to Chinese hamster chromosomes 3. Evidence for the role of chromosome rearrangement in gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Stallings, R.L.; Munk, A.C.; Longmire, J.L.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.

    1984-12-01

    Cadmium resistant (Cd/sup r/) variants with coordinately amplified metallothionein I and II (MTI and MTII) genes have been derived from both Chinese hamster ovary and near-euploid Chinese hamster cell lines. Cytogenetic analyses of Cd/sup r/ variants consistently revealed breakage and rearrangement involving chromosome 3p. In situ hybridization with Chinese hamster MT-encoding cDNA probe localized amplified MT gene sequences near the translocation breakpoint involving chromosome 3p. These observations suggested that both functionally related, isometallothionein loci are linked on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. Southern blot analyses of DNAs isolated from a panel of Chinese hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids which segregate hamster chromosomes confirmed that both MTI and MTII are located on chromosome 3. The authors speculate that rearrangement of chromosome 3p could be causally involved with the amplification of MT genes in Cd/sup r/ hamster cell lines. 34 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  2. Nuclease-hypersensitive sites in chromatin of the estrogen-inducible apoVLDL II gene of chicken.

    PubMed

    Kok, K; Snippe, L; Ab, G; Gruber, M

    1985-07-25

    DNAseI-hypersensitive sites were localized in apoVLDL II chromatin from chicken. In the liver two sites at 1.75 and 1.0 kb upstream from the cap-site are present before the gene is activated. After induction by estradiol a number of additional sites appear, three in the promotor region of the gene, one within the coding region and two behind the poly-A signal. These sites disappear when the expression of the gene is shut off upon estradiol withdrawal. All sites appear to be tissue-specific in that they are not found in other tissues of the rooster. However, in oviduct of the laying hen we find a hypersensitive site at 1.6 kb in front of the gene. PMID:4022779

  3. Nuclease-hypersensitive sites in chromatin of the estrogen-inducible apoVLDL II gene of chicken.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, K; Snippe, L; Ab, G; Gruber, M

    1985-01-01

    DNAseI-hypersensitive sites were localized in apoVLDL II chromatin from chicken. In the liver two sites at 1.75 and 1.0 kb upstream from the cap-site are present before the gene is activated. After induction by estradiol a number of additional sites appear, three in the promotor region of the gene, one within the coding region and two behind the poly-A signal. These sites disappear when the expression of the gene is shut off upon estradiol withdrawal. All sites appear to be tissue-specific in that they are not found in other tissues of the rooster. However, in oviduct of the laying hen we find a hypersensitive site at 1.6 kb in front of the gene. Images PMID:4022779

  4. Functional analysis of the class II hydrophobin gene HFB2-6 from the biocontrol agent Trichoderma asperellum ACCC30536.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Mijiti, Gulijimila; Wang, Zhiying; Yu, Wenjing; Fan, Haijuan; Zhang, Rongshu; Liu, Zhihua

    2015-02-01

    A class II hydrophobin gene, HFB2-6, was cloned from Trichoderma asperellum ACCC30536 and its biocontrol function was studied. According to our previous transcriptome data, six of the eight class II hydrophobin genes were obviously differential expression in four inducing conditions, especially the gene HFB2-6. Moreover, HFB2-6 proven to be differentially transcribed under eight different treatments. HFB2-6 transcripts were up-regulated under 1% Alternaria alternata cell wall and 5% A. alternata fermentation liquid treatments, and by nutritional stress conditions, suggesting that HFB2-6 plays roles in interactions with both biotic and abiotic environmental conditions. HFB2-6 expression was down-regulated under 1% poplar leaf powder culture conditions, but its expression was up-regulated under 1% poplar root powder, indicating that HFB2-6 has a function in root colonization. Furthermore, the recombinant hydrophobin rHFB2-6 was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-HFB2-6 and purified from the recombinant strain. Genes related to both the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signal transduction pathways were up-regulated by interaction with renatured rHFB2-6. The ORCA3 (octadecanoid-derivative responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain) gene of the poplar jasmonic acid signal transduction pathway showed a peak expression of 4.48 times at 2 h, and the peak expression of PR1 (pathogenesis-related protein gene) in the salicylic acid signal transduction pathway was 4.58 times at 72 h. Two genes, MP (monopteros) and GH3.17 (auxin original response gene), in the auxin signal transduction pathway were also up-regulated after induction with rHFB2-6, indicating that rHFB2-6 can promote poplar growth and confer broad-spectrum resistance to pathogens. PMID:25644947

  5. Genetic connections among Turkic-speaking Iranian ethnic groups based on HLA class II gene diversity.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, S; Safi, S

    2013-12-01

    Iran is a linguistically heterogeneous nation where Persian, Turkic and Arabic are the three main language families spoken. Based on their linguistic properties, Qashqais, Turkmens and Azeris are Turkic-speaking people. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether any genetic relationship exists among the Turkic-speaking Iranian subpopulations based on HLA class II gene diversity. HLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles were identified by PCR-based methods in 100 Qashqais and 66 Turkmens, and the results were compared with our previously published HLA data for Azeris. Despite a number of allelic and haplotypic similarities, Qashqais, Turkmens and Azeris were not in the same clade of the phylogenetic tree. However, based on the results of principal coordinates analysis, they are grouped together with Kurds and Bakhtiaris. Contrary to their common linguistic features, the Turkic-speaking people of Iran are closer to other Iranian subpopulations than to the people of Turkey and central Asia. Overall, it seems that linguistic criteria alone are not able to determine the relationships among these populations, and a combination of different kinds of anthropological information should be used to determine their actual phylogenetic relationships. PMID:23745951

  6. Targeted gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor to alveolar type II epithelial cells reduces lung fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gazdhar, Amiq; Temuri, Almas; Knudsen, Lars; Gugger, Mathias; Schmid, Ralph A; Ochs, Matthias; Geiser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Inefficient alveolar wound repair contributes to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent growth factor for alveolar type II epithelial cells (AECII) and may improve repair and reduce fibrosis. We studied whether targeted gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII improves lung fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. A plasmid encoding human HGF expressed from the human surfactant protein C promoter (pSpC-hHGF) was designed, and extracorporeal electroporation-mediated gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII was performed 7 days after bleomycin-induced lung injury in the rat. Animals were killed 7 days after hHGF gene transfer. Electroporation-mediated HGF gene transfer resulted in HGF expression specifically in AECII at biologically relevant levels. HGF gene transfer reduced pulmonary fibrosis as assessed by histology, hydroxyproline determination, and design-based stereology compared with controls. Our results indicate that the antifibrotic effect of HGF is due in part to a reduction of transforming growth factor-?(1), modulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and reduction of extravascular fibrin deposition. We conclude that targeted HGF gene transfer specifically to AECII decreases bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and may therefore represent a novel cell-specific gene transfer technology to treat pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23134111

  7. Transcriptional Network Analysis Reveals that AT1 and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptors Are Both Involved in the Regulation of Genes Essential for Glioma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Fujita, André; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Iamashita, Priscila; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive primary brain tumors with high infiltrative potential. The expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors has been associated with poor prognosis in human astrocytomas, the most common type of glioma. In this study, we investigated the role of Angiotensin II in glioma malignancy through transcriptional profiling and network analysis of cultured C6 rat glioma cells exposed to Ang II and to inhibitors of its membrane receptor subtypes. C6 cells were treated with Ang II and specific antagonists of AT1 and AT2 receptors. Total RNA was isolated after three and six hours of Ang II treatment and analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology. Gene expression data was evaluated through transcriptional network modeling to identify how differentially expressed (DE) genes are connected to each other. Moreover, other genes co-expressing with the DE genes were considered in these analyses in order to support the identification of enriched functions and pathways. A hub-based network analysis showed that the most connected nodes in Ang II-related networks exert functions associated with cell proliferation, migration and invasion, key aspects for glioma progression. The subsequent functional enrichment analysis of these central genes highlighted their participation in signaling pathways that are frequently deregulated in gliomas such as ErbB, MAPK and p53. Noteworthy, either AT1 or AT2 inhibitions were able to down-regulate different sets of hub genes involved in protumoral functions, suggesting that both Ang II receptors could be therapeutic targets for intervention in glioma. Taken together, our results point out multiple actions of Ang II in glioma pathogenesis and reveal the participation of both Ang II receptors in the regulation of genes relevant for glioma progression. This study is the first one to provide systems-level molecular data for better understanding the protumoral effects of Ang II in the proliferative and infiltrative behavior of gliomas. PMID:25365520

  8. The role of the UTS2 gene polymorphisms and plasma Urotensin-II levels in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yumrutas, Onder; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Büyükhatipoglu, Hakan; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Bagis, Haydar; Cevik, M Ozgur; Kalender, M Emin; Eslik, Zeynep; Arslan, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy predominantly affecting women. To date, numerous numbers of studies were reported novel genetic contributors with diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential for the breast carcinogenesis. However, the role of urotensin-II in breast carcinogenesis has not been elucidated yet. Urotensin-II is a somatostatin-like cyclic tiny peptide identified by its potent vasoconstrictor activity. Soon after its discovery, its involvement in many disease states as well as its expression in various tissues including the tumors have been demonstrated. Moreover, there is strong evidence that suggest urotensin-II as the significant contributor of angiogenesis as well as cell proliferation and tumor biology. In this study, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to evaluate plasma levels of urotensin-II and Thr21Met and Ser89Asn polymorphisms of UTS2 gene in breast cancer patients. In the present case-control study, we noticed a significant decrease in the levels of urotensin-II protein in the plasma of the breast cancer patients (p?gene was associated with the risk of developing breast cancer (p??0.05). In addition, we demonstrated the gradual decreasing of urotensin-II protein levels from TT and TM to MM genotypes. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that urotensin-II could contribute to breast carcinogenesis and Thr21Met polymorphism can be an important risk factor in developing breast tumors. PMID:25604143

  9. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for aspartokinase II from a thermophilic methylotrophic Bacillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Schendel, F J; Flickinger, M C

    1992-01-01

    The structural gene coding for the lysine-sensitive aspartokinase II of the methylotrophic thermotolerant Bacillus sp. strain MGA3 was cloned from a genomic library by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotrophic mutant lacking all three aspartokinase isozymes. The nucleotide sequence of the entire 2.2-kb PstI fragment was determined, and a single open reading frame coding for the aspartokinase II enzyme was found. Aspartokinase II was shown to be an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer (M(r) 122,000) with the beta subunit (M(r) 18,000) encoded within the alpha subunit (M(r) 45,000) in the samea reading frame. The enzyme was purified, and the N-terminal sequences of the alpha and beta subunits were identical with those predicted from the gene sequences. The predicted amino acid sequence was 76% identical with the sequence of the Bacillus subtilis aspartokinase II. The transcription initiation site was located approximately 350 bp upstream of the translation start site, and putative promoter regions at -10 (TATGCT) and -35 (ATGACA) were identified. A 300-nucleotide intervening sequence between the transcription initiation and translational start sites suggests a possible attenuation mechanism for the regulation of transcription of this enzyme in the presence of lysine. Images PMID:1444390

  10. Timing of spoII gene expression relative to septum formation during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Gholamhoseinian, A; Piggot, P J

    1989-01-01

    spoII mutants formed heat-resistant spores when transformed with spo+ DNa near the start of sporulation. Many of the spores formed remained genetically spoII. It is deduced from this result and previous epistasis experiments that the spoII loci are transcribed before the spore septum is formed. PMID:2507532

  11. Timing of spoII gene expression relative to septum formation during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Gholamhoseinian, A; Piggot, P J

    1989-10-01

    spoII mutants formed heat-resistant spores when transformed with spo+ DNa near the start of sporulation. Many of the spores formed remained genetically spoII. It is deduced from this result and previous epistasis experiments that the spoII loci are transcribed before the spore septum is formed. PMID:2507532

  12. Angiotensin II type I receptor gene polymorphism: anthropometric and metabolic syndrome traits

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, M; Gaunt, T; Syddall, H; Cooper, C; Phillips, D; Ye, S; Day, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: The renin angiotensin system is important in the regulation of vascular tone and fluid and electrolyte balance. The angiotensin converting enzyme gene (ACE) genotype has been shown to affect exercise response and glucose load response dependent on birth weight. Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1) A1166C has previously been associated with the development of hypertension and coronary disease, but its metabolic effects have not been investigated. Method: AGTR1 A1166C was genotyped by allele specific PCR in 378 individuals from Hertfordshire, UK, who had been characterised for metabolic syndrome traits. Results: Genotype counts were: AA, 183; AC, 170; CC, 25, consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The CC genotype was associated with significantly lower body mass index (by 1.7 units) in men (p = 0.03), and the same magnitude effect in women with significant lower weight in both genders (p = 0.01), also lower waist circumference and waist-hip ratio (p = 0.01) in men, with a trend for lower waist circumference in women also. Additionally, the CC genotype and/or C allele was associated with lower fasting glucose and insulin, and 30 and 120 min glucose in men (respectively, p = 0.08, 0.04, 0.01, 0.06). Lower means of systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, cholesterol, and fasting triglyceride were also observed for the CC genotype in both genders though these were not statistically significant. Conclusions: The AGTR1 1166 CC genotype appears to predispose to favourable anthropometric and metabolic traits, relative to cardiovascular risk. PMID:15863668

  13. Attenuation of corneal myofibroblast development through nanoparticle-mediated soluble transforming growth factor-? type II receptor (sTGF?RII) gene transfer

    E-print Network

    Sharma, Ajay

    Purpose: To explore (i) the potential of polyethylenimine (PEI)-DNA nanoparticles as a vector for delivering genes into human corneal fibroblasts, and (ii) whether the nanoparticle-mediated soluble extracellular domain of ...

  14. Human Cytomegalovirus pUL79 Is an Elongation Factor of RNA Polymerase II for Viral Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Yi-Chieh; Campbell, Jessica A.; Lenschow, Deborah J.; Yu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have identified a unique mechanism in which human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) protein pUL79 acts as an elongation factor to direct cellular RNA polymerase II for viral transcription during late times of infection. We and others previously reported that pUL79 and its homologues are required for viral transcript accumulation after viral DNA synthesis. We hypothesized that pUL79 represented a unique mechanism to regulate viral transcription at late times during HCMV infection. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the proteome associated with pUL79 during virus infection by mass spectrometry. We identified both cellular transcriptional factors, including multiple RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) subunits, and novel viral transactivators, including pUL87 and pUL95, as protein binding partners of pUL79. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) followed by immunoblot analysis confirmed the pUL79-RNAP II interaction, and this interaction was independent of any other viral proteins. Using a recombinant HCMV virus where pUL79 protein is conditionally regulated by a protein destabilization domain ddFKBP, we showed that this interaction did not alter the total levels of RNAP II or its recruitment to viral late promoters. Furthermore, pUL79 did not alter the phosphorylation profiles of the RNAP II C-terminal domain, which was critical for transcriptional regulation. Rather, a nuclear run-on assay indicated that, in the absence of pUL79, RNAP II failed to elongate and stalled on the viral DNA. pUL79-dependent RNAP II elongation was required for transcription from all three kinetic classes of viral genes (i.e. immediate-early, early, and late) at late times during virus infection. In contrast, host gene transcription during HCMV infection was independent of pUL79. In summary, we have identified a novel viral mechanism by which pUL79, and potentially other viral factors, regulates the rate of RNAP II transcription machinery on viral transcription during late stages of HCMV infection. PMID:25166009

  15. RNA pol II transcript abundance controls condensin accumulation at mitotically up-regulated and heat-shock-inducible genes in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Norihiko; Sajiki, Kenichi; Xu, Xingya; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Arakawa, Orie; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Condensin plays fundamental roles in chromosome dynamics. In this study, we determined the binding sites of condensin on fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) chromosomes at the level of nucleotide sequences using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq). We found that condensin binds to RNA polymerase I-, II- and III-transcribed genes during both mitosis and interphase, and we focused on pol II constitutive and inducible genes. Accumulation sites for condensin are distinct from those of cohesin and DNA topoisomerase II. Using cell cycle stage and heat-shock-inducible genes, we show that pol II-mediated transcripts cause condensin accumulation. First, condensin's enrichment on mitotically activated genes was abolished by deleting the sep1+ gene that encodes an M-phase-specific forkhead transcription factor. Second, by raising the temperature, condensin accumulation was rapidly induced at heat-shock protein genes in interphase and even during mid-mitosis. In interphase, condensin accumulates preferentially during the postreplicative phase. Pol II-mediated transcription was neither repressed nor activated by condensin, as levels of transcripts per se did not change when mutant condensin failed to associate with chromosomal DNA. However, massive chromosome missegregation occurred, suggesting that abundant pol II transcription may require active condensin before proper chromosome segregation. PMID:25847133

  16. Genomic instability in the type II TGF-beta1 receptor gene in atherosclerotic and restenotic vascular cells.

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, T A; Du, B; Consigli, S; Szabo, P; Bray, P J; Hartner, L; Weksler, B B; Sanborn, T A; Bergman, G; Bush, H L

    1997-01-01

    Cells proliferating from human atherosclerotic lesions are resistant to the antiproliferative effect of TGF-beta1, a key factor in wound repair. DNA from human atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions was used to test the hypothesis that microsatellite instability leads to specific loss of the Type II receptor for TGF-beta1 (TbetaR-II), causing acquired resistance to TGF-beta1. High fidelity PCR and restriction analysis was adapted to analyze deletions in an A10 microsatellite within TbetaR-II. DNA from lesions, and cells grown from lesions, showed acquired 1 and 2 bp deletions in TbetaR-II, while microsatellites in the hMSH3 and hMSH6 genes, and hypermutable regions of p53 were unaffected. Sequencing confirmed that these deletions occurred principally in the replication error-prone A10 microsatellite region, though nonmicrosatellite mutations were observed. The mutations could be identified within specific patches of the lesion, while the surrounding tissue, or unaffected arteries, exhibited the wild-type genotype. This microsatellite deletion causes frameshift loss of receptor function, and thus, resistance to the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of TGF-beta1. We propose that microsatellite instability in TbetaR-II disables growth inhibitory pathways, allowing monoclonal selection of a disease-prone cell type within some vascular lesions. PMID:9410894

  17. Comprehensive analysis of MHC class II genes in teleost fish genomes reveals dispensability of the peptide-loading DM system in a large part of vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules play an essential role in presenting peptide antigens to CD4+ T lymphocytes in the acquired immune system. The non-classical class II DM molecule, HLA-DM in the case of humans, possesses critical function in assisting the classical MHC class II molecules for proper peptide loading and is highly conserved in tetrapod species. Although the absence of DM-like genes in teleost fish has been speculated based on the results of homology searches, it has not been definitively clear whether the DM system is truly specific for tetrapods or not. To obtain a clear answer, we comprehensively searched class II genes in representative teleost fish genomes and analyzed those genes regarding the critical functional features required for the DM system. Results We discovered a novel ancient class II group (DE) in teleost fish and classified teleost fish class II genes into three major groups (DA, DB and DE). Based on several criteria, we investigated the classical/non-classical nature of various class II genes and showed that only one of three groups (DA) exhibits classical-type characteristics. Analyses of predicted class II molecules revealed that the critical tryptophan residue required for a classical class II molecule in the DM system could be found only in some non-classical but not in classical-type class II molecules of teleost fish. Conclusions Teleost fish, a major group of vertebrates, do not possess the DM system for the classical class II peptide-loading and this sophisticated system has specially evolved in the tetrapod lineage. PMID:24279922

  18. Chromatin features, RNA polymerase II and the comparative expression of lens genes encoding crystallins, transcription factors, and autophagy mediators

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Rockowitz, Shira; Chauss, Daniel; Wang, Ping; Kantorow, Marc; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Gene expression correlates with local chromatin structure. Our studies have mapped histone post-translational modifications, RNA polymerase II (pol II), and transcription factor Pax6 in lens chromatin. These data represent the first genome-wide insights into the relationship between lens chromatin structure and lens transcriptomes and serve as an excellent source for additional data analysis and refinement. The principal lens proteins, the crystallins, are encoded by predominantly expressed mRNAs; however, the regulatory mechanisms underlying their high expression in the lens remain poorly understood. Methods The formaldehyde-assisted identification of regulatory regions (FAIRE-Seq) was employed to analyze newborn lens chromatin. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data published earlier (GSE66961) have been used to assist in FAIRE-seq data interpretation. RNA transcriptomes from murine lens epithelium, lens fibers, erythrocytes, forebrain, liver, neurons, and pancreas were compared to establish the gene expression levels of the most abundant mRNAs versus median gene expression across other differentiated cells. Results Normalized RNA expression data from multiple tissues show that crystallins rank among the most highly expressed genes in mammalian cells. These findings correlate with the extremely high abundance of pol II all across the crystallin loci, including crystallin genes clustered on chromosomes 1 and 5, as well as within regions of “open” chromatin, as identified by FAIRE-seq. The expression levels of mRNAs encoding DNA-binding transcription factors (e.g., Foxe3, Hsf4, Maf, Pax6, Prox1, Sox1, and Tfap2a) revealed that their transcripts form “clusters” of abundant mRNAs in either lens fibers or lens epithelium. The expression of three autophagy regulatory mRNAs, encoding Tfeb, FoxO1, and Hif1?, was found within a group of lens preferentially expressed transcription factors compared to the E12.5 forebrain. Conclusions This study reveals novel features of lens chromatin, including the remarkably high abundance of pol II at the crystallin loci that exhibit features of “open” chromatin. Hsf4 ranks among the most abundant fiber cell-preferred DNA-binding transcription factors. Notable transcripts, including Atf4, Ctcf, E2F4, Hey1, Hmgb1, Mycn, RXR?, Smad4, Sp1, and Taf1 (transcription factors) and Ctsd, Gabarapl1, and Park7 (autophagy regulators) have been identified with high levels of expression in lens fibers, which suggests specific roles in lens fiber cell terminal differentiation. PMID:26330747

  19. Mutations in the COL5A1 gene are causal in the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes I and II.

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, A; Nuytinck, L; Hausser, I; Anton-Lamprecht, I; Naeyaert, J M

    1997-01-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous connective-tissue disorder of which at least nine subtypes are recognized. Considerable clinical overlap exists between the EDS I and II subtypes, suggesting that both are allelic disorders. Recent evidence based on linkage and transgenic mice studies suggest that collagen V is causally involved in human EDS. Collagen V forms heterotypic fibrils with collagen I in many tissues and plays an important role in collagen I fibrillogenesis. We have identified a mutation in COL5A1, the gene encoding the pro(alpha)1(V) collagen chain, segregating with EDS I in a four-generation family. The mutation causes the substitution of the most 5' cysteine residue by a serine within a highly conserved sequence of the pro(alpha)1(V) C-propeptide domain and causes reduction of collagen V by preventing incorporation of the mutant pro(alpha)1(V) chains in the collagen V trimers. In addition, we have detected splicing defects in the COL5A1 gene in a patient with EDS I and in a family with EDS II. These findings confirm the causal role of collagen V in at least a subgroup of EDS I, prove that EDS I and II are allelic conditions, and represent a, so far, unique example of a human collagen disorder caused by substitution of a highly conserved cysteine residue in the C-propeptide domain of a fibrillar collagen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9042913

  20. Association between Estrogen Receptor-? Gene XbaI and PvuII Polymorphisms and Periodontitis Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Yuan-Yuan; Yuan, Rui-Xia; Zuo, Hong-Xia; Yan, Jin-Zhu; Niu, Yu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background. Certain studies have previously explored the association between the estrogen receptor-? (ER-?) gene polymorphisms and periodontitis susceptibility, although the current results are controversial. The present study, using meta-analysis, aimed to investigate the nature of the genetic susceptibility of the ER-? for developing periodontitis. Methods. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, CNKI, and Wanfang databases was conducted up to January 8, 2015. Statistical manipulation was performed using Stata version 13.0 software. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confident intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the association in five genetic models. Results. A total of 17 eligible case-control studies from seven identified publications consisting of nine studies for the XbaI polymorphism and eight studies for the PvuII polymorphism were included in the meta-analysis. We found elevated risk of periodontitis in XbaI XX genotype carriers. Moreover, subgroup analyses demonstrated increased risk for chronic periodontitis of XbaI XX genotype carriers, specifically in the Chinese Han female population. No significant association was observed between PvuII polymorphism and periodontitis. Conclusion. Current evidence indicated that the homozygote (XX) genotype of ER-? gene XbaI polymorphism, but not PvuII mutation, may increase the risk of chronic periodontitis, specifically in the Chinese Han female population. PMID:26688601

  1. Splitting Hares and Tortoises: A Classification of Neuronal Immediate Early Gene Transcription Based on Poised RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Ramendra N.; Dudek, Serena M.

    2013-01-01

    Immediate early transcription is an integral part of the neuronal response to environmental stimulation and serves many brain processes including development, learning, triggers of programmed cell death, and reaction to injury and drugs. Following a stimulus, neurons express a select few genes within a short period of time without undergoing de novo protein translation. Referred to as the ‘gateway to genetic response’, these immediate early genes (IEGs) are either expressed within a few minutes of stimulation or later within the hour. In neuronal IEGs that are expressed rapidly, productive elongation in response to neuronal activity is jump-started by constitutive transcription initiation together with RNA polymerase II stalling in the vicinity of the promoter. IEGs expressed later in the hour do not depend on this mechanism. On the basis of this Polymerase II poising, we propose that the immediate early genes can be grouped in two distinct classes: the rapid and the delayed IEGs. The possible biological relevance of these classes in neurons is discussed. PMID:23711585

  2. Use of the computer-retargeted group II intron RmInt1 of Sinorhizobium meliloti for gene targeting

    PubMed Central

    M García-Rodríguez, Fernando; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Teresa; Díaz-Prado, Vanessa; Toro, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Gene-targeting vectors derived from mobile group II introns capable of forming a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex containing excised intron lariat RNA and an intron-encoded protein (IEP) with reverse transcriptase (RT), maturase, and endonuclease (En) activities have been described. RmInt1 is an efficient mobile group II intron with an IEP lacking the En domain. We performed a comprehensive study of the rules governing RmInt1 target site recognition based on selection experiments with donor and recipient plasmid libraries, with randomization of the elements of the intron RNA involved in target recognition and the wild-type target site. The data obtained were used to develop a computer algorithm for identifying potential RmInt1 targets in any DNA sequence. Using this algorithm, we modified RmInt1 for the efficient recognition of DNA target sites at different locations in the Sinorhizobium meliloti chromosome. The retargeted RmInt1 integrated efficiently into the chromosome, regardless of the location of the target gene. Our results suggest that RmInt1 could be efficiently adapted for gene targeting. PMID:24646865

  3. Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type II: molecular analysis and expression of the SEC23B Gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II (CDAII), the most common form of CDA, is an autosomal recessive condition. CDAII diagnosis is based on invasive, expensive, and time consuming tests that are available only in specialized laboratories. The recent identification of SEC23B mutations as the cause of CDAII opens new possibilities for the molecular diagnosis of the disease. The aim of this study was to characterize molecular genomic SEC23B defects in 16 unrelated patients affected by CDAII and correlate the identified genetic alterations with SEC23B transcript and protein levels in erythroid precursors. Methods SEC23B was sequenced in 16 patients, their relatives and 100 control participants. SEC23B transcript level were studied by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in peripheral erythroid precursors and lymphocytes from the patients and healthy control participants. Sec23B protein content was analyzed by immunoblotting in samples of erythroblast cells from CDAII patients and healthy controls. Results All of the investigated cases carried SEC23B mutations on both alleles, with the exception of two patients in which a single heterozygous mutation was found. We identified 15 different SEC23B mutations, of which four represent novel mutations: p.Gln214Stop, p.Thr485Ala, p.Val637Gly, and p.Ser727Phe. The CDAII patients exhibited a 40-60% decrease of SEC23B mRNA levels in erythroid precursors when compared with the corresponding cell type from healthy participants. The largest decrease was observed in compound heterozygote patients with missense/nonsense mutations. In three patients, Sec23B protein levels were evaluated in erythroid precursors and found to be strictly correlated with the reduction observed at the transcript level. We also demonstrate that Sec23B mRNA expression levels in lymphocytes and erythroblasts are similar. Conclusions In this study, we identified four novel SEC23B mutations associated with CDAII disease. We also demonstrate that the genetic alteration results in a significant decrease of SEC23B transcript in erythroid precursors. Similar down-regulation was observed in peripheral lymphocytes, suggesting that the use of these cells might be sufficient in the identification of Sec23B gene alterations. Finally, we demonstrate that decreased Sec23B protein levels in erythroid precursors correlate with down-regulation of the SEC23B mRNA transcript. PMID:22208203

  4. Mutational spectrum in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II: identification of 19 novel variants in SEC23B gene.

    PubMed

    Russo, Roberta; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Asci, Roberta; Gambale, Antonella; Perrotta, Silverio; Ramenghi, Ugo; Forni, Gian Luca; Uygun, Vedat; Delaunay, Jean; Iolascon, Achille

    2010-12-01

    SEC23B gene encodes an essential component of the coat protein complex II (COPII)-coated vesicles. Mutations in this gene cause the vast majority the congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Type II (CDA II), a rare disorder resulting from impaired erythropoiesis. Here, we investigated 28 CDA II patients from 21 unrelated families enrolled in the CDA II International Registry. Overall, we found 19 novel variants [c.2270 A>C p.H757P; c.2149-2 A>G; c.1109+1 G>A; c.387(delG) p.L129LfsX26; c.1858 A>G p.M620V; c.1832 G>C p.R611P; c.1735 T>A p.Y579N; c.1254 T>G p.I418M; c.1015 C>T p.R339X; c.1603 C>T p.R535X; c.1654 C>T p.L552F; c.1307 C>T p.S436L; c.279+3 A>G; c. 2150(delC) p.A717VfsX7; c.1733 T>C p.L578P; c.1109+5 G>A; c.221+31 A>G; c.367 C>T p.R123X; c.1857_1859delCAT; p.I619del] in the homozygous or the compound heterozygous state. Homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for two nonsense mutations was never found. In four cases the sequencing analysis has failed to find two mutations. To discuss the putative functional consequences of missense mutations, computational analysis and sequence alignment were performed. Our data underscore the high allelic heterogeneity of CDA II, as the most of SEC23B variations are inherited as private mutations. In this mutation update, we also provided a tool to improve and facilitate the molecular diagnosis of CDA II by defining the frequency of mutations in each exon. PMID:20941788

  5. Estrogen-inducible and liver-specific expression of the chicken Very Low Density Apolipoprotein II gene locus in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wijnholds, J; Philipsen, S; Pruzina, S; Fraser, P; Grosveld, F; Ab, G

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the chicken Very Low Density Apolipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene locus in transgenic mice. A DNA fragment composed of the transcribed region, 16 kb of 5' flanking and 400 bp of 3' flanking sequences contained all the information sufficient for estrogen-inducible, liver-specific expression of the apoVLDL II gene. The far-upstream region contains a Negative Regulating Element coinciding with a DNaseI-hypersensitive site at -11 kb. In transgenic mice, the NRE at -11 kb is used for downregulating the expression to a lower maximum level. The NRE might be used for modulating apoVLDL II gene expression, and may be involved in the rapid shut-down of the expression after hormone removal. Images PMID:8479914

  6. Estrogen-inducible and liver-specific expression of the chicken Very Low Density Apolipoprotein II gene locus in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wijnholds, J; Philipsen, S; Pruzina, S; Fraser, P; Grosveld, F; Ab, G

    1993-04-11

    We have examined the chicken Very Low Density Apolipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene locus in transgenic mice. A DNA fragment composed of the transcribed region, 16 kb of 5' flanking and 400 bp of 3' flanking sequences contained all the information sufficient for estrogen-inducible, liver-specific expression of the apoVLDL II gene. The far-upstream region contains a Negative Regulating Element coinciding with a DNaseI-hypersensitive site at -11 kb. In transgenic mice, the NRE at -11 kb is used for downregulating the expression to a lower maximum level. The NRE might be used for modulating apoVLDL II gene expression, and may be involved in the rapid shut-down of the expression after hormone removal. PMID:8479914

  7. Gene expression of group II phospholipase A2 in intestine in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Haapamäki, M M; Grönroos, J M; Nurmi, H; Alanen, K; Kallajoki, M; Nevalainen, T J

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) has an essential role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. AIMS: This study aimed at identifying cells in intestinal and mesenteric tissue samples that might express group II phospholipase A2 (PLA2-II) at the mRNA and enzyme protein levels in patients with ulcerative colitis. PATIENTS AND TISSUE SAMPLES: Tissue samples were obtained from the intestine, mesentery, skeletal muscle, and subcutaneous fat of six patients who underwent panproctocolectomy for severe ulcerative colitis. Mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained from the colon of another group of six patients with ulcerative colitis during routine diagnostic colonoscopies. Tissues from six patients without intestinal inflammatory diseases served as controls. METHODS: Tissue samples were studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry for PLA2-II enzyme protein, and in situ hybridisation and northern hybridisation for PLA2-II mRNA. RESULTS: PLA2-II mRNA and PLA2-II protein were detected in metaplastic Paneth cells in six patients and in the columnar epithelial cells of colonic mucosa in four out of six patients with active ulcerative colitis. Positive findings were less numerous in patients with mild ulcerative colitis. Only two out of six control patients had a weak positive signal for PLA2-II mRNA and one of these two patients had a weak positive immunoreaction for PLA2-II in columnar epithelial cells in the colonic mucosa. None of the control patients had metaplastic Paneth cells. CONCLUSIONS: Metaplastic Paneth cells and colonic epithelial cells synthesise PLA2-II in ulcerative colitis. The activity of the PLA2-II synthesis seems to be related to the degree of inflammation in the diseased bowel. Images PMID:9155583

  8. Hypomorphic mutations of SEC23B gene account for mild phenotypes of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Roberta; Langella, Concetta; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Gambale, Antonella; Vitiello, Francesco; Vallefuoco, Fara; Ek, Torben; Yang, Elizabeth; Iolascon, Achille

    2013-01-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, a recessive disorder of erythroid differentiation, is due to mutations in SEC23B, a component of the core trafficking machinery COPII. In no case homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for nonsense mutation(s) was found. This study represents the first description of molecular mechanisms underlying SEC23B hypomorphic genotypes by the analysis of five novel mutations. Our findings suggest that reduction of SEC23B gene expression is not associated with CDA II severe clinical presentation; conversely, the combination of a hypomorphic allele with one functionally altered results in more severe phenotypes. We propose a mechanism of compensation SEC23A-mediated which justifies these observations. PMID:23453696

  9. Hypomorphic mutations of SEC23B gene account for mild phenotypes of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II.

    PubMed

    Russo, Roberta; Langella, Concetta; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Gambale, Antonella; Vitiello, Francesco; Vallefuoco, Fara; Ek, Torben; Yang, Elizabeth; Iolascon, Achille

    2013-06-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, a recessive disorder of erythroid differentiation, is due to mutations in SEC23B, a component of the core trafficking machinery COPII. In no case homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for nonsense mutation(s) was found. This study represents the first description of molecular mechanisms underlying SEC23B hypomorphic genotypes by the analysis of five novel mutations. Our findings suggest that reduction of SEC23B gene expression is not associated with CDA II severe clinical presentation; conversely, the combination of a hypomorphic allele with one functionally altered results in more severe phenotypes. We propose a mechanism of compensation SEC23A-mediated which justifies these observations. PMID:23453696

  10. Rate of elongation by RNA polymerase II is associated with specific gene features and epigenetic modifications

    PubMed Central

    Veloso, Artur; Kirkconnell, Killeen S.; Magnuson, Brian; Biewen, Benjamin; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Wilson, Thomas E.; Ljungman, Mats

    2014-01-01

    The rate of transcription elongation plays an important role in the timing of expression of full-length transcripts as well as in the regulation of alternative splicing. In this study, we coupled Bru-seq technology with 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole 1-?-D-ribofuranoside (DRB) to estimate the elongation rates of over 2000 individual genes in human cells. This technique, BruDRB-seq, revealed gene-specific differences in elongation rates with a median rate of around 1.5 kb/min. We found that genes with rapid elongation rates showed higher densities of H3K79me2 and H4K20me1 histone marks compared to slower elongating genes. Furthermore, high elongation rates had a positive correlation with gene length, low complexity DNA sequence, and distance from the nearest active transcription unit. Features that negatively correlated with elongation rate included the density of exons, long terminal repeats, GC content of the gene, and DNA methylation density in the bodies of genes. Our results suggest that some static gene features influence transcription elongation rates and that cells may alter elongation rates by epigenetic regulation. The BruDRB-seq technique offers new opportunities to interrogate mechanisms of regulation of transcription elongation. PMID:24714810

  11. Molecular characterization of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II genes in outbred pig populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune, disease and vaccine responses. Thus, understanding how SLA gene polymorphism affects immunity, especially in outbred pig populations with a diverse genetic background, requires accu...

  12. The Pathological Response to Anthracycline is Associated with Topoisomerase II? Gene Amplification in the HER2 Breast Cancer Subset

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Takashi; Sasaki, Takeshi; Tanabe, Mikiko; Narui, Kazutaka; Kida, Kumiko; Shimada, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Daisuke; Yamada, Akimitsu; Morita, Satoshi; Oba, Mari S.; Kawachi, Kae; Nozawa, Akinori; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Endo, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    Background HER2-positive breast cancer sensitivity to anthracyclines is enhanced when topoisomerase II? (TOP2A) is co-amplified under both adjuvant and metastatic settings. However, the relationship between anthracycline sensitivity and TOP2A amplification in HER2-positive breast cancers in neoadjuvant settings is not known. Methods The TOP2A gene status was examined by FISH in biopsies from 18 patients who received anthracycline and cyclophosphamide before surgery. Results The TOP2A gene was amplified in 6/17 patients and was significantly associated with pathological response to the chemotherapy regimen. Conclusions TOP2A amplification could predict anthracycline-sensitivity. Thus, the HER2/TOP2A co-amplified subtype may be effectively treated by anthracycline-containing regimens alone. PMID:25642443

  13. Frequent intragenic deletion of the P gene in Tanzanian patients with Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.; Fukai, K.; Holmes, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    Type II oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. OCA2, which results from mutations of the P gene, is the most frequent type of albinism in African and African-American patients. OCA2 is especially frequent in Tanzania, where it occurs with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,400. We have identified abnormalities of the P gene in each of 13 unrelated patients with OCA2 from Tanzania. One of these, a deletion of exon 7, is strongly predominant, accounting for {approximately}77% of mutant alleles in this group of patients. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Genetic transformation and gene expression in white pine (pinus strobus)

    SciTech Connect

    Minocha, R.

    1987-10-01

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to develop protocols for transformation of white pine (Pinus strobus) embryonic tissue; and (2) to analyze the regulation of foreign gene expression in Pinus strobus. A number of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains containing chimeric genes for neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII for kanamycin resistance) and chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) under the control of either a constitutive promoter (NOS-nopaline synthase) or light-inducible promoters (RuBisCO small subunit and chlorophyll a/b binding protein) were used. A variety of tissues from white pine seedlings and mature trees was used. The techniques for transformation were modified from those used for tobacco transformation. The results show that white pine tissue from young seedlings is high suitable for transformation by A. tumefaciens. Whereas the normal tissues are very sensitive to kanamycin, transformed callus was quite resistant to this antibiotic.

  15. Lipophilic tetranuclear ruthenium(II) complexes as two-photon luminescent tracking non-viral gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bole; Ouyang, Cheng; Qiu, Kangqiang; Zhao, Jing; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-02-23

    Fluorescence detection is the most effective tool for tracking gene delivery in living cells. To reduce photodamage and autofluorescence and to increase deep penetration into cells, choosing appropriate fluorophores that are capable of two-photon activation under irradiation in the NIR or IR regions is an effective approach. In this work, we have developed six tetranuclear ruthenium(II) complexes, GV1-6, and have studied their one- and two-photon luminescence properties. DNA interaction studies have demonstrated that GV2-6, bearing hydrophobic alkyl ether chains, show more efficient DNA condensing ability but lower DNA binding constants than GV1. However, the hydrophobic alkyl ether chains also enhance the DNA delivery ability of GV2-6 compared with that of GV1. More importantly, we have applied GV1-6 as non-viral gene vectors for tracking DNA delivery in living cells by one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopies. In two-photon microscopy, a high signal-to-noise contrast was achieved by irradiation with an 830?nm laser. This is the first example of the use of transition-metal complexes for two-photon luminescent tracking of the cellular pathways of gene delivery and as DNA carriers. Our work provides new insights into improving real-time tracking during gene delivery and transfection as well as important information for the design of multifunctional non-viral vectors. PMID:25597394

  16. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene) in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weicai; Bei, Yongjian; Li, Hanhua

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB) exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae), which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ? dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation. PMID:25629763

  17. Expanding our Understanding of Sequence-Function Relationships of Type II Polyketide Biosynthetic Gene Clusters: Bioinformatics-Guided Identification of Frankiamicin A from Frankia sp. EAN1pec

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Yackley, Benjamin J.; Greenberg, Jacob A.; Rogelj, Snezna; Melançon, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    A large and rapidly increasing number of unstudied “orphan” natural product biosynthetic gene clusters are being uncovered in sequenced microbial genomes. An important goal of modern natural products research is to be able to accurately predict natural product structures and biosynthetic pathways from these gene cluster sequences. This requires both development of bioinformatic methods for global analysis of these gene clusters and experimental characterization of select products produced by gene clusters with divergent sequence characteristics. Here, we conduct global bioinformatic analysis of all available type II polyketide gene cluster sequences and identify a conserved set of gene clusters with unique ketosynthase ?/? sequence characteristics in the genomes of Frankia species, a group of Actinobacteria with underexploited natural product biosynthetic potential. Through LC-MS profiling of extracts from several Frankia species grown under various conditions, we identified Frankia sp. EAN1pec as producing a compound with spectral characteristics consistent with the type II polyketide produced by this gene cluster. We isolated the compound, a pentangular polyketide which we named frankiamicin A, and elucidated its structure by NMR and labeled precursor feeding. We also propose biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for frankiamicin A based on comparative genomic analysis and literature precedent, and conduct bioactivity assays of the compound. Our findings provide new information linking this set of Frankia gene clusters with the compound they produce, and our approach has implications for accurate functional prediction of the many other type II polyketide clusters present in bacterial genomes. PMID:25837682

  18. Temporal Dissection of Rate Limiting Transcriptional Events Using Pol II ChIP and RNA Analysis of Adrenergic Stress Gene Activation.

    PubMed

    Morris, Daniel P; Lei, Beilei; Longo, Lawrence D; Bomsztyk, Karol; Schwinn, Debra A; Michelotti, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, increasing evidence supports mechanisms of co-transcriptional gene regulation and the generality of genetic control subsequent to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment. In this report, we use Pol II Chromatin Immunoprecipitation to investigate relationships between the mechanistic events controlling immediate early gene (IEG) activation following stimulation of the ?1a-Adrenergic Receptor expressed in rat-1 fibroblasts. We validate our Pol II ChIP assay by comparison to major transcriptional events assessable by microarray and PCR analysis of precursor and mature mRNA. Temporal analysis of Pol II density suggests that reduced proximal pausing often enhances gene expression and was essential for Nr4a3 expression. Nevertheless, for Nr4a3 and several other genes, proximal pausing delayed the time required for initiation of productive elongation, consistent with a role in ensuring transcriptional fidelity. Arrival of Pol II at the 3' cleavage site usually correlated with increased polyadenylated mRNA; however, for Nfil3 and probably Gprc5a expression was delayed and accompanied by apparent pre-mRNA degradation. Intragenic pausing not associated with polyadenylation was also found to regulate and delay Gprc5a expression. Temporal analysis of Nr4a3, Dusp5 and Nfil3 shows that transcription of native IEG genes can proceed at velocities of 3.5 to 4 kilobases/min immediately after activation. Of note, all of the genes studied here also used increased Pol II recruitment as an important regulator of expression. Nevertheless, the generality of co-transcriptional regulation during IEG activation suggests temporal and integrated analysis will often be necessary to distinguish causative from potential rate limiting mechanisms. PMID:26244980

  19. Temporal Dissection of Rate Limiting Transcriptional Events Using Pol II ChIP and RNA Analysis of Adrenergic Stress Gene Activation

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Daniel P.; Lei, Beilei; Longo, Lawrence D.; Bomsztyk, Karol; Schwinn, Debra A.; Michelotti, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, increasing evidence supports mechanisms of co-transcriptional gene regulation and the generality of genetic control subsequent to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) recruitment. In this report, we use Pol II Chromatin Immunoprecipitation to investigate relationships between the mechanistic events controlling immediate early gene (IEG) activation following stimulation of the ?1a-Adrenergic Receptor expressed in rat-1 fibroblasts. We validate our Pol II ChIP assay by comparison to major transcriptional events assessable by microarray and PCR analysis of precursor and mature mRNA. Temporal analysis of Pol II density suggests that reduced proximal pausing often enhances gene expression and was essential for Nr4a3 expression. Nevertheless, for Nr4a3 and several other genes, proximal pausing delayed the time required for initiation of productive elongation, consistent with a role in ensuring transcriptional fidelity. Arrival of Pol II at the 3’ cleavage site usually correlated with increased polyadenylated mRNA; however, for Nfil3 and probably Gprc5a expression was delayed and accompanied by apparent pre-mRNA degradation. Intragenic pausing not associated with polyadenylation was also found to regulate and delay Gprc5a expression. Temporal analysis of Nr4a3, Dusp5 and Nfil3 shows that transcription of native IEG genes can proceed at velocities of 3.5 to 4 kilobases/min immediately after activation. Of note, all of the genes studied here also used increased Pol II recruitment as an important regulator of expression. Nevertheless, the generality of co-transcriptional regulation during IEG activation suggests temporal and integrated analysis will often be necessary to distinguish causative from potential rate limiting mechanisms. PMID:26244980

  20. MHC class I and MHC class II DRB gene variability in wild and captive Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Ina; Sharma, Reeta; Goyal, Surendra Prakash; Mishra, Sudanshu; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2010-10-01

    Bengal tigers are highly endangered and knowledge on adaptive genetic variation can be essential for efficient conservation and management. Here we present the first assessment of allelic variation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class II DRB genes for wild and captive tigers from India. We amplified, cloned, and sequenced alpha-1 and alpha-2 domain of MHC class I and beta-1 domain of MHC class II DRB genes in 16 tiger specimens of different geographic origin. We detected high variability in peptide-binding sites, presumably resulting from positive selection. Tigers exhibit a low number of MHC DRB alleles, similar to other endangered big cats. Our initial assessment-admittedly with limited geographic coverage and sample size-did not reveal significant differences between captive and wild tigers with regard to MHC variability. In addition, we successfully amplified MHC DRB alleles from scat samples. Our characterization of tiger MHC alleles forms a basis for further in-depth analyses of MHC variability in this illustrative threatened mammal. PMID:20821315

  1. IGF-I, IGF-II, and Insulin Stimulate Different Gene Expression Responses through Binding to the IGF-I Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Versteyhe, Soetkin; Klaproth, Birgit; Borup, Rehannah; Palsgaard, Jane; Jensen, Maja; Gray, Steven G.; De Meyts, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and the insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II are closely related peptides important for regulation of metabolism, growth, differentiation, and development. The IGFs exert their main effects through the IGF-I receptor. Although the insulin receptor is the main physiological receptor for insulin, this peptide hormone can also bind at higher concentrations to the IGF-I receptor and exert effects through it. We used microarray gene expression profiling to investigate the gene expression regulated by IGF-I, IGF-II, and insulin after stimulation of the IGF-I receptor. Fibroblasts from mice, knockout for IGF-II and the IGF-II/cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor, and expressing functional IGF-I but no insulin receptors, were stimulated for 4?h with equipotent saturating concentrations of insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II. Each ligand specifically regulated a group of transcripts that was not regulated by the other two ligands. Many of the functions and pathways these regulated genes were involved in, were consistent with the known biological effects of these ligands. The differences in gene expression might therefore account for some of the different biological effects of insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II. This work adds to the evidence that not only the affinity of a ligand determines its biological response, but also its nature, even through the same receptor. PMID:23950756

  2. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} The sequences of -604 to -84 bp of the pUPII promoter contained the region of a putative negative cis-regulatory element. {yields} The core promoter was located in the 5F-1. {yields} Transcription factor HNF4 can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. {yields} These features of the pUPII promoter are fundamental to development of a target-specific vector. -- Abstract: Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)?Cys? zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C

    2013-05-01

    Proteins with a Zn(II)?Cys? domain, Cys-X?-Cys-X?-Cys-X????-Cys-X?-Cys-X???-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overview of this family of genes. Annotation of this gene family in most fungal genomes is still far from perfect and refined bioinformatic algorithms are urgently needed. Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic soil fungus that can produce the carcinogenic aflatoxin. It is the second leading causative agent of invasive aspergillosis. The 37-Mb genome of A. flavus is predicted to encode 12,000 proteins. Two and a half percent of the total proteins are estimated to contain the C6 domain, more than twofold greater than those estimated for yeast, which is about 1 %. The variability in the spacing between cysteines, C?-C? and C?-C?, in the zinc cluster enables classification of the domains into distinct subgroups, which are also well conserved in Aspergillus nidulans. Sixty-six percent (202/306) of the A. flavus C6 proteins contain a specific transcription factor domain, and 7 % contain a domain of unknown function, DUF3468. Two A. nidulans C6 proteins containing the DUF3468 are involved in asexual conidiation and another two in sexual differentiation. In the anamorphic A. flavus, a homolog of the latter lacks the C6 domain. A. flavus being heterothallic and reproducing mainly through conidiation appears to have lost some components involved in homothallic sexual development. Of the 55 predicted gene clusters thought to be involved in production of secondary metabolites, only about half have a C6-encoding gene in or near the gene clusters. The features revealed by the A. flavus C6 proteins likely are common for other ascomycete fungi. PMID:23563886

  4. Spatial and temporal expression patterns of diverse Pin-II proteinase inhibitor genes in Capsicum annuum Linn.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Giri, Ashok P; Kumar, Pavan; Gupta, Vidya S

    2009-08-01

    Pin-II type proteinase inhibitor (PI) genes were cloned from fruit and stem tissues of Capsicum annuum L. var Phule Jyoti using primers designed from reported CanPI gene sequence (AF039398). In total, 21 novel CanPIs, members of the Pin-II PI family, were identified in the study, with three isoforms of 1-inhibitory repeat domain (IRD), eight isoforms of 2-IRD, three isoforms of 3-IRD, five isoforms of 4-IRD and two partial CanPI sequences. Most of the sequences showed variation (2 to 20%) in the deduced AA sequences which were pronounced close to the reactive site loop. Expression patterns of CanPIs in the fruit and stem tissues of mature C. annuum plants were shown to vary qualitatively and quantitatively using semi-quantitative RT-PCR expression analysis. In the fruit tissue, CanPIs with different IRDs (from 1 to 4) were expressed simultaneously. In stem tissue, 1- and 2-IRD CanPIs were strongly expressed along moderate expression of 3- and 4-IRD genes. Analysis of CanPI protein activity showed a range of active forms across the tissues. CanPI expression was differentially up-regulated upon wounding and insect attack. Although infestation by aphids (Myzus persicae) and lepidopteran pests (Spodoptera litura) specifically induced 4-IRD CanPIs, virus-infected leaves did not affect CanPI expression. Analysis of CanPI protein activity indicated that the up-regulation in CanPI expression was not always correlated with increase in PI activity. Our results demonstrated that CanPI expression is regulated spatially, temporally as well as qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:19393726

  5. Loss of DNase II function in the gonad is associated with a higher expression of antimicrobial genes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsiang; Lai, Huey-Jen; Lin, Tai-Wei; Chen, Chang-Shi; Lo, Szecheng J

    2015-08-15

    Three waves of apoptosis shape the development of Caenorhabditis elegans. Although the exact roles of the three DNase II genes (nuc-1, crn-6 and crn-7), which are known to mediate degradation of apoptotic DNA, in the embryonic and larval phases of apoptosis have been characterized, the DNase II acting in the third wave of germ cell apoptosis remains undetermined. In the present study, we performed in vitro and in vivo assays on various mutant nematodes to demonstrate that NUC-1 and CRN-7, but not CRN-6, function in germ cell apoptosis. In addition, in situ DNA-break detection and anti-phosphorylated ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) staining illustrated the sequential and spatially regulated actions of NUC-1 and CRN-7, at the pachytene zone of the gonad and at the loop respectively. In line with the notion that UV-induced DNA fragment accumulation in the gonad activates innate immunity responses, we also found that loss of NUC-1 and CRN-7 lead to up-regulation of antimicrobial genes (abf-2, spp-1, nlp-29, cnc-2, and lys-7). Our observations suggest that an incomplete digestion of DNA fragments resulting from the absence of NUC-1 or CRN-7 in the gonad could induce the ERK signalling, consequently activating antimicrobial gene expression. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate for the first time that nuc-1 and crn-7 play a role in degrading apoptotic DNA in distinct sites of the gonad, and act as negative regulators of innate immunity in C. elegans. PMID:26251453

  6. Mediator, TATA-binding protein, and RNA polymerase II contribute to low histone occupancy at active gene promoters in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Suraiya A; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z; Rode, Kara A; Barber, Wesley T; Ellis, Laura C; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H

    2014-05-23

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. PMID:24727477

  7. Topoisomerase II? binding protein 1 c.*229C>T (rs115160714) gene polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Forma, Ewa; Wójcik-Krowiranda, Katarzyna; Jó?wiak, Pawe?; Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Bie?kiewicz, Andrzej; Bry?, Magdalena; Krze?lak, Anna

    2014-07-01

    TopBP1 (topoisomerase II? binding protein 1) protein is involved in DNA replication, DNA damage checkpoint response and transcriptional regulation. In this study we investigated whether alterations in the TopBP1 gene can influence the risk of endometrial cancer. We examined the association between five single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs185903567, rs116645643, rs115160714, rs116195487, and rs112843513) located in the 3'UTR region of the TopBP1 gene and endometrial cancer risk as well as allele-specific gene expression. One hundred twenty-one endometrial cancer patients were genotyped for these SNPs. Allele-specific TopBP1 mRNA and protein expressions were determined by real time PCR and western blotting methods, respectively. Only one SNP (rs115160714) showed an association with endometrial cancer. Compared to homozygous common allele carriers, heterozygous for the T variant had significantly increased risk of endometrial cancer [adjusted odds ratio (OR)?=?5.59, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.96-15.91, p?=?0.0003]. Mean TopBP1 mRNA and protein expression were higher in the individuals with the CT genotype. There was a significant association between the rs115160714 and tumor grade and FIGO classification. Most carriers of minor allele had a high grade tumors (G3) classified as FIGO III/IV. The results of our study raise a possibility that a genetic variation of TopBP1 may be implicated in the etiology of endometrial cancer. PMID:24346708

  8. 9-cis-retinoic acid represses estrogen-induced expression of the very low density apolipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed

    Schippers, I J; Kloppenburg, M; Snippe, L; Ab, G

    1994-11-01

    The chicken very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) gene is estrogen-inducible and specifically expressed in liver. We examined the possible involvement of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and its ligand 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) in the activation of the apoVLDLII promoter. We first concentrated on a potential RXR recognition site, which deviates at only one position from a perfect direct A/GGGTCA repeat spaced by one nucleotide (DR-1) and was earlier identified as a common HNF-4/COUP-TF recognition site. However, band shift analysis revealed that this imperfect DR-1 motif does not interact with RXR alpha-homodimers. In accordance with this observation we found that this regulatory element does not mediate transactivation through RXR alpha in the presence of 9-cis-RA. However, our experiments revealed another, unexpected, effect of 9-cis-RA. Instead of stimulating, 9-cis-RA attenuated estrogen-induced expression of transfected estrogen-responsive VLDL-CAT reporter plasmids. This repression appeared to take place through the main estrogen response element (ERE) of the gene. Importantly, 9-cis-RA also strongly repressed the estrogen-induced expression of the endogenous apoVLDLII gene in cultured chicken hepatoma cells. PMID:7859923

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (P<0.05) in LXSN rats (23+/-1, 37+/-2, and 52+/-2 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng). Importantly, treating LSN-HHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli. PMID:15166181

  10. Differential stimulation by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha isoforms of the estrogen-activated promoter of the very-low-density apolipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed

    Calkhoven, C F; Snippe, L; Ab, G

    1997-10-01

    The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins alpha and beta (C/EBP alpha and C/EBP beta) are highly expressed in liver and are believed to function in maintaining the differentiated state of the hepatocytes. C/EBP alpha appears to be a critical regulator of genes involved in metabolic processes. We are interested in the roles of C/EBP in the expression of the very-low-density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene. This gene encodes an avian yolk protein, is induced by estrogens and is only expressed in liver. To examine the role of C/EBP in apoVLDL II expression, footprinting and electromobility-shift analysis were performed. For three of the protein-binding sites in the apoVLDL II promoter region, C/EBP alpha and C/EBP beta were identified as the major DNA-binding activities. For one of the C/EBP genes, C/EBP alpha, the effect of the gene products on apoVLDL II transcription was examined. From transfection experiments we conclude that maximal estrogen-dependent activity of the apoVLDL II promoter requires the dual action of the estrogen receptor and C/EBP. The level of activity is different depending on the nature of the C/EBP alpha translational isoform transfected, the full-length C/EBP alpha polypeptide being the most active isoform and the N-terminally truncated isoform being moderately active. The present results suggest a role of C/EBP alpha translational isoform ratio in the modulation of expression of C/EBP target genes, such as those involved in metabolic processes. PMID:9363761

  11. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.

  12. EVIDENCE OF MINOR GENES IN CHICKPEA 'SPANISH WHITE' FOR RESISTANCE TO ASCOCHYTA RABIEI PATHOTYPE II

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND and OBJECTIVES Isolates from the United States of Ascochyta rabiei, the causal agent of chickpea Ascochyta blight, were divided into two pathotypes (I and II). Cultivar ‘Spanish White’ is susceptible to both pathotypes and ‘Dwelley’ is resistant to pathotype I but susceptible to pathotyp...

  13. Interactive roles of NPR1 gene-dosage and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels inmutantmice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Das, Subhankar; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to elucidate the interactive roles of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) gene (Npr1) and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokines levels in Npr1 gene-targeted (1-copy, 2-copy, 3-copy, 4-copy) mice. Methods Npr1 genotypes included 1-copy gene-disrupted heterozygous (+/?), 2-copy wild-type (+/+), 3-copy gene-duplicated heterozygous (++/+) and 4-copy gene-duplicated homozygous (++/++) mice. Animals were fed low, normal and high-salt diets. Plasma and cardiac levels of ANG II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined. Results With a high-salt diet, cardiac ANG II levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (13.7 ± 2.8 fmol/mg protein, 111%) compared with 2-copy mice (6.5 ± 0.6), but decreased (?) in 4-copy (4.0 ± 0.5, 38%) mice. Cardiac aldosterone levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (80 ± 4 fmol/mg protein, 79%) compared with 2-copy mice (38 ± 3). Plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha was increased (+) in 1-copy mice (30.27 ± 2.32 pg/ml, 38%), compared with 2-copy mice (19.36 ± 2.49, 24%), but decreased (?) in 3-copy (11.59 ± 1.51, 12%) and 4-copy (7.13 ± 0.52, 22%) mice. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1? levels were also significantly increased (+) in 1-copy compared with 2-copy mice but decreased (?) in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. Conclusion These results demonstrate that a high-salt diet aggravates cardiac ANG II, aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokine levels in Npr1 gene-disrupted 1-copy mice, whereas, in Npr1 gene-duplicated (3-copy and 4-copy) mice, high salt did not render such elevation, suggesting the potential roles of Npr1 against salt loading. PMID:23188418

  14. SIX MAJOR CLADES OF AGARICALES INFERRED FROM PNA POLYMERASE II AND NUCLEAR RIBOSOMAL RNA GENES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many taxonomic families of agarics are not monophyletic and require re-evaluation by molecular phylogenetic methods. Using over 5600 nucleotide characters from rpb1, rpb1-intron 2, rpb2 and 18S, 25S, and 5.8S ribosomal RNA genes, we recover six major clades of Agaricales with Bayesian and parsimony ...

  15. Molecular phylogeny of Fusarium inferred from partial RNA polymerase II gene sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently there are no robust phylogenetic hypotheses for Fusarium based on large-scale sampling across the breadth of this important group of mycotoxigenic phytopathogens. Nucleotide variation within the second largest RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2) protein-coding gene, however, has clearly demonst...

  16. QTL mapping of genetic determinants of lipoprotein metabolism in mice: Mutations of the apolipoprotein A-II gene affecting lipoprotein turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Weinreb, A.; Purcell-Huynh, D.A.; Castellani, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    Cholesterol and lipoproteins represent important risk factors for atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the genes involved in determining lipoprotein levels, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed using a cross between NZB and SM/J mice. Significant LOD scores for loci determining total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL and VLDL cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) were obtained. NZB mice have a 7-10 fold higher apoA-II level SM/J. LOD scores of 19.6 (chow) and 10.3 (high fat) were obtained at the apoA-II gene locus. Comparison of apoA-II levels by apoA-II genotype reveals that {approximately}30% of the variance in apoA-II levels can be accounted for by differences within the apoA-II gene. Northern analysis of mRNA from NZB and SM/J mice fed a high fat diet failed to show any significant differences in mRNA levels. The rates of apoA-II protein synthesis relative to total protein synthesis between the two strains were similar, with a rate of 0.16% for NZB and 0.18% for SM/J. Sequencing of NZB and SM/J apoA-II cDNAs revealed a pro5 to gln5 substitution in SM/J. Therefore, differences in the apoA-II levels between NZB and SM/J may be partly due to a structural difference in apoA-II resulting in an increased rate of apoA-II clearance in SM/J. A coincident QTL for HDL at the same chromosome 1 locus suggests that a structural difference in apoA-II may be affecting the rate of HDL clearance. It is of interest to note that the pro5 to gln5 substitution leads to apoA-II amyloid deposition in the SAM mouse.

  17. Genome sequence of Fulvimarina pelagi HTCC2506T, a Mn(II)-oxidizing alphaproteobacterium possessing an aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic gene cluster and Xanthorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ilnam; Oh, Hyun-Myung; Lim, Seung-Il; Ferriera, Steve; Giovannoni, Stephen J; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Fulvimarina pelagi is a Mn(II)-oxidizing marine heterotrophic bacterium in the order Rhizobiales. Here we announce the draft genome sequence of F. pelagi HTCC2506(T), which was isolated from the Sargasso Sea by using dilution-to-extinction culturing. The genome sequence contained a xanthorhodopsin gene as well as a photosynthetic gene cluster, which suggests the coexistence of two different phototrophic mechanisms in a single microorganism. PMID:20639329

  18. Epigenetic modification of DRG neuronal gene expression subsequent to nerve injury: Etiological contribution to complex regional pain syndromes (Part II)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuzhou; Stefano, George B.; Kream, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Cumulating evidence indicated that nerve injury-associated cellular and molecular changes play an essential role in contributing to the development of pathological pain, and more recent findings implicated the critical role of epigenetic mechanisms in pain-related sensitization in the DRG subsequent to nerve injury. In this part of the dyad review (Part II), we reviewed and paid special attention on the etiological contribution of DGR gene expression modulated by epigenetic mechanisms of CRPS. As essential effectors to different molecular activation, we first discussed the activation of various signaling pathways that subsequently from nerve injury, and in further illustrated the fundamental and functional underpinnings of nerve injury-induced pain, in which we argued for the potential epigenetic mechanisms in response to sensitizing stimuli or injury. Therefore, understanding the specific mediating factors that influence individual epigenetic differences contributing to pain sensitivity and responsiveness to analgesics possesses crucial clinical implications. PMID:25027291

  19. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus) suggest trans-species polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Eimes, John A; Townsend, Andrea K; Sepil, Irem; Nishiumi, Isao; Satta, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP), in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis) American crows (C. brachyrhynchos) and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis). Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While clustering of positively selected amino acids by supertyping revealed a single supertype shared by only jungle and carrion crows, a pattern consistent with convergence, the overall phylogenetic patterns we observed suggest that TSP, rather than convergence, explains the interspecific allelic similarity of MHC IIB genes in these species of crows. PMID:25802816

  20. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus) suggest trans-species polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Andrea K.; Sepil, Irem; Nishiumi, Isao; Satta, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP), in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis) American crows (C. brachyrhynchos) and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis). Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While clustering of positively selected amino acids by supertyping revealed a single supertype shared by only jungle and carrion crows, a pattern consistent with convergence, the overall phylogenetic patterns we observed suggest that TSP, rather than convergence, explains the interspecific allelic similarity of MHC IIB genes in these species of crows. PMID:25802816

  1. Genes associated with metabolic syndrome predict disease-free survival in stage II colorectal cancer patients. A novel link between metabolic dysregulation and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Ramos, Ricardo; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B; Reglero, Guillermo; Feliu, Jaime; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2014-12-01

    Studies have recently suggested that metabolic syndrome and its components increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Both diseases are increasing in most countries, and the genetic association between them has not been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to assess the association between genetic risk factors of metabolic syndrome or related conditions (obesity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes mellitus type 2) and clinical outcome in stage II colorectal cancer patients. Expression levels of several genes related to metabolic syndrome and associated alterations were analysed by real-time qPCR in two equivalent but independent sets of stage II colorectal cancer patients. Using logistic regression models and cross-validation analysis with all tumour samples, we developed a metabolic syndrome-related gene expression profile to predict clinical outcome in stage II colorectal cancer patients. The results showed that a gene expression profile constituted by genes previously related to metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with clinical outcome of stage II colorectal cancer patients. This metabolic profile was able to identify patients with a low risk and high risk of relapse. Its predictive value was validated using an independent set of stage II colorectal cancer patients. The identification of a set of genes related to metabolic syndrome that predict survival in intermediate-stage colorectal cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy and avoid the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low risk. Our results also confirm the linkage between metabolic disorder and colorectal cancer and suggest the potential for cancer prevention and/or treatment by targeting these genes. PMID:25001263

  2. Immunoaffinity chromatographic purification of cellobiohydrolase II mutants from recombinant trichoderma reesei strains devoid of major endoglucanase genes.

    PubMed

    Koivula, A; Lappalainen, A; Virtanen, S; Mäntylä, A L; Suominen, P; Teeri, T T

    1996-12-01

    Efficient purification of Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase II (CBHII) requires the use of affinity chromatography based on a substrate analogue. Due to altered substrate binding, the purification of many active-site mutants of CBHII from the complex fungal culture media represents a considerable challenge. Here we describe a combination of two approaches to facilitate the purification: the first is based on the construction of novel engineered T. reesei strains devoid of the major contaminating endoglucanases, and the second uses immunoaffinity chromatography as the final purification step. Two different procedures for the preparation of the antibody matrix were tested. Crosslinking of the monoclonal antibody to Protein G matrix instead of the conventional immobilization via cyanogen bromide increased the binding efficiency. Three different active-site mutants of CBHII bound to the immunoaffinity column in neutral pH and were eluted in pH 2.7. The purity of the CBHII mutant preparations was tested using small chromophoric substrates and hydroxyethyl cellulose, which are hydrolyzed by many other cellulases but not by CBHII. The immunoaffinity column purified the CBHII mutants over 800-fold in a single step and resulted in homogeneous protein preparations free of proteolytically cleaved forms of CBHII. The use of the double replacement T. reesei production strains, especially the one lacking the genes coding for both the endogeneous CBHII and the endoglucanase II (EGII), helped to reduce the total endoglucanase activity in the preparations. PMID:8959766

  3. Resemblance and Dissemblance of Arabidopsis Type II Peroxiredoxins: Similar Sequences for Divergent Gene Expression, Protein Localization, and Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Bréhélin, Claire; Meyer, Etienne H.; de Souris, Jean-Paul; Bonnard, Géraldine; Meyer, Yves

    2003-01-01

    The Arabidopsis type II peroxiredoxin (PRXII) family is composed of six different genes, five of which are expressed. On the basis of the nucleotide and protein sequences, we were able to define three subgroups among the PRXII family. The first subgroup is composed of AtPRXII-B, -C, and -D, which are highly similar and localized in the cytosol. AtPRXII-B is ubiquitously expressed. More striking is the specific expression of AtPRXII-C and AtPRXII-D localized in pollen. The second subgroup comprises the mitochondrial AtPRXII-F, the corresponding gene of which is expressed constitutively. We show that AtPRXII-E, belonging to the last subgroup, is expressed mostly in reproductive tissues and that its product is addressed to the plastid. By in vitro enzymatic experiments, we demonstrate that glutaredoxin is the electron donor of recombinant AtPRXII-B for peroxidase reaction, but the donors of AtPRXII-E and AtPRXII-F have still to be identified. PMID:12913160

  4. Directional substitution and evolution of nucleotide content in the cytochrome oxidase II gene in earwigs (dermapteran insects).

    PubMed

    Wirth, T; Le Guellec, R; Veuille, M

    1999-12-01

    The cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII) gene was sequenced for six dermapteran species. The nucleotide composition of this gene is biased in most animals. While the CG content of other insect orders is low (mean, 27.6%; range, 19.5%-33.1%), species from the Forficula genus showed unusually high values (mean, 42.4%; range, 37.3%-44.1%), mostly due to high CG frequencies at third codon positions: the mean CG content at these positions was around 45% (range, 43.9%-46.9%) for Forficula, compared with only 13.3% for other insects. This effect was so strong that in one species, Forficula lesnei, there was no significant difference between the frequencies of the four bases. During evolution, this loss of bias has involved a significant increase in the synonymous substitution rate and an increase of transitions over transversions compared with other insects. A strong directionality of substitutions has favored T-->C and A-->G changes. This phenomenon was also observed between two conspecific populations of Forficula auricularia. A species from a closely related genus, Anechura bipunctata, was intermediate between Forficula and other insects for these parameters, while two remotely related dermapteran species, Labidura riparia and Euborellia moesta, were similar to other insects. These results suggest that the evolution of Forficula DNA content has been both rapid and recent. PMID:10605107

  5. Live-cell Imaging of Pol II Promoter Activity to Monitor Gene expression with RNA IMAGEtag reporters

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ilchung; Ray, Judhajeet; Gupta, Vinayak; Ilgu, Muslum; Beasley, Jonathan; Bendickson, Lee; Mehanovic, Samir; Kraus, George A.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2014-04-20

    We describe a ribonucleic acid (RNA) reporter system for live-cell imaging of gene expression to detect changes in polymerase II activity on individual promoters in individual cells. The reporters use strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags) that can be expressed from a promoter of choice. For imaging, the cells are incubated with their ligands that are separately conjugated with one of the FRET pair, Cy3 and Cy5. The IMAGEtags were expressed in yeast from the GAL1, ADH1 or ACT1 promoters. Transcription from all three promoters was imaged in live cells and transcriptional increases from the GAL1 promoter were observed with time after adding galactose. Expression of the IMAGEtags did not affect cell proliferation or endogenous gene expression. Advantages of this method are that no foreign proteins are produced in the cells that could be toxic or otherwise influence the cellular response as they accumulate, the IMAGEtags are short lived and oxygen is not required to generate their signals. The IMAGEtag RNA reporter system provides a means of tracking changes in transcriptional activity in live cells and in real time.

  6. Gene expression in the DpnI and DpnII restriction enzyme systems of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.; Sabelnikov, A.G.; Chen, Jau-Der; Greenberg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Although a number of bacterial species are naturally transformable, that is, their cells are able to take up external DNA in substantial amounts and integrate it into the chromosome without artificial manipulation of the cell surface, Streptococcus pneumoniae, the first species in which this phenomenon was detected, remains a prototype of such transformation. Cells of S. pneumonias also contain potent restriction endonucleases able to severely restrict DNA introduced during viral infection. Our current understanding of the genetic basis of the complementary DpnI and DpnII restriction systems and of the biochemistry of their component enzymes are briefly reviewed. The manner in which these enzymes impinge on the transfer of chromosomal genes and of plasmeds will be examined in detail. It will be seen that far from acting against foreign DNA in general, the restriction systems seem to be designed to exclude only infecting viral DNA The presence of complementary restriction systems in different cells of S. pneumonias enhances their effectiveness in blocking viral infection and promoting species survival. This enhanced effectiveness requires the expression of alternative restriction systems. Therefore, the ability of the cells to transfer the restriction enzyme genes and to regulate their expression are important for survival of the species.

  7. The tax gene sequences form two divergent monophyletic lineages corresponding to types I and II of simian and human T-cell leukemia/lymphotropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Giri, A; Slattery, J P; Heneine, W; Gessain, A; Rivadeneira, E; Desrosiers, R C; Rosen, L; Anthony, R; Pamungkas, J; Iskandriati, D; Richards, A L; Herve, V; McClure, H; O'Brien, S J; Franchini, G

    1997-04-28

    Evolutionary associations of human and simian T-cell leukemia/lymphotropic viruses I and II (HTLV-I/II and STLV-I/II) are inferred from phylogenetic analysis of tax gene sequences. Samples studied consisted of a geographically diverse assemblage of viral strains obtained from 10 human subjects and 20 individuals representing 12 species of nonhuman primates. Sequence analyses identified distinct substitutions, which distinguished between viral types I and II, irrespective of host species. Phylogenetic reconstruction of nucleotide sequences strongly supported two major evolutionary groups corresponding to viral types I and II. With the type I lineage, clusters were composed of strains from multiple host species. A genetically diverse, monophyletic lineage consisting of eight new viral strains from several species of Asian macaques was identified. The second lineage consisted of a monophyletic assemblage of HTLV-II/STLV-II strains from Africa and the New World, including an isolate from a pygmy chimp (Pan paniscus) as an early divergence within the lineage. High levels of genetic variation among strains from Asian STLV-I macaque suggest the virus arose in Asia. Evidence of the origin of the type II virus is less clear, but diversity among HTLV-II variants from a single isolated population of Mbati villagers is suggestive but not proof of an African origin. PMID:9143307

  8. Expression of a partially deleted gene of human type II procollagen (COL2A1) in transgenic mice produces a chondrodysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenberg, P.; Khillan, J.S.; Prockop, D.J.; Helminen, H.; Kontusaari, S.; Ala-Kokko, L. )

    1991-09-01

    A minigene version of the human gene for type II procollagen (COL2AI) was prepared that lacked a large central region containing 12 of the 52 exons and therefore 291 of the 1523 codons of the gene. The construct was modeled after sporadic in-frame deletions of collagen genes that cause synthesis of shortened pro{alpha} chains that associate with normal pro{alpha} chains and thereby cause degradation of the shortened and normal pro{alpha} chains through a process called procollagen suicide. The gene construct was used to prepare five lines of transgenic mice expressing the minigene. A large proportion of the mice expressing the minigene developed a phenotype of a chondrodysplasia with dwarfism, short and thick limbs, a short snout, a cranial bulge, a cleft palate, and delayed mineralization of bone. A number of mice died shortly after birth. Microscopic examination of cartilage revealed decreased density and organization of collagen fibrils. In cultured chondrocytes from the transgenic mice, the minigene was expressed as shortened pro{alpha}1(II) chains that were disulfide-linked to normal mouse pro{alpha}1(II) chains. Therefore, the phenotype is probably explained by depletion of the endogenous mouse type II procollagen through the phenomenon of procollagen suicide.

  9. Unraveling regulatory mechanisms of atrial remodeling of mitral regurgitation pigs by gene expression profiling analysis: role of type I angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mien-Cheng; Chang, Jen-Ping; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Hsu, Sheng-Da; Huang, Hsien-Da; Ho, Wan-Chun; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Hsiao, Chang-Chun; Liu, Wen-Hao

    2015-05-01

    Left atrial enlargement associated with mitral regurgitation (MR) predicts a poor prognosis. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms of atrial remodeling remain unclear. We used high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and enrichment analysis to identify the alteration of RNA expression pattern and biological processes involved in the atrial remodeling of pigs with and without MR. Gene arrays from left atria tissues were compared in 13 pigs (iatrogenic MR pigs [n = 6], iatrogenic MR pigs treated with valsartan [n = 4], and pigs without MR [n = 3]). A total of 22 genes were differentially upregulated by altered fold change >2.0 (Log2FC > 1), and 49 genes were differentially downregulated by altered fold change <0.5 (Log2FC < -1) in the left atria of the MR pigs compared with the pigs without MR. Enrichment analysis showed that renin-angiotensin system was identified in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway. Notably, 12 of the 22 upregulated genes were identified to be downregulated by valsartan and 10 of the 49 downregulated genes were identified to be upregulated by valsartan. The tissue concentrations of angiotensin II and gene expression of hypertrophic gene, myosin regulatory light chain 2, ventricular isoforms, and fibrosis-related genes were significantly increased in the MR pigs compared with pigs without MR. In conclusion, differentially expressed transcriptome and related biological pathways have been identified in the left atria of the MR pigs compared with pigs without MR. Additionally, some of the differentially expressed genes could be regulated by type I angiotensin II receptor blocker. PMID:25500755

  10. Comparative genomic analysis reveals independent expansion of a lineage-specific gene family in vertebrates: The class II cytokine receptors and their ligands in mammals and fish

    PubMed Central

    Lutfalla, Georges; Crollius, Hugues Roest; Stange-thomann, Nicole; Jaillon, Olivier; Mogensen, Knud; Monneron, Danièle

    2003-01-01

    Background The high degree of sequence conservation between coding regions in fish and mammals can be exploited to identify genes in mammalian genomes by comparison with the sequence of similar genes in fish. Conversely, experimentally characterized mammalian genes may be used to annotate fish genomes. However, gene families that escape this principle include the rapidly diverging cytokines that regulate the immune system, and their receptors. A classic example is the class II helical cytokines (HCII) including type I, type II and lambda interferons, IL10 related cytokines (IL10, IL19, IL20, IL22, IL24 and IL26) and their receptors (HCRII). Despite the report of a near complete pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes) genome sequence, these genes remain undescribed in fish. Results We have used an original strategy based both on conserved amino acid sequence and gene structure to identify HCII and HCRII in the genome of another pufferfish, Tetraodon nigroviridis that is amenable to laboratory experiments. The 15 genes that were identified are highly divergent and include a single interferon molecule, three IL10 related cytokines and their potential receptors together with two Tissue Factor (TF). Some of these genes form tandem clusters on the Tetraodon genome. Their expression pattern was determined in different tissues. Most importantly, Tetraodon interferon was identified and we show that the recombinant protein can induce antiviral MX gene expression in Tetraodon primary kidney cells. Similar results were obtained in Zebrafish which has 7 MX genes. Conclusion We propose a scheme for the evolution of HCII and their receptors during the radiation of bony vertebrates and suggest that the diversification that played an important role in the fine-tuning of the ancestral mechanism for host defense against infections probably followed different pathways in amniotes and fish. PMID:12869211

  11. Analysis of class I and II histone deacetylase gene expression in human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Maddipoti, Sirisha; Quesada, Andres; Bohannan, Zachary; Cabrero Calvo, Monica; Colla, Simona; Wei, Yue; Estecio, Marcos; Wierda, William; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are well-characterized anti-leukemia agents and HDAC gene expression deregulation has been reported in various types of cancers. This study sought to characterize HDAC gene expression patterns in several types of leukemia. To do so, a systematic study was performed of the mRNA expression of all drug-targetable HDACs for which reagents were available. This was done by real-time PCR in 24 leukemia cell lines and 39 leukemia patients, which included AML, MDS and CLL patients, some of whom received HDAC inhibitor treatment. Among the samples analyzed, there was no discernible pattern in HDAC expression. HDAC expression was generally increased in CLL patients, except for HDAC2 and HDAC4. HDAC expression was also generally increased in VPA-treated MOLT4 cells. However, this increased expression was not seen in AML patients treated with vorinostat. In summary, increased HDAC expression was noted in CLL patients in general, but the HDAC expression patterns in myeloid malignancies appear to be heterogeneous, which implies that the role of HDACs in leukemia may be related to global expression or protein function rather than specific expression patterns. PMID:25944469

  12. A dendritic nano-sized hexanuclear ruthenium(II) complex as a one- and two-photon luminescent tracking non-viral gene vector

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Kangqiang; Yu, Bole; Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Huang, Juanjuan; Zou, Shanshan; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent tracking gene delivery could provide us with a better understanding of the critical steps in the transfection process. However, for in vivo tracking applications, a small diameter (<10?nm) is one of the rigorous requirements for tracking vectors. Herein, we have demonstrated a new paradigm for two-photon tracking gene delivery based on a dendritic nano-sized hexanuclear ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex. Because this metallodendrimer has a multivalent periphery, the complex, which is 6.1?nm, showed high stability and excellent dispersibility and could stepwise condense DNA in vitro. With the outstanding photochemical properties of Ru(II) polypyridyl, this complex could track gene delivery in vivo using one- and two-photon imaging. PMID:26185052

  13. Multiple parasites mediate balancing selection at two MHC class II genes in the fossorial water vole: insights from multivariate analyses and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Tollenaere, C; Bryja, J; Galan, M; Cadet, P; Deter, J; Chaval, Y; Berthier, K; Ribas Salvador, A; Voutilainen, L; Laakkonen, J; Henttonen, H; Cosson, J-F; Charbonnel, N

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the factors mediating selection acting on two MHC class II genes (DQA and DRB) in water vole (Arvicola scherman) natural populations in the French Jura Mountains. Population genetics showed significant homogeneity in allelic frequencies at the DQA1 locus as opposed to neutral markers (nine microsatellites), indicating balancing selection acting on this gene. Moreover, almost exhaustive screening for parasites, including gastrointestinal helminths, brain coccidia and antibodies against viruses responsible for zoonoses, was carried out. We applied a co-inertia approach to the genetic and parasitological data sets to avoid statistical problems related to multiple testing. Two alleles, Arte-DRB-11 and Arte-DRB-15, displayed antagonistic associations with the nematode Trichuris arvicolae, revealing the potential parasite-mediated selection acting on DRB locus. Selection mechanisms acting on the two MHC class II genes thus appeared different. Moreover, overdominance as balancing selection mechanism was showed highly unlikely in this system. PMID:18624885

  14. Estradiol-dependent transcription initiation upstream from the chicken apoVLDLII gene coding for the very-low-density apolipoprotein II.

    PubMed

    Strijker, R; Blom van Assendelft, G; Dikkeschei, B D; Gruber, M; Ab, G

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated RNAs originating from the 5'-flanking region of the chicken very-low-density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) gene. S1 nuclease mapping and primer extension experiments revealed two minor upstream transcription start points located 1105 and 1530 nucleotides in front of the apoVLDLII gene. Transcription starting at these points is dependent upon estradiol as is transcription from the major start points. The transcripts are polyadenylated, but are not detectable in polysomes. Run-on assays indicated that the low concentration of the upstream initiated transcripts is due both to low transcription levels and to low transcript stability. The sequence around the upstream start points does not show strong homologies with consensus sequences of promoters for eukaryotic protein encoding genes. Nevertheless, the upstream sequences are transcribed in vivo by RNA polymerase II. PMID:3781248

  15. Three genes in the human MHC class III region near the junction with the class II: Gene for receptor of advanced glycosylation end products, PBX2 homeobox gene and a notch homolog, human counterpart of mouse mammary tumor gene int-3

    SciTech Connect

    Sugaya, K.; Fukagawa, T.; Matsumoto, K.

    1994-09-15

    Cosmid walking of about 250 kb from MHC class III gene CYP21 to class II was conducted. The gene for receptor of advanced glycosylation end products of proteins (RAGE, a member of immunoglobulin super-family molecules), the PBX2 homeobox gene designated HOX12, and the human counterpart of the mouse mammary tumor gene int-3 were found. The contiguous RAGE and HOX12 genes were completely sequenced, and the human int-3 counterpart was partially sequenced and assigned to a Notch homolog. This human Notch homolog, designated NOTCH3, showed both the intracellular portion present in the mouse int-3 sequence and the extracellular portion absent in the int-3. It thus corresponds to the intact form of a Notch-type transmembrane protein. About 20 kb of dense Alu clustering was found just centromeric to the NOTCH3. 48 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Identification of two novel critical mutations in PCNT gene resulting in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II associated with multiple intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Feng; Wang, Xu-Dong; Zhu, Min-Wei; Lou, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Qiong; Zhu, Chun-Yu; Feng, Hong-Lin; Lin, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is a highly detrimental human autosomal inherited recessive disorder. The hallmark characteristics of this disease are intrauterine and postnatal growth restrictions, with some patients also having cerebrovascular problems such as cerebral aneurysms. The genomic basis behind most clinical features of MOPD II remains largely unclear. The aim of this work was to identify the genetic defects in a Chinese family with MOPD II associated with multiple intracranial aneurysms. The patient had typical MOPD II syndrome, with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms. We identified three novel mutations in the PCNT gene, including one single base alteration (9842A>C in exon 45) and two deletions (Del-C in exon 30 and Del-16 in exon 41). The deletions were co-segregated with the affected individual in the family and were not present in the control population. Computer modeling demonstrated that the deletions may cause drastic changes on the secondary and tertiary structures, affecting the hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of the mutant proteins. In conclusion, we identified two novel mutations in the PCNT gene associated with MOPD II and intracranial aneurysms, and the mutations were expected to alter the stability and functioning of the protein by computer modeling. PMID:26231886

  17. Sugar-mediated transcriptional regulation of the Gap gene system and concerted photosystem II functional modulation in the microalga Scenedesmus vacuolatus.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Federico; Ortega, José M; Losada, Manuel; Serrano, Aurelio

    2005-08-01

    Partial cDNAs corresponding to the GapA, GapC and GapN genes that encode the three different glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs) of the green microalga Scenedesmus vacuolatus SAG 211-8b have been cloned and characterized. Northern blot experiments, as well as immunoblots and activity measurements, demonstrate a differential regulation by sugars of the components of the algal Gap gene system. Addition of glucose or other metabolizable sugars to photoautotrophic cultures promoted a drastic repression of the GapA gene and depletion to negligible levels of the corresponding GAPDHA, a chloroplastic protein involved in photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. By contrast, expression of the GapC and GapN genes encoding their cytosolic counterparts involved in glycolysis was enhanced. However, no down-regulation of the GapA gene by glucose took place in the dark, indicating that the observed effect is associated with sugar assimilation in the light. Likewise, glucose promoted in illuminated algal cultures a severe decrease of photosystem II functionality, estimated by O2 evolution activity, thermoluminescence emission and D1 protein level, while again, no effect was observed in the dark. On the basis of the correlation found between photosystem II performance and sugar transcriptional regulation of the GapA gene, a scenario of sugar-mediated regulation of photosynthetic metabolism in microalgae is proposed that will help to explain the so-called glucose bleaching effect in photosynthetic eukaryotes. PMID:15830207

  18. Identification of Type II Interferon Receptors in Geese: Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Qi, Yulin; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon ? receptor 1 (IFNGR1) and IFNGR2 are two cell membrane molecules belonging to class II cytokines, which play important roles in the IFN-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. Here, goose IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were cloned and identified for the first time. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that relatively high levels of goose IFN? mRNA transcripts were detected in immune tissues, including the harderian gland, cecal tonsil, cecum, and thymus. Relatively high expression levels of both IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were detected in the cecal tonsil, which implicated an important role of IFN? in the secondary immune system of geese. No specific correlation between IFN?, IFNGR1, and IFNGR2 expression levels was observed in the same tissues of healthy geese. IFN? and its cognate receptors showed different expression profiles, although they appeared to maintain a relatively balanced state. Furthermore, the agonist R848 led to the upregulation of goose IFN? but did not affect the expression of goose IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. In summary, trends in expression of goose IFN? and its cognate receptors showed tissue specificity, as well as an age-related dependency. These findings may help us to better understand the age-related susceptibility to pathogens in birds. PMID:26345454

  19. Angiotensin II modulates interleukin-1{beta}-induced inflammatory gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells via interfering with ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shanqin; Zhi, Hui; Hou, Xiuyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine how angiotensin II modulates ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk and gene expression. {yields} Angiotensin II suppresses IL-1{beta}-induced prolonged ERK and NF-{kappa}B activation. {yields} ERK-RSK1 signaling is required for IL-1{beta}-induced prolonged NF-{kappa}B activation. {yields} Angiotensin II modulates NF-{kappa}B responsive genes via regulating ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk. {yields} ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk is a novel mechanism regulating inflammatory gene expression. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II is implicated in cardiovascular diseases, which is associated with a role in increasing vascular inflammation. The present study investigated how angiotensin II modulates vascular inflammatory signaling and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. In cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), angiotensin II suppressed interleukin-1{beta}-induced prolonged phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK)-1, and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, leading to decreased iNOS but enhanced VCAM-1 expression, associated with an up-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 expression. Knock-down of RSK1 selectively down regulated interleukin-1{beta}-induced iNOS expression without influencing VCAM-1 expression. In vivo experiments showed that interleukin-1{beta}, iNOS, and VCAM-1 expression were detectable in the aortic arches of both wild-type and apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice. VCAM-1 and iNOS expression were higher in ApoE{sup -/-} than in wild type mouse aortic arches. Angiotensin II infusion (3.2 mg/kg/day, for 6 days, via subcutaneous osmotic pump) in ApoE{sup -/-} mice enhanced endothelial and adventitial VCAM-1 and iNOS expression, but reduced medial smooth muscle iNOS expression associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK and RSK-1. These results indicate that angiotensin II can differentially modulate inflammatory gene expression in aortic smooth muscle cells through influencing ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk, which may contribute to angiotensin II-induced inflammatory disorders related to cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Swine leukocyte antigen class II genes (SLA-DRA, SLA-DRB1, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1) polymorphism and genotyping in Guizhou minipigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Z; Xia, J H; Xin, L L; Wang, Z G; Qian, L; Wu, S G; Yang, S L; Li, K

    2015-01-01

    The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex harbors highly polymorphic gene clusters encoding glycoproteins that are involved in responses to vaccines, infectious disease, and production performance. Pigs with well-defined SLA class II genes are useful for the study of disease, immunology, and vaccines. In this study, we analyzed four SLA class II genes (SLA-DRA, SLA-DRB1, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1) in 22 founder Guizhou minipigs using a sequence-based typing method. Twelve alleles were detected, compared with the SLA class II allele sequences in the GenBank, and one of twelve alleles was found to be novel in Guizhou minipigs. There are four SLA II haplotypes, and one of them has been previously reported in Meishan pigs. Furthermore, based on sequence information of these alleles, we developed a simple SLA typing method implemented to SLA-typing for unknown offspring of Guizhou minipigs, relying on designed twelve sequence specific primers that could discriminate between each other. According to the combination of sequence-based typing and PCR-SSP, we were able to rapidly check SLA typing of Guizhou breeding stock and identified four SLA haplotypes in the herd. Therefore, SLA-defined Guizhou minipigs will be useful as animal models for xenotransplantation and immunological research. PMID:26634489

  2. Generation and analysis of knock-in mice carrying pseudohypoaldosteronism type II-causing mutations in the cullin 3 gene.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yuya; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sohara, Eisei; Mori, Takayasu; Inoue, Yuichi; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Eriko; Ohta, Akihito; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is a hereditary hypertensive disease caused by mutations in four different genes: with-no-lysine kinases (WNK) 1 and 4, Kelch-like family member 3 (KLHL3), and cullin 3 (Cul3). Cul3 and KLHL3 form an E3 ligase complex that ubiquitinates and reduces the expression level of WNK4. PHAII-causing mutations in WNK4 and KLHL3 impair WNK4 ubiquitination. However, the molecular pathogenesis of PHAII caused by Cul3 mutations is unclear. In cultured cells and human leukocytes, PHAII-causing Cul3 mutations result in the skipping of exon 9, producing mutant Cul3 protein lacking 57 amino acids. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in the kidneys and is responsible for the pathogenesis of PHAII in vivo is unknown. We generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation in the C-terminus of intron 8 of Cul3, c.1207-1G>A, which corresponds to a PHAII-causing mutation in the human Cul3 gene. Heterozygous Cul3(G(-1)A/+) knock-in mice did not exhibit PHAII phenotypes, and the skipping of exon 9 was not evident in their kidneys. However, the level of Cul3 mRNA expression in the kidneys of heterozygous knock-in mice was approximately half that of wild-type mice. Furthermore, homozygous knock-in mice were nonviable. It suggested that the mutant allele behaved like a knockout allele and did not produce Cul3 mRNA lacking exon 9. A reduction in Cul3 expression alone was not sufficient to develop PHAII in the knock-in mice. Our findings highlighted the pathogenic role of mutant Cul3 protein and provided insight to explain why PHAII-causing mutations in Cul3 cause kidney-predominant PHAII phenotypes. PMID:26490675

  3. Rearrangements at the 11p15 locus and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II gene in sporadic adrenocortical tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gicquel, C.; Schneid, H.; Le Bouc, Y.; Bertagna, X.; Francillard-Leblond, M.; Luton, J.P.; Girard, F.

    1994-06-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of sporadic adrenocortical tumors in adults. Because loss of heterozygosity at the 11p15 locus has been described in childhood tumors, particularly in adrenocortical tumors associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and because insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a crucial regulator of fetal adrenal growth, the authors looked for structural analysis at the 11p15 locus and IGF-II gene expression in 23 sporadic adrenocortical adult tumors: 6 carcinomas (5 with Cushing`s syndrome and 1 nonsecreting) and 17 benign adenomas (13 with Cushing`s syndrome, 1 pure androgen secreting, and 3 nonsecreting). Twenty-one patients were informative at the 11p15 locus, and six (four carcinomas and two adenomas) of them (28.5%) exhibited 11p15 structural abnormalities in tumor DNA (five, a uniparental disomy and one, a mosaicism). In a single case that could be further studied, a paternal isodisomy was observed. Very high IGF-II mRNA contents were detected in seven tumors (30%; 5 of the 6 carcinomas and 2 of the 17 adenomas). They were particularly found in tumors with uniparental disomy at the 11p15 locus. Overall, a strong correlation existed between IGF-II mRNA contents and DNA demethylation at the IGF-II locus. These data show that genetic alterations involving the 11p15 locus were highly frequent in malignant tumors, but found only in rare adenomas. These results in combination with evidence for overexpression of IGF-II from the 11p15.5 locus suggest that abnormalities in structure and/or expression of the IGF-II gene play a role as a late event of a multistep process of tumorigenesis. 58 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Expression of type II iodothyronine deiodinase gene in the brain of a tropical spinefoot, Siganus guttatus.

    PubMed

    Wambiji, Nina; Park, Yong-Ju; Kim, Se-Jae; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Takeuchi, Yuki; Takemura, Akihiro

    2011-12-01

    Type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) converts 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine to 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine and is involved in regulating thyroid hormone-dependent processes in various tissues. D2 mRNA expression in the mediobasal hypothalamus is affected by photoperiod, which influences reproductive processes in temperate birds and mammals. We examined whether D2 mRNA is expressed in the hypothalamus (located in the forebrain within the diencephalon area) and whether its abundance is affected by day length, temperature, or food availability in the tropical spinefoot, Siganus guttatus, which is endemic to tropical monsoon areas. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that D2 mRNA is expressed in various brain regions. The abundance of hypothalamic D2 mRNA was higher at 12.00h than at 06.00h or 24.00h. Rearing fish under constant dark conditions resulted in a decrease in D2 mRNA abundance during the subjective night. A single injection of melatonin lowered D2 mRNA abundance within 3h. Collectively, it appears that hypothalamic D2 mRNA abundance is regulated by the circadian system and/or melatonin. No differences in D2 mRNA abundance were observed, when fish were reared at 20, 25, and 30°C. However, food deprivation stimulated D2 mRNA expression during the daytime. These results suggest that photoperiodic and nutritive conditions affect hypothalamic D2 mRNA expression in S. guttatus. PMID:21463701

  5. Comparison of HLA class II genes in Caucasoid, Chinese, and Japanese patients with primary Sjoegren's syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Ho-II.; Chan, E.; Peebles, C.; Fox, R.I. ); Fei, I.; Chen, S. ); Saito, Ichiro; Sawada, Shigemasa ); Bugawan, T.L.; Erlich, H.A. ); Yi, D. )

    1993-04-15

    To better define the genetic factors that predispose to primary Sjoegren's syndrome (SS), the authors used polymerase chain reaction in combination with oligonucleotide probe hybridization and DNA sequencing to analyze HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, and -DPB1 alleles in Caucasoid (California), Japanese (Tokyo), and Chinese (Shanghai and Beijing) SS patients. In comparison to local controls in each region, we found: (1) increased frequency of the predicted haplotype HLA-DRB1[sup *]0301-DRB3[sup *]0101-DQA1[sup *]0501-DQB1[sup *]0201 in Caucasoid patients (p < 0.001); (2) increased frequency of the predicted haplotype HLA-DRB1[sup *]0405-DRB4[sup *]0101-DQA1[sup *]0301-DQB1[sup *]0401 in Japanese patients (p < 0.05); (3) increased frequency of the predicted haplotype DRB1[sup *]0803-DQA1[sup *]0103-DQB1[sup *]0601 in Chinese patients (p < 0.05); and (4) no statistically significant association with DBP1 alleles in any group, although an increased number of Caucasoid and Japanese SS patients possessed DPB1[sup *]0301. Comparison of DNA sequences for the three disease-associated haplotypes in these ethnic groups revealed a shared region of predicted amino acids from positions 58 to 69 in the first domain of HLA-DQB1. These results extend previous studies by demonstrating that no single class II allele was associated with 1[degrees] SS in the different ethnic groups. However, a shared amino acid motif in the DQB1 first domain was present in each disease-associated haplotype. 25 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Regulation of Adipogenesis by Lymphatic fluid Stasis Part II: Expression of Adipose Differentiation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Aschen, Seth; Zampell, Jamie C.; Elhadad, Sonia; Weitman, Evan; De Brot Andrade, Marina; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although fat deposition is a defining clinical characteristic of lymphedema, the cellular mechanisms that regulate this response remain unknown. The goal of this study was to determine how lymphatic fluid stasis regulates adipogenic gene activation and fat deposition. Methods Adult female mice underwent tail lymphatic ablation and sacrifice at 1, 3, or 6 weeks post-operatively (n=8/group). Samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. An alternative group of mice underwent axillary dissections or sham incisions and limb tissues were harvested 3 weeks post-operatively (n=8/group). Results Lymphatic fluid stasis resulted in significant subcutaneous fat deposition and fibrosis in lymphedematous tail regions (p<0.001). Western blot analysis demonstrated that proteins regulating adipose differentiation including CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-alpha (CEBP-?) and adiponectin were markedly upregulated in response to lymphatic fluid stasis in the tail and axillary models. Expression of these markers increased in edematous tissues according to the gradient of lymphatic stasis distal to the wound. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated that adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-?), another critical adipogenic transcription factor, followed similar expression gradients. Finally, adiponectin and PPAR-? expression localized to a variety of cell types in newly formed subcutaneous fat. Conclusions The mouse-tail model of lymphedema demonstrates pathological findings similar to clinical lymphedema including fat deposition and fibrosis. We show that lymphatic fluid stasis potently upregulates the expression of fat differentiation markers both spatially and temporally. These studies elucidate mechanisms regulating abnormal fat deposition in lymphedema pathogenesis and therefore provide a basis for developing targeted treatments. PMID:22456356

  7. Simian virus 40 gene A regulation of cellular DNA synthesis. II. In nonpermissive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hiscott, J B; Defendi, V

    1981-01-01

    The stimulation of host macromolecular synthesis and induction into the cell cycle of serum-deprived G0-G1-arrested mouse embryo fibroblasts were examined after infection of resting cells with wild-type simian virus 40 or with viral mutants affecting T antigen (tsA58) or small t antigen (dl884). At various times after virus infection, cell cultures were analyzed for DNA synthesis by autoradiography and flow microfluorimetry. Whereas mock-infected cultured remained quiescent and displayed either a 2N DNA content (80%) or a 4N DNA content (15%), mouse cells infected with wild-type simian virus 40, tsA58 at 33 degrees C, or dl884 were induced into active cell cycling at approximately 18 h postinfection. Although dl884-infected mouse cells were induced to cycle initially at the same rate as wild type-infected cells, they became arrested earlier after infection and also failed to reach the saturation densities of wild-type simian virus 40-infected cells. Infection with dl884 also failed to induce loss of cytoplasmic actin cables in the majority of the infected cell population. Mouse cells infected with tsA58 and maintained at 39.5 degrees C showed a transient burst of DNA synthesis as reflected by changes in cell DNA content and an increase in the number of labeled nuclei during the first 24 h postinfection; however, after the abortive stimulation of DNA synthesis at 39.5 degrees C shift experiments demonstrated that host DNA replication was regulated by a functional A gene product. It is concluded that both products of the early region of simian virus 40 DNA play a complementary role in recruiting and maintaining simian virus 40-infected cells in the cell cycle. Images PMID:6261020

  8. Control of human carnitine palmitoyltransferase II gene transcription by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor through a partially conserved peroxisome proliferator-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Barrero, María J; Camarero, Nuria; Marrero, Pedro F; Haro, Diego

    2003-01-01

    The expression of several genes involved in fatty acid metabolism is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). To gain more insight into the control of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) gene expression, we examined the transcriptional regulation of the human CPT II gene. We show that the 5'-flanking region of this gene is transcriptionally active and binds PPARalpha in vivo in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, we characterized the peroxisome proliferator-responsive element (PPRE) in the proximal promoter of the CPT II gene, which appears to be a novel PPRE. The sequence of this PPRE contains one half-site which is a perfect consensus sequence (TGACCT) but no clearly recognizable second half-site (CAGCAC); this part of the sequence contains only one match to the consensus, which seems to be irrelevant for the binding of PPARalpha. As expected, other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily also bind to this element and repress the activation mediated by PPARalpha, thus showing that the interplay between several nuclear receptors may regulate the entry of fatty acids into the mitochondria, a crucial step in their metabolism. PMID:12408750

  9. Structural analysis of the regulatory elements of the type-II procollagen gene. Conservation of promoter and first intron sequences between human and mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Vikkula, M; Metsäranta, M; Syvänen, A C; Ala-Kokko, L; Vuorio, E; Peltonen, L

    1992-01-01

    Transcription of the type-II procollagen gene (COL2A1) is very specifically restricted to a limited number of tissues, particularly cartilages. In order to identify transcription-control motifs we have sequenced the promoter region and the first intron of the human and mouse COL2A1 genes. With the assumption that these motifs should be well conserved during evolution, we have searched for potential elements important for the tissue-specific transcription of the COL2A1 gene by aligning the two sequences with each other and with the available rat type-II procollagen sequence for the promoter. With this approach we could identify specific evolutionarily well-conserved motifs in the promoter area. On the other hand, several suggested regulatory elements in the promoter region did not show evolutionary conservation. In the middle of the first intron we found a cluster of well-conserved transcription-control elements and we conclude that these conserved motifs most probably possess a significant function in the control of the tissue-specific transcription of the COL2A1 gene. We also describe locations of additional, highly conserved nucleotide stretches, which are good candidate regions in the search for binding sites of yet-uncharacterized cartilage-specific transcription regulators of the COL2A1 gene. PMID:1637314

  10. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L.; Woychik, R.P.; Wilkinson, J.E.; Geisler, J.G. |

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (A{sup y}) or viable yellow (A{sup vy}) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant {open_quotes}obese yellow{close_quotes} a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Light-Intensity-Dependent Expression of Lhc Gene Family Encoding Light-Harvesting Chlorophyll-a/b Proteins of Photosystem II in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Haruhiko; Nakamori, Akira; Minagawa, Jun; Ono, Taka-aki

    2002-01-01

    Excessive light conditions repressed the levels of mRNAs accumulation of multiple Lhc genes encoding light-harvesting chlorophyll-a/b (LHC) proteins of photosystem (PS)II in the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The light intensity required for the repression tended to decrease with lowering temperature or CO2 concentration. The responses of six LhcII genes encoding the major LHC (LHCII) proteins and two genes (Lhcb4 and Lhcb5) encoding the minor LHC proteins of PSII (CP29 and CP26) were similar. The results indicate that the expression of these Lhc genes is coordinately repressed when the energy input through the antenna systems exceeds the requirement for CO2 assimilation. The Lhc mRNA level repressed under high-light conditions was partially recovered by adding the electron transport inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, suggesting that redox signaling via photosynthetic electron carriers is involved in the gene regulation. However, the mRNA level was still considerably lower under high-light than under low-light conditions even in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. Repression of the Lhc genes by high light was prominent even in the mutants deficient in the reaction center(s) of PSII or both PSI and PSII. The results indicate that two alternative processes are involved in the repression of Lhc genes under high-light conditions, one of which is independent of the photosynthetic reaction centers and electron transport events. PMID:12226512

  12. A potentially critical Hpa II site of the X chromosome-linked PGK1 gene is unmethylated prior to the onset of meiosis of human oogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singer-Sam, J.; Dai, A.; Riggs, A.D. ); Goldstein, L.; Gartler, S.M. )

    1992-02-15

    Hpa II site H8 is in the CpG-rich 5{prime} untranslated region of the human X chromosome-linked gene for phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1). It is the only Hpa II site in the CpG island' whose methylation pattern is perfectly correlated with transcriptional silence of this gene. The authors measured DNA methylation at site H8 in fetal oogonia and oocytes and found, using a quantitative assay based on the polymerase chain reaction, that purified germ cells isolated by micromanipulation were unmethylated in 47-day to 110-day fetuses, whereas ovaries depleted of germ cells and non-ovary tissues were methylated. They conclude that site H8 is the unmethylated in germ cells prior to the onset of meiosis and reactivation of the X chromosome.

  13. pBaSysBioII: an integrative plasmid generating gfp transcriptional fusions for high-throughput analysis of gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Botella, Eric; Fogg, Mark; Jules, Matthieu; Piersma, Sjouke; Doherty, Geoff; Hansen, Annette; Denham, Emma L; Le Chat, Ludovic; Veiga, Patrick; Bailey, Kirra; Lewis, Peter J; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Aymerich, Stéphane; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Devine, Kevin M

    2010-06-01

    Plasmid pBaSysBioII was constructed for high-throughput analysis of gene expression in Bacillus subtilis. It is an integrative plasmid with a ligation-independent cloning (LIC) site, allowing the generation of transcriptional gfpmut3 fusions with desired promoters. Integration is by a Campbell-type event and is non-mutagenic, placing the fusion at the homologous chromosomal locus. Using phoA, murAA, gapB, ptsG and cggR promoters that are responsive to phosphate availability, growth rate and carbon source, we show that detailed profiles of promoter activity can be established, with responses to changing conditions being measurable within 1 min of the stimulus. This makes pBaSysBioII a highly versatile tool for real-time gene expression analysis in growing cells of B. subtilis. PMID:20150235

  14. Alteration of Soil Rhizosphere Communities following Genetic Transformation of White Spruce?

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Philippe M.; Hamelin, Richard C.; Filion, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The application of plant genetic manipulations to agriculture and forestry with the aim of alleviating insect damage through Bacillus thuringiensis transformation could lead to a significant reduction in the release of pesticides into the environment. However, many groups have come forward with very valid and important questions related to potentially adverse effects, and it is crucial to assess and better understand the impact that this technology might have on ecosystems. In this study, we analyzed rhizosphere soil samples collected from the first B. thuringiensis-transformed trees [with insertion of the CryIA(b) toxin-encoding gene] grown in Canada (Val-Cartier, QC, Canada) as part of an ecological impact assessment project. Using a robust amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis approach coupled with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the rhizosphere-inhabiting microbial communities of white spruce (Picea glauca) genetically modified by biolistic insertion of the cryIA(b), uidA (beta-glucuronidase), and nptII genes were compared with the microbial communities associated with non-genetically modified counterparts and with trees in which only the genetic marker genes uidA and nptII have been inserted. Analysis of 1,728 rhizosphere bacterial clones (576 clones per treatment) using a Cramér-von Mises statistic analysis combined with a Monte Carlo comparison clearly indicated that there was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between the microbial communities inhabiting the rhizospheres of trees carrying the cryIA(b), uidA, and nptII transgenes, trees carrying only the uidA and nptII transgenes, and control trees. Clear rhizosphere microbial community alterations due to B. thuringiensis tree genetic modification have to our knowledge never been described previously and open the door to interesting questions related to B. thuringiensis genetic transformation and also to the impact of commonly used uidA and nptII genetic marker genes. PMID:17468272

  15. Mutations in the MGAT2 gene controlling complex N-glycan synthesis cause carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type II, an autosomal recessive disease with defective brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, J.; Schachter, H.; Dunn, J.

    1996-10-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome (CDGS) type II is a multisystemic congenital disease with severe involvement of the nervous system. Two unrelated CDGS type II patients are shown to have point mutations (one patient having Ser{r_arrow}Phe and the other having His{r_arrow}Arg) in the catalytic domain of the gene MGAT2, encoding UDP-GlcNAc:{alpha}-6-D-mannoside {Beta}-1,2-N-ace-tylglucosaminyltransferase II (GnT II), an enzyme essential for biosynthesis of complex Asn-linked glycans. Both mutations caused both decreased expression of enzyme protein in a baculovirus/insect cell system and inactivation of enzyme activity. Restriction-endonuclease analysis of DNA from 23 blood relatives of one of these patients showed that 13 donors were heterozygotes; the other relatives and 21 unrelated donors were normal homozygotes. All heterozygotes showed a significant reduction (33%-68%) in mononuclear-cell GnT II activity. The data indicate that CDGS type II is an autosomal recessive disease and that complex Asn-linked glycans are essential for normal neurological development. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and fluid obtained from metal implant sites. PMID:25594566

  17. Differential Regulation and Posttranslational Processing of the Class II Hydrophobin Genes from the Biocontrol Fungus Hypocrea atroviridis?

    PubMed Central

    Mikus, Marianna; Hatvani, Lóránt; Neuhof, Torsten; Komo?-Zelazowska, Monika; Dieckmann, Ralf; Schwecke, Torsten; Druzhinina, Irina S.; von Döhren, Hans; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrophobins are small extracellular proteins, unique to and ubiquitous in filamentous fungi, which mediate interactions between the fungus and environment. The mycoparasitic fungus Hypocrea atroviridis has recently been shown to possess 10 different class II hydrophobin genes, which is a much higher number than that of any other ascomycete investigated so far. In order to learn the potential advantage of this hydrophobin multiplicity for the fungus, we have investigated their expression patterns under different physiological conditions (e.g., vegetative growth), various conditions inducing sporulation (light, carbon starvation, and mechanical injury-induced stress), and confrontation with potential hosts for mycoparasitism. The results show that the 10 hydrophobins display different patterns of response to these conditions: one hydrophobin (encoded by hfb-2b) is constitutively induced under all conditions, whereas other hydrophobins were formed only under conditions of carbon starvation (encoded by hfb-1c and hfb-6c) or light plus carbon starvation (encoded by hfb-2c, hfb-6a, and hfb-6b). The hydrophobins encoded by hfb-1b and hfb-5a were primarily formed during vegetative growth and under mechanical injury-provoked stress. hfb-22a was not expressed under any conditions and is likely a pseudogene. None of the 10 genes showed a specific expression pattern during mycoparasitic interaction. Most, but not all, of the expression patterns under the three different conditions of sporulation were dependent on one or both of the two blue-light regulator proteins BLR1 and BLR2, as shown by the use of respective loss-of-function mutants. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry of mycelial solvent extracts provided sets of molecular ions corresponding to HFB-1b, HFB-2a, HFB-2b, and HFB-5a in their oxidized and processed forms. These in silico-deduced sequences of the hydrophobins indicate cleavages at known signal peptide sites as well as additional N- and C-terminal processing. Mass peaks observed during confrontation with plant-pathogenic fungi indicate further proteolytic attack on the hydrophobins. Our study illustrates both divergent and redundant functions of the 10 hydrophobins of H. atroviridis. PMID:19329667

  18. Differential regulation and posttranslational processing of the class II hydrophobin genes from the biocontrol fungus Hypocrea atroviridis.

    PubMed

    Mikus, Marianna; Hatvani, Lóránt; Neuhof, Torsten; Komo?-Zelazowska, Monika; Dieckmann, Ralf; Schwecke, Torsten; Druzhinina, Irina S; von Döhren, Hans; Kubicek, Christian P

    2009-05-01

    Hydrophobins are small extracellular proteins, unique to and ubiquitous in filamentous fungi, which mediate interactions between the fungus and environment. The mycoparasitic fungus Hypocrea atroviridis has recently been shown to possess 10 different class II hydrophobin genes, which is a much higher number than that of any other ascomycete investigated so far. In order to learn the potential advantage of this hydrophobin multiplicity for the fungus, we have investigated their expression patterns under different physiological conditions (e.g., vegetative growth), various conditions inducing sporulation (light, carbon starvation, and mechanical injury-induced stress), and confrontation with potential hosts for mycoparasitism. The results show that the 10 hydrophobins display different patterns of response to these conditions: one hydrophobin (encoded by hfb-2b) is constitutively induced under all conditions, whereas other hydrophobins were formed only under conditions of carbon starvation (encoded by hfb-1c and hfb-6c) or light plus carbon starvation (encoded by hfb-2c, hfb-6a, and hfb-6b). The hydrophobins encoded by hfb-1b and hfb-5a were primarily formed during vegetative growth and under mechanical injury-provoked stress. hfb-22a was not expressed under any conditions and is likely a pseudogene. None of the 10 genes showed a specific expression pattern during mycoparasitic interaction. Most, but not all, of the expression patterns under the three different conditions of sporulation were dependent on one or both of the two blue-light regulator proteins BLR1 and BLR2, as shown by the use of respective loss-of-function mutants. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry of mycelial solvent extracts provided sets of molecular ions corresponding to HFB-1b, HFB-2a, HFB-2b, and HFB-5a in their oxidized and processed forms. These in silico-deduced sequences of the hydrophobins indicate cleavages at known signal peptide sites as well as additional N- and C-terminal processing. Mass peaks observed during confrontation with plant-pathogenic fungi indicate further proteolytic attack on the hydrophobins. Our study illustrates both divergent and redundant functions of the 10 hydrophobins of H. atroviridis. PMID:19329667

  19. Identification, characterization, and expression analyses of class II and IV chitinase genes from Douglas-fir seedlings infected by Phellinus sulphurascens.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Sturrock, R N; Williams, H L; Ekramoddoullah, A K M

    2010-04-01

    Laminated root rot (LRR) disease, caused by the fungus Phellinus sulphurascens, is a major threat to coastal Douglas-fir (DF) (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in western North America. Understanding host-pathogen interactions of this pathosystem is essential to manage this important conifer root disease. Our research objectives were to identify DF pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and analyze their expression patterns over the course of infection. We constructed a cDNA library of Phellinus sulphurascens-infected DF seedling roots and sequenced a total of 3,600 random cDNA clones from this library. One of the largest groups of identified genes (203 cDNA clones) matched with chitinase genes reported in other plant species. We identified at least three class II and six class IV chitinase genes from DF seedlings. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses showed significant differential expression patterns locally in root tissues and systemically in needle tissues after fungal invasion. Nonetheless, there was a common trend in gene expression patterns for most of the chitinase genes: an upregulation within 12 h of pathogen inoculation followed by down-regulation within 2 to 3 days postinoculation (dpi), and then further upregulation within 5 to 7 dpi. Western immunoblot data showed differential accumulation of class IV chitinases in Phellinus sulphurascens-infected DF seedlings. Further detailed functional analyses will help us to understand the specific role of DF chitinases in defense against Phellinus sulphurascens infection. PMID:20205539

  20. Brassica napus responses to short-term excessive copper treatment with decrease of photosynthetic pigments, differential expression of heavy metal homeostasis genes including activation of gene NRAMP4 involved in photosystem II stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zlobin, I E; Kholodova, V P; Rakhmankulova, Z F; Kuznetsov, Vl V

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, the influence of 50 and 100 µM CuSO4 was investigated starting from 3 h till 72 h treatment of 4-weeks Brassica napus plants. High CuSO4 concentrations in nutrient medium resulted in the rapid copper accumulation in plants, especially in roots, much slower and to lower degree in leaves. Copper excess induced early decrease in the leaf water content and temporary leaf wilting. The decrease in content of photosynthetic pigments became significant to 24 h of excessive copper treatments and reached 35 % decrease to 72 h, but there were no significant changes in maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry. The copper excess affected the expression of ten genes involved in heavy metal homeostasis and copper detoxification. The results showed the differential and organ-specific expression of most genes. The potential roles of copper-activated genes encoding heavy metal transporters (ZIP5, NRAMP4, YSL2, and MRP1), metallothioneins (MT1a and MT2b), low-molecular chelator synthesis enzymes (PCS1 and NAS2), and metallochaperones (CCS and HIPP06) in heavy metal homeostasis and copper ion detoxification were discussed. The highest increase in gene expression was shown for NRAMP4 in leaves in spite of relatively moderate Cu accumulation there. The opinion was advanced that the NRAMP4 activation can be considered among the early reactions in the defense of the photosystem II against copper excess. PMID:25361533

  1. Gastric carcinomas with microsatellite instability: clinical features and mutations to the TGF-beta type II receptor, IGFII receptor, and BAX genes.

    PubMed

    Iacopetta, B J; Soong, R; House, A K; Hamelin, R

    1999-03-01

    The replication error phenotype (RER+) represents an important new form of genetic alteration characterized by widespread instability in repetitive nucleotide sequences. The aim of this study was to compare the features of RER+ gastric tumours with those of RER+ colonic tumours. RER status was determined by analysis of size alterations in the BAT-26 mononucleotide repeat microsatellite. Twelve of 121 (10 per cent) gastric carcinomas from a low-incidence region were found to be RER+. BAT-26 instability was associated with tumours showing an absence of nodal invasion ( p=0.009) and with a trend for improved prognosis. These tumours were more frequent in older, female patients. Frameshift mutations in mononucleotide repeat sequences within the transforming growth factor-beta receptor II (RII), insulin-like growth factor II receptor (IGFIIR), and BAX genes were observed in 83, 33, and 25 per cent, respectively, of RER+ tumours. Only 1/12 (8 per cent) RER+ tumours contained a p53 gene mutation compared with 29/109 (27 per cent) RER- tumours. RER+ gastric carcinomas therefore share several important features with RER+ colonic tumours, including less frequent nodal invasion, improved prognosis, a similar frequency of mutation in growth control genes containing repetitive nucleotide sequences, and a low frequency of mutation of the p53 tumour suppressor gene. PMID:10398102

  2. Hetero- and homozygosity of MHC class II gene products in systemic lupus erythematosus. The Members of the Deutsche Multizentrische SLE-Studie.

    PubMed

    Hartung, K; Coldewey, R; Krapf, F; Lang, B; Specker, C; Schendel, D; Schneider, P; Seuchter, S; Stangel, W; Albert, E

    1991-10-01

    An analysis of HLA class II antigens in 356 white patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) showed that all HLA-DR and -DQ homozygous and heterozygous combinations appear with frequencies expected from the observed gene frequencies. HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3 gene frequencies were both increased in SLE, as were the odds ratios of all DR2 and DR3 hetero- and homozygous combinations. HLA-DR2/C4AQ0 heterozygotes were also not increased over expected values. Therefore, gene complementation at MHC loci does not contribute to susceptibility to SLE, but rather one or two MHC allele(s) in linkage with HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3. PMID:1801306

  3. Effects of alien and intraspecies cytoplasms on manifestation of nuclear genes for wheat resistance to brown rust: II. Specificity of cytoplasm influence on different Lr genes

    SciTech Connect

    Voluevich, E.A.; Buloichik, A.A.; Palilova, A.N.

    1995-04-01

    Specificity of expression of the major nuclear genes Lr to two brown rust clones in hybrids with the same maternal cytoplasm was analyzed. It was evaluated by a resistant: susceptible ratio in the F{sub 2}. Reciprocal hybrids were obtained from the cross between the progeny of homozygous susceptible plants of the cultivar Penjamo 62 and its alloplasmatic lines carrying cytoplasms of Triticum dicoccoides var. fulvovillosum, Aegilops squarrosa var. typical, Agropyron trichophorum, and isogenic lines of the cultivar Thatcher (Th) with the Lr1, Lr9, Lr15, and Lr19 genes. It was shown that the effect of the Lr1 gene in the cytoplasm of cultivar Thatcher and in eu-, and alloplasmatic forms of Penjamo 62 was less expressed than that of other Lr genes. Cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (dicoccoides)-Penjamo 62 was the only exception: in the F{sub 2}, hybrids with Th (Lr1) had a higher yield of resistant forms than those with Th (Lr15). In the hybrid combinations studied, expression and/or transmission of the Lr19 gene was more significant than that of other genes. This gene had no advantages over Lr15 and Lr19 only in cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (squarrosa)-Penjamo 62. In certain hybrid cytoplasms, the display of the Lr1, Lr15, and Lr19 genes, in contrast to Lr9, varied with the virulence of the pathogen clones. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Differential introduction of DNA damage and repair in mammalian genes transcribed by RNA polymerases I and II.

    PubMed Central

    Vos, J M; Wauthier, E L

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a general quantitative method for comparing the levels of drug-induced DNA crosslinking in specific mammalian genes. We observed a dramatic difference between the efficiency of the removal of both psoralen monoadducts and interstrand crosslinks from the rRNA genes and the efficiency of their removal from the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in cultured human and hamster cells. While 90% of the interstand crosslinks were removed from the human DHFR gene in 48 h, less than 25% repair occurred in the rRNA genes. Similarly, in Chinese hamster ovary cells, 85% repair of interstrand crosslinks occurred within 8 h in the DHFR gene versus only 20% repair in the rRNA genes. The preferential repair of the DHFR gene relative to that of the rRNA genes was also observed for psoralen monoadducts in cells from both mammalian species. In human-mouse hybrid cells, the active mouse rRNA genes were five times more susceptible to psoralen modification than are the silent rRNA human genes, but adduct removal was similarly inefficient for both classes. We conclude that the repair of chemical damage such as psoralen photoadducts in an expressed mammalian gene may depend upon the class of transcription to which it belongs. Images PMID:2005908

  5. Terminal oxidase diversity and function in "Metallosphaera yellowstonensis": gene expression and protein modeling suggest mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation in the sulfolobales.

    PubMed

    Kozubal, M A; Dlakic, M; Macur, R E; Inskeep, W P

    2011-03-01

    "Metallosphaera yellowstonensis" is a thermoacidophilic archaeon isolated from Yellowstone National Park that is capable of autotrophic growth using Fe(II), elemental S, or pyrite as electron donors. Analysis of the draft genome sequence from M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 revealed seven different copies of heme copper oxidases (subunit I) in a total of five different terminal oxidase complexes, including doxBCEF, foxABCDEFGHIJ, soxABC, and the soxM supercomplex, as well as a novel hypothetical two-protein doxB-like polyferredoxin complex. Other genes found in M. yellowstonensis with possible roles in S and or Fe cycling include a thiosulfate oxidase (tqoAB), a sulfite oxidase (som), a cbsA cytochrome b(558/566), several small blue copper proteins, and a novel gene sequence coding for a putative multicopper oxidase (Mco). Results from gene expression studies, including reverse transcriptase (RT) quantitative PCR (qPCR) of cultures grown autotrophically on either Fe(II), pyrite, or elemental S showed that the fox gene cluster and mco are highly expressed under conditions where Fe(II) is an electron donor. Metagenome sequence and gene expression studies of Fe-oxide mats confirmed the importance of fox genes (e.g., foxA and foxC) and mco under Fe(II)-oxidizing conditions. Protein modeling of FoxC suggests a novel lysine-lysine or lysine-arginine heme B binding domain, indicating that it is likely the cytochrome component of a heterodimer complex with foxG as a ferredoxin subunit. Analysis of mco shows that it encodes a novel multicopper blue protein with two plastocyanin type I copper domains that may play a role in the transfer of electrons within the Fox protein complex. An understanding of metabolic pathways involved in aerobic iron and sulfur oxidation in Sulfolobales has broad implications for understanding the evolution and niche diversification of these thermophiles as well as practical applications in fields such as bioleaching of trace metals from pyritic ores. PMID:21239558

  6. A second Zn(II)(2)Cys(6) transcriptional factor encoded by the YNA2 gene is indispensable for the transcriptional activation of the genes involved in nitrate assimilation in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Avila, Julio; González, Celedonio; Brito, Nélida; Machín, Félix; Pérez, M Dolores; Siverio, José M

    2002-04-01

    Nitrate assimilation genes encoding a nitrate transporter (YNT1), nitrite reductase (YNI1), a Zn(II)(2)Cys(6) transcriptional factor involved in nitrate induction (YNA1) and the nitrate reductase (YNR1) are clustered in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. A second gene, termed YNA2 (yeast nitrate assimilation), was located seven nucleotides away from the 3' region of YNR1 gene. The cluster is flanked by an ORF encoding a protein with similarity to glutathione-S-transferase on the YNT1 side and an ORF with similarity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad3p on the YNA2 side. The disruption of YNA2 confers the resulting null mutant strain with inability to grow in nitrate. The YNA2 gene encodes a putative protein of 618 residues bearing in the N-terminus the consensus sequence Cys-X(2)-Cys-X(6)-Cys-X(5-16)-Cys-X(2)-Cys-X(6-8)-Cys characteristic of the Zn(II)(2)Cys(6) transcriptional factors. YNA2 is therefore a member of the H. polymorpha nitrate assimilation gene cluster which is transcribed in the opposite direction to the rest of the members. Yna2p shares about 27% similarity with the H. polymorpha Yna1p Zn(II)(2)Cys(6) transcriptional factor involved in nitrate induction. Unlike the wild-type, the yna2::URA3 strain showed no expression of the nitrate assimilation genes when incubated in nitrate for 2 h. With regard to YNA2 expression, similar YNA2 transcript levels were observed in ammonium and in ammonium plus nitrate, but about a four-fold higher expression was observed in nitrate. However, this induction by nitrate of the YNA2 gene was not observed in the Deltayna1::URA3 strain. On the contrary, the pattern of YNA1 expression was the same in the wild-type as in the yna2::URA3 strain, indicating that YNA2 does not affect YNA1 expression. PMID:11921102

  7. Distinguishing the Roles of Topoisomerases I and II in Relief of Transcription-Induced Torsional Stress in Yeast rRNA Genes ?

    PubMed Central

    French, Sarah L.; Sikes, Martha L.; Hontz, Robert D.; Osheim, Yvonne N.; Lambert, Tashima E.; El Hage, Aziz; Smith, Mitchell M.; Tollervey, David; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Beyer, Ann L.

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the role of topoisomerase activity in relieving transcription-induced supercoiling, yeast genes encoding rRNA were visualized in cells deficient for either or both of the two major topoisomerases. In the absence of both topoisomerase I (Top1) and topoisomerase II (Top2) activity, processivity was severely impaired and polymerases were unable to transcribe through the 6.7-kb gene. Loss of Top1 resulted in increased negative superhelical density (two to six times the normal value) in a significant subset of rRNA genes, as manifested by regions of DNA template melting. The observed DNA bubbles were not R-loops and did not block polymerase movement, since genes with DNA template melting showed no evidence of slowed elongation. Inactivation of Top2, however, resulted in characteristic signs of slowed elongation in rRNA genes, suggesting that Top2 alleviates transcription-induced positive supercoiling. Together, the data indicate that torsion in front of and behind transcribing polymerase I has different consequences and different resolution. Positive torsion in front of the polymerase induces supercoiling (writhe) and is largely resolved by Top2. Negative torsion behind the polymerase induces DNA strand separation and is largely resolved by Top1. PMID:21098118

  8. No association between variants in the ACE and angiotensin II receptor 1 genes and acute mountain sickness in Nepalese pilgrims to the Janai Purnima Festival at 4380 m.

    PubMed

    Koehle, Michael S; Wang, Pei; Guenette, Jordan A; Rupert, Jim L

    2006-01-01

    Koehle, Michael S., Pei Wang, Jordan A. Guenette, and Jim L. Rupert. No association between variants in the ACE and angiotensin II receptor 1 genes and acute mountain sickness in Nepalese pilgrims to the Janai Purnima Festival at 4380 m. High Alt. Med. Biol. 7:281-289, 2006.--Acute mountain sickness (AMS) causes significant morbidity among visitors to altitude. The primary contributors to developing AMS are altitude and rate of ascent; however, the substantial variation in susceptibility between individuals has led a number of investigators to propose that there may be genetic predilection to the disease. The ACE I/D polymorphism has been shown to predict performance among elite mountaineers. This study compares genotype and allele frequencies at the ACE I/D locus, two other loci in the ACE gene, and one locus in the angiotensin-2 receptor gene between individuals who did, or did not, express signs of AMS while attending a high altitude religious festival in Nepal (4380 m). Subjects (80 males, 23 females) were recruited and genotyped. All subjects were Nepalese. Forty-four of the subjects had been diagnosed with AMS by physicians at a high altitude health camp; the rest were free from altitude illness. All subjects were genotyped at polymorphic loci in the genes encoding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II receptor type 1 gene (AGTR1). The polymorphisms examined were two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ACE (ACE(A-240T), dbSNP rs4291; and ACE(A2350G), dbSNP rs4343), the intronic Alu insertion in ACE (ACE I/D), and the SNP ATR(A1166C), (dbSNP rs17231380) in AGTR1d. All polymorphisms in ACE were found to be in linkage disequilibrium. No significant associations were found between AMS incidence and any of the alleles, suggesting that variants at these loci do not contribute to susceptibility to AMS in this population. PMID:17173513

  9. Construction of a YAC contig and STS map spanning at least 10 cM in 1q41, the critical region of Usher II gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.Y.; Zhen, D.K.; Li, B.F.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder causing congenital hearing loss, progressive retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction. The Usher syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous. At least three genetic types of Usher syndrome are know to exist. The Usher II (USH2) syndrome has originally been linked to 1q41 between D1S70 and D1S81. more recently its location was refined and placed between D1S217 and D1S229. We have constructed a YAC contig containing 23 clones and a minimum of 10 Mbp of human DNA. A total of three NotI linking clones, fourteen polymorphic microsatelite markers, eight YAC end clones and twenty lambda and cosmid subclones have been used to order the YACs and assess their integrity. The YAC subclones were used to reassess the location of the USH2 gene. Seven CpG islands have already been identified in the region. Several potential exons have been identified by exon amplification in the cosmid subclones. This map of overlapping clones, the set of densely spaced physical markers and potential exons will promote our understanding of the 1q1 region, its associated genes and eventually the gene mutated in Usher syndrome type II.

  10. Transfer of recombinant plasmids containing the gene for DpnII DNA methylase into strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae that produce DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.; Springhorn, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Plasmid transfer via the transformation pathway of Streptococcus pneumoniae was weakly restricted by the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonuclease, either of which gave a reduction only to 0.4, compared with phage infection, which was restricted to 10/sup -5/. The greater sensitivity of plasmid transfer compared with chromosomal transformation, which was not at all restricted, can be attributed to partially double-stranded intermediates formed from two complementary donor fragments. However, clustering of potential restriction sites in the plasmids increased the probability of escape from restriction. The recombinant plasmid pMP10, in which the gene for the DpnII DNA methylase was cloned, can be transferred to strains that contain neither restriction enzyme or that contain DpnII as readily as can the vector pMP5. Introduction of pMP10 raised the level of methylase by five times the level normally present in DpnII strains. Transfer of pMP10 to DpnI-containing strains was infrequent, presumably owing to the suicidal methylation of DNA which rendered it susceptible to the host endonuclease. The few clones in which pMP10 was established had lost DpnI. Loss of the plasmid after curing of the cell eliminated the methylase but did not restore DpnI. Although this loss of DpnI could result from spontaneous mutations, its relatively high frequency, 0.1% suggested that the loss was due to a regulatory shift.

  11. Acinetobacter baumannii clonal lineages I and II harboring different carbapenem-hydrolyzing-?-lactamase genes are widespread among hospitalized burn patients in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Mahdian, Somayeh; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Pakzad, Iraj; Ghanbari, Fatemeh; Soroush, Setareh; Azimi, Lila; Rastegar-Lari, Abdolaziz; Giannouli, Maria; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze antimicrobial resistance patterns and their encoding genes and genotypic diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from burn patients in Tehran, Iran. The presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase- and blaOXA-encoding genes among 37 multidrug resistant (MDR) A. baumannii strains isolated from patients hospitalized in a teaching hospital in Tehran was evaluated. Susceptibility to 7 antibiotics was tested by disk agar diffusion and to polymyxin B and colistin was tested by E-test, according to CLSI guidelines. All isolates were then analyzed by PCR for the presence of blaIMP, blaVIM, blaSIMblaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, and blaOXA-58-like carbapenemase genes, and blaOXA-51-like, blaTEM, blaSHV, blaPER, blaVEB, and blaGIM genes. Genotyping of A. baumannii strains was performed by repetitive sequence-based (REP)-PCR and cluster analysis of REP-PCR profiles. A. baumannii isolates were assigned to international clones by multiplex PCR sequence group analysis. Twenty-five A. baumannii isolates were classified as MDR, and 12 were classified as extensively drug resistant. All isolates were susceptible to colistin and polymyxin B. Eighty-one percent of the isolates was resistant to imipenem or meropenem and harbored at least one or both of the blaOXA-23-like or blaOXA-24-like carbapenemase genes. Co-existence of different resistance genes was found among carbapenem-resistant isolates. Multiplex PCR sequence group analysis most commonly assigned A. baumannii isolates to international clones I (18/37; 48.6%) and II (18/37; 48.6%). An alarming increase in resistance to carbapenems and the spread of blaOXA-23-like and/or blaOXA-24-like carbapenemase genes was observed among A. baumannii strains belonging to clonal lineages I and II, isolated from burn patients in Tehran. PMID:26111484

  12. Genetic variants in IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and adiponectin genes and colon cancer risk in African Americans and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Keku, Temitope O.; Vidal, Adriana; Oliver, Shannon; Hoyo, Catherine; Hall, Ingrid J.; Omofoye, Seun; McDoom, Maya; Worley, Kendra; Galanko, Joseph; Sandler, Robert S.; Millikan, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluating genetic susceptibility may clarify effects of known environmental factors and also identify individuals at high risk. We evaluated the association of four insulin-related pathway gene polymorphisms in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) (CA)n repeat, insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-II) (rs680), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) (rs2854744), and adiponectin (APM1 rs1501299) with colon cancer risk, as well as relationships with circulating IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and C-peptide in a population-based study. Methods Participants were African Americans (231cases, 306 controls) and Whites (297 cases, 530 controls). Consenting subjects provided blood specimens, and lifestyle/diet information. Genotyping for all genes except IGF-I was performed by the 5?-exonuclease (Taqman) assay. The IGF-I (CA)n repeat was assayed by PCR, and fragment analysis. Circulating proteins were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by logistic regression. Results The IGF-I (CA)19 repeat was higher in White controls (50%) than African American controls (31%). Whites homozygous for the IGF-I (CA)19 repeat had a nearly two fold increase in risk of colon cancer (OR=1.77; 95%CI=1.15–2.73), but not African Americans (OR= 0.73, 95%CI 0.50–1.51). We observed an inverse association between the IGF-II Apa1 A-variant and colon cancer risk (OR= 0.49, 95%CI 0.28–0.88) in Whites only. Carrying the IGFBP-3 variant alleles was associated with lower IGFBP-3 protein levels, a difference most pronounced in Whites (p- trend < 0.05). Conclusions These results support an association between insulin pathway-related genes and elevated colon cancer risk in Whites but not in African Americans. PMID:22565227

  13. DNA-Mediated Transfer of an RNA Polymerase II Gene: Reversion of the Temperature-Sensitive Hamster Cell Cycle Mutant TsAF8 by Mammalian DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ingles, C. James; Shales, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of the TsAF8 temperature-sensitive (TS) mutant of Syrian hamster BHK-21 cells, with calcium phosphate precipitates of genomic TS+ DNAs from a variety of mammalian cell lines permitted the selection of TS+ colonies at 40°C. TS+ transformation events were distinguished from spontaneous TS+ reversions in experiments in which ?-amanitin-sensitive (AmaS) TS+ DNA was used to transform an AmaR derivative of TsAF8 cells and AmaR TS+ DNA was used to transform AmaS TsAF8 cells. In each case it was possible to demonstrate the unselected acquisition of the appropriate AmaS or AmaR phenotype with the selected TS+ allele. Each of these TS+ transformed cell lines when grown at 40°C contained an RNA polymerase II activity with a sensitivity to inhibition by ?-amanitin characteristic of the particular DNA used to transform the TS cells, whereas at 34°C the same cells contained a mixture of AmaR and AmaS polymerase II activities. Together, these data provide convincing evidence that the RNA polymerase II gene determining sensitivity to inhibition by ?-amanitin can be transferred to TsAF8 cells and that the TS defect in TsAF8 is a polymerase II mutation. PMID:14582161

  14. Data in support of a functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    PubMed

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    This data article contains insights into the methodology used for the analysis of three exonic mutations altering the splicing of the IDS gene: c.241C>T, c.257C>T and c.1122C>T. We have performed splicing assays for the wild-type and mutant minigenes corresponding to these substitutions. In addition, bioinformatic predictions of splicing regulatory sequence elements as well as RNA interference and overexpression experiments were conducted. The interpretation of these data and further extensive experiments into the analysis of these three mutations and also into the methodology applied to correct one of them can be found in "Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II" Matos et al. (2015) [1]. PMID:26693516

  15. Data in support of a functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This data article contains insights into the methodology used for the analysis of three exonic mutations altering the splicing of the IDS gene: c.241C>T, c.257C>T and c.1122C>T. We have performed splicing assays for the wild-type and mutant minigenes corresponding to these substitutions. In addition, bioinformatic predictions of splicing regulatory sequence elements as well as RNA interference and overexpression experiments were conducted. The interpretation of these data and further extensive experiments into the analysis of these three mutations and also into the methodology applied to correct one of them can be found in “Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II” Matos et al. (2015) [1]. PMID:26693516

  16. Genetic variation of the MHC class II DRB genes in the Japanese weasel, Mustela itatsi, endemic to Japan, compared with the Siberian weasel, Mustela sibirica.

    PubMed

    Nishita, Y; Abramov, A V; Kosintsev, P A; Lin, L-K; Watanabe, S; Yamazaki, K; Kaneko, Y; Masuda, R

    2015-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that play a critical role in vertebrate immune system and are highly polymorphic. To further understand the molecular evolution of the MHC genes, we compared MHC class II DRB genes between the Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi), a species endemic to Japan, and the Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica), a closely related species on the continent. We sequenced a 242-bp region of DRB exon 2, which encodes antigen-binding sites (ABS), and found 24 alleles from 31 M. itatsi individuals and 17 alleles from 21 M. sibirica individuals, including broadly distributed, species-specific and/or geographically restricted alleles. Our results suggest that pathogen-driven balancing selection have acted to maintain the diversity in the DRB genes. For predicted ABS, nonsynonymous substitutions exceeded synonymous substitutions, also indicating positive selection, which was not seen at non-ABS. In a Bayesian phylogenetic tree, two M. sibirica DRB alleles were basal to the rest of the sequences from mustelid species and may represent ancestral alleles. Trans-species polymorphism was evident between many mustelid DRB alleles, especially between M. itatsi and M. sibirica. These two Mustela species divided about 1.7 million years ago, but still share many MHC alleles, indicative of their close phylogenetic relationship. PMID:26593752

  17. RELATIONSHIPS OF HG(II) VOLATILIZATION FROM A FRESHWATER POND TO ABUNDANCE OF MER GENES IN THE GENE POOL OF THE INDIGENOUS MICROBIAL COMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of biological activities in the reduction and volatilization of Hg(II) from a polluted pond was investigated. lemental mercury was evolved from pond water immediately following spiking with 203 Hg(NO3)2, whereas a lag period of 36 hr was required in control samples colle...

  18. The QTL within the H2 Complex Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis Infection in Mice Is the Classical Class II H2-Ab1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Logunova, Nadezhda; Korotetskaya, Maria; Polshakov, Vladimir; Apt, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The level of susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) infection depends upon allelic variations in numerous interacting genes. In our mouse model system, the whole-genome quantitative trait loci (QTLs) scan revealed three QTLs involved in TB control on chromosomes 3, 9, and in the vicinity of the H2 complex on chromosome 17. For the present study, we have established a panel of new congenic, MHC-recombinant mouse strains bearing differential small segments of chromosome 17 transferred from the TB-susceptible I/St (H2j) strain onto the genetic background of TB-resistant C57BL/6 (B6) mice (H2b). This allowed narrowing the QTL interval to 17Ch: 33, 77-34, 34 Mb, containing 36 protein-encoding genes. Cloning and sequencing of the H2j allelic variants of these genes demonstrated profound polymorphic variations compare to the H2b haplotype. In two recombinant strains, B6.I-249.1.15.100 and B6.I-249.1.15.139, recombination breakpoints occurred in different sites of the H2-A? 1 gene (beta-chain of the Class II heterodimer H2-A), providing polymorphic variations in the domain ?1 of the A?-chain. These variations were sufficient to produce different TB-relevant phenotypes: the more susceptible B6.I-249.1.15.100 strain demonstrated shorter survival time, more rapid body weight loss, higher mycobacterial loads in the lungs and more severe lung histopathology compared to the more resistant B6.I-249.1.15.139 strain. CD4+ T cells recognized mycobacterial antigens exclusively in the context of the H2-A Class II molecule, and the level of IFN-?-producing CD4+ T cells in the lungs was significantly higher in the resistant strain. Thus, we directly demonstrated for the first time that the classical H2- Ab1 Class II gene is involved in TB control. Molecular modeling of the H2-Aj product predicts that amino acid (AA) substitutions in the A?-chain modify the motif of the peptide-MHC binding groove. Moreover, unique AA substitutions in both ?- and ?-chains of the H2-Aj molecule might affect its interactions with the T-cell receptor (TCR). PMID:26618355

  19. The QTL within the H2 Complex Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis Infection in Mice Is the Classical Class II H2-Ab1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Logunova, Nadezhda; Korotetskaya, Maria; Polshakov, Vladimir; Apt, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The level of susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) infection depends upon allelic variations in numerous interacting genes. In our mouse model system, the whole-genome quantitative trait loci (QTLs) scan revealed three QTLs involved in TB control on chromosomes 3, 9, and in the vicinity of the H2 complex on chromosome 17. For the present study, we have established a panel of new congenic, MHC-recombinant mouse strains bearing differential small segments of chromosome 17 transferred from the TB-susceptible I/St (H2j) strain onto the genetic background of TB-resistant C57BL/6 (B6) mice (H2b). This allowed narrowing the QTL interval to 17Ch: 33, 77–34, 34 Mb, containing 36 protein-encoding genes. Cloning and sequencing of the H2j allelic variants of these genes demonstrated profound polymorphic variations compare to the H2b haplotype. In two recombinant strains, B6.I-249.1.15.100 and B6.I-249.1.15.139, recombination breakpoints occurred in different sites of the H2-A? 1 gene (beta-chain of the Class II heterodimer H2-A), providing polymorphic variations in the domain ?1 of the A?-chain. These variations were sufficient to produce different TB-relevant phenotypes: the more susceptible B6.I-249.1.15.100 strain demonstrated shorter survival time, more rapid body weight loss, higher mycobacterial loads in the lungs and more severe lung histopathology compared to the more resistant B6.I-249.1.15.139 strain. CD4+ T cells recognized mycobacterial antigens exclusively in the context of the H2-A Class II molecule, and the level of IFN-?-producing CD4+ T cells in the lungs was significantly higher in the resistant strain. Thus, we directly demonstrated for the first time that the classical H2- Ab1 Class II gene is involved in TB control. Molecular modeling of the H2-Aj product predicts that amino acid (AA) substitutions in the A?-chain modify the motif of the peptide–MHC binding groove. Moreover, unique AA substitutions in both ?- and ?-chains of the H2-Aj molecule might affect its interactions with the T-cell receptor (TCR). PMID:26618355

  20. Coordinate amplification of metallothionein I and II genes in cadmium-resistant Chinese hamster cells: implications for mechanisms regulating metallothionein gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, B.D.; Enger, M.D.; Griffith, B.B.; Griffith, J.K.; Hanners, J.L.; Longmire, J.L.; Munk, A.C.; Stallings, R.L.; Tesmer, J.G.; Walters, R.A.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The authors describe here the derivation, characterization, and use of clonal cadmium-resistance (Cd/sup r) strains of the Chinese hamster cell line CHO which differ in their metallothionein (MT) induction capacity. By nondenaturing polyacrylaminde gel electrophoresis, the authors showed that the stable Cd/sup r/ phenotype is correlated with the augmented expression of both isometallothioneins (MTI and MTII). In cells resistant to concentrations of CdCl2 exceeding 20 M, coordinate amplifications of genes encoding both isometallothioneins was demonstrated by using cDNA MT-coding sequence probes and probes specific for 3'-noncoding regions of Chinese hamster MTI and MTII genes. Molecular and in situ hybridization analyses supported close linkage of Chinese hamster MTI and MTII genes, which the authors have mapped previously to Chinese hamster chromosome 3. This suggests the existence of a functionally related MT gene cluster in this species. Amplified Cd/sup r/ variants expressing abundant MT and their corresponding Cd/sup s/ parental CHO cells should be useful for future studies directed toward elucidating the mechanisms that regulate expressions of the isometallothioneins. 59 references, 8 figures.

  1. The Fusarium verticillioides FUM gene cluster encodes a Zn(II)2Cys6 protein that affects FUM gene expression and fumonisin production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by some Fusarium species and can contaminate maize or maize products. Ingestion of fumonisins is associated with diseases, including cancer and neural tube defects, in humans and animals. In fungi, genes involved in synthesis of mycotoxins and other secondary met...

  2. Two founder mutations in the SEC23B gene account for the relatively high frequency of CDA II in the Italian population

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Roberta; Gambale, Antonella; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Serra, Maria Luisa; Troiano, Annaelena; De Maggio, Ilaria; Capasso, Mario; Luzzatto, Lucio; Delaunay, Jean; Tamary, Hannah; Iolascon, Achille

    2011-01-01

    Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia type II is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by unique abnormalities in the differentiation of cells of the erythroid lineage. The vast majority of CDA II cases result from mutations in the SEC23B gene. To date, 53 different causative mutations have been reported in 86 unrelated cases (from the CDA II European Registry), 47 of them Italian. We have now identified SEC23B mutations in 23 additional patients, 17 Italians and 6 non-Italian Europeans. The relative allelic frequency of the mutations was then reassessed in a total of 64 Italian and 45 non-Italian unrelated patients. Two mutations, E109K and R14W, account for over one-half of the cases of CDA II in Italy. Whereas the relative frequency of E109K is similar in Italy and in the rest of Europe (and is also prevalent in Moroccan Jews), the relative frequency of R14W is significantly higher in Italy (26.3% vs. 10.7%). By haplotype analysis we demonstrated that both are founder mutations in the Italian population. By using the DMLE+ program our estimate for the age of the E109K mutation in Italian population is ?2,200 years; whereas for the R14W mutation it is ?3,000 years. We hypothesize that E109K may have originated in the Middle East and may have spread in the heyday of the Roman Empire. Instead, R14W may have originated in Southern Italy. The relatively high frequency of the R14W mutation may account for the known increased prevalence of CDA II in Italy. Am. J. Hematol. 86:727–732, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21850656

  3. Two founder mutations in the SEC23B gene account for the relatively high frequency of CDA II in the Italian population.

    PubMed

    Russo, Roberta; Gambale, Antonella; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Serra, Maria Luisa; Troiano, Annaelena; De Maggio, Ilaria; Capasso, Mario; Luzzatto, Lucio; Delaunay, Jean; Tamary, Hannah; Iolascon, Achille

    2011-09-01

    Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia type II is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by unique abnormalities in the differentiation of cells of the erythroid lineage. The vast majority of CDA II cases result from mutations in the SEC23B gene. To date, 53 different causative mutations have been reported in 86 unrelated cases (from the CDA II European Registry), 47 of them Italian. We have now identified SEC23B mutations in 23 additional patients, 17 Italians and 6 non-Italian Europeans. The relative allelic frequency of the mutations was then reassessed in a total of 64 Italian and 45 non-Italian unrelated patients. Two mutations, E109K and R14W, account for over one-half of the cases of CDA II in Italy. Whereas the relative frequency of E109K is similar in Italy and in the rest of Europe (and is also prevalent in Moroccan Jews), the relative frequency of R14W is significantly higher in Italy (26.3% vs. 10.7%). By haplotype analysis we demonstrated that both are founder mutations in the Italian population. By using the DMLE+ program our estimate for the age of the E109K mutation in Italian population is ?2,200 years; whereas for the R14W mutation it is ?3,000 years. We hypothesize that E109K may have originated in the Middle East and may have spread in the heyday of the Roman Empire. Instead, R14W may have originated in Southern Italy. The relatively high frequency of the R14W mutation may account for the known increased prevalence of CDA II in Italy. PMID:21850656

  4. Effects of natural phytochemicals in Angelica sinensis (Danggui) on Nrf2-mediated gene expression of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes and anti-inflammation.

    PubMed

    Saw, Constance Lay Lay; Wu, Qing; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Wang, Hu; Yang, Yinhua; Xu, Xiaoting; Huang, Ying; Khor, Tin Oo; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2013-09-01

    The root of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (abbreviated as AS) (Danggui) has a long history in Asian herbal medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that AS possesses anti-cancer and anti-oxidant activities. Because the transcription factor Nrf2 mediates the expression of many cellular anti-oxidative stress genes, including genes that are involved in phase II drug metabolism and anti-oxidative stress, this study sought to investigate whether pure compounds from AS or an AS extract could activate antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated gene expression and induce anti-inflammatory activities. Z-Ligustilide (Ligu), 3-butylidenephthalide (Buty) and CO2 supercritical fluid-extracted lipophilic AS extract (SFE) were tested in HepG2-C8 cells stabilized with ARE luciferase reporter gene. Ligu and Buty caused significant toxicity only at 100 ?m. All three samples induced ARE-luciferase activity; however, SFE at 8.5 µg/ml induced ARE-luciferase activity 2-3 fold more potently than did either of the pure compounds. SFE also significantly increased the endogenous mRNA of Nrf2 and the Nrf2 target anti-oxidative gene NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1). The protein expression of NQO1 was also significantly induced by SFE. In RAW 264.7 cells, SFE suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-1? and TNF-? expression about 2 fold stronger than sulforaphane, whereas both pure compounds and SFE suppressed inflammatory nitric oxide (NO) production. In summary, this study demonstrates that AS has anti-inflammatory effects and activates the Nrf2 pathway, which protects against oxidative stress. PMID:23640758

  5. Exceptional Hyperthyroidism and a Role for both Major Histocompatibility Class I and Class II Genes in a Murine Model of Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Sandra M.; Aliesky, Holly A.; Chen, Chun-Rong; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease, can be induced by immunizing susceptible strains of mice with adenovirus encoding the human thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) or its A-subunit. Studies in two small families of recombinant inbred strains showed that susceptibility to developing TSHR antibodies (measured by TSH binding inhibition, TBI) was linked to the MHC region whereas genes on different chromosomes contributed to hyperthyroidism. We have now investigated TSHR antibody production and hyperthyroidism induced by TSHR A-subunit adenovirus immunization of a larger family of strains (26 of the AXB and BXA strains). Analysis of the combined AXB and BXA families provided unexpected insight into several aspects of Graves' disease. First, extreme thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism in one remarkable strain, BXA13, reflected an inability to generate non-functional TSHR antibodies measured by ELISA. Although neutral TSHR antibodies have been detected in Graves' sera, pathogenic, functional TSHR antibodies in Graves' patients are undetectable by ELISA. Therefore, this strain immunized with A-subunit-adenovirus that generates only functional TSHR antibodies may provide an improved model for studies of induced Graves' disease. Second, our combined analysis of linkage data from this and previous work strengthens the evidence that gene variants in the immunoglobulin heavy chain V region contribute to generating thyroid stimulating antibodies. Third, a broad region that encompasses the MHC region on mouse chomosome 17 is linked to the development of TSHR antibodies (measured by TBI). Most importantly, unlike other strains, TBI linkage in the AXB and BXA families to MHC class I and class II genes provides an explanation for the unresolved class I/class II difference in humans. PMID:21738647

  6. Identification of three new mutations in the NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase gene responsible for recessive congenital methemoglobinemia type II

    SciTech Connect

    Mota-Vieira, L.; Kaplan, J.C.; Kahn, A.; Leroux, A.

    1994-09-01

    Recessive congenital methemoglobinemia (RCM; McKusick N{degrees}25800) due to NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (cytb5r) deficiency leads to two different types of diseases: in type I form, cyanosis is the only symptom and the enzyme is only defective in red blood cells; in type II form, cyanosis is associated with severe mental retardation and neurological impairment and the enzyme defect is systemic. We have identified three new molecular defects in two unrelated patients with type II RCM. A homozygous C{r_arrow}T transition in codon 218 (Arg) was detected in the cDNA of one patient, resulting in a premature stop codon (TGA) in exon 8. Restriction enzyme analysis of genomic DNA confirmed the homozygosity of the propositus and heterozygosity for an identical defect in both parents. The second patient was found to be a compound heterozygote, carrying two different mutant alleles in the cyb5r gene. One allele presented a missense mutation (T{r_arrow}C) with substitution of Cys-203 (TGC) by Arg (CGC) in exon 7. The second allele showed a 3 bp deletion of nucleotides 815-817 of the cDNA. The CTG ATG sequence at position 814-819 in exon 9 coding for Leu-271 and Met-272 was replaced by the CTG triplet, with conservation of the Leu-271 and loss of the Met-272. To our knowledge, these are the first examples of a homozygous nonsense mutation and of a compound heterozygous mutation detected in the cytb5r gene. This finding supports the diversity of genetic defects in the cytb5r gene leading to the severe form of the disease.

  7. Assignment of the gene for the core protein II (UQCRC2) subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex to human chromosome 16p12

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.M.V. Kingston General Hospital ); Ozawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi ); Rozen, R. Montreal Children's Hospital )

    1993-11-01

    The mammalian cytochrome be[sub 1] complex (complex III) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain catalyzes electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome c. The complex consists of 10-11 subunits: Core proteins I and II, cytochromes b and c[sub 1], the Rieske iron-sulfur protein, the ubiquinone-binding protein, the hinge protein, and 3-4 subunits of low molecular weight. Cytochrome b is encoded by the mitochondrial genome; the other subunits are encoded by nuclear genes. Both the human cytochrome c[sub 1] and the human ubiquinone-binding protein subunits have been assigned to chromosome 8 by somatic cell hybrid mapping. In this study, the authors used in situ hybridization to map core protein II. In situ hybridization to BrdU-synchronized peripheral blood lymphocytes was performed using the method of Harper and Saunders. Chromosomes were stained with a modified fluorescence, 0.25% Wright's stain procedure. The positions of silver grains directly over or touching well-banded metaphase chromosomes were mapped to an ISCN idiogram. The analysis of the distribution of 200 silver grams following in situ hybridization revealed a significant clustering of grains in the p12 region of chromosome 16. The assignment of the core II subunit to human chromosome 16p12 confirms that it is encoded by the nuclear, rather than the mitochondrial, genome. The identification of a single strong hybridization signal is indicative of one locus with no pseudogenes. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. ||

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  9. Production of dammarane-type sapogenins in rice by expressing the dammarenediol-II synthase gene from Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Lin, Juncheng; Cheng, Zuxin; Xu, Ming; Huang, Xinying; Yang, Zhijian; Zheng, Jingui

    2015-10-01

    Ginsenosides are the main active ingredients in Chinese medicinal ginseng; 2,3-oxidosqualene is a precursor metabolite to ginsenosides that is present in rice. Because rice lacks a key rate-limiting enzyme (dammarenediol-II synthase, DS), rice cannot synthesize dammarane-type ginsenosides. In this study, the ginseng (Panax ginseng CA Mey.) DS gene (GenBank: AB265170.1) was transformed into rice using agrobacterium, and 64 rice transgenic plants were produced. The Transfer-DNA (T-DNA) insertion sites in homozygous lines of the T2 generation were determined by using high-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (hiTAIL-PCR) and differed in all tested lines. One to two copies of the T-DNA were present in each transformant, and real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that the transformed DS gene could be transcribed and highly expressed. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that the dammarane-type sapogenin 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) content was 0.35-0.59 mg/g dw and the dammarane-type sapogenin 20(S)-protopanaxatriol (PPT) content was 0.23-0.43 mg/g dw in the transgenic rice. LC/MS analysis confirmed production of PPD and PPT. These results indicate that a new "ginseng rice" germplasm containing dammarane-type sapogenins has been successfully developed by transforming the ginseng DS gene into rice. PMID:26398795

  10. Targeted disruption of the murine Bin1/Amphiphysin II gene does not disable endocytosis but results in embryonic cardiomyopathy with aberrant myofibril formation.

    PubMed

    Muller, Alexander J; Baker, Judith F; DuHadaway, James B; Ge, Kai; Farmer, George; Donover, P Scott; Meade, Raymond; Reid, Christian; Grzanna, Reinhard; Roach, Arthur H; Shah, Neelima; Soler, Alejandro Peralta; Prendergast, George C

    2003-06-01

    The mammalian Bin1/Amphiphysin II gene encodes an assortment of alternatively spliced adapter proteins that exhibit markedly divergent expression and subcellular localization profiles. Bin1 proteins have been implicated in a variety of different cellular processes, including endocytosis, actin cytoskeletal organization, transcription, and stress responses. To gain insight into the physiological functions of the Bin1 gene, we have disrupted it by homologous recombination in the mouse. Bin1 loss had no discernible impact on either endocytosis or phagocytosis in mouse embryo-derived fibroblasts and macrophages, respectively. Similarly, actin cytoskeletal organization, proliferation, and apoptosis in embryo fibroblasts were all unaffected by Bin1 loss. In vivo, however, Bin1 loss resulted in perinatal lethality. Bin1 has been reported to affect muscle cell differentiation and T-tubule formation. No striking histological abnormalities were evident in skeletal muscle of Bin1 null embryos, but severe ventricular cardiomyopathy was observed in these embryos. Ultrastructurally, myofibrils in ventricular cardiomyocytes of Bin1 null embryos were severely disorganized. These results define a developmentally critical role for the Bin1 gene in cardiac muscle development. PMID:12773571

  11. Cis-acting elements reinforcing the activity of the estrogen-response element in the very-low-density apolipoprotein II gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Schippers, I J; Kloppenburg, M; van Waardenburg, R; Ab, G

    1994-04-01

    The gene coding for chicken very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) is expressed exclusively in liver in response to estrogen. Previous work in our laboratory identified several protein binding sites, identified by the letters A to F, and their cognate factors within the first 300 bp flanking the gene. Here we present an extensive functional analysis of the apoVLDLII promoter by gene transfer experiments using a chicken hepatoma cell line and cultured non-hepatic cells. Deletion analysis revealed that the -301 to -163-bp promoter region, comprising elements E1, E2 and F, is sufficient for strong estrogen-dependent expression. Mutation analysis demonstrated that efficient transcription requires the interplay of the major estrogen response element E1 with several other cis-acting elements. Analysis of individual protein binding sites showed that element E1 is sufficient by itself to confer weak estrogen-induced transcription from the apoVLDLII promoter, and that additional promoter elements are required for full estrogen-responsiveness. Elements F and B1 were capable of strongly potentiating the activity of element E1. In general, the activity of certain cis-acting elements appeared to be strongly promoter-context dependent. Cultured non-liver cells expressed transfected VLDL-CAT reporter plasmids in the presence of cotransfected estrogen receptor expression vector in a hormone-dependent way, indicating that for the control of tissue specificity the 5'-proximal promoter region is not sufficient. PMID:8168531

  12. THE GLUTAMATE CARBOXYPEPTIDASE GENE II (C>T) POLYMORPHISM DOES NOT AFFECT FOLATE STATUS IN THE FRAMINGHAM OFFSPRING COHORT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Naturally occurring folates are comprised mostly of reduced polyglutamyl derivatives and require hydrolysis to monoglutamyl derivatives before they are absorbed by the small intestine. This hydrolysis is catalyzed by glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII). Recently, a 1561 C>T polymorphism in the GCP...

  13. Impaired growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae on potato plants overexpressing the oryzacystatin II gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant proteinase inhibitors are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. Oryzacystatins I and II (OCI and OCII) show potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate ...

  14. DNA-mediated transfer of an RNA polymerase II gene: Reversion of the temperature-sensitive hamster cell cycle mutant TsAF8 by mammalian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ingles, C.J.; Shales, M.

    1982-06-01

    Treatment of the TsAF8 temperature-sensitive (TS) mutant of Syrian hamster BHK-21 cells, with calcium phosphate precipitates of genomic TS/sup +/ DNAs from a variety of mammalian cell lines permitted the selection of TS/sup +/ colonies at 40/sup 0/C. TS/sup +/ transformation events were distinguished from spontaneous TS/sup +/ reversions in experiments in which ..cap alpha..-amanitin-sensitive (Ama/sup s/) TS/sup +/ DNA was used to transform an AMA/sup R/ derivative of TsAF8 cells and Ama/sup R/ TS/sup +/ DNA was used to transform Ama/sup s/ TsAF8 cells. In each case it was possible to demonstrate the unselected acquisition of the appropriate Ama/sup s/ or Ama/sup R/ phenotype with the selected TS/sup +/ allele. Each of these TS/sup +/ transformed cell lines when grown at 40/sup 0/C contained an RNA polymerase II activity with a sensitivity to inhibition by ..cap alpha..-amanitin characteristic of the particular DNA used to transform the TS cells, whereas at 34/sup 0/C the same cells contained a mixture of Ama/sup R/ and Ama/sup s/ polymerase II activities. Together, these data provide convincing evidence that the RNA polymerase II gene determining sensitivity to inhibition by ..cap alpha..-amanitin can be transferred to TsAF8 cells and that the TS defect in TsAF8 is a polymerase II mutation.

  15. The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone via nongenomic pathway activates Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II to regulate gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yu-Pu; Liu, Wen; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2015-03-27

    The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) triggers calcium signaling pathway to regulate 20E response gene expression, but the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. We propose that the 20E-induced phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) serves an important function in 20E response gene transcription in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. CaMKII showed increased expression and phosphorylation during metamorphosis. 20E elevated CaMKII phosphorylation. However, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and ryanodine receptor inhibitor suramin, the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, and the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor inhibitor xestospongin C suppressed 20E-induced CaMKII phosphorylation. Two ecdysone-responsible GPCRs and G?q protein were involved in 20E-induced CaMKII phosphorylation by RNA interference analysis. 20E regulated CaMKII threonine phosphorylation at amino acid 290, thereby inducing CaMKII nuclear translocation. CaMKII knockdown by dsCaMKII injection into the larvae prevented the occurrence of larval-pupal transition and suppressed 20E response gene expression. CaMKII phosphorylation and nuclear translocation maintained USP1 lysine acetylation at amino acid 303 by inducing histone deacetylase 3 phosphorylation and nuclear export. The lysine acetylation of USP1 was necessary for the interaction of USP1 with EcRB1 and their binding to the ecdysone response element. Results suggest that 20E (via GPCR activation and calcium signaling) activates CaMKII phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, which regulate USP1 lysine acetylation to form an EcRB1-USP1 complex for 20E response gene transcription. PMID:25670853

  16. Genetic Variation of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Class II B Gene) in the Threatened Hume’s Pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weicai; Bei, Yongjian; Li, Hanhua

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB) exon 2 in a wild population of Hume’s pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae), which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume’s pheasant. The dN ? dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume’s pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume’s pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume’s pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume’s pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation. PMID:25629763

  17. Sequence Analysis of the Capsid Gene during a Genotype II.4 Dominated Norovirus Season in One University Hospital: Identification of Possible Transmission Routes

    PubMed Central

    Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Böttiger, Blenda; Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Fonager, Jannik

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a leading cause of gastroenteritis and genotype II.4 (GII.4) is responsible for the majority of nosocomial NoV infections. Our objective was to examine whether sequencing of the capsid gene might be a useful tool for the hospital outbreak investigation to define possible transmission routes. All NoV positive samples submitted from one university hospital during the 2007/8 season were selected. Genotyping of selected samples by partial polymerase gene sequencing had shown that the majority belonged to the GII.4 variant Den Haag 2006b and had identical polymerase sequences. Sequences of the capsid gene (1412 nucleotides) were obtained from the first available sample from 55 patients. From six immunocompromised patients with persistent infections a second sample was also included. As a control for a point-source outbreak, five samples from a foodborne outbreak caused by the same GII.4 variant were analyzed. Forty-seven of the inpatients (85%) were infected with the GII.4 variant Den Haag 2006b. Phylogenetic analysis of the Den Haag 2006b sequences identified four distinct outbreaks in different departments and a fifth outbreak with possible inter-department spread. In addition, a more heterogeneous cluster with evidence of repeated introductions from the community, but also possible inter-department spread was observed. In all six patients with paired sequences, evidence for in vivo evolution of the virus was found. Capsid gene sequencing showed substantial sequence variation among NoV GII.4 variant Den Haag 2006b strains from one single institution during a nine months’ period. This method proved useful to understand the local epidemiology and, when used promptly, has the potential to make infection control measures more targeted. PMID:25590635

  18. Cre/lox system to develop selectable marker free transgenic tobacco plants conferring resistance against sap sucking homopteran insect.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Dipankar; Sarkar, Anindya; Mondal, Hossain A; Schuermann, David; Hohn, Barbara; Sarmah, Bidyut K; Das, Sampa

    2008-10-01

    A binary expression vector was constructed containing the insecticidal gene Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL), and a selectable nptII marker gene cassette, flanked by lox sites. Similarly, another binary vector was developed with the chimeric cre gene construct. Transformed tobacco plants were generated with these two independent vectors. Each of the T(0) lox plants was crossed with T(0) Cre plants. PCR analyses followed by the sequencing of the target T-DNA part of the hybrid T(1) plants demonstrated the excision of the nptII gene in highly precised manner in certain percentage of the T(1) hybrid lines. The frequency of such marker gene excision was calculated to be 19.2% in the hybrids. Marker free plants were able to express ASAL efficiently and reduce the survivability of Myzus persiceae, the deadly pest of tobacco significantly, compared to the control tobacco plants. Results of PCR and Southern blot analyses of some of the T(2) plants detected the absence of cre as well as nptII genes. Thus, the crossing strategy involving Cre/lox system for the excision of marker genes appears to be very effective and easy to execute. Documentation of such marker excision phenomenon in the transgenic plants expressing the important insecticidal protein for the first time has a great significance from agricultural and biotechnological points of view. PMID:18663453

  19. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 Regulate Mediator and RNA Polymerase II Recruitment to CBF-Responsive Cold-Regulated Genes[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hemsley, Piers A.; Hurst, Charlotte H.; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R.; De Cothi, Elizabeth A.; Steele, John F.; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation–induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature–induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  20. Delineating the structural, functional and evolutionary relationships of sucrose phosphate synthase gene family II in wheat and related grasses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) is an important component of the plant sucrose biosynthesis pathway. In the monocotyledonous Poaceae, five SPS genes have been identified. Here we present a detailed analysis of the wheat SPSII family in wheat. A set of homoeologue-specific primers was developed in order to permit both the detection of sequence variation, and the dissection of the individual contribution of each homoeologue to the global expression of SPSII. Results The expression in bread wheat over the course of development of various sucrose biosynthesis genes monitored on an Affymetrix array showed that the SPS genes were regulated over time and space. SPSII homoeologue-specific assays were used to show that the three homoeologues contributed differentially to the global expression of SPSII. Genetic mapping placed the set of homoeoloci on the short arms of the homoeologous group 3 chromosomes. A resequencing of the A and B genome copies allowed the detection of four haplotypes at each locus. The 3B copy includes an unspliced intron. A comparison of the sequences of the wheat SPSII orthologues present in the diploid progenitors einkorn, goatgrass and Triticum speltoides, as well as in the more distantly related species barley, rice, sorghum and purple false brome demonstrated that intronic sequence was less well conserved than exonic. Comparative sequence and phylogenetic analysis of SPSII gene showed that false purple brome was more similar to Triticeae than to rice. Wheat - rice synteny was found to be perturbed at the SPS region. Conclusion The homoeologue-specific assays will be suitable to derive associations between SPS functionality and key phenotypic traits. The amplicon sequences derived from the homoeologue-specific primers are informative regarding the evolution of SPSII in a polyploid context. PMID:20591144

  1. Selective pressures on MHC class II genes in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) as inferred by hierarchical analysis of population structure.

    PubMed

    Herdegen, M; Babik, W; Radwan, J

    2014-11-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex, which are the most polymorphic of all vertebrate genes, are a pre-eminent system for the study of selective pressures that arise from host-pathogen interactions. Balancing selection capable of maintaining high polymorphism should lead to the homogenization of MHC allele frequencies among populations, but there is some evidence to suggest that diversifying selection also operates on the MHC. However, the pattern of population structure observed at MHC loci is likely to depend on the spatial and/or temporal scale examined. Here, we investigated selection acting on MHC genes at different geographic scales using Venezuelan guppy populations inhabiting four regions. We found a significant correlation between MHC and microsatellite allelic richness across populations, which suggests the role of genetic drift in shaping MHC diversity. However, compared to microsatellites, more MHC variation was explained by differences between populations within larger geographic regions and less by the differences between the regions. Furthermore, among proximate populations, variation in MHC allele frequencies was significantly higher compared to microsatellites, indicating that selection acting on MHC may increase population structure at small spatial scales. However, in populations that have significantly diverged at neutral markers, the population-genetic signature of diversifying selection may be eradicated in the long term by that of balancing selection, which acts to preserve rare alleles and thus maintain a common pool of MHC alleles. PMID:25244157

  2. Characterization of Three mnp Genes of Fomitiporia mediterranea and Report of Additional Class II Peroxidases in the Order Hymenochaetales ? †

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Ingo; Robertson, Deborah L.; Hibbett, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We report the sequence-based characterization and expression patterns of three manganese peroxidase genes from the white rot fungus and grape vine pathogen Fomitiporia mediterranea (Agaricomycotina, Hymenochaetales), termed Fmmnp1, Fmmnp2, and Fmmnp3. The predicted open reading frames (ORFs) are 1,516-, 1,351-, and 1,345-bp long and are interrupted by seven, four, and four introns, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences encode manganese peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.13) containing 371, 369, and 371 residues, respectively, and are similar to the manganese peroxidases of the model white rot organism Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The expression of the genes is most likely differentially regulated, as revealed by real-time PCR analysis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that other members of the order Hymenochaetales harbor mnp genes encoding proteins that are related only distantly to those of F. mediterranea. Furthermore, multiple partial lip- and mnp-like sequences obtained for Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Agaricomycotina, Polyporales) suggest that lignin degradation by white rot taxa relies heavily on ligninolytic peroxidases and is not efficiently achieved by laccases only. PMID:20675443

  3. A standardised challenge model with an enterotoxigenic F4+ Escherichia coli strain in piglets assessing clinical traits and faecal shedding of fae and est-II toxin genes.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Franz; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Martinez-Vallespin, Beatriz; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five feed additives on post weaning diarrhoea (PWD) in piglets challenged 3 d after weaning with an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (ETEC). In three experimental runs, a total of 84 piglets was weaned at 21 days of age and randomly assigned to seven treatments. As dietary treatment, piglets were fed a basal diet or diets with addition of bovine colostrum (0.2%), pineapple stem extract containing bromelain (0.2%), an autolysed yeast preparation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (0.1%), a combination of organic acids (0.7%) and a phytogenic product with thyme essential oil (0.015%). A porcine ETEC, serotype O149:K91:K88ac was given twice via oral infection on day 3 after weaning at 10(10) colony forming units/animal. One group of piglets was fed the basal diet without ETEC challenge. Traits included clinical sores, body temperature, faecal scoring and determination of faecal dry matter and the shedding of fae and est-II ETEC toxin genes. After weaning, non-challenged control piglets did not show signs of diarrhoea or impaired health, while the majority of infected piglets had a drop in body temperature, signs of diarrhoea and impaired general health. Mortality, the decrease of faecal dry matter and shedding of the toxin genes fae and est-II were not affected by the different additives. In conclusion, the ETEC challenge model induced distinct clinical signs of PWD in piglets, but the tested feed additives had no preventive effect under these conditions. PMID:25313936

  4. A new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3{beta}-HSD gene causes salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Sakkal-Alkaddour, S.; Chang, Ying T.; Yang, Xiaojiang; Songya Pang

    1996-01-01

    We report a new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) gene in a Pakistanian female child with the salt-wasting form of 3{Beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The etiology for her congenital adrenal hyperplasia was not defined. Although the family history suggested possible 3{beta}-HSd deficiency disorder, suppressed adrenal function caused by excess glucocorticoid therapy in this child at 7 yr of age did not allow hormonal diagnosis. To confirm 3{beta}-HSD deficiency, we sequenced the type II 3{beta}-HSD gene in the patient, her family, and the parents of her deceased paternal cousins. The type II 3{beta}-HSD gene region of a putative promotor, exons I, II, III, and IV, and exon-intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced in all subjects. The DNA sequence of the child revealed a single nucleotide deletion at codon 318 [ACA(Thr){r_arrow}AA] in exon IV in one allele, and two nucleotide deletions at codon 273 [AAA(Lys){r_arrow}A] in exon IV in the other allele. The remaining gene sequences were normal. The codon 318 mutation was found in one allele from the father, brother, and parents of the deceased paternal cousins. The codon 273 mutation was found in one allele of the mother and a sister. These findings confirmed inherited 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the child caused by the compound heterozygous type II 3{beta}-HSD gene mutation. Both codons at codons 279 and 367, respectively, are predicted to result in an altered and truncated type II 3{beta}-HSD protein, thereby causing salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the patient. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. ANG II receptor subtype 1a gene knockdown in the subfornical organ prevents increased drinking behavior in bile duct-ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Joseph D.; Nedungadi, T. Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct ligation (BDL) causes congestive liver failure that initiates hemodynamic changes, resulting in dilutional hyponatremia due to increased water intake and vasopressin release. This project tested the hypothesis that angiotensin signaling at the subfornical organ (SFO) augments drinking behavior in BDL rats. A genetically modified adeno-associated virus containing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for ANG II receptor subtype 1a (AT1aR) gene was microinjected into the SFO of rats to knock down expression. Two weeks later, BDL or sham surgery was performed. Rats were housed in metabolic chambers for measurement of fluid and food intake and urine output. The rats were euthanized 28 days after BDL surgery for analysis. A group of rats was perfused for immunohistochemistry, and a second group was used for laser-capture microdissection for analysis of SFO AT1aR gene expression. BDL rats showed increased water intake that was attenuated in rats that received SFO microinjection of AT1aR shRNA. Among BDL rats treated with scrambled (control) and AT1aR shRNA, we observed an increased number of vasopressin-positive cells in the supraoptic nucleus that colocalized with ?FosB staining, suggesting increased vasopressin release in both groups. These results indicate that angiotensin signaling through the SFO contributes to increased water intake, but not dilutional hyponatremia, during congestive liver failure. PMID:25009217

  6. Cancer Stem Cell Gene Profile as Predictor of Relapse in High Risk Stage II and Stage III, Radically Resected Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Giampieri, Riccardo; Scartozzi, Mario; Loretelli, Cristian; Piva, Francesco; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Lezoche, Giovanni; Prete, Michela Del; Bittoni, Alessandro; Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Cecchini, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario; Bearzi, Italo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data indicate that prognostic stratification of radically resected colorectal cancer based on disease stage only may not be always be adequate. Preclinical findings suggest that cancer stem cells may influence the biological behaviour of colorectal cancer independently from stage: objective of the study was to assess whether a panel of stemness markers were correlated with clinical outcome in resected stage II and III colon cancer patients. A panel of 66 markers of stemness were analysed and thus patients were divided into two groups (A and B) with most patients clustering in a manner consistent with different time to relapse by using a statistical algorithm. A total of 62 patients were analysed. Thirty-six (58%) relapsed during the follow-up period (range 1.63–86.5 months). Twelve (19%) and 50 (81%) patients were allocated into group A and B, respectively. A significantly different median relapse-free survival was observed between the 2 groups (22.18 vs 42.85 months, p?=?0.0296). Among of all genes tested, those with the higher “weight” in determining different prognosis were CD44, ALCAM, DTX2, HSPA9, CCNA2, PDX1, MYST1, COL1A1 and ABCG2. This analysis supports the idea that, other than stage, biological variables, such as expression levels of colon cancer stem cell genes, may be relevant in determining an increased risk of relapse in resected colorectal cancer patients. PMID:24023782

  7. Structure and evolution of a new avian MHC class II B gene in a sub-Antarctic seabird, the thin-billed prion (Procellariiformes: Pachyptila belcheri).

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica C; Edwards, Scott V

    2009-03-01

    The major histocompatibility complex encodes molecules that present foreign peptides to T cells of the immune system. The peptide binding region (PBR) of these molecules is among the most polymorphic regions found in vertebrate taxa. Genomic cloning approaches are improving our understanding of the evolution of this multigene family in nonmodel avian groups. By building a cosmid library, a new MHC class II B gene, Pabe-DAB1, was isolated and characterized at the genomic level in a sub-Antarctic seabird, the thin-billed prion (Pachyptila belcheri). Pabe-DAB1 exhibits the hallmark structural features of functional MHC class II loci. Direct sequencing of the PBR encoding exon in a panel of prions revealed significantly higher levels of genetic diversity compared to two noncoding neutral loci, with most alleles differing by at least one replacement substitution in the peptide binding codons. We estimated evolutionary dynamics for Pabe-DAB1 using a variety of Bayesian and other approaches. Evidence for balancing selection comes from a spatially variable ratio of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitutions (mean d (N)/d (S) = 2.87) in the PBR, with sites predicted to be functionally relevant exhibiting the highest omega values. We estimate the population recombination rate to be approximately 0.3 per site per generation, indicating an important role for recombination in generating polymorphism at this locus. Pabe-DAB1 is among the few avian class II loci characterized at the genomic level and with a known intron-exon structure, a feature that greatly facilitated the amplification and sequencing of a single MHC locus in this species. PMID:19209378

  8. Association of atrial fibrillation with gene polymorphisms of connexin 40 and angiotensin II receptor type 1 in Chongming adults of Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuxin; Lu, Yingmin; Huang, Damin; Luo, Xiaohan; Yue, Dongmei; Zhang, Jinchun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterized the gene polymorphisms of connexin 40 (cx40) and angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) in Chongming adults with atrial fibrillation (AF) and to explore their relationships with AF. Methods: 82 patients with AF, and 82 subjects without AF were enrolled. Polymorphisms of cx40 G-44A and AT1 A1166C were detected. Moreover, several samples were randomly selected to validate the gene polymorphisms of cx40 and AT1. Results: Genotypes AA, AG and GG of cx40 G-44A were found in both AF patients and controls. The frequencies of genotypes AA, AG and GG were 39%, 29% and 32%, respectively, in AF patients and 31%, 35% and 34%, respectively in controls. The frequencies of alleles A and G were 54% and 46%, respectively in AF patients and 48% and 52%, respectively, in controls (P < 0.05). The risk for AF in patients with allele A increased 1.31 times (OR = 1.31, P < 0.05). The frequencies of genotypes AA, AC and CC were 88%, 8% and 4%, respectively in AF patients and 93%, 6% and 1%, respectively in controls. The frequencies of alleles A and C were 92% and 8%, respectively in AF patients and 96% and 4%, respectively in controls (P < 0.05). More AF patients had allele C as compared to controls. The risk for AF increased by 1.43 times in patients with allele C (OR = 1.43, P < 0.05). Conclusion: There were relationships between gene polymorphisms of cx40 and AT1 and AF in Chongming adults. Allele A of cx40 G-44A and allele C of AT1 A1166C significantly increase the risk for AF. PMID:26380021

  9. Generation of Trichoderma atroviride mutants with constitutively activated G protein signaling by using geneticin resistance as selection marker

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are important industrial producers of cellulases and hemicellulases, but also widely used as biocontrol agents (BCAs) in agriculture. In the latter function Trichoderma species stimulate plant growth, induce plant defense and directly antagonize plant pathogenic fungi through their mycoparasitic capabilities. The recent release of the genome sequences of four mycoparasitic Trichoderma species now forms the basis for large-scale genetic manipulations of these important BCAs. Thus far, only a limited number of dominant selection markers, including Hygromycin B resistance (hph) and the acetamidase-encoding amdS gene, have been available for transformation of Trichoderma spp. For more extensive functional genomics studies the utilization of additional dominant markers will be essential. Results We established the Escherichia coli neomycin phosphotransferase II-encoding nptII gene as a novel selectable marker for the transformation of Trichoderma atroviride conferring geneticin resistance. The nptII marker cassette was stably integrated into the fungal genome and transformants exhibited unaltered phenotypes compared to the wild-type. Co-transformation of T. atroviride with nptII and a constitutively activated version of the G? subunit-encoding tga3 gene (tga3Q207L) resulted in a high number of mitotically stable, geneticin-resistant transformants. Further analyses revealed a co-transformation frequency of 68% with 15 transformants having additionally integrated tga3Q207L into their genome. Constitutive activation of the Tga3-mediated signaling pathway resulted in increased vegetative growth and an enhanced ability to antagonize plant pathogenic host fungi. Conclusion The neomycin phosphotransferase II-encoding nptII gene from Escherichia coli proved to be a valuable tool for conferring geneticin resistance to the filamentous fungus T. atroviride thereby contributing to an enhanced genetic tractability of these important BCAs. PMID:23158850

  10. Purifying Selection and Birth-and-Death Evolution in the Class II Hydrophobin Gene Families of the Ascomycete Trichoderma/Hypocrea

    SciTech Connect

    kubicek, Christian P.; Baker, Scott E.; Gamauf, Christian; Kenerley, Chuck; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2008-01-10

    Hydrophobins are proteins containing eight conserved cysteine residues that occur uniquely in mycelial fungi, where their main function is to confer hydrophobicity to fungal surfaces in contact with air and during attachment of hyphae to hydrophobic surfaces of hosts, symbiotic partners or of themselves resulting in morphogenetic signals. Based on their hydropathy patterns and their solubility characteristics, they are classified in class I and class II hydrophobins, the latter being found only in ascomycetes. Here we have investigated the mechanisms driving the evolution of the class II hydrophobins in nine species of the mycoparasitic ascomycetous genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea, using three fully sequenced genomes (H. jecorina=T. reesei, H. atroviridis=T. atroviride; H. virens=T. virens) and a total of 14.000 ESTs of six others (T. asperellum, H. lixii=T. harzianum, T. aggressivum var. europeae, T. longibrachiatum, T. cf. viride). The former three contained six, ten and nine members, which is the highest number found in any other ascomycete so far. They all showed the conserved four beta-strands/one helix structure, which is stabilized by four disulfide bonds. In addition, a small number of these HFBs contained an extended N-terminus rich in either praline and aspartate, or glycine-asparagine. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a mosaic of terminal clades contain duplicated genes and shows only three reasonably supported clades. Calculation of the ratio of differences in synonymous vs. non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions provides evidence for strong purifying selection (KS/Ka >> 1). A genome database search for class II HFBs from other ascomycetes retrieved a much smaller number of hydrophobins (2-4) from each species, and most of them were from Pyrenomycetes. A combined phylogeny of these sequences with those of Trichoderma showed that the Trichoderma HFBs mostly formed their own clades, whereas those of other pyrenomycetes occured in shared clades. Our study shows that the genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea has a proliferated arsenal of class II hydrophobins which arose by purifying selection and birth-and-death evolution.

  11. A novel point mutation in the translation initiation codon of the pre-pro-vasopressin-neurophysin II gene: Cosegregation with morphological abnormalities and clinical symptoms in autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Rutishauser, J.; Boeni-Schnetzler, M.; Froesch, E.R.; Wichmann, W.; Huisman, T.

    1996-01-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a rare variant of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus. Several different mutations in the human vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene have been described. We studied nine family members from three generations of an ADNDI pedigree at the clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. AVP concentrations were measured during diagnostic fluid restriction tests. Coronal and sagittal high resolution T1-weighted images of the pituitary were obtained from affected and healthy family members. PCR was used to amplify the AVP-NP II precursor gene, and PCR products were directly sequenced. Under maximal osmotic stimulation, AVP serum levels were close to or below the detection limit in affected individuals. Magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed the characteristic hyperintense ({open_quotes}bright spot{close_quotes}) appearance of the posterior pituitary in two healthy family members. This signal was absent in all four ADNDI patients examined. The coding sequences of AVP and its carrier protein, neurophysin II, were normal in all family members examined. Affected individuals showed a novel single base deletion (G 227) in the translation initiation codon of the AVP-NP II signal peptide on one allele. The mutation in the AVP-NP II leader sequence appears to be responsible for the disease in this kindred, possibly by interfering with protein translocation. The absence of the hyperintense posterior pituitary signal in affected individuals could reflect deficient posterior pituitary function. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. The role of HLA class II genes in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: Molecular analysis of 180 Caucasian, multiplex families

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, J.A.; Cook, M.; Erlich, H.A. |

    1996-11-01

    We report here our analysis of HLA class II alleles in 180 Caucasian nuclear families with at least two children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 genotypes were determined with PCR/sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe typing methods. The data allowed unambiguous determination of four-locus haplotypes in all but three of the families. Consistent with other studies, our data indicate an increase in DR3/DR4, DR3/DR3, and DR4/DR4 genotypes in patients compared to controls. In addition, we found an increase in DR1/DR4, DR1/DR3, and DR4/DR8 genotypes. While the frequency of DQB1*0302 on DR4 haplotypes is dramatically increased in DR3/DR4 patients, DR4 haplotypes in DR1/DR4 patients exhibit frequencies of DQB1*0302 and DQB1*0301 more closely resembling those in control populations. The protective effect of DR2 is evident in this data set and is limited to the common DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype. Most DR2{sup +} patients carry the less common DR2 haplotype DRB1*1601-DQB1*0502, which is not decreased in patients relative to controls. DPB1 also appears to play a role in disease susceptibility. DPB1*0301 is increased in patients (P < .001) and may contribute to the disease risk of a number of different DR-DQ haplotypes. DPB1*0101, found almost exclusively on DR3 haplotypes in patients, is slightly increased, and maternal transmissions of DRB1*0301-DPB1*0101 haplotypes to affected children occur twice as frequently as do paternal transmissions. Transmissions of DR3 haplotypes carrying other DPB1 alleles occur at approximately equal maternal and paternal frequencies. The complex, multigenic nature of HLA class II-associated IDDM susceptibility is evident from these data. 76 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  13. Class II transactivator (CIITA) mediates transcriptional repression of pdk4 gene by interacting with hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1)

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingming; Li, Ping; Wu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased accumulation and/or impaired utilization of fatty acid in extra-adipose tissues are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (Pdk4) is a key enzyme involved in fatty oxidation and energy expenditure, and its expression can be repressed by pro-inflammatory stimuli. Previously, we have shown that class II transactivator (CIITA) mediates the adverse effect of interferon gamma (IFN-?) in skeletal muscle cells by cooperating with hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1) to repress silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) transcription. Building upon this finding, we report here that CIITA interacted with HIC1 via the GTP-binding domain (GBD) while HIC1 interacted with CIITA via the BTB/POZ domain. The GBD domain was required for CIITA to repress SIRT1 transcription probably acting as a bridge for CIITA to bind to HIC1 and consequently to bind to the SIRT1 promoter. IFN-? stimulation, CIITA over-expression, or HIC1 over-expression repressed Pdk4 promoter activity while silencing either CIITA or HIC1 normalized Pdk4 expression in the presence of IFN-?. An increase in SIRT1 expression or activity partially rescued Pdk4 expression in the presence of CIITA, but SIRT1 inhibition abrogated Pdk4 normalization even in the absence of CIITA. Taken together, our data have identified a HIC1-CIITA-SIRT1 axis that regulates Pdk4 transcription in response to IFN-? stimulation. PMID:26243517

  14. Functional analysis of splicing mutations in the IDS gene and the use of antisense oligonucleotides to exploit an alternative therapy for MPS II.

    PubMed

    Matos, Liliana; Gonçalves, Vânia; Pinto, Eugénia; Laranjeira, Francisco; Prata, Maria João; Jordan, Peter; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belén; Alves, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the IDS gene, including exonic alterations associated with aberrant splicing. In the present work, cell-based splicing assays were performed to study the effects of two splicing mutations in exon 3 of IDS, i.e., c.241C>T and c.257C>T, whose presence activates a cryptic splice site in exon 3 and one in exon 8, i.e., c.1122C>T that despite being a synonymous mutation is responsible for the creation of a new splice site in exon 8 leading to a transcript shorter than usual. Mutant minigene analysis and overexpression assays revealed that SRSF2 and hnRNP E1 might be involved in the use and repression of the constitutive 3' splice site of exon 3 respectively. For the c.1122C>T the use of antisense therapy to correct the splicing defect was explored, but transfection of patient fibroblasts with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (n=3) and a locked nucleic acid failed to abolish the abnormal transcript; indeed, it resulted in the appearance of yet another aberrant splicing product. Interestingly, the oligonucleotides transfection in control fibroblasts led to the appearance of the aberrant transcript observed in patients' cells after treatment, which shows that the oligonucleotides are masking an important cis-acting element for 5' splice site regulation of exon 8. These results highlight the importance of functional studies for understanding the pathogenic consequences of mis-splicing and highlight the difficulty in developing antisense therapies involving gene regions under complex splicing regulation. PMID:26407519

  15. Non-coding RNA derived from the region adjacent to the human HO-1 E2 enhancer selectively regulates HO-1 gene induction by modulating Pol II binding

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Mimura, Junsei; Itoh, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have disclosed the function of enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), which are long non-coding RNAs transcribed from gene enhancer regions, in transcriptional regulation. However, it remains unclear whether eRNAs are involved in the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene (HO-1) induction. Here, we report that multiple nuclear-enriched eRNAs are transcribed from the regions adjacent to two human HO-1 enhancers (i.e. the distal E2 and proximal E1 enhancers), and some of these eRNAs are induced by the oxidative stress-causing reagent diethyl maleate (DEM). We demonstrated that the expression of one forward direction (5? to 3?) eRNA transcribed from the human HO-1 E2 enhancer region (named human HO-1enhancer RNA E2-3; hereafter called eRNA E2-3) was induced by DEM in an NRF2-dependent manner in HeLa cells. Conversely, knockdown of BACH1, a repressor of HO-1 transcription, further increased DEM-inducible eRNA E2-3 transcription as well as HO-1 expression. In addition, we showed that knockdown of eRNA E2-3 selectively down-regulated DEM-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, eRNA E2-3 knockdown attenuated DEM-induced Pol II binding to the promoter and E2 enhancer regions of HO-1 without affecting NRF2 recruitment to the E2 enhancer. These findings indicate that eRNAE2-3 is functional and is required for HO-1 induction. PMID:25404134

  16. Generation of BAC transgenic tadpoles enabling live imaging of motoneurons by using the urotensin II-related peptide (ust2b) gene as a driver.

    PubMed

    Bougerol, Marion; Auradé, Frédéric; Lambert, François M; Le Ray, Didier; Combes, Denis; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Relaix, Frédéric; Pollet, Nicolas; Tostivint, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Xenopus is an excellent tetrapod model for studying normal and pathological motoneuron ontogeny due to its developmental morpho-physiological advantages. In mammals, the urotensin II-related peptide (UTS2B) gene is primarily expressed in motoneurons of the brainstem and the spinal cord. Here, we show that this expression pattern was conserved in Xenopus and established during the early embryonic development, starting at the early tailbud stage. In late tadpole stage, uts2b mRNA was detected both in the hindbrain and in the spinal cord. Spinal uts2b+ cells were identified as axial motoneurons. In adult, however, the uts2b expression was only detected in the hindbrain. We assessed the ability of the uts2b promoter to drive the expression of a fluorescent reporter in motoneurons by recombineering a green fluorescent protein (GFP) into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing the entire X. tropicalis uts2b locus. After injection of this construction in one-cell stage embryos, a transient GFP expression was observed in the spinal cord of about a quarter of the resulting animals from the early tailbud stage and up to juveniles. The GFP expression pattern was globally consistent with that of the endogenous uts2b in the spinal cord but no fluorescence was observed in the brainstem. A combination of histological and electrophysiological approaches was employed to further characterize the GFP+ cells in the larvae. More than 98% of the GFP+ cells expressed choline acetyltransferase, while their projections were co-localized with ?-bungarotoxin labeling. When tail myotomes were injected with rhodamine dextran amine crystals, numerous double-stained GFP+ cells were observed. In addition, intracellular electrophysiological recordings of GFP+ neurons revealed locomotion-related rhythmic discharge patterns during fictive swimming. Taken together our results provide evidence that uts2b is an appropriate driver to express reporter genes in larval motoneurons of the Xenopus spinal cord. PMID:25658845

  17. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Fraxinus pennsylvanica hypocotyls and plant regeneration.

    PubMed

    Du, Ningxia; Pijut, Paula M

    2009-06-01

    A genetic transformation protocol for green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) hypocotyl explants was developed. Green ash hypocotyls were transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring binary vector pq35GR containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and beta-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion gene, and an enhanced green fluorescent protein gene. Pre-cultured hypocotyl explants were transformed in the presence of 100 microM acetosyringone using 90 s sonication plus 10 min vacuum-infiltration. Kanamycin at 20 mg l(-1) was used for selecting transformed cells. Adventitious shoots regenerated on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 13.3 microM 6-benzylaminopurine, 4.5 microM thidiazuron, 50 mg l(-1) adenine sulfate, and 10% coconut water. GUS- and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive shoots from the cut ends of hypocotyls were produced via an intermediate callus stage. Presence of the GUS and nptII genes in GUS-positive shoots were confirmed by PCR and copy number of the nptII gene in PCR-positive shoots was determined by Southern blotting. Three transgenic plantlets were acclimatized to the greenhouse. This transformation and regeneration system using hypocotyls provides a foundation for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of green ash. Studies are underway using a construct containing the Cry8Da protein of Bacillus thuringiensis for genetic transformation of green ash. PMID:19343350

  18. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Phase II Drug Metabolizing/Antioxidant Enzymes Gene Response by Anti-cancer Agent Sulforaphane in Rat Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of Phase II drug metabolizing enzyme (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (i.v.) administration of an anti-cancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN) METHODS SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque™ Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted, converted to cDNA, and quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko’s indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap Method. RESULTS SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-?B, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5 folds) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increase (> 5 folds) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. CONCLUSION Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after i.v. administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD response of lymphocyte mRNA expression is valuable for quantitating Nrf2 mediated effects of SFN. This study may provide a conceptual framework for future clinical PK-PD studies of dietary cancer chemopreventive agents in human. PMID:22931102

  19. Existence of mixed isotype A beta E alpha class II molecules in Ed alpha gene-introduced C57BL/6 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mineta, T; Seki, K; Matsunaga, M; Kimoto, M

    1990-01-01

    In this study the existence of mixed isotype Ab beta Ed alpha molecules in Ed alpha gene-introduced C57BL/6 (B6Ed alpha) transgenic mice is demonstrated. Biosynthetically labelled B6Ed alpha transgenic spleen cells were immunoprecipitated with anti-Ab beta or anti-Ed alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb) and analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (NEPHGE/SDS-PAGE). Anti-Ab beta mAb precipitated Ed alpha molecules in addition to Ab beta and Ab alpha molecules. Anti-Ed alpha mAb precipitated Ab beta molecules in addition ot Eb beta and Ed alpha molecules. No Ed alpha molecule was precipitated by anti-Ab beta mAb from B10.A(3R) spleen cells, which have a very similar organization of class II molecules to B6Ed alpha transgenic mice. Since this B6Ed alpha transgenic mouse was shown to have 20-40 copies per cell of the Ed alpha transgene (Kashiwamura et al., 1988), it is speculated that large amounts of Ed alpha transgene are made but, according to the data presented here, only a small amount actually associates with Ab beta as opposed to Eb beta. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2312163

  20. Expression of Caveolin-1 reduces cellular responses to TGF-{beta}1 through down-regulating the expression of TGF-{beta} type II receptor gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Youn Sook; Han, In-Oc; Park, Seok Hee . E-mail: parks@skku.edu

    2007-07-27

    Transcriptional repression of Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} type II receptor (T{beta}RII) gene has been proposed to be one of the major mechanisms leading to TGF-{beta} resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells down-regulates the expression of T{beta}RII gene in the transcriptional level, eventually resulting in the decreased responses to TGF-{beta}. The reduced expression of T{beta}RII gene by Cav-1 appeared to be due to the changes of the sequence-specific DNA binding proteins to either Positive Regulatory Element 1 (PRE1) or PRE2 of the T{beta}RII promoter. In addition, Cav-1 expression inhibited TGF-{beta}-mediated cellular proliferation and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor (PAI)-1 gene expression as well as TGF-{beta}-induced luciferase activity. Furthermore, the inhibition of endogeneous Cav-1 by small interfering RNA increased the expression of T{beta}RII gene. These findings strongly suggest that expression of Cav-1 leads to the decreased cellular responsiveness to TGF-{beta} through down-regulating T{beta}RII gene expression.

  1. A novel gateway-compatible binary vector series (PC-GW) for flexible cloning of multiple genes for genetic transformation of plants.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Jyoti; Yalamanchili, Roopa; La Hovary, Christophe; Ji, Mikyoung; Rodriguez-Welsh, Maria; Aslett, Denise; Ganapathy, Sowmya; Grunden, Amy; Sederoff, Heike; Qu, Rongda

    2015-09-01

    The rapidly advancing field of plant synthetic biology requires transforming plants with multiple genes. This has sparked a growing interest in flexible plant transformation vectors, which can be used for multi-gene transformations. We have developed a novel binary vector series, named the PC-GW series (GenBank: KP826769-KP826773), for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. The PC-GW vectors use the pCAMBIA vector backbone, and contain NPTII, hpt, bar, mCherry or egfp genes as selectable markers for plant transformation. In a modified multiple cloning site (MCS) of the T-DNA region, we have placed the attR1, attR2 and ccdB sequences for rapid cloning of one to four genes by Gateway™-assisted recombination. In addition, we have introduced four meganuclease sites, and other restriction sites for multi-gene vector construction. Finally, we have placed a CaMV 35S promoter and a 35S terminator on the 5' and 3' ends of the MCS. The CaMV 35S promoter is flanked by PstI restriction sites that can be used to replace it with another promoter sequence if needed. The PC-GW vectors provide choices for selectable markers, cloning methods, and can accommodate up to eight gene constructs in a single T-DNA, thereby significantly reducing the number of transformations or crosses needed to generate multi-transgene expressing plants. PMID:26188330

  2. Stable transformation and expression of GhEXPA8 fiber expansin gene to improve fiber length and micronaire value in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Kamran S.; Shahid, Ahmad A.; Rao, Abdul Q.; Bashir, Aftab; Aftab, Asia; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Cotton fiber is multigenic trait controlled by number of genes. Previous studies suggest that one of these genes may be responsible for switching cotton fiber growth on and off to influence the fiber quality produced from a cotton seed. In the present study, the Gossypium hirsutum GhEXPA8 fiber expansin gene was introduced into local cotton variety NIAB 846 by using an Agrobacterium-mediated gene transformation. The neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) gene was used as a selection marker for screening of putative transgenic cotton plants. Integration and expression of the fiber expansin gene in cotton plants was confirmed with molecular techniques including Southern blot analyses, real-time PCR. Cellulose assay was used for measurement of cellulose contents of transgenic cotton fiber. The data collected from 3 years of field performance of the transgenic cotton plants expressing GhEXPA8 showed that significant improvement has been made in fiber lengths and micronaire values as compared to control G. hirsutum variety NIAB 846 cotton plants. Statistical techniques were also used for analysis of fiber and agronomic characteristics. The results of this study support improvement of cotton fiber through genetic modification. PMID:26583018

  3. Genetic control of T cell responsiveness to the Friend murine leukemia virus envelope antigen. Identification of class II loci of the H-2 as immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T cells primed specifically for the envelope glycoprotein of Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) were prepared by immunizing mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed the entire env gene of F-MuLV. Significant proliferative responses of F-MuLV envelope- specific, H-2a/b T cells were observed when the T cells were stimulated with antigen-pulsed peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) having the b allele at the K, A beta, A alpha, and E beta loci of the H-2. On the other hand, PEC having only the kappa allele at these loci did not induce the envelope-specific T cell proliferation, even when the PEC had the b allele at the E alpha, S, or D loci. F-MuLV envelope-specific proliferation of H-2a/b T cells under the stimulation of antigen- pulsed, H-2a/b PEC was specifically blocked with anti-I-Ab and anti-I- Ek mAbs but not with anti-Kb, anti-Kk, or anti-I-Ak mAbs. Moreover, (B10.MBR x A/WySn)F1 mice that have the b allele only at the K locus but not in I-A subregion were nonresponders to the envelope glycoprotein, and the bm12 mutation at the A beta locus completely abolished the T cell responsiveness to this antigen. These results indicate that proliferative T cells recognize a limited number of epitopes on F-MuLV envelope protein in the context of I-Ab, hybrid I- Ak/b, and/or hybrid I-Ek/b class II MHC molecules but fail to recognize the same envelope protein in the context of I-Ak or I-Ek molecules. This influence of the H-2I region on T cell recognition of the envelope glycoprotein appeared to control in vivo induction of protective immunity against Friend virus complex after immunization with the vaccinia-F-MuLV env vaccine. Thus, these results provide, for the first time, direct evidence for Ir gene-controlled responder/nonresponder phenotypes influencing the immune response to a pathogenic virus of mice. PMID:3141552

  4. Comparative genomic analysis reveals independent expansion of a lineage-specific gene family in vertebrates: The class II cytokine receptors and their ligands in mammals and fish

    E-print Network

    Lutfalla, Georges

    Background: The high degree of sequence conservation between coding regions in fish and mammals can be exploited to identify genes in mammalian genomes by comparison with the sequence of similar genes in fish. Conversely, ...

  5. Nuclear transcriptional activity of the tobacco plastid psbA promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, M; Vandewiele, M

    1989-01-01

    The plastid psbA promoter of tobacco was used with the aim to construct plastid specific marker genes. Upon transfer to the tobacco nuclear genome the plastid promoter fragment appeared to specify a messenger RNA. Placed 5' to the bar or nptII coding sequences the level of expression is sufficient to obtain a selectable phenotype. The transcription start site in the nucleus is site specific and is located 4 nucleotides downstream relative to the start site used in plastids. Translational fusions of the psbA coding sequence with the nptII and bar coding sequences revealed that the psbA leader sequence and the psbA translation start codon, being the second ATG codon, are recognized by the plant cytoplasmic translation apparatus. A promoter cassette utilisable in both E. coli and tobacco, was obtained by placing the CaMV 35S enhancer 5' to the psbA promoter. Images PMID:2563150

  6. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  7. Human X-box-binding protein 1 is required for the transcription of a subset of human class II major histocompatibility genes and forms a heterodimer with c-fos

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, S.J.; Strominger, J.L. ); Hsiouchi Liou; Davidon, R.; Glimcher, L.H. )

    1991-05-15

    A complementary DNA encoding a member of the leucine-zipper class of proteins (human X-box-binding protein, hXBP-1) that binds to the 3{prime} end of the conserved X box (X2) of the HLA-DRA major histocompatibility complex gene was recently described. Further gel-retardation analysis has demonstrated that hXBP-1 also binds to HLA-DPB X2 but not to other X2 sequences. Transient transfection of a mammalian expression vector with the hXBP-1 cDNA inserted in the antisense orientation represses the surface expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DP in Raji cells. Cotransfection of the antisense hXBP-1 vector with a HLA-DRA/chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (but not a HLA-DQB/chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) reporter plasmid decreases chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in Raji cells and in {gamma}-interferon-treated HeLa cells relative to cells cotransfected with a control antisense vector. Moreover, hXBP-1 is shown to form a stable heterodimer with the product of the c-fos protooncogene. These data suggest that the hXBP-1 c-fos heterodimer is critical for the transcription of a subset of the human class II major histocompatibility complex genes and that the regulatory mechanisms for the different class II genes are distinct.

  8. Structure and Function of Fusion Gene Products in

    E-print Network

    Spang, Rainer

    Structure and Function of Fusion Gene Products in Childhood Acute Leukemia #12;Chromosomal;Transcriptional Activation RNA Polymerase II Gene Transcription Histon Acetylation Complex Chromatin Remodeling

  9. Structure and stability of Co(II)-complexes formed by wild-type and metal-ligand substitution mutants of T4 gene 32 protein 

    E-print Network

    Guo, Juqian

    1996-01-01

    Phage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) is a zinc metalloprotein that binds cooperatively and preferentially to single-stranded nucleic acids and functions as a replication and recombination accessory protein. We have previously shown that the ZN...

  10. Darwin's legacy II: why biology is not physics, or why it has taken a century to see the dependence of genes on the environment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rama S

    2015-01-01

    Genes and environment make the organism. Darwin stood firm in his denial of any direct role of environment in the modification of heredity. His theory of evolution heralded two debates: one about the importance and adequacy of natural selection as the main mechanism of evolution, and the other about the role of genes versus environment in the modification of phenotype and evolution. Here, I provide an overview of the second debate and show that the reasons for the gene versus environment battle were twofold: first, there was confusion about the role of environment in modifying the inheritance of a trait versus the evolution of that trait, and second, there was misunderstanding about the meaning of environment and its interaction with genes in the production of phenotypes. It took nearly a century to see that environment does not directly affect the inheritance of a phenotype (i.e., its heredity), but it is nevertheless the primary mover of phenotypic evolution. Effects of genes and environment are not separate but interdependent. One cannot separate the effect of genes from that of environment, or nature from nurture. To answer the question posed in the title, it is partly because the 20th century has been a century of unending progress in genetics. But also because unlike physics, biology is not colorblind; progress in biology has often been delayed beyond the Kuhnian paradigm change due to built-in interest in negating the influence of environment. Those who are against evolution, of course, cannot be expected to understand the role of environment in evolution. Those for it, many biologists included, believing in the supremacy of genes empowers them by giving adaptation a solely gene-directed (self-driven) "teleological" interpretation. PMID:25985891

  11. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, and double strand break genes as markers for response to radiotherapy in patients with Stage I to II head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carles, Joan . E-mail: jcarles@imas.imim.es; Monzo, Mariano; Amat, Marta; Jansa, Sonia; Artells, Rosa; Navarro, Alfons; Foro, Palmira; Alameda, Francesc; Gayete, Angel; Gel, Bernat; Miguel, Maribel; Albanell, Joan; Fabregat, Xavier

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes can influence response to radiotherapy. We analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in nine DNA repair genes in 108 patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNSCC) who had received radiotherapy only. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 to December 2004, patients with Stage I and II histopathologically confirmed HNSCC underwent radiotherapy. DNA was obtained from paraffin-embedded tissue, and SNP analysis was performed using a real-time polymerase chain reaction allelic discrimination TaqMan assay with minor modifications. Results: Patients were 101 men (93.5%) and 7 (6.5%) women, with a median age of 64 years (range, 40 to 89 years). Of the patients, 76 (70.4%) patients were Stage I and 32 (29.6%) were Stage II. The XPF/ERCC1 SNP at codon 259 and XPG/ERCC5 at codon 46 emerged as significant predictors of progression (p 0.00005 and 0.049, respectively) and survival (p = 0.0089 and 0.0066, respectively). Similarly, when variant alleles of XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5 and XPA were examined in combination, a greater number of variant alleles was associated with shorter time to progression (p = 0.0003) and survival (p 0.0002). Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms in XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5, and XPA may significantly influence response to radiotherapy; large studies are warranted to confirm their role in HNSCC.

  12. The structure at 2.4 Å resolution of the protein from gene locus At3g21360, a putative Fe{sup II}/2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Allard, Simon T. M.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Aceti, David J.; Wrobel, Russell L.; Frederick, Ronnie O.; Sreenath, Hassan; Vojtik, Frank C.; Jeon, Won Bae; Newman, Craig S.; Primm, John; Sussman, Michael R.; Fox, Brian G.; Markley, John L.; Phillips, George N. Jr

    2005-05-01

    The crystal structure of the 37.2 kDa At3g21360 gene product from A. thaliana was determined at 2.4 Å resolution. The structure establishes that this protein binds a metal ion and is a member of a clavaminate synthase-like superfamily in A. thaliana. The crystal structure of the gene product of At3g21360 from Arabidopsis thaliana was determined by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion method and refined to an R factor of 19.3% (R{sub free} = 24.1%) at 2.4 Å resolution. The crystal structure includes two monomers in the asymmetric unit that differ in the conformation of a flexible domain that spans residues 178–230. The crystal structure confirmed that At3g21360 encodes a protein belonging to the clavaminate synthase-like superfamily of iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes. The metal-binding site was defined and is similar to the iron(II) binding sites found in other members of the superfamily.

  13. A new double right border binary vector for producing marker-free transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Once a transgenic plant is developed, the selectable marker gene (SMG) becomes unnecessary in the plant. In fact, the continued presence of the SMG in the transgenic plant may cause unexpected pleiotropic effects as well as environmental or biosafety issues. Several methods for removal of SMGs that have been reported remain inaccessible due to protection by patents, while development of new ones is expensive and cost prohibitive. Here, we describe the development of a new vector for producing marker-free plants by simply adapting an ordinary binary vector to the double right border (DRB) vector design using conventional cloning procedures. Findings We developed the DRB vector pMarkfree5.0 by placing the bar gene (representing genes of interest) between two copies of T-DNA right border sequences. The ?-glucuronidase (gus) and nptII genes (representing the selectable marker gene) were cloned next followed by one copy of the left border sequence. When tested in a model species (tobacco), this vector system enabled the generation of 55.6% kanamycin-resistant plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The frequency of cotransformation of the nptII and bar transgenes using the vector was 66.7%. Using the leaf bleach and Basta assays, we confirmed that the nptII and bar transgenes were coexpressed and segregated independently in the transgenic plants. This enable separation of the transgenes in plants cotransformed using pMarkfree5.0. Conclusions The results suggest that the DRB system developed here is a practical and effective approach for separation of gene(s) of interest from a SMG and production of SMG-free plants. Therefore this system could be instrumental in production of “clean” plants containing genes of agronomic importance. PMID:24207020

  14. Ligand-independent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor by ursodeoxycholic acid: Repression of IFN-{gamma}-induced MHC class II gene expression via a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Makino, Yuichi; Miura, Takanori

    1996-02-15

    The therapeutic effectiveness of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) for various autoimmune liver diseases strongly indicates that UDCA possesses immunomodulatory activities. Experimental evidence also supports this notion, since, for example, UDCA has been shown to suppress secretion of IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-{gamma} from activated T lymphocytes, and Ig production from B lymphocytes. To investigate the mechanical background of UDCA-mediated immunomodulation, we asked whether UDCA interacts with the intracellular signal transduction pathway, especially whether it is involved in immunosuppressive glucocorticoid hormone action. For this purpose, we used a cloned Chinese hamster ovary cell line, CHOpMTGR, in which glucocorticoid receptor cDNA was stably integrated. In immunocytochemical analysis, we found that treatment with UDCA promoted the nuclear translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor in a ligand-independent fashion, which was further confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, the translocated glucocorticoid receptor demonstrated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Transient transfection experiments revealed that treatment of the cells with UDCA marginally enhanced glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression. We also showed that UDCA suppressed IFN-{gamma}-mediated induction of MHC class II gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pathway. Together, UDCA-dependent promotion of translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor may be associated with, at least in part, its immunomodulatory action through glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene regulation. 68 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Exposure to 3,3',5-triiodothyronine affects histone and RNA polymerase II modifications, but not DNA methylation status, in the regulatory region of the Xenopus laevis thyroid hormone receptor ?? gene.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Kentaro; Nishiyama, Norihito; Izumi, Yushi; Otsuka, Shunsuke; Ishihara, Akinori; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play a critical role in amphibian metamorphosis, during which the TH receptor (TR) gene, thrb, is upregulated in a tissue-specific manner. The Xenopus laevis thrb gene has 3 TH response elements (TREs) in the 5' flanking regulatory region and 1 TRE in the exon b region, around which CpG sites are highly distributed. To clarify whether exposure to 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) affects histone and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) modifications and the level of DNA methylation in the 5' regulatory region, we conducted reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay using X. laevis cultured cells and premetamorphic tadpoles treated with or without 2 nM T3. Exposure to T3 increased the amount of the thrb transcript, in parallel with enhanced histone H4 acetylation and RNAPII recruitment, and probably phosphorylation of RNAPII at serine 5, in the 5' regulatory and exon b regions. However, the 5' regulatory region remained hypermethylated even with exposure to T3, and there was no significant difference in the methylation status between DNAs from T3-untreated and -treated cultured cells or tadpole tissues. Our results demonstrate that exposure to T3 induced euchromatin-associated epigenetic marks by enhancing histone acetylation and RNAPII recruitment, but not by decreasing the level of DNA methylation, in the 5' regulatory region of the X. laevis thrb gene. PMID:26417689

  16. An RNA-splicing mutation (G{sup +51VS20}) in the Type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Weis, M.A.; Eyre, D.R.; Gruber, H.E.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. |

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal {alpha}1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G{yields}T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U{sub 1} small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to {alpha}1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that {alpha}-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of {alpha}1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Constitutive Expression of the Maize Genes B1 and C1 in Transgenic Hi II Maize Results in Differential Tissue Pigmentation and Generates Resistance to Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthocyanin biosynthesis in maize protects tissues from biotic and abiotic stresses. Constitutive expression of the maize B1 and C1 genes, which induces anthocyanin biosynthesis, resulted in transgenic plants with varied phenotypes. Some colored leaves were substantially resistant to thrips damage...

  18. Cultivation and characterization of novel human group A rotaviruses with long RNA electropherotypes, subgroup II specificities, and serotype 2 VP7 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bingnan, F; Unicomb, L E; Tu, G L; Ali, A; Malek, A; Rahim, Z; Tzipori, S

    1991-01-01

    During an epidemiological study of human rotavirus infections in Bangladesh, three group A strains hybridized with a serotype 2 oligonucleotide probe, but they had long RNA electropherotypes. The three strains were collected from 8- to 20-month-old infants with acute diarrhea and moderate malnutrition. By a modified isolation procedure, two strains (T-B and T-C) were adapted in MA104 cell cultures. They were identified to be subgroup II specific by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with subgroup I- and II-specific monoclonal antibodies and were identified by a fluorescent focus reduction neutralization assay with hyperimmune antisera to be serotype 2 specific. Further characterization of these unusual rotavirus strains needs to be carried out. Images PMID:1658036

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins with a Zn(II)2Cys6 domain, Cys-X2-Cys-X6-Cys-X5-12-Cys-X2-Cys-X6-9-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overvie...

  20. The mapping of the human 52-kD Ro/SSA autoantigen gene to human chromosome II, and its polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.B.; Itoh, Kazuko ); Fujisaku, Atsushi ); Pontarotti, P. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Neas, B.R. Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City )

    1993-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the ribonucleoprotein Ro/SSA occur in nearly half of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and are associated with lymphopenia, photosensitive dermatitis, and pulmonary and renal disease, which suggests that they have an immunopathologic role. The majority of Ro/SSA precipitin-positive patients produce serum antibodies that bind to the 60-kD and 52-kD Ro/SSA proteins. The authors previously isolated and determined the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone that encodes the 52-kD form of the human Ro/SSA protein. In the present study, they have determined the chromosomal location of the gene by in situ hybridization to the end of the short arm of chromosome 11. Hybridization of portions of the cDNA probe to restriction enzyme-digested DNA indicated the gene is composed of at least three exons. The exon encoding the putative zinc fingers of this protein was found to be distinct from that which encodes the leucine zipper. An RFLP of this gene was identified and is associated with the presence of lupus, primarily in black Americans. 60 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Endogenous estrogen status, but not genistein supplementation, modulates 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mutation in the liver cII gene of transgenic big blue rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Hutts, Robert C; Mei, Nan; Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Michelle E; Shelton, Sharon; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Aidoo, Anane

    2005-06-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that isoflavones found in soybeans have estrogenic activity and may safely alleviate the symptoms of menopause. One of these isoflavones, genistein, is commonly used by postmenopausal women as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy. Although sex hormones have been implicated as an important risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, there are limited data on the potential effects of the estrogens, including phytoestrogens, on chemical mutagenesis in liver. Because of the association between mutation induction and the carcinogenesis process, we investigated whether endogenous estrogen and supplemental genistein affect 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mutagenesis in rat liver. Intact and ovariectomized female Big Blue rats were treated with 80 mg DMBA/kg body weight. Some of the rats also received a supplement of 1,000 ppm genistein. Sixteen weeks after the carcinogen treatment, the rats were sacrificed, their livers were removed, and mutant frequencies (MFs) and types of mutations were determined in the liver cII gene. DMBA significantly increased the MFs in liver for both the intact and ovariectomized rats. While there was no significant difference in MF between the ovariectomized and intact control animals, the mutation induction by DMBA in the ovariectomized groups was significantly higher than that in the intact groups. Dietary genistein did not alter these responses. Molecular analysis of the mutants showed that DMBA induced chemical-specific types of mutations in the liver cII gene. These results suggest that endogenous ovarian hormones have an inhibitory effect on liver mutagenesis by DMBA, whereas dietary genistein does not modulate spontaneous or DMBA-induced mutagenesis in either intact or ovariectomized rats. PMID:15662719

  2. Low density lipoprotein receptor gene Ava II polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several common genetic polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene have associated with modifications of serum total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, but the results are not consistent in different populations. Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 1024 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 792 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-C, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and the ratio of ApoA1 to ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.01 for all). The frequency of A- and A+ alleles was 65.5% and 34.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 80.7% and 19.3% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. The frequency of A-A-, A-A+ and A+A+ genotypes was 42.6%, 45.9% and 11.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 64.9%, 31.6% and 3.5% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. There was also significant difference in the genotypic frequencies between males and females in Bai Ku Yao (P <0.05), and in the genotypic and allelic frequencies between normal LDL-C (? 3.20 mmol/L) and high LDL-C (>3.20 mmol/L) subgroups in Bai Ku Yao (P < 0.05 for each) and between males and females in Han (P < 0.05 for each). The levels of LDL-C in males and TC and HDL-C in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05 for all) in Bai Ku Yao, whereas the levels of HDL-C in males and HDL-C and ApoA1 in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05-0.001) in Han. The subjects with A+A+ genotype had higher serum LDL-C, TC, HDL-C or ApoA1 levels than the subjects with A-A+ and A-A- genotypes. Spearman rank correlation analysis revealed that the levels of LDL-C in Bai Ku Yao and HDL-C in Han were correlated with genotypes (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01; respectively). Conclusions The association of LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism and serum lipid levels is different between the Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. The discrepancy might partly result from different LDL-R gene Ava ? polymorphism or LDL-R gene-enviromental interactions. PMID:21345210

  3. Three-dimensional in vitro effects of compression and time in culture on aggregate modulus and on gene expression and protein content of collagen type II in murine chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chokalingam, Kumar; Hunter, Shawn; Gooch, Cynthia; Frede, Chris; Florer, Jane; Wenstrup, Richard; Butler, David

    2009-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine how culture time and dynamic compression, applied to murine chondrocyte-agarose constructs, influence construct stiffness, expression of col2 and type II collagen. Chondrocytes were harvested from the ribs of six newborn double transgenic mice carrying transgenes that use enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP-T) as reporters for expression from the col2a1 and col1a1 promoters, respectively. Sixty-three constructs (8 mm diameter x 3 mm thick) per animal were created by seeding chondrocytes (10 x 10(6) per mL) in agarose gel (2% w/v). Twenty-eight constructs from each animal were stimulated for 7, 14, 21, or 28 days in a custom bioreactor housed in an electromagnetic system. Twenty-eight constructs exposed to identical culture conditions but without mechanical stimulation served as nonstimulated controls for 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. The remaining seven constructs served as day 0 controls. Fluorescing cells with rounded morphology were present in all constructs at all five time points. Seven, 14, 21, and 28 days of stimulation significantly increased col2 expression according to ECFP fluorescence and messenger RNA expression according to quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Col2 gene expression in stimulated and nonstimulated constructs showed initial increases up to day 14 and then showed decreases by day 28. Stimulation significantly increased type II collagen content at 21 and 28 days and aggregate modulus only at 28 days. There was a significant increase in aggregate modulus in stimulated constructs between day 0 and 7 and between day 21 and day 28. This study reveals that compressive mechanical stimulation is a potent stimulator of col2 gene expression that leads to measurable but delayed increases in protein (type II collagen) and then biomechanical stiffness. Future studies will examine the effects of components of the mechanical signal in culture and address the question of whether such in vitro improvements in tissue-engineered constructs enhance repair outcomes after surgery. PMID:19231914

  4. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi; International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases , Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ? hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ? To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ? hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ? hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.

  5. Polymorphisms in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Genes Affect the Expression Levels of Membrane-Bound Type I and Type II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sennikov, Sergey V.; Vasilyev, Filipp F.; Lopatnikova, Julia A.; Shkaruba, Nadezhda S.; Silkov, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    The level of TNF receptors on various cells of immune system and its association with the gene polymorphism were investigated. Determining the levels of membrane-bound TNF? receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed by flow cytometry using BD QuantiBRITE calibration particles. Soluble TNF? receptor (sTNFRs) levels were determined by ELISA and genotyping was determined by PCR-RFLP. Homozygous TT individuals at SNP ?609G/T TNFRI (rs4149570) showed lower levels of sTNFRI compared to GG genotype carriers. Homozygous carriers of CC genotype at SNP ?1207G/C TNFRI (rs4149569) had lower expression densities of membrane-bound TNFRI on intact CD14+ monocytes compared to individuals with the GC genotype. The frequency differences in the CD3+ and CD19+ cells expressing TNFRII in relation to SNP ?1709A/T TNFRII (rs652625) in healthy individuals were also determined. The genotype CC in SNP ?3609C/T TNFRII (rs590368) was associated with a lower percentage of CD14+ cells expressing TNFRII compared to individuals with the CT genotype. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had no significant changes in the frequencies of genotypes. Reduced frequency was identified for the combination TNFRI ?609GT + TNFRII ?3609CC only. The polymorphisms in genes represent one of cell type-specific mechanisms affecting the expression levels of membrane-bound TNF? receptors and TNF?-mediated signaling. PMID:24782596

  6. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B.

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation was unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Studying Genes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  8. Isoforms of human C4b-binding protein. II. Differential modulation of the C4BPA and C4BPB genes by acute phase cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, O.C.; Sanchez-Corral, P.; Rodriguez de Cordoba, S.

    1995-10-15

    Human C4b-binding protein (C4BP) controls activation of the complement system and inactivates the anticoagulant vitamin K-dependent protein S using two distinct polypeptides known as C4BP{alpha} and C4BP{beta}, respectively. C4BP presents three isoforms, {alpha}7{beta}1, {alpha}7{beta}0, and {alpha}6{beta}1, the proportion of which depends on the relative levels of C4BP{alpha} and C4BP{beta}. To better understand the regulation of C4BP during the acute phase response we analyzed the C4BP isoforms in 23 serial samples of acute phase patients and characterized the effect of various acute phase cytokines on the expression of the C4BPA and C4BPB genes using Hep3B cells. We show that the elevation of C4BP during acute phase response leads to changes in the proportion of the C4BP isoforms. However, there are striking differences among acute phase individuals. Some of them present a pattern of induction that primarily affects the {alpha}7{beta}0 isoform, whereas others present the opposite situation, increasing the C4BP{beta}-containing isoforms. In vitro studies demonstrate that IL-6, IL-1{beta}, and INF-{gamma} increase the levels of both C4BP{alpha} and C4BP{beta}-mRNAs, whereas TNF-{alpha} down-regulates these mRNAs. INF-{gamma} shows, in addition, a differential effect on the C4BP{alpha} and C4BP{beta}-mRNAs. Differential modulation of the C4BPA and C4BPB genes has been postulated as an efficient mechanism to maintain steady concentrations of C4BP{beta} when C4BP is induced. A synergistic 10-fold induction of C4BP{alpha}-mRNA, but a marginal increase of C4BP{beta}-mRNA, was observed when INF-{gamma} was used together with TNF-{alpha}, suggesting that association of these cytokines is critical to avoid elevation of C4BP{beta} during the acute phase induction of C4BP. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Polymorphisms in Phase I and Phase II genes and breast cancer risk and relations to persistent organic pollutant exposure: a case–control study in Inuit women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that chemicals belonging to the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as perfluorinated compounds (PFAS) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are risk factors in Breast Cancer (BC) development in Greenlandic Inuit women. The present case–control study aimed to investigate the main effect of polymorphisms in genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and estrogen biosynthesis, CYP1A1, CYP1B1, COMT and CYP17, CYP19 and the BRCA1 founder mutation in relation to BC risk and to explore possible interactions between the gene polymorphisms and serum POP levels on BC risk in Greenlandic Inuit women. Methods The study population consisted of 31 BC cases and 115 matched controls, with information on serum levels of POPs. Genotyping was conducted for CYP1A1 (Ile462Val; rs1048943), CYP1B1 (Leu432Val; rs1056836), COMT (Val158Met; rs4680), CYP17A1 (A1>?A2; rs743572); CYP19A1 (C>?T; rs10046) and CYP19A1 ((TTTA)n repeats) polymorphisms and BRCA1 founder mutation using TaqMan allelic discrimination method and polymerase chain reaction based restriction fragment length polymorphism. The ?2 –test was used to compare categorical variables between cases and controls and the odds ratios were estimated by unconditional logistic regression models. Results We found an independent association of CYP1A1 (Val) and CYP17 (A1) with BC risk. Furthermore, an increased BC risk was observed for women with high serum levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and carriers of at least: one CYP1A1 variant Val allele; one variant COMT Met allele; or the common CYP17 A1 allele. No combined effects were seen between PFAS exposure and CYP1B1 and CYP19 polymorphisms. The risk of BC was not found significantly associated with exposure to PCBs and OCPs, regardless of genotype for all investigated SNPs. The frequency of the Greenlandic founder mutation in BRCA1 was as expected higher in cases than in controls. Conclusions The BRCA1 founder mutation and polymorphisms in CYP1A1 (Val) and CYP17 (A1) can increase the BC risk among Inuit women and the risk increases with higher serum levels of PFOS and PFOA. Serum PFAS levels were a consistent risk factor of BC, but inter-individual polymorphic differences might cause variations in sensitivity to the PFAS/POP exposure. PMID:24629213

  10. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were ?-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and ?-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, ?-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  11. Shark Class II Invariant Chain Reveals Ancient Conserved Relationships with Cathepsins and MHC Class II

    PubMed Central

    Criscitiello, Michael F.; Ohta, Yuko; Eubanks, Jeannine O.; Chen, Patricia L.; Flajnik, Martin F.

    2011-01-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) is the critical third chain required for the MHC class II heterodimer to be properly guided through the cell, loaded with peptide, and expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells. Here, we report the isolation of the nurse shark Ii gene, and the comparative analysis of Ii splice variants, expression, genomic organization, predicted structure, and function throughout vertebrate evolution. Alternative splicing to yield Ii with and without the putative protease-protective, thyroglobulin-like domain is as ancient as the MHC-based adaptive immune system, as our analyses in shark and lizard further show conservation of this mechanism in all vertebrate classes except bony fish. Remarkable coordinate expression of Ii and class II was found in shark tissues. Conserved Ii residues and cathepsin L orthologs suggest their long co-evolution in the antigen presentation pathway, and genomic analyses suggest 450 million years of conserved Ii exon/intron structure. Other than an extended linker preceding the thyroglobulin-like domain in cartilaginous fish, the Ii gene and protein are predicted to have largely similar physiology from shark to man. Duplicated Ii genes found only in teleosts appear to have become sub-functionalized, as one form is predicted to play the same role as that mediated by Ii mRNA alternative splicing in all other vertebrate classes. No Ii homologs or potential ancestors of any of the functional Ii domains were found in the jawless fish or lower chordates. PMID:21996610

  12. Multidimensional gene search with Genehopper

    PubMed Central

    Munz, Matthias; Tönnies, Sascha; Balke, Wolf-Tilo; Simon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The high abundance of genetic information enables researchers to gain new insights from the comparison of human genes according to their similarities. However, existing tools that allow the exploration of such gene-to-gene relationships, apply each similarity independently. To make use of multidimensional scoring, we developed a new search engine named Genehopper. It can handle two query types: (i) the typical use case starts with a term-to-gene search, i.e. an optimized full-text search for an anchor gene of interest. The web-interface can handle one or more terms including gene symbols and identifiers of Ensembl, UniProt, EntrezGene and RefSeq. (ii) When the anchor gene is defined, the user can explore its neighborhood by a gene-to-gene search as the weighted sum of nine normalized gene similarities based on sequence homology, protein domains, mRNA expression profiles, Gene Ontology Annotation, gene symbols and other features. Each weight can be adjusted by the user, allowing flexible customization of the gene search. All implemented similarities have a low pairwise correlation (max r2 = 0.4) implying a low linear dependency, i.e. any change in a single weight has an effect on the ranking. Thus, we treated them as separate dimensions in the search space. Genehopper is freely available at http://genehopper.ifis.cs.tu-bs.de. PMID:25990726

  13. Multidimensional gene search with Genehopper.

    PubMed

    Munz, Matthias; Tönnies, Sascha; Balke, Wolf-Tilo; Simon, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The high abundance of genetic information enables researchers to gain new insights from the comparison of human genes according to their similarities. However, existing tools that allow the exploration of such gene-to-gene relationships, apply each similarity independently. To make use of multidimensional scoring, we developed a new search engine named Genehopper. It can handle two query types: (i) the typical use case starts with a term-to-gene search, i.e. an optimized full-text search for an anchor gene of interest. The web-interface can handle one or more terms including gene symbols and identifiers of Ensembl, UniProt, EntrezGene and RefSeq. (ii) When the anchor gene is defined, the user can explore its neighborhood by a gene-to-gene search as the weighted sum of nine normalized gene similarities based on sequence homology, protein domains, mRNA expression profiles, Gene Ontology Annotation, gene symbols and other features. Each weight can be adjusted by the user, allowing flexible customization of the gene search. All implemented similarities have a low pairwise correlation (max r(2) = 0.4) implying a low linear dependency, i.e. any change in a single weight has an effect on the ranking. Thus, we treated them as separate dimensions in the search space. Genehopper is freely available at http://genehopper.ifis.cs.tu-bs.de. PMID:25990726

  14. V7, A novel leukocyte surface protein that participates in T cell activation. II. Molecular cloning and characterization of the V7 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ruegg, C.L.; Rivas, A.; Madani, N.D.

    1995-05-01

    V7 is a cell surface glycoprotein expressed on Ag-activated T cells, monocytes, and granulocytes, as well as subpopulations of T cells and accessory cells present in thymic medulla and tonsil. A mAb directed against V7 inhibits the proliferative response to T cells to allogeneic cells or immobilized anti-CD3 Ab, but no lectin mitogens, suggesting that V7 plays a role in TCR/CD3-mediated T cell activation. We have used the anti-V7 Ab in eukaryotic expression cloning experiments to isolate a cDNA clone containing a 3,340-bp insert that encodes V7 when transiently expressed in simian and murine fibroblastoid cells. DNA sequence analysis revealed a novel 1,021-amino acid open reading frame the structure of which conforms to the category of type I integral membrane proteins. The protein sequence includes a 20-residue putative hydrophobic signal sequence followed by a putative extracellular domain of 934 amino acids, a prototypic hydrophobic transmembrane spanning a domain of 25 residues, and finally a short and highly charged putative cytoplasmic domain of 42 residues. The extracellular domain contains seven pairs of regularly spaced cysteine residues, suggestive of Ig-like domains. On the basis of statistical analysis of the sequences of the putative cysteine loops, all seven of the Ig-like domains belong to the variable, or V-type, category. By using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the V7 gene to human chromosome 1p13. Thus, the V7 glycoprotein represents a novel member of the Ig superfamily that is involved in critical intracellular signals essential for immune function. 44 refs., 8 figs., 21 tabs.

  15. Hymenolepis diminuta: analysis of the expression of Toll-like receptor genes (TLR2 and TLR4) in the small and large intestines of rats. Part II.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, D I; Wojtkowiak-Giera, A; Kolasa, A; Czernomysy-Furowicz, D; Lanocha, N; Wandurska-Nowak, E; Salamatin, R; Jagodzinski, P P

    2013-10-01

    Toll-like receptors in the gastrointestinal tract can influence intestinal homeostasis and play a role in the repair and restitution of intestinal epithelium following tissue damage. In our previous study a statistically significant increase in the level of TLR4 and TLR2 gene expression was observed in rats in early stages of hymenolepidosis. Moreover, the immunopositive cell number and the intensity of immunohistochemical staining (indicating the presence of TLRs within intestinal epithelial cells) increased over the infection period. In this paper, we determined changes in the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 and the number of anaerobic intestinal commensal bacteria in Hymenolepis diminuta infected rats. In the isolated jejunum of infected rats at 16 days post infection (dpi), the expression of TLR4 and TLR2 was significantly higher than uninfected rats. In the colon, a statistically significantly increased expression of TLR2 was observed from 16 to 40 dpi, and TLR4 from 16 to 60 dpi. The jejunum and colon of infected rats contained Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli), Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lactobacillus) and Candida. The total number of intestinal bacteria was higher in H. diminuta infected rats, but the observed microbiota had only minor effects on the expression of TLR2 and TLR4. Toll-like receptors play a role in maintaining epithelial barrier function in response to enteric pathogens and parasites. In our study, the alteration of TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the infected rats indicates the potential role of the innate immune system in the pathomechanism of this infection. PMID:23994484

  16. Influence of RNA Polymerase II Catalytic Activity on Transcription Start Site Selection 

    E-print Network

    Jin, Huiyan

    2015-08-01

    RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) is responsible for expression of all protein-coding genes in eukaryotes. To understand gene expression at the molecular level, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of Pol II function. I investigate how Pol II...

  17. Lifestyle intervention might easily improve blood pressure in hypertensive men with the C genotype of angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Kitade, Azusa; Nagaoka, Junko; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Harada, Kiyomi; Aoi, Wataru; Wada, Sayori; Asano, Hiroaki; Sakane, Naoki; Higashi, Akane

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Recent studies have reported an association of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) 3123Cytosine/Adenine (3123C/A) polymorphism with essential hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the AT2R 3123C/A polymorphism affects blood pressure for free-living hypertensive men during a 5-month intervention period. SUBJECTS/METHODS The subjects were free-living hypertensive Japanese men aged 40 to 75 years who agreed to intervention in the period from 2004 to 2011. Detection of the AT2R 3123C/A polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction. The dietary intervention was designed to decrease salt level and to increase potassium level through cooking instructions and self-monitoring of the diet. The exercise session consisted of activities such as stretching, resistance training, and walking. Blood pressure, urinary sodium and potassium excretion, dietary and lifestyle data, and non-fasting venous blood sample were collected at baseline and after the intervention period. RESULTS Thirty nine subjects were eligible for participation and the follow-up rate was 97.4%. The C allele proportion was 57.9%. AT2R 3123C/A polymorphism was X-chromosome-linked, therefore we analyzed the C and A genotypes. At baseline, no significant differences were observed between the genotype groups. After the intervention, there were no significant differences in lifestyle habit between the groups. Nevertheless, the estimated salt excretion (g/day) was significantly decreased only in the C genotype (13.0-10.3, P = 0.031). No significant change was observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mmHg) in the A genotype, but a significant decrease was observed in the C genotype (150.0-141.5, P = 0.024). CONCLUSTIONS In the C genotype, it might be easy to improve SBP through lifestyle intervention in free-living hypertensive Japanese men, however generalization could not be achieved by the small sample size. PMID:26244077

  18. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke

    1997-01-20

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3, 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Gene promoters dictate histone occupancy within genes.

    PubMed

    Perales, Roberto; Erickson, Benjamin; Zhang, Lian; Kim, Hyunmin; Valiquett, Elan; Bentley, David

    2013-10-01

    Spt6 is a transcriptional elongation factor and histone chaperone that reassembles transcribed chromatin. Genome-wide H3 mapping showed that Spt6 preferentially maintains nucleosomes within the first 500 bases of genes and helps define nucleosome-depleted regions in 5' and 3' flanking sequences. In Spt6-depleted cells, H3 loss at 5' ends correlates with reduced pol II density suggesting enhanced transcription elongation. Consistent with its 'Suppressor of Ty' (Spt) phenotype, Spt6 inactivation caused localized H3 eviction over 1-2 nucleosomes at 5' ends of Ty elements. H3 displacement differed between genes driven by promoters with 'open'/DPN and 'closed'/OPN chromatin conformations with similar pol II densities. More eviction occurred on genes with 'closed' promoters, associated with 'noisy' transcription. Moreover, swapping of 'open' and 'closed' promoters showed that they can specify distinct downstream patterns of histone eviction/deposition. These observations suggest a novel function for promoters in dictating histone dynamics within genes possibly through effects on transcriptional bursting or elongation rate. PMID:24013117

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the eye (retina) and have reduced vision. Carpal tunnel syndrome commonly occurs in children with this disorder and ... help with understanding mucopolysaccharidosis type II? apnea ; breakdown ; carpal tunnel syndrome ; cell ; chromosome ; deficiency ; enzyme ; gene ; heart failure ; heart ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Glutaric acidemia type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that come together to make an enzyme called electron transfer flavoprotein. The ETFDH gene provides instructions for making another enzyme called electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase. Glutaric acidemia type II is ...

  2. Genomewide Structural Annotation and Evolutionary Analysis of the Type I MADS-Box Genes in Plants

    E-print Network

    Gent, Universiteit

    -box genes by the absence of the keratin-like box. In this in silico study, we have structurally an- notated and type II genes are also referred to as MADS SRF-like and MADS MEF2- like genes, respectively (Alvarez conserved MADS domain, animal type I (SRF-like) and type II (MEF2-like) genes contain an additionally

  3. [Detection of transgenic crop with gene chip].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Chun; Sun, Chun-Yun; Feng, Hong; Hu, Xiao-Dong; Yin, Hai-Bin

    2003-05-01

    Some selected available sequences of reporter genes,resistant genes, promoters and terminators are amplified by PCR for the probes of transgenic crop detection gene chip. These probes are arrayed at definite density and printed on the surface of amino-slides by bioRobot MicroGrid II. Results showed that gene chip worked quickly and correctly, when transgenic rice, pawpaw,maize and soybean were applied. PMID:15639876

  4. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.).

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinium consists of approximately 450 species, of which highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is one of the three major Vaccinium fruit crops (i.e., blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry) domesticated in the twentieth century. In blueberry the adventitious shoot regeneration using leaf explants has been the most desirable regeneration system to date; Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is the major gene delivery method and effective selection has been reported using either the neomycin phosphotransferase II gene (nptII) or the bialaphos resistance (bar) gene as selectable markers. The A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation protocol described in this chapter is based on combining the optimal conditions for efficient plant regeneration, reliable gene delivery, and effective selection. The protocol has led to successful regeneration of transgenic plants from leaf explants of four commercially important highbush blueberry cultivars for multiple purposes, providing a powerful approach to supplement conventional breeding methods for blueberry by introducing genes of interest. PMID:25416254

  5. 788 VOLUME 14 NUMBER 9 SEPTEMBER 2007 NATURE STRUCTURAL & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II)

    E-print Network

    Lamond, Angus I.

    of this issue,Darzacq et al.1 have now taken analysis of the mechanism of gene transcription in eukaryotes788 VOLUME 14 NUMBER 9 SEPTEMBER 2007 NATURE STRUCTURAL & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is fundamental to the mechanism of gene expression and a major target of biological

  6. How eukaryotic genes are transcribed

    PubMed Central

    Venters, Bryan J.; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Regulation of eukaryotic gene expression is far more complex than one might have imagined thirty years ago. However, progress towards understanding gene regulatory mechanisms has been rapid and comprehensive, which has made the integration of detailed observations into broadly connected concepts a challenge. This review attempts to integrate the following concepts: 1) a well-defined organization of nucleosomes and modification states at most genes, 2) regulatory networks of sequence-specific transcription factors, 3) chromatin remodeling coupled to promoter assembly of the general transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, and 4) phosphorylation states of RNA polymerase II coupled to chromatin modification states during transcription. The wealth of new insights arising from the tools of biochemistry, genomics, cell biology, and genetics is providing a remarkable view into the mechanics of gene regulation. PMID:19514890

  7. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  8. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  9. Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    James Barber

    2005-04-28

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  10. Highly efficient expression of interleukin-2 under the control of rabbit ?-globin intron II gene enhances protective immune responses of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) DNA vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Du, Yijun; Lu, Yu; Wang, Xinglong; Qi, Jing; Liu, Jiyu; Hu, Yue; Li, Feng; Wu, Jiaqiang; Guo, Lihui; Liu, Junzhen; Tao, Haiying; Sun, Wenbo; Chen, Lei; Cong, Xiaoyan; Ren, Sufang; Shi, Jianli; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinbao; Huang, Baohua; Wan, Renzhong

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) had caused catastrophic losses in swine industry in China. The current inactivated vaccine provided only limited protection, and the attenuated live vaccine could protect piglets against the HP-PRRSV but there was a possibility that the attenuated virus returned to high virulence. In this study, the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1© was modified under the control of rabbit ?-globin intron II gene and the modified vector pMVAX1© was constructed. Porcine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and GP3-GP5 fusion protein of HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN were highly expressed by pMVAX1©. Mice inoculated with pMVAX1©-GP35 developed significantly higher PRRSV-specific antibody responses and T cell proliferation than those vaccinated with pVAX1©-GP35. pMVAX1©-GP35 was selected as PRRS DNA vaccine candidate and co-administrated with pVAX1©-IL-2 or pMVAX1©-IL-2 in pigs. pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 could provide enhanced PRRSV-specific antibody responses, T cell proliferation, Th1-type and Th2-type cytokine responses and CTL responses than pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35. Following homologous challenge with HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN, similar with attenuated PRRS vaccine group, pigs inoculated with pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 showed no clinical signs, almost no lung lesions and no viremia, as compared to those in pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 groups. It indicated that pMVAX1©-IL-2 effectively increases humoral and cell mediated immune responses of pMVAX1©-GP35. Co-administration of pMVAX1©-IL-2 and pMVAX1©-GP35 might be attractive candidate vaccines for preventing HP-PRRSV infections. PMID:24603502

  11. Selection of reliable reference genes for gene expression studies in peach using real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background RT-qPCR is a preferred method for rapid and reliable quantification of gene expression studies. Appropriate application of RT-qPCR in such studies requires the use of reference gene(s) as an internal control to normalize mRNA levels between different samples for an exact comparison of gene expression level. However, recent studies have shown that no single reference gene is universal for all experiments. Thus, the identification of high quality reference gene(s) is of paramount importance for the interpretation of data generated by RT-qPCR. Only a few studies on reference genes have been done in plants and none in peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch). Therefore, the present study was conducted to identify suitable reference gene(s) for normalization of gene expression in peach. Results In this work, eleven reference genes were investigated in different peach samples using RT-qPCR with SYBR green. These genes are: actin 2/7 (ACT), cyclophilin (CYP2), RNA polymerase II (RP II), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), ribosomal protein L13 (RPL13), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), tubblin beta (TUB), tubblin alpha (TUA), translation elongation factor 2 (TEF2) and ubiquitin 10 (UBQ10). All eleven reference genes displayed a wide range of Cq values in all samples, indicating that they expressed variably. The stability of these genes except for RPL13 was determined by three different descriptive statistics, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper, which produced highly comparable results. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that expression stability varied greatly between genes studied in peach. Based on the results from geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper analyses, for all the sample pools analyzed, TEF2, UBQ10 and RP II were found to be the most suitable reference genes with a very high statistical reliability, and TEF2 and RP II for the other sample series, while 18S rRNA, RPL13 and PLA2 were unsuitable as internal controls. GAPDH and ACT also performed poorly and were less stable in our analysis. To achieve accurate comparison of levels of gene expression, two or more reference genes must be used for data normalization. The combinations of TEF2/UBQ10/RP II and TEF2/RP II were suggested for use in all samples and subsets, respectively. PMID:19619301

  12. GMO detection in food and feed through screening by visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Li, Rong; Quan, Sheng; Shen, Ping; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin; Yang, Litao

    2015-06-01

    Isothermal DNA/RNA amplification techniques are the primary methodology for developing on-spot rapid nucleic acid amplification assays, and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique has been developed and applied in the detection of foodborne pathogens, plant/animal viruses, and genetically modified (GM) food/feed contents. In this study, one set of LAMP assays targeting on eight frequently used universal elements, marker genes, and exogenous target genes, such as CaMV35S promoter, FMV35S promoter, NOS, bar, cry1Ac, CP4 epsps, pat, and NptII, were developed for visual screening of GM contents in plant-derived food samples with high efficiency and accuracy. For these eight LAMP assays, their specificity was evaluated by testing commercial GM plant events and their limits of detection were also determined, which are 10 haploid genome equivalents (HGE) for FMV35S promoter, cry1Ac, and pat assays, as well as five HGE for CaMV35S promoter, bar, NOS terminator, CP4 epsps, and NptII assays. The screening applicability of these LAMP assays was further validated successfully using practical canola, soybean, and maize samples. The results suggested that the established visual LAMP assays are applicable and cost-effective for GM screening in plant-derived food samples. PMID:25822163

  13. The use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) improves Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of 'Spadona' pear (Pyrus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Yancheva, S D; Shlizerman, L A; Golubowicz, S; Yabloviz, Z; Perl, A; Hanania, U; Flaishman, M A

    2006-03-01

    An efficient and reproducible system for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the pear (Pyrus communis L.) cultivar Spadona was developed. Leaf explants of in vitro propagated plants were cocultivated with the disarmed Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harboring the plasmid pME504, carrying the uidA-intron and nptII genes. Under selective conditions, 5% of the plantlets regenerated and were positively stained for GUS. However, most of the GUS-positive plants re-callused and subsequently died, leaving only 0.3-0.8% of these plantlets to reach maturity. In order to identify transformed shoots at early stages of regeneration, we introduced the green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the pear cultivar Spadona using the plasmid PZP carrying the nuclear-targeted GFP and nptII genes. High expression levels of GFP were detected in transgenic cells as early as 7 days after transformation. GFP marked-callii and transformed plants were observed after 14 and 24 days, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy screening of transformed plant material, under the selection of kanamycin, increased the transformation frequency to 3.0-4.0%. We conclude that the introduction of GFP improves the selection of transformed plants of Spadona pear. PMID:16328389

  14. Peptide-based gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahat, R I; Monera, O D; Smith, L C; Rolland, A

    1999-04-01

    To achieve effective plasmid-based gene therapy, the control of cellular access and uptake, intracellular trafficking and nuclear retention of plasmids must be achieved. Inefficient endosomal release, cytoplasmic transport and nuclear entry of plasmids are amongst some of the key limiting factors in the use of plasmids for effective gene therapy. A number of non-viral gene delivery systems have been designed to overcome these limiting factors. The most common approach to protect and control plasmid distribution is to complex plasmids with cationic lipids or polymers through electrostatic interactions. Endosomal release of plasmids can be achieved, for instance, by using pH-sensitive lipids, inactivated viral particles, endosomolytic peptides and polymers. Among the least explored gene delivery systems are those that consist mainly of synthetic, short peptides. Peptides can be incorporated into multicomponent gene delivery complexes for specific purposes, such as for DNA condensation, cell-specific targeting, endosomolysis or nuclear transport. The aims of this review are to: (i) explore the conceptual and experimental aspects of peptide-DNA interactions; (ii) critically assess the possible use of peptides for efficient gene transfer; and (iii) present an overview on the use of peptides to enhance the effectiveness of other gene delivery systems. On balance, peptide-based gene delivery systems appear to have a significant potential as commercially viable gene delivery products. PMID:11715946

  15. Tyrosine hydroxylase and insulin-like growth factor II but not insulin are adjacent in the teleost species barramundi, Lates calcarifer.

    PubMed

    Collet, C; Candy, J; Sara, V

    1998-02-01

    In humans, the genes encoding tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), insulin and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) form an extremely tight linkage group on chromosome 11p15. Characterisation of the homologous genomic region of a teleost, the barramundi Lates calcarifer, revealed tight linkage of the TH and IGF-II genes, and the absence of the gene encoding insulin. PMID:9682446

  16. Gene Concepts, Gene Talk, and Gene Patents

    E-print Network

    Torrance, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    concepts have exerted strong effects on institutions such as medicine, the biotechnology industry, politics, and the law. A particularly rich example of this is the interplay between gene concepts and patent law. Over the last century, biology has...

  17. Soluble epoxide hydrolase plays an essential role in angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    of both spontaneously hypertensive rats and Ang II-infused Wistar rats. Blocking the Ang II type 1 cardiomy- ocytes isolated from rat and mouse. Expression of these marker genes was elevated with adenovirus

  18. Welding II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding II, a performance-based course offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to introduce students to out-of-position shielded arc welding with emphasis on proper heats, electrode selection, and alternating/direct currents. After introductory…

  19. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-09-05

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  20. Fugu II

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2008-11-19

    Broadcast Transcript: Fugu Part II: In the last Postcard, we talked about fugu, the poisonous poisson that has been a favorite in Japan for centuries. Well, it seems that a fish farm has recently raised fugu that are poison-free. A non-toxic fugu...

  1. Toucan: deciphering the cis-regulatory logic of coregulated genes

    E-print Network

    Toucan: deciphering the cis-regulatory logic of coregulated genes Stein Aerts*, Gert Thijs, Bert for the rapid dis- covery of signi®cant cis-regulatory elements from sets of coexpressed or coregulated genes. Biologists can automatically (i) retrieve genes and intergenic regions, (ii) identify putative regulatory

  2. Investigating the roles of arabidopsis polycomb-group genes in regulating flowering time and during plant development by (I) challenging silencing and (II) developing approaches to dissect Pc-G action 

    E-print Network

    Creasey, Kate M.

    2009-01-01

    Polycomb-group (Pc-G) proteins regulate homeotic gene silencing associated with the repressive covalent histone modification, trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3). Pc-G mediated silencing is believed to ...

  3. Gene therapy on the move

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Büning, Hildegard; Galy, Anne; Schambach, Axel; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The first gene therapy clinical trials were initiated more than two decades ago. In the early days, gene therapy shared the fate of many experimental medicine approaches and was impeded by the occurrence of severe side effects in a few treated patients. The understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to treatment- and/or vector-associated setbacks has resulted in the development of highly sophisticated gene transfer tools with improved safety and therapeutic efficacy. Employing these advanced tools, a series of Phase I/II trials were started in the past few years with excellent clinical results and no side effects reported so far. Moreover, highly efficient gene targeting strategies and site-directed gene editing technologies have been developed and applied clinically. With more than 1900 clinical trials to date, gene therapy has moved from a vision to clinical reality. This review focuses on the application of gene therapy for the correction of inherited diseases, the limitations and drawbacks encountered in some of the early clinical trials and the revival of gene therapy as a powerful treatment option for the correction of monogenic disorders. PMID:24106209

  4. Trichoderma genes

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Pamela (Los Altos, CA); Goedegebuur, Frits (Vlaardingen, NL); Van Solingen, Pieter (Naaldwijk, NL); Ward, Michael (San Francisco, CA)

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  5. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  6. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  7. BORE II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore »upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  8. Complete Genome Sequencing of Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila ZAC14D2_NAIMI4_2, a Multidrug-Resistant Strain Isolated from Sediments of a Polluted River in Mexico, Uncovers New Antibiotic Resistance Genes and a Novel Class-II Lasso Peptide Biosynthesis Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Sánchez, Luz Edith

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila strain, generated with PacBio RS II single-molecule real-time technology, consisting of a single circular chromosome of 4.13 Mb. We annotated mobile genetic elements and natural product biosynthesis clusters, including a novel class-II lasso peptide with a 7-residue macrolactam ring. PMID:26659678

  9. Complete Genome Sequencing of Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila ZAC14D2_NAIMI4_2, a Multidrug-Resistant Strain Isolated from Sediments of a Polluted River in Mexico, Uncovers New Antibiotic Resistance Genes and a Novel Class-II Lasso Peptide Biosynthesis Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Ochoa-Sánchez, Luz Edith

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila strain, generated with PacBio RS II single-molecule real-time technology, consisting of a single circular chromosome of 4.13 Mb. We annotated mobile genetic elements and natural product biosynthesis clusters, including a novel class-II lasso peptide with a 7-residue macrolactam ring. PMID:26659678

  10. Gene duplication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hansche, P E; Beres, V; Lange, P

    1978-04-01

    Five independent duplications of the acid-phosphatase (aphtase) structural gene (acp1) were recovered from chemostat populations of S. cerevisiae that were subject to selection for in vivo hyper-aphtase activity. Two of the duplications arose spontaneously. Three of them were induced by UV. All five of the duplication events involved the transpositioning of the aphtase structural gene, acp1, and all known genes distal to acp1 on the right arm of chromosome II, to the terminus of an arm of other unknown chromosomes. One of the five duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II was found to be transmitted mitotically and meiotically with very high fidelity. The other four duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II were found to be unstable, being lost at a rate of about 2% per mitosis. However, selection for increased fidelity of mitotic transmission was effective in one of these strains. No tandem duplications of the aphtase structural gene were found. PMID:348562

  11. Gene Duplication in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Hansche, P. E.; Beres, V.; Lange, P.

    1978-01-01

    Five indepdendent duplications of the acid-phosphatase (aphtase) structural gene (acp1) were recovered from chemostat populations of S. cerevisiae that were subject to selection for in vivo hyper-aphtase activity. Two of the duplications arose spontaneously. Three of them were induced by UV. All five of the duplication events involved the transpositioning of the aphtase structural gene, acp1, and all known genes distal to acp1 on the right arm of chromosome II, to the terminus of an arm of other unknown chromosomes. One of the five duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II was found to be transmitted mitotically and meiotically with very high fidelity. The other four duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II were found to be unstable, being lost at a rate of about 2% per mitosis. However, selection for increased fidelity of mitotic transmission was effective in one of these strains. No tandem duplications of the aphtase structural gene were found. PMID:348562

  12. NPDES Phase II Compliance &

    E-print Network

    Radcliffe, David

    NPDES Phase II Compliance & Illicit Discharge Ordinances Benjamin Corson-Knowles Fall 2005 #12;The-0612 jroskie@uga.edu #12;NPDES Phase II Compliance & Illicit Discharge Ordinances Author: Benjamin Corson..................................................................................2 II. Background of the Phase II Rule

  13. ASDB: database of alternatively spliced genes.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, M S; Dubchak, I; Dralyuk, I; Zorn, M

    1999-01-01

    A database of alternatively spliced genes (ASDB) has been constructed based on (i) the results of the analysis of Swiss-Prot entries containing products of these genes and (ii) clustering procedure joining proteins that could arise by alternative splicing of the same gene. ASDB incorporates information about alternatively spliced genes, their products and expression patterns. It can be searched in order to find all products of alternative splicing produced in a particular tissue or a given organism, or all variants generated by a particular transcript. ASDB currently contains about 1700 protein sequences and can be accessed via the Internet at URL http://cbcg.nersc.gov/asdb PMID:9847209

  14. Role of RPB9 in RNA Polymerase II Fidelity 

    E-print Network

    Knippa, Kevin Christopher

    2013-07-30

    RNA polymerase II, the polymerase responsible for transcribing protein coding genes in eukaryotes, possesses an ability to discriminate between correct (complementary to the DNA template) and incorrect substrates (selectivity), and as well as remove...

  15. Phototropin involvement in the expression of genes encoding chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes and LHC

    E-print Network

    Phototropin involvement in the expression of genes encoding chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis accumulation, (ii) synchronization of the synthesis of chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, Chl-binding proteins, phototropin, gene expression, chlorophyll, carotenoid, blue light. Introduction Chlorophyll (Chl

  16. Intron-loss evolution of hatching enzyme genes in Teleostei

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hatching enzyme, belonging to the astacin metallo-protease family, digests egg envelope at embryo hatching. Orthologous genes of the enzyme are found in all vertebrate genomes. Recently, we found that exon-intron structures of the genes were conserved among tetrapods, while the genes of teleosts frequently lost their introns. Occurrence of such intron losses in teleostean hatching enzyme genes is an uncommon evolutionary event, as most eukaryotic genes are generally known to be interrupted by introns and the intron insertion sites are conserved from species to species. Here, we report on extensive studies of the exon-intron structures of teleostean hatching enzyme genes for insight into how and why introns were lost during evolution. Results We investigated the evolutionary pathway of intron-losses in hatching enzyme genes of 27 species of Teleostei. Hatching enzyme genes of basal teleosts are of only one type, which conserves the 9-exon-8-intron structure of an assumed ancestor. On the other hand, otocephalans and euteleosts possess two types of hatching enzyme genes, suggesting a gene duplication event in the common ancestor of otocephalans and euteleosts. The duplicated genes were classified into two clades, clades I and II, based on phylogenetic analysis. In otocephalans and euteleosts, clade I genes developed a phylogeny-specific structure, such as an 8-exon-7-intron, 5-exon-4-intron, 4-exon-3-intron or intron-less structure. In contrast to the clade I genes, the structures of clade II genes were relatively stable in their configuration, and were similar to that of the ancestral genes. Expression analyses revealed that hatching enzyme genes were high-expression genes, when compared to that of housekeeping genes. When expression levels were compared between clade I and II genes, clade I genes tends to be expressed more highly than clade II genes. Conclusions Hatching enzyme genes evolved to lose their introns, and the intron-loss events occurred at the specific points of teleostean phylogeny. We propose that the high-expression hatching enzyme genes frequently lost their introns during the evolution of teleosts, while the low-expression genes maintained the exon-intron structure of the ancestral gene. PMID:20796321

  17. The -256T>C Polymorphism in the Apolipoprotein A-II Gene Promoter Is Associated with Body Mass Index and Food Intake in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Apolipoprotein A-II (APOA2) plays an ambiguous role in lipid metabolism, obesity, and atherosclerosis. METHODS: We studied the association between a functional APOA2 promoter polymorphism (-265T>C) and plasma lipids (fasting and postprandial), anthropometric variables, and food intake in...

  18. APOLLO II

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.; Cossic, A.; Zmijarevic, I.

    1988-11-01

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  19. Evaluating Machine Learning Algorithms Used to Infer Gene Regulatory Network Structure

    E-print Network

    Spirtes, Peter

    ;iv VI. EXPERIMENTAL MANIPULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION 67 Gene expression manipulation 71 KnockoutEvaluating Machine Learning Algorithms Used to Infer Gene Regulatory Network Structure by Dan suggestions and assistance. #12;iii I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND GENE REGULATION? 3

  20. Studying Genes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... one generation to the next. What is a genome? A genome is all of the genetic material in an ... activity of genes. Does everybody have the same genome? While the human genome is mostly the same ...

  1. Standardization of functional reporter and antibiotic resistance cassettes to facilitate the genetic engineering of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Sureka, Swati; Chakravorty, Arun; Holmes, Eric C; Spassibojko, Olga; Bhatt, Nupur; Wu, Dongliang; Turgeon, B Gillian

    2014-12-19

    The unique physiological properties of fungi are useful for a myriad of applications, which could greatly benefit from increased control of native pathways and introduction of recombinant genes. However, fungal genetic engineering is still limited in scope and accessibility, largely due to lack of standardization. To help standardize the genetic engineering of filamentous fungi, we created BioBricks of commonly used antibiotic resistance genes, neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph), which confer resistance to G418 (Geneticin) and hygromycin B, respectively. Additionally, we created a BioBrick of the constitutive trpC promoter, from the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway of Aspergillus nidulans, and used it to create a composite part including the GFP gene. The functionality of these parts was demonstrated in the model fungal organism Cochliobolus heterostrophus, and as these tools are in modular BioBrick format, they can be easily used to facilitate genetic engineering of other fungal species. PMID:25524098

  2. Gene Perturbation Atlas (GPA): a single-gene perturbation repository for characterizing functional mechanisms of coding and non-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yun; Gong, Yonghui; Lv, Yanling; Lan, Yujia; Hu, Jing; Li, Feng; Xu, Jinyuan; Bai, Jing; Deng, Yulan; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Yu, Fulong; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptome profiling after gene perturbation is a powerful means of elucidating gene functional mechanisms in diverse contexts. The comprehensive collection and analysis of the resulting transcriptome profiles would help to systematically characterize context-dependent gene functional mechanisms and conduct experiments in biomedical research. To this end, we collected and curated over 3000 transcriptome profiles in human and mouse from diverse gene perturbation experiments, which involved 1585 different perturbed genes (microRNAs, lncRNAs and protein-coding genes) across 1170 different cell lines/tissues. For each profile, we identified differential genes and their associated functions and pathways, constructed perturbation networks, predicted transcription regulation and cancer/drug associations, and assessed cooperative perturbed genes. Based on these transcriptome analyses, the Gene Perturbation Atlas (GPA) can be used to detect (i) novel or cell-specific functions and pathways affected by perturbed genes, (ii) protein interactions and regulatory cascades affected by perturbed genes, and (iii) perturbed gene-mediated cooperative effects. The GPA is a user-friendly database to support the rapid searching and exploration of gene perturbations. Particularly, we visualized functional effects of perturbed genes from multiple perspectives. In summary, the GPA is a valuable resource for characterizing gene functions and regulatory mechanisms after single-gene perturbations. The GPA is freely accessible at http://biocc.hrbmu.edu.cn/GPA/. PMID:26039571

  3. Cell Reports Pol II Docking and Pausing

    E-print Network

    Meyer, Barbara

    (Pol II) during starvation and recovery in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting that promoter transcriptional responses to nutrient availability. Larvae that hatch without food arrest development in the first of genes that are upregulated during recovery (Baugh et al., 2009), suggesting that postrecruit- ment

  4. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3?-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Aminoglycoside 3?-phosphotransferase II is encoded by the kan r gene originally isolated from transposon Tn5 of the bacterium Escherichia...reasonably required for selection of plant cells carrying the kan r gene along with the genetic material of interest. [59 FR...

  5. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3?-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Aminoglycoside 3?-phosphotransferase II is encoded by the kan r gene originally isolated from transposon Tn5 of the bacterium Escherichia...reasonably required for selection of plant cells carrying the kan r gene along with the genetic material of interest. [59 FR...

  6. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3?-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Aminoglycoside 3?-phosphotransferase II is encoded by the kan r gene originally isolated from transposon Tn5 of the bacterium Escherichia...reasonably required for selection of plant cells carrying the kan r gene along with the genetic material of interest. [59 FR...

  7. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3?-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Aminoglycoside 3?-phosphotransferase II is encoded by the kan r gene originally isolated from transposon Tn5 of the bacterium Escherichia...reasonably required for selection of plant cells carrying the kan r gene along with the genetic material of interest. [59 FR...

  8. 21 CFR 573.130 - Aminoglycoside 3?-phospho- transferase II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Aminoglycoside 3?-phosphotransferase II is encoded by the kan r gene originally isolated from transposon Tn5 of the bacterium Escherichia...reasonably required for selection of plant cells carrying the kan r gene along with the genetic material of interest. [59 FR...

  9. Reclassification of "Bacillus pulvifaciens" group II as Brevibacillus agri.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, L K

    1997-04-01

    Organisms formerly identified as strains of Paenibacillus pulvifaciens group II were reclassified as members of the species Brevibacillus agri. The reclassification was based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from selected Bacillaceae. The analysis strongly supported placement of group II strains in the genus Brevibacillus. High DNA relatedness of 87-100% and close phenotypic similarity demonstrated that group II strains were members of the species Brevibacillus agri. PMID:9058544

  10. Attention Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.

    2007-01-01

    A major problem for developmental science is understanding how the cognitive and emotional networks important in carrying out mental processes can be related to individual differences. The last five years have seen major advances in establishing links between alleles of specific genes and the neural networks underlying aspects of attention. These…

  11. Designer Genes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Miller, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Genetic technologies may soon help fill some of the most important needs of humanity from food to energy to health care. The research of major designer genes companies and reasons why the initial mad rush for biotechnology has slowed are reviewed. (SR)

  12. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Prunus salicina.

    PubMed

    Urtubia, Carolina; Devia, Jessica; Castro, Alvaro; Zamora, Pablo; Aguirre, Carlos; Tapia, Eduardo; Barba, Paola; Dell Orto, Paola; Moynihan, Michael R; Petri, César; Scorza, Ralph; Prieto, Humberto

    2008-08-01

    We report Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of two Prunus salicina varieties, 'Angeleno' and 'Larry Anne', using a modification of the hypocotyl slice technique previously described for P. domestica. Regeneration rates on thidiazuron (TDZ) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) supplemented Murashige and Skoog (MS) media reached 11% for 'Angeleno' and 19% for 'Larry Anne' hypocotyl slices. Transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens GV3101 harboring a plasmid with the neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) and the green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes produced ten independent lines, six from 'Angeleno' and four from 'Larry Anne', representing transformation efficiencies of 0.8 and 0.3%, respectively, relative to the initial number of hypocotyl slices. Plants of six lines were found to produce the transgene encoded mRNAs. DNA blotting demonstrated the presence of transgene sequences in trees from five lines after 18 months of growth in the greenhouse. PMID:18493725

  13. QUANTIFICATION OF TRANSGENIC PLANT MARKER GENE PERSISTENCE IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods were developed to monitor persistence of genomic DNA in decaying plants in the field. As a model, we used recombinant neomycin phosphotransferase II (rNPT-II) marker genes present in genetically engineered plants. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed, com...

  14. What Is a Gene?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... their lungs as healthy as possible. What Is Gene Therapy? Gene therapy is a new kind of medicine — so new ... tested is replacing sick genes with healthy ones. Gene therapy trials — where the research is tested on people — ...

  15. Genes and Psoriasis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diet Tips" to find out more! Email * Zipcode Genes and Psoriasis Genes hold the key to understanding ... is responsible for causing psoriatic disease. How do genes work? Genes control everything from height to eye ...

  16. Genes and Hearing Loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  17. PI Control of Gene Expression in Tumorous Cell Lines 

    E-print Network

    Mendonca, Rouella J.

    2010-01-16

    in different genes in the Human Embryonic Kidney and Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Grade II cell lines. The difference in the gene expressions of the two cell lines motivates the problem in this thesis. The thesis provided intervention methods to make the colon...

  18. Analysis of Antibiotic Resistant Genes in Aquacultural Bacteria

    E-print Network

    Kane, Andrew S.

    1 Analysis of Antibiotic Resistant Genes in Aquacultural Bacteria JY Wang* YJ Geng RX Wang J Feng resistance genes Su1II of Vibrio harveyi contents #12;2 Introduction 1. present status · Antibiotics transfer among different bacteria · Resistant bacteria transfer to human · Antibiotic agents residue human

  19. RNA polymerase II-associated factor 1 regulates the release and phosphorylation of paused RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming; Yang, Wenjing; Ni, Ting; Tang, Zhanyun; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Zhu, Jun; Roeder, Robert G

    2015-12-11

    Release of promoter-proximal paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) during early elongation is a critical step in transcriptional regulation in metazoan cells. Paused Pol II release is thought to require the kinase activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) for the phosphorylation of DRB sensitivity-inducing factor, negative elongation factor, and C-terminal domain (CTD) serine-2 of Pol II. We found that Pol II-associated factor 1 (PAF1) is a critical regulator of paused Pol II release, that positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) directly regulates the initial recruitment of PAF1 complex (PAF1C) to genes, and that the subsequent recruitment of CDK12 is dependent on PAF1C. These findings reveal cooperativity among P-TEFb, PAF1C, and CDK12 in pausing release and Pol II CTD phosphorylation. PMID:26659056

  20. Phylogenomics of MADS-Box Genes in Plants - Two Opposing Life Styles in One Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Gramzow, Lydia; Theißen, Günter

    2013-01-01

    The development of multicellular eukaryotes, according to their body plan, is often directed by members of multigene families that encode transcription factors. MADS (for MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE1, AGAMOUS, DEFICIENS and SERUM RESPONSE FACTOR)-box genes form one of those families controlling nearly all major aspects of plant development. Knowing the complete complement of MADS-box genes in sequenced plant genomes will allow a better understanding of the evolutionary patterns of these genes and the association of their evolution with the evolution of plant morphologies. Here, we have applied a combination of automatic and manual annotations to identify the complete set of MADS-box genes in 17 plant genomes. Furthermore, three plant genomes were reanalyzed and published datasets were used for four genomes such that more than 2,600 genes from 24 species were classified into the two types of MADS-box genes, Type I and Type II. Our results extend previous studies, highlighting the remarkably different evolutionary patterns of Type I and Type II genes and provide a basis for further studies on the evolution and function of MADS-box genes. PMID:24833059

  1. Core Promoter Functions in the Regulation of Gene Expression of Drosophila Dorsal Target Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Zehavi, Yonathan; Kuznetsov, Olga; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Developmental processes are highly dependent on transcriptional regulation by RNA polymerase II. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters consist of core promoter motifs, e.g. the initiator, TATA box, and the downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. Here, we explored the importance of core promoter functions in the dorsal-ventral developmental gene regulatory network. This network includes multiple genes that are activated by different nuclear concentrations of Dorsal, an NF?B homolog transcription factor, along the dorsal-ventral axis. We show that over two-thirds of Dorsal target genes contain DPE sequence motifs, which is significantly higher than the proportion of DPE-containing promoters in Drosophila genes. We demonstrate that multiple Dorsal target genes are evolutionarily conserved and functionally dependent on the DPE. Furthermore, we have analyzed the activation of key Dorsal target genes by Dorsal, as well as by another Rel family transcription factor, Relish, and the dependence of their activation on the DPE motif. Using hybrid enhancer-promoter constructs in Drosophila cells and embryo extracts, we have demonstrated that the core promoter composition is an important determinant of transcriptional activity of Dorsal target genes. Taken together, our results provide evidence for the importance of core promoter composition in the regulation of Dorsal target genes. PMID:24634215

  2. Multivariate detection of gene-gene interactions

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    interactions is crucial to obtaining a more complete picture of complex diseases. It is thought that gene-gene-mediated disease. Interactions among genes are de...ned as pheno- typic e¤ects that di¤er from those observed and ongoing e¤orts have centered on disease associations with single genes (a single nucleotide polymorphism

  3. Candidate Genes for Cannabis Use Disorders: Findings, Challenges and Directions

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Aim Twin studies have shown that cannabis use disorders (abuse/dependence) are highly heritable. This review aims to: (i) review existing linkage studies of cannabis use disorders and (ii) review gene association studies, to identify potential candidate genes, including those that have been tested for composite substance use disorders, and (iii) to highlight challenges in the genomic study of cannabis use disorders. Methods Peer-reviewed linkage and candidate gene association studies are reviewed. Results Four linkage studies are reviewed: results from these have homed in on regions on chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 9, 14, 17 and 18, which harbor candidates of predicted biological relevance, such as monoglyceride lipase (MGL) on chromosome 3, but also novel genes, including ELTD1 (EGF, latrophilin and seven transmembrane domain containing 1) on chromosome 1. Gene association studies are presented for (a) genes posited to have specific influences on cannabis use disorders: CNR1, CB2, FAAH, MGL, TRPV1 and GPR55 and (b) genes from various neurotransmitter systems that are likely to exert a non-specific influence on risk of cannabis use disorders e.g. GABRA2, DRD2 and OPRM1. Conclusions There are challenges associated with (i) understanding biological complexity underlying cannabis use disorders (including the need to study gene-gene and gene-environment interactions), (ii) using diagnostic versus quantitative phenotypes, (iii) delineating which stage of cannabis involvement (e.g. use vs. misuse) genes influence and (iv) problems of sample ascertainment. PMID:19335651

  4. Fructan synthesis, accumulation and polymer traits. II. Fructan pools in populations of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) with variation for water-soluble carbohydrate and candidate genes were not correlated with biosynthetic activity and demonstrated constraints to polymer chain extension

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Joe A.; Cairns, Andrew J.; Thomas, David; Timms-Taravella, Emma; Skøt, Kirsten; Charlton, Adam; Williams, Peter; Turner, Lesley B.

    2015-01-01

    Differences have been shown between ryegrass and fescue within the Festulolium subline introgression family for fructan synthesis, metabolism, and polymer-size traits. It is well-established that there is considerable variation for water-soluble carbohydrate and fructan content within perennial ryegrass. However there is much still to be discovered about the fructan polymer pool in this species, especially in regard to its composition and regulation. It is postulated that similar considerable variation for polymer traits may exist, providing useful polymers for biorefining applications. Seasonal effects on fructan content together with fructan synthesis and polymer-size traits have been examined in diverse perennial ryegrass material comprising contrasting plants from a perennial ryegrass F2 mapping family and from populations produced by three rounds of phenotypic selection. Relationships with copy number variation in candidate genes have been investigated. There was little evidence of any variation in fructan metabolism across this diverse germplasm under these conditions that resulted in substantial differences in the complement of fructan polymers present in leaf tissue at high water-soluble carbohydrate concentrations. The importance of fructan synthesis during fructan accumulation was unclear as fructan content and polymer characteristics in intact plants during the growing season did not reflect the capacity for de novo synthesis. However, the retention of fructan in environmental conditions favoring high sink/low source demand may be an important component of the high sugar trait and the roles of breakdown and turnover are discussed. PMID:26528321

  5. Validation of a quantitative 12-multigene expression assay (Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay) in Korean patients with stage II colon cancer: implication of ethnic differences contributing to differences in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Duck Hyoun; Kim, Woo Ram; Min, Byung Soh; Kim, Young Wan; Song, Mi Kyung; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the Recurrence Score® of the quantitative 12-multigene expression assay and to determine risk groups based on the continuous Recurrence Score® in Korean patients. Method A total of 95 patients with pathological T3N0 tumors and mismatch repair-proficient tumors were enrolled. The Recurrence Score® was used to classify risk groups (low risk, <30; intermediate risk, 30–40; high risk, ?41). Results Fifty-four patients (56.8%) were aged over 70 years. There were 49 men (51.6%) and 56 cases of right-sided colon cancer (58.9%). Eight cases (8.4%) had well-differentiated tumors, and 86 cases (90.5%) showed moderate differentiation. Only one case (1.1%) had a poorly differentiated tumor. Three patients (3.2%) had lymphovascular invasion. Sixty-one patients were identified as low risk (64.2%) and 34 patients as intermediate risk (35.8%). There were no high-risk patients. Although not significant, the 3-year recurrence risk increased with the Recurrence Score®. Conclusion Distribution patterns of risk groups based on the Recurrence Score®, particularly the absence of a high-risk group, were different from the prior validation studies. These findings suggest that ethnic differences between Koreans and Western patients are potential contributing factors for different gene expressions in the quantitative 12-multigene expression assay. PMID:26719709

  6. tRNA genes as transcriptional repressor elements.

    PubMed Central

    Hull, M W; Erickson, J; Johnston, M; Engelke, D R

    1994-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes frequently contain large numbers of repetitive RNA polymerase III (pol III) promoter elements interspersed between and within RNA pol II transcription units, and in several instances a regulatory relationship between the two types of promoter has been postulated. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tRNA genes are the only known interspersed pol III promoter-containing repetitive elements, and we find that they strongly inhibit transcription from adjacent pol II promoters in vivo. This inhibition requires active transcription of the upstream tRNA gene but is independent of its orientation and appears not to involve simple steric blockage of the pol II upstream activator sites. Evidence is presented that different pol II promoters can be repressed by different tRNA genes placed upstream at varied distances in both orientations. To test whether this phenomenon functions in naturally occurring instances in which tRNA genes and pol II promoters are juxtaposed, we examined the sigma and Ty3 elements. This class of retrotransposons is always found integrated immediately upstream of different tRNA genes. Weakening tRNA gene transcription by means of a temperature-sensitive mutation in RNA pol III increases the pheromone-inducible expression of sigma and Ty3 elements up to 60-fold. Images PMID:8289806

  7. Compare Gene Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linux environment in serial or parallel mode.

  8. Susceptibility Genes for Multiple Sclerosis Identified in a Gene-Based Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiang; Deng, Fei-Yan; Lu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating and inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to identify more genes associated with MS. Methods Based on the publicly available data of the single-nucleotide polymorphism-based genome-wide association study (GWAS) from the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes, we conducted a powerful gene-based GWAS in an initial sample with 931 family trios, and a replication study sample with 978 cases and 883 controls. For interesting genes, gene expression in MS-related cells between MS cases and controls was examined by using publicly available datasets. Results A total of 58 genes was identified, including 20 "novel" genes significantly associated with MS (p<1.40×10-4). In the replication study, 44 of the 58 identified genes had been genotyped and 35 replicated the association. In the gene-expression study, 21 of the 58 identified genes exhibited differential expressions in MS-related cells. Thus, 15 novel genes were supported by replicated association and/or differential expression. In particular, four of the novel genes, those encoding myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), coiled-coil alpha-helical rod protein 1 (CCHCR1), human leukocyte antigen complex group 22 (HCG22), and major histocompatibility complex, class II, DM alpha (HLA-DMA), were supported by the evidence of both. Conclusions The results of this study emphasize the high power of gene-based GWAS in detecting the susceptibility genes of MS. The novel genes identified herein may provide new insights into the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying MS. PMID:26320842

  9. Primordial emergence of the recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1): sequence of the complete shark gene indicates homology to microbial integrases.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, R M; Schluter, S F; Bernstein, H; Marchalonis, J J

    1996-01-01

    The rearrangement of antibody and T-cell receptor gene segments is indispensable to the vertebrate immune response. All extant jawed vertebrates can rearrange these gene segments. This ability is conferred by the recombination activating genes I and II (RAG I and RAG II). To elucidate their origin and function, the cDNA encoding RAG I from a member of the most ancient class of extant gnathostomes, the Carcharhine sharks, was characterized. Homology domains identified within shark RAG I prompted sequence comparison analyses that suggested similarity of the RAG I and II genes, respectively, to the integrase family genes and integration host factor genes of the bacterial site-specific recombination system. Thus, the apparent explosive evolution (or "big bang") of the ancestral immune system may have been initiated by a transfer of microbial site-specific recombinases. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8790351

  10. The plant mitochondrial mat-r gene/nad1 gene complex. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolstenholme, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The authors have completed sequencing the segments (totalling 19 kb, both complementary strands) of the maize mtDNA molecule that encode the entire NADH dehydrogenase subunit (nadl) gene. They have identified nucleotides in mature transcripts of the nadl gene that are edited and have generated clones of cDNAs of entire mature (fully spliced) nadl transcripts. They have examined the relative rates of splicing in transcripts of the four nadl gene group II introns and begun examining nadl intron cDNAs to determine the extent and distribution of RNA edits in introns, in order to evaluate the possibility that intron excision and exon splicing might be editing independent.

  11. Paleo-evolutionary plasticity of plant disease resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent access to a large set of genome sequences, combined with a robust evolutionary scenario of modern monocot (i.e. grasses) and eudicot (i.e. rosids) species from their founder ancestors, offered the opportunity to gain insights into disease resistance genes (R-genes) evolutionary plasticity. Results We unravel in the current article (i) a R-genes repertoire consisting in 7883 for monocots and 15758 for eudicots, (ii) a contrasted R-genes conservation with 23.8% for monocots and 6.6% for dicots, (iii) a minimal ancestral founder pool of 384 R-genes for the monocots and 150 R-genes for the eudicots, (iv) a general pattern of organization in clusters accounting for more than 60% of mapped R-genes, (v) a biased deletion of ancestral duplicated R-genes between paralogous blocks possibly compensated by clusterization, (vi) a bias in R-genes clusterization where Leucine-Rich Repeats act as a ‘glue’ for domain association, (vii) a R-genes/miRNAs interome enriched toward duplicated R-genes. Conclusions Together, our data may suggest that R-genes family plasticity operated during plant evolution (i) at the structural level through massive duplicates loss counterbalanced by massive clusterization following polyploidization; as well as at (ii) the regulation level through microRNA/R-gene interactions acting as a possible source of functional diploidization of structurally retained R-genes duplicates. Such evolutionary shuffling events leaded to CNVs (i.e. Copy Number Variation) and PAVs (i.e. Presence Absence Variation) between related species operating in the decay of R-genes colinearity between plant species. PMID:24617999

  12. EcoGene 3.0.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jindan; Rudd, Kenneth E

    2013-01-01

    EcoGene (http://ecogene.org) is a database and website devoted to continuously improving the structural and functional annotation of Escherichia coli K-12, one of the most well understood model organisms, represented by the MG1655(Seq) genome sequence and annotations. Major improvements to EcoGene in the past decade include (i) graphic presentations of genome map features; (ii) ability to design Boolean queries and Venn diagrams from EcoArray, EcoTopics or user-provided GeneSets; (iii) the genome-wide clone and deletion primer design tool, PrimerPairs; (iv) sequence searches using a customized EcoBLAST; (v) a Cross Reference table of synonymous gene and protein identifiers; (vi) proteome-wide indexing with GO terms; (vii) EcoTools access to >2000 complete bacterial genomes in EcoGene-RefSeq; (viii) establishment of a MySql relational database; and (ix) use of web content management systems. The biomedical literature is surveyed daily to provide citation and gene function updates. As of September 2012, the review of 37 397 abstracts and articles led to creation of 98 425 PubMed-Gene links and 5415 PubMed-Topic links. Annotation updates to Genbank U00096 are transmitted from EcoGene to NCBI. Experimental verifications include confirmation of a CTG start codon, pseudogene restoration and quality assurance of the Keio strain collection. PMID:23197660

  13. Hemophilia and Gene Therapy

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Hemophilia and Gene Therapy Jackie Chu June 4, 2008 #12;Overview Hemophilia, the disease Gene therapy Hemophilia as a target for gene therapy Gene delivery systems Clinical trials New methods Future of gene therapy for hemophilia #12;Hemophilia, the disease X-linked, recessive bleeding disorder

  14. Using quantitative real-time PCR to detect chimeras in transgenic tobacco and apricot and to monitor their dissociation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The routine generation of transgenic plants involves analysis of transgene integration into the host genome by means of Southern blotting. However, this technique cannot distinguish between uniformly transformed tissues and the presence of a mixture of transgenic and non-transgenic cells in the same tissue. On the other hand, the use of reporter genes often fails to accurately detect chimerical tissues because their expression can be affected by several factors, including gene silencing and plant development. So, new approaches based on the quantification of the amount of the transgene are needed urgently. Results We show here that chimeras are a very frequent phenomenon observed after regenerating transgenic plants. Spatial and temporal analyses of transformed tobacco and apricot plants with a quantitative, real-time PCR amplification of the neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) transgene as well as of an internal control (?-actin), used to normalise the amount of target DNA at each reaction, allowed detection of chimeras at unexpected rates. The amount of the nptII transgene differed greatly along with the sub-cultivation period of these plants and was dependent on the localisation of the analysed leaves; being higher in roots and basal leaves, while in the apical leaves it remained at lower levels. These data demonstrate that, unlike the use of the gus marker gene, real-time PCR is a powerful tool for detection of chimeras. Although some authors have proposed a consistent, positive Southern analysis as an alternative methodology for monitoring the dissociation of chimeras, our data show that it does not provide enough proof of uniform transformation. In this work, however, real-time PCR was applied successfully to monitor the dissociation of chimeras in tobacco plants and apricot callus. Conclusions We have developed a rapid and reliable method to detect and estimate the level of chimeras in transgenic tobacco and apricot plants. This method can be extended to monitor the dissociation of chimeras and the recovery of uniformly-transformed plants. PMID:20637070

  15. Reveille II - 19 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    Copyright 2012 Asmaa Sadek Kassab ii ABSTRACT In an effort to understand the resuspension phenomena, interactions of spherical micro-meter particles (glass beads (GB) and Stainless steel (SS)) were investigated experimentally on different surfaces... ABSTRACT .......................................................................................................... ii DEDICATION....................................................................................................... iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS...

  16. Belle II distributing computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovny, P.

    2015-05-01

    The next generation B factory experiment Belle II will collect huge data samples which are a challenge for the computing system. To cope with the high data volume and rate, Belle II is setting up a distributed computing system based on existing technologies and infrastructure, plus Belle II specific extensions for workflow abstraction. This paper describes the highlights of the Belle II computing and the current status. We will also present the experience of the latest MC production campaign in 2014.

  17. Dexamethasone Promotes Hypertension by Allele-specific Regulation of the Human Angiotensinogen Gene*S

    E-print Network

    Abraham, Nader G.

    Dexamethasone Promotes Hypertension by Allele-specific Regulation of the Human Angiotensinogen Gene, Valhalla, New York, 10595 Background: Glucocorticoids modulate the RAS and cause hypertension. Results to dexamethasone with tissue-specific up-regulation of hAGT, increased plasma AngII, and hypertension. Conclusion

  18. -PTOLEMY II -HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -PTOLEMY II - HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT MODELING AND DESIGN IN JAVA John Davis, II Mudit Goel University of California at Berkeley http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu Memorandum UCB/ERL M99/40 Document Contents Part 1: Using Ptolemy II 1. Introduction 1-1 1.1.Modeling and Design 1-1 1.2.Architecture Design 1

  19. -PTOLEMY II -HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -PTOLEMY II - HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT MODELING AND DESIGN IN JAVA John Davis, II Christopher of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley http://ptolemy with Ptolemy II 1.0 March 15, 2001 This project is supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

  20. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the MADS-box gene family in sesame.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Wang, Linhai; Yu, Jingyin; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Zhang, Xiurong

    2015-09-10

    MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that play crucial roles in plant growth and development. Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an oil crop that contributes to the daily oil and protein requirements of almost half of the world's population; therefore, a genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family is needed. Fifty-seven MADS-box genes were identified from 14 linkage groups of the sesame genome. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships with Arabidopsis thaliana, Utricularia gibba and Solanum lycopersicum MADS-box genes was performed. Sesame MADS-box genes were clustered into four groups: 28 MIKC(c)-type, 5 MIKC(?)-type, 14 M?-type and 10 M?-type. Gene structure analysis revealed from 1 to 22 exons of sesame MADS-box genes. The number of exons in type II MADS-box genes greatly exceeded the number in type I genes. Motif distribution analysis of sesame MADS-box genes also indicated that type II MADS-box genes contained more motifs than type I genes. These results suggested that type II sesame MADS-box genes had more complex structures. By analyzing expression profiles of MADS-box genes in seven sesame transcriptomes, we determined that MIKC(C)-type MADS-box genes played significant roles in sesame flower and seed development. Although most MADS-box genes in the same clade showed similar expression features, some gene functions were diversified from the orthologous Arabidopsis genes. This research will contribute to uncovering the role of MADS-box genes in sesame development. PMID:25967387

  1. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5' UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  2. Comparative analysis of a CFo ATP synthase subunit II homologue derived from marine and fresh-water algae.

    PubMed

    Suda, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Okuda, Yuko; Tsunemoto, Mei; Matsuda, Yuri; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kazunori; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Harada, Kazuo; Bamba, Takeshi; Hirata, Kazumasa

    2009-11-01

    Comparative analysis was performed with a CFo ATP synthase subunit II homologue (CFo-II) derived from marine or fresh-water algae. The marine algae-derived CFo-II-transformed Escherichia coli grew and accumulated ATP more vigorously in NaCl or Cadmium containing medium, suggesting that this gene was useful for the development of stress-tolerant plant. PMID:19804857

  3. Rudimentary phosvitin domain in a minor chicken vitellogenin gene.

    PubMed

    Byrne, B M; de Jong, H; Fouchier, R A; Williams, D L; Gruber, M; Ab, G

    1989-03-21

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence and the derived amino acid sequence of the phosphoprotein-encoding region of the chicken vitellogenin III gene. The sequence of this minor vitellogenin could be aligned with exon 22 up to exon 27 of the previously sequenced major vitellogenin II gene (van het Schip et al., 1987). The exon 23 and 25 sequences are rich in serine codons (26% and 41%, respectively), and this region encodes at least one of the small egg yolk phosphoproteins. The major egg yolk phosphoprotein, phosvitin, is encoded by the analogous region in vitellogenin II. Comparison of the vitellogenin II and vitellogenin III sequences shows a great reduction in the size of the putative exon 23 of the latter (321 base pairs as opposed to 690). The number of serine codons is also drastically reduced from 124 in exon 23 of the vitellogenin II gene to 28 in vitellogenin III. The grouping of synonymous serine codons, as has hitherto been observed in sequenced vitellogenin phosphoproteins, has been maintained in vitellogenin III. A putative asparagine-linked N-glycosylation site which was conserved in the chicken vitellogenin II and the Xenopus laevis vitellogenin A2 gene, at the beginning of exon 23, is also present in vitellogenin III. The two chicken vitellogenins show a low conservation in the phosphoprotein-encoding region (average 33%, at the protein level) compared to that in the peripheral sequences (58% identity), which indicates that it is a rapidly evolving domain of the vertebrate vitellogenin gene. PMID:2701940

  4. Gene-to-metabolite network for biosynthesis of lignans in MeJA-elicited Isatis indigotica hairy root cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruibing; Li, Qing; Tan, Hexin; Chen, Junfeng; Xiao, Ying; Ma, Ruifang; Gao, Shouhong; Zerbe, Philipp; Chen, Wansheng; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Root and leaf tissue of Isatis indigotica shows notable anti-viral efficacy, and are widely used as “Banlangen” and “Daqingye” in traditional Chinese medicine. The plants' pharmacological activity is attributed to phenylpropanoids, especially a group of lignan metabolites. However, the biosynthesis of lignans in I. indigotica remains opaque. This study describes the discovery and analysis of biosynthetic genes and AP2/ERF-type transcription factors involved in lignan biosynthesis in I. indigotica. MeJA treatment revealed differential expression of three genes involved in phenylpropanoid backbone biosynthesis (IiPAL, IiC4H, Ii4CL), five genes involved in lignan biosynthesis (IiCAD, IiC3H, IiCCR, IiDIR, and IiPLR), and 112 putative AP2/ERF transcription factors. In addition, four intermediates of lariciresinol biosynthesis were found to be induced. Based on these results, a canonical correlation analysis using Pearson's correlation coefficient was performed to construct gene-to-metabolite networks and identify putative key genes and rate-limiting reactions in lignan biosynthesis. Over-expression of IiC3H, identified as a key pathway gene, was used for metabolic engineering of I. indigotica hairy roots, and resulted in an increase in lariciresinol production. These findings illustrate the utility of canonical correlation analysis for the discovery and metabolic engineering of key metabolic genes in plants. PMID:26579184

  5. Type II supernova diversity

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    It is now firmly established that at a significant fraction of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae (SNe II) arise from red supergiant progenitors. However, a large diversity of SN properties exist, and it is presently unclear how this can be understood in terms of progenitor differences and pre-SN stellar evolution. In this contribution, I present the diversity of SN II V-band light-curves for a large sample of SNe II, and compare these to photometry of SNe II which have progenitor mass constraints from pre-explosion imaging.

  6. Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.).

    PubMed

    Maravi, Devendra Kumar; Mazumdar, Purabi; Alam, Shamsher; Goud, Vaibhav V; Sahoo, Lingaraj

    2015-01-01

    The seed oil of Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) as a source of biodiesel fuel is gaining worldwide importance. Commercial-scale exploration of Jatropha has not succeeded due to low and unstable seed yield in semiarid lands unsuitable for the food production and infestation to diseases. Genetic engineering is promising to improve various agronomic traits in Jatropha and to understand the molecular functions of key Jatropha genes for molecular breeding. We describe a protocol routinely followed in our laboratory for stable and efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Jatropha using cotyledonary leaf as explants. The 4-day-old explants are infected with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 harboring pBI121 plant binary vector, which contains nptII as plant selectable marker and gus as reporter. The putative transformed plants are selected on kanamycin, and stable integration of transgene(s) is confirmed by histochemical GUS assay, polymerase chain reaction, and Southern hybridization. PMID:25416246

  7. Changes in ventricular remodelling and clinical status during the year following a single administration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 non-viral gene therapy in chronic ischaemic heart failure patients: the STOP-HF randomized Phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eugene S.; Miller, Leslie; Patel, Amit N.; Anderson, Russell David; Mendelsohn, Farrell O.; Traverse, Jay; Silver, Kevin H.; Shin, Julia; Ewald, Gregory; Farr, Mary Jane; Anwaruddin, Saif; Plat, Francis; Fisher, Scott J.; AuWerter, Alexander T.; Pastore, Joseph M.; Aras, Rahul; Penn, Marc S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) promotes tissue repair through mechanisms of cell survival, endogenous stem cell recruitment, and vasculogenesis. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Plasmid Treatment for Patients with Heart Failure (STOP-HF) is a Phase II, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate safety and efficacy of a single treatment of plasmid stromal cell-derived factor-1 (pSDF-1) delivered via endomyocardial injection to patients with ischaemic heart failure (IHF). Methods Ninety-three subjects with IHF on stable guideline-based medical therapy and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ?40%, completed Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLWHFQ) and 6-min walk distance (6 MWD), were randomized 1 : 1 : 1 to receive a single treatment of either a 15 or 30 mg dose of pSDF-1 or placebo via endomyocardial injections. Safety and efficacy parameters were assessed at 4 and 12 months after injection. Left ventricular functional and structural measures were assessed by contrast echocardiography and quantified by a blinded independent core laboratory. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Plasmid Treatment for Patients with Heart Failure was powered based on change in 6 MWD and MLWHFQ at 4 months. Results Subject profiles at baseline were (mean ± SD): age 65 ± 9 years, LVEF 28 ± 7%, left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) 167 ± 66 mL, N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) (NTproBNP) 1120 ± 1084 pg/mL, MLWHFQ 50 ± 20 points, and 6 MWD 289 ± 99 m. Patients were 11 ± 9 years post most recent myocardial infarction. Study injections were delivered without serious adverse events in all subjects. Sixty-two patients received drug with no unanticipated serious product-related adverse events. The primary endpoint was a composite of change in 6 MWD and MLWHFQ from baseline to 4 months follow-up. The primary endpoint was not met (P = 0.89). For the patients treated with pSDF-1, there was a trend toward an improvement in LVEF at 12 months (placebo vs. 15 mg vs. 30 mg ?LVEF: ?2 vs. ?0.5 vs. 1.5%, P = 0.20). A pre-specified analysis of the effects of pSDF-1 based on tertiles of LVEF at entry revealed improvements in EF and LVESV from lowest-to-highest LVEF. Patients in the first tertile of EF (<26%) that received 30 mg of pSDF-1 demonstrated a 7% increase in EF compared with a 4% decrease in placebo (?LVEF = 11%, P = 0.01) at 12 months. There was also a trend towards improvement in LVESV, with treated patients demonstrating an 18.5 mL decrease compared with a 15 mL increase for placebo at 12 months (?LVESV = 33.5 mL, P = 0.12). The change in end-diastolic and end-systolic volume equated to a 14 mL increase in stroke volume in the patients treated with 30 mg of pSDF-1 compared with a decrease of ?11 mL in the placebo group (?SV = 25 mL, P = 0.09). In addition, the 30 mg-treated cohort exhibited a trend towards improvement in NTproBNP compared with placebo at 12 months (?784 pg/mL, P = 0.23). Conclusions The blinded placebo-controlled STOP-HF trial demonstrated the safety of a single endocardial administration of pSDF-1 but failed to demonstrate its primary endpoint of improved composite score at 4 months after treatment. Through a pre-specified analysis the STOP-HF trial demonstrates the potential for attenuating LV remodelling and improving EF in high-risk ischaemic cardiomyopathy. The safety profile supports repeat dosing with pSDF-1 and the degree of left ventricular remodelling suggests the potential for improved outcomes in larger future trials. PMID:26056125

  8. Integrating human omics data to prioritize candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The identification of genes involved in human complex diseases remains a great challenge in computational systems biology. Although methods have been developed to use disease phenotypic similarities with a protein-protein interaction network for the prioritization of candidate genes, other valuable omics data sources have been largely overlooked in these methods. Methods With this understanding, we proposed a method called BRIDGE to prioritize candidate genes by integrating disease phenotypic similarities with such omics data as protein-protein interactions, gene sequence similarities, gene expression patterns, gene ontology annotations, and gene pathway memberships. BRIDGE utilizes a multiple regression model with lasso penalty to automatically weight different data sources and is capable of discovering genes associated with diseases whose genetic bases are completely unknown. Results We conducted large-scale cross-validation experiments and demonstrated that more than 60% known disease genes can be ranked top one by BRIDGE in simulated linkage intervals, suggesting the superior performance of this method. We further performed two comprehensive case studies by applying BRIDGE to predict novel genes and transcriptional networks involved in obesity and type II diabetes. Conclusion The proposed method provides an effective and scalable way for integrating multi omics data to infer disease genes. Further applications of BRIDGE will be benefit to providing novel disease genes and underlying mechanisms of human diseases. PMID:24344781

  9. Emerging Roles of Nrf2 and Phase II Antioxidant Enzymes in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meijuan; An, Chengrui; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Phase II metabolic enzymes are a battery of critical proteins that detoxify xenobiotics by increasing their hydrophilicity and enhancing their disposal. These enzymes have long been studied for their preventative and protective effects against mutagens and carcinogens and for their regulation via the Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1) / Nrf2 (Nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2) / ARE (antioxidant response elements) pathway. Recently, a series of studies have reported the altered expression of phase II genes in postmortem tissue of patients with various neurological diseases. These observations hint at a role for phase II enzymes in the evolution of such conditions. Furthermore, promising findings reveal that overexpression of phase II genes, either by genetic or chemical approaches, confers neuroprotection in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, there is a need to summarize the current literature on phase II genes in the central nervous system (CNS). This should help guide future studies on phase II genes as therapeutic targets in neurological diseases. In this review, we first briefly introduce the concept of phase I, II and III enzymes, with a special focus on phase II enzymes. We then discuss their expression regulation, their inducers and executors. Following this background, we expand our discussion to the neuroprotective effects of phase II enzymes and the potential application of Nrf2 inducers to the treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:23025925

  10. Apelin Protects Against Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiovascular Fibrosis and Decreases PAI-1 Production

    PubMed Central

    Siddiquee, Khandaker; Hampton, Jessica; Khan, Susan; Zadory, Dan; Gleaves, Linda; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Smith, Layton Harris

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that apelin protects against AngII-induced cardiovascular fibrosis and vascular remodeling. Methods and Results Wild type mice administered apelin or apelin plus Ang II exhibited less cardiovascular fibrosis and decreased PAI-1 gene expression than mice receiving Ang II, L-NAME, apelin plus L-NAME or apelin plus AngII plus L-NAME. In vitro analysis using a luciferase construct driven by 3.1Kb of the human PAI-1 promoter revealed that apelin blocks Ang II-mediated PAI-1 gene expression. Immunoblotting for phosphorylated myosin phosphatase subunit and myosin light chain revealed that apelin blocked Ang II activation of the Rho kinase pathway, which is associated with induction of PAI-1 gene expression by Ang II. In addition, treatment of human aortic smooth muscle cells with apelin reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein production in the presence and absence of Ang II. Conversely, L-NAME treatment attenuated the down-regulation of PAI-1 by apelin in cells. Conclusions Apelin protects against cardiac fibrosis and vascular remodeling through direct regulation of PAI-1 gene expression. This protective effect is mediated through the synergistic inhibition of Ang II signaling and increased production of NO by apelin. Our data extend previous findings and provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms by which apelin elicits a cardio-protective effect. PMID:21358420

  11. Chloroplast Biogenesis of Photosystem II Cores Involves a Series of Assembly-Controlled Steps

    E-print Network

    controlled. INTRODUCTION Photosystem II (PSII) is a multimeric protein-pigment complex embedded by the chloroplast gene psbD, to form a precomplex, detected as a high molecular mass species (45 to 200 k

  12. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory.

    PubMed

    Gould, David

    2013-08-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called 'gene doping'. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place. PMID:23082866

  13. RNA splicing and genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, P.A.

    1988-11-25

    The splicing of long transcripts RNA (copied from DNA in the cell nucleus) into smaller specific mRNA is an important event in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The splicing reaction occurs as a late step in the nuclear pathway for synthesis of mRNAs. This pathway commences with initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II and probably involves an integrated series of steps each dependent on previous events. Splicing of precursors to mRNAs involves the formation of a spliceosome complex containing 5' and 3' splice sites. This complex contains the evolutionary highly conserved small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) Us, U4, U5, and U6. The most abundant snRNA, U1, is required to form the spliceosome and may be a part of the spliceosome. Analogues of these snRNAs have been identified in yeast. Assembly of the spliceosome probably involves the binding of a multi-snRNA complex containing U4, U5, and U6 snRNAs. Several observations suggest that the association of snRNAs in such complexes is quite dynamic. It is argued that the snRANs in the spliceosome form a catalytic RNA structure that is responsible for the cleavage and ligation steps during splicing.

  14. In vitro type II binding of chromosomal DNA to membrane in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Y; McCollum, M; McKenzie, T; Laffan, J; Zuberi, A; Sueoka, N

    1991-01-01

    DNA-membrane association critical for initiation of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis can be classified into two types. Type I is salt resistant and dependent on the initiation gene, dnaB, and type II is salt sensitive and independent of the dnaB gene. We found and sequenced two adjacent areas of type II binding within 1% of oriC on the B. subtilis chromosome. Images FIG. 2 PMID:1938973

  15. Autism and Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document defines and discusses autism and how genes play a role in the condition. Answers to the following questions are covered: (1) What are genes? (2) What is autism? (3) What causes autism? (4) Why study genes to learn about autism? (5) How do researchers look for the genes involved in autism? (screen the whole genome; conduct cytogenetic…

  16. Stably paused genes revealed through inhibition of transcription initiation by the TFIIH inhibitor triptolide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Gao, Xin; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in metazoans is regulated in several steps, including preinitiation complex (PIC) formation, initiation, Pol II escape, productive elongation, cotranscriptional RNA processing, and termination. Genome-wide studies have demonstrated that the phenomenon of promoter-bound Pol II pausing is widespread, especially for genes involved in developmental and stimulus-responsive pathways. However, a mechanistic understanding of the paused Pol II state at promoters is limited. For example, at a global level, it is unclear to what extent the engaged paused Pol II is stably tethered to the promoter or undergoes rapid cycles of initiation and termination. Here we used the small molecule triptolide (TPL), an XPB/TFIIH inhibitor, to block transcriptional initiation and then measured Pol II occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). This inhibition of initiation enabled us to investigate different states of paused Pol II. Specifically, our global analysis revealed that most genes with paused Pol II, as defined by a pausing index, show significant clearance of Pol II during the period of TPL treatment. Our study further identified a group of genes with unexpectedly stably paused Pol II, with unchanged Pol II occupancy even after 1 h of inhibition of initiation. This group of genes constitutes a small portion of all paused genes defined by the conventional criterion of pausing index. These findings could pave the way for evaluating the contribution of different elongation/pausing factors on different states of Pol II pausing in developmental and other stimulus-responsive pathways. PMID:25561494

  17. Extraordinary diversity of visual opsin genes in dragonflies

    PubMed Central

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Shunsuke; Arikawa, Kentaro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-01-01

    Dragonflies are colorful and large-eyed animals strongly dependent on color vision. Here we report an extraordinary large number of opsin genes in dragonflies and their characteristic spatiotemporal expression patterns. Exhaustive transcriptomic and genomic surveys of three dragonflies of the family Libellulidae consistently identified 20 opsin genes, consisting of 4 nonvisual opsin genes and 16 visual opsin genes of 1 UV, 5 short-wavelength (SW), and 10 long-wavelength (LW) type. Comprehensive transcriptomic survey of the other dragonflies representing an additional 10 families also identified as many as 15–33 opsin genes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic multiplications and losses of the opsin genes in the course of evolution. In contrast to many SW and LW genes expressed in adults, only one SW gene and several LW genes were expressed in larvae, reflecting less visual dependence and LW-skewed light conditions for their lifestyle under water. In this context, notably, the sand-burrowing or pit-dwelling species tended to lack SW gene expression in larvae. In adult visual organs: (i) many SW genes and a few LW genes were expressed in the dorsal region of compound eyes, presumably for processing SW-skewed light from the sky; (ii) a few SW genes and many LW genes were expressed in the ventral region of compound eyes, probably for perceiving terrestrial objects; and (iii) expression of a specific LW gene was associated with ocelli. Our findings suggest that the stage- and region-specific expressions of the diverse opsin genes underlie the behavior, ecology, and adaptation of dragonflies. PMID:25713365

  18. Extraordinary diversity of visual opsin genes in dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Futahashi, Ryo; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Shunsuke; Arikawa, Kentaro; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-03-17

    Dragonflies are colorful and large-eyed animals strongly dependent on color vision. Here we report an extraordinary large number of opsin genes in dragonflies and their characteristic spatiotemporal expression patterns. Exhaustive transcriptomic and genomic surveys of three dragonflies of the family Libellulidae consistently identified 20 opsin genes, consisting of 4 nonvisual opsin genes and 16 visual opsin genes of 1 UV, 5 short-wavelength (SW), and 10 long-wavelength (LW) type. Comprehensive transcriptomic survey of the other dragonflies representing an additional 10 families also identified as many as 15-33 opsin genes. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic multiplications and losses of the opsin genes in the course of evolution. In contrast to many SW and LW genes expressed in adults, only one SW gene and several LW genes were expressed in larvae, reflecting less visual dependence and LW-skewed light conditions for their lifestyle under water. In this context, notably, the sand-burrowing or pit-dwelling species tended to lack SW gene expression in larvae. In adult visual organs: (i) many SW genes and a few LW genes were expressed in the dorsal region of compound eyes, presumably for processing SW-skewed light from the sky; (ii) a few SW genes and many LW genes were expressed in the ventral region of compound eyes, probably for perceiving terrestrial objects; and (iii) expression of a specific LW gene was associated with ocelli. Our findings suggest that the stage- and region-specific expressions of the diverse opsin genes underlie the behavior, ecology, and adaptation of dragonflies. PMID:25713365

  19. Compare Gene Profiles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linuxmore »environment in serial or parallel mode.« less

  20. Kinetic characterization of group II intron folding and splicing.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Group II introns are large self-splicing ribozymes found in bacterial genomes, in organelles of plants and fungi, and even in some animal organisms. Many organellar group II introns interrupt important housekeeping genes; therefore, their splicing is critical for the survival of the host organism. Group II introns are versatile catalytic RNAs: they facilitate their own excision from a pre-mRNA, they promote ligation of exons to form a translation-competent mature mRNA; they can act like mobile genomic elements and insert themselves into RNA and DNA targets with remarkable precision, which makes them attractive tools for genetic engineering. The first step in characterization of any group II intron is the evaluation of its catalytic activity and its ability to properly fold into the native functionally active structure. This chapter describes kinetic assays used to characterize folding and catalytic properties of group II intron-derived ribozymes. PMID:22315065

  1. Engineering a Recombinant Baculovirus with a Peptide Hormone Gene and its Effect on the Corn Earworm, Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The helicokinins are peptides identified from Helicoverpa zea that when injected into the larvae were found to cause excessive diuresis and loss of feeding activity. Of the three peptides, helicokinin II (HezK-II) was found to be most potent. A synthetic gene encoding HezK-II was constructed based o...

  2. -PTOLEMY II -HETEROGENEOUS

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -PTOLEMY II - HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT MODELING AND DESIGN IN JAVA John Davis, II Ron Galicia Mudit University of California at Berkeley http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu Document Version 0.1.1 February 12.2.8. Timed CSP and Timed PN 1-5 1.3.Choosing Models of Computation 1-6 1.4.Visual Syntaxes 1-6 1.5.Ptolemy II

  3. PTOLEMY II HETEROGENEOUS

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ­PTOLEMY II ­ HETEROGENEOUS CONCURRENT MODELING AND DESIGN IN JAVA John Davis, II Ron Galicia Mudit University of California at Berkeley http://ptolemy.eecs.berkeley.edu Document Version 0.1.1 February 12 Syntaxes 1­6 1.5. Ptolemy II 1­7 1.5.1. Package Structure 1­7 1.5.2. Overview of Key Classes 1­9 1

  4. Combinations of Gene Ontology and Pathway Characterize and Predict Prognosis Genes for Recurrence of Gastric Cancer After Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haiyan; Guo, Zhanjun; Wang, Cuijv

    2015-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the second leading cause of death from cancer globally. The most common cause of GC is the infection of Helicobacter pylori, but ?11% of cases are caused by genetic factors. However, recurrences occur in approximately one-third of stage II GC patients, even if they are treated with adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. This is potentially due to expression variation of genes; some candidate prognostic genes were identified in patients with high-risk recurrences. The objective of this study was to develop an effective computational method for meaningfully interpreting these GC-related genes and accurately predicting novel prognostic genes for high-risk recurrence patients. We employed properties of genes (gene ontology [GO] and KEGG pathway information) as features to characterize GC-related genes. We obtained an optimal set of features for interpreting these genes. By applying the minimum redundancy maximum relevance algorithm, we predicted the GC-related genes. With the same approach, we further predicted the genes for the prognostic of high-risk recurrence. We obtained 1104 GO terms and KEGG pathways and 530 GO terms and KEGG pathways, respectively, that characterized GC-related genes and recurrence-related genes well. Finally, three novel prognostic genes were predicted to help supplement genetic markers of high-risk GC patients for recurrence after surgery. An in-depth text mining indicated that the results are quite consistent with previous knowledge. Survival analysis of patients confirmed the novel prognostic genes as markers. By analyzing the related genes, we developed a systematic method to interpret the possible underlying mechanism of GC. The novel prognostic genes facilitate the understanding and therapy of GC recurrences after surgery. PMID:26154702

  5. Type II universal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  6. Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Inhibition in Smooth Muscle Reduces Angiotensin II–Induced Hypertension by Controlling Aortic Remodeling and Baroreceptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anand M; Morgan, Donald A; Nuno, Daniel W; Ketsawatsomkron, Pimonrat; Bair, Thomas B; Venema, Ashlee N; Dibbern, Megan E; Kutschke, William J; Weiss, Robert M; Lamping, Kathryn G; Chapleau, Mark W; Sigmund, Curt D; Rahmouni, Kamal; Grumbach, Isabella M

    2015-01-01

    Background Multifunctional calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) is activated by angiotensin II (Ang II) in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but its function in experimental hypertension has not been explored. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of CaMKII inhibition selectively in VSMCs on Ang II hypertension. Methods and Results Transgenic expression of a CaMKII peptide inhibitor in VSMCs (TG SM-CaMKIIN model) reduced the blood pressure response to chronic Ang II infusion. The aortic depressor nerve activity was reset in hypertensive versus normotensive wild-type animals but not in TG SM-CaMKIIN mice, suggesting that changes in baroreceptor activity account for the blood pressure difference between genotypes. Accordingly, aortic pulse wave velocity, a measure of arterial wall stiffness and a determinant of baroreceptor activity, increased in hypertensive versus normotensive wild-type animals but did not change in TG SM-CaMKIIN mice. Moreover, examination of blood pressure and heart rate under ganglionic blockade revealed that VSMC CaMKII inhibition abolished the augmented efferent sympathetic outflow and renal and splanchnic nerve activity in Ang II hypertension. Consequently, we hypothesized that VSMC CaMKII controls baroreceptor activity by modifying arterial wall remodeling in Ang II hypertension. Gene expression analysis in aortas from normotensive and Ang II–infused mice revealed that TG SM-CaMKIIN aortas were protected from Ang II–induced upregulation of genes that control extracellular matrix production, including collagen. VSMC CaMKII inhibition also strongly altered the expression of muscle contractile genes under Ang II. Conclusions CaMKII in VSMCs regulates blood pressure under Ang II hypertension by controlling structural gene expression, wall stiffness, and baroreceptor activity. PMID:26077587

  7. Diversification of Lupine Bradyrhizobium Strains: Evidence from Nodulation Gene Trees? †

    PubMed Central

    St?pkowski, Tomasz; Hughes, Colin E.; Law, Ian J.; Markiewicz, ?ukasz; Gurda, Dorota; Chlebicka, Agnieszka; Moulin, Lionel

    2007-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium strains isolated in Europe from Genisteae and serradella legumes form a distinct lineage, designated clade II, on nodulation gene trees. Clade II bradyrhizobia appear to prevail also in the soils of Western Australia and South Africa following probably accidental introduction with seeds of their lupine and serradella hosts. Given this potential for dispersal, we investigated Bradyrhizobium isolates originating from a range of native New World lupines, based on phylogenetic analyses of nodulation (nodA, nodZ, noeI) and housekeeping (atpD, dnaK, glnII, recA) genes. The housekeeping gene trees revealed considerable diversity among lupine bradyrhizobia, with most isolates placed in the Bradyrhizobium japonicum lineage, while some European strains were closely related to Bradyrhizobium canariense. The nodA gene tree resolved seven strongly supported groups (clades I to VII) that correlated with strain geographical origins and to some extent with major Lupinus clades. All European strains were placed in clade II, whereas only a minority of New World strains was placed in this clade. This work, as well as our previous studies, suggests that clade II diversified predominately in the Old World, possibly in the Mediterranean. Most New World isolates formed subclade III.2, nested in a large “pantropical” clade III, which appears to be New World in origin, although it also includes strains originating from nonlupine legumes. Trees generated using nodZ and noeI gene sequences accorded well with the nodA tree, but evidence is presented that the noeI gene may not be required for nodulation of lupine and that loss of this gene is occurring. PMID:17400786

  8. Rapid targeted gene disruption in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthrax is a zoonotic disease recognized to affect herbivores since Biblical times and has the widest range of susceptible host species of any known pathogen. The ease with which the bacterium can be weaponized and its recent deliberate use as an agent of terror, have highlighted the importance of gaining a deeper understanding and effective countermeasures for this important pathogen. High quality sequence data has opened the possibility of systematic dissection of how genes distributed on both the bacterial chromosome and associated plasmids have made it such a successful pathogen. However, low transformation efficiency and relatively few genetic tools for chromosomal manipulation have hampered full interrogation of its genome. Results Group II introns have been developed into an efficient tool for site-specific gene inactivation in several organisms. We have adapted group II intron targeting technology for application in Bacillus anthracis and generated vectors that permit gene inactivation through group II intron insertion. The vectors developed permit screening for the desired insertion through PCR or direct selection of intron insertions using a selection scheme that activates a kanamycin resistance marker upon successful intron insertion. Conclusions The design and vector construction described here provides a useful tool for high throughput experimental interrogation of the Bacillus anthracis genome and will benefit efforts to develop improved vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:24047152

  9. Structural Insights into Group II Intron Catalysis and Branch-Site

    E-print Network

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    and Jennifer A. Doudna1,2 * Group II self-splicing introns catalyze autoexcision from precursor RNA tran self-splicing intron, revealing an unexpected two-nucleotide bulged structure around the branch- point of eukaryotic pre-messenger RNAs. Group II self-splicing introns, found in organellar genes of yeast, plants

  10. Expression of the thymidine phosphorylase gene in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hata, K; Kamikawa, T; Arao, S; Tashiro, H; Katabuchi, H; Okamura, H; Fujiwaki, R; Miyazaki, K; Fukumoto, M

    1999-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is associated with angiogenesis and the progression of solid tumours. High intracellular levels of this enzyme indicate increased chemosensitivity to pyrimidine antimetabolites. TP gene expression in 56 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer (27 of serous, 10 mucinous, 12 endometrioid, five clear cell and two undifferentiated) were analysed by polymerase chain reaction of RNA after reverse transcription. These included eight of low malignant potential. Twenty were stage I, four stage II, 27 stage III and five stage IV. The level of TP gene expression was presented by the relative yield of the TP gene to the ?2-microglobulin gene. TP gene expression ranged from 0.19 to 5.38 (median 0.93). The value of TP gene expression in stage III–IV was significantly higher than that of TP gene expression in stage I–II (P = 0.0005). Histological grade significantly associated with TP gene expression (P = 0.008), but histological subtype did not (P = 0.166). A follow-up study of 34 cases after complete resection of the primary tumours by surgical operation was performed. TP gene expression of the cases with recurrence showed significantly higher levels compared to cases without recurrence (P = 0.049). Survival data were available for 47 of the 56 patients. The prognosis of the patients with high TP gene expression (equal to, or greater than, median) was to be significantly worse than patients with low TP gene expression (less than median) (P = 0.021). The TP gene expression level may play one of the key roles in the biology of ovarian epithelial cancer and define a more aggressive tumour phenotype. A new therapeutic intervention mediated by TP protein activity is anticipated. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10206303

  11. Genome-wide dynamics of Pol II elongation and its interplay with promoter proximal pausing, chromatin, and exons

    PubMed Central

    Jonkers, Iris; Kwak, Hojoong; Lis, John T

    2014-01-01

    Production of mRNA depends critically on the rate of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation. To dissect Pol II dynamics in mouse ES cells, we inhibited Pol II transcription at either initiation or promoter-proximal pause escape with Triptolide or Flavopiridol, and tracked Pol II kinetically using GRO-seq. Both inhibitors block transcription of more than 95% of genes, showing that pause escape, like initiation, is a ubiquitous and crucial step within the transcription cycle. Moreover, paused Pol II is relatively stable, as evidenced from half-life measurements at ?3200 genes. Finally, tracking the progression of Pol II after drug treatment establishes Pol II elongation rates at over 1000 genes. Notably, Pol II accelerates dramatically while transcribing through genes, but slows at exons. Furthermore, intergenic variance in elongation rates is substantial, and is influenced by a positive effect of H3K79me2 and negative effects of exon density and CG content within genes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02407.001 PMID:24843027

  12. Classification and evolution of type II CRISPR-Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    Chylinski, Krzysztof; Makarova, Kira S.; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas systems of archaeal and bacterial adaptive immunity are classified into three types that differ by the repertoires of CRISPR-associated (cas) genes, the organization of cas operons and the structure of repeats in the CRISPR arrays. The simplest among the CRISPR-Cas systems is type II in which the endonuclease activities required for the interference with foreign deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are concentrated in a single multidomain protein, Cas9, and are guided by a co-processed dual-tracrRNA:crRNA molecule. This compact enzymatic machinery and readily programmable site-specific DNA targeting make type II systems top candidates for a new generation of powerful tools for genomic engineering. Here we report an updated census of CRISPR-Cas systems in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Type II systems are the rarest, missing in archaea, and represented in ?5% of bacterial genomes, with an over-representation among pathogens and commensals. Phylogenomic analysis suggests that at least three cas genes, cas1, cas2 and cas4, and the CRISPR repeats of the type II-B system were acquired via recombination with a type I CRISPR-Cas locus. Distant homologs of Cas9 were identified among proteins encoded by diverse transposons, suggesting that type II CRISPR-Cas evolved via recombination of mobile nuclease genes with type I loci. PMID:24728998

  13. Cardiovascular gene therapy for myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Scimia, Maria C; Gumpert, Anna M; Koch, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular gene therapy is the third most popular application for gene therapy, representing 8.4% of all gene therapy trials as reported in 2012 estimates. Gene therapy in cardiovascular disease is aiming to treat heart failure from ischemic and non-ischemic causes, peripheral artery disease, venous ulcer, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis and monogenic diseases, such as Fabry disease. Areas covered In this review, we will focus on elucidating current molecular targets for the treatment of ventricular dysfunction following myocardial infarction (MI). In particular, we will focus on the treatment of i) the clinical consequences of it, such as heart failure and residual myocardial ischemia and ii) etiological causes of MI (coronary vessels atherosclerosis, bypass venous graft disease, in-stent restenosis). Expert opinion We summarise the scheme of the review and the molecular targets either already at the gene therapy clinical trial phase or in the pipeline. These targets will be discussed below. Following this, we will focus on what we believe are the 4 prerequisites of success of any gene target therapy: safety, expression, specificity and efficacy (SESE). PMID:24328708

  14. Gene symbol precision.

    PubMed

    Bennani-Baiti, Barbara; Bennani-Baiti, Idriss M

    2012-01-10

    Several gene databases, including heavily used ones such as the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, erroneously assign, on occasion, literature references to genes or proteins. These mistakes are mostly due to an overlap in gene aliases, whereby two distinct genes share a pseudonym. This is particularly confusing when the gene products have also biological properties in common, are part of signaling pathways that cross-talk to one another, or are regulated by the same effectors. We present examples spanning several research fields including apoptosis, ubiquitin-dependent degradation, signaling by Notch, Wnt, and small G proteins, transporters of glutathione conjugates of electrophiles, and mitochondrial and ribosomal RNA genes. To solve the problem, we argue in favor of including Entrez gene numbers in papers submitted for publication as unique gene identifiers to allow precise identification of genes and species studied. PMID:22019431

  15. Extensive Gains and Losses of Olfactory Receptor Genes in Mammalian Evolution

    E-print Network

    Nei, Masatoshi

    monotremes and from marsupials and (ii) hundreds of gains and losses of OR genes have occurred in an order are available for at least six different orders of mammals including two early-diverged lineages, monotremes

  16. PNUTS/PP1 Regulates RNAPII-Mediated Gene Expression and Is Necessary for Developmental Growth

    E-print Network

    Ciurciu, Anita

    In multicellular organisms, tight regulation of gene expression ensures appropriate tissue and organismal growth throughout development. Reversible phosphorylation of the RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD) ...

  17. A functional link between housekeeping selenoproteins and phase II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Aniruddha; Carlson, Bradley A; Weaver, James A; Novoselov, Sergey V; Fomenko, Dmitri E; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Hatfield, Dolph L

    2008-07-01

    Sec (selenocysteine) is biosynthesized on its tRNA and incorporated into selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins) as the 21st amino acid residue. Selenoprotein synthesis is dependent on Sec tRNA and the expression of this class of proteins can be modulated by altering Sec tRNA expression. The gene encoding Sec tRNA (Trsp) is a single-copy gene and its targeted removal in liver demonstrated that selenoproteins are essential for proper function wherein their absence leads to necrosis and hepatocellular degeneration. In the present study, we found that the complete loss of selenoproteins in liver was compensated for by an enhanced expression of several phase II response genes and their corresponding gene products. The replacement of selenoprotein synthesis in mice carrying mutant Trsp transgenes, wherein housekeeping, but not stress-related selenoproteins are expressed, led to normal expression of phase II response genes. Thus the present study provides evidence for a functional link between housekeeping selenoproteins and phase II enzymes. PMID:18373496

  18. A functional link between housekeeping selenoproteins and phase II enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Aniruddha; Carlson, Bradley A.; Weaver, James A.; Novoselov, Sergey V.; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Selenocysteine (Sec) is biosynthesized on its tRNA and incorporated into selenium-containing proteins (selenoproteins) as the 21st amino acid. Selenoprotein synthesis is dependent on Sec tRNA and the expression of this class of proteins can be modulated by altering Sec tRNA expression. The gene encoding Sec tRNA (Trsp) is a single copy gene and its targeted removal in liver demonstrated that selenoproteins are essential for proper function wherein their absence leads to necrosis and hepatocellular degeneration. In the present study, we found that the complete loss of selenoproteins in liver was compensated by an enhanced expression of several phase II response genes and their corresponding gene products. The replacement of selenoprotein synthesis in mice carrying mutant Trsp transgenes, wherein housekeeping, but not stress-related selenoproteins are expressed, led to normal expression of phase II response genes. Thus, this study provides evidence for a functional link between housekeeping selenoproteins and phase II enzymes. PMID:18373496

  19. Speciation genes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rieseberg, Loren H.; Blackman, Benjamin K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Analyses of speciation genesgenes that contribute to the cessation of gene flow between populations – can offer clues regarding the ecological settings, evolutionary forces and molecular mechanisms that drive the divergence of populations and species. This review discusses the identities and attributes of genes that contribute to reproductive isolation (RI) in plants, compares them with animal speciation genes and investigates what these genes can tell us about speciation. Scope Forty-one candidate speciation genes were identified in the plant literature. Of these, seven contributed to pre-pollination RI, one to post-pollination, prezygotic RI, eight to hybrid inviability, and 25 to hybrid sterility. Genes, gene families and genetic pathways that were frequently found to underlie the evolution of RI in different plant groups include the anthocyanin pathway and its regulators (pollinator isolation), S RNase-SI genes (unilateral incompatibility), disease resistance genes (hybrid necrosis), chimeric mitochondrial genes (cytoplasmic male sterility), and pentatricopeptide repeat family genes (cytoplasmic male sterility). Conclusions The most surprising conclusion from this review is that identities of genes underlying both prezygotic and postzygotic RI are often predictable in a broad sense from the phenotype of the reproductive barrier. Regulatory changes (both cis and trans) dominate the evolution of pre-pollination RI in plants, whereas a mix of regulatory mutations and changes in protein-coding genes underlie intrinsic postzygotic barriers. Also, loss-of-function mutations and copy number variation frequently contribute to RI. Although direct evidence of positive selection on speciation genes is surprisingly scarce in plants, analyses of gene family evolution, along with theoretical considerations, imply an important role for diversifying selection and genetic conflict in the evolution of RI. Unlike in animals, however, most candidate speciation genes in plants exhibit intraspecific polymorphism, consistent with an important role for stochastic forces and/or balancing selection in development of RI in plants. PMID:20576737

  20. Autistic Behavior, Behavior Analysis, and the Gene--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malott, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the negative behavior-analytic commentary on Drash and Tudor's behavior-analytic analysis of the etiology of autistic repertoires and values. This article also asks that, in our effort to scrub it clean, we not drown Drash and Tudor's beautiful, but fragile, new-born, behavior-analytic baby in hyper-methodological,…

  1. Genes and gene networks involved in sodium fluoride-elicited cell death accompanying endoplasmic reticulum stress in oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Yunoki, Tatsuya; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Nobuo; Kondo, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Here, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cell death induced by sodium fluoride (NaF), we analyzed gene expression patterns in rat oral epithelial ROE2 cells exposed to NaF using global-scale microarrays and bioinformatics tools. A relatively high concentration of NaF (2 mM) induced cell death concomitant with decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential, chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation. Using 980 probe sets, we identified 432 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated genes, that were differentially expressed by >2.5-fold in the cells treated with 2 mM of NaF and categorized them into 4 groups by K-means clustering. Ingenuity® pathway analysis revealed several gene networks from gene clusters. The gene networks Up-I and Up-II included many up-regulated genes that were mainly associated with the biological function of induction or prevention of cell death, respectively, such as Atf3, Ddit3 and Fos (for Up-I) and Atf4 and Hspa5 (for Up-II). Interestingly, knockdown of Ddit3 and Hspa5 significantly increased and decreased the number of viable cells, respectively. Moreover, several endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related genes including, Ddit3, Atf4 and Hapa5, were observed in these gene networks. These findings will provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of NaF-induced cell death accompanying ER stress in oral epithelial cells. PMID:24853129

  2. Angiotensin II and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D; Sorescu, D; Taylor, W R

    2001-04-19

    Numerous clinical and laboratory data are now available supporting the hypothesis that the renin-angiotensin system is mechanistically relevant in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The traditional role of the renin-angiotensin system in the context of blood pressure regulation has been modified to incorporate the concept that angiotensin II (Ang II) is a potent proinflammatory agent. In vascular cells, Ang II is a potent stimulus for the generation of reactive oxygen species. As a result, Ang II upregulates the expression of many redox-sensitive cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Extensive data now confirm that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system inhibits atherosclerosis in animal models as well as in humans. These studies provide mechanistic insights into the precise role of Ang II in atherosclerosis and suggest that pharmacologic interventions involving the renin-angiotensin system may be of fundamental importance in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:11334765

  3. Gene Ontology Driven Classification of Gene

    E-print Network

    Spang, Rainer

    evaluation on leukemia · Limitations and future work · Conclusions #12;Introduction 23-Jul-02 3 / 17Claudio · Identifier, name, description · Children (other GO nodes) · Probe-set annotations · One logistic regression genes and direct children) #12;GO driven gene expression classification 23-Jul-02 7 / 17Claudio Lottaz

  4. From Gene Networks to Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Schlitt, Thomas; Palin, Kimmo; Rung, Johan; Dietmann, Sabine; Lappe, Michael; Ukkonen, Esko; Brazma, Alvis

    2003-01-01

    We propose a novel method to identify functionally related genes based on comparisons of neighborhoods in gene networks. This method does not rely on gene sequence or protein structure homologies, and it can be applied to any organism and a wide variety of experimental data sets. The character of the predicted gene relationships depends on the underlying networks;they concern biological processes rather than the molecular function. We used the method to analyze gene networks derived from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, a large-scale gene deletion study, and from the genomic positions of consensus binding sites for transcription factors of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 816 functional relationships between 159 genes and show that these relationships correspond to protein–protein interactions, co-occurrence in the same protein complexes, and/or co-occurrence in abstracts of scientific articles. Our results suggest functions for seven previously uncharacterized yeast genes: KIN3 and YMR269W may be involved in biological processes related to cell growth and/or maintenance, whereas IES6, YEL008W, YEL033W, YHL029C, YMR010W, and YMR031W-A are likely to have metabolic functions. PMID:14656964

  5. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  6. Differential gene expression during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis: regulation of the spoVJ gene.

    PubMed

    Errington, J; Wootten, L; Dunkerley, J C; Foulger, D

    1989-08-01

    The process of spore formation in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a simple developmental system controlled by 50 or more genes. The complex pattern of regulatory interactions between these genes is beginning to be elucidated. spoVJ is a poorly characterized locus in which mutations affect spore development at a relatively late stage (Stage V). We have now cloned and physically characterized the spoVJ locus, and analysed its expression by lacZ fusion. Expression of spoVJ is temporally delayed until about two hours after the initiation of sporulation. Its expression is also spatially restricted to the mother cell compartment; as such, it represents the earliest known mother-cell-specific event. Control of spoVJ transcription is complex: expression is dependent upon the products of all of the spoO genes and on some of the spoII genes but it is independent of all later genes except spoIIID. As spoIIID mutations do not affect prespore development, this gene must be an important early determinant of mother-cell-specific gene expression. PMID:2514336

  7. A simple, universal, efficient PCR-based gene synthesis method: sequential OE-PCR gene synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingping; Ding, Yingying; Liao, Wenting; Chen, Qiuli; Zhang, Huaqun; Qi, Peipei; He, Ting; Wang, Jinhong; Deng, Songhua; Pan, Tianyue; Ren, Hao; Pan, Wei

    2013-07-25

    Herein we present a simple, universal, efficient gene synthesis method based on sequential overlap extension polymerase chain reactions (OE-PCRs). This method involves four key steps: (i) the design of paired complementary 54-mer oligonucleotides with 18 bp overlaps, (ii) the utilisation of sequential OE-PCR to synthesise full-length genes, (iii) the cloning and sequencing of four positive T-clones of the synthesised genes and (iv) the resynthesis of target genes by OE-PCR with correct templates. Mispriming and secondary structure were found to be the principal obstacles preventing successful gene synthesis and were easily identified and solved in this method. Compensating for the disadvantages of being laborious and time-consuming, this method has many attractive advantages, such as the ability to guarantee successful gene synthesis in most cases and good allowance for Taq polymerase, oligonucleotides, PCR conditions and a high error rate. Thus, this method provides an alternative tool for individual gene synthesis without strict needs of the high-specialised experience. PMID:23597923

  8. MADS goes genomic in conifers: towards determining the ancestral set of MADS-box genes in seed plants

    PubMed Central

    Gramzow, Lydia; Weilandt, Lisa; Theißen, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims MADS-box genes comprise a gene family coding for transcription factors. This gene family expanded greatly during land plant evolution such that the number of MADS-box genes ranges from one or two in green algae to around 100 in angiosperms. Given the crucial functions of MADS-box genes for nearly all aspects of plant development, the expansion of this gene family probably contributed to the increasing complexity of plants. However, the expansion of MADS-box genes during one important step of land plant evolution, namely the origin of seed plants, remains poorly understood due to the previous lack of whole-genome data for gymnosperms. Methods The newly available genome sequences of Picea abies, Picea glauca and Pinus taeda were used to identify the complete set of MADS-box genes in these conifers. In addition, MADS-box genes were identified in the growing number of transcriptomes available for gymnosperms. With these datasets, phylogenies were constructed to determine the ancestral set of MADS-box genes of seed plants and to infer the ancestral functions of these genes. Key Results Type I MADS-box genes are under-represented in gymnosperms and only a minimum of two Type I MADS-box genes have been present in the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of seed plants. In contrast, a large number of Type II MADS-box genes were found in gymnosperms. The MRCA of extant seed plants probably possessed at least 11–14 Type II MADS-box genes. In gymnosperms two duplications of Type II MADS-box genes were found, such that the MRCA of extant gymnosperms had at least 14–16 Type II MADS-box genes. Conclusions The implied ancestral set of MADS-box genes for seed plants shows simplicity for Type I MADS-box genes and remarkable complexity for Type II MADS-box genes in terms of phylogeny and putative functions. The analysis of transcriptome data reveals that gymnosperm MADS-box genes are expressed in a great variety of tissues, indicating diverse roles of MADS-box genes for the development of gymnosperms. This study is the first that provides a comprehensive overview of MADS-box genes in conifers and thus will provide a framework for future work on MADS-box genes in seed plants. PMID:24854168

  9. Common Human Cancer Genes Discovered by Integrated Gene-Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Yi, Yijun; Liu, Pengyuan; Wen, Weidong; James, Michael; Wang, Daolong; You, Ming

    2007-01-01

    Background Microarray technology enables a standardized, objective assessment of oncological diagnosis and prognosis. However, such studies are typically specific to certain cancer types, and the results have limited use due to inadequate validation in large patient cohorts. Discovery of genes commonly regulated in cancer may have an important implication in understanding the common molecular mechanism of cancer. Methods and Findings We described an integrated gene-expression analysis of 2,186 samples from 39 studies to identify and validate a cancer type-independent gene signature that can identify cancer patients for a wide variety of human malignancies. The commonness of gene expression in 20 types of common cancer was assessed in 20 training datasets. The discriminative power of a signature defined by these common cancer genes was evaluated in the other 19 independent datasets including novel cancer types. QRT-PCR and tissue microarray were used to validate commonly regulated genes in multiple cancer types. We identified 187 genes dysregulated in nearly all cancerous tissue samples. The 187-gene signature can robustly predict cancer versus normal status for a wide variety of human malignancies with an overall accuracy of 92.6%. We further refined our signature to 28 genes confirmed by QRT-PCR. The refined signature still achieved 80% accuracy of classifying samples from mixed cancer types. This signature performs well in the prediction of novel cancer types that were not represented in training datasets. We also identified three biological pathways including glycolysis, cell cycle checkpoint II and plk3 pathways in which most genes are systematically up-regulated in many types of cancer. Conclusions The identified signature has captured essential transcriptional features of neoplastic transformation and progression in general. These findings will help to elucidate the common molecular mechanism of cancer, and provide new insights into cancer diagnostics, prognostics and therapy. PMID:17989776

  10. GNormPlus: An Integrative Approach for Tagging Genes, Gene Families, and Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Kao, Hung-Yu; Lu, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    The automatic recognition of gene names and their associated database identifiers from biomedical text has been widely studied in recent years, as these tasks play an important role in many downstream text-mining applications. Despite significant previous research, only a small number of tools are publicly available and these tools are typically restricted to detecting only mention level gene names or only document level gene identifiers. In this work, we report GNormPlus: an end-to-end and open source system that handles both gene mention and identifier detection. We created a new corpus of 694 PubMed articles to support our development of GNormPlus, containing manual annotations for not only gene names and their identifiers, but also closely related concepts useful for gene name disambiguation, such as gene families and protein domains. GNormPlus integrates several advanced text-mining techniques, including SimConcept for resolving composite gene names. As a result, GNormPlus compares favorably to other state-of-the-art methods when evaluated on two widely used public benchmarking datasets, achieving 86.7% F1-score on the BioCreative II Gene Normalization task dataset and 50.1% F1-score on the BioCreative III Gene Normalization task dataset. The GNormPlus source code and its annotated corpus are freely available, and the results of applying GNormPlus to the entire PubMed are freely accessible through our web-based tool PubTator. PMID:26380306

  11. The evaluation of involvement of angiotensin II, its receptors, and androgen receptor in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Matysiak, Zuzanna El?bieta; Och?dalski, Tomasz; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka Wanda

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynecological malignancy. Alterations of angiogenic factors including angiotensin (AngII) or VEGF are observed in EC. Expression of angiotensin receptor 1 (AT1) is correlated with EC. Moreover, the expression of VEGF is up-regulated by AngII. Androgens are involved in the pathogenesis of EC. Genetic variations in androgen receptor (AR) gene may increase EC risk. This review proved strong correlation among EC, AngII, its receptors and AR, where AT influence on AR and, as a result, induce the expression of genes related to carcinogenesis. PMID:25231075

  12. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Peck, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised. PMID:25445012

  13. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II.

    PubMed

    Carter, Andrew T; Peck, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised. PMID:25445012

  14. Nemertean toxin genes revealed through transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Nathan V; Kocot, Kevin M; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2014-12-01

    Nemerteans are one of few animal groups that have evolved the ability to utilize toxins for both defense and subduing prey, but little is known about specific nemertean toxins. In particular, no study has identified specific toxin genes even though peptide toxins are known from some nemertean species. Information about toxin genes is needed to better understand evolution of toxins across animals and possibly provide novel targets for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. We sequenced and annotated transcriptomes of two free-living and one commensal nemertean and annotated an additional six publicly available nemertean transcriptomes to identify putative toxin genes. Approximately 63-74% of predicted open reading frames in each transcriptome were annotated with gene names, and all species had similar percentages of transcripts annotated with each higher-level GO term. Every nemertean analyzed possessed genes with high sequence similarities to known animal toxins including those from stonefish, cephalopods, and sea anemones. One toxin-like gene found in all nemerteans analyzed had high sequence similarity to Plancitoxin-1, a DNase II hepatotoxin that may function well at low pH, which suggests that the acidic body walls of some nemerteans could work to enhance the efficacy of protein toxins. The highest number of toxin-like genes found in any one species was seven and the lowest was three. The diversity of toxin-like nemertean genes found here is greater than previously documented, and these animals are likely an ideal system for exploring toxin evolution and industrial applications of toxins. PMID:25432940

  15. Bovine Mammary Gene Expression Profiling during the Onset of Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xueyan; Shi, Kerong; Yan, Zhengui; Wang, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactogenesis includes two stages. Stage I begins a few weeks before parturition. Stage II is initiated around the time of parturition and extends for several days afterwards. Methodology/Principal Findings To better understand the molecular events underlying these changes, genome-wide gene expression profiling was conducted using digital gene expression (DGE) on bovine mammary tissue at three time points (on approximately day 35 before parturition (?35 d), day 7 before parturition (?7 d) and day 3 after parturition (+3 d)). Approximately 6.2 million (M), 5.8 million (M) and 6.1 million (M) 21-nt cDNA tags were sequenced in the three cDNA libraries (?35 d, ?7 d and +3 d), respectively. After aligning to the reference sequences, the three cDNA libraries included 8,662, 8,363 and 8,359 genes, respectively. With a fold change cutoff criteria of ?2 or ??2 and a false discovery rate (FDR) of ?0.001, a total of 812 genes were significantly differentially expressed at ?7 d compared with ?35 d (stage I). Gene ontology analysis showed that those significantly differentially expressed genes were mainly associated with cell cycle, lipid metabolism, immune response and biological adhesion. A total of 1,189 genes were significantly differentially expressed at +3 d compared with ?7 d (stage II), and these genes were mainly associated with the immune response and cell cycle. Moreover, there were 1,672 genes significantly differentially expressed at +3 d compared with ?35 d. Gene ontology analysis showed that the main differentially expressed genes were those associated with metabolic processes. Conclusions The results suggest that the mammary gland begins to lactate not only by a gain of function but also by a broad suppression of function to effectively push most of the cell's resources towards lactation. PMID:23990904

  16. Gene Carlson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Carlson, Gene; Shriner, Clint

    2009-12-10

    Oral history interview with Gene Carlson conducted by Clint Shriner on December 10, 2009. In this interview, Gene Carlson, lead pastor at Westlink Christian Church, discusses the formative experiences that resulted in his decision to join...

  17. Molecular studies of Pseudomonas exotoxin A gene.

    PubMed Central

    Vasil, M L; Chamberlain, C; Grant, C C

    1986-01-01

    A 2.7-kilobase DNA fragment carrying the entire exotoxin A (ETA) structural gene was divided into three nonoverlapping probes. Two probes covering the ETA structural gene were used in colony hybridization experiments to determine whether sequences homologous to the ETA gene could be detected in genera other than Pseudomonas or in Pseudomonas species other than Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The majority of strains examined other than the P. aeruginosa strains failed to react in the colony hybridization assays. Some Pseudomonas spp. other than P. aeruginosa and some Bordetella spp. did react in colony hybridization assays with the probes. However, additional studies in which we used Southern hybridization methods indicated that these reactions were apparently nonspecific and that the ETA gene is limited to P. aeruginosa. Studies in which we used all three ETA-related probes in Southern hybridization experiments to analyze the ETA gene and surrounding sequences in P. aeruginosa strains isolated from diverse sources revealed the following: (i) the incidence of the ETA gene in P. aeruginosa is approximately equal to 95%; (ii) there are strains which have been isolated from human infections that do not carry the ETA structural gene; (iii) there is a maximum of one copy of the ETA gene per genome in any given strain; (iv) sequences within and 4 to 5 kilobases downstream of the ETA structural gene appear to be well conserved in different strains of P. aeruginosa; and (v) in contrast, sequences immediately upstream of the ETA structural gene are considerably rearranged from strain to strain. A multicopy plasmid carrying the entire cloned ETA gene was transferred to a tox- P. aeruginosa strain. This strain synthesized and secreted mature, full-length ETA, but the amount produced was small considering the multicopy nature of the plasmid. Synthesis of toxin in this strain was only minimally affected by iron. Our data suggest that the synthesis of ETA is positively regulated. Finally, we found that the presence of the ETA gene is independent of the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce several other recognized virulence factors, supporting the concept of the multifactorial nature of P. aeruginosa virulence. Images PMID:3009329

  18. Comprehensive analysis of the flowering genes in Chinese cabbage and examination of evolutionary pattern of CO-like genes in plant kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaoming; Duan, Weike; Huang, Zhinan; Liu, Gaofeng; Wu, Peng; Liu, Tongkun; Li, Ying; Hou, Xilin

    2015-09-01

    In plants, flowering is the most important transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. The flowering patterns of monocots and eudicots are distinctly different, but few studies have described the evolutionary patterns of the flowering genes in them. In this study, we analysed the evolutionary pattern, duplication and expression level of these genes. The main results were as follows: (i) characterization of flowering genes in monocots and eudicots, including the identification of family-specific, orthologous and collinear genes; (ii) full characterization of CONSTANS-like genes in Brassica rapa (BraCOL genes), the key flowering genes; (iii) exploration of the evolution of COL genes in plant kingdom and construction of the evolutionary pattern of COL genes; (iv) comparative analysis of CO and FT genes between Brassicaceae and Grass, which identified several family-specific amino acids, and revealed that CO and FT protein structures were similar in B. rapa and Arabidopsis but different in rice; and (v) expression analysis of photoperiod pathway-related genes in B. rapa under different photoperiod treatments by RT-qPCR. This analysis will provide resources for understanding the flowering mechanisms and evolutionary pattern of COL genes. In addition, this genome-wide comparative study of COL genes may also provide clues for evolution of other flowering genes.

  19. Comprehensive analysis of the flowering genes in Chinese cabbage and examination of evolutionary pattern of CO-like genes in plant kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaoming; Duan, Weike; Huang, Zhinan; Liu, Gaofeng; Wu, Peng; Liu, Tongkun; Li, Ying; Hou, Xilin

    2015-01-01

    In plants, flowering is the most important transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. The flowering patterns of monocots and eudicots are distinctly different, but few studies have described the evolutionary patterns of the flowering genes in them. In this study, we analysed the evolutionary pattern, duplication and expression level of these genes. The main results were as follows: (i) characterization of flowering genes in monocots and eudicots, including the identification of family-specific, orthologous and collinear genes; (ii) full characterization of CONSTANS-like genes in Brassica rapa (BraCOL genes), the key flowering genes; (iii) exploration of the evolution of COL genes in plant kingdom and construction of the evolutionary pattern of COL genes; (iv) comparative analysis of CO and FT genes between Brassicaceae and Grass, which identified several family-specific amino acids, and revealed that CO and FT protein structures were similar in B. rapa and Arabidopsis but different in rice; and (v) expression analysis of photoperiod pathway-related genes in B. rapa under different photoperiod treatments by RT-qPCR. This analysis will provide resources for understanding the flowering mechanisms and evolutionary pattern of COL genes. In addition, this genome-wide comparative study of COL genes may also provide clues for evolution of other flowering genes. PMID:26416765

  20. Comprehensive analysis of the flowering genes in Chinese cabbage and examination of evolutionary pattern of CO-like genes in plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoming; Duan, Weike; Huang, Zhinan; Liu, Gaofeng; Wu, Peng; Liu, Tongkun; Li, Ying; Hou, Xilin

    2015-01-01

    In plants, flowering is the most important transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. The flowering patterns of monocots and eudicots are distinctly different, but few studies have described the evolutionary patterns of the flowering genes in them. In this study, we analysed the evolutionary pattern, duplication and expression level of these genes. The main results were as follows: (i) characterization of flowering genes in monocots and eudicots, including the identification of family-specific, orthologous and collinear genes; (ii) full characterization of CONSTANS-like genes in Brassica rapa (BraCOL genes), the key flowering genes; (iii) exploration of the evolution of COL genes in plant kingdom and construction of the evolutionary pattern of COL genes; (iv) comparative analysis of CO and FT genes between Brassicaceae and Grass, which identified several family-specific amino acids, and revealed that CO and FT protein structures were similar in B. rapa and Arabidopsis but different in rice; and (v) expression analysis of photoperiod pathway-related genes in B. rapa under different photoperiod treatments by RT-qPCR. This analysis will provide resources for understanding the flowering mechanisms and evolutionary pattern of COL genes. In addition, this genome-wide comparative study of COL genes may also provide clues for evolution of other flowering genes. PMID:26416765

  1. Proto-genes and de novo gene birth

    E-print Network

    Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra

    Novel protein-coding genes can arise either through re-organization of pre-existing genes or de novo. Processes involving re-organization of pre-existing genes, notably after gene duplication, have been extensively described. ...

  2. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation and plant regeneration of the hardwood tree species Fraxinus profunda.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Micah E; Pijut, Paula M

    2014-06-01

    This transformation and regeneration protocol provides an integral framework for the genetic improvement of Fraxinus profunda (pumpkin ash) for future development of plants resistant to the emerald ash borer. Using mature hypocotyls as the initial explants, an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation system was successfully developed for pumpkin ash (Fraxinus profunda). This transformation protocol is an invaluable tool to combat the highly aggressive, non-native emerald ash borer (EAB), which has the potential to eliminate native Fraxinus spp. from the natural landscape. Hypocotyls were successfully transformed with Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harboring the pq35GR vector, containing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as well as a fusion gene between neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and gusA. Hypocotyls were cultured for 7 days on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 22.2 ?M 6-benzyladenine (BA), 4.5 ?M thidiazuron (TDZ), 50 mg L(-1) adenine hemisulfate (AS), and 10 % coconut water (CW) prior to transformation. Hypocotyls were transformed using 90 s sonication plus 10 min vacuum infiltration after Agrobacterium was exposed to 100 ?M acetosyringone for 1 h. Adventitious shoots were regenerated on MS medium with 22.2 ?M BA, 4.5 ?M TDZ, 50 mg L(-1) AS, 10 % CW, 400 mg L(-1) timentin, and 20 mg L(-1) kanamycin. Timentin at 400 and 20 mg L(-1) kanamycin were most effective at controlling Agrobacterium growth and selecting for transformed cells, respectively. The presence of nptII, GUS (?-glucuronidase), and EGFP in transformed plants was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), while the expression of EGFP was also confirmed through fluorescent microscopy and reverse transcription-PCR. This transformation protocol provides an integral foundation for future genetic modifications of F. profunda to provide resistance to EAB. PMID:24493252

  3. Sandro Rusconi Gene transfer

    E-print Network

    Málaga, Universidad de

    Sandro Rusconi aaaaaa UNIFR Rusconi 2003 Gene transfer: limits and potential as doping vehicle Geneva 30.09.03 AISTS 'genes & sport' workshop 1972-75 Primary school teacher (Locarno, Switzerland) 1975 on 'molecular medicine' & molecular doping: applications and problems, Gene-based doping applications

  4. Sandro Rusconi Gene transfer

    E-print Network

    Málaga, Universidad de

    Sandro Rusconi UNIFR Rusconi 2003 Gene transfer: limits and potential as doping vehicle Geneva 30.09.03 AISTS 'genes & sport' workshop 1972-75 Primary school teacher (Locarno, Switzerland) 1975-79 Graduation medicine' & molecular doping: applications and problems, Gene-based doping applications, comparison

  5. Reading and Generalist Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Meaburn, Emma L.; Harlaar, Nicole; Plomin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Twin-study research suggests that many (but not all) of the same genes contribute to genetic influence on diverse learning abilities and disabilities, a hypothesis called "generalist genes". This generalist genes hypothesis was tested using a set of 10 DNA markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) found to be associated with early reading…

  6. Current Understanding of Usher Syndrome Type II

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Le; Song, Hongman; Sokolov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common deafness-blindness caused by genetic mutations. To date, three genes have been identified underlying the most prevalent form of Usher syndrome, the type II form (USH2). The proteins encoded by these genes are demonstrated to form a complex in vivo. This complex is localized mainly at the periciliary membrane complex in photoreceptors and the ankle-link of the stereocilia in hair cells. Many proteins have been found to interact with USH2 proteins in vitro, suggesting that they are potential additional components of this USH2 complex and that the genes encoding these proteins may be the candidate USH2 genes. However, further investigations are critical to establish their existence in the USH2 complex in vivo. Based on the predicted functional domains in USH2 proteins, their cellular localizations in photoreceptors and hair cells, the observed phenotypes in USH2 mutant mice, and the known knowledge about diseases similar to USH2, putative biological functions of the USH2 complex have been proposed. Finally, therapeutic approaches for this group of diseases are now being actively explored. PMID:22201796

  7. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that ?-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a ?-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  8. Immunoglobulin ? Gene Rearrangement Can Precede ? Gene Rearrangement

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berg, Jörg; Mcdowell, Mindy; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1990-01-01

    Immunoglobulin genes are generated during differentiation of B lymphocytes by joining gene segments. A mouse pre-B cell contains a functional immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene, but no light-chain gene. Although there is only one heavy-chain locus, there are two lightchain loci: ? and ? .It has been reported that ? loci in the germ-line configuration are never (in man) or very rarely (in the mouse) present in cells with functionally rearranged ? -chain genes. Two explanations have been proposed to explain this: (a) the ordered rearrangement theory, which postulatesmore »that light-chain gene rearrangement in the pre-B cell is first attempted at the ? locus, and that only upon failure to produce a functional ? chain is there an attempt to rearrange the ? locus; and (b) the stochastic theory, which postulates that rearrangement at the ? locus proceeds at a rate that is intrinsically much slower than that at the ? locus. We show here that ? -chain genes are generated whether or not the ? locus has lost its germ-line arrangement, a result that is compatible only with the stochastic theory. « less

  9. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Clostridium Difficile Toxin Gene Amplification Assay. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-08-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) toxin gene amplification assay into class II (special controls). The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:26314093

  10. RNA polymerase stalling at developmental control genes in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo

    E-print Network

    Kellis, Manolis

    RNA polymerase stalling at developmental control genes in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo Julia microarray (ChIP-chip) assays in Drosophila embryos and identified three distinct Pol II binding behaviors Pol II occupancy in whole Drosophila embryos. Although this is one of the few systems in which

  11. Connectionist Approaches for Predicting Mouse Gene Function from Gene Expression

    E-print Network

    Bonner, Anthony

    Therapy. Identifying gene function based on gene expression data is much easier in prokaryotes than ways, especially in Gene Therapy [5]. Identifying gene function in prokaryotes is much easier thanConnectionist Approaches for Predicting Mouse Gene Function from Gene Expression Emad Andrews

  12. Genes Help Set Menopause Timing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rights reserved. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Menopause Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Genes and Gene Therapy Menopause About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us ...

  13. A Large Fraction of Extragenic RNA Pol II Transcription Sites Overlap Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Ghisletti, Serena; Polletti, Sara; Tusi, Betsabeh Khoramian; Muller, Heiko; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Wei, Chia-Lin; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed outside mapped protein-coding genes. One class of extragenic transcription products is represented by long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), some of which result from Pol_II transcription of bona-fide RNA genes. Whether all lncRNAs described insofar are products of RNA genes, however, is still unclear. Here we have characterized transcription sites located outside protein-coding genes in a highly regulated response, macrophage activation by endotoxin. Using chromatin signatures, we could unambiguously classify extragenic Pol_II binding sites as belonging to either canonical RNA genes or transcribed enhancers. Unexpectedly, 70% of extragenic Pol_II peaks were associated with genomic regions with a canonical chromatin signature of enhancers. Enhancer-associated extragenic transcription was frequently adjacent to inducible inflammatory genes, was regulated in response to endotoxin stimulation, and generated very low abundance transcripts. Moreover, transcribed enhancers were under purifying selection and contained binding sites for inflammatory transcription factors, thus suggesting their functionality. These data demonstrate that a large fraction of extragenic Pol_II transcription sites can be ascribed to cis-regulatory genomic regions. Discrimination between lncRNAs generated by canonical RNA genes and products of transcribed enhancers will provide a framework for experimental approaches to lncRNAs and help complete the annotation of mammalian genomes. PMID:20485488

  14. A large fraction of extragenic RNA pol II transcription sites overlap enhancers.

    PubMed

    De Santa, Francesca; Barozzi, Iros; Mietton, Flore; Ghisletti, Serena; Polletti, Sara; Tusi, Betsabeh Khoramian; Muller, Heiko; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Wei, Chia-Lin; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2010-05-01

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed outside mapped protein-coding genes. One class of extragenic transcription products is represented by long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), some of which result from Pol_II transcription of bona-fide RNA genes. Whether all lncRNAs described insofar are products of RNA genes, however, is still unclear. Here we have characterized transcription sites located outside protein-coding genes in a highly regulated response, macrophage activation by endotoxin. Using chromatin signatures, we could unambiguously classify extragenic Pol_II binding sites as belonging to either canonical RNA genes or transcribed enhancers. Unexpectedly, 70% of extragenic Pol_II peaks were associated with genomic regions with a canonical chromatin signature of enhancers. Enhancer-associated extragenic transcription was frequently adjacent to inducible inflammatory genes, was regulated in response to endotoxin stimulation, and generated very low abundance transcripts. Moreover, transcribed enhancers were under purifying selection and contained binding sites for inflammatory transcription factors, thus suggesting their functionality. These data demonstrate that a large fraction of extragenic Pol_II transcription sites can be ascribed to cis-regulatory genomic regions. Discrimination between lncRNAs generated by canonical RNA genes and products of transcribed enhancers will provide a framework for experimental approaches to lncRNAs and help complete the annotation of mammalian genomes. PMID:20485488

  15. The Expansion of the PRAME Gene Family in Eutheria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ti-Cheng; Yang, Yang; Yasue, Hiroshi; Bharti, Arvind K.; Retzel, Ernest F.; Liu, Wan-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The PRAME gene family belongs to the group of cancer/testis genes whose expression is restricted primarily to the testis and a variety of cancers. The expansion of this gene family as a result of gene duplication has been observed in primates and rodents. We analyzed the PRAME gene family in Eutheria and discovered a novel Y-linked PRAME gene family in bovine, PRAMEY, which underwent amplification after a lineage-specific, autosome-to-Y transposition. Phylogenetic analyses revealed two major evolutionary clades. Clade I containing the amplified PRAMEYs and the unamplified autosomal homologs in cattle and other eutherians is under stronger functional constraints; whereas, Clade II containing the amplified autosomal PRAMEs is under positive selection. Deep-sequencing analysis indicated that eight of the identified 16 PRAMEY loci are active transcriptionally. Compared to the bovine autosomal PRAME that is expressed predominantly in testis, the PRAMEY gene family is expressed exclusively in testis and is up-regulated during testicular maturation. Furthermore, the sense RNA of PRAMEY is expressed specifically whereas the antisense RNA is expressed predominantly in spermatids. This study revealed that the expansion of the PRAME family occurred in both autosomes and sex chromosomes in a lineage-dependent manner. Differential selection forces have shaped the evolution and function of the PRAME family. The positive selection observed on the autosomal PRAMEs (Clade II) may result in their functional diversification in immunity and reproduction. Conversely, selective constraints have operated on the expanded PRAMEYs to preserve their essential function in spermatogenesis. PMID:21347312

  16. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to their children. A family history of a bleeding disorder can be a risk factor. Factor II deficiency ... through a vein (intravenously). If you have this bleeding disorder, be sure to: Tell your health care providers ...

  17. Gene expression profiling in the lungs of pigs with different susceptibilities to Glasser's disease

    E-print Network

    Wilkinson, Jamie M; Sargent, Carole A; Galina-Pantoja, Lucina; Tucker, Alexander W

    2010-07-29

    . These include the pro-inflammatory cytokine genes resistin (RETN) and interleukin 1-beta (IL1B). At 72 hours, a reduction in the expression of genes involved in antigen presentation by both MHC class I and II molecules was observed, which could have contributed...

  18. CLONING AND EXPRESSION OF A LIGNIN PEROXIDASE GENE FROM STREPTOMYCES VIRIDOSPORUS IN STREPTOMYCES LIVIDANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A lignin peroxidase gene was cloned from Streptomyces viridosporus T7A into Streptomyces lividans TK64 in plasmid pIJ702. g1II-digested genomic DNA(4-10kb) of S. viridosporus was shotgun-cloned into S. lividans after insertion into the melanin (mel+) gene of pIJ702. ransformants ...

  19. Comparison of visualization methods for an atlas of gene expression data sets

    E-print Network

    Kaski, Samuel

    A paper Comparison of visualization methods for an atlas of gene expression data sets Jarkko Venna-202-506778. 1 #12;Comparison of visualization methods for an atlas of gene expression data sets data sets as a visual interface to expression data- banks, and (ii) to study which dimensionality

  20. Gene hunting in autoinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Steady progress in our understanding of the genetic basis of autoinflammatory diseases has been made over the past 16 years. Since the discovery of the familial Mediterranean fever gene MEFV (also known as marenostrin) in 1997, 18 other genes responsible for monogenic autoinflammatory diseases have been identified to date. The discovery of these genes was made through the utilisation of many genetic mapping techniques, including next generation sequencing platforms. This review article clearly describes the gene hunting approaches, methods of data analysis and the technological platforms used, which has relevance to all those working within the field of gene discovery for Mendelian disorders. PMID:24070009

  1. Mod II engine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karl, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The Mod II engine, a four-cylinder, automotive Stirling engine utilizing the Siemens-Rinia double-acting concept, was assembled and became operational in January 1986. This paper describes the Mod II engine, its first assembly, and the subsequent development work done on engine components up to the point that engine performance characterization testing took place. Performance data for the engine are included.

  2. FACULTY LEGISLATION LIBRARY MATTERS (pages II-400 through II-499)

    E-print Network

    Scharer, John E.

    FACULTY LEGISLATION Page LIBRARY MATTERS (pages II-400 through II-499) General Library System Glossary II-400 Faculty Legislation #12;II-400 GLOSSARY General Library System GENERAL LIBRARY SYSTEM: A system of libraries on the Madison Campus, headed by the director of libraries and consisting

  3. Topoisomerase II and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, MaryJean; Lindsey, R. Hunter; Felix, Carolyn A.; Grimwade, David; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes that modulate DNA under- and overwinding, knotting, and tangling. Beyond their critical physiological functions, these enzymes are the targets for some of the most widely prescribed anticancer drugs (topoisomerase II poisons) in clinical use. Topoisomerase II poisons kill cells by increasing levels of covalent enzyme-cleaved DNA complexes that are normal reaction intermediates. Drugs such as etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone are frontline therapies for a variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, their use is also associated with the development of specific leukemias. Regimens that include etoposide or doxorubicin are linked to the occurrence of acute myeloid leukemias that feature rearrangements at chromosomal band 11q23. Similar rearrangements are seen in infant leukemias and are associated with gestational diets that are high in naturally occurring topoisomerase II–active compounds. Finally, regimens that include mitoxantrone and epirubicin are linked to acute promyelocytic leukemias that feature t(15;17) rearrangements. The first part of this article will focus on type II topoisomerases and describe the mechanism of enzyme and drug action. The second part will discuss how topoisomerase II poisons trigger chromosomal breaks that lead to leukemia and potential approaches for dissociating the actions of drugs from their leukemogenic potential. PMID:24495080

  4. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system. PMID:26611578

  5. Long-Range Gene Control and Genetic Disease

    E-print Network

    Bejerano, Gill

    , GLI3, and FOXP2 V. The "Bystander" Effect A. Aniridia and PAX6 VI. MAF, SDC2, TGFB2, REEP3, and PLP1-Range Gene Regulation II. Position Effect Revisited A. Thalassemias and the - and #12;-globin loci III. Loss VII. Two Position Effects--Different Outcomes A. Sonic hedgehog, holoprosencephaly, and preaxial

  6. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of specific tfb genes and the regulation of nitrogen metabolism and other global cellular responses.

  7. TRANSCRIPTION. Recruitment of RNA polymerase II by the pioneer transcription factor PHA-4.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H-T; Chen, H-M; Yang, Z; Wang, J; Lee, N K; Burger, A; Zaret, K; Liu, T; Levine, E; Mango, S E

    2015-06-19

    Pioneer transcription factors initiate cell-fate changes by binding to silent target genes. They are among the first factors to bind key regulatory sites and facilitate chromatin opening. Here, we identify an additional role for pioneer factors. In early Caenorhabditis elegans foregut development, the pioneer factor PHA-4/FoxA binds promoters and recruits RNA polymerase II (Pol II), often in a poised configuration in which Pol II accumulates near transcription start sites. At a later developmental stage, PHA-4 promotes chromatin opening. We found many more genes with poised RNA polymerase than had been observed previously in unstaged embryos, revealing that early embryos accumulate poised Pol II and that poising is dynamic. Our results suggest that Pol II recruitment, in addition to chromatin opening, is an important feature of PHA-4 pioneer factor activity. PMID:26089518

  8. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division. PMID:26527278

  9. Tumour suppression associated with expression of human insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, P. N.; Lee, A.; Hill, D. J.; Cheetham, J. E.; James, D.; Stewart, C.

    1991-01-01

    Recent circumstantial evidence has implicated Insulin-like growth factor II in the genesis of several tumour types, notably developmental tumours (Scott et al., 1985; Schofield & Tate, 1987; Wilkins et al., 1989). This type of tumour, thought to originate during the defective differentiation of organ precursors (Miereau et al., 1987), often expresses greatly elevated levels of mRNA for IGF-II, a known mitogen for these cells and abundantly expressed in their presumed normal counterparts (Scott et al., 1985; Schofield & Tate, 1987; Gray et al., 1987). It has been proposed that continued, inappropriate expression of this gene drives tumour growth by an autocrine mechanism. In order to examine the potential role of IGF-II in the growth of tumour cells an IGF-II cDNA was introduced into a retroviral expression vector, and used to infect a cloned fibroblast cell line. Expression of IGF-II conferred a degree of serum independence of growth in cell culture, however, when cells were injected into nude mice as subcutaneous grafts, clones expressing IGF-II from the retrovirus were found to have a greatly increased (five fold) latency of sarcoma formation. After a prolonged lag all cell lines eventually gave rise to tumours in which the introduced IGF-II genes had either been lost or inactivated, suggesting that in this system IGF-II acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2039693

  10. Tumour suppression associated with expression of human insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed

    Schofield, P N; Lee, A; Hill, D J; Cheetham, J E; James, D; Stewart, C

    1991-05-01

    Recent circumstantial evidence has implicated Insulin-like growth factor II in the genesis of several tumour types, notably developmental tumours (Scott et al., 1985; Schofield & Tate, 1987; Wilkins et al., 1989). This type of tumour, thought to originate during the defective differentiation of organ precursors (Miereau et al., 1987), often expresses greatly elevated levels of mRNA for IGF-II, a known mitogen for these cells and abundantly expressed in their presumed normal counterparts (Scott et al., 1985; Schofield & Tate, 1987; Gray et al., 1987). It has been proposed that continued, inappropriate expression of this gene drives tumour growth by an autocrine mechanism. In order to examine the potential role of IGF-II in the growth of tumour cells an IGF-II cDNA was introduced into a retroviral expression vector, and used to infect a cloned fibroblast cell line. Expression of IGF-II conferred a degree of serum independence of growth in cell culture, however, when cells were injected into nude mice as subcutaneous grafts, clones expressing IGF-II from the retrovirus were found to have a greatly increased (five fold) latency of sarcoma formation. After a prolonged lag all cell lines eventually gave rise to tumours in which the introduced IGF-II genes had either been lost or inactivated, suggesting that in this system IGF-II acts as a tumour suppressor gene. PMID:2039693

  11. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Fuganti-Pagliarini, Renata; Bendix, Claire; Nakayama, Thiago Jonas; Celaya, Brandon; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Harmon, Frank G; Nepomuceno, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i) drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii) several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans. PMID:24475115

  12. Extreme expansion of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in African elephants and evolutionary dynamics of orthologous gene groups in 13 placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Niimura, Yoshihito; Matsui, Atsushi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-09-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) detect odors in the environment, and OR genes constitute the largest multigene family in mammals. Numbers of OR genes vary greatly among species--reflecting the respective species' lifestyles--and this variation is caused by frequent gene gains and losses during evolution. However, whether the extent of gene gains/losses varies among individual gene lineages and what might generate such variation is unknown. To answer these questions, we used a newly developed phylogeny-based method to classify >10,000 intact OR genes from 13 placental mammal species into 781 orthologous gene groups (OGGs); we then compared the OGGs. Interestingly, African elephants had a surprisingly large repertoire (? 2000) of functional OR genes encoded in enlarged gene clusters. Additionally, OR gene lineages that experienced more gene duplication had weaker purifying selection, and Class II OR genes have evolved more dynamically than those in Class I. Some OGGs were highly expanded in a lineage-specific manner, while only three OGGs showed complete one-to-one orthology among the 13 species without any gene gains/losses. These three OGGs also exhibited highly conserved amino acid sequences; therefore, ORs in these OGGs may have physiologically important functions common to every placental mammal. This study provides a basis for inferring OR functions from evolutionary trajectory. PMID:25053675

  13. Cloning and use of a coral 36B4 gene to study the differential expression of coral genes between light and dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Moya, Aurélie; Tambutté, Sylvie; Béranger, Guillaume; Gaume, Béatrice; Scimeca, Jean-Claude; Allemand, Denis; Zoccola, Didier

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to validate reference genes for gene expression studies between light and dark conditions in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata for future gene expression studies of the "light-enhanced calcification" phenomenon. For this purpose, we cloned, sequenced, and characterized a candidate reference gene, the 36B4 gene from the coral S. pistillata, and validated 36B4 and beta-actin as reference genes. To illustrate the future applications of these reference genes, we tested the dark and light expression of two photosynthetic genes (Rubisco and D1 protein of the photosystem II) and two genes encoding proteins involved in calcium transport for coral calcification (a calcium ATPase and a calcium channel). Results show that both photosynthetic genes are enhanced during the light when standardized against 36B4 and beta-actin, whereas the two genes encoding proteins involved in calcium transport are not differentially expressed between light and dark conditions. The characterization of a coral 36B4 and the establishment of such valid reference genes will be useful for future gene expression studies between diverse conditions (aposymbiotic/symbiotic, stress/control, light/dark conditions) in scleractinian corals. PMID:18425549

  14. Extreme expansion of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in African elephants and evolutionary dynamics of orthologous gene groups in 13 placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Atsushi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) detect odors in the environment, and OR genes constitute the largest multigene family in mammals. Numbers of OR genes vary greatly among species—reflecting the respective species' lifestyles—and this variation is caused by frequent gene gains and losses during evolution. However, whether the extent of gene gains/losses varies among individual gene lineages and what might generate such variation is unknown. To answer these questions, we used a newly developed phylogeny-based method to classify >10,000 intact OR genes from 13 placental mammal species into 781 orthologous gene groups (OGGs); we then compared the OGGs. Interestingly, African elephants had a surprisingly large repertoire (?2000) of functional OR genes encoded in enlarged gene clusters. Additionally, OR gene lineages that experienced more gene duplication had weaker purifying selection, and Class II OR genes have evolved more dynamically than those in Class I. Some OGGs were highly expanded in a lineage-specific manner, while only three OGGs showed complete one-to-one orthology among the 13 species without any gene gains/losses. These three OGGs also exhibited highly conserved amino acid sequences; therefore, ORs in these OGGs may have physiologically important functions common to every placental mammal. This study provides a basis for inferring OR functions from evolutionary trajectory. PMID:25053675

  15. Giant [C II] Halos Around H II Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Ray W.; Melnick, Gary; Smyers, Scott D.; Kurtz, Noel T.; Gosnell, Timothy R.; Harwit, Martin; Werner, Michael W.

    1981-01-01

    We have mapped the submillimeter (157 mu.m) [C II] emission from the M17 complex. The [C II] emission extends over at least 1/4 deg in the sky. The regions emitting the C II radio recombination lines contribute only in a minor way to the total 157 mu.m [C II] flux. The total [C II] luminosity of M17 exceeds 2 x 10(exp 3) solar luminosity.

  16. Gene identification and analysis: an application of neural network-based information fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, S.; Xu, Y.; Shah, M.B.; Mural, R.J.; Einstein, J.R.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1996-10-01

    Identifying genes within large regions of uncharacterized DNA is a difficult undertaking and is currently the focus of many research efforts. We describe a gene localization and modeling system called GRAIL. GRAIL is a multiple sensor-neural network based system. It localizes genes in anonymous DNA sequence by recognizing gene features related to protein-coding slice sites, and then combines the recognized features using a neural network system. Localized coding regions are then optimally parsed into a gene mode. RNA polymerase II promoters can also be predicted. Through years of extensive testing, GRAIL consistently localizes about 90 percent of coding portions of test genes with a false positive rate of about 10 percent. A number of genes for major genetic diseases have been located through the use of GRAIL, and over 1000 research laboratories worldwide use GRAIL on regular bases for localization of genes on their newly sequenced DNA.

  17. [Investigation of Antibiotic Resistance Genes (ARGs) in Landfill].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Xu, Jing; Zhao, You-cai; Song, Li-yan

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs), an emerging contaminant, have been detected worldwide in various environments such as sediments and river. However, little is known about ARGs distribution in landfill. In this study, we investigated five ARGs [sulfonamides resistant genes (sulI and sulII), chloramphenicols resistant gene (cat), ?-lactams resistant gene (bla-SHV), and tetracyclines resistant gene (tetW)] in refuse samples collected from jiangeungou landfill (Xi'an, China) by real-time PCR. We then correlated the ARGs and physiochemical properties of refuse to examine the link between them. Results showed that all tested ARGs have been detected in all samples, suggesting that landfill served as ARGs reservoir. The highest copies numbers of sulII, sulI, tetW, bla-SHV, and cat were (3.70 ± 0.06) x 10(8) copies · g(-1) ( dry refuse), (9.33 · 0.06) x 10(6) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), (2.27 0.08) x 10(5) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), (3.68 ± 0.09) x 10(4) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), and (1.39 ± 0.10) x 10(4) copies · g(-1) (dry refuse), respectively. Further, sulI, sulII, and cat positively correlated to moisture and sulI and cat negatively correlated to pH. PMID:26314129

  18. SS CC II EE NN TT II FF II CC HH II GG HH LL II GG HH TT SS Soft condensed matter

    E-print Network

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    59 SS CC II EE NN TT II FF II CC HH II GG HH LL II GG HH TT SS Soft condensed matter AA LL II GG HH TT FF OO RR SS CC II EE NN CC EE Principal publication and authors Q.Y. Kong (a), J.H. Lee (b), K) at different concentrations. #12;60 HH II GG HH LL II GG HH TT SS 22 00 11 00 EE SS RR FF The UV-vis spectrum

  19. Selection of reference genes for studies of porcine endometrial gene expression on gestational day 12.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouqi; Li, Jiaqi; Zhang, Ailing; Liu, Manqing; Zhang, Hao

    2011-05-01

    Comparing gene expression patterns in the endometrium on gestational day 12 (GD12) between Erhualian (ER) and Landrace×Large White (LL) pigs is helpful to understand the biological mechanisms of fecundity. Selecting genes that have stable expression levels as the internal standards in a comparative study is essential for identifying real gene-specific variation by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Five genes expressed in sow endometria on GD12 were evaluated for their suitability as internal control for relative quantification by qRT-PCR. These genes were beta-actin (ACTB), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), RNA polymerase II polypeptide G (RPG), and ribosomal protein S20 (RPS20), which represent different functional classes. Our results indicated that ACTB, B2M, and PGK1 were not suitable as internal standards for normalization because of their huge variability between the two breeds. RPS20 and RPG were most stable, and the former is recommended to serve as the internal standard when the use of multiple housekeeping genes is unpractical. PMID:21501585

  20. Somatic gene therapy. Present situation and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, U; Chan, S

    1998-11-01

    The ultimate goal in the management of inherited as well as acquired diseases is a rational therapy with the aim to eliminate the underlying biochemical defects, rather than a symptomatic treatment. Among other approaches somatic gene therapy is a promising candidate to meet these objectives and appears to have the potential to revolutionize modern medicine. Gene therapy is characterized by the transfer of genetic information to a patient through the use of recombinant DNA technology. Several strategies for the treatment of monogenetic disorders as well as chronical diseases like cancer and AIDS have been used in various somatic gene therapy projects. So far, 329 clinical studies (phases I, I/II and II) with over 2500 patients have been initiated worldwide since 1989. No significant toxicity and adverse side effects have been observed. To allow efficient transfer of the therapeutic genes, a variety of gene delivery techniques have been developed based on viral and non-viral vector systems. For the success of this technology it is vital to achieve regulated and sustained expression of foreign genes in specific target tissues. This will be crucial for the widespread application of somatic gene therapy. So far none for the gene delivery systems is able to meet the requirements of safety, efficiency and specificity demonstrating that vector research will be an important focus in the development of optimized transfer methods. From a regulatory point of view pharmaceutical DNA-products can be regarded as drugs and are therefore subject to the same regulations. Human gene therapy must, however, be limited to manipulations affecting somatic, differentiated cells to prevent the transferred gene from being transmitted to the individual's descendants. Applications for the purpose of 'enhancement' and not for the treatment of diseases are also not acceptable. Under these prerequisites, somatic gene therapy does not raise any new ethical concerns and can be interpreted as a special form of an organ transplantation. A comparison of the different regulatory situations of gene therapy in Europe and the United States demonstrates that for the European countries a uniform regulation is desired. Today somatic gene therapy is still in its infancy. It will continue to be scientifically and technically challenging until simple and effective procedures will have been developed. Demonstration of its clinical efficacy especially in the long term will have to be the next step. Looking at the history of biotechnology and the success of the biotechnology industry that is now providing safe and efficient products from recombinant DNA-technology there is little doubt that gene therapy will become a successful treatment for various indications in the next decade. The purpose of this article is to review the current status of the development in somatic gene therapy. PMID:9850435

  1. Do Housekeeping Genes Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    The searching of human housekeeping (HK) genes has been a long quest since the emergence of transcriptomics, and is instrumental for us to understand the structure of genome and the fundamentals of biological processes. The resolved genes are frequently used in evolution studies and as normalization standards in quantitative gene-expression analysis. Within the past 20 years, more than a dozen HK-gene studies have been conducted, yet none of them sampled human tissues completely. We believe an integration of these results will help remove false positive genes owing to the inadequate sampling. Surprisingly, we only find one common gene across 15 examined HK-gene datasets comprising 187 different tissue and cell types. Our subsequent analyses suggest that it might not be appropriate to rigidly define HK genes as expressed in all tissue types that have diverse developmental, physiological, and pathological states. It might be beneficial to use more robustly identified HK functions for filtering criteria, in which the representing genes can be a subset of genome. These genes are not necessarily the same, and perhaps need not to be the same, everywhere in our body. PMID:25970694

  2. Classification of colon cancer based on the expression of randomly selected genes.

    PubMed

    Tan, X H; Cheng, R; Hu, H P; Bai, Y P

    2015-01-01

    In order to ascertain the relationship between gene expression and colon cancer localization, a classification method based on random gene selection and a self-organizing map network is proposed. Different numbers of genes were selected randomly from 54,675 genes of 53 colon cancer patients in stage union for international cancer control II. These patients were then divided into two sets: a training set of 36 and a validation set of 17 patients. In this study, we randomly selected 1000, 100, 50, 30, 10, 5, and 3 genes, 1000 times, respectively. The minimum misclassification ratio of each gene group was 3/17 to 4/17, and the percentage of gene groups that were less than 0.25 was approximately 1-7%. Moreover, the misclassification ratio of most gene groups (about 82-89%) was lower than 0.4. Through the analysis of these low misclassification ratio gene groups, we found that there were few common genes between them. This revealed that colon cancer localization is not associated with a single gene group but with many gene groups. Furthermore, K-fold cross validation was used to test the reliability of the possible informative genes, and the results indicated that using gene expression to classify colon tumor localization was not feasible. PMID:26505413

  3. I Ii I '.. i I

    E-print Network

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    the ,', . ;,Qif~1itftrtll(2Cili(i6tOQII~ ' .:;tgt4ii«illi~ o~pages ,13&1~~' ;~; ·,··;'9£WI~if)id in this bulletin. June 19-AugusI18: Full Term · June 19·July 19:aTerm · July 2D-August18:bTerm APRIL 26 APRIL 24I iii CCDurses I Ii I '.. ·i I :: I II i Ii slUnmer?.' I . , . ill. --.. [I: - 'Ii

  4. Characterization of the interferon genes in homozygous rainbow trout reveals two novel genes, alternate splicing and differential regulation of duplicated genes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, M.K.; Laing, K.J.; Woodson, J.C.; Thorgaard, G.H.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    The genes encoding the type I and type II interferons (IFNs) have previously been identified in rainbow trout and their proteins partially characterized. These previous studies reported a single type II IFN (rtIFN-??) and three rainbow trout type I IFN genes that are classified into either group I (rtIFN1, rtIFN2) or group II (rtIFN3). In this present study, we report the identification of a novel IFN-?? gene (rtIFN-??2) and a novel type I group II IFN (rtIFN4) in homozygous rainbow trout and predict that additional IFN genes or pseudogenes exist in the rainbow trout genome. Additionally, we provide evidence that short and long forms of rtIFN1 are actively and differentially transcribed in homozygous trout, and likely arose due to alternate splicing of the first exon. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to systematically profile all of the rainbow trout IFN transcripts, with high specificity at an individual gene level, in na??ve fish and after stimulation with virus or viral-related molecules. Cloned PCR products were used to ensure the specificity of the qRT-PCR assays and as absolute standards to assess transcript abundance of each gene. All IFN genes were modulated in response to Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a DNA vaccine based on the IHNV glycoprotein, and poly I:C. The most inducible of the type I IFN genes, by all stimuli tested, were rtIFN3 and the short transcript form of rtIFN1. Gene expression of rtIFN-??1 and rtIFN-??2 was highly up-regulated by IHNV infection and DNA vaccination but rtIFN-??2 was induced to a greater magnitude. The specificity of the qRT-PCR assays reported here will be useful for future studies aimed at identifying which cells produce IFNs at early time points after infection. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Functional genomics identifies neural stem cell sub-type expression profiles and genes regulating neuroblast homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Travis D.; Miller, Michael R.; Robinson, Kristin J.; Bayraktar, Omer A.; Osterhout, Jessica A.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila larval central brain contains about 10,000 differentiated neurons and 200 scattered neural progenitors (neuroblasts), which can be further subdivided into ~95 type I neuroblasts and eight type II neuroblasts per brain lobe. Only type II neuroblasts generate self-renewing intermediate neural progenitors (INPs), and consequently each contributes more neurons to the brain, including much of the central complex. We characterized six different mutant genotypes that lead to expansion of neuroblast numbers; some preferentially expand type II or type I neuroblasts. Transcriptional profiling of larval brains from these mutant genotypes versus wild-type allowed us to identify small clusters of transcripts enriched in type II or type I neuroblasts, and we validated these clusters by gene expression analysis. Unexpectedly, only a few genes were found to be differentially expressed between type I/II neuroblasts, suggesting that these genes play a large role in establishing the different cell types. We also identified a large group of genes predicted to be expressed in all neuroblasts but not neurons. We performed a neuroblast-specific, RNAi-based functional screen and identified 84 genes that are required to maintain proper neuroblast numbers; all have conserved mammalian orthologs. These genes are excellent candidates for regulating neural progenitor self-renewal in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:22061480

  6. The gap gene network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gap genes are involved in segment determination during the early development of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as well as in other insects. This review attempts to synthesize the current knowledge of the gap gene network through a comprehensive survey of the experimental literature. I focus on genetic and molecular evidence, which provides us with an almost-complete picture of the regulatory interactions responsible for trunk gap gene expression. I discuss the regulatory mechanisms involved, and highlight the remaining ambiguities and gaps in the evidence. This is followed by a brief discussion of molecular regulatory mechanisms for transcriptional regulation, as well as precision and size-regulation provided by the system. Finally, I discuss evidence on the evolution of gap gene expression from species other than Drosophila. My survey concludes that studies of the gap gene system continue to reveal interesting and important new insights into the role of gene regulatory networks in development and evolution. PMID:20927566

  7. Gene expression data analysis.

    PubMed

    Brazma, A; Vilo, J

    2001-08-01

    Microarrays are one of the latest breakthroughs in experimental molecular biology, which allow monitoring of gene expression for tens of thousands of genes in parallel and are already producing huge amounts of valuable data. Analysis and handling of such data is becoming one of the major bottlenecks in the utilization of the technology. The raw microarray data are images, which have to be transformed into gene expression matrices, tables where rows represent genes, columns represent various samples such as tissues or experimental conditions, and numbers in each cell characterize the expression level of the particular gene in the particular sample. These matrices have to be analyzed further if any knowledge about the underlying biological processes is to be extracted. In this paper we concentrate on discussing bioinformatics methods used for such analysis. We briefly discuss supervised and unsupervised data analysis and its applications, such as predicting gene function classes and cancer classification as well as some possible future directions. PMID:11580977

  8. Polymorphism of apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) among inbred strains of mice. Relationship between the molecular type of apoA-II and mouse senile amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, K; Kitagawa, K; Naiki, H; Hanada, K; Hosokawa, M; Takeda, T

    1991-01-01

    Three types of apolipoprotein A-II (apoA-II) proteins (A, B and C) were predicted from the nucleotide sequence of apoA-II cDNA. Substitution of amino acid residues was noted at four positions (type A: Pro-5, Asp-20, Met-26, Ala-38; B: Pro-5, Glu-20, Val-26, Val-38; C: Gln-5, Glu-20, Val-26, Ala-38). Each type was identifiable by digestion of amplified apoA-II DNA by PCR, using restriction-fragment-length polymorphism of the apoA-II gene for restriction enzymes Cfr13I and MspI. The molecular type of apoA-II was determined among 23 strains of mice including nine of the senescence accelerated mouse series developed in our laboratory. Examination of types of apoA-II and amyloid deposition in the F2 and F3 hybrid mice showed that apoA-II amyloid deposition was present only in the mice homozygous for type C apoA-II and which were 12-17 months of age. The molecular type of apoA-II may be a factor involved in the development of senile amyloidosis in mice. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1683229

  9. Metabolic engineering of Pichia pastoris for the production of dammarenediol-II.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Bin; Liu, Min; Tao, Xin-Yi; Zhang, Zhong-Xi; Wang, Feng-Qing; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2015-12-20

    Dammarenediol-II is the nucleus of dammarane-type ginsenosides, which are a group of active triterpenoids exhibiting various pharmacological activities. Based on the native triterpene synthetic pathway, a dammarenediol-II synthetic pathway was established in Pichia pastoris by introducing a dammarenediol-II synthase gene (PgDDS) from Panax ginseng, which is responsible for the cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene to dammarenediol-II in this study. To enhance productivity, a strategy of "increasing supply and reducing competitive consumption of 2,3-oxidosqualene" was used. To increase the supply of 2,3-oxidosqualene, we augmented expression of the ERG1 gene, which is responsible for 2,3-oxidosqualene synthesis. This significantly improved the yield of dammarenediol-II over 6.7-fold, from 0.030mg/g dry cell weight (DCW) to 0.203mg/g DCW. Subsequently, to reduce competition for 2,3-oxidosqualene from ergosterol biosynthesis without affecting the normal growth of P. pastoris, we targeted the ERG7gene, which is responsible for conversion of 2,3-oxidosqualene to lanosterol. This gene was downregulated by replacing its native promoter with a thiamine-repressible promoter, using a marker-recycling and gene-targeting Cre- lox71/66 system developed for P. pastoris herein. The yield of dammarenediol-II was further increased more than 3.6-fold, to 0.736mg/g DCW. Furthermore, the direct addition of 0.5g/L squalene into the culture medium further enhanced the yield of dammarenediol-II to 1.073mg/g DCW, which was 37.5-fold higher than the yield from the strain with the PgDDS gene introduction only. The P. pastoris strains engineered in this study constitute a good platform for further production of ginsenosides in Pichia species. PMID:26467715

  10. Identification of blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58, blaDIM-1 and blaVIM carbapenemase genes in hospital enterobacteriaceae isolates from Sierra Leone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe the results of a molecular epidemiological survey of 15 carbapenemase-encoding genes from a recent collection of clinical isolates. The most salient findings revealed that (i) 60% of the isolates harbored multiple carbapenemase genes, (ii) the blaDIM-1 gene that has only been reported in...

  11. Mammalian suppressor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, P.A.; Capecchi, M.R.; Raj Bhandary, U.L.; Laski, F.A.

    1987-08-18

    A method is described of suppressing a nonsense codon in a gene for production of a protein of interest in mammalian cells, the method comprising: (a) preparing an oligonucleotide primer comprising a region complementary to the nonsense codon; (b) preparing a DNA template for production of a tRNA molecule; (c) forming a suppressor gene from the template and primer by site specific mutagenesis; and (d) transforming the suppressor gene into a mammalian cell, whereby the nonsense codon will be suppressed.

  12. Green genes gleaned.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2005-07-01

    A recent paper by Ayumi Tanaka and colleagues identifying an Arabidopsis thaliana gene for 3,8-divinyl(proto)chlorophyllide 8-vinyl reductase brings a satisfying conclusion to the hunt for genes encoding enzymes for the steps in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. Now, at least in angiosperm plants represented by Arabidopsis, genes for all 15 steps in the pathway from glutamyl-tRNA to chlorophylls a and b have been identified. PMID:15951223

  13. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  14. About APPLE II Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180° requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  15. Cotranscriptional histone H2B monoubiquitylation is tightly coupled with RNA polymerase II elongation rate

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Gilad; Hollander, Dror; Voichek, Yoav; Ast, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Various histone modifications decorate nucleosomes within transcribed genes. Among these, monoubiquitylation of histone H2B (H2Bub1) and methylation of histone H3 on lysines 36 (H3K36me2/3) and 79 (H3K79me2/3) correlate positively with gene expression. By measuring the progression of the transcriptional machinery along genes within live cells, we now report that H2B monoubiquitylation occurs cotranscriptionally and accurately reflects the advance of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In contrast, H3K36me3 and H3K79me2 are less dynamic and represent Pol II movement less faithfully. High-resolution ChIP-seq reveals that H2Bub1 levels are selectively reduced at exons and decrease in an exon-dependent stepwise manner toward the 3? end of genes. Exonic depletion of H2Bub1 in gene bodies is highly correlated with Pol II pausing at exons, suggesting elongation rate changes associated with intron–exon structure. In support of this notion, H2Bub1 levels were found to be significantly correlated with transcription elongation rates measured in various cell lines. Overall, our data shed light on the organization of H2Bub1 within transcribed genes and single out H2Bub1 as a reliable marker for ongoing transcription elongation. PMID:25049226

  16. Drosophila MCRS2 associates with RNA polymerase II complexes to regulate transcription.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ditte Skovaa; Raja, Sunil Jayaramaiah; Colombani, Julien; Shaw, Rachael Louise; Langton, Paul Francis; Akhtar, Asifa; Tapon, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    Drosophila MCRS2 (dMCRS2; MCRS2/MSP58 and its splice variant MCRS1/p78 in humans) belongs to a family of forkhead-associated (FHA) domain proteins. Whereas human MCRS2 proteins have been associated with a variety of cellular processes, including RNA polymerase I transcription and cell cycle progression, dMCRS2 has been largely uncharacterized. Recent data show that MCRS2 is purified as part of a complex containing the histone acetyltransferase MOF (males absent on first) in both humans and flies. MOF mediates H4K16 acetylation and regulates the expression of a large number of genes, suggesting that MCRS2 could also have a function in transcription regulation. Here, we show that dMCRS2 copurifies with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) complexes and localizes to the 5' ends of genes. Moreover, dMCRS2 is required for optimal recruitment of RNAP II to the promoter regions of cyclin genes. In agreement with this, dMCRS2 is required for normal levels of cyclin gene expression. We propose a model whereby dMCRS2 promotes gene transcription by facilitating the recruitment of RNAP II preinitiation complexes (PICs) to the promoter regions of target genes. PMID:20679484

  17. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. PMID:23618815

  18. Molecular cloning and structural analysis of mouse gene and pseudogenes for proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; Hayashi, Y; Hirose, F; Matsuoka, S; Moriuchi, T; Shiroishi, T; Moriwaki, K; Matsukage, A

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated clones containing the entire mouse proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene of 3890 bp and flanking sequences using a rat PCNA cDNA as a probe. The mouse gene has 6 exons whose sequences and junction points of exons with introns are extensively homologous to the human gene while sizes and nucleotide sequences of introns are much less conserved than exons. By a transient expression assay of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, the promoter of this gene is localized within 200 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site. We have also isolated two processed pseudogenes. Homology between the first one (psi PCNA-I) and the exons of the PCNA gene was 76.8% in the region so far sequenced. The second one (psi PCNA-II) consists of a region highly homologous to the entire exons of the PCNA gene, and only 9 out of total 1256 bp are different from the corresponding exon sequence of the gene. The 5'-flanking region of the psi PCNA-II did not function as an active promoter. Surveys in various wild and laboratory mice genomes suggest that the psi PCNA-II was generated through the reverse transcription process of the PCNA mRNA about 5 x 10(5) years ago in the domesticus subspecies of Mus musculus, the house mouse. The psi PCNA-II is tentatively mapped in the chromosome 17 of the C57BL mouse. Images PMID:1674997

  19. Effect of peroxiredoxin II on the quality and mitochondrial activity of pre-implantation bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Fakruzzaman, Md; Ghanem, Nasser; Bang, Jae-Il; Ha, A-Na; Lee, Kyeong-Lim; Sohn, Sea-Hwan; Wang, Zhongde; Lee, Dong-Seok; Kong, Il-Keun

    2015-08-01

    Endogenous peroxiredoxin II (PRDX II) protein plays a vital role in early embryonic development. This study assessed the beneficial effects of exogenous PRDX II on bovine embryo development at the cellular and molecular levels. To this end, in vitro maturation (IVM) medium was supplemented with various concentrations of PRDX II (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100?g/mL). Of these, 12.5?g/mL PRDX II was the most effective and significantly promoted embryonic development. Therefore, this concentration of PRDX II was used in subsequent experiments. The percentage of embryos that developed into Day 8 blastocysts and the total number of cells per blastocyst (38.2% and 150.6±5.1) was higher in the PRDX II-treated group than in the control (26.4% and 128.9±3.9, respectively). Moreover, the percent of TUNEL positive cells was higher (P<0.05) in the control than in the PRDX II-treated. Furthermore, PRDX II added to the IVM media increased mitochondria content in blastocysts and decreased the intracellular ROS levels in oocytes and blastocysts compared with the control (P<0.05). The expression of genes associated with blastocyst quality (CDX2 and IFN?), antioxidant activity (SOD2), and mitochondrial activity (TFAM) was higher, whereas the expression of a gene involved in the apoptotic pathway (c-FOS) was lower, in the PRDX II-treated than in the control group. In conclusion, supplementation of IVM medium with PRDX II promotes development to the blastocyst stage and improves blastocyst quality through reducing ROS, enhancing embryonic mitochondrial activity, and modulating development- related target genes expression. PMID:26130600

  20. RNA Polymerase III Accurately Initiates Transcription from RNA Polymerase II Promoters in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Duttke, Sascha H. C.

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, there are three major RNA polymerases (Pol) in the nucleus, which are commonly described as transcribing non-overlapping subsets of genes. Structural studies have highlighted a conserved core shared among all three transcription systems. Initiation of human Pol III from TATA box-containing Pol II promoters under conditions with impaired Pol II transcription activity have been described previously. RNA polymerase III and Pol II were found to co-localize at the promoters of the c-myc gene and the RPPH1 sRNA in vivo. Here, I report that Pol III can, like Pol II, initiate transcription from most tested Pol II core promoters when assayed with crude human nuclear extracts (HSK, SNF, or Dignam). Both polymerases often initiate from the same transcription start site, and depend on a TATA box or AT-rich region but not the downstream promoter element (DPE) or the motif ten element (MTE). Moderate (?2-fold) changes in the ratio of DNA template to nuclear extract were sufficient to change Pol II-mediated transcription to a mixture of Pol II- and Pol III-, or to a solely Pol III-dependent initiation of transcription from Pol II promoters. Polymerase specificity is thus not fixed but a variable that depends on the properties of the promoter and the transcription conditions. These findings provide functional evidence for a close similarity between the Pol II and Pol III transcription complexes, and additionally explain previous controversies in the literature. PMID:24917680