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Sample records for ii randomized controlled

  1. Effects of Native Type II Collagen Treatment on Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bakilan, Fulya; Armagan, Onur; Ozgen, Merih; Tascioglu, Funda; Bolluk, Ozge; Alatas, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral native type II collagen treatment on the symptoms and biological markers of cartilage degradation, when given concomitantly with acetaminophen in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were included and randomly distributed into two groups: one treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen (group AC; n=19) and the other treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen plus 10 mg/day of native type II collagen (group AC+CII; n=20) for 3 months. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at rest and during walking, Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores, were recorded. Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO2 and Fibulin-3 levels were quantified in urine as biomarkers of disease progression. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02237989. Results: After 3 months of treatment, significant improvements compared to baseline were reported in joint pain (VAS walking), function (WOMAC) and quality of life (SF-36) in the AC+CII group, while only improvements in some subscales of the SF-36 survey and VAS walking were detected in the AC group. Comparisons between the groups revealed a significant difference in VAS walking score in favour of the AC+CII group as compared to AC group. Biochemical markers of cartilage degradation in urine did not significantly improve in any of the groups. Conclusion: All in all, these results suggest that native type II collagen treatment combined with acetaminophen is superior to only acetaminophen for symptomatic treatment of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27551171

  2. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Tao; Li, Peng-Yang; Zhang, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Lei; Yi, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) are widely used drugs that are proven to reduce cardiovascular disease events; however, several recent meta-analyses yielded conflicting conclusions regarding the relationship between ARB and cancer incidence, especially when ARB are combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI).We investigated the risk of cancer associated with ARB at different background ACEI levels.Search of PubMed and EMBASE (1966 to December 17, 2015) without language restriction.Randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) had at least 12 months of follow-up data and reported cancer incidence was included.Study characteristics, quality, and risk of bias were assessed by 2 reviewers independently.Nineteen RCTs including 148,334 patients were included in this study. Random-effects model meta-analyses were used to estimate the risk ratio (RR) of cancer risk. No excessive cancer risk was observed in our analyses of ARB alone versus placebo alone without background ACEI use (risk ratio [RR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.18, P = 0.05); ARB alone versus ACEI alone (RR 1.03, 95%CI 0.94-1.14, P = 0.50); ARB plus partial use of ACEI versus placebo plus partial use of ACEI (RR 0.97, 95%CI 0.90-1.04, P = 0.33); and ARB plus ACEI versus ACEI (RR 0.99, 95%CI 0.79-1.24, P = 0.95).Lack of long-term data, inadequate reporting of safety data, significant heterogeneity in underlying study populations, and treatment regimens.ARB have a neutral effect on cancer incidence in randomized trials. We observed no significant differences in cancer incidence when we compared ARB alone with placebo alone, ARB alone with ACEI alone, ARB plus partial use of ACEI with placebo plus partial use of ACEI, or ARB plus ACEI combination with ACEI. PMID:27149494

  3. Randomized Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Yolanda; Marín, Pedro; Moreno, Beatriz; Berenguer, Joan; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Martínez-Heras, Eloy; Sola-Valls, Nuria; Arnaiz, Joan-Albert; Andreu, Enrique J.; Fernández, Begoña; Bullich, Santi; Sánchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Graus, Francesc; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Objective Uncontrolled studies of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in multiple sclerosis suggested some beneficial effect. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover phase II study we investigated their safety and efficacy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Efficacy was evaluated in terms of cumulative number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions (GEL) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 6 months and at the end of the study. Methods Patients unresponsive to conventional therapy, defined by at least 1 relapse and/or GEL on MRI scan in past 12 months, disease duration 2 to 10 years and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 3.0–6.5 were randomized to receive IV 1–2×106 bone-marrow-derived-MSCs/Kg or placebo. After 6 months, the treatment was reversed and patients were followed-up for another 6 months. Secondary endpoints were clinical outcomes (relapses and disability by EDSS and MS Functional Composite), and several brain MRI and optical coherence tomography measures. Immunological tests were explored to assess the immunomodulatory effects. Results At baseline 9 patients were randomized to receive MSCs (n = 5) or placebo (n = 4). One patient on placebo withdrew after having 3 relapses in the first 5 months. We did not identify any serious adverse events. At 6 months, patients treated with MSCs had a trend to lower mean cumulative number of GEL (3.1, 95% CI = 1.1–8.8 vs 12.3, 95% CI = 4.4–34.5, p = 0.064), and at the end of study to reduced mean GEL (−2.8±5.9 vs 3±5.4, p = 0.075). No significant treatment differences were detected in the secondary endpoints. We observed a non-significant decrease of the frequency of Th1 (CD4+ IFN-γ+) cells in blood of MSCs treated patients. Conclusion Bone-marrow-MSCs are safe and may reduce inflammatory MRI parameters supporting their immunomodulatory properties. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01228266 PMID:25436769

  4. Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cancer in Men: The Physicians’ Health Study II Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gaziano, J. Michael; Sesso, Howard D.; Christen, William G.; Bubes, Vadim; Smith, Joanne P.; MacFadyen, Jean; Schvartz, Miriam; Manson, JoAnn E.; Glynn, Robert J.; Buring, Julie E.

    2012-01-01

    Context Multivitamin preparations are the most common dietary supplement, taken by at least one-third of all US adults. Limited observational studies have not provided evidence regarding associations of multivitamin use with total and site-specific cancer incidence or mortality. Objective To determine whether long-term multivitamin supplementation decreases the risk of total and site-specific cancer events among men. Design The Physicians’ Health Study II is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a common multivitamin that began in 1997 with treatment and follow-up through June 1, 2011. Setting and Participants A total of 14,641 male U.S. physicians initially aged ≥50 years (mean [± SD] age; 64.3 [± 9.2] years), including 1,312 men with a history of cancer at randomization, were enrolled. Intervention Daily multivitamin, as Centrum Silver. Main Outcome Measures A primary outcome was total cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer), with prostate, colorectal, and other site-specific cancers among secondary endpoints included in this report. Results During a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 11.2 (10.7 to 13.3) years, there were 2,669 men with confirmed cancer, including 1,373 cases of prostate cancer and 210 cases of colorectal cancer. Compared with placebo, men taking a daily multivitamin had a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of total cancer (active and placebo multivitamin groups, 17.0 and 18.3 events, respectively, per 1,000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86–0.998; P=0.044). There was no significant effect of a daily multivitamin on prostate cancer (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.88–1.09; P=0.76), colorectal cancer (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.68–1.17; P=0.39), or other site-specific cancers There was a lower risk of cancer mortality that did not reach statistical significance (HR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.77–1.01; P=0.07). Daily multivitamin use was associated with a reduction in total

  5. EEG, HRV and Psychological Correlates while Playing Bejeweled II: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Russoniello, Carmen V; O'Brien, Kevin; Parks, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    Stress related medical disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression, and anxiety are serious medical issues that can cause disability and death. Interventions to prevent their development and exacerbation are needed. Casual video games (CVGs) are fun, easy to play, spontaneous and tremendously popular. People report that they play these games because they decrease their stress and improve their mood. This study tested this theory by comparing people playing Bejeweled II a popular CVG with control subjects measured under similar conditions. Electroencephalographic (EEG) changes after playing Bejeweled II were consistent with increased mood and corroborated with similar findings on psychological reports. Moreover, heart rate variability (HRV) changes consistent with autonomic nervous system relaxation or decreased physical stress were also recorded. It is concluded, therefore, that playing a CVG like Bejeweled II can increase mood and decrease stress. These finding have broad implications and include the potential development of prescriptive interventions using Bejeweled II to prevent and treat stress related medical disorders. Finally, these findings demonstrate a method using EEG, HRV and psychological correlates to understand the psychophysiological or cybernetic interconnection between participant and video game. PMID:19592761

  6. Periodontal Tissue Regeneration Using Fibroblast Growth Factor -2: Randomized Controlled Phase II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Masahiro; Nakashima, Keisuke; Kowashi, Yusuke; Fujii, Takeo; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Sasano, Takashi; Furuuchi, Toshi; Fukuda, Mitsuo; Noguchi, Toshihide; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Iwayama, Yukio; Takashiba, Shogo; Kurihara, Hidemi; Ninomiya, Masami; Kido, Jun-ichi; Nagata, Toshihiko; Hamachi, Takafumi; Maeda, Katsumasa; Hara, Yoshitaka; Izumi, Yuichi; Hirofuji, Takao; Imai, Enyu; Omae, Masatoshi; Watanuki, Mitsuru; Murakami, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    Background The options for medical use of signaling molecules as stimulators of tissue regeneration are currently limited. Preclinical evidence suggests that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 can promote periodontal regeneration. This study aimed to clarify the activity of FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration of periodontal tissue lost by periodontitis and to evaluate the safety of such stimulation. Methodology/Principal Findings We used recombinant human FGF-2 with 3% hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) as vehicle and conducted a randomized double-blinded controlled trial involving 13 facilities. Subjects comprised 74 patients displaying a 2- or 3-walled vertical bone defect as measured ≥3 mm apical to the bone crest. Patients were randomly assigned to 4 groups: Group P, given HPC with no FGF-2; Group L, given HPC containing 0.03% FGF-2; Group M, given HPC containing 0.1% FGF-2; and Group H, given HPC containing 0.3% FGF-2. Each patient underwent flap operation during which we administered 200 µL of the appropriate investigational drug to the bone defect. Before and for 36 weeks following administration, patients underwent periodontal tissue inspections and standardized radiography of the region under investigation. As a result, a significant difference (p = 0.021) in rate of increase in alveolar bone height was identified between Group P (23.92%) and Group H (58.62%) at 36 weeks. The linear increase in alveolar bone height at 36 weeks in Group P and H was 0.95 mm and 1.85 mm, respectively (p = 0.132). No serious adverse events attributable to the investigational drug were identified. Conclusions Although no statistically significant differences were noted for gains in clinical attachment level and alveolar bone gain for FGF-2 groups versus Group P, the significant difference in rate of increase in alveolar bone height (p = 0.021) between Groups P and H at 36 weeks suggests that some efficacy could be expected from FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration of

  7. A randomized controlled clinical trial of vildagliptin plus metformin combination therapy in patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    SU, YONG; SU, YA-LI; LV, LI-FANG; WANG, LI-MIN; LI, QUAN-ZHONG; ZHAO, ZHI-GANG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin plus metformin combination therapy in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Type II diabetic patients with poor glycemic control following at least three months of metformin treatment were selected and randomized into two groups. Vildagliptin or placebo was administered with metformin. Body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood lipid and hepatorenal function levels were analyzed in the patients prior to and 24-weeks after the trial. FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels of the patients in the vildagliptin group significantly decreased following the trial, whereas no statistically significant differences were observed in the various indicators of the placebo group prior to and following the trial. The FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in the vildagliptin group were significantly lower compared with the placebo group 24-weeks after the trial. Comparisons of body weight, blood lipid and hepatorenal function between the groups prior to and following the trial exhibited no statistically significant differences. Therefore, vildagliptin plus metformin combination therapy effectively reduced FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in patients with no risk of weight gain or hepatorenal dysfunction. PMID:24669235

  8. Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with quetiapine in treating bipolar II depression: a randomized, double-blinded, control study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shao-hua; Lai, Jian-bo; Xu, Dong-rong; Qi, Hong-li; Peterson, Bradley S.; Bao, Ai-min; Hu, Chan-chan; Huang, Man-li; Chen, Jing-kai; Wei, Ning; Hu, Jian-bo; Li, Shu-lan; Zhou, Wei-hua; Xu, Wei-juan; Xu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and cognitive responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in bipolar II depressed patients remain unclear. In this study, thirty-eight bipolar II depressed patients were randomly assigned into three groups: (i) left high-frequency (n = 12), (ii) right low-frequency (n = 13), (iii) sham stimulation (n = 13), and underwent four-week rTMS with quetiapine concomitantly. Clinical efficacy was evaluated at baseline and weekly intervals using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive functioning was assessed before and after the study with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Word-Color Interference Test (Stroop), and Trail Making Test (TMT). Thirty-five patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the mean scores of both the HDRS-17 and the MADRS significantly decreased over the 4-week trial, which did not differ among the three groups. Exploratory analyses revealed no differences in factor scores of HDRS-17s, or in response or remission rates. Scores of WCST, Stroop, or TMT did not differ across the three groups. These findings indicated active rTMS combined with quetiapine was not superior to quetiapine monotherapy in improving depressive symptoms or cognitive performance in patients with bipolar II depression. PMID:27460201

  9. Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with quetiapine in treating bipolar II depression: a randomized, double-blinded, control study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shao-Hua; Lai, Jian-Bo; Xu, Dong-Rong; Qi, Hong-Li; Peterson, Bradley S; Bao, Ai-Min; Hu, Chan-Chan; Huang, Man-Li; Chen, Jing-Kai; Wei, Ning; Hu, Jian-Bo; Li, Shu-Lan; Zhou, Wei-Hua; Xu, Wei-Juan; Xu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and cognitive responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in bipolar II depressed patients remain unclear. In this study, thirty-eight bipolar II depressed patients were randomly assigned into three groups: (i) left high-frequency (n = 12), (ii) right low-frequency (n = 13), (iii) sham stimulation (n = 13), and underwent four-week rTMS with quetiapine concomitantly. Clinical efficacy was evaluated at baseline and weekly intervals using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive functioning was assessed before and after the study with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Word-Color Interference Test (Stroop), and Trail Making Test (TMT). Thirty-five patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the mean scores of both the HDRS-17 and the MADRS significantly decreased over the 4-week trial, which did not differ among the three groups. Exploratory analyses revealed no differences in factor scores of HDRS-17s, or in response or remission rates. Scores of WCST, Stroop, or TMT did not differ across the three groups. These findings indicated active rTMS combined with quetiapine was not superior to quetiapine monotherapy in improving depressive symptoms or cognitive performance in patients with bipolar II depression. PMID:27460201

  10. Strategies to retain participants in a long-term HIV prevention randomized controlled trial: lessons from the MINTS-II study.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Keith J; Nygaard, Kate; Danilenko, Gene P; Goknur, Sinan; Oakes, J Michael; Rosser, B R Simon

    2012-02-01

    Achieving satisfactory retention in online HIV prevention trials typically has proven difficult, particularly over extended timeframes. The overall aim of this study was to assess factors associated with retention in the Men's INTernet Study II (MINTS-II), a randomized controlled trial of a sexual risk reduction intervention for men who have sex with men. Participants were recruited via e-mails and banner advertisements in December, 2007 to participate in the MINTS-II Sexpulse intervention and followed over a 12-month period. Retention across the treatment and control arms was 85.2% at 12 months. Factors associated with higher retention included: randomization to the control arm, previous participation in a study by the research team, e-mail and telephone reminders to complete a survey once it was available online, and fewer e-mail contacts between surveys. The results provide evidence that achieving satisfactory retention is possible in online HIV prevention trials, and suggest best practices for maximizing retention. PMID:21538084

  11. Strategies to retain participants in a long-term HIV prevention randomized controlled trial: Lessons from the MINTS-II study

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Keith J.; Nygaard, Kate; Danilenko, Gene P.; Goknur, Sinan; Oakes, J. Michael; Rosser, B.R. Simon

    2012-01-01

    Achieving satisfactory retention in online HIV prevention trials typically have proved difficult, particularly over extended timeframes. The overall aim of this study was to assess factors associated with retention in the Men’s INTernet Study II (MINTS-II), a randomized controlled trial of a sexual risk reduction intervention for men who have sex with men. Participants were recruited via e-mails and banner advertisements in December, 2007 to participate in the MINTS-II Sexpulse intervention and followed over a 12-month period. Retention across the treatment and control arms was 85.2% at 12 months. Factors associated with higher retention included: randomization to the control arm, previous participation in a study by the research team, e-mail and telephone reminders to complete a survey once it was available to take, and fewer e-mail contacts between surveys. The results provide evidence that achieving satisfactory retention is possible in online HIV prevention trials, and suggest best practices for maximizing retention. PMID:21538084

  12. A randomized control study of treating secondary stage II breast cancer-related lymphoedema with free lymph node transfer.

    PubMed

    Dionyssiou, Dimitrios; Demiri, Efterpi; Tsimponis, Antonis; Sarafis, Alexandros; Mpalaris, Vasillios; Tatsidou, Georgia; Arsos, Georgios

    2016-02-01

    Microsurgical techniques are increasingly used for treating severe lymphoedema cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free vascularized lymph node transfer (LNT) in stage II breast cancer-related lymphoedema patients in comparison with non-surgical management. During the last 3 years, 83 female patients were examined at our lymphoedema clinic. Finally, 36 cases were included in this study and randomly divided in two groups: group A patients (n = 18, mean age 47 years) underwent microsurgical LNT; followed by 6 months of physiotherapy and compression, while group B patients (n = 18, mean age 49 years) were managed by physiotherapy and compression alone for 6 months. Patients of both groups removed their elastic garments after 6 months and were re-examined 1 year later. All the 36 patients had detailed evaluation of the affected extremity including limb volume measurement, infection episodes and scale scoring of pain, feeling of heaviness and functional status both at baseline and 18 month. Limb volume reduction was observed in both groups; mean reduction was greater in group A (57 %) than in group B (18 %). Infection episodes in group A were significantly reduced compared to those in group B patients. All group A patients reported painless and feeling of heaviness-free extremities with overall functional improvement, while the corresponding changes in group B patients were no more than marginal. Moreover, the LNT procedure was estimated as cost effective compared to conservative treatment alone. LNT represents an effective therapeutic approach for stage II lymphoedema patients; it significantly reduces limb volume, decreases recurrent infections and improves the overall function. PMID:26895326

  13. Efficacy and safety of alirocumab in high cardiovascular risk patients with inadequately controlled hypercholesterolaemia on maximally tolerated doses of statins: the ODYSSEY COMBO II randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Christopher P.; Cariou, Bertrand; Blom, Dirk; McKenney, James M.; Lorenzato, Christelle; Pordy, Robert; Chaudhari, Umesh; Colhoun, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To compare the efficacy [low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering] and safety of alirocumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9, compared with ezetimibe, as add-on therapy to maximally tolerated statin therapy in high cardiovascular risk patients with inadequately controlled hypercholesterolaemia. Methods and results COMBO II is a double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, parallel-group, 104-week study of alirocumab vs. ezetimibe. Patients (n = 720) with high cardiovascular risk and elevated LDL-C despite maximal doses of statins were enrolled (August 2012–May 2013). This pre-specified analysis was conducted after the last patient completed 52 weeks. Patients were randomized to subcutaneous alirocumab 75 mg every 2 weeks (plus oral placebo) or oral ezetimibe 10 mg daily (plus subcutaneous placebo) on a background of statin therapy. At Week 24, mean ± SE reductions in LDL-C from baseline were 50.6 ± 1.4% for alirocumab vs. 20.7 ± 1.9% for ezetimibe (difference 29.8 ± 2.3%; P < 0.0001); 77.0% of alirocumab and 45.6% of ezetimibe patients achieved LDL-C <1.8 mmol/L (P < 0.0001). Mean achieved LDL-C at Week 24 was 1.3 ± 0.04 mmol/L with alirocumab and 2.1 ± 0.05 mmol/L with ezetimibe, and were maintained to Week 52. Alirocumab was generally well tolerated, with no evidence of an excess of treatment-emergent adverse events. Conclusion In patients at high cardiovascular risk with inadequately controlled LDL-C, alirocumab achieved significantly greater reductions in LDL-C compared with ezetimibe, with a similar safety profile. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01644188. PMID:25687353

  14. Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial of Combined Oral laxatives Medication for BOwel PREParation (COMBO-PREP study).

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Hong, Chang Won; Kim, Byung Chang; Park, Sung Chan; Han, Kyung Su; Joo, Jungnam; Oh, Jae Hwan; Sohn, Dae Kyung

    2016-02-01

    The combination of different laxatives at reduced volumes may benefit patients by enhancing efficacy for bowel cleansing and increasing tolerability. However, evidence regarding combined preparations is scarce. This study evaluated whether the combined preparations are associated with enhanced efficacy and tolerability. This randomized phase II study had a single-blind, parallel-arm design. Between December 2013 and September 2014, consecutive patients aged between 20 and 65 years and who required diagnostic colonoscopies were considered for inclusion. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 arms: sodium picosulfate and magnesium citrate (PMC) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) with ascorbic acid in a day-prior (PMC-PEG-DP), PMC and oral sodium phosphate (NaP) in a day-prior (PMC-NaP-DP), PMC and PEG with ascorbic acid in a split-dose (PMC-PEG-SD), and PMC and oral NaP in a split-dose (PMC-NaP-SD). Primary endpoint was the Aronchick scale, and Ottawa scale results by colon segment, patients' adverse gastrointestinal symptoms, and willingness to reuse the same agents were also recorded. Successful bowel preparation was defined as an "excellent" or "good" score on the Aronchick scale. A total of 236 patients were randomized and 229 patients received the planned colonoscopy. The rates of successful bowel preparation in the PMC-PEG-DP, PMC-NaP-DP, PMC-PEG-SD, and PMC-NaP-SD were 82.5%, 64.4%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Excluding the failed PMC-NaP-DP group, all groups showed satisfactory rates of successful bowel preparation, and the mean Ottawa scores were significantly better in the PMC-PEG-SD and PMC-NaP-SD groups than in the PMC-PEG-DP group (P < 0.0001). The PMC-PEG-DP, PMC-NaP-DP, PMC-PEG-SD, and PMC-NaP-SD groups were similar in terms of rates of adverse gastrointestinal symptoms reported on a 5-point scale (P = 0.40) and willingness to reuse the same combined preparations (P = 0.55). PMC-PEG in a day-prior or split-dose and PMC-NaP in a split

  15. Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial of Combined Oral laxatives Medication for BOwel PREParation (COMBO-PREP study)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Hong, Chang Won; Kim, Byung Chang; Park, Sung Chan; Han, Kyung Su; Joo, Jungnam; Oh, Jae Hwan; Sohn, Dae Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The combination of different laxatives at reduced volumes may benefit patients by enhancing efficacy for bowel cleansing and increasing tolerability. However, evidence regarding combined preparations is scarce. This study evaluated whether the combined preparations are associated with enhanced efficacy and tolerability. This randomized phase II study had a single-blind, parallel-arm design. Between December 2013 and September 2014, consecutive patients aged between 20 and 65 years and who required diagnostic colonoscopies were considered for inclusion. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 arms: sodium picosulfate and magnesium citrate (PMC) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) with ascorbic acid in a day-prior (PMC-PEG-DP), PMC and oral sodium phosphate (NaP) in a day-prior (PMC-NaP-DP), PMC and PEG with ascorbic acid in a split-dose (PMC-PEG-SD), and PMC and oral NaP in a split-dose (PMC-NaP-SD). Primary endpoint was the Aronchick scale, and Ottawa scale results by colon segment, patients’ adverse gastrointestinal symptoms, and willingness to reuse the same agents were also recorded. Successful bowel preparation was defined as an “excellent” or “good” score on the Aronchick scale. A total of 236 patients were randomized and 229 patients received the planned colonoscopy. The rates of successful bowel preparation in the PMC-PEG-DP, PMC-NaP-DP, PMC-PEG-SD, and PMC-NaP-SD were 82.5%, 64.4%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Excluding the failed PMC-NaP-DP group, all groups showed satisfactory rates of successful bowel preparation, and the mean Ottawa scores were significantly better in the PMC-PEG-SD and PMC-NaP-SD groups than in the PMC-PEG-DP group (P < 0.0001). The PMC-PEG-DP, PMC-NaP-DP, PMC-PEG-SD, and PMC-NaP-SD groups were similar in terms of rates of adverse gastrointestinal symptoms reported on a 5-point scale (P = 0.40) and willingness to reuse the same combined preparations (P = 0.55). PMC-PEG in a day-prior or split-dose and PMC

  16. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, John; Chapman, Katie; Nixon, Jane; Patel, Anita; Holloway, Ivana; Mellish, Kirste; Anwar, Shamaila; Breen, Rachel; Knapp, Martin; Murray, Jenni; Farrin, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— We developed a new postdischarge system of care comprising a structured assessment covering longer-term problems experienced by patients with stroke and their carers, linked to evidence-based treatment algorithms and reference guides (the longer-term stroke care system of care) to address the poor longer-term recovery experienced by many patients with stroke. Methods— A pragmatic, multicentre, cluster randomized controlled trial of this system of care. Eligible patients referred to community-based Stroke Care Coordinators were randomized to receive the new system of care or usual practice. The primary outcome was improved patient psychological well-being (General Health Questionnaire-12) at 6 months; secondary outcomes included functional outcomes for patients, carer outcomes, and cost-effectiveness. Follow-up was through self-completed postal questionnaires at 6 and 12 months. Results— Thirty-two stroke services were randomized (29 participated); 800 patients (399 control; 401 intervention) and 208 carers (100 control; 108 intervention) were recruited. In intention to treat analysis, the adjusted difference in patient General Health Questionnaire-12 mean scores at 6 months was −0.6 points (95% confidence interval, −1.8 to 0.7; P=0.394) indicating no evidence of statistically significant difference between the groups. Costs of Stroke Care Coordinator inputs, total health and social care costs, and quality-adjusted life year gains at 6 months, 12 months, and over the year were similar between the groups. Conclusions— This robust trial demonstrated no benefit in clinical or cost-effectiveness outcomes associated with the new system of care compared with usual Stroke Care Coordinator practice. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN 67932305. PMID:26152298

  17. VERTOS II: Percutaneous vertebroplasty versus conservative therapy in patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures; rationale, objectives and design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Klazen, CAH; Verhaar, HJJ; Lampmann, LEH; Juttmann, JR; Blonk, MC; Jansen, FH; Tielbeek, AV; Schoemaker, MC; Buskens, E; van der Graaf, Y; Janssens, X; Fransen, H; van Everdingen, KJ; Muller, AF; Mali, WPThM; Lohle, PNM

    2007-01-01

    Background The standard care in patients with a painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is conservative therapy. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV), a minimally invasive technique, is gaining popularity as a new treatment option. Many prospective and retrospective studies have reported on the effectiveness and safety of PV, but no large randomized controlled trial (RCT) has been published. Objective To estimate cost-effectiveness of PV compared to conservative therapy in terms of: pain reduction, quality of life, complications, secondary fractures and mortality. Materials and methods The VERTOS II study is designed as a prospective, multicenter RCT. Patients with a painful VCF with bone edema on MR imaging, local back pain for 6 weeks or less, osteopenia and aged 50 years or older, after obtaining informed consent are included and randomized for PV or conservative therapy. In total 200 patients will be enrolled. Follow-up is at regular intervals during a 1-year period with standard questionnaires, addressing: clinical symptoms, pain medication, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Secondary fractures, necessary additional therapies and complications are recorded. Conclusion The VERTOS II study is the first methodologically sound RCT designed to assess the cost-effectiveness of PV compared to conservative therapy in patients with an acute osteoporotic VCF. Trial registration , NCT00232466 PMID:17973983

  18. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase II, Presurgical Biomarker Trial of Celecoxib Versus Exemestane in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Aristarco, Valentina; Serrano, Davide; Gandini, Sara; Johansson, Harriet; Macis, Debora; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Lazzeroni, Matteo; Feroce, Irene; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Pagani, Gianmatteo; Toesca, Antonio; Caldarella, Pietro; DeCensi, Andrea; Bonanni, Bernardo

    2016-05-01

    In breast cancer presurgical trials, the Ki-67 labeling index predicts disease outcome and offers clues to the preventive potential of drugs. We conducted a placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the activity of exemestane and celecoxib before surgery. The main endpoint was the change in Ki-67. Secondary endpoints were the modulation of circulating biomarkers. Postmenopausal women with histologically confirmed estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer were randomly assigned to exemestane 25 mg/day (n = 50), or celecoxib 800 mg/day (n = 50), or placebo (n = 25) for 6 weeks before surgery. Changes in biomarkers were analyzed through an ANCOVA model adjusting for baseline values. Exemestane showed a median absolute 10% reduction in Ki-67 [from 22 (interquartile range, IQR, 16-27), to 8 (IQR 5-18)], and a 15% absolute reduction in PgR expression [from 50 (IQR 3-90) to 15 (IQR -0-30)] after 6 weeks of treatment. Exemestane significantly increased testosterone [median change 0.21 ng/mL, (IQR 0.12-0.35)], decreased SHBG [median change -14.6 nmol/L, (IQR -23.1 to -8.6)], decreased total and HDL cholesterol by -10 mg/dL (IQR -21-2) and -7 mg/dL, (IQR -14 to -2), respectively. Triglycerides were reduced by both agents [median change -0.5 mg/dL (IQR -17.5-13.5) and -8 mg/dL (IQR -28-9) for celecoxib and exemestane, respectively]. Exemestane showed a remarkable antiproliferative effect on breast cancer, whereas celecoxib did not affect breast cancer proliferation. Given the proven preventive efficacy of exemestane, these findings support the use of Ki-67 to explore the optimal exemestane dose and schedule in the prevention setting. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 349-56. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26928670

  19. Undenatured type II collagen (UC-II®) for joint support: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background UC-II contains a patented form of undenatured type II collagen derived from chicken sternum. Previous preclinical and clinical studies support the safety and efficacy of UC-II in modulating joint discomfort in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of UC-II in moderating joint function and joint pain due to strenuous exercise in healthy subjects. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in healthy subjects who had no prior history of arthritic disease or joint pain at rest but experienced joint discomfort with physical activity. Fifty-five subjects who reported knee pain after participating in a standardized stepmill performance test were randomized to receive placebo (n = 28) or the UC-II (40 mg daily, n = 27) product for 120 days. Joint function was assessed by changes in degree of knee flexion and knee extension as well as measuring the time to experiencing and recovering from joint pain following strenuous stepmill exertion. Results After 120 days of supplementation, subjects in the UC-II group exhibited a statistically significant improvement in average knee extension compared to placebo (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 74.0 ± 2.2º; p = 0.011) and to baseline (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.002). The UC-II cohort also demonstrated a statistically significant change in average knee extension at day 90 (78.8 ± 1.9º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.045) versus baseline. No significant change in knee extension was observed in the placebo group at any time. It was also noted that the UC-II group exercised longer before experiencing any initial joint discomfort at day 120 (2.8 ± 0.5 min, p = 0.019), compared to baseline (1.4 ± 0.2 min). By contrast, no significant changes were seen in the placebo group. No product related adverse events were observed during the study. At study conclusion, five

  20. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Intensive Care Unit–Acquired Weakness: Protocol and Methodological Implications for a Randomized, Sham-Controlled, Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Alexander D.; Brower, Roy G.; Palmer, Jeffrey B.; Fan, Eddy; Zanni, Jennifer M.; Ciesla, Nancy D.; Feldman, Dorianne R.; Korupolu, Radha; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Background As the population ages and critical care advances, a growing number of survivors of critical illness will be at risk for intensive care unit (ICU)–acquired weakness. Bed rest, which is common in the ICU, causes adverse effects, including muscle weakness. Consequently, patients need ICU-based interventions focused on the muscular system. Although emerging evidence supports the benefits of early rehabilitation during mechanical ventilation, additional therapies may be beneficial. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), which can provide some muscular activity even very early during critical illness, is a promising modality for patients in the ICU. Objective The objectives of this article are to discuss the implications of bed rest for patients with critical illness, summarize recent studies of early rehabilitation and NMES in the ICU, and describe a protocol for a randomized, phase II pilot study of NMES in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Design The study was a randomized, sham-controlled, concealed, phase II pilot study with caregivers and outcome assessors blinded to the treatment allocation. Setting The study setting will be a medical ICU. Participants The study participants will be patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation for 1 day or more, who are expected to stay in the ICU for an additional 2 days or more, and who meet no exclusion criteria. Intervention The intervention will be NMES (versus a sham [control] intervention) applied to the quadriceps, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles for 60 minutes per day. Measurements Lower-extremity muscle strength at hospital discharge will be the primary outcome measure. Limitations Muscle strength is a surrogate measure, not a patient-centered outcome. The assessments will not include laboratory, genetic, or histological measures aimed at a mechanistic understanding of NMES. The optimal duration or dose of NMES is unclear. Conclusions If NMES is beneficial, the results of

  1. A Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Phase II Trial of Allisartan Isoproxil in Essential Hypertensive Population at Low-Medium Risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Li, Xiao-hui; Huang, Zhi-jun; Yang, Guo-ping; Zhang, Guo-gang; Zhao, Shui-ping; Guo, Ying; Lu, Shi-juan; Ma, Jian-lin; Meng, Fan-bo; Chen, Ping; Yuan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) is a well-tolerated class of antihypertensive agents, exhibiting effective antihypertensive and cardiovascular protective function. The objective of the study was to examine the efficacy and safety of Allisartan Isoproxil, a newly developed, selective, nonpeptide blocker of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), in essential hypertensive patients at low-medium risk. Methods and Findings A Phase II prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial comparing Allisartan Isoproxil 240mg versus placebo was conducted in essential hypertensive patients at low-medium risk at 8 sites in China. After a 2-week placebo baseline period, 275 patients received once-daily treatment with Allisartan Isoproxil 240mg or placebo randomly for 8 weeks. Systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) was measured at week 2, 4 and 8. By the end of treatment, mean reductions from baseline of SBP and DBP in Allisartan Isoproxil and placebo groups were 14.5/10.4 and 8.3/7.7 mmHg, respectively (P<0.01). The rate of effective blood pressure control in Allisartan Isoproxil group was significantly higher than in placebo group at week 4 (61.3% vs 50.0%, P<0.05) and week 8 (67.2% vs 48.6%, P<0.01). In terms of safety and tolerability, there were no report of death and serious adverse event (SAE) in all subjects. There was no difference of frequency between two groups in adverse event (AE) and adverse drug reaction (ADR) (P>0.05). No one withdraw because of an ADR in two groups. 124 patients received additional 56 weeks treatment with Allisartan Isoproxil and 84 of them completed the study. The rate of effective BP control kept up to 80% since week 24. No significant clinical change was observed and ADRs were generally mild or moderate during the long-term study. Conclusions/Significance Allisartan Isoproxil 240mg was effective and safe for essential hypertension patients at low-medium risk. Trial Registration http

  2. Effects of antihypertensive drugs on carotid intima-media thickness: Focus on angiotensin II receptor blockers. A review of randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Cuspidi, Cesare; Negri, Francesca; Giudici, Valentina; Capra, Anna; Sala, Carla

    2009-01-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaques have been shown to have a strong continuous relationship with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality; therefore, carotid atherosclerosis, as assessed by ultrasonography, can be regarded as a reliable surrogate end-point for therapeutic interventions. In this survey, we report the results of 16 double blind, randomized, controlled studies comparing: 1) antihypertensive drugs versus placebo/no treatment (five trials including 3,215 patients); 2) different active antihypertensive drug regimens (five trials including 4,662 patients); 3) angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs) versus other antihypertensive agents (six trials including 841 patients). Our main findings can be summarized as follows: I) Long-term antihypertensive treatment has a blunting effect on carotid IMT progression, regardless of types of drugs. II) Calcium-channel blockers (CCBs) are more effective than other antihypertensive drugs including diuretics, beta-blockers, and angiotensin converting-enzyme (ACE)-inhibitors in this blunting effect; III) the effect of ARBs compared to other antihypertensive regimens (mostly based on atenolol) on carotid atherosclerosis progression needs to be further elucidated, as a protective effect was demonstrated by some, but not all studies examined. Thus, further studies are needed to clarify the role of ARBs in this therapeutic area. PMID:21949612

  3. Randomized controlled clinical trial of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    SU, YONG; SU, YA-LI; LV, LI-FANG; WANG, LI-MIN; LI, QUAN-ZHONG; ZHAO, ZHI-GANG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Type II diabetic patients exhibiting poor glycemic control following α-glucosidase inhibitor treatment for at least two months were selected and randomly distributed into vildagliptin and placebo groups. The body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c) and blood lipid levels and hepatorenal functions of the patients were determined before and 12 weeks after the trial. Following the trial, the FBG, PPG, HbA1c, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglyceride (TG) levels in the vildagliptin group were significantly decreased compared with the pretreatment levels (P<0.05), whereas only the PPG level in the placebo group decreased (P<0.05). The FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in the vildagliptin group were markedly lower than those in the placebo group 12 weeks after the trial. A comparison of the body weights and hepatorenal functions before and after the trial or between groups did not show statistically significant differences. The combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor effectively reduced the FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in patients without inducing weight gain or hepatorenal dysfunction. However, the therapy may have caused a reduction in the blood lipid levels. PMID:24926379

  4. Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Glucose Control and Inflammatory Response in Type II Diabetes: A Double Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sofiani, Mohammed E.; Jammah, Anwar; Racz, Michael; Khawaja, Rajab A.; Hasanato, Rana; El-Fawal, Hassan A. N.; Mousa, Shaker A.; Mason, Darius L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) and vitamin D deficiency are major health concerns around the world. Evidence suggests a possible role of vitamin D in improvement of insulin secretion and sensitivity. Objectives: We assessed whether vitamin D supplementation could be used in vitamin D deficient-type II diabetes to improve glucose metabolism, components of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and specific inflammatory biomarkers. Patients and Methods: A double blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted in King Khalid University Hospital, Saudi Arabia to evaluate the effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on glycemic control, MetS components and specific inflammatory biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin (IL-6), leptin, adiponectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Twenty-two patients with type II diabetes with insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6 (42 mmol/mol) and serum 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L were randomized using a computer program to receive either supplementation with cholecalciferol (5000 IU/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c levels from baseline. Results: Median [IQR] 25(OH)D levels increased significantly in the vitamin D group as 58.1 [48, 67.3] nmol/L (P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in the change of HbA1c between the groups (P = 0.5) with a decrease of -0.1% [-1, 0.5] in the vitamin D group and an increase of 0.15% [0.1, 0.2] in the placebo group. A significant improvement was observed in the homeostasis model of assessment of β-cell activity (HOMA-%B) (P = 0.03) with vitamin D supplementation compared to baseline. Conclusions: Vitamin D repletion for 12 weeks increased serum vitamin D concentrations and improved β-cell activity in vitamin D-deficient type II diabetes with no significant changes in HbA1c or insulin sensitivity. PMID:25745497

  5. Control theory for random systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current knowledge available for designing and predicting the effectiveness of controllers for dynamic systems which can be modeled by ordinary differential equations. A short discussion of feedback control is followed by a description of deterministic controller design and the concept of system state. The need for more realistic disturbance models led to the use of stochastic process concepts, in particular the Gauss-Markov process. A compensator controlled system, with random forcing functions, random errors in the measurements, and random initial conditions, is treated as constituting a Gauss-Markov random process; hence the mean-square behavior of the controlled system is readily predicted. As an example, a compensator is designed for a helicopter to maintain it in hover in a gusty wind over a point on the ground.

  6. Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) Pad Abort Test Vehicle (PATV) II Attitude Control System (ACS) Integration and Pressurization Subsystem Dynamic Random Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekrami, Yasamin; Cook, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to mitigate catastrophic failures on future generation space vehicles, engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have begun to integrate a novel crew abort systems that could pull a crew module away in case of an emergency at the launch pad or during ascent. The Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) is a recent test vehicle that was designed as an alternative to the baseline Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) to demonstrate the performance of a "tower-less" LAS configuration under abort conditions. The MLAS II test vehicle will execute a propulsive coast stabilization maneuver during abort to control the vehicles trajectory and thrust. To accomplish this, the spacecraft will integrate an Attitude Control System (ACS) with eight hypergolic monomethyl hydrazine liquid propulsion engines that are capable of operating in a quick pulsing mode. Two main elements of the ACS include a propellant distribution subsystem and a pressurization subsystem to regulate the flow of pressurized gas to the propellant tanks and the engines. The CAD assembly of the Attitude Control System (ACS) was configured and integrated into the Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) design. A dynamic random vibration analysis was conducted on the Main Propulsion System (MPS) helium pressurization panels to assess the response of the panel and its components under increased gravitational acceleration loads during flight. The results indicated that the panels fundamental and natural frequencies were farther from the maximum Acceleration Spectral Density (ASD) vibrations which were in the range of 150-300 Hz. These values will direct how the components will be packaged in the vehicle to reduce the effects high gravitational loads.

  7. Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of whole-brain irradiation with concomitant chloroquine for brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Chloroquine (CLQ), an antimalarial drug, has a lysosomotropic effect associated with increased radiationsensibility, which is mediated by the leakage of hydrolytic enzymes, increased apoptosis, autophagy and increased oxidative stress in vitro. In this phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of radiosensibilization using CLQ concomitant with 30 Gray (Gy) of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) to treat patients with brain metastases (BM) from solid tumors. Methods Seventy-three eligible patients were randomized. Thirty-nine patients received WBI (30 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks) concomitant with 150 mg of CLQ for 4 weeks (the CLQ arm). Thirty-four patients received the same schedule of WBI concomitant with a placebo for 4 weeks (the control arm). All the patients were evaluated for quality of life (QoL) using the EORTC Quality of Life (QoL) Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) (Mexican version) before beginning radiotherapy and one month later. Results The overall response rate (ORR) was 54% for the CLQ arm and 55% for the control arm (p=0.92). The progression-free survival of brain metastases (BMPFS) rates at one year were 83.9% (95% CI 69.4-98.4) for the CLQ arm and 55.1% (95% CI 33.6-77.6) for the control arm. Treatment with CLQ was independently associated with increased BMPFS (RR 0.31,95% CI [0.1-0.9], p=0.046).The only factor that was independently associated with increased overall survival (OS) was the presence of< 4 brain metastases (RR 1.9, 95% CI [1.12-3.3], p=0.017). WBI was associated with improvements in cognitive and emotional function but also with worsened nausea in both patients groups. No differences in QoL or toxicity were found between the study arms. Conclusion Treatment with CLQ plus WBI improved the control of BM (compared with the control arm) with no increase in toxicity; however, CLQ did not improve the RR or OS. A phase III clinical trial is warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:24010771

  8. Neuroplastic Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Painful Symptoms Reduction in Chronic Hepatitis C: A Phase II Randomized, Double Blind, Sham Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brietzke, Aline P.; Rozisky, Joanna R.; Dussan-Sarria, Jairo A.; Deitos, Alicia; Laste, Gabriela; Hoppe, Priscila F. T.; Muller, Suzana; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Alvares-da-Silva, Mário R.; de Amorim, Rivadavio F. B.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pegylated Interferon Alpha (Peg-IFN) in combination with other drugs is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C infection (HCV) and is related to severe painful symptoms. The aim of this study was access the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in controlling the painful symptoms related to Peg-IFN side effects. Materials and Methods: In this phase II double-blind trial, twenty eight (n = 28) HCV subjects were randomized to receive either 5 consecutive days of active tDCS (n = 14) or sham (n = 14) during 5 consecutive days with anodal stimulation over the primary motor cortex region using 2 mA for 20 min. The primary outcomes were visual analogue scale (VAS) pain and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum levels. Secondary outcomes were the pressure-pain threshold (PPT), the Brazilian Profile of Chronic Pain: Screen (B-PCP:S), and drug analgesics use. Results: tDCS reduced the VAS scores (P < 0.003), with a mean pain drop of 56% (p < 0.001). Furthermore, tDCS was able to enhance BDNF levels (p < 0.01). The mean increase was 37.48% in the active group. Finally, tDCS raised PPT (p < 0.001) and reduced the B-PCP:S scores and analgesic use (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Five sessions of tDCS were effective in reducing the painful symptoms in HCV patients undergoing Peg-IFN treatment. These findings support the efficacy of tDCS as a promising therapeutic tool to improve the tolerance of the side effects related to the use of Peg-IFN. Future larger studies (phase III and IV trials) are needed to confirm the clinical use of the therapeutic effects of tDCS in such condition. Trial registration: Brazilian Human Health Regulator for Research with the approval number CAAE 07802012.0.0000.5327. PMID:26793047

  9. Comparison of everolimus-eluting and biolimus-eluting coronary stents with everolimus-eluting bioresorbable scaffold: study protocol of the randomized controlled EVERBIO II trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Second-generation everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and third generation biolimus-eluting stents (BES) have been shown to be superior to first-generation paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) and second-generation sirolimus-eluting stents (SES). However, neointimal proliferation and very late stent thrombosis is still an unresolved issue of drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation overall. The Absorb™ (Abbott Vascular, Abbott Park, IL, USA) is the first CE approved DES with a bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) thought to reduce long-term complication rates. The EVERBIO II trial was set up to compare the BVS safety and efficacy with both EES and BES in all patients viable for inclusion. Methods/Design The EVERBIO II trial is a single-center, assessor-blinded, randomized trial. The study population consists of all patients aged ≥18 years old undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Exclusion criterion is where the lesion cannot be treated with BVS (reference vessel diameter >4.0 mm). A total of 240 patients will be enrolled and randomly assigned into 3 groups of 80 with either BVS, EES or BES implantation. All patients will undergo a follow-up angiography study at 9 months. Clinical follow-up for up to 5 years will be conducted by telephone. The primary endpoint is in-segment late lumen loss at 9 months measured by quantitative coronary angiography. Secondary endpoints are patient-oriented major adverse cardiac event (MACE) (death, myocardial infarction and target-vessel revascularization), device-oriented MACE (cardiac death, myocardial infarction and target-lesion revascularization), stent thrombosis according to ARC and binary restenosis at follow-up 12 months angiography. Discussion EVERBIO II is an independent, randomized study, aiming to compare the clinical efficacy, angiographic outcomes and safety of BVS, EES and BES in all comer patients. Trial registration The trial listed in clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01711931. PMID:24398143

  10. Adaptive and innovative Radiation Treatment FOR improving Cancer treatment outcomE (ARTFORCE); a randomized controlled phase II trial for individualized treatment of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Failure of locoregional control is the main cause of recurrence in advanced head and neck cancer. This multi-center trial aims to improve outcome in two ways. Firstly, by redistribution of the radiation dose to the metabolically most FDG-PET avid part of the tumour. Hereby, a biologically more effective dose distribution might be achieved while simultaneously sparing normal tissues. Secondly, by improving patient selection. Both cisplatin and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) antibodies like Cetuximab in combination with Radiotherapy (RT) are effective in enhancing tumour response. However, it is unknown which patients will benefit from either agent in combination with irradiation. We will analyze the predictive value of biological markers and 89Zr-Cetuximab uptake for treatment outcome of chemoradiation with Cetuximab or cisplatin to improve patient selection. Methods ARTFORCE is a randomized phase II trial for 268 patients with a factorial 2 by 2 design: cisplatin versus Cetuximab and standard RT versus redistributed RT. Cisplatin is dosed weekly 40 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Cetuximab is dosed 250mg/m2 weekly (loading dose 400 mg/m2) for 6 weeks. The standard RT regimen consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks. Redistributed adaptive RT consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a SIB between 64-80 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks with redistributed dose to the gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV), and adaptation of treatment for anatomical changes in the third week of treatment. Patients with locally advanced, biopsy confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, oral cavity or hypopharynx are eligible. Primary endpoints are: locoregional recurrence free survival at 2 years, correlation of the median 89Zr-cetuximab uptake and biological markers with treatment specific outcome, and toxicity. Secondary endpoints are quality of life, swallowing function

  11. A double blind randomized placebo controlled phase I/II study assessing the safety and efficacy of allogeneic bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell in critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremities comprises a clinical spectrum that extends from no symptoms to presentation with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Bone marrow derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM- MSCs) may ameliorate the consequences of CLI due to their combinatorial potential for inducing angiogenesis and immunomodulatory environment in situ. The primary objective was to determine the safety of BM- MSCs in patients with CLI. Methods Prospective, double blind randomized placebo controlled multi-center study was conducted in patients with established CLI as per Rutherford classification in category II-4, III-5, or III-6 with infra-inguinal arterial occlusive disease and were not suitable for or had failed revascularization treatment. The primary end point was incidence of treatment – related adverse events (AE). Exploratory efficacy end points were improvement in rest pain, increase in Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI), ankle pressure, healing of ulcers, and amputation rates. Twenty patients (BM-MSC: Placebo = 1:1) were administered with allogeneic BM-MSCs at a dose of 2 million cells/kg or placebo (PlasmaLyte A) at the gastrocnemius muscle of the ischemic limb. Results Improvement was observed in the rest pain scores in both the arms. Significant increase in ABPI and ankle pressure was seen in BM-MSC arm compared to the placebo group. Incidence of AEs in the BM-MSC arm was 13 vs. 45 in the placebo arm where as serious adverse events (SAE) were similar in both the arms (5 in BM-MSC and 4 in the placebo group). SAEs resulted in death, infected gangrene, amputations in these patients. It was observed that the SAEs were related to disease progression and not related to stem cells. Conclusion BM-MSCs are safe when injected IM at a dose of 2 million cells/kg body weight. Few efficacy parameters such as ABPI and ankle pressure showed positive trend warranting further studies. Trial registration NIH website (http

  12. Vitamin D and aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS): a phase II, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Antonella L; Taylor, Marie E; Gao, Feng; Armamento-Villareal, Reina; Jamalabadi-Majidi, Shohreh; Napoli, Nicola; Ellis, Matthew J

    2011-08-01

    A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized phase II trial was performed to determine whether High Dose Vitamin D2 supplementation (HDD) in women receiving adjuvant anastrozole improves aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS) and bone loss. Patients with early breast cancer and AIMSS were stratified according to their baseline 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) level. Stratum A (20-29 ng/ml) received either HDD 50,000 IU capsules weekly for 8 weeks then monthly for 4 months or placebo. Stratum B (10-19 ng/ml) received either HDD for 16 weeks and then monthly for 2 months, or placebo. AIMSS was assessed by the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI) at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 months. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was measured at baseline and at 6 months. The primary endpoint of the study was the change-from-baseline musculoskeletal pain. The secondary endpoint was the percent change in BMD at 6 months. Sixty women were enrolled. Baseline characteristics were comparable between the groups. At 2 months, FIQ pain (P = 0.0045), BPI worst-pain (P = 0.04), BPI average-pain (P = 0.0067), BPI pain-severity (P = 0.04), and BPI interference (P = 0.034) scores were better in the HDD than placebo group. The positive effect of HDD on AIMSS was stronger across all time points in Stratum B than Stratum A (FIQ pain, P = 0.04; BPI average, P = 0.03; BPI severity, P = 0.03; BPI interference, P = 0.04). BMD at the femoral neck decreased in the placebo and did not change in the HDD group (P = 0.06). Weekly HDD improves AIMSS and may have a positive effect on bone health. Vitamin D supplementation strategies for breast cancer patients on AI should be further investigated. PMID:21691817

  13. Safety and feasibility of switching from phenytoin to levetiracetam monotherapy for glioma-related seizure control following craniotomy: a randomized phase II pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Daniel A; Tarapore, Phiroz; Chang, Edward; Burt, Marlene; Chakalian, Lenna; Barbaro, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Lamborn, Kathleen R; McDermott, Michael W

    2009-07-01

    Seizures are common in patients with gliomas, and phenytoin (PHT) is frequently used to control tumor-related seizures. PHT, however, has many undesirable side effects (SEs) and drug interactions with glioma chemotherapy. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a newer antiepileptic drug (AED) with fewer SEs and essentially no drug interactions. We performed a pilot study testing the safety and feasibility of switching patients from PHT to LEV monotherapy for postoperative control of glioma-related seizures. Over a 13-month period, 29 patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to initiate LEV therapy within 24 h of surgery or to continue PHT therapy. 6 month follow-up data were available for 15 patients taking LEV and for 8 patients taking PHT. In the LEV group, 13 patients (87%) were seizure-free. In the PHT group, 6 patients (75%) were seizure-free. Reported SEs at 6 months was as follows (%LEV/%PHT group): dizziness (0/14), difficulty with coordination (0/29), depression (7/14) lack of energy or strength (20/43), insomnia (40/43), mood instability (7/0). The pilot data presented here suggest that it is safe to switch patients from PHT to LEV monotherapy following craniotomy for supratentorial glioma. A large-scale, double-blinded, randomized control trial of LEV versus PHT is required to determine seizure control equivalence and better assess differences in SEs. PMID:19169651

  14. Efficiency of Hyaloglide in the prevention of the recurrence of adhesions after tenolysis of flexor tendons in zone II: a randomized, controlled, multicentre clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Riccio, M; Battiston, B; Pajardi, G; Corradi, M; Passaretti, U; Atzei, A; Altissimi, M; Vaienti, L; Catalano, F; Del Bene, M; Fasolo, P; Ceruso, M; Luchetti, R; Landi, A

    2010-02-01

    Hyaloglide is a hyaluronan-based gel based on a novel auto-crosslinked technology designed to reduce postsurgical adhesions. Its efficacy was assessed in a multicentred randomized controlled trial comparing the results of flexor tenolysis in zone 2 following failed flexor tendon repairs. In the control group a standard release was performed. In the treated group, Hyaloglide was applied into the flexor sheath and around the site of tenolysis. Forty-five patients, 19 controls and 26 treated with Hyaloglide, were enrolled in 13 centres. All the patients were evaluated at 30, 60, 90 and 180 days after surgery by testing Total Active Motion, Quick-DASH questionnaire and number of working days lost after surgery. Patients in the Hyaloglide group had a statistically better recovery of finger motion at all time intervals and returned earlier to work and daily activities. The use of Hyaloglide did not appear to increase the complication rate. PMID:19710086

  15. Experimental pain ratings and reactivity of cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II following a trial of hypnosis: Results of a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel R.; Quinn, Noel B.; Kronfli, Tarek; King, Christopher D.; Page, Gayle G.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert R.; Stapleton, Laura M.; McGuire, Lynanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective Current evidence supports the efficacy of hypnosis for reducing the pain associated with experimental stimulation and various acute and chronic conditions; however, the mechanisms explaining how hypnosis exerts its effects remain less clear. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines represent potential targets for investigation given their purported roles in the perpetuation of painful conditions; yet, no clinical trials have thus far examined the influence of hypnosis on these mechanisms. Design Healthy participants, highly susceptible to the effects of hypnosis, were randomized to either a hypnosis intervention or a no-intervention control. Using a cold pressor task, assessments of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were collected prior to the intervention (Pre) and following the intervention (Post) along with pain-provoked changes in salivary cortisol and the soluble receptor of tumor necrosis factor-α (sTNFαRII). Results Compared to the no-intervention control, data analyses revealed that hypnosis significantly reduced pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. Hypnosis was not significantly associated with suppression of cortisol or sTNFαRII reactivity to acute pain from Pre to Post; however, the effect sizes for these associations were medium-sized. Conclusions Overall, the findings from this randomized controlled pilot study support the importance of a future large-scale study on the effects of hypnosis for modulating pain-related changes of the HPA axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:22233394

  16. Happy Family Kitchen II: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of a Community-Based Family Intervention for Enhancing Family Communication and Well-being in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Henry C. Y.; Mui, Moses; Wan, Alice; Ng, Yin-Lam; Stewart, Sunita M.; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S.

    2016-01-01

    Long working hours and stressful urban lifestyles pose major challenges to family communication and well-being in Hong Kong. A community-based family intervention derived from a positive psychology framework, by using cooking and dining as a platform, was developed for improving family communication and well-being. Social workers and teachers from 31 social service units and schools in collaboration with an academic partner organized and conducted the intervention programs for 2,070 individuals from 973 families in a deprived district in Hong Kong. The participants were randomly assigned into the intervention or control group in a cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT). The core intervention covered one of five positive psychology themes: joy, gratitude, flow, savoring, and listening. Assessments at pre-intervention, immediate post-intervention, and 4 and 12 weeks post-intervention showed improved family communication and well-being with sustainable effects up to 12 weeks. Positive changes in family happiness and family health were greater in the intervention group than in the control group. The savoring intervention had the most improved outcomes among the five themes. We concluded that this large-scale brief cRCT developed and conducted in real-world settings provided evidence for the feasibility and effectiveness of a community-based family intervention. This study was registered under ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01796275). PMID:27199864

  17. Happy Family Kitchen II: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of a Community-Based Family Intervention for Enhancing Family Communication and Well-being in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Ho, Henry C Y; Mui, Moses; Wan, Alice; Ng, Yin-Lam; Stewart, Sunita M; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2016-01-01

    Long working hours and stressful urban lifestyles pose major challenges to family communication and well-being in Hong Kong. A community-based family intervention derived from a positive psychology framework, by using cooking and dining as a platform, was developed for improving family communication and well-being. Social workers and teachers from 31 social service units and schools in collaboration with an academic partner organized and conducted the intervention programs for 2,070 individuals from 973 families in a deprived district in Hong Kong. The participants were randomly assigned into the intervention or control group in a cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT). The core intervention covered one of five positive psychology themes: joy, gratitude, flow, savoring, and listening. Assessments at pre-intervention, immediate post-intervention, and 4 and 12 weeks post-intervention showed improved family communication and well-being with sustainable effects up to 12 weeks. Positive changes in family happiness and family health were greater in the intervention group than in the control group. The savoring intervention had the most improved outcomes among the five themes. We concluded that this large-scale brief cRCT developed and conducted in real-world settings provided evidence for the feasibility and effectiveness of a community-based family intervention. This study was registered under ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01796275). PMID:27199864

  18. A Phase II/III Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) for Nausea Caused by Chemotherapy for Cancer: A Currently Accruing URCC CCOP Cancer Control Study.

    PubMed

    Hickok, Jane T; Roscoe, Joseph A; Morrow, Gary R; Ryan, Julie L

    2007-09-01

    Despite the widespread use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist antiemetics such as ondansetron and granistron, up to 70% of patients with cancer receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy agents experience postchemotherapy nausea and vomiting. Delayed postchemotherapy nausea (nausea that occurs >/= 24 hours after chemotherapy administration) and anticipatory nausea (nausea that develops before chemotherapy administration, in anticipation of it) are poorly controlled by currently available antiemetic agents. Scientific studies suggest that ginger (Zingiber officinale) might have beneficial effects on nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness, surgery, and pregnancy. In 2 small studies of patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy, addition of ginger to standard antiemetic medication further reduced the severity of postchemotherapy nausea. This article describes a phase II/III randomized, dose-finding, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the efficacy of ginger for nausea associated with chemotherapy for cancer. The study is currently being conducted by private practice oncology groups that are funded by the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and affiliated with the University of Rochester Cancer Center Community Clinical Oncology Program Research Base. PMID:18632524

  19. Phase II, Randomized, Placebo-controlled, 90-day Study of Emixustat HCL in Geographic Atrophy Associated with Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dugel, Pravin U.; Novack, Roger L.; Csaky, Karl G.; Richmond, Preston P.; Birch, David G.; Kubota, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the safety, tolerability, and pharmacodynamics of emixustat hydrochloride (ACU-4429), a novel visual cycle modulator, in subjects with geographic atrophy (GA) associated with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Subjects were randomly assigned to oral emixustat (2, 5, 7, or 10 mg once daily) or placebo (3:1 ratio) for 90 days. Recovery of rod photoreceptor sensitivity following a photobleach was measured by electroretinography. Safety evaluations included analysis of adverse events (AEs) and ophthalmic examinations. Results Seventy-two subjects (54 emixustat, 18 placebo) were evaluated. Emixustat suppressed rod photoreceptor sensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. Suppression plateaued by Day 14, and was reversible within 7-14 days after drug cessation. No systemic AEs of concern were noted. Dose-related ocular AEs (chromatopsia, 57% emixustat vs. 17% placebo; and delayed dark adaptation, 48% emixustat vs. 6% placebo) were mild to moderate, and the majority resolved on study or within 7-14 days after study drug cessation. Conclusions In this phase II study, emixustat produced a dose-dependent, reversible effect on rod function, and an ocular AE profile that is consistent with the proposed mechanism of action. These results support further testing of emixustat for the treatment of GA associated with dry AMD. PMID:25932553

  20. Metformin intervention in obese non-diabetic patients with breast cancer: phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kwang-Pil; Ma, Seung Hyun; Yang, Jae-Jeong; Hwang, Yunji; Ahn, Choonghyun; Cho, Young-Min; Noh, Dong-Young; Park, Byung-Joo; Han, Wonshik; Park, Sue K

    2015-09-01

    Previous observational studies have suggested that metformin in diabetes patients may reduce breast cancer risk more than the reductions from other anti-diabetes medications. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy of metformin for controlling physical and metabolic profiles related to prognosis and adverse events in non-diabetic breast cancer patients. Female breast cancer patients (N = 105), at least 6 months post-mastectomy, with obesity (≥25 kg/m(2)) and/or pre-diabetes (fasting blood sugar levels ≥100 mg/dL), were randomly assigned to three groups (placebo, metformin 500 mg, and metformin 1000 mg) stratified by tamoxifen use. A linear mixed model for repeated measurements among three groups and ANOVA for profile differences during 6 months of treatment were used for the intention-to-treat analysis. The metformin 1000 mg group had a significantly greater decline in glucose and HbA1c levels between treatment weeks 0 and 6 month (p = 0.008 and 0.009, respectively), and the declines increased with an increase in body mass index (BMI) level (p interaction with BMI = 0.007 and 0.067, respectively). A marginally significant different effect from the metformin 1000 mg treatment was detected for glucose and HbA1c levels (p interaction = 0.084 and 0.063, respectively) in the intention-to-treat analysis. Metformin 1000 mg treatment had a favorable effect on controlling glucose and HbA1C levels in obese non-diabetic breast cancer patients, indicating prognostic importance. Further trials are needed to elucidate the risk-benefit ratio of long-term use of metformin. PMID:26293146

  1. Immunogenicity and safety of tetravalent dengue vaccine in 2-11 year-olds previously vaccinated against yellow fever: randomized, controlled, phase II study in Piura, Peru.

    PubMed

    Lanata, Claudio F; Andrade, Teresa; Gil, Ana I; Terrones, Cynthia; Valladolid, Omar; Zambrano, Betzana; Saville, Melanie; Crevat, Denis

    2012-09-01

    In a randomized, placebo-controlled, monocenter, observer blinded study conducted in an area where dengue is endemic, we assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) in 2-11 year-olds with varying levels of pre-existing yellow-fever immunity due to vaccination 1-7 years previously. 199 children received 3 injections of CYD-TDV (months 0, 6 and 12) and 99 received placebo (months 0 and 6) or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (month 12). One month after the third dengue vaccination, serotype specific neutralizing antibody GMTs were in the range of 178-190 (1/dil) (versus 16.7-38.1 in the control group), a 10-20 fold-increase from baseline, and 94% of vaccines were seropositive to all four serotypes (versus 39% in the control group). There were no vaccine-related SAEs. The observed reactogenicity profile was consistent with phase I studies, with severity grade 1-2 injection site pain, headache, malaise and fever most frequently reported and no increase after subsequent vaccinations. Virologically confirmed dengue cases were seen after completion of the 3 doses: 1 in the CYD-TDV group (N=199), and 3 in the control group (N=99). A 3-dose regimen of CYD-TDV had a good safety profile in 2-11 year olds with a history of YF vaccination and elicited robust antibody responses that were balanced against the four serotypes. PMID:22863660

  2. A phase II, sham-controlled, double-blinded study testing the safety and efficacy of the coronary sinus reducer in patients with refractory angina: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A growing population of patients lives with severe coronary artery disease not amenable to coronary revascularization and with refractory angina despite optimal medical therapy. Percutaneous reduction of the coronary sinus is an emerging treatment for myocardial ischemia that increases coronary sinus pressure to promote a transcollateral redistribution of coronary artery in-flow from nonischemic to ischemic subendocardial territories. A first-in-man study has demonstrated that the percutaneous reduction of the coronary sinus can be performed safely in such patients. The COSIRA trial seeks to assess whether a percutaneous reduction of the coronary sinus can improve the symptoms of refractory angina in patients with limited revascularization options. Methods/Design The COSIRA trial is a phase II double-blind, sham-controlled, randomized parallel trial comparing the percutaneously implanted coronary sinus Reducer (Neovasc Inc, Richmond, BC, Canada) to a sham implantation in 124 patients enrolled in Canada, Belgium, England, Scotland, Sweden and Denmark. All patients need to have stable Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) class III or IV angina despite optimal medical therapy, with evidence of reversible ischemia related to disease in the left coronary artery, and a left ventricular ejection fraction >25%. Participants experiencing an improvement in their angina ≥2 CCS classes six months after the randomization will meet the primary efficacy endpoint. The secondary objective of this trial is to test whether coronary sinus Reducer implantation will improve left ventricular ischemia, as measured by the improvement in dobutamine echocardiogram wall motion score index and in time to 1 mm ST-segment depression from baseline to six-month post-implantation. Discussion Based on previous observations, the COSIRA is expected to provide a significant positive result or an informative null result upon which rational development decisions can be based. Patient safety

  3. A Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Safety, Procedure Time, and Cost of the PrePex™ Device to Forceps Guided Surgical Circumcision in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Tshimanga, Mufuta; Mangwiro, Tonderayi; Mugurungi, Owen; Xaba, Sinokuthemba; Murwira, Munyaradzi; Kasprzyk, Danuta; Montaño, Daniel E.; Nyamukapa, Daisy; Tambashe, Basile; Chatikobo, Pesanai; Gundidza, Patricia; Gwinji, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS promote MC (male circumcision) as a key HIV prevention strategy where HIV prevalence and incidence are high and MC prevalence is low. In Zimbabwe, to achieve the 1.26 million circumcisions needed to be performed by 2015 to achieve optimal MC coverage, a new approach was needed. The primary objective of the current trial was to assess the performance (safety, procedure time, and cost) of the PrePex device compared to forceps-guided surgical circumcision. Methods and Findings This Phase II, randomized, open-label trial in Zimbabwe involved healthy, non-circumcised adult male volunteers who were randomly assigned to the PrePex device (n = 160) or surgical arm (n = 80). Three doctors and 4 nurses, all certified on both circumcision methods, performed the procedures. The PrePex device procedure involves a plastic ring with a rubber O-ring that necrotizes the foreskin to facilitate easy and minimally invasive removal. Total procedure time was the primary endpoint. Adverse event (AE) data were also gathered for 90 days post-procedure. All 80 participants in the surgical arm and 158 participants in the PrePex arm achieved complete circumcision. The total procedure time for the PrePex device was approximately one-third of the total surgical procedure (4.8 minutes, Standard Deviation [SD]: 1.2 versus 14.6 minutes; SD: 4.2; p<0.00001). There were 2 AEs for 2 participants (rate of 1.3%, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.0025–4.53%), which were resolved with simple intervention. The AEs were device related, including 1 case of pain leading to device removal and 1 case of removal of the device. Conclusions The trial supports previous studies’ conclusions that the PrePex procedure is safe, quick, easy to apply, and effective in terms of procedure time as an alternative to traditional surgical circumcision. The PrePex device has great potential for use in overburdened health systems and in

  4. A Phase II Randomized, Controlled Trial of S-Adenosylmethionine in Reducing Serum α-Fetoprotein in Patients with Hepatitis C Cirrhosis and Elevated AFP.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Timothy R; Osann, Kathryn; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Pimstone, Neville; Hoefs, John C; Hu, Ke-Qin; Hassanein, Tarek; Boyer, Thomas D; Kong, Lorene; Chen, Wen-Pin; Richmond, Ellen; Gonzalez, Rachel; Rodriguez, Luz M; Meyskens, Frank L

    2015-09-01

    In animal models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), deficiency of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) increased the risk of HCC whereas administration of SAMe reduced HCC. The aim of this trial was to determine whether oral SAMe administration to patients with hepatitis C cirrhosis would decrease serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) level, a biomarker of HCC risk in hepatitis C. This was a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of SAMe, up to 2.4 g/d, for 24 weeks as compared with placebo among subjects with hepatitis C cirrhosis and a mildly elevated serum AFP. Primary outcome was change in AFP between baseline and week 24. Secondary outcomes included changes in routine tests of liver function and injury, other biomarkers of HCC risk, SAMe metabolites, markers of oxidative stress, and quality of life. One hundred ten subjects were randomized and 87 (44 SAMe and 43 placebo) completed treatment. There was no difference in the change in AFP during 24 weeks among subjects receiving SAMe as compared with placebo. Changes in markers of liver function, liver injury, and hepatitis C viral level were not significantly different between groups. Similarly, SAMe did not change markers of oxidative stress or serum glutathione level. SAMe blood level increased significantly among subjects receiving SAMe. Changes in quality of life did not differ between groups. Overall, this trial did not find that SAMe treatment improved serum AFP in subjects with advanced hepatitis C cirrhosis and a mildly elevated AFP. SAMe did not improve tests of liver function or injury or markers of oxidative stress or antioxidant potential. PMID:26130251

  5. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part II, Cancer Pain Populations

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F.; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life in cancer populations. Methods. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were subsequently included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy is effective for treating pain compared to no treatment [standardized mean difference (SMD)  = −.20] and active (SMD = −0.55) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also found to be beneficial for treating fatigue (SMD = −1.06) and anxiety (SMD = −1.24). Conclusion. Based on the evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to an active comparator, for the treatment of pain, fatigue, and anxiety. No recommendations were suggested for massage therapy compared to no treatment or sham control based on the available literature to date. This review addresses massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option for cancer pain populations. PMID:27165967

  6. Efficacy and Safety of AM-101 in the Treatment of Acute Inner Ear Tinnitus—A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    van de Heyning, Paul; Muehlmeier, Guido; Cox, Tony; Lisowska, Grazyna; Maier, Heinz; Morawski, Krzysztof; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intratympanic AM-101 in patients with persistent acute inner ear tinnitus after acute acoustic trauma, idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), or acute otitis media. Study Design Prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with follow-up visits on Days 7, 30, and 90. Setting Twenty-eight European sites (academic tertiary referral centers and private ENT practices). Patients 248 patients aged 16 to 65 years. Interventions Three intratympanic injections of AM-101 (0.27 or 0.81 mg/ml) or placebo over 3 consecutive days. Main Outcome Measures Efficacy was assessed by changes in minimum masking level (MML; primary end point), loudness match, tinnitus loudness, tinnitus annoyance, and sleep difficulties on a 0 to 100 numerical rating scale, THI-12 questionnaire, and patient global impression of change. Safety was evaluated using the frequency of clinically relevant hearing deterioration and adverse events. Results The study overall failed to demonstrate a treatment benefit based on the change in MML. However, AM-101 0.81 mg/ml showed statistically significantly better improvement for tinnitus loudness, annoyance, sleep difficulties, and tinnitus impact in patients with tinnitus after noise trauma or otitis media. The subgroup of ISSNHL-related tinnitus patients did not show conclusive results. The study drug and I.T. injections were well tolerated. Conclusion The study established proof of concept for AM-101 in the treatment of tinnitus arising from cochlear glutamate excitotoxicity. Patient-reported outcomes seem to be more relevant and reliable efficacy measures for assessing treatment-related changes in tinnitus than psychoacoustic tests. PMID:24603353

  7. Two cilengitide regimens in combination with standard treatment for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and unmethylated MGMT gene promoter: results of the open-label, controlled, randomized phase II CORE study

    PubMed Central

    Nabors, L. Burt; Fink, Karen L.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Grujicic, Danica; Tarnawski, Rafal; Nam, Do Hyun; Mazurkiewicz, Maria; Salacz, Michael; Ashby, Lynn; Zagonel, Vittorina; Depenni, Roberta; Perry, James R.; Hicking, Christine; Picard, Martin; Hegi, Monika E.; Lhermitte, Benoit; Reardon, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Survival outcomes for patients with glioblastoma remain poor, particularly for patients with unmethylated O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter. This phase II, randomized, open-label, multicenter trial investigated the efficacy and safety of 2 dose regimens of the selective integrin inhibitor cilengitide combined with standard chemoradiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and an unmethylated MGMT promoter. Methods Overall, 265 patients were randomized (1:1:1) to standard cilengitide (2000 mg 2×/wk; n = 88), intensive cilengitide (2000 mg 5×/wk during wk 1−6, thereafter 2×/wk; n = 88), or a control arm (chemoradiotherapy alone; n = 89). Cilengitide was administered intravenously in combination with daily temozolomide (TMZ) and concomitant radiotherapy (RT; wk 1−6), followed by TMZ maintenance therapy (TMZ/RT→TMZ). The primary endpoint was overall survival; secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, pharmacokinetics, and safety and tolerability. Results Median overall survival was 16.3 months in the standard cilengitide arm (hazard ratio [HR], 0.686; 95% CI: 0.484, 0.972; P = .032) and 14.5 months in the intensive cilengitide arm (HR, 0.858; 95% CI: 0.612, 1.204; P = .3771) versus 13.4 months in the control arm. Median progression-free survival assessed per independent review committee was 5.6 months (HR, 0.822; 95% CI: 0.595, 1.134) and 5.9 months (HR, 0.794; 95% CI: 0.575, 1.096) in the standard and intensive cilengitide arms, respectively, versus 4.1 months in the control arm. Cilengitide was well tolerated. Conclusions Standard and intensive cilengitide dose regimens were well tolerated in combination with TMZ/RT→TMZ. Inconsistent overall survival and progression-free survival outcomes and a limited sample size did not allow firm conclusions regarding clinical efficacy in this exploratory phase II study. PMID:25762461

  8. Randomized Phase II, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Exemestane With or Without Entinostat in Postmenopausal Women With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer Progressing on Treatment With a Nonsteroidal Aromatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, Denise A.; Ismail-Khan, Roohi R.; Melichar, Bohuslav; Lichinitser, Mikhail; Munster, Pamela N.; Klein, Pamela M.; Cruickshank, Scott; Miller, Kathy D.; Lee, Min J.; Trepel, Jane B

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Entinostat is an oral isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor that targets resistance to hormonal therapies in estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast cancer. This randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II study evaluated entinostat combined with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane versus exemestane alone. Patients and Methods Postmenopausal women with ER+ advanced breast cancer progressing on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor were randomly assigned to exemestane 25 mg daily plus entinostat 5 mg once per week (EE) or exemestane plus placebo (EP). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Blood was collected in a subset of patients for evaluation of protein lysine acetylation as a biomarker of entinostat activity. Results One hundred thirty patients were randomly assigned (EE group, n = 64; EP group, n = 66). Based on intent-to-treat analysis, treatment with EE improved median PFS to 4.3 months versus 2.3 months with EP (hazard ratio [HR], 0.73; 95% CI, 0.50 to 1.07; one-sided P = .055; two-sided P = .11 [predefined significance level of .10, one-sided]). Median overall survival was an exploratory end point and improved to 28.1 months with EE versus 19.8 months with EP (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.97; P = .036). Fatigue and neutropenia were the most frequent grade 3/4 toxicities. Treatment discontinuation because of adverse events was higher in the EE group versus the EP group (11% v 2%). Protein lysine hyperacetylation in the EE biomarker subset was associated with prolonged PFS. Conclusion Entinostat added to exemestane is generally well tolerated and demonstrated activity in patients with ER+ advanced breast cancer in this signal-finding phase II study. Acetylation changes may provide an opportunity to maximize clinical benefit with entinostat. Plans for a confirmatory study are underway. PMID:23650416

  9. Methylphenidate and/or a Nursing Telephone Intervention for Fatigue in Patients With Advanced Cancer: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, Eduardo; Yennurajalingam, Sriram; Palmer, J. Lynn; Perez-Cruz, Pedro E.; Frisbee-Hume, Susan; Allo, Julio A.; Williams, Janet L.; Cohen, Marlene Z.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-related-fatigue (CRF) is common in advanced cancer. The primary objective of the study was to compare the effects of methylphenidate (MP) with those of placebo (PL) on CRF as measured using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue (FACIT-F) fatigue subscale. The effect of a combined intervention including MP plus a nursing telephone intervention (NTI) was also assessed. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced cancer with a fatigue score of ≥ 4 out of 10 on the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) were randomly assigned to one of the following four groups: MP+NTI, PL+NTI, MP + control telephone intervention (CTI), and PL+CTI. Methylphenidate dose was 5 mg every 2 hours as needed up to 20 mg per day. The primary end point was the median difference in FACIT-F fatigue at day 15. Secondary outcomes included anxiety, depression, and sleep. Results One hundred forty-one patients were evaluable. Median FACIT-F fatigue scores improved from baseline to day 15 in all groups: MP+NTI (median score, 4.5; P = .005), PL+NTI (median score, 8.0; P < .001), MP+CTI (median score, 7.0; P = .004), and PL+CTI (median score, 5.0; P = .03). However, there were no significant differences in the median improvement in FACIT-F fatigue between the MP and PL groups (5.5 v 6.0, respectively; P = .69) and among all four groups (P = .16). Fatigue (P < .001), nausea (P = .01), depression (P = .02), anxiety (P = .01), drowsiness (P < .001), appetite (P = .009), sleep (P < .001), and feeling of well-being (P < .001), as measured by the ESAS, significantly improved in patients who received NTI. Grade ≥ 3 adverse events did not differ between MP and PL (40 of 93 patients v 29 of 97 patients, respectively; P = .06). Conclusion MP and NTI alone or combined were not superior to placebo in improving CRF. PMID:23690414

  10. Chemotherapy With or Without Maintenance Sunitinib for Untreated Extensive-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Study—CALGB 30504 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Ready, Neal E.; Pang, Herbert H.; Gu, Lin; Otterson, Gregory A.; Thomas, Sachdev P.; Miller, Antonius A.; Baggstrom, Maria; Masters, Gregory A.; Graziano, Stephen L.; Crawford, Jeffrey; Bogart, Jeffrey; Vokes, Everett E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of maintenance sunitinib after chemotherapy for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Patients and Methods The Cancer and Leukemia Group B 30504 trial was a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II study that enrolled patients before chemotherapy (cisplatin 80 mg/m2 or carboplatin area under the curve of 5 on day 1 plus etoposide 100 mg/m2 per day on days 1 to 3 every 21 days for four to six cycles). Patients without progression were randomly assigned 1:1 to placebo or sunitinib 37.5 mg per day until progression. Cross-over after progression was allowed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) from random assignment for maintenance placebo versus sunitinib using a one-sided log-rank test with α = .15; 80 randomly assigned patients provided 89% power to detect a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.67. Results One hundred forty-four patients were enrolled; 138 patients received chemotherapy. Ninety-five patients were randomly assigned; 10 patients did not receive maintenance therapy (five on each arm). Eighty-five patients received maintenance therapy (placebo, n = 41; sunitinib, n = 44). Grade 3 adverse events with more than 5% incidence were fatigue (19%), decreased neutrophils (14%), decreased leukocytes (7%), and decreased platelets (7%) for sunitinib and fatigue (10%) for placebo; grade 4 adverse events were GI hemorrhage (n = 1) and pancreatitis, hypocalcemia, and elevated lipase (n = 1; all in same patient) for sunitinib and thrombocytopenia (n = 1) and hypernatremia (n = 1) for placebo. Median PFS on maintenance was 2.1 months for placebo and 3.7 months for sunitinib (HR, 1.62; 70% CI, 1.27 to 2.08; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.60; one-sided P = .02). Median overall survival from random assignment was 6.9 months for placebo and 9.0 months for sunitinib (HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.79 to 2.10; one-sided P = .16). Three sunitinib and no placebo patients achieved complete response during maintenance. Ten (77%) of 13 patients evaluable after cross

  11. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial on probiotic soy milk and soy milk: effects on epigenetics and oxidative stress in patients with type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Mitra; Salehi, Rasoul; Feizi, Awat; Mirlohi, Maryam; Ghiasvand, Reza; Habibi, Nahal

    2015-11-01

    This clinical trial aimed to discover the effects of probiotic soy milk and soy milk on MLH1 and MSH2 promoter methylation, and oxidative stress among type II diabetic patients. Forty patients with type II diabetes mellitus aged 35-68 years were assigned to two groups in this randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial. Patients in the intervention group consumed 200 ml/day of probiotic soy milk containing Lactobacillus plantarum A7, while those in the control group consumed 200 ml/d of conventional soy milk for 8 weeks. Fasting blood samples, anthropometric measurements, and 24-h dietary recalls were collected at the baseline and at the end of the study, respectively. Probiotic soy milk significantly decreased promoter methylation in proximal and distal MLH1 promoter region (P < 0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively) compared with the baseline values, while plasma concentration of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) decreased significantly compared with soy milk (P < 0.05). In addition, a significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was observed in probiotic soy milk group compared with baseline value (P < 0.01). There were no significant changes from baseline in the promoter methylation of MSH2 within either group (P > 0.05). The consumption of probiotic soy milk improved antioxidant status in type II diabetic patients and may decrease promoter methylation among these patients, indicating that probiotic soy milk is a promising agent for diabetes management. PMID:26577825

  12. Clearance of cervical human papillomavirus infection by topical application of curcumin and curcumin containing polyherbal cream: a phase II randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Basu, Partha; Dutta, Sankhadeep; Begum, Rakiba; Mittal, Srabani; Dutta, Paromita Das; Bharti, Alok Chandra; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Biswas, Jaydip; Dey, Bindu; Talwar, Gursaran Prashad; Das, Bhudev Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin and curcumin containing polyherbal preparations have demonstrated anti-microbial and anti- viral properties in pre-clinical studies. Till date no therapeutic intervention has been proved to be effective and safe in clearing established cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. The present study evaluated the efficacy of Basant polyherbal vaginal cream (containing extracts of curcumin, reetha, amla and aloe vera) and of curcumin vaginal capsules to eliminate HPV infection from cervix. Women were screened by Pap smear and HPV DNA test by PCR. HPV positive women without high grade cervical neoplasias (N=287) were randomized to four intervention arms to be treated with vaginal Basant cream, vaginal placebo cream, curcumin vaginal capsules and placebo vaginal capsules respectively. All subjects were instructed to use one application of the assigned formulation daily for 30 consecutive days except during menstruation and recalled within seven days of the last application for repeat HPV test, cytology and colposcopy. HPV clearance rate in Basant arm (87.7%) was significantly higher than the combined placebo arms (73.3%). Curcumin caused higher rate of clearance (81.3%) than placebo though the difference was not statistically significant. Vaginal irritation and itching, mostly mild to moderate, was significantly higher after Basant application. No serious adverse events were noted. PMID:24289574

  13. Observer-based controller design for networked control systems with sensor quantisation and random communication delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; You, Jia

    2012-10-01

    This article addresses the study of observer-based controller design for network-based control systems in the presence of output quantisation and random communication delay simultaneously. In the communication channel, the output measurement are quantised before transmission, and two kinds of network-induced delays are taken into account simultaneously: (i) random delay from sensor to controller and (ii) random delay from controller to actuator. These two types of random delays are modelled as two independent Bernoulli distributed white sequences. The observer-based controller is synthesised to stabilise the networked closed-loop system in the sense of stochastic stability. Sufficient conditions for the existence of the controller are provided by stochastic Lyapunov method. An illustrative numerical example is employed to demonstrate the applicability and flexibility of the proposed design strategy.

  14. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of oral DA-1229 in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have inadequate glycaemic control with diet and exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Chang Hee; Park, Cheol-Young; Ahn, Kyu-Joeng; Kim, Nan-Hee; Jang, Hak-Chul; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Park, Joong-Yeol; Chung, Choon-Hee; Min, Kyung-Wan; Sung, Yeon-Ah; Park, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Hyo Jung; Park, Sung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background DA-1229 is a novel, potent and selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is orally bioavailable. We aimed to evaluate the optimal dose, efficacy and safety of DA-1229, in Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus suboptimally controlled with diet and exercise. Methods We enrolled 158 patients (mean age, 53 years and a mean BMI, 25.6 kg/m2). The mean baseline fasting plasma glucose level, HbA1c and duration of diabetes were 8.28 mmol/L, 7.6% (60 mmol/mol) and 3.9 years, respectively. After 2 or 6 weeks of an exercise and diet program followed by 2 weeks of a placebo period, the subjects were randomized into one of four groups for a 12-week active treatment period: placebo, 2.5, 5 or 10 mg of DA-1229. Results All three doses of DA-1229 significantly reduced HbA1c from baseline compared to the placebo group (−0.09 in the placebo group vs. −0.56, −0.66 and −0.61% in 2.5, 5 and 10-mg groups, respectively) but without any significant differences between the doses. Insulin secretory function, as assessed by homeostasis model assessment β-cell, the insulinogenic index, 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) C-peptide and post-OGTT C-peptide area under the curve (AUC)0–2h, significantly improved with DA-1229 treatment. The incidence of adverse events was similar between the treatment groups and DA-1229 did not affect body weight or induce hypoglycaemic events. Conclusions DA-1229 monotherapy (5 mg for 12 weeks) improved HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose level, OGTT results and β-cell function. This drug was well tolerated in Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. DA-1229 is a novel, potent and selective DPP-IV inhibitor that is orally bioavailable. In a pharmacodynamic study, more than 80% of DPP-IV was inhibited by a single dose of 5 mg or higher of DA-1229, and this level of inhibition was maintained for at least 24

  15. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Linda C.; Gies, Donna; Thompson, Emmanuel; Thomas, Bejoy

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using

  16. Networked Dynamic Systems: Identification, Controllability, and Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi-Abdolyousefi, Marzieh

    The presented dissertation aims to develop a graph-centric framework for the analysis and synthesis of networked dynamic systems (NDS) consisting of multiple dynamic units that interact via an interconnection topology. We examined three categories of network problems, namely, identification, controllability, and randomness. In network identification, as a subclass of inverse problems, we made an explicit relation between the input-output behavior of an NDS and the underlying interacting network. In network controllability, we provided structural and algebraic insights into features of the network that enable external signal(s) to control the state of the nodes in the network for certain classes of interconnections, namely, path, circulant, and Cartesian networks. We also examined the relation between network controllability and the symmetry structure of the graph. Motivated by the analysis results for the controllability and observability of deterministic networks, a natural question is whether randomness in the network layer or in the layer of inputs and outputs generically leads to favorable system theoretic properties. In this direction, we examined system theoretic properties of random networks including controllability, observability, and performance of optimal feedback controllers and estimators. We explored some of the ramifications of such an analysis framework in opinion dynamics over social networks and sensor networks in estimating the real-time position of a Seaglider from experimental data.

  17. Recruiting Participants for Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, H. Alix; Roschelle, Jeremy; Feng, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to look across strategies used in a wide range of studies to build a framework for researchers to use in conceptualizing the recruitment process. This paper harvests lessons learned across 19 randomized controlled trials in K-12 school settings conducted by a leading research organization to identify strategies that…

  18. Reporting Randomized Controlled Trials in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean; Montgomery, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly used to evaluate programs and interventions in order to inform education policy and practice. High quality reports of these RCTs are needed for interested readers to understand the rigor of the study, the interventions tested, and the context in which the evaluation took place (Mayo-Wilson et…

  19. A prospective, randomized, controlled, clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of high-frequency ultrasound in the treatment of Stage II and Stage III pressure ulcers in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Polak, Anna; Franek, Andrzej; Blaszczak, Edward; Nawrat-Szoltysik, Agnieszka; Taradaj, Jakub; Wiercigroch, Lidia; Dolibog, Pawel; Stania, Magdalena; Juras, Grzegorz

    2014-08-01

    International guidelines recommend high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS; MHz) for treating infected pressure ulcers (PUs). A 2-year, prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted to evaluate how HFUS affects PU healing among 42 geriatric patients treated in four nursing and care centers in Silesia, Poland. Participants (age range 71-95 years,) all with wounds that did not respond to previous treatment for at least 4 weeks, were randomly assigned to the treatment group (TG) (20 with 21 PUs, mean age 83.60 ± 5.04 years) or control group (CG) (22 with 23 PUs, mean age 82.59 ± 6.65 years). All patients received standard wound care (SWC); the TG additionally was provided HFUS (1 MHz, 0.5 W/ cm2, duty cycle of 20%, 1-3 minutes/cm2; one session per day, 5 days a week). Patients were monitored for 6 weeks or until wounds closed. Percent change in wound surface area (WSA), the Gilman's parameter, the weekly rate of change in WSA, and the percentage of PUs that improved (ie, decreased in size by at least 50% or closed) were used to compare differences. Data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test, the Wilcoxon matched pairs test, and the Mann-Whitney U test (P <0.05). Mean baseline WSA and the pretreatment duration of PUs were 15.38 ± 12.92 cm2 and 1.64 ± 0.73 months and 11.08 ± 7.52 cm2 and 2.26 ± 1.42 months in the TG and CG groups, respectively. After 6 weeks of treatment, the WSA of PUs decreased significantly in both groups (P = 0.000069 in the TG and P = 0.0062 in the CG) with significantly greater improvement in the TG (an average of 68.80% ± 37.23% compared with 37.24% ± 57.84%; P = 0.047). The value of the Gilman's parameter was greater in the TG than in the CG (0.88 ± 0.62 and 0.43 ± 0.50, respectively; P = 0.018). The mean weekly change of WSA was greater in the TG than in the CG but only for Stage II PUs (3.09 ± 2.93 cm2/week and 1.08 ± 1.43 cm2/week; P = 0.045). More Stage II PUs in the TG decreased by at least 50% (11 of 14 = 78.57%) than in

  20. Nonperturbative dynamical decoupling with random control.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jun; Bishop, C Allen; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2014-01-01

    Parametric fluctuations or stochastic signals are introduced into the rectangular pulse sequence to investigate the feasibility of random dynamical decoupling. In a large parameter region, we find that the out-of-order control pulses work as well as the regular pulses for dynamical decoupling and dissipation suppression. Calculations and analysis are enabled by and based on a nonperturbative dynamical decoupling approach allowed by an exact quantum-state-diffusion equation. When the average frequency and duration of the pulse sequence take proper values, the random control sequence is robust, fault-tolerant, and insensitive to pulse strength deviations and interpulse temporal separation in the quasi-periodic sequence. This relaxes the operational requirements placed on quantum control devices to a great deal. PMID:25169735

  1. LICC: L-BLP25 in patients with colorectal carcinoma after curative resection of hepatic metastases--a randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational, double-blinded phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background 15-20% of all patients initially diagnosed with colorectal cancer develop metastatic disease and surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment available. Current 5-year survival following R0-resection of liver metastases is 28-39%, but recurrence eventually occurs in up to 70%. To date, adjuvant chemotherapy has not improved clinical outcomes significantly. The primary objective of the ongoing LICC trial (L-BLP25 In Colorectal Cancer) is to determine whether L-BLP25, an active cancer immunotherapy, extends recurrence-free survival (RFS) time over placebo in colorectal cancer patients following R0/R1 resection of hepatic metastases. L-BLP25 targets MUC1 glycoprotein, which is highly expressed in hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. In a phase IIB trial, L-BLP25 has shown acceptable tolerability and a trend towards longer survival in patients with stage IIIB locoregional NSCLC. Methods/Design This is a multinational, phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a sample size of 159 patients from 20 centers in 3 countries. Patients with stage IV colorectal adenocarcinoma limited to liver metastases are included. Following curative-intent complete resection of the primary tumor and of all synchronous/metachronous metastases, eligible patients are randomized 2:1 to receive either L-BLP25 or placebo. Those allocated to L-BLP25 receive a single dose of 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide (CP) 3 days before first L-BLP25 dose, then primary treatment with s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg once weekly for 8 weeks, followed by s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg maintenance doses at 6-week (years 1&2) and 12-week (year 3) intervals unless recurrence occurs. In the control arm, CP is replaced by saline solution and L-BLP25 by placebo. Primary endpoint is the comparison of recurrence-free survival (RFS) time between groups. Secondary endpoints are overall survival (OS) time, safety, tolerability, RFS/OS in MUC-1 positive cancers. Exploratory

  2. He II heat transfer through random packed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlaan, Mark

    Superfluid helium (He II) contained in porous media is examined. In particular, heat transfer experiments were performed on He II contained in random packs of uniform size polyethylene spheres. Measured results include the steady state temperature and pressure drops across packs of spheres (35 micron, 49 micron, and 98 micron diameter) and the associated steady, step, and pulse heat inputs. Bath temperatures range from 1.6 K to 2.1 K to help grasp the superfluid effects. Laminar, turbulent, and transitional fluid flow regimes are examined. Turbulent results are fitted to an empirically derived turbulent He II heat flow in a channel equation with an added tortuosity (extra length traveled) term that accounts for the porous media. An average tortuosity of 1.33 +/- 0.07 was obtained, which is in good agreement with the values of 1.36 - 1.41 concluded from published work on classical fluid pressure drop across random packed spheres. Laminar permeability and shape factor results are compared to past studies of He II in porous media and in channel flows. The average critical heat flux, which describes the onset of turbulence, is predicted to be 0.19 W cm-2. The onset of turbulence is determined through a critical heat flux from which a critical Reynolds number is formulated, but does not describe He II turbulence in the normal fluid component. Other proposed He II "Reynolds numbers" are examined. The addition of the laminar and turbulent heat flow equations into a unifying prediction fits the transition regime data within 25 %. Transient temperatures compare favorably to a one-dimensional numerical solution that considers a variable Gorter-Mellink exponent and a piece-wise determination of the heat flux. Turbulent pressure drop results are fitted with empirically derived friction factors. The laminar permeability and equivalent channel shape factor derived from the pressure drop are compared the permeability and shape factor obtained from the temperature drop. Results

  3. Sample controllability of impulsive differential systems with random coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuorui; Sun, Jitao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the controllability of impulsive differential systems with random coefficients. Impulsive differential systems with random coefficients are a different stochastic model from stochastic differential equations. Sufficient conditions of sample controllability for impulsive differential systems with random coefficients are obtained by using random Sadovskii's fixed-point theorem. Finally, an example is given to illustrate our results.

  4. ADULTS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Krupa N.; Majeed, Zahraa; Yoruk, Yilmaz B.; Yang, Hongmei; Hilton, Tiffany N.; McMahon, James M.; Hall, William J.; Walck, Donna; Luque, Amneris E.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected older adults (HOA) are at risk of functional decline. Interventions promoting physical activity that can attenuate functional decline and are easily translated into the HOA community are of high priority. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether a physical activity counseling intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) improves physical function, autonomous motivation, depression and the quality of life (QOL) in HOA. Methods A total of 67 community-dwelling HOA with mild-to-moderate functional limitations were randomized to one of two groups: a physical activity counseling group or the usual care control group. We used SDT to guide the development of the experimental intervention. Outcome measures that were collected at baseline and final study visits included a battery of physical function tests, levels of physical activity, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL. Results The study participants were similar in their demographic and clinical characteristics in both the treatment and control groups. Overall physical performance, gait speed, measures of endurance and strength, and levels of physical activity improved in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Measures of autonomous regulation such as identified regulation, and measures of depression and QOL improved significantly in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Across the groups, improvement in intrinsic regulation and QOL correlated with an improvement in physical function (p<0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that a physical activity counseling program grounded in SDT can improve physical function, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL in HOA with functional limitations. PMID:26867045

  5. Short and Long-Term Effects of the Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Irbesartan on Intradialytic Central Hemodynamics: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled One-Year Intervention Trial (the SAFIR Study)

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjaergaard, Krista Dybtved; Jensen, Jens Dam; Christensen, Kent Lodberg; Strandhave, Charlotte; Tietze, Ida Noerager; Novosel, Marija Kristina; Bibby, Bo Martin; Jespersen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Little is known about the tolerability of antihypertensive drugs during hemodialysis treatment. The present study evaluated the use of the angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) irbesartan. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, one-year intervention trial. Setting and Participants Eighty-two hemodialysis patients with urine output >300 mL/day and dialysis vintage <1 year. Intervention Irbesartan/placebo 300 mg/day for 12 months administered as add-on to antihypertensive treatment using a predialytic systolic blood pressure target of 140 mmHg in all patients. Outcomes and Measurements Cardiac output, stroke volume, central blood volume, total peripheral resistance, mean arterial blood pressure, and frequency of intradialytic hypotension. Results At baseline, the groups were similar regarding age, comorbidity, blood pressure, antihypertensive medication, ultrafiltration volume, and dialysis parameters. Over the one-year period, predialytic systolic blood pressure decreased significantly, but similarly in both groups. Mean start and mean end cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure were stable and similar in the two groups, whereas central blood volume increased slightly but similarly over time. The mean hemodynamic response observed during a dialysis session was a drop in cardiac output, in stroke volume, in mean arterial pressure, and in central blood volume, whereas heart rate increased. Total peripheral resistance did not change significantly. Overall, this pattern remained stable over time in both groups and was uninfluenced by ARB treatment. The total number of intradialytic hypotensive episodes was (placebo/ARB) 50/63 (P = 0.4). Ultrafiltration volume, left ventricular mass index, plasma albumin, and change in intradialytic total peripheral resistance were significantly associated with intradialytic hypotension in a multivariate logistic regression analysis based on

  6. The penumbra of randomized control trials

    PubMed Central

    Nanivadekar, Arun S.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-occupation with randomized control trials as the basis of evidence-based medicine has increasingly shadowed other study designs over the last half a century. These include surveys, case-control studies, and case-cohort studies. They have the potential to overcome several ethical and cost constraints, but depend on the embedding of research in routine practice, emphasis on relevant but limited, accurate, and complete data, harnessing of information technology for this purpose, and epidemiological and statistical literacy among clinicians. Only then will it be possible to nurture and network research-oriented practices by therapeutic areas. Given these, the alternative study designs can pave the way to regulatory reforms that will ultimately benefit the discoverers, approvers and users of health-care tools. PMID:24010055

  7. Periodic or random nanostructures for light scattering control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berginc, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Our paper mainly focuses on the control of light scattering by periodic or randomly rough structures. First designed with bi-periodical structures, antireflective surfaces can be achieved with random patterns. We present some new structures with periodic or random patterns, which have been designed by rigorous numerical methods (FDTD) or analytical methods. We show that random interfaces offer new degrees of freedom and possibilities by control of their statistical properties.

  8. Randomized controlled trials - a matter of design.

    PubMed

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial. PMID:27354804

  9. Results of a Phase II Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Trial of Polyphenon E in Women with Persistent High Risk HPV Infection and Low Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Francisco A.R.; Cornelison, Terri; Nuño, Tomas; Greenspan, David L.; Byron, John W.; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Alberts, David S.; Chow, H-H. Sherry

    2014-01-01

    Objective In vitro data and pilot data suggest that green tea catechins may possess chemopreventive activity for cervical cancer and precursor lesions. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial of Polyphenon E (decaffeinated and enriched green tea catechin extract) in women with persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and low grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN1) to evaluate the potential of Polyphenon E for cervical cancer prevention. Methods Ninety-eight eligible women were randomized to receive either Polyphenon E (containing 800 mg epigallocatechin gallate) or placebo once daily for 4 months. The primary study outcome was oncogenic HPV clearance and clearance of CIN1. Results Polyphenon E was shown to be acceptable, safe and well tolerated. There was no difference in the response rate by treatment allocation. Complete response, defined as negative for high risk HPV and normal histopathology, was noted in 7 (17.1%) and 6 (14.6%) women in the Polyphenon E and placebo arms, respectively. Progression, defined as persistent oncogenic HPV with histopathologic evidence of progression, was more common in the Polyphenon E group than in the placebo group [6 (14.6%) vs. 3 (7.7%)]. Conclusion Based on the largest randomized placebo-controlled trial of a green tea extract for HPV related cervical disease, we conclude that four months of Polyphenon E intervention did not promote the clearance of persistent high risk HPVand related CIN 1. Further studies may be necessary to better delineate the risk factors for persistent HPV infection and biology of the disease to facilitate the evaluation of chemopreventive strategies. PMID:24388920

  10. Hormone-Balancing Effect of Pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Lepidium peruvianum Chacon): (II) Physiological and Symptomatic Responses of Early-Postmenopausal Women to Standardized doses of Maca in Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Multi-Centre Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, H. O.; Mscisz, A.; Reich-Bilinska, H.; Kapczynski, W.; Mrozikiewicz, P.; Bobkiewicz-Kozlowska, T.; Kedzia, B.; Lowicka, A.; Barchia, I.

    2006-01-01

    This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-corrected, outpatient, multi-centre (five sites) clinical study, in which a total of 168 Caucasian early-postmenopausal women volunteers (age>49 years) participated after fulfilling the criteria: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) >30 IU/ml and estrogen (E2) <40 pg/ml levels at admission. They were randomly allocated to Placebo and Pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Maca-GO) treatment, according to different monthly treatment sequences scheduled for each site. Two 500 mg vegetable hard gel capsules with Maca-GO or Placebo powder were self-administered twice daily with meals (total 2 g/day) during three (Trial I; n=102) or four (Trial II; n=66) months study periods. At the baseline and follow- up monthly intervals, blood levels of FSH, E2, progesterone (PRG) and lutinizing hormone (LH), as well as serum cholesterol (CHOL), triglycerides (TRG), high- and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) were measured. Menopausal symptoms were assessed according to Greene’s Score (GMS) and Kupperman’s Index (KMI). Data were analyzed using multivariate technique on blocs of monthly results in one model and Maca versus Placebo contrast in another model. A total of 124 women concluded the study. Maca-GO significantly stimulated production of E2 (P<0.001) with a simultaneous suppression (P<0.05) of blood FSH, increase (P<0.05) in HDL. Maca-GO significantly reduced both frequency and severity of individual menopausal symptoms (hot flushes and night sweating in particular) resulting in significant (P<0.001) alleviation of KMI (from 22 to 10), thus, offering an attractive non-hormonal addition to the choices available to early-postmenopausal women in the form of a natural plant alternative to Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) – hence, reducing dependence on hormone therapy programs. PMID:23675005

  11. Topaz-II reactor control unit development

    SciTech Connect

    Wyant, F.J.; Jensen, D.; Logothetis, J.

    1994-12-31

    The development for a new digital reactor control unit for the Topaz-II reactor is described. The unit is expected to provide the means for automated control during a possible Topaz flight experiment. The breadboard design and development is discussed.

  12. Estimating the minimum control count of random network models

    PubMed Central

    Ruths, Derek; Ruths, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The study of controllability of complex networks has introduced the minimum number of controls required for full controllability as a new network measure of interest. This network measure, like many others, is non-trivial to compute. As a result, establishing the significance of minimum control counts (MCCs) in real networks using random network null models is expensive. Here we derive analytic estimates for the expected MCCs of networks drawn from three commonly-used random network models. Our estimates show good agreement with exact control counts. Furthermore, the analytic expressions we derive offer insights into the structures within each random network model that induce the need for controls. PMID:26817434

  13. Air Pollution Control, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Werner, Ed.

    This book contains five major articles in areas of current importance in air pollution control. They are written by authors who are actively participating in the areas on which they report. It is the aim of each article to completely cover theory, experimentation, and practice in the field discussed. The contents are as follows: Emissions,…

  14. How chaosity and randomness control human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulmetyev, Renat M.; Yulmetyeva, Dinara; Gafarov, Fail M.

    2005-08-01

    We discuss the fundamental role that chaosity and randomness play in the determination of quality and efficiency of medical treatment. The statistical parameter of non-Markovity from non-equilibrium statistical physics of condensed matters is offered as a quantitative information measure of chaosity and randomness. The role of chaosity and randomness is determined by the phenomenological property, which includes quantitative informational measures of chaosity and randomness and pathology (disease) in a covariant form. Manifestations of the statistical informational behavior of chaosity and randomness are examined while analyzing the chaotic dynamics of RR intervals from human ECG's, the electric signals of a human muscle's tremor of legs in a normal state and at Parkinson disease, the electric potentials of the human brain core from EEG's during epileptic seizure and a human hand finger tremor in Parkinson's disease. The existence of the above stated informational measure allows to introduce the quantitative factor of the quality of treatment. The above-stated examples confirm the existence of new phenomenological property, which is important not only for the decision of medical problems, but also for the analysis of the wide range of problems of physics of complex systems of life and lifeless nature.

  15. Efficacy and Safety of FospropofolFD Compared to Propofol When Given During the Induction of General Anaesthesia: A Phase II, Multi-centre, Randomized, Parallel-Group, Active-Controlled, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Luo, Chaozhi; Liu, Jin; Zhang, Wensheng; Li, Yan; Xu, Jing

    2016-07-01

    The present phase II study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of fospropofol disodium for injection (FospropofolFD ) and propofol when given during the induction of general anaesthesia in patients scheduled for elective surgery. FospropofolFD is a water-soluble prodrug of propofol. Approved by the Ethical Committee, 240 participants aged 18-65 years were equally randomly allocated to receive an intravenous bolus of FospropofolFD 20 mg/kg or propofol 2 mg/kg without any anaesthetic pre-treatment. The primary efficacy end-point was the sedation success rate within 5 min. after administering investigational drugs (the sedation success is defined as obtaining Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale score of 1). All the participants completed the induction and intubation within 25 min. after administration. The sedation success rates within 5 min. after administration of FospropofolFD 20 mg/kg and propofol 2 mg/kg were 94.50% versus 100% in the intention-to-treat population and 95.10% versus 100% in the per-protocol population, respectively. The non-inferiority test obtained a p-value less than 0.025, and the lower limits of the one-sided 97.5% confidence interval were more than -0.09. This meant that FospropofolFD 20 mg/kg was considered non-inferior to propofol 2 mg/kg for the primary efficacy end-point. Compared with propofol 2 mg/kg, FospropofolFD 20 mg/kg had a slower sedation efficacy. No serious adverse events were observed in the two groups. The sedation success rate within 5 min. after administration of FospropofolFD 20 mg/kg was non-inferior to propofol 2 mg/kg, and FospropofolFD 20 mg/kg can be used for the induction of general anaesthesia safely. PMID:26781338

  16. Digital servo control of random sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    It is necessary to place number of sensors at different positions in sound field to determine actual sound intensities to which test object is subjected. It is possible to determine whether specification is being met adequately or exceeded. Since excitation is of random nature, signals are essentially coherent and it is impossible to obtain true average.

  17. Randomized phase II trial of sulindac, atorvastatin, and prebiotic dietary fiber for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Limburg, Paul J; Mahoney, Michelle R; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Sontag, Stephen J; Schoen, Robert E; Benya, Richard; Lawson, Michael J; Weinberg, David S; Stoffel, Elena; Chiorean, Michael; Heigh, Russell; Levine, Joel; Della'Zanna, Gary; Rodriguez, Luz; Richmond, Ellen; Gostout, Christopher; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2011-02-01

    Sulindac, atorvastatin, or prebiotic dietary fiber may reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, clinical trial data are currently limited. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving subjects 40 years or older, with previously resected colon cancer or multiple/advanced colorectal adenomas. Magnification chromoendoscopy (MCE) was performed to identify and characterize rectal aberrant crypt foci (ACF); eligibility criteria required five or more rectal ACFs at baseline. Intervention assignments were as follows: (a) atorvastatin 20 mg qd; (b) sulindac 150 mg bid; (c) oligofructose-enriched inulin (as ORAFTI®Synergy1) 6 gm bid; or (d) control (maltodextrin) 6 gm bid, for 6 months. Percent change in rectal ACF number (%ΔACF) within arm was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints included changes in proliferation (Ki67) and apoptosis (caspase-3), as measured from normal mucosa biopsy samples. Among 85 eligible randomized subjects, 76 (86%) completed the trial per protocol. The median (range) of rectal ACF was 9 (5-34) and 8 (0-37) at baseline and postintervention, respectively. The median (SD) for %ΔACF was 5.6 (-69% to 143%), -18.6 (-83% to 160%), -3.6 (-88% to 83%), and -10.0 (-100% to 117%) in the atorvastatin, sulindac, ORAFTI®Synergy1 and control arms, respectively. Neither within-arm (P = 0.12-0.59) nor between-arm (P = 0.30-0.92) comparisons of %ΔACF were statistically significant. The active and control interventions also seemed to have similar effects on mucosal proliferation and apoptosis (P > 0.05 for each comparison). Data from this multicenter, phase II trial do not provide convincing evidence of CRC risk reduction from 6-month interventions with atorvastatin, sulindac, or ORAFTI®Synergy1, although statistical power was limited by the relatively small sample size. PMID:21209397

  18. Efficacy of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program KM2H2 for Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention among Senior Hypertensive Patients: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Phase-II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jie; Chen, Xinguang; Li, Sijian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of the program Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2) in encouraging physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke among hypertensive patients enrolled in the Community-Based Hypertension Control Program (CBHCP). Design Cluster randomized controlled trial with three waves of longitudinal assessments at baseline, 3 and 6 months post intervention. Setting Community-based and patient-centered self-care for behavioral intervention in urban settings of China. Participants A total of 450 participants diagnosed with hypertension from 12 community health centers in Wuhan, China were recruited, and were randomly assigned by center to receive either KM2H2 plus standard CBHCP care (6 centers and 232 patients) or the standard care only (6 centers and 218 patients). Intervention KM2H2 is a behavioral intervention guided by the Transtheoretical Model, the Model of Personalized Medicine and Social Capital Theory. It consists of six intervention sessions and two booster sessions engineered in a progressive manner. The purpose is to motivate and maintain physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke. Outcome Measures Heart attack and stroke (clinically diagnosed, primary outcome), blood pressure (measured, secondary outcome), and physical activity (self-report, tertiary outcome) were assessed at the individual level during the baseline, 3- and 6-month post-intervention. Results Relative to the standard care, receiving KM2H2 was associated with significant reductions in the incidence of heart attack (3.60% vs. 7.03%, p < .05) and stroke (5.11% vs. 9.90%, p<0.05), and moderate reduction in blood pressure (-3.72mmHg in DBP and -2.92 mmHg in DBP) at 6-month post-intervention; and significant increases in physical activity at 3- (d = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.85) and 6-month (d = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.85) post-intervention, respectively. Conclusion The program KM2H2 is efficacious to reduce the

  19. Randomized controlled trials: what are they and who needs them?

    PubMed

    Pihlstrom, Bruce L; Curran, Alice E; Voelker, Helen T; Kingman, Albert

    2012-06-01

    Dentistry is rapidly entering a new era of evidence-based practice, and society is demanding prevention and treatment that has been proven to be effective in terms of meaningful health outcomes. Practitioners, individual patients and the public need randomized controlled trials because they provide the highest level of scientific evidence to change clinical practice and inform public health policy. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are conceptually simple but deceptively complex to design, implement and translate into clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials are fundamentally different from observational clinical research because they randomly assign volunteers to receive test or control interventions, they are prospective and the success of the test intervention is based on a meaningful clinical outcome that is specified before the trial begins. To be successful, randomized controlled trials must be carefully designed and powered to answer a specific question that will be generalizable to the population under study. Randomized controlled trials can be designed to evaluate efficacy, effectiveness, superiority, equivalence or noninferiority. Prominent issues and challenges in designing and conducting randomized controlled trials include carefully defining enrollment criteria, establishing an organizational infrastructure, use of a data-coordinating center, developing a manual of procedures, obtaining informed consent, recruiting and ensuring the safety of volunteer subjects, ensuring data quality, analysis and publication of trial outcomes, and translating results into clinical practice. PMID:22507057

  20. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Phase II Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Apricoxib in Combination With Either Docetaxel or Pemetrexed in Patients With Biomarker-Selected Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Martin J.; Tan, Ming T.; Fidler, Mary J.; Sanborn, Rachel E.; Otterson, Greg; Sequist, Lecia V.; Evans, Tracey L.; Schneider, Bryan J.; Keresztes, Roger; Rogers, John S.; de Mayolo, Jorge Antunez; Feliciano, Josephine; Yang, Yang; Medeiros, Michelle; Zaknoen, Sara L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Overexpression of COX-2 correlates with advanced stage and worse outcomes in non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), possibly as a result of elevated levels of COX-2–dependent prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Exploratory analyses of studies that used COX-2 inhibitors have demonstrated potentially superior outcome in patients in whom the urinary metabolite of PGE2 (PGE-M) is suppressed. We hypothesized that patients with disease defined by PGE-M suppression would benefit from the addition of apricoxib to second-line docetaxel or pemetrexed. Patients and Methods Patients with NSCLC who had disease progression after one line of platinum-based therapy, performance status of 0 to 2, and normal organ function were potentially eligible. Only patients with a ≥ 50% decrease in urinary PGE-M after 5 days of treatment with apricoxib could enroll. Docetaxel 75 mg/m2 or pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 once every 21 days per the investigator was administered with apricoxib or placebo 400 mg once per day. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Exploratory analysis was performed regarding baseline urinary PGE-M and outcomes. Results In all, 101 patients completed screening, and 72 of the 80 who demonstrated ≥ 50% suppression were randomly assigned to apricoxib or placebo. Toxicity was similar between the arms. No improvement in PFS was seen with apricoxib versus placebo. The median PFS for the control arm was 97 days (95% CI, 52 to 193 days) versus 85 days (95% CI, 67 to 142 days) for the experimental arm (P = .91). Conclusion Apricoxib did not improve PFS, despite biomarker-driven patient selection. PMID:25452446

  1. The Seattle–King County Healthy Homes II Project: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Asthma Self-management Support Comparing Clinic-Based Nurses and In-Home Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James; Takaro, Tim K.; Song, Lin; Beaudet, Nancy; Edwards, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the marginal benefit of in-home asthma self-management support provided by community health workers (CHWs) with standard asthma education from clinic-based nurses. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Community and public health clinics and homes. Participants Three hundred nine children aged 3 to 13 years with asthma living in low-income households. Interventions All participants received nurse-provided asthma education and referrals to community resources. Some participants also received CHW-provided home environmental assessments, asthma education, social support, and asthma-control resources. Outcome Measures Asthma symptom–free days, Pediatric Asthma Caretaker Quality of Life Scale score, and use of urgent health services. Results Both groups showed significant increases in caretaker quality of life (nurse-only group: 0.4 points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.6; nurse + CHW group: 0.6 points; 95% CI, 0.4–0.8) and number of symptom-free days (nurse only: 1.3 days; 95% CI, 0.5–2.1; nurse + CHW: 1.9 days; 95% CI, 1.1–2.8), and absolute decreases in the proportion of children who used urgent health services in the prior 3 months (nurse only: 17.6%; 95% CI, 8.1%–27.2%; nurse + CHW: 23.1%; 95% CI, 13.6%–32.6%). Quality of life improved by 0.22 more points in the nurse + CHW group (95% CI, 0.00–0.44; P=.049). The number of symptom-free days increased by 0.94 days per 2 weeks (95% CI, 0.02–1.86; P = .046), or 24.4 days per year, in the nurse + CHW group. While use of urgent health services decreased more in the nurse + CHW group, the difference between groups was not significant. Conclusion The addition of CHW home visits to clinic-based asthma education yielded a clinically important increase in symptom-free days and a modest improvement in caretaker quality of life. PMID:19188646

  2. Randomized controlled trial of atorvastatin in clinically isolated syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Waubant, E.; Pelletier, D.; Mass, M.; Cohen, J.A.; Kita, M.; Cross, A.; Bar-Or, A.; Vollmer, T.; Racke, M.; Stüve, O.; Schwid, S.; Goodman, A.; Kachuck, N.; Preiningerova, J.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Calabresi, P.A.; Miller, A.; Mokhtarani, M.; Iklé, D.; Murphy, S.; Kopetskie, H.; Ding, L.; Rosenberg, E.; Spencer, C.; Zamvil, S.S.; Waubant, E.; Pelletier, D.; Mass, M.; Bourdette, D.; Egan, R.; Cohen, J.; Stone, L.; Kita, M.; Elliott, M.; Cross, A.; Parks, B.J.; Bar-Or, A.; Vollmer, T.; Campagnolo, D.; Racke, M.; Stüve, O.; Frohman, E.; Schwid, S.; Goodman, A.; Segal, B.; Kachuck, N.; Weiner, L.; Preiningerova, J.; Carrithers, M.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Calabresi, P.; Kerr, D.; Miller, A.; Lublin, F.; Sayre, Peter; Hayes, Deborah; Rosenberg, Ellen; Gao, Wendy; Ding, Linna; Adah, Steven; Mokhtarani, Masoud; Neuenburg, Jutta; Bromstead, Carolyn; Olinger, Lynn; Mullen, Blair; Jamison, Ross; Speth, Kelly; Saljooqi, Kerensa; Phan, Peter; Phippard, Deborah; Seyfert-Margolis, Vicki; Bourcier, Katarzyna; Debnam, Tracia; Romaine, Jennifer; Wolin, Stephanie; O'Dale, Brittany; Iklé, David; Murphy, Stacey; Kopetskie, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To test efficacy and safety of atorvastatin in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). Methods: Subjects with CIS were enrolled in a phase II, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 14-center randomized trial testing 80 mg atorvastatin on clinical and brain MRI activity. Brain MRIs were performed quarterly. The primary endpoint (PEP) was development of ≥3 new T2 lesions, or one clinical relapse within 12 months. Subjects meeting the PEP were offered additional weekly interferon β-1a (IFNβ-1a). Results: Due to slow recruitment, enrollment was discontinued after 81 of 152 planned subjects with CIS were randomized and initiated study drug. Median (interquartile range) numbers of T2 and gadolinium-enhancing (Gd) lesions were 15.0 (22.0) and 0.0 (0.0) at baseline. A total of 53.1% of atorvastatin recipients (n = 26/49) met PEP compared to 56.3% of placebo recipients (n = 18/32) (p = 0.82). Eleven atorvastatin subjects (22.4%) and 7 placebo subjects (21.9%) met the PEP by clinical criteria. Proportion of subjects who did not develop new T2 lesions up to month 12 or to starting IFNβ-1a was 55.3% in the atorvastatin and 27.6% in the placebo group (p = 0.03). Likelihood of remaining free of new T2 lesions was significantly greater in the atorvastatin group compared with placebo (odds ratio [OR] = 4.34, p = 0.01). Likelihood of remaining free of Gd lesions tended to be higher in the atorvastatin group (OR = 2.72, p = 0.11). Overall, atorvastatin was well tolerated. No clear antagonistic effect of atorvastatin plus IFNβ-1a was observed on MRI measures. Conclusion: Atorvastatin treatment significantly decreased development of new brain MRI T2 lesion activity, although it did not achieve the composite clinical and imaging PEP. Classification of Evidence: This study provided Class II evidence that atorvastatin did not reduce the proportion of patients with CIS meeting imaging and clinical criteria for starting immunomodulating therapy after 12 months

  3. History of the Athens Canadian Random Bred and the Athens Random Bred control populations.

    PubMed

    Collins, K E; Marks, H L; Aggrey, S E; Lacy, M P; Wilson, J L

    2016-05-01

    The University of Georgia maintains two meat-type chicken control strains: the Athens Random Bred (ARB) and the Athens Canadian Random Bred (ACRB). The Athens Random Bred was developed from colored plumage commercial meat chicken strains in 1956. The ACRB is a replicate population of the Ottawa Meat Control strain which was developed in 1955 from white plumage commercial meat-type chickens. These genetic lines have been extremely valuable research resources and have been used extensively to provide comparative context to modern meat-type strains. The ACRB may be the oldest pedigreed control commercial meat-type chicken still in existence today. This paper reviews the history of the breed backgrounds for both control populations and reviews research utilizing the ACRB. PMID:26976904

  4. Random and Targeted Interventions for Epidemic Control in Metapopulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Gouhei; Urabe, Chiyori; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-07-01

    In general, different countries and communities respond to epidemics in accordance with their own control plans and protocols. However, owing to global human migration and mobility, strategic planning for epidemic control measures through the collaboration of relevant public health administrations is gaining importance for mitigating and containing large-scale epidemics. Here, we present a framework to evaluate the effectiveness of random (non-strategic) and targeted (strategic) epidemic interventions for spatially separated patches in metapopulation models. For a random intervention, we analytically derive the critical fraction of patches that receive epidemic interventions, above which epidemics are successfully contained. The analysis shows that the heterogeneity of patch connectivity makes it difficult to contain epidemics under the random intervention. We demonstrate that, particularly in such heterogeneously connected networks, targeted interventions are considerably effective compared to the random intervention. Our framework is useful for identifying the target areas where epidemic control measures should be focused.

  5. Smart structures for rotorcraft control (SSRC) II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacot, A. Dean; Dadone, Leo

    1998-06-01

    The Smart Structures for Rotor Control (SSRC) is a consortium under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Smart Structures program. Phase I of the program was administered by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, with Boeing Seattle as the consortium administrator, and MIT, PSU and Boeing Helicopters as the other principal consortium members. Phase II, renamed Smart Materials and Structures Demonstration Consortium (SMSDC), is a combination of the proposed Phase II efforts of SSRC and the Boeing MESA Smart Materials Actuated Rotor Technology (SMART) program. This paper summarizes the SSRC efforts, introduces the SMSDC program, and provides a framework for the relationships between specific SSRC technical papers in this conference. The SSRC objectives were to research smart structure methods to achieve reduced rotorcraft vibration, reduce acoustic noise, and increased performance. The SSRC program includes dynamic piezoelectric actuation of flaps on the rotor blades, distributed dynamic piezo actuation of the rotor twist, and quasi-steady rotor twist control using shape memory alloys. The objective of Phase II is then to fly a rotorcraft to demonstrate such a system.

  6. Emergence of patterns in random processes. II. Stochastic structure in random events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William I.

    2014-06-01

    Random events can present what appears to be a pattern in the length of peak-to-peak sequences in time series and other point processes. Previously, we showed that this was the case in both individual and independently distributed processes as well as for Brownian walks. In addition, we introduced the use of the discrete form of the Langevin equation of statistical mechanics as a device for connecting the two limiting sets of behaviors, which we then compared with a variety of observations from the physical and social sciences. Here, we establish a probabilistic framework via the Smoluchowski equation for exploring the Langevin equation and its expected peak-to-peak sequence lengths, and we introduce a concept we call "stochastic structure in random events," or SSRE. We extend the Brownian model to include antipersistent processes via autoregressive (AR) models. We relate the latter to describe the behavior of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, and we devise a further test for the validity of the Langevin and AR models. Given our analytic results, we show how the Langevin equation can be adapted to describe population cycles of three to four years observed among many mammalian species in biology.

  7. Emergence of patterns in random processes. II. Stochastic structure in random events.

    PubMed

    Newman, William I

    2014-06-01

    Random events can present what appears to be a pattern in the length of peak-to-peak sequences in time series and other point processes. Previously, we showed that this was the case in both individual and independently distributed processes as well as for Brownian walks. In addition, we introduced the use of the discrete form of the Langevin equation of statistical mechanics as a device for connecting the two limiting sets of behaviors, which we then compared with a variety of observations from the physical and social sciences. Here, we establish a probabilistic framework via the Smoluchowski equation for exploring the Langevin equation and its expected peak-to-peak sequence lengths, and we introduce a concept we call "stochastic structure in random events," or SSRE. We extend the Brownian model to include antipersistent processes via autoregressive (AR) models. We relate the latter to describe the behavior of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, and we devise a further test for the validity of the Langevin and AR models. Given our analytic results, we show how the Langevin equation can be adapted to describe population cycles of three to four years observed among many mammalian species in biology. PMID:25019731

  8. Multiple input/output random vibration control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-input/output random vibration control algorithm was developed based on system identification concepts derived from random vibration spectral analysis theory. The unique features of the algorithm are: (1) the number of input excitors and the number of output control responses need not be identical; (2) the system inverse response matrix is obtained directly from the input/output spectral matrix; and (3) the system inverse response matrix is updated every control loop cycle to accommodate system amplitude nonlinearities. A laboratory demonstration case of two imputs with three outputs is presented to demonstrate the system capabilities.

  9. Affectionate Writing Reduces Total Cholesterol: Two Randomized, Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Kory; Mikkelson, Alan C.; Hesse, Colin; Pauley, Perry M.

    2007-01-01

    In two 5-week trials, healthy college students were randomly assigned either to experimental or control groups. Participants in the experimental groups wrote about their affection for significant friends, relatives, and/or romantic partners for 20 minutes on three separate occasions; on the same schedule, those in the control groups wrote about…

  10. The Use of Control in Non-Randomized Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Si; Jorgensen, Randall

    The concept of control is fundamental to comparative research. In research designs where randomization of observational units is not possible, control has been exercised statistically from a single covariate by a process of residualization. The alternative, known as subclassification on the propensity score, was developed primarily for…

  11. Randomized Controlled Trials for the Treatment of Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Dominique C; Mekkes, Jan R; Tzellos, Thrasivoulos

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, inflammatory, recurrent, debilitating skin disease. Several treatment modalities are available, but most of them lack high-quality evidence. A systematic search was performed to identify all randomized controlled trials for the treatment of HS in order to review and evaluate the evidence. Recommendations for future randomized controlled trials include using validated scores, inclusion of patient rated outcomes, and thorough report of side effects. Evidence for long-term treatment and benefit/risk ratio of available treatment modalities is needed in order to enhance evidence-based treatment in daily clinical practice. Combining surgery with antiinflammatory treatment warrants further investigation. PMID:26617360

  12. Randomized phase II trial on mitomycin-C/cisplatin +/- KLT in heavily pretreated advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, H Y; Cai, Y; Yang, X M; Wang, Z H; Wang, J L; Zhao, X M; Li, J; Hu, X C

    2008-01-01

    A randomized phase II study using mitomycin (MMC)/cisplatin (DDP) regimen with or without Kanglaite (KLT, a traditional Chinese medicine) as salvage treatment was conducted to exploit KLT's potential effects on patients with advanced breast cancer (ABC). Triweekly regimen consisted of mitomycin (8 mg/m(2)) administered intravenously on day 1, and cisplatin (25 mg/m(2)) intravenously on days 1 to 3. KLT (100 ml) was given intravenously per day on days 1 to 14 every 3 weeks. Between April 2006 and July 2007, 60 patients with a median age of 48 years were randomized into MMC/DDP with or without KLT treatment. In all, the objective response rate (ORR) was 17.5%. There were no significant differences between experimental and control treatments in terms of ORR (14.3% vs. 20.7%, p = 0.730), clinical benefit rates (24.1% vs. 28.6%, p = 0.468), median time to progression (TTP; 3.63 vs. 4.0, p = 0.872), and overall survival (OS; 7.17 vs. not reached, p = 0.120). The median TTP for patients with complete or partial responses was 6.0 months, but only 2.1 months for patients with stable or progressive disease (SD or PD; p = 0.028). While the median OS for patients who obtained clinical benefit from chemotherapy was not reached, that of patients with SD of no more than 6 months or PD was only 7.17 months (p = 0.004). There is no additional benefit when KLT is added to the MMC/DDP doublet in the management of ABC. Patients who obtained clinical benefit from chemotherapy had a longer TTP and OS. PMID:18711764

  13. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II dose-finding study of the short acting β1-blocker, landiolol hydrochloride, in patients with suspected ischemic cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hirano, Masaharu; Hara, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Takahiko; Yamashina, Akira; Ikari, Yuji; Iino, Misako; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Kuribayashi, Sachio

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of the short-acting β1-receptor blocker, landiolol hydrochloride (0.06 and 0.125-mg/kg), to placebo during coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) in a phase 2 dose-finding study. A total of 183 patients suspected of having ischemic cardiac disease and scheduled to undergo an invasive coronary angiography were randomized to groups treated with landiolol hydrochloride (0.06 or 0.125-mg/kg) or placebo. The heart rate, safety, and the performance of coronary diagnosis using landiolol hydrochloride were evaluated in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, parallel study. The patients' heart rates during the coronary CTA were 67.6 ± 8.7 and 62.6 ± 7.8 beats/min in the 0.06 and 0.125-mg/kg landiolol hydrochloride groups, respectively, both of which were significantly lower than the heat rate of 73.7 ± 11.8 beats/min in the placebo group (P = 0.003 and P < 0.001, respectively). No adverse events or reactions occurred at an incidence of 5 % or greater, confirming the safety of landiolol hydrochloride. The proportion of correctly classified patients was significantly higher in the 0.125-mg/kg landiolol hydrochloride group than in the placebo group (73.6 vs. 50.0 %). Landiolol hydrochloride at doses of 0.06 and 0.125-mg/kg significantly decreased the heart rate compared with a placebo. The present findings suggest that landiolol hydrochloride is safe and useful at a dose of 0.125-mg/kg to improve coronary diagnostic performance during coronary CTA. PMID:23784548

  14. In School Settings, Are All RCTs (Randomized Control Trials) Exploratory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Denis; Jaciw, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    The motivation for this paper is the authors' recent work on several randomized control trials in which they found the primary result, which averaged across subgroups or sites, to be moderated by demographic or site characteristics. They are led to examine a distinction that the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) makes between "confirmatory"…

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Two Online Mathematics Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Haiwen; Woodworth, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    This study applies a randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of supplemental instruction using two online mathematics curricula--DreamBox and Reasoning Mind. It is an independent evaluation intended to generate unbiased results that will help inform the ongoing development of a charter school network's hybrid instructional model, which…

  16. Pedometer Use in University Freshmen: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCheminant, James D.; Smith, John D.; Covington, N. Kay; Hardin-Renschen, Tracie; Heden, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To describe activity patterns associated with a pedometer intervention in university freshmen and compare the intervention participants to controls for several health outcomes. Methods: Forty-six university freshmen were randomized to a group that wore a pedometer across the academic year with a goal of 10,000 steps/day or to a control…

  17. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  18. A double-blind randomized control trial of diazepam

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    A double-blind randomized controlled trial of diazepam against placebo in the management of minor conditions seen in general practice demonstrated that administration of either diazepam or placebo was associated with a substantial reduction in symptomatology three weeks later. There was no demonstrable difference between diazepam and placebo. PMID:6358487

  19. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  20. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  1. Teacher Awareness Program on Child Abuse: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Patrick; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Because teachers lack knowledge of the law, of school board policies, and of issues regarding child abuse and neglect, a professional development workshop was developed and presented to all teachers in the Ottawa Public Schools. Evaluation by a randomized controlled trial showed the workshop effective in increasing and maintaining knowledge.…

  2. Random vibration analysis of the Topaz-II nuclear reactor power system. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.E.

    1995-06-01

    The TOPAZ-II Ya-21U is one of six Russian made space nuclear power systems which is based on theomionic power conversion. The U.S. is presently analyzing TOPAZ-II to determine the reliability and feasibility of using this system. A structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit in May 1993 to provide data from which modal parameters could be identified. This test showed the fundamental frequency to be 10.5 Hz, yet the test results that the Russians conducted identified a fundamental frequency of 5 Hz. Another finite element model was created incorporating new developments in TOPAZ-II and modifications to the finite element model to better simulate the mass properties of the TOPAZ-II2. A second structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit 06-09 September 1994. This thesis focuses on the random vibration analysis of the TOPAZ-II Ya-2lU utilizing the most recent test results and the Master Series (updated version) I-DEAS software. The modal respose of the model and simulated random vibration tests were within 8.33%. This model is a feasible tool which can be used to analyze the TOPAZ unit without testing the unit to fatigue.

  3. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  4. The quality of randomized controlled trials in major anesthesiology journals.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Mary Lou V H; Rosenberg, Andrew L; O'Reilly, Michael; Shanks, Amy M; Sliwinski, Michelle J; Nauss, Michael D

    2005-06-01

    Increased attention has been directed at the quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and how they are being reported. We examined leading anesthesiology journals to identify if there were specific areas for improvement in the design and analysis of published clinical studies. All RCTs that appeared between January 2000 and December 2000 in leading anesthesiology journals (Anesthesiology,Anesthesia & Analgesia,Anaesthesia, and Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia) were retrieved by a MEDLINE search. We used a previously validated assessment tool, including 14 items associated with study quality, to determine a quality score for each article. The overall mean weighted quality score was 44% +/- 16%. Overall average scores were relatively high for appropriate controls (77% +/- 7%) and discussions of side effects (67% +/- 6%). Scores were very low for randomization blinding (5% +/- 2%), blinding observers to results (1% +/- 1%), and post-beta estimates (16% +/- 13%). Important pretreatment clinical predictors were absent in 32% of all studies. Significant improvement in the reporting and conduct of RCTs is required and should focus on randomization methodology, the blinding of investigators, and sample size estimates. Repeat assessments of the literature may improve the adoption of guidelines for the improvement of the quality of randomized controlled trials. PMID:15920210

  5. A Wearable Proprioceptive Stabilizer (Equistasi®) for Rehabilitation of Postural Instability in Parkinson’s Disease: A Phase II Randomized Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, Daniele; Giantin, Maria Giulia; Fasano, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Background Muscle spindles endings are extremely sensitive to externally applied vibrations, and under such circumstances they convey proprioceptive inflows to the central nervous system that modulate the spinal reflexes excitability or the muscle responses elicited by postural perturbations. The aim of this pilot study is to test the feasibility and effectiveness of a balance training program in association with a wearable proprioceptive stabilizer (Equistasi) that emits focal mechanical vibrations in patients with PD. Methods Forty patients with PD were randomly divided in two groups wearing an active or inactive device. All the patients received a 2-month intensive program of balance training. Assessments were performed at baseline, after the rehabilitation period (T1), and two more months after (T2). Posturographic measures were used as primary endpoint; secondary measures of outcome included the number of falls and several clinical scales for balance and quality of life. Results Both groups improved at the end of the rehabilitation period and we did not find significant between-group differences in any of the principal posturographic measures with the exception of higher sway area and limit of stability on the instrumental functional reach test during visual deprivation at T1 in the Equistasi group. As for the secondary outcome, we found an overall better outcome in patients enrolled in the Equistasi group: 1) significant improvement at T1 on Berg Balance Scale (+45.0%, p = .026), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (+83.7, p = .004), Falls Efficacy Scale (−33.3%, p = .026) and PDQ-39 (−48.8%, p = .004); 2) sustained improvement at T2 in terms of UPDRS-III, Berg Balance Scales, Time Up and Go and PDQ-39; 3) significant and sustained reduction of the falls rate. Conclusions This pilot trial shows that a physiotherapy program for training balance in association with focal mechanical vibration exerted by a wearable proprioceptive stabilizer

  6. Randomized controlled trials in diving and hyperbaric medicine.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are widely accepted as the most appropriate methodology available for the investigation of health interventions. This is because of the low potential for systematic bias and the ability to assume causality. Well-designed RCTs, often modified by the addition of blinding participants to the treatment allocated, greatly assist physicians and funding agencies in deciding on the most effective and cost-efficient methods available to prevent and treat ill health. One of the problems for hyperbaric physicians is the widely scattered nature of the evidence, making retrieval and appraisal problematic. This review assembles the randomized evidence in order to assist practitioners, discusses the nature of randomized trials and explores approaches to designing and performing powerful and convincing trials in this area. It is extracted from the UHMS Report Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Indications. PMID:24224286

  7. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial Investigating the Safety and Immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara Smallpox Vaccine (MVA-BN®) in 56-80-Year-Old Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N.; Hay, Christine M.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Marbury, Thomas C.; Wagner, Eva; Kreitmeir, Eva; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Young, Philip; Nichols, Richard; Meyer, Thomas P.; Weigl, Josef; Virgin, Garth; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; Chaplin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® is a live, highly attenuated, viral vaccine under advanced development as a non-replicating smallpox vaccine. In this Phase II trial, the safety and immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® (MVA) was assessed in a 56–80 years old population. Methods MVA with a virus titer of 1 x 108 TCID50/dose was administered via subcutaneous injection to 56–80 year old vaccinia-experienced subjects (N = 120). Subjects received either two injections of MVA (MM group) or one injection of Placebo and one injection of MVA (PM group) four weeks apart. Safety was evaluated by assessment of adverse events (AE), focused physical exams, electrocardiogram recordings and safety laboratories. Solicited AEs consisted of a set of pre-defined expected local reactions (erythema, swelling, pain, pruritus, and induration) and systemic symptoms (body temperature, headache, myalgia, nausea and fatigue) and were recorded on a memory aid for an 8-day period following each injection. The immunogenicity of the vaccine was evaluated in terms of humoral immune responses measured with a vaccinia-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) before and at different time points after vaccination. Results Vaccinations were well tolerated by all subjects. No serious adverse event related to MVA and no case of myopericarditis was reported. The overall incidence of unsolicited AEs was similar in both groups. For both groups immunogenicity responses two weeks after the final vaccination (i.e. Visit 4) were as follows: Seroconversion (SC) rates (doubling of titers from baseline) in vaccine specific antibody titers measured by ELISA were 83.3% in Group MM and 82.8% in Group PM (difference 0.6% with 95% exact CI [-13.8%, 15.0%]), and 90.0% for Group MM and 77.6% for Group PM measured by PRNT (difference 12.4% with 95% CI of [-1.1%, 27.0%]). Geometric mean titers (GMT) measured by ELISA two weeks after

  8. Control with a random access protocol and packet dropouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liyuan; Guo, Ge

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates networked control systems whose actuators communicate with the controller via a limited number of unreliable channels. The access to the channels is decided by a so-called group random access protocol, which is modelled as a binary Markov sequence. Data packet dropouts in the channels are modelled as independent Bernoulli processes. For such systems, a systematic characterisation for controller synthesis is established and stated in terms of the transition probabilities of the Markov protocol and the packet dropout probabilities. The results are illustrated via a numerical example.

  9. [Impact of the activation of intention to perform physical activity in type II diabetics: a randomized clinical trial].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marco Antonio Vieira; Gouvêa, Giovana Renata; Claro, Anielle Fabiane Buoso; Agondi, Rúbia de Freitas; Cortellazzi, Karine Laura; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro; Mialhe, Fábio Luiz

    2015-03-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent disease among the adult Brazilian population, and one that can be controlled by interventions such as physical activity, among others. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the impact of a traditional motivational strategy, associated with the activation of intention theory, on adherence to physical activity in patients with type II, diabetes mellitus who are part of the Unified Health System (SUS). Participants were divided into a control group (CG) and an intervention group (IG). In both groups, the traditional motivational strategy was applied, but the activation of intention strategy was only applied to the IG Group. After a two-month follow-up, statistically significant differences were verified between the groups, related to the practice of walking (p = 0.0050), number of days per week (p = 0.0076), minutes per day (p = 0.0050) and minutes walking per week (p = 0.0015). At the end of the intervention, statistically significant differences in abdominal circumference (p = 0.0048) between the groups were observed. The conclusion drawn is that the activation of intention strategy had greater impact on adherence to physical activity and reduction in abdominal circumference in type II diabetics, than traditional motivational strategy. PMID:25760127

  10. Perceptions of Massage Therapists Participating in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Adam; Dreusicke, Mark; Keever, Teresa; Ali, Ather

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical practice and randomized trials often have disparate aims, despite involving similar interventions. Attitudes and expectancies of practitioners influence patient outcomes, and there is growing emphasis on optimizing provider–patient relationships. In this study, we evaluated the experiences of licensed massage therapists involved in a randomized controlled clinical trial using qualitative methodology. Methods Seven massage therapists who were interventionists in a randomized controlled trial participated in structured interviews approximately 30 minutes in length. Interviews focused on their experiences and perceptions regarding aspects of the clinical trial, as well as recommendations for future trials. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for emergent topics and themes using standard qualitative methods. Results Six themes emerged. Therapists discussed 1) promoting the profession of massage therapy through research, 2) mixed views on using standardized protocols, 3) challenges of sham interventions, 4) participant response to the sham intervention, 5) views on scheduling and compensation, and 6) unanticipated benefits of participating in research. Conclusions Therapists largely appreciated the opportunity to promote massage through research. They demonstrated insight and understanding of the rationale for a clinical trial adhering to a standardized protocol. Evaluating the experiences and ideas of complementary and alternative medicine practitioners provides valuable insight that is relevant for the implementation and design of randomized trials. PMID:26388961

  11. Efficacy of nifedipine and alfuzosin in the management of distal ureteric stones: A randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Sameer; Lal, Shyam; Charak, K. S.; Chakravarti, Sumit; Kohli, Supreeti; Ahmad, Shamshad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stone disease is a significant and world-wide health problem. Recently, certain drugs have been used as a supplement to observation alone in an effort to improve spontaneous stone expulsion. We evaluated the efficacy of nifedipine and alfuzosin in the medical treatment of symptomatic, uncomplicated distal ureteral stones. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled prospective study to determine the efficacy of alfuzosin and nifedipine as an adjunctive medical therapy, to increases the stone-expulsion rates in distal ureteric calculus of size ≤10 mm. Investigators and patients were blinded to the randomization scheme. Patients were randomly divided into three equal groups of 35 patients each. Patients in Group I received tablet nifedipine 30 mg/day, Group II received alfuzosin 10 mg/day and Group III was the control group received tablet diclofenac sodium. The patient blood pressure, stone position on imaging, number of pain attacks, time of stone-expulsion, hospital re-admission and any adverse events were assessed. Patients were followed-up weekly and continued until the patient was rendered stone free or up to 28 days. Statistical analysis was performed and P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: Stone-expulsion was observed in 60%, 85.7% and 20% patients in Group I, II and III respectively. A statistically significant difference was noted in between Groups I versus III, Groups II versus III and Groups I versus II (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0315 respectively). The mean number of pain attacks was 2.91 ± 1.01 for Group I, 1.8 ± 0.83 for Group II, and 2.82 ± 1.12 for Group III, which is statistical significant in Groups II versus III, and Groups I versus II (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). Hospital re-admission rate was less in treatment groups when compare to control group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The use of alfuzosin and nifedipine as a medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteric stones proved to be safe and

  12. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. Methods: To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. Results: There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors’ efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Conclusions: Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups—plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen

  13. Teacher awareness program on child abuse: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McGrath, P; Cappelli, M; Wiseman, D; Khalil, N; Allan, B

    1987-01-01

    Teachers have a significant role in preventing, detecting and reporting child abuse and neglect. They are hindered in fulfilling this role by a serious lack of knowledge of the law, of school board policies, and of maltreatment. A comprehensive professional development workshop was developed and presented to elementary school teachers. The package was evaluated by means of a randomized controlled trial. The workshop proved to be effective in increasing and maintaining knowledge. PMID:3828866

  14. Effect of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Indurkar, Maya Sanjeev; Verma, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several chemotherapeutic agents have been developed to prevent gingivitis and its progression into periodontitis. In this present study, the efficacy of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel was assessed and compared on plaque induced gingivitis. Aim: To evaluate the effect of ozonated oil on plaque induced gingivitis and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine gel. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects, aged from 18 to 65 years, with plaque-induced gingivitis were selected from the outpatient Department of Periodontology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Aurangabad, for this study. They were divided randomly into the test or ozonated oil group (Group I) and the control or chlorhexidine gel group (Group II) with 10 subjects in each group. Subjects were randomly assigned to massage their gingiva thrice a day for 3 weeks with ozonated oil (test), and chlorhexidine gel (control). Plaque index and gingival index scores were recorded for the 20 subjects at baseline and after 3 weeks. Results: Ozonated oil (Group I) and chlorhexidine gel (Group II) groups showed statistically significant differences with respect to plaque index and gingival index, from the baseline to 3 weeks (P < 0.001 in both). But the difference between Group I and Group II, at the end of the study period, was not statistically significant with respect to the plaque index and gingival index. Conclusions: The ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel, both can be used as an effective agent in maintaining and improving gingival health. PMID:27041835

  15. Active control of tensegrity structures under random excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Raja, M.; Narayanan, S.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we consider vibration control of tensegrity structures under stationary and nonstationary random excitations. These excitations may be representative of many physical loading conditions, such as earthquake, wind, aerodynamic and acoustic excitations. The optimal control theory based on H2 and \\mathrm {H}_{\\infty } controller with full state and limited state feedback is used for the control. The response of the tensegrity structure is represented by the zero lag covariance matrix and the same is obtained by solving the matrix Lyapunov equation. The force generated by the electro-mechanical coupling of the piezoelectric actuator is used in the formulation. A tensegrity structure of class-1 comprising of two modules, with 24 pretension cables and six struts with piezoelectric actuators, is considered.

  16. Randomly Sampled-Data Control Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kuoruey

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to solve the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) problem with random time sampling. Such a sampling scheme may arise from imperfect instrumentation as in the case of sampling jitter. It can also model the stochastic information exchange among decentralized controllers to name just a few. A practical suboptimal controller is proposed with the nice property of mean square stability. The proposed controller is suboptimal in the sense that the control structure is limited to be linear. Because of i. i. d. assumption, this does not seem unreasonable. Once the control structure is fixed, the stochastic discrete optimal control problem is transformed into an equivalent deterministic optimal control problem with dynamics described by the matrix difference equation. The N-horizon control problem is solved using the Lagrange's multiplier method. The infinite horizon control problem is formulated as a classical minimization problem. Assuming existence of solution to the minimization problem, the total system is shown to be mean square stable under certain observability conditions. Computer simulations are performed to illustrate these conditions.

  17. Aromatherapy and behaviour disturbances in dementia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, J; Brown, R; Coulter, F; Irvine, E; Copland, C

    2001-10-01

    A random controlled trial of the relaxing effects of an aromatherapy massage on disordered behaviour in dementia was conducted. Twenty-one patients were randomly allocated into one of three conditions, aromatherapy and massage (AM), conversation and aromatherapy (CA) and massage only (M). AM showed the greatest reduction in the frequency of excessive motor behaviour of all three conditions. This reached statistical significance between the hours of three and four pm (p < 0.05). Post hoc analysis suggested that at this time of day the AM consistently reduced motor behaviour when compared with CA (p = 0.05). This provides preliminary evidence of a measurable sedative effect of aromatherapy massage on dementia within a robust scientific paradigm. Further research is recommended with an expanded sample size. PMID:11607948

  18. The Effectiveness of Propolis on Gingivitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Niraldo; Nör, Jacques E.; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a propolis rinse on induced gingivitis by using the co-twin study design. Methods: Twenty-one twin pairs (n=42) were enrolled in a gingivitis study with oral hygiene promotion (14 days) and gingivitis induction (21 days). During the gingivitis induction phase, one member of the twin pair was randomly assigned to a 2% typified propolis rinse, and the other was assigned a color-matched 0.05% sodium fluoride plus 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride rinse (positive control). Patients rinsed twice daily with 20 mL for 30 seconds for 21 days. Gingivitis was measured on days −14 (baseline), 0 (after hygiene phase), and 21 (after no-hygiene phase) by using the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) and by standard digital imaging of the gum tissues (G-parameter). Results: The 38 persons who completed the study (age 13–22 years) were well balanced according to PBS at baseline and G-parameter after the initial hygiene phase. After 21 days without oral hygiene, the propolis rinse and positive control rinse groups did not differ significantly for average PBS measurements or G-parameter. Conclusions: Use of a 2% typified propolis rinse was equivalent to a positive control rinse during a 21-day no-hygiene period. PMID:25380344

  19. Data handling at EBR-II (Experimental Breeder Reactor II) for advanced diagnostics and control work

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, R.W.; Schorzman, L.W.

    1988-01-01

    Improved control and diagnostics systems are being developed for nuclear and other applications. The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Division of Argonne National Laboratory has embarked on a project to upgrade the EBR-II control and data handling systems. The nature of the work at EBR-II requires that reactor plant data be readily available for experimenters, and that the plant control systems be flexible to accommodate testing and development needs. In addition, operational concerns require that improved operator interfaces and computerized diagnostics be included in the reactor plant control system. The EBR-II systems have been upgraded to incorporate new data handling computers, new digital plant process controllers, and new displays and diagnostics are being developed and tested for permanent use. In addition, improved engineering surveillance will be possible with the new systems.

  20. Building Kindergartners’ Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to one of three groups (n = 44 in each group): a number sense intervention group, a language intervention group, or a business as usual control group. Accounting for initial skill level in mathematical knowledge, children who received the number sense intervention performed better than controls at immediate post test, with meaningful effects on measures of number competencies and general math achievement. Many of the effects held eight weeks after the intervention was completed, suggesting that children internalized what they had learned. There were no differences between the language and control groups on any math-related measures. PMID:25866417

  1. Balneotherapy in fibromyalgia: a single blind randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ozkurt, Seçil; Dönmez, Arif; Zeki Karagülle, M; Uzunoğlu, Emel; Turan, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Nergis

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of balneotherapy in fibromyalgia management. Fifty women with fibromyalgia under pharmacological treatment were randomly assigned to either the balneotherapy (25) or the control (25) group. Four patients from the balneotherapy group and one patient from the control group left the study after randomization. The patients in the balneotherapy group (21) had 2 thermomineral water baths daily for 2 weeks in Tuzla Spa Center. The patients in the control group (24) continued to have their medical treatment and routine daily life. An investigator who was blinded to the study arms assessed the patients. All patients were assessed four times; at the beginning of the study, at the end of the 2nd week, the 1st month, and the 3rd month after balneotherapy. Outcome measures of the study were pain intensity, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), patient's global assessment, investigator's global assessment, SF-36 scores, and tender point count. Balneotherapy was found to be superior at the end of the cure period in terms of pain intensity, FIQ, Beck Depression Inventory, patient's global assessment, investigator's global assessment scores, and tender point count as compared to the control group. The superiority of balneotherapy lasted up to the end of the 3rd month, except for the Beck Depression Inventory score and the investigator's global assessment score. Significant improvements were observed in PF, GH, and MH subscales of SF-36 during the study period in the balneotherapy group; however, no such improvement was observed in the control group. Balneotherapy was superior only in VT subscale at the end of therapy and at the end of the third month after the therapy as compared to the controls. It was concluded that balneotherapy provides beneficial effects in patients with fibromyalgia. PMID:21461716

  2. Cervical Lidocaine for IUD Insertional Pain: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, Colleen P.; Madden, Tessa; Zhao, Qiuhong; Secura, Gina; Allsworth, Jenifer E.; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anticipated pain with intrauterine device (IUD) insertion may be a barrier to widespread use. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of intracervical 2% lidocaine gel for pain relief with IUD insertion. Study Design We performed a double-blind, randomized controlled trial of women undergoing IUD insertion. Participants were randomly assigned to 2% lidocaine or placebo gel. Study gel (3ccs) wase placed 3 minutes prior to IUD insertion. Pain scores were measured at various time points using a 10-point visual analog scale. Results Of the 200 participants randomized, 199 completed the study. Pain scores among lidocaine and placebo arms were similar at tenaculum placement (lidocaine and placebo; median 4, range 0–10 p=0.15) as well as with insertion (lidocaine: median 5 range 1–10, placebo: median 6 range 0–10 p=0.16). These results did not differ by parity. Conclusions Topical or intracervical 2% lidocaine gel prior to IUD insertion does not decrease pain scores. PMID:23107081

  3. Medication reconciliation at patient admission: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Antonio E.; Lombardi, Natália F.; Andrzejevski, Vânia S.; Frandoloso, Gibran; Correr, Cassyano J.; Carvalho, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To measure length of hospital stay (LHS) in patients receiving medication reconciliation. Secondary characteristics included analysis of number of preadmission medications, medications prescribed at admission, number of discrepancies, and pharmacists interventions done and accepted by the attending physician. Methods: A 6 month, randomized, controlled trial conducted at a public teaching hospital in southern Brazil. Patients admitted to general wards were randomized to receive usual care or medication reconciliation, performed within the first 72 hours of hospital admission. Results: The randomization process assigned 68 patients to UC and 65 to MR. LHS was 10±15 days in usual care and 9±16 days in medication reconciliation (p=0.620). The total number of discrepancies was 327 in the medication reconciliation group, comprising 52.6% of unintentional discrepancies. Physicians accepted approximately 75.0% of the interventions. Conclusion: These results highlight weakness at patient transition care levels in a public teaching hospital. LHS, the primary outcome, should be further investigated in larger studies. Medication reconciliation was well accepted by physicians and it is a useful tool to find and correct discrepancies, minimizing the risk of adverse drug events and improving patient safety. PMID:27011775

  4. Shallow Semantic Parsing of Randomized Controlled Trial Reports

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Hyung; Kogan, Yacov; Thomas, Prem; Codish, Seymour; Krauthammer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we are measuring the performance of Propbank-based Machine Learning (ML) for automatically annotating abstracts of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) with semantically meaningful tags. Propbank is a resource of annotated sentences from the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) corpus, and we were interested in assessing performance issues when porting this resource to the medical domain. We compare intra-domain (WSJ/WSJ) with cross-domain (WSJ/medical abstracts) performance. Although the intra-domain performance is superior, we found a reasonable cross-domain performance. PMID:17238412

  5. Neighborhood Effects in a Behavioral Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Sandi L.; Leonard, Tammy; Murdoch, James; Hughes, Amy; McQueen, Amy; Gupta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions intended to modify health behaviors may be influenced by neighborhood effects which can impede unbiased estimation of intervention effects. Examining a RCT designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (N=5,628), we found statistically significant neighborhood effects: average CRC test use among neighboring study participants was significantly and positively associated with individual patient’s CRC test use. This potentially important spatially-varying covariate has not previously been considered in a RCT. Our results suggest that future RCTs of health behavior interventions should assess potential social interactions between participants, which may cause intervention arm contamination and may bias effect size estimation. PMID:25456014

  6. Efficacy of Yoga for Vasomotor Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Katherine M.; Reed, Susan D.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Sherman, Karen J.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Caan, Bette; Sternfeld, Barbara; Carpenter, Janet S.; Learman, Lee A.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Cohen, Lee S.; Joffe, Hadine; Anderson, Garnet L.; Larson, Joseph C.; Hunt, Julie R.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of yoga in alleviating VMS frequency and bother. Methods Three by two factorial design, randomized, controlled. Eligible women were randomized to yoga (n=107), exercise (n=106), or usual activity (n=142), and were simultaneously randomized to double-blind comparison of omega-3 fatty acid (n=177) or placebo (n=178) capsules. Yoga intervention was twelve, weekly, 90-minute yoga classes with daily home practice. Primary outcomes were VMS frequency and bother assessed by daily diaries at baseline, 6, and 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included insomnia symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index) at baseline and 12 weeks. Results Among 249 randomized women, 237 (95%) completed 12-week assessments. Mean baseline VMS frequency was 7.4/day (95% CI 6.6, 8.1) in the yoga group and 8.0/day (95% CI 7.3, 8.7) in the usual activity group. Intent-to-treat analyses included all participants with response data (n=237). There was no difference between intervention groups in change in VMS frequency from baseline to 6 and 12 weeks (mean difference (yoga – usual activity) from baseline −0.3 (95% CI −1.1, 0.5) at 6 weeks and −0.3 (95% CI −1.2, 0.6) at 12 weeks (p=0.119 across both time points). Results were similar for VMS bother. At week 12, yoga was associated with an improvement in insomnia symptoms (mean difference [yoga-usual activity] in change –Insomnia Severity Index, 1.3 [95% CI −2.5, −0.1][p=0.007]). Conclusion Among healthy women, 12 weeks of yoga class plus home practice compared with usual activity did not improve VMS frequency or bother, but reduced insomnia symptoms. PMID:24045673

  7. A randomized controlled trial of qigong for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia is difficult to treat and requires the use of multiple approaches. This study is a randomized controlled trial of qigong compared with a wait-list control group in fibromyalgia. Methods One hundred participants were randomly assigned to immediate or delayed practice groups, with the delayed group receiving training at the end of the control period. Qigong training (level 1 Chaoyi Fanhuan Qigong, CFQ), given over three half-days, was followed by weekly review/practice sessions for eight weeks; participants were also asked to practice at home for 45 to 60 minutes per day for this interval. Outcomes were pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function, and these were recorded at baseline, eight weeks, four months and six months. Immediate and delayed practice groups were analyzed individually compared to the control group, and as a combination group. Results In both the immediate and delayed treatment groups, CFQ demonstrated significant improvements in pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function when compared to the wait-list/usual care control group at eight weeks, with benefits extending beyond this time. Analysis of combined data indicated significant changes for all measures at all times for six months, with only one exception. Post-hoc analysis based on self-reported practice times indicated greater benefit with the per protocol group compared to minimal practice. Conclusions This study demonstrates that CFQ, a particular form of qigong, provides long-term benefits in several core domains in fibromyalgia. CFQ may be a useful adjuvant self-care treatment for fibromyalgia. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938834. PMID:22863206

  8. Corticosteroid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhong-Min; Wang, Shi-Ji; Zhao, Shu-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yu-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent reports about the benefits of corticosteroid therapy in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have shown conflicting results. We aimed to explore the effects of corticosteroid therapy in SAP patients on patient outcomes by performing a meta-analysis. Methods: Databases (Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedicine Database, and China Academic Journal Full-Text Database) were queried for all relevant, randomized, controlled trials investigating corticosteroid therapy in patients with SAP. Results: Six randomized, controlled trials including 430 SAP patients were identified. Corticosteroid therapy for SAP was associated with reductions in the length of hospital stay, the need for surgical intervention, and the mortality rate (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -9.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.91 to -2.04, P = 0.01; odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.18-0.67, P = 0.002; OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.94, P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the complication rates or Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores in patients with or without corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion: Corticosteroid therapy may improve outcomes in patients with SAP. PMID:26339332

  9. Enhancing antiepileptic drug adherence: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian; Sheeran, Paschal; Reuber, Markus

    2009-12-01

    Suboptimal adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is commonplace, and increases the risk of status epilepticus and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. This randomized controlled trial was designed to demonstrate whether an implementation intention intervention involving the completion of a simple self-administered questionnaire linking the intention of taking medication with a particular time, place, and other activity can improve AED treatment schedule adherence. Of the 81 patients with epilepsy who were randomized, 69 completed a 1-month monitoring period with an objective measure of tablet taking (electronic registration of pill bottle openings, Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS]). Intervention participants showed improved adherence relative to controls on all three outcomes: doses taken in total (93.4% vs. 79.1%), days on which correct dose was taken (88.7% vs. 65.3%), and doses taken on schedule (78.8% vs. 55.3%) (P<0.01). The implementation intention intervention may be an easy-to-administer and effective means of promoting AED adherence. PMID:19864187

  10. Cognitive Stimulation in Patients with Dementia: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mapelli, Daniela; Di Rosa, Elisa; Nocita, Rosaria; Sava, Donatella

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims This study explores the effective outcomes of a structured cognitive stimulation treatment to improve cognition and behavioral symptoms in people with dementia (PWDs), using a randomized controlled clinical trial. Methods Thirty PWDs were divided into three groups: experimental (treated with cognitive stimulation), placebo (treated with occupational therapy), and control (continuing with the usual activities of the nursing home). Assessment, at baseline and after a period of 8 weeks, was performed using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, activities of daily living, Mini-Mental State Examination, Esame Neuropsicologico Breve 2, Geriatric Depression Scale and Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Scale. Results Only the experimental group improved its performance in cognitive tests (p < 0.05) and showed a significant decrease in behavioral symptoms (p < 0.01) after the treatment. Conclusions The results suggest that a cognitive stimulation treatment for PWDs would improve not only their cognition, but also behavioral symptoms. PMID:24052800

  11. Standards of Reporting of Randomized Controlled Trials in General Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Wiener, Martin; Alshameeri, Zeiad; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Elbourne, Diana; Reed, Malcolm W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the quality of reporting of surgical randomized controlled trials published in surgical and general medical journals using Jadad score, allocation concealment, and adherence to CONSORT guidelines and to identify factors associated with good quality. Summary Background Data: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide the best evidence about the relative effectiveness of different interventions. Improper methodology and reporting of RCTs can lead to erroneous conclusions about treatment effects, which may mislead decision-making in health care at all levels. Methods: Information was obtained on RCTs published in 6 general surgical and 4 general medical journals in the year 2003. The quality of reporting of RCTs was assessed under masked conditions using allocation concealment, Jadad score, and a CONSORT checklist devised for the purpose. Results: Of the 69 RCTs analyzed, only 37.7% had a Jadad score of ≥3, and only 13% of the trials clearly explained allocation concealment. The modified CONSORT score of surgical trials reported in medical journals was significantly higher than those reported in surgical journals (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.001). Overall, the modified CONSORT score was higher in studies with higher author numbers (P = 0.03), multicenter studies (P = 0.002), and studies with a declared funding source (P = 0.022). Conclusion: The overall quality of reporting of surgical RCTs was suboptimal. There is a need for improving awareness of the CONSORT statement among authors, reviewers, and editors of surgical journals and better quality control measures for trial reporting and methodology. PMID:17060756

  12. Preconception maternal nutrition: a multi-site randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research directed to optimizing maternal nutrition commencing prior to conception remains very limited, despite suggestive evidence of its importance in addition to ensuring an optimal nutrition environment in the periconceptional period and throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. Methods/Study design This is an individually randomized controlled trial of the impact on birth length (primary outcome) of the time at which a maternal nutrition intervention is commenced: Arm 1: ≥ 3 mo preconception vs. Arm 2: 12-14 wk gestation vs. Arm 3: none. 192 (derived from 480) randomized mothers and living offspring in each arm in each of four research sites (Guatemala, India, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo). The intervention is a daily 20 g lipid-based (118 kcal) multi-micronutient (MMN) supplement. Women randomized to receive this intervention with body mass index (BMI) <20 or whose gestational weight gain is low will receive an additional 300 kcal/d as a balanced energy-protein supplement. Researchers will visit homes biweekly to deliver intervention and monitor compliance, pregnancy status and morbidity; ensure prenatal and delivery care; and promote breast feeding. The primary outcome is birth length. Secondary outcomes include: fetal length at 12 and 34 wk; incidence of low birth weight (LBW); neonatal/infant anthropometry 0-6 mo of age; infectious disease morbidity; maternal, fetal, newborn, and infant epigenetics; maternal and infant nutritional status; maternal and infant microbiome; gut inflammatory biomarkers and bioactive and nutritive compounds in breast milk. The primary analysis will compare birth Length-for-Age Z-score (LAZ) among trial arms (independently for each site, estimated effect size: 0.35). Additional statistical analyses will examine the secondary outcomes and a pooled analysis of data from all sites. Discussion Positive results of this trial will support a paradigm shift in attention to nutrition of all females of

  13. Postoperative pain relief following hysterectomy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Raghvendra, K. P.; Thapa, Deepak; Mitra, Sukanya; Ahuja, Vanita; Gombar, Satinder; Huria, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women experience moderate to severe postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a new modality for providing postoperative pain relief in these patients. Materials and Methods: The present study was a single center, prospective randomized trial. After the Institutional Ethics Committee approval and informed consent, patients were randomized to either epidural group: Epidural block placement + general anesthesia (GA) or TAP group: Single shot TAP block + GA. Patients in both the groups received standard general anesthetic technique and intravenous tramadol patient-controlled analgesia in the postoperative period. Patients were monitored for tramadol consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) both at rest and on coughing, hemodynamics, and side effects at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. Results: The total consumption of tramadol in 24 h was greater in TAP group as compared to epidural group (68.8 [25.5] vs. 5.3 [11.6] mg, P < 0.001). The VAS scores at rest and on coughing were higher in TAP group as compared to the epidural group at 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively (P < 0.05). None of the patients in either group had any adverse effects. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia provided greater tramadol-sparing effect with superior analgesia postoperatively as compared to TAP block in patients up to 24 h following TAH. PMID:27499592

  14. Treatment of bulimia nervosa with sertraline: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Milano, W; Petrella, C; Sabatino, C; Capasso, A

    2004-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is one of the most frequently encountered eating disorders in industrialized societies. It has been suggested that reduced serotonin activity may trigger some of the cognitive and mood disturbances associated with BN. Thus, pharmacologic treatment of BN is mainly based on the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which have proved effective. At present, the biological basis of this disorder is not completely clear. The aim of this randomized, controlled trial was to verify the efficacy of sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, in a group of patients with a diagnosis of BN. Twenty female outpatients, with an age range of 24 to 36 years and a diagnosis of purging type BN as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM IV), were assigned randomly to two treatment groups. The first group received sertraline 100 mg/day for 12 weeks; the second group received placebo. The study was conducted for 12 weeks, with weekly clinical assessments. At the end of the observation period, the group treated with sertraline had a statistically significant reduction in the number of binge eating crises and purging compared with the group who received placebo. In no case was treatment interrupted because of side effects. This study confirms that sertraline is well tolerated and effective in reducing binge-eating crises and purging in patients with BN. PMID:15605617

  15. Treatment of bulimia nervosa with fluvoxamine: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Milano, W; Siano, C; Putrella, C; Capasso, A

    2005-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is one of the most common eating disorders in industrialized societies. It has been suggested that reduced serotonin activity triggers some of the cognitive and mood disturbances associated with BN. For this reason, the pharmacologic treatment of BN consists mainly of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which have been proven effective. At present, the physiologic bases of this disorder are not yet completely understood. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to verify the efficacy of the SSRI fluvoxamine in patients with a diagnosis of BN. Twelve female outpatients aged 21 to 34 years with a diagnosis of BN-binge purging (as defined by the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [DSM IV]) were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups: the fluvoxamine 200 mg/day group and the placebo group. The patients underwent weekly clinical assessments for 12 weeks. At the end of the observation period, there was a statistically significant reduction in the number of binge-eating crises and purging episodes in the fluvoxamine group compared with placebo. In no case was treatment interrupted because of emergent side effects. These findings support the hypothesis that fluvoxamine is well tolerated and effective in reducing binge-eating crises and purging episodes in patients with BN. PMID:16236688

  16. Reiki for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Assefi, Nassim; Bogart, Andy; Goldberg, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Fibromyalgia is a common, chronic pain condition for which patients frequently use complementary and alternative medicine, including Reiki. Our objective was to determine whether Reiki is beneficial as an adjunctive fibromyalgia treatment. Design This was a factorial designed, randomized, sham-controlled trial in which participants, data collection staff, and data analysts were blinded to treatment group. Setting/location The study setting was private medical offices in the Seattle, Washington metropolitan area. Subjects The subjects were comprised 100 adults with fibromyalgia. Intervention Four (4) groups received twice-weekly treatment for 8 weeks by either a Reiki master or actor randomized to use direct touch or no touch (distant therapy). Outcome measures The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by visual analog scale at weeks 4, 8, and 20 (3 months following end of treatment). Secondary outcomes were physical and mental functioning, medication use, and health provider visits. Participant blinding and adverse effects were ascertained by selfreport. Improvement between groups was examined in an intention-to-treat analysis. Results Neither Reiki nor touch had any effect on pain or any of the secondary outcomes. All outcome measures were nearly identical among the 4 treatment groups during the course of the trial. Conclusion Neither Reiki nor touch improved the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Energy medicine modalities such as Reiki should be rigorously studied before being recommended to patients with chronic pain symptoms. PMID:18991519

  17. Fasciclin II controls proneural gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    García-Alonso, L; VanBerkum, M F; Grenningloh, G; Schuster, C; Goodman, C S

    1995-01-01

    Fasciclin II (Fas II), an NCAM-like cell adhesion molecule in Drosophila, is expressed on a subset of embryonic axons and controls selective axon fasiculation. Fas II is also expressed in imaginal discs. Here we use genetic analysis to show that Fas II is required for the control of proneural gene expression. Clusters of cells in the eye-antennal imaginal disc express the achaete proneural gene and give rise to mechanosensory neurons; other clusters of cells express the atonal gene and give rise to ocellar photoreceptor neurons. In fasII loss-of-function mutants, the expression of both proneural genes is absent in certain locations, and, as a result, the corresponding sensory precursors fail to develop. In fasII gain-of-function conditions, extra sensory structures arise from this same region of the imaginal disc. Mutations in the Abelson tyrosine kinase gene show dominant interactions with fasII mutations, suggesting that Abl and Fas II function in a signaling pathway that controls proneural gene expression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7479828

  18. Adaptive robust control of the EBR-II reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Power, M.A.; Edwards, R.M.

    1996-05-01

    Simulation results are presented for an adaptive H{sub {infinity}} controller, a fixed H{sub {infinity}} controller, and a classical controller. The controllers are applied to a simulation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II primary system. The controllers are tested for the best robustness and performance by step-changing the demanded reactor power and by varying the combined uncertainty in initial reactor power and control rod worth. The adaptive H{sub {infinity}} controller shows the fastest settling time, fastest rise time and smallest peak overshoot when compared to the fixed H{sub {infinity}} and classical controllers. This makes for a superior and more robust controller.

  19. The electrically and magnetically controllable random laser from dye-doped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lihua; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Chong; Wang, Yan; Cui, Yiping; Lu, Yanqing

    2014-08-01

    The electrically and magnetically controllable random laser from dye-doped liquid crystals (LCs) was studied. The rubbing-alignment of the polyimide in the LC cell influenced the threshold voltage and the response time of the electrically controllable random laser. When the applied electric field was increased, the response time of the random laser decreased. The magnetically controllable random laser was studied in the hollow fiber structure, of which the response time was less than 1 s.

  20. A randomized controlled trial of analgesia during vaccination in adults.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Anna; Lord, Allison; Hogan, Mary-Ellen; Kikuta, Andrew; Yiu, Ashley; Darra, Erwin; Bruinse, Barbara; Keogh, Tom; Stephens, Derek

    2010-07-19

    Although immunization injections are the most common painful medical procedures, pain-relieving interventions are not routinely used. In this randomized controlled trial, we compared the effectiveness of topical anesthesia using liposomal lidocaine to: (1) vapocoolant spray using a proprietary blend of 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane; (2) nurse-administered tactile stimulation; or (3) self-directed distraction by means of reading a magazine. Liposomal lidocaine was more effective (p

  1. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect. PMID:18387273

  2. Randomized Controlled Trials in Environmental Health Research: Ethical Issues

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are becoming increasingly common in environmental health research. Like all studies involving human subjects, environmental health RCTs raise many different ethical issues, ranging from obtaining informed consent, to minimizing risks, to protecting privacy and confidentiality. One of the most important issues raised by these studies is whether it is ethical to withhold effective environmental health interventions from research subjects in order to satisfy scientific objectives. Although environmental health investigators usually do not have professional obligations to provide medical care to research subjects, they have ethical obligations to avoid exploiting them. Withholding interventions from research subjects can be ethical, provided that it does not lead to exploitation of individuals or groups. To avoid exploiting individuals or groups, investigators should ensure that research subjects and study populations receive a fair share of the benefits of research. PMID:18236934

  3. Outcomes in Registered, Ongoing Randomized Controlled Trials of Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Cécile; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life). Methods On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1) patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2) surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. Principal Findings We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333) of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623) of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150) used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150) as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150), primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61) of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59) in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22) in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months). Conclusions There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs. PMID:22916183

  4. Effects of nattokinase on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Gum, Si Nae; Paik, Jean Kyung; Lim, Hyo Hee; Kim, Kyong-Chol; Ogasawara, Kazuya; Inoue, Kenichi; Park, Sungha; Jang, Yangsoo; Lee, Jong Ho

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of nattokinase supplementation on blood pressure in subjects with pre-hypertension or stage 1 hypertension. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 86 participants ranging from 20 to 80 years of age with an initial untreated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 130 to 159 mmHg received nattokinase (2,000 FU/capsule) or a placebo capsule for 8 weeks. Seventy-three subjects completed the protocol. Compared with the control group, the net changes in SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were -5.55 mmHg (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -0.57 mmHg; p<0.05) and -2.84 mmHg (CI, -5.33 to -0.33 mmHg; p<0.05), respectively, after the 8-week intervention. The corresponding net change in renin activity was -1.17 ng/mL/h for the nattokinase group compared with the control group (p<0.05). In conclusion, nattokinase supplementation resulted in a reduction in SBP and DBP. These findings suggest that increased intake of nattokinase may play an important role in preventing and treating hypertension. PMID:18971533

  5. Qigong and fibromyalgia: randomized controlled trials and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sawynok, Jana; Lynch, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Qigong is currently considered as meditative movement, mindful exercise, or complementary exercise and is being explored for relief of symptoms in fibromyalgia. Aim. This narrative review summarizes randomized controlled trials, as well as additional studies, of qigong published to the end of 2013 and discusses relevant methodological issues. Results. Controlled trials indicate regular qigong practice (daily, 6-8 weeks) produces improvements in core domains for fibromyalgia (pain, sleep, impact, and physical and mental function) that are maintained at 4-6 months compared to wait-list subjects or baselines. Comparisons with active controls show little difference, but compared to baseline there are significant and comparable effects in both groups. Open-label studies provide information that supports benefit but remain exploratory. An extension trial and case studies involving extended practice (daily, 6-12 months) indicate marked benefits but are limited by the number of participants. Benefit appears to be related to amount of practice. Conclusions. There is considerable potential for qigong to be a useful complementary practice for the management of fibromyalgia. However, there are unique methodological challenges, and exploration of its clinical potential will need to focus on pragmatic issues and consider a spectrum of trial designs. Mechanistic considerations need to consider both system-wide and more specific effects. PMID:25477991

  6. Ameliorating children's reading-comprehension difficulties: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Paula J; Snowling, Margaret J; Truelove, Emma; Hulme, Charles

    2010-08-01

    Children with specific reading-comprehension difficulties can read accurately, but they have poor comprehension. In a randomized controlled trial, we examined the efficacy of three interventions designed to improve such children's reading comprehension: text-comprehension (TC) training, oral-language (OL) training, and TC and OL training combined (COM). Children were assessed preintervention, midintervention, postintervention, and at an 11-month follow-up. All intervention groups made significant improvements in reading comprehension relative to an untreated control group. Although these gains were maintained at follow-up in the TC and COM groups, the OL group made greater gains than the other groups did between the end of the intervention and follow-up. The OL and COM groups also demonstrated significant improvements in expressive vocabulary compared with the control group, and this was a mediator of the improved reading comprehension of the OL and COM groups. We conclude that specific reading-comprehension difficulties reflect (at least partly) underlying oral-language weaknesses that can be effectively ameliorated by suitable teaching. PMID:20585051

  7. A randomized controlled pilot trial of lithium in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    PubMed

    Saccà, Francesco; Puorro, Giorgia; Brunetti, Arturo; Capasso, Giovambattista; Cervo, Amedeo; Cocozza, Sirio; de Leva, Mariafulvia; Marsili, Angela; Pane, Chiara; Quarantelli, Mario; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Trepiccione, Francesco; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Morra, Vincenzo Brescia

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder. Lithium is able to stimulate autophagy, and to reduce Ca(2+) efflux from the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor. We designed a phase II, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, 48-week trial with lithium carbonate in 20 patients with SCA2. The primary objective was to determine safety and tolerability of lithium. The secondary objectives were to determine disease progression, quality of life, mood, and brain volume change. Sixteen patients completed the trial, 8 randomized to lithium, 8 to placebo. Forty adverse events (AEs) were reported during the trial, twenty-eight in the lithium and 12 in the placebo group (p = 0.11). Mean AE duration was 57.4 ± 60.8 and 77.4 ± 68.5 days (p = 0.37). Non-significant differences were observed for the SARA and for brain volume change, whereas a significant reduction in the BDI-II was observed for lithium group (p < 0.05). Lithium was well tolerated and reported AEs were similar to those previously described for bipolar disorder patients. A correctly powered phase III trial is needed to assess if lithium may slow disease progression in SCA2. PMID:25346067

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness Meditation for Chronic Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jason C.; Manber, Rachel; Segal, Zindel; Xia, Yinglin; Shapiro, Shauna; Wyatt, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic insomnia. Design: Three-arm, single-site, randomized controlled trial. Setting: Academic medical center. Participants: Fifty-four adults with chronic insomnia. Interventions: Participants were randomized to either mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI), or an eight-week self-monitoring (SM) condition. Measurements and Results: Patient-reported outcome measures were total wake time (TWT) from sleep diaries, the pre-sleep arousal scale (PSAS), measuring a prominent waking correlate of insomnia, and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) to determine remission and response as clinical endpoints. Objective sleep measures were derived from laboratory polysomnography and wrist actigraphy. Linear mixed models showed that those receiving a meditation-based intervention (MBSR or MBTI) had significantly greater reductions on TWT minutes (43.75 vs 1.09), PSAS (7.13 vs 0.16), and ISI (4.56 vs 0.06) from baseline-to-post compared to SM. Post hoc analyses revealed that each intervention was superior to SM on each of the patient-reported measures, but no significant differences were found when comparing MBSR to MBTI from baseline-to-post. From baseline to 6-month follow-up, MBTI had greater reductions in ISI scores than MBSR (P < 0.05), with the largest difference occurring at the 3-month follow-up. Remission and response rates in MBTI and MBSR were sustained from post-treatment through follow-up, with MBTI showing the highest rates of treatment remission (50%) and response (78.6%) at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions: Mindfulness meditation appears to be a viable treatment option for adults with chronic insomnia and could provide an alternative to traditional treatments for insomnia. Trial Registration: Mindfulness-Based Approaches to Insomnia: clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT00768781 Citation: Ong JC, Manber R, Segal Z, Xia Y

  9. Emphasized warning reduces salt intake: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pinjuh Markota, Nina; Rumboldt, Mirjana; Rumboldt, Zvonko

    2015-03-01

    Excessive salt intake is a major cardiovascular risk factor. At variance to the developed countries, the main source of sodium in transitional and developing countries is salt added while cooking and/or at the table. The objective of this trial was to examine the impact of warning labels placed on home salt containers on daily salt intake.A sample of treated hypertensives (n = 150) was randomized in two subgroups, one receiving just a leaflet about the harmful effects of excessive salt intake (control; n = 74), and the other one receiving in addition warning stickers for household salt containers (intervention; n = 76). Arterial blood pressure (BP) and 24-hour urinary sodium excretion (Na24) were measured in all the subjects at the start of the trial, and 1 month and 2 months later. The average starting Na24 was 207 ± 71 mmol in the control group and 211 ± 85 mmol in the intervention group (P = .745). One month and 2 months later, a significant decrease was observed in the intervention group (to 183 ± 63 mmol and 176 ± 55 mmol; P < .0001), as opposed to the control group (203 ± 60 mmol and 200 ± 58 mmol; P = .1466). Initial BP was 143.7/84.1 mm Hg in the control, and 142.9/84.7 mm Hg in the intervention group (P = .667). One month and 2 months later, a significant drop in BP, by 5.3/2.9 mm Hg, was observed in the intervention group as opposed to the control group (0.4/0.9 mm Hg). Decrease in Na24 positively correlated to BP lowering (r(2) = 0.5989; P < .0001). A significant reduction in 24Na and BP is achieved with warning labels on harmful effects of excessive salt intake. Decreasing daily salt input by 35 mmol may result in an extra BP lowering by some 5-6/2-3 mm Hg. PMID:25659228

  10. Randomized trial of chemotherapy versus chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for stage I-II Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, S; Maschio, M; Santarelli, M T; Muriel, F S; Corrado, C; Garcia, I; Schwartz, L; Montero, C; Sanahuja, F L; Magnasco, O

    1988-11-16

    A total of 277 patients with untreated Hodgkin's disease, clinical stages I-II, were randomized to cyclophosphamide, vinblastine, procarbazine, and prednisone (CVPP) alone for 6 monthly cycles or to CVPP plus radiation therapy (RT), 3,000 rad, to involved areas (CVPP plus RT). One or more of the following factors were considered as unfavorable prognosis: age greater than 45 years, more than two lymph node areas involved, or bulky disease. In the favorable group, disease-free survival (77% vs. 70%) or overall survival (92% vs. 91%) at 84 months for CVPP versus RT plus CVPP was similar. Patients with unfavorable prognosis treated with RT plus CVPP had longer disease-free survival (75% vs. 34%) (P = .001) and overall survival (84% vs. 66%) than patients treated with CVPP alone. PMID:3184196

  11. Acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Hollifield, Michael; Sinclair-Lian, Nityamo; Warner, Teddy D; Hammerschlag, Richard

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential efficacy and acceptability of accupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). People diagnosed with PTSD were randomized to either an empirically developed accupuncture treatment (ACU), a group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or a wait-list control (WLC). The primary outcome measure was self-reported PTSD symptoms at baseline, end treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Repeated measures MANOVA was used to detect predicted Group X Time effects in both intent-to-treat (ITT) and treatment completion models. Compared with the WLC condition in the ITT model, accupuncture provided large treatment effects for PTSD (F [1, 46] = 12.60; p < 0.01; Cohen's d = 1.29), similar in magnitude to group CBT (F [1, 47] = 12.45; p < 0.01; d = 1.42) (ACU vs. CBT, d = 0.29). Symptom reductions at end treatment were maintained at 3-month follow-up for both interventions. Accupuncture may be an efficacious and acceptable nonexposure treatment option for PTSD. Larger trials with additional controls and methods are warranted to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:17568299

  12. Sealing caries in primary molars: randomized control trial, 5-year results.

    PubMed

    Innes, N P T; Evans, D J P; Stirrups, D R

    2011-12-01

    The Hall Technique (HT) is a method for managing carious primary molars. Decay is sealed under pre-formed metal crowns without any caries removal, tooth preparation, or local anesthesia. The aim of this study was to compare HT clinical/radiographic failure rates with General Dental Practitioners' (GDPs) standard (control) restorations. We conducted a split-mouth, randomized control trial (132 children, aged 3-10 yrs, GDPs n = 17) in Scotland. There were 264 study teeth with initial lesions, 42% of which were radiographically > half-way into dentin, and 67% of which had Class II restorations. Teeth were randomized to HT (intervention) or GDPs' usual treatment (control). Annual clinical/radiographic follow-up data were recorded. Ninety-one patients (69%) had 48 months' minimum follow-up. At 60 months, 'Major' failures (irreversible pulpitis, loss of vitality, abscess, or unrestorable tooth) were recorded: HT, 3 (3%); control restorations, 15 (16.5%) (p = 0.000488; NNT 8); and 'Minor' failures (reversible pulpitis, restoration loss/wear/fracture; or secondary caries): HT, 4 (5%); control restorations, 38 (42%) (p < 0.000001; NNT 3). Overall, there were follow-up data for 130 patients (2-60 mos): 'Major' failures: HT, 3 (2%); control restorations, 22 (17%) (p = 0.000004; NNT 7); and 'Minor' failures, HT, 7 (5%); control restorations, 60 (46%) (p < 0.000001; NNT 3). Sealing in caries by the Hall Technique statistically, and clinically, significantly outperformed GDPs' standard restorations in the long term (Trial registration no. ISRCTN 47267892). PMID:21921249

  13. Rural providers' access to online resources: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Laura J.; McElfresh, Karen R.; Warner, Teddy D.; Stromberg, Tiffany L.; Trost, Jaren; Jelinek, Devin A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research determined the usage and satisfaction levels with one of two point-of-care (PoC) resources among health care providers in a rural state. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, twenty-eight health care providers in rural areas were stratified by occupation and region, then randomized into either the DynaMed or the AccessMedicine study arm. Study participants were physicians, physician assistants, and nurses. A pre- and post-study survey measured participants' attitudes toward different information resources and their information-seeking activities. Medical student investigators provided training and technical support for participants. Data analyses consisted of analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired t tests, and Cohen's d statistic to compare pre- and post-study effects sizes. Results Participants in both the DynaMed and the AccessMedicine arms of the study reported increased satisfaction with their respective PoC resource, as expected. Participants in both arms also reported that they saved time in finding needed information. At baseline, both arms reported too little information available, which increased to “about right amounts of information” at the completion of the study. DynaMed users reported a Cohen's d increase of +1.50 compared to AccessMedicine users' reported use of 0.82. DynaMed users reported d2 satisfaction increases of 9.48 versus AccessMedicine satisfaction increases of 0.59 using a Cohen's d. Conclusion Participants in the DynaMed arm of the study used this clinically oriented PoC more heavily than the users of the textbook-based AccessMedicine. In terms of user satisfaction, DynaMed users reported higher levels of satisfaction than the users of AccessMedicine. PMID:26807050

  14. Motion control design of the Bearcat II mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ming; Liao, Xiaoqun; Hall, Ernest L.

    1999-08-01

    Motion control is one of the most critical factors in the design of a robot. The purpose of this paper is to describe the research for applying motion control principles for a mobile robot systems design, which is on going at the University of Cincinnati Robotics Center. The mobile robot was constructed during the 1998-1999 academic year, and called BEARCAT II. Its design has inherited many features of its predecessor, BEARCAT II, such as vision guidance, sonar detection and digital control. In addition, BEARCAT II achieved many innovative motion control features as rotating sonar, zero turning radius, current control loop, and multi- level controller. This paper will focus on the motion control design, development and programming for the vehicle steering control and rotating sonar systems. The systems have been constructed and tested at the 1999 International Ground Robotics Competition with the BEARCAT II running an obstacle course for 153.5 feet and finishing fourth in the competition. The significance of this work is in the increased understanding of robot control and the potential application of autonomous guided vehicle technology for industry, defense and medicine.

  15. Phase II, randomized, open, controlled study of AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 pre-pandemic influenza vaccine in children aged 3 to 9 years: follow-up of safety and immunogenicity persistence at 24 months post-vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Domingo, Javier; Baldó, José-María; Planelles-Catarino, Maria Victoria; Garcés-Sánchez, María; Ubeda, Isabel; Jubert–Rosich, Angels; Marès, Josep; Garcia-Corbeira, Pilar; Moris, Philippe; Teko, Maurice; Vanden Abeele, Carline; Gillard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background An AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 influenza vaccine elicited broad and persistent immune responses with an acceptable safety profile up to 6 months following the first vaccination in children aged 3–9 years. Methods In this follow-up of the Phase II study, we report immunogenicity persistence and safety at 24 months post-vaccination in children aged 3–9 years. The randomized, open-label study assessed two doses of H5N1 A/Vietnam/1194/2004 influenza vaccine (1·9 μg or 3·75 μg hemagglutinin antigen) formulated with AS03A or AS03B (11·89 mg or 5·93 mg tocopherol, respectively). Control groups received seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine. Safety was assessed prospectively and included potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs). Immunogenicity was assessed by hemagglutination-inhibition assay 12 and 24 months after vaccination; cross-reactivity and cell-mediated responses were also assessed. (NCT00502593). Results The safety population included 405 children. Over 24 months, five events fulfilled the criteria for pIMDs, of which four occurred in H5N1 vaccine recipients, including uveitis (n = 1) and autoimmune hepatitis (n = 1), which were considered to be vaccine-related. Overall, safety profiles of the vaccines were clinically acceptable. Humoral immune responses at 12 and 24 months were reduced versus those observed after the second dose of vaccine, although still within the range of those observed after the first dose. Persistence of cell-mediated immunity was strong, and CD4+ T cells with a TH1 profile were observed. Conclusions Two doses of an AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 influenza vaccine in children showed low but persistent humoral immune responses and a strong persistence of cell-mediated immunity, with clinically acceptable safety profiles up to 24 months following first vaccination. PMID:25652873

  16. Insect Control (II): Hormones and Viruses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses research in the use of hormones and viruses to control insect populations. Although entomologists do not think that pheromones, hormones, and viruses will completely replace more conventional chemical insecticides, they will become increasingly important and will reduce our dependence on traditional insecticides. (JR)

  17. NSLS-II Digital RF Controller Logic and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Holub, B.; Gao, F.; Kulpin, J.; Marques, C.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) accelerator consists of the Storage Ring, the Booster Ring and Linac along with their associated cavities. Given the number, types and variety of functions of these cavities, we sought to limit the logic development effort by reuse of parameterized code on one hardware platform. Currently there are six controllers installed in the NSLS-II system. There are two in the Storage ring, two in the Booster ring, one in the Linac and one in the Master Oscillator Distribution system.

  18. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Recruitment Methods: The Staying Well after Depression Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krusche, Adele; Rudolf von Rohr, Isabelle; Muse, Kate; Duggan, Danielle; Crane, Catherine; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are widely accepted as being the most efficient way of investigating the efficacy of psychological therapies. However, researchers conducting RCTs commonly report difficulties recruiting an adequate sample within planned timescales. In an effort to overcome recruitment difficulties, researchers often are forced to expand their recruitment criteria or extend the recruitment phase, thus increasing costs and delaying publication of results. Research investigating the effectiveness of recruitment strategies is limited and trials often fail to report sufficient details about the recruitment sources and resources utilised. Purpose We examined the efficacy of strategies implemented during the Staying Well after Depression RCT in Oxford to recruit participants with a history of recurrent depression. Methods We describe eight recruitment methods utilised and two further sources not initiated by the research team and examine their efficacy in terms of (i) the return, including the number of potential participants who contacted the trial and the number who were randomized into the trial, (ii) cost-effectiveness, comprising direct financial cost and manpower for initial contacts and randomized participants, and (iii) comparison of sociodemographic characteristics of individuals recruited from different sources. Results Poster advertising, web-based advertising and mental health worker referrals were the cheapest methods per randomized participant; however, the ratio of randomized participants to initial contacts differed markedly per source. Advertising online, via posters and on a local radio station were the most cost-effective recruitment methods for soliciting participants who subsequently were randomized into the trial. Advertising across many sources (saturation) was found to be important. Limitations It may not be feasible to employ all the recruitment methods used in this trial to obtain participation from other

  19. Naturopathic Care for Anxiety: A Randomized Controlled Trial ISRCTN78958974

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Kieran; Szczurko, Orest; Perri, Dan; Mills, Edward J.; Bernhardt, Bob; Zhou, Qi; Seely, Dugald

    2009-01-01

    Background Anxiety is a serious personal health condition and represents a substantial burden to overall quality of life. Additionally anxiety disorders represent a significant cost to the health care system as well as employers through benefits coverage and days missed due to incapacity. This study sought to explore the effectiveness of naturopathic care on anxiety symptoms using a randomized trial. Methods Employees with moderate to severe anxiety of longer than 6 weeks duration were randomized based on age and gender to receive naturopathic care (NC) (n = 41) or standardized psychotherapy intervention (PT) (n = 40) over a period of 12 weeks. Blinding of investigators and participants during randomization and allocation was maintained. Participants in the NC group received dietary counseling, deep breathing relaxation techniques, a standard multi-vitamin, and the herbal medicine, ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) (300 mg b.i.d. standardized to 1.5% withanolides, prepared from root). The PT intervention received psychotherapy, and matched deep breathing relaxation techniques, and placebo. The primary outcome measure was the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and secondary outcome measures included the Short Form 36 (SF-36), Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI), and Measure Yourself Medical Outcomes Profile (MY-MOP) to measure anxiety, mental health, and quality of life respectively. Participants were blinded to the placebo-controlled intervention. Results Seventy-five participants (93%) were followed for 8 or more weeks on the trial. Final BAI scores decreased by 56.5% (p<0.0001) in the NC group and 30.5% (p<0.0001) in the PT group. BAI group scores were significantly decreased in the NC group compared to PT group (p = 0.003). Significant differences between groups were also observed in mental health, concentration, fatigue, social functioning, vitality, and overall quality of life with the NC group exhibiting greater clinical benefit. No serious adverse reactions

  20. Dressing wear time after breast reconstruction: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the major risk variables for surgical site infection is wound management. Understanding infection risk factors for breast operations is essential in order to develop infection-prevention strategies and improve surgical outcomes. The aim of this trial is to assess the influence of dressing wear time on surgical site infection rates and skin colonization. Patients’ perception at self-assessment will also be analyzed. Methods/Design This is a two-arm randomized controlled trial. Two hundred breast cancer patients undergoing immediate or delayed breast reconstruction will be prospectively enrolled. Patients will be randomly allocated to group I (dressing removed on postoperative day one) or group II (dressing removed on postoperative day six). Surgical site infections will be defined by standard criteria from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Skin colonization will be assessed by culture of samples collected at predefined time points. Patients will score dressing wear time with regard to safety, comfort and convenience. Discussion The evidence to support dressing standards for breast surgery wounds is empiric and scarce. CDC recommends protecting, with a sterile dressing for 24 to 48 hours postoperatively, a primarily closed incision, but there is no recommendation to cover this kind of incision beyond 48 hours, or on the appropriate time to shower or bathe with an uncovered incision. The results of the ongoing trial may support standard recommendations regarding dressing wear time after breast reconstruction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: http://NCT01148823. PMID:23432779

  1. EMDR for Syrian refugees with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms: results of a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Acarturk, Ceren; Konuk, Emre; Cetinkaya, Mustafa; Senay, Ibrahim; Sijbrandij, Marit; Cuijpers, Pim; Aker, Tamer

    2015-01-01

    Background The most common mental health problems among refugees are depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is an effective treatment for PTSD. However, no previous randomized controlled trial (RCT) has been published on treating PTSD symptoms in a refugee camp population. Objective Examining the effect of EMDR to reduce the PTSD and depression symptoms compared to a wait-list condition among Syrian refugees. Method Twenty-nine adult participants with PTSD symptoms were randomly allocated to either EMDR sessions (n=15) or wait-list control (n=14). The main outcome measures were Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) at posttreatment and 4-week follow-up. Results Analysis of covariance showed that the EMDR group had significantly lower trauma scores at posttreatment as compared with the wait-list group (d=1.78, 95% CI: 0.92–2.64). The EMDR group also had a lower depression score after treatment as compared with the wait-list group (d=1.14, 95% CI: 0.35–1.92). Conclusion The pilot RCT indicated that EMDR may be effective in reducing PTSD and depression symptoms among Syrian refugees located in a camp. Larger RCTs to verify the (cost-) effectiveness of EMDR in similar populations are needed. PMID:25989952

  2. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. Methods: All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. Results: The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P < 0.01), and a lower EPDS score 42 days postpartum (P < 0.05). The rate of cesarean section in the EM group was lower than the UC group (P < 0.01), and the cesarean section rate without a medical indication was lower (P < 0.01). The duration of the second stage of labor in the EM group was shorter than the UC group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China. PMID:26309641

  3. Randomized controlled trials – a matter of design

    PubMed Central

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial. PMID:27354804

  4. Carnosine Treatment for Gulf War Illness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Baraniuk, James N.; El-Amin, Suliman; Corey, Rebecca; Rayhan, Rakib U.; Timbol, Christian R.

    2013-01-01

    About 25% of 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War veterans experience disabling fatigue, widespread pain, and cognitive dysfunction termed Gulf War illness (GWI) or Chronic Multisymptom Illness (CMI). A leading theory proposes that wartime exposures initiated prolonged production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and central nervous system injury. The endogenous antioxidant L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a potential treatment since it is a free radical scavenger in nervous tissue. To determine if nutritional supplementation with L-carnosine would significantly improve pain, cognition and fatigue in GWI, a randomized double blind placebo controlled 12 week dose escalation study involving 25 GWI subjects was employed. L-carnosine was given as 500, 1000, and 1500 mg increasing at 4 week intervals. Outcomes included subjective fatigue, pain and psychosocial questionnaires, and instantaneous fatigue and activity levels recorded by ActiWatch Score devices. Cognitive function was evaluated by WAIS-R digit symbol substitution test. Carnosine had 2 potentially beneficial effects: WAIS-R scores increased significantly, and there was a decrease in diarrhea associated with irritable bowel syndrome. No other significant incremental changes were found. Therefore, 12 weeks of carnosine (1500 mg) may have beneficial cognitive effects in GWI. Fatigue, pain, hyperalgesia, activity and other outcomes were resistant to treatment. PMID:23618477

  5. Carnosine treatment for gulf war illness: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, James Nicholas; El-Amin, Suliman; Corey, Rebecca; Rayhan, Rakib; Timbol, Christian

    2013-05-01

    About 25% of 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War veterans experience disabling fatigue, widespread pain, and cognitive dysfunction termed Gulf War illness (GWI) or Chronic Multisymptom Illness (CMI). A leading theory proposes that wartime exposures initiated prolonged production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and central nervous system injury. The endogenous antioxidant L-carnosine (B-alanyl-L-histidine) is a potential treatment since it is a free radical scavenger in nervous tissue. To determine if nutritional supplementation with L-carnosine would significantly improve pain, cognition and fatigue in GWI, a randomized double blind placebo controlled 12 week dose escalation study involving 25 GWI subjects was employed. L-carnosine was given as 500, 1000, and 1500 mg increasing at 4 week intervals. Outcomes included subjective fatigue, pain and psychosocial questionnaires, and instantaneous fatigue and activity levels recorded by ActiWatch Score devices. Cognitive function was evaluated by WAIS-R digit symbol substitution test. Carnosine had 2 potentially beneficial effects: WAIS-R scores increased significantly, and there was a decrease in diarrhea associated with irritable bowel syndrome. No other significant incremental changes were found. Therefore, 12 weeks of carnosine (1500 mg) may have beneficial cognitive effects in GWI. Fatigue, pain, hyperalgesia, activity and other outcomes were resistant to treatment. PMID:23618477

  6. Modifying Media Content for Preschool Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Michelle M.; Herrenkohl, Todd; Haggerty, Kevin; Rivara, Frederick P.; Zhou, Chuan; Liekweg, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although previous studies have revealed that preschool-aged children imitate both aggression and prosocial behaviors on screen, there have been few population-based studies designed to reduce aggression in preschool-aged children by modifying what they watch. METHODS: We devised a media diet intervention wherein parents were assisted in substituting high quality prosocial and educational programming for aggression-laden programming without trying to reduce total screen time. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 565 parents of preschool-aged children ages 3 to 5 years recruited from community pediatric practices. Outcomes were derived from the Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation at 6 and 12 months. RESULTS: At 6 months, the overall mean Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation score was 2.11 points better (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78–3.44) in the intervention group as compared with the controls, and similar effects were observed for the externalizing subscale (0.68 [95% CI: 0.06–1.30]) and the social competence subscale (1.04 [95% CI: 0.34–1.74]). The effect for the internalizing subscale was in a positive direction but was not statistically significant (0.42 [95% CI: −0.14 to 0.99]). Although the effect sizes did not noticeably decay at 12 months, the effect on the externalizing subscale was no longer statistically significant (P = .05). In a stratified analysis of the effect on the overall scores, low-income boys appeared to derive the greatest benefit (6.48 [95% CI: 1.60–11.37]). CONCLUSIONS: An intervention to reduce exposure to screen violence and increase exposure to prosocial programming can positively impact child behavior. PMID:23420911

  7. Amoxicillin for acute rhinosinusitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Garbutt, Jane M.; Banister, Christina; Spitznagel, Edward; Piccirillo, Jay F.

    2013-01-01

    Context Evidence to support antibiotic treatment for acute rhinosinusitis is scant, yet antibiotics are commonly used. Objective To determine the incremental effect of amoxicillin treatment over symptomatic treatments for adults with clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis. Design Randomized placebo-controlled trial Participants and Setting Adults with uncomplicated, acute rhinosinusitis were recruited from 10 community practices in Missouri between November 1st 2006 and May 1st 2009 Interventions Ten-day course of either amoxicillin (1500mg/day) or placebo administered in three doses/day. All patients received a 5-7-day supply of symptomatic treatments for pain, fever, cough and nasal congestion to use as needed. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was improvement in the disease-specific quality of life after 3–4 days of treatment assessed with the SNOT-16 (minimally important difference 0.5 on 0 to 3 scale). Secondary outcomes included the patients' retrospective assessment of change in sinus symptoms and functional status, recurrence or relapse, satisfaction with and adverse effects of treatment. Outcomes were assessed by telephone interview at Days 3, 7, 10 and 28. Results 166 adults (36% male, 78% Caucasian) were randomized to amoxicillin (85) or placebo (81); 92% concurrently used ≥1 symptomatic treatment (amoxicillin, 94%, placebo 90%, p=0.34). The mean change in SNOT-16 scores was not significantly different between groups on Day 3 (mean difference between groups 0.03, 95% CI −0.12 to 0.19) and Day 10, but differed at Day 7 favoring amoxicillin (mean difference between groups 0.19, 95% CI 0.024 to 0.35). At Day 7 more participants treated with amoxicillin reported symptom improvement (74% vs. 56%, p=0.0205; NNT = 6, 95% CI 3 to 34), with no difference at Day-3 or Day-10. No between group differences were found for any other secondary outcomes. No serious adverse events occurred. Conclusion Among patients with acute rhinosinusitis, a 10-day

  8. Caudal epidural steroid injection: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Murakibhavi, V. G.; Khemka, Aditya G.

    2011-01-01

    Study design: Prospective study. Study rationale: A recurrent phenomenon, the lifetime prevalence of low back pain has been reported as 54%–80%, while annual prevalence ranges from 15%–45%.1 It is also associated with enormous economic, societal, and health impact.2 India, being a developing country, has its problem compounded by the occupational compulsions in parts of the rural areas.3 For some interventional therapies, like epidural steroid injections, utilization rates have increased dramatically.4,5,6,7,8,9 They have become one of the most commonly performed interventions in the United States for low back pain with radiculopathy.10 Clinical question: Multiple systematic reviews,11 a meta-analysis,12 several guidelines,13 health technology assessments by insurers, and local medical review policies and coverage decisions have been published. However, controversy continues regarding the effectiveness of epidural steroid injections. In addition three types of epidurals, namely interlaminar, transforaminal, and caudal, with variable results complicate the picture for practice of interventional pain management. The underlying mechanism of action of epidurally administered steroid and local anesthetic injections is still not well understood and compounds the problem.14 Objective: To evaluate and update the effects of caudal epidural injection in the management of chronic low back pain and sciatica. Final Class of evidence-treatment Yes Study design:  RCT •  Cohort  Case control  Case series Methods  Concealed allocation (RCT) •  Intention to treat (RCT) •  Blinded/independent evaluation of primary outcome •  F/U ≥ 85% •  Adequate sample size • Control for confounding Overall class of evidence II The definiton of the different classes of evidence is available here. PMID:23230402

  9. Nivolumab for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Motzer, Robert J.; Rini, Brian I.; McDermott, David F.; Redman, Bruce G.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Harrison, Michael R.; Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Drabkin, Harry A.; George, Saby; Logan, Theodore F.; Margolin, Kim A.; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Lambert, Alexandre M.; Waxman, Ian M.; Hammers, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nivolumab is a fully human immunoglobulin G4 programmed death–1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody that restores T-cell immune activity. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity, dose-response relationship, and safety of nivolumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Patients and Methods Patients with clear-cell mRCC previously treated with agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway were randomly assigned (blinded ratio of 1:1:1) to nivolumab 0.3, 2, or 10 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. The primary objective was to evaluate the dose-response relationship as measured by progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results A total of 168 patients were randomly assigned to the nivolumab 0.3- (n = 60), 2- (n = 54), and 10-mg/kg (n = 54) cohorts. One hundred eighteen patients (70%) had received more than one prior systemic regimen. Median PFS was 2.7, 4.0, and 4.2 months, respectively (P = .9). Respective ORRs were 20%, 22%, and 20%. Median OS was 18.2 months (80% CI, 16.2 to 24.0 months), 25.5 months (80% CI, 19.8 to 28.8 months), and 24.7 months (80% CI, 15.3 to 26.0 months), respectively. The most common treatment-related adverse event (AE) was fatigue (24%, 22%, and 35%, respectively). Nineteen patients (11%) experienced grade 3 to 4 treatment-related AEs. Conclusion Nivolumab demonstrated antitumor activity with a manageable safety profile across the three doses studied in mRCC. No dose-response relationship was detected as measured by PFS. These efficacy and safety results in mRCC support study in the phase III setting. PMID:25452452

  10. Population control II: The population establishment today.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, B

    1997-01-01

    Although population assistance represents a relatively small share of official development assistance, it influences many other aspects of development planning. The organizations that comprise the population establishment have a common purpose--the reduction of population growth in the Third World--but they are not homogeneous and sometimes have conflicting goals and strategies. National governments, multilateral agencies, nongovernmental organizations, foundations, academic centers, and pressure groups all contribute to creating and sustaining what has become a virtual population control industry. Through scholarships, travel grants, awards, and favorable publicity, Third World elites have been encouraged to join the population establishment. The World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the U.N. Fund for Population Activities have pursued explicit strategies for pressuring Third World governments to design and implement population policies, most recently in Africa. PMID:9285281

  11. The NASA F-15 Intelligent Flight Control Systems: Generation II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschbacher, Mark; Bosworth, John

    2006-01-01

    The Second Generation (Gen II) control system for the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) program implements direct adaptive neural networks to demonstrate robust tolerance to faults and failures. The direct adaptive tracking controller integrates learning neural networks (NNs) with a dynamic inversion control law. The term direct adaptive is used because the error between the reference model and the aircraft response is being compensated or directly adapted to minimize error without regard to knowing the cause of the error. No parameter estimation is needed for this direct adaptive control system. In the Gen II design, the feedback errors are regulated with a proportional-plus-integral (PI) compensator. This basic compensator is augmented with an online NN that changes the system gains via an error-based adaptation law to improve aircraft performance at all times, including normal flight, system failures, mispredicted behavior, or changes in behavior resulting from damage.

  12. The Cessation in Pregnancy Incentives Trial (CPIT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Seventy percent of women in Scotland have at least one baby, making pregnancy an opportunity to help most young women quit smoking before their own health is irreparably compromised. By quitting during pregnancy their infants will be protected from miscarriage and still birth as well as low birth weight, asthma, attention deficit disorder and adult cardiovascular disease. In the UK, the NICE guidelines: ‘How to stop smoking in pregnancy and following childbirth’ (June 2010) highlighted that little evidence exists in the literature to confirm the efficacy of financial incentives to help pregnant smokers to quit. Its first research recommendation was to determine: Within a UK context, are incentives an acceptable, effective and cost-effective way to help pregnant women who smoke to quit? Design and methods This study is a phase II exploratory individually randomized controlled trial comparing standard care for pregnant smokers with standard care plus the additional offer of financial voucher incentives to engage with specialist cessation services and/or to quit smoking during pregnancy. Participants (n = 600) will be pregnant smokers identified at maternity booking who, when contacted by specialist cessation services, agree to having their details passed to the NHS Smokefree Pregnancy Study Helpline to discuss the trial. The NHS Smokefree Pregnancy Study Helpline will be responsible for telephone consent and follow-up in late pregnancy. The primary outcome will be self reported smoking in late pregnancy verified by cotinine measurement. An economic evaluation will refine cost data collection and assess potential cost-effectiveness while qualitative research interviews with clients and health professionals will assess the level of acceptance of this form of incentive payment. The research questions are: What is the likely therapeutic efficacy? Are incentives potentially cost-effective? Is individual randomization an efficient trial design without

  13. Controlling transmission eigenchannels in random media by edge reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liyi; Tian, Chushun; Bliokh, Yury P.; Freilikher, Valentin

    2015-09-01

    Transmission eigenchannels and associated eigenvalues, that give a full account of wave propagation in random media, have recently emerged as a major theme in theoretical and applied optics. Here, we demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that in quasi-one-dimensional (1 D ) diffusive samples, their behavior is governed mostly by the asymmetry in the reflections of the sample edges rather than by the absolute values of the reflection coefficients themselves. We show that there exists a threshold value of the asymmetry parameter, below which high transmission eigenchannels exist, giving rise to a singularity in the distribution of the transmission eigenvalues ρ (T →1 ) ˜(1-T ) -1/2 . At the threshold, ρ (T ) exhibits critical statistics with a distinct singularity ˜(1-T ) -1/3 ; above it, the high transmission eigenchannels disappear and ρ (T ) vanishes for T exceeding a maximal transmission eigenvalue. We show that such statistical behavior of the transmission eigenvalues can be explained in terms of effective cavities (resonators), analogous to those in which the states are trapped in 1 D strong Anderson localization. In particular, the ρ (T ) transition can be mapped onto the shuffling of the resonator with perfect transmittance from the sample center to the edge with stronger reflection. We also find a similar transition in the distribution of resonant transmittances in 1 D layered samples. These results reveal a physical connection between high transmission eigenchannels in diffusive systems and 1 D strong Anderson localization. They open up a fresh opportunity for practically useful application: controlling the transparency of opaque media and the spatial profile of high transmission eigenchannels by tuning their coupling to the environment.

  14. Internet-based randomized controlled trials: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Erin; McGeechan, Kevin; Barratt, Alexandra; Herbert, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background The internet is increasingly being used to conduct randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Knowledge of the types of interventions evaluated and the methodological quality of these trials could inform decisions about whether to conduct future trials using conventional methods, fully online or a mixture of the two. Objective To identify and describe the scope of internet-based RCTs for human health condition interventions and evaluate their methodological quality. Methods A systematic review of RCTs of any health intervention conducted fully or primarily on the internet was carried out. Results 23 fully and 27 primarily internet-based RCTs were identified. The first was conducted in 2000. The majority of trials evaluated interventions that involved providing health information to participants, but a few evaluated self-administered interventions (eg, valerian, stretching). Methodological quality was variable and the methods were generally poorly reported. The risk of bias was low in only a small number of trials; most had substantial methodological shortcomings. Only one trial was identified as meeting all criteria for adequate methodological quality. A particular problem was high rates of loss to follow-up (fully online: mean 47%; primarily online: mean 36%). Conclusions It is theoretically possible but perhaps difficult to test the effectiveness of health interventions rigorously with RCTs conducted fully or primarily over the internet. The use of the internet to conduct trials is more suited to pragmatic rather than explanatory trials. The main limitation of these trials is that they typically experience high rates of loss to follow-up. Methodological standards now accepted for traditional RCTs needs to be evident for online RCTs as well, especially in reporting of their methods. PMID:23065196

  15. The HONEYPOT Randomized Controlled Trial Statistical Analysis Plan

    PubMed Central

    Pascoe, Elaine Mary; Lo, Serigne; Scaria, Anish; Badve, Sunil V.; Beller, Elaine Mary; Cass, Alan; Hawley, Carmel Mary; Johnson, David W.

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: The HONEYPOT study is a multicenter, open-label, blinded-outcome, randomized controlled trial designed to determine whether, compared with standard topical application of mupirocin for nasal staphylococcal carriage, exit-site application of antibacterial honey reduces the rate of catheter-associated infections in peritoneal dialysis patients. ♦ Objective: To make public the pre-specified statistical analysis principles to be adhered to and the procedures to be performed by statisticians who will analyze the data for the HONEYPOT trial. ♦ Methods: Statisticians and clinical investigators who were blinded to treatment allocation and treatment-related study results and who will remain blinded until the central database is locked for final data extraction and analysis determined the statistical methods and procedures to be used for analysis and wrote the statistical analysis plan. The plan describes basic analysis principles, methods for dealing with a range of commonly encountered data analysis issues, and the specific statistical procedures for analyzing the primary, secondary, and safety outcomes. ♦ Results: A statistical analysis plan containing the pre-specified principles, methods, and procedures to be adhered to in the analysis of the data from the HONEYPOT trial was developed in accordance with international guidelines. The structure and content of the plan provide sufficient detail to meet the guidelines on statistical principles for clinical trials produced by the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. ♦ Conclusions: Making public the pre-specified statistical analysis plan for the HONEYPOT trial minimizes the potential for bias in the analysis of trial data and the interpretation and reporting of trial results. PMID:23843589

  16. Tryptophan Supplementation and Postoperative Delirium – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Thomas N.; Dunn, Christina L.; Adams, Jill C.; Hawkins, Carrie L.; Tran, Zung V.; Raeburn, Christopher D.; Moss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Tryptophan deficiency has been associated with increased incidence of postoperative delirium. Therefore, we hypothesized that the post-operative administration of tryptophan would be beneficial for elderly surgical patients who are at higher risk of developing post-operative delirium. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Setting: Participants A total of 325 individuals aged 60 years and older undergoing major elective operations requiring a postoperative intensive care unit admission. Intervention L-tryptophan, 1 gram orally, three times daily or placebo was started following the operation and continued for up to three days postoperatively. Measurements Delirium and its motor subtypes were measured using the Confusion Assessment Method-ICU and the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale. The primary outcome for between groups comparison was the incidence of excitatory (mixed and hyperactive) postoperative delirium. The secondary outcomes for comparison were the incidence and duration of overall postoperative delirium. Results The overall incidence of postoperative delirium was 39% (116) (95% confidence interval 34% to 44%). The percentages of patients with excitatory delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups were 17% and 9% (p=0.176), and the duration of excitatory delirium was 3.3±1.7 and 3.1±1.9 days (p=0.741). The percentage of patients with overall delirium in the tryptophan and placebo groups was 40% and 37% (p=0.597), and the duration of overall delirium was 2.9±1.8 and 2.4±1.6 days (p=0.167). Conclusion Postoperative tryptophan supplementation in older adults undergoing major elective operations requiring postoperative intensive care unit admission demonstrated no efficacy in reducing the incidence of postoperative excitatory delirium or overall delirium, and the duration of excitatory or overall delirium. PMID:25112175

  17. Community based intervention to optimize osteoporosis management: randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis-related fractures are a significant public health concern. Interventions that increase detection and treatment of osteoporosis are underutilized. This pragmatic randomised study was done to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted community-based care program aimed at optimizing evidence-based management in patients at risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Methods This was a 12-month randomized trial performed in Ontario, Canada. Eligible patients were community-dwelling, aged ≥55 years, and identified to be at risk for osteoporosis-related fractures. Two hundred and one patients were allocated to the intervention group or to usual care. Components of the intervention were directed towards primary care physicians and patients and included facilitated bone mineral density testing, patient education and patient-specific recommendations for osteoporosis treatment. The primary outcome was the implementation of appropriate osteoporosis management. Results 101 patients were allocated to intervention and 100 to control. Mean age of participants was 71.9 ± 7.2 years and 94% were women. Pharmacological treatment (alendronate, risedronate, or raloxifene) for osteoporosis was increased by 29% compared to usual care (56% [29/52] vs. 27% [16/60]; relative risk [RR] 2.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29 to 3.40). More individuals in the intervention group were taking calcium (54% [54/101] vs. 20% [20/100]; RR 2.67, 95% CI 1.74 to 4.12) and vitamin D (33% [33/101] vs. 20% [20/100]; RR 1.63, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.65). Conclusions A multi-faceted community-based intervention improved management of osteoporosis in high risk patients compared with usual care. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT00465387) PMID:20799973

  18. Prognostic interaction patterns in diabetes mellitus II: A random-matrix-theory relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aparna; Pawar, Amit Kumar; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    We analyze protein-protein interactions in diabetes mellitus II and its normal counterpart under the combined framework of random matrix theory and network biology. This disease is the fifth-leading cause of death in high-income countries and an epidemic in developing countries, affecting around 8 % of the total adult population in the world. Treatment at the advanced stage is difficult and challenging, making early detection a high priority in the cure of the disease. Our investigation reveals specific structural patterns important for the occurrence of the disease. In addition to the structural parameters, the spectral properties reveal the top contributing nodes from localized eigenvectors, which turn out to be significant for the occurrence of the disease. Our analysis is time-efficient and cost-effective, bringing a new horizon in the field of medicine by highlighting major pathways involved in the disease. The analysis provides a direction for the development of novel drugs and therapies in curing the disease by targeting specific interaction patterns instead of a single protein.

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Storytelling as a Communication Tool

    PubMed Central

    Hartling, Lisa; Scott, Shannon D.; Johnson, David W.; Bishop, Ted; Klassen, Terry P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Stories may be an effective tool to communicate with patients because of their ability to engage the reader. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of story booklets compared to standard information sheets for parents of children attending the emergency department (ED) with a child with croup. Methods Parents were randomized to receive story booklets (n=208) or standard information sheets (n=205) during their ED visit. The primary outcome was change in anxiety between triage to ED discharge as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted at 1 and 3 days after discharge, then every other day until 9 days (or until resolution of symptoms), and at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included: expected future anxiety, event impact, parental knowledge, satisfaction, decision regret, healthcare utilization, time to symptom resolution. Results There was no significant difference in the primary outcome of change in parental anxiety between recruitment and ED discharge (change of 5 points for the story group vs. 6 points for the comparison group, p=0.78). The story group showed significantly greater decision regret regarding their decision to go to the ED (p<0.001): 6.7% of the story group vs. 1.5% of the comparison group strongly disagreed with the statement “I would go for the same choice if I had to do it over again”. The story group reported shorter time to resolution of symptoms (mean 3.7 days story group vs. 4.0 days comparison group, median 3 days both groups; log rank test, p=0.04). No other outcomes were different between study groups. Conclusions Stories about parent experiences managing a child with croup did not reduce parental anxiety. The story group showed significantly greater decision regret and quicker time to resolution of symptoms. Further research is needed to better understand whether stories can be effective in improving patient-important outcomes. Trial Registration Current Controlled

  20. Massage Therapy and Labor Outcomes: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Patricia; Shroff, Farah; Jaspar, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Massage is a time-honored method by which women have received comfort throughout the millennia, yet it has not been rigorously evaluated in the modern day delivery suite. No study to date that we are aware of has evaluated the effect of massage therapy by a regulated massage therapist on labor pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of massage therapy provided by registered massage therapists in managing pain among women in active labor. Methods BC Women’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Research Design: a randomized controlled trial. Participants: 77 healthy nulliparous women presenting in spontaneous labor. Intervention: Swedish massage administered for up to five hours by a registered massage therapist during labor vs. standard care. Main outcome measures include: cervical dilation at the time of administration of epidural, compared using estimated marginal means in an analysis of covariance. We also compared perception of pain at three time periods during labor according to cervical dilation at 3–4 cm, 5–7 cm, and 8–10 cm using the McGill Present Pain Intensity Scale. Results The mean cervical dilation at the time of epidural insertion after adjustment for station of the presenting part, cervical dilation, and status of membranes on admission to hospital was 5.9 cm (95% CI 5.2–6.7) compared to 4.9 in the control group (95% CI 4.2–5.8). Scores on the McGill Pain Scale were consistently lower in the massage therapy group (13.3 vs. 16.9 at 3–4 cm, 13.3 vs. 15.8 at 5–6 cm, and 19.4 vs. 28.3 at 7–8 cm), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Our findings from this pilot study suggest that massage therapy by a registered massage therapist has the potential to be an effective means of pain management that may be associated with delayed use of epidural analgesia. It may therefore have the potential to reduce exposure to epidural analgesia during labor and decrease rates of associated

  1. Rationale and design of the allogeneiC human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in patients with aging fRAilTy via intravenoUS delivery (CRATUS) study: A phase I/II, randomized, blinded and placebo controlled trial to evaluate the safety and potential efficacy of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cell infusion in patients with aging frailty

    PubMed Central

    Golpanian, Samuel; DiFede, Darcy L.; Pujol, Marietsy V.; Lowery, Maureen H.; Levis-Dusseau, Silvina; Goldstein, Bradley J.; Schulman, Ivonne H.; Longsomboon, Bangon; Wolf, Ariel; Khan, Aisha; Heldman, Alan W.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Frailty is a syndrome associated with reduced physiological reserves that increases an individual's vulnerability for developing increased morbidity and/or mortality. While most clinical trials have focused on exercise, nutrition, pharmacologic agents, or a multifactorial approach for the prevention and attenuation of frailty, none have studied the use of cell-based therapies. We hypothesize that the application of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (allo-hMSCs) as a therapeutic agent for individuals with frailty is safe and efficacious. The CRATUS trial comprises an initial non-blinded phase I study, followed by a blinded, randomized phase I/II study (with an optional follow-up phase) that will address the safety and pre-specified beneficial effects in patients with the aging frailty syndrome. In the initial phase I protocol, allo-hMSCs will be administered in escalating doses via peripheral intravenous infusion (n=15) to patients allocated to three treatment groups: Group 1 (n=5, 20 million allo-hMSCs), Group 2 (n=5, 100 million allo-hMSCs), and Group 3 (n=5, 200 million allo-hMSCs). Subsequently, in the randomized phase, allo-hMSCs or matched placebo will be administered to patients (n=30) randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of two doses of MSCs versus placebo: Group A (n=10, 100 million allo-hMSCs), Group B (n=10, 200 million allo-hMSCs), and Group C (n=10, placebo). Primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCs administered in frail older individuals. This study will determine the safety of intravenous infusion of stem cells and compare phenotypic outcomes in patients with aging frailty. PMID:26933813

  2. Two Phase II randomized trials on the CRTh2 antagonist AZD1981 in adults with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kuna, Piotr; Bjermer, Leif; Tornling, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 (Th2) cell (CRTh2) receptor antagonists is being investigated for asthma. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the CRTh2 receptor antagonist, AZD1981 (with/without inhaled corticosteroids [ICSs]), on lung function and asthma control. Patients and methods Adults aged 18–60 years were enrolled in two randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trials (protocol number: D9830C00003 [study 1, n=209] and protocol number: D9830C00004 [study 2, n=510]). In study 1, patients with stable asthma (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 65%−110%) were withdrawn from ICS (<400 µg/d) and randomized to AZD1981 1,000 mg twice daily (bid) or placebo. In study 2, patients with uncontrolled asthma (FEV1: 40%−85%) despite ICS therapy (≥500 µg/d) were randomized to 50 mg, 400 mg, or 1,000 mg bid AZD1981 or placebo. The primary efficacy variable for both trials was the change in morning peak expiratory flow after 4 weeks of treatment. Secondary variables included Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ-5) scores, FEV1 assessments, safety, and tolerability. In study 2, efficacy was also assessed according to atopic status. Results Following 4 weeks of treatment, there was a nonsignificant increase in morning peak expiratory flow on AZD1981 1,000 mg bid (9.5 L/min vs placebo, P=0.086 [study 1] and 12 L/min vs placebo, P=0.16 [study 2]). In study 2, all doses of AZD1981 provided significant improvements in ACQ-5 scores (0.26–0.3 units vs placebo, P=0.010–0.022); however, there was no dose–response relationship. Improved ACQ-5 scores and FEV1 were observed in the majority of atopic patients treated with AZD1981. AZD1981 was well tolerated across treatment groups. Conclusion Further research may be warranted in atopic patients to fully evaluate the clinical efficacy of AZD1981. PMID:27621597

  3. Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation at Jiaji points reduce abdominal pain after colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanqing; Wu, Weilan; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiuyan; Qiu, Liangcheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) at Jiaji acupuncture points has therapeutic potential for relieving viscera pain and opioid-related side effects. This prospective, randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of TEAS on abdominal pain after colonoscopy. Methods: Consecutive outpatients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II underwent selective colonoscopy were randomly assigned into two groups for either TEAS or sham pretreatment. The primary outcomes were the incidence of abdominal pain after colonoscopy. The secondary outcomes included the incidence of abdominal distension, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), duration of PACU stay, and patient’s satisfaction and acceptance. Results: Among the 229 patients analyzed, fewer occurrence of post-procedural abdominal pain (11.4% vs 25.2%, P = 0.007) and distension (1.8% vs 7.8%, P = 0.032) were observed in TEAS group, when compared with the sham group. The duration of PACU stay was significant shortened in TEAS group (P < 0.001). Meanwhile, patients’ satisfaction score to medical service was higher (P < 0.001), and their acceptance to colonoscopy was improved (P = 0.011). Conclusion: Pretreatment with TEAS can reduce post-procedural discomfort, provide more efficient medical resources utilization, and improved patient’s satisfaction and colonoscopy acceptance. PMID:26131193

  4. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of resveratrol for Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ronald G.; Craft, Suzanne; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Reynolds, Brigid A.; Brewer, James B.; Rissman, Robert A.; Raman, Rema; Aisen, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter 52-week phase 2 trial of resveratrol in individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease (AD) examined its safety and tolerability and effects on biomarker (plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42, CSF Aβ40, Aβ42, tau, and phospho-tau 181) and volumetric MRI outcomes (primary outcomes) and clinical outcomes (secondary outcomes). Methods: Participants (n = 119) were randomized to placebo or resveratrol 500 mg orally once daily (with dose escalation by 500-mg increments every 13 weeks, ending with 1,000 mg twice daily). Brain MRI and CSF collection were performed at baseline and after completion of treatment. Detailed pharmacokinetics were performed on a subset (n = 15) at baseline and weeks 13, 26, 39, and 52. Results: Resveratrol and its major metabolites were measurable in plasma and CSF. The most common adverse events were nausea, diarrhea, and weight loss. CSF Aβ40 and plasma Aβ40 levels declined more in the placebo group than the resveratrol-treated group, resulting in a significant difference at week 52. Brain volume loss was increased by resveratrol treatment compared to placebo. Conclusions: Resveratrol was safe and well-tolerated. Resveratrol and its major metabolites penetrated the blood–brain barrier to have CNS effects. Further studies are required to interpret the biomarker changes associated with resveratrol treatment. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with AD resveratrol is safe, well-tolerated, and alters some AD biomarker trajectories. The study is rated Class II because more than 2 primary outcomes were designated. PMID:26362286

  5. Connective tissue reflex massage for type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belen; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Quesada-Rubio, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of connective tissue massage to improve blood circulation and intermittent claudication symptoms in type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Ninety-eight type 2 diabetes patients with stage I or II-a peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (Leriche-Fontaine classification) were randomly assigned to a massage group or to a placebo group treated using disconnected magnetotherapy equipment. Peripheral arterial circulation was determined by measuring differential segmental arterial pressure, heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen saturation and skin blood flow. Measurements were taken before and at 30 min, 6 months and 1 year after the 15-week treatment. After the 15-week program, the groups differed (P < .05) in differential segmental arterial pressure in right lower limb (lower one-third of thigh, upper and lower one-third of leg) and left lower limb (lower one-third of thigh and upper and lower one-third of leg). A significant difference (P < .05) was also observed in skin blood flow in digits 1 and 4 of right foot and digits 2, 4 and 5 of left foot. ANOVA results were significant (P < .05) for right and left foot oxygen saturation but not for heart rate and temperature. At 6 months and 1 year, the groups differed in differential segmental arterial pressure in upper third of left and right legs. Connective tissue massage improves blood circulation in the lower limbs of type 2 diabetic patients at stage I or II-a and may be useful to slow the progression of PAD. PMID:19933770

  6. Comparison of ADM and Connective Tissue Graft as the Membrane in Class II Furcation Defect Regeneration: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Esfahanian, Vahid; Farhad, Shirin; Sadighi Shamami, Mehrnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Furcally-involved teeth present unique challenges to the success of periodontal therapy and influence treatment outcomes. This study aimed to assess to compare use of ADM and connective tissue membrane in class II furcation defect regeneration. Materials and methods. 10 patient with 2 bilaterally class II furcation defects in first and/or second maxilla or man-dibular molar without interproximal furcation involvement, were selected. Four weeks after initial phase of treatment, before and thorough the surgery pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level to stent (CAL-S), free gingival margin to stent(FGM-S) , crestal bone to stent (Crest-S), horizontal defect depth to stent (HDD-S) and vertical defect depth to stent (VDD-S) and crestal bone to defect depth measured from stent margin. Thereafter, one side randomly treated using connective tissue and DFDBA (study group) and opposite side received ADM and DFDBA (control group). After 6 months, soft and hard tissue parameters measured again in re-entry. Results. Both groups presented improvements after therapies (P & 0.05). No inter-group differences were seen in PD re-duction (P = 0.275), CAL gain (P = 0.156), free gingival margin (P = 0.146), crest of the bone (P = 0.248), reduction in horizontal defects depth (P = 0.139) and reduction in vertical defects depth (P = 0.149). Conclusion. Both treatments modalities have potential of regeneration without any adverse effect on healing process. Connective tissue grafts did not have significant higher bone fill compared to that of ADM. PMID:25093054

  7. All optical mode controllable Er-doped random fiber laser with distributed Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W L; Ma, R; Tang, C H; Rao, Y J; Zeng, X P; Yang, Z J; Wang, Z N; Gong, Y; Wang, Y S

    2015-07-01

    An all-optical method to control the lasing modes of Er-doped random fiber lasers (RFLs) is proposed and demonstrated. In the RFL, an Er-doped fiber (EDF) recoded with randomly separated fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) is used as the gain medium and randomly distributed reflectors, as well as the controllable element. By combining random feedback of the FBG array and Fresnel feedback of a cleaved fiber end, multi-mode coherent random lasing is obtained with a threshold of 14 mW and power efficiency of 14.4%. Moreover, a laterally-injected control light is used to induce local gain perturbation, providing additional gain for certain random resonance modes. As a result, active mode selection of the RFL is realized by changing locations of the laser cavity that is exposed to the control light. PMID:26125397

  8. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. Conclusion The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  9. Telephone Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Subthreshold Depression and Presenteeism in Workplace: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Toshi A.; Horikoshi, Masaru; Kawakami, Norito; Kadota, Masayo; Sasaki, Megumi; Sekiya, Yuki; Hosogoshi, Hiroki; Kashimura, Masami; Asano, Kenichi; Terashima, Hitomi; Iwasa, Kazunori; Nagasaku, Minoru; Grothaus, Louis C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Subthreshold depression is highly prevalent in the general population and causes great loss to society especially in the form of reduced productivity while at work (presenteeism). We developed a highly-structured manualized eight-session cognitive-behavioral program with a focus on subthreshold depression in the workplace and to be administered via telephone by trained psychotherapists (tCBT). Methods We conducted a parallel-group, non-blinded randomized controlled trial of tCBT in addition to the pre-existing Employee Assistance Program (EAP) versus EAP alone among workers with subthreshold depression at a large manufacturing company in Japan. The primary outcomes were depression severity as measured with Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and presenteeism as measured with World Health Organization Health and Work Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ). In the course of the trial the follow-up period was shortened in order to increase acceptability of the study. Results The planned sample size was 108 per arm but the trial was stopped early due to low accrual. Altogether 118 subjects were randomized to tCBT+EAP (n = 58) and to EAP alone (n = 60). The BDI-II scores fell from the mean of 17.3 at baseline to 11.0 in the intervention group and to 15.7 in the control group after 4 months (p<0.001, Effect size = 0.69, 95%CI: 0.32 to 1.05). However, there was no statistically significant decrease in absolute and relative presenteeism (p = 0.44, ES = 0.15, −0.21 to 0.52, and p = 0.50, ES = 0.02, −0.34 to 0.39, respectively). Conclusion Remote CBT, including tCBT, may provide easy access to quality-assured effective psychotherapy for people in the work force who present with subthreshold depression. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach in longer terms. The study was funded by Sekisui Chemicals Co. Ltd. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00885014 PMID:22532849

  10. Resampling the N9741 Trial to Compare Tumor Dynamic Versus Conventional End Points in Randomized Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manish R.; Gray, Elizabeth; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Karrison, Theodore G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The optimal end point for randomized phase II trials of anticancer therapies remains controversial. We simulated phase II trials by resampling patients from N9741, a randomized phase III trial of chemotherapy regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer, and compared the power of various end points to detect the superior therapy (FOLFOX [infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin] had longer overall survival than both IROX [irinotecan plus oxaliplatin] and IFL [irinotecan and bolus fluorouracil plus leucovorin]). Methods Tumor measurements and progression-free survival (PFS) data were obtained for 1,471 patients; 1,002 had consistently measured tumors and were resampled (5,000 replicates) to simulate two-arm, randomized phase II trials with α = 0.10 (one sided) and 20 to 80 patients per arm. End points included log ratio of tumor size at 6, 12, and 18 weeks relative to baseline; time to tumor growth (TTG), estimated using a nonlinear mixed-effects model; and PFS. Arms were compared using rank sum tests for log ratio and TTG and a log-rank test for PFS. Results For FOLFOX versus IFL, TTG and PFS had similar power, with both exceeding the power of log ratio at 18 weeks; for FOLFOX versus IROX, TTG and log ratio at 18 weeks had similar power, with both exceeding the power of PFS. The best end points exhibited > 80% power with 60 to 80 patients per arm. Conclusion TTG is a powerful end point for randomized phase II trials of cytotoxic therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer; it was either comparable or superior to PFS and log ratio at 18 weeks. Additional studies will be needed to clarify the potential of TTG as a phase II end point. PMID:25349295

  11. Gabapentin Treatment for Alcohol Dependence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Barbara J.; Quello, Susan; Goodell, Vivian; Shadan, Farhad; Kyle, Mark; Begovic, Adnan

    2013-01-01

    Importance Approved medications for alcohol dependence are prescribed for fewer than 9% of US alcoholics. Objective To determine if gabapentin, a widely-prescribed generic calcium channel/GABA modulating medication, increases rates of sustained abstinence and no heavy drinking, and decreases alcohol-related insomnia, dysphoria and craving, in a dose-dependent manner. Design, Participants and Setting A 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized dose-ranging trial of 150 men and women over 18 years of age with current alcohol dependence, conducted 2004–2010 at a single-site outpatient clinical research facility adjoining a general medical hospital. Interventions Oral gabapentin (0, 900, 1800 mg/d) and concomitant manual-guided counseling. Main Outcome Measures Rates of complete abstinence and no heavy drinking (co-primary) and changes in mood, sleep and craving (secondary) over the 12-week study. Results Gabapentin significantly improved the rates of abstinence and no heavy drinking. The abstinence rate was 4.1% (95% CI, 1.1 to 13.7) in the placebo group, 11.1% (95% CI, 5.2 to 22.2) in the 900 mg group, and 17.0% (95% CI, 8.9 to 30.1) in the 1800 mg group (p = 0.04 for linear dose effect, NNT = 8 for 1800 mg). The no heavy drinking rate was 22.5% (95% CI, 13.6 to 37.2) in the placebo group, 29.6% (95% CI, 19.1 to 42.8) in the 900 mg group, and 44.7% (95% CI, 31.4 to 58.8) in the 1800 mg group (p = 0.02 for linear dose effect, NNT = 5 for 1800 mg). Similar linear dose effects were obtained with measures of mood (F=7.37, df=2, p=0.001), sleep (F=136, df=2, p<0.001), and craving (F=3.56, df=2, p=0.029). There were no serious drug-related adverse events, and terminations from adverse-events (9 of 150 participants), time on study (9.1 [3.8] weeks) and rate of study completion (85 of 150 participants) did not differ between groups. Conclusions and Relevance Gabapentin (particularly the 1800 mg dosage) was effective in treating alcohol dependence and relapse

  12. Weight Control Intervention for Truck Drivers: The SHIFT Randomized Controlled Trial, United States

    PubMed Central

    Wipfli, Brad; Thompson, Sharon V.; Elliot, Diane L.; Anger, W. Kent; Bodner, Todd; Hammer, Leslie B.; Perrin, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of the Safety and Health Involvement For Truckers (SHIFT) intervention with a randomized controlled design. Methods. The multicomponent intervention was a weight-loss competition supported with body weight and behavioral self-monitoring, computer-based training, and motivational interviewing. We evaluated intervention effectiveness with a cluster-randomized design involving 22 terminals from 5 companies in the United States in 2012 to 2014. Companies were required to provide interstate transportation services and operate at least 2 larger terminals. We randomly assigned terminals to intervention or usual practice control conditions. We assessed participating drivers (n = 452) at baseline and 6 months. Results. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the postintervention difference between groups in mean body mass index change was 1.00 kilograms per meters squared (P < .001; intervention = −0.73; control = +0.27). Behavioral changes included statistically significant improvements in fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity. Conclusions. Results establish the effectiveness of a multicomponent and remotely administered intervention for producing significant weight loss among commercial truck drivers. PMID:27463067

  13. Physiologic Responsiveness Should Guide Entry into Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Goligher, Ewan C; Kavanagh, Brian P; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Ferguson, Niall D

    2015-12-15

    Most randomized trials in critical care report no mortality benefit; this may reflect competing pathogenic mechanisms, patient heterogeneity, or true ineffectiveness of interventions. We hypothesize that in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), randomizing only those patients who show a favorable physiological response to an intervention would help ensure that only those likely to benefit would be entered into the study. If true, this would decrease study "noise" and reduce required sample size, thereby increasing the chances of finding true-positive outcomes. It would also lessen the chances of exposing patients to treatments that are unlikely to help or that could cause harm. We present a reanalysis of randomized clinical trials of positive end-expiratory pressure in ARDS that support this hypothesis. PMID:25580530

  14. Predicting premature termination within a randomized controlled trial for binge-eating patients.

    PubMed

    Flückiger, Christoph; Meyer, Andrea; Wampold, Bruce E; Gassmann, Daniel; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Munsch, Simone

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the dropout rates of efficacious forms of psychotherapy for patients with binge eating disorder (BED) is an unsolved problem within this increasing population. Up until now the role of psychotherapy process characteristics as predictors of premature termination has not been investigated in the BED literature. Within a randomized controlled trial (N=78) we investigated the degree to which early psychological process characteristics, such as components of the therapeutic relationship and the experiences of mastery and motivational clarification, predicted premature termination of treatment. We statistically controlled for the influences of covariates such as rapid response of treatment, treatment group, body mass index, Axis II disorder, and patients' preexisting generalized self-efficacy at baseline. Patients' postsession reports from Sessions 1 to 5 indicated that low self-esteem in-session experiences was a stable predictor of premature termination. Its predictive value persisted after controlling for the above-mentioned covariates. Exploratory analyses further revealed low self-esteem experiences, low global alliance, and low mastery and clarification experiences as predictors in those patients who explicitly specified discontentment with therapy as reason for premature termination. These results indicate that patients' self-esteem experiences may not be an epiphenomenon of their specific psychopathology but may represent general mechanisms on which remaining or withdrawing from psychotherapeutic treatment depends. Early psychotherapy process characteristics should therefore be considered in training and evaluation of psychotherapists carrying through BED treatments. PMID:22035999

  15. Key Items to Get Right When Conducting a Randomized Controlled Trial in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This is a checklist of key items to get right when conducting a randomized controlled trial to evaluate an educational program or practice ("intervention"). It is intended as a practical resource for researchers and sponsors of research, describing items that are often critical to the success of a randomized controlled trial. A significant…

  16. Outcomes from a School-Randomized Controlled Trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Eric C.; Low, Sabina; Smith, Brian H.; Haggerty, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program conducted in 33 California elementary schools. Schools were matched on school demographic characteristics and assigned randomly to intervention or waitlisted control conditions. Outcome measures were obtained from (a) all school…

  17. Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Treatment Trials for Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Hunna J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a meta-analysis on randomized, controlled treatment trials of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Method: Studies were included if they employed randomized, controlled methodology and treated young people (19 years or under) with OCD. A comprehensive literature search identified 13 RCTs containing 10…

  18. The Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese Families: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Sin, Tammy C. S.; Choi, Siu-yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Hong Kong Chinese families, using randomized controlled trial design. Methods: The participants included 111 Hong Kong Chinese parents with children aged 2--7 years old, who were randomized into the intervention group (n = 54) and control group (n…

  19. Intention-to-Treat Analysis in Partially Nested Randomized Controlled Trials with Real-World Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweig, Jonathan David; Pane, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Demands for scientific knowledge of what works in educational policy and practice has driven interest in quantitative investigations of educational outcomes, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have proliferated under these conditions. In educational settings, even when individuals are randomized, both experimental and control students are…

  20. Efficacy of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach: Results from a 3-Year, Longitudinal Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Larsen, Ross A. A.; Baroody, Alison E.; Curby, Timothy W.; Ko, Michelle; Thomas, Julia B.; Merritt, Eileen G.; Abry, Tashia; DeCoster, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled field trial examined the efficacy of the Responsive Classroom (RC) approach on student achievement. Schools (n = 24) were randomized into intervention and control conditions; 2,904 children were studied from end of second to fifth grade. Students at schools assigned to the RC condition did not outperform students at…

  1. Raising the bar for enthusiasm when looking at results of randomized phase II trials-the case of sunitinib in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Massimo; Bironzo, Paolo; Scagliotti, Giorgio Vittorio

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of targeted agents, randomized phase II trials designed with explicit comparative intent, to allow a better interpretation of the results obtained with experimental treatment, have become a common approach for anti-cancer drug development. In the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30504 randomized phase II trial, patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), without progression after four to six cycles of standard chemotherapy with cisplatin or carboplatin plus etoposide, were randomized to sunitinib or placebo, until disease progression. Primary endpoint of the study was progression-free survival (PFS), and the results were formally positive [hazard ratio (HR) 0.62; one-sided P=0.02]. However, the prognosis of patients with extensive-stage SCLC is particularly bad, and even a relevant relative benefit (i.e., an encouraging HR) will likely correspond to a debatable absolute benefit: the difference in median PFS between patients treated with sunitinib and patients assigned to control arm was slightly higher than 1.5 months. Is this difference in median PFS big enough to predict a clinically relevant benefit in overall survival? Unfortunately, we do not know. From a "clinical" point of view, is this small absolute improvement in PFS relevant enough to further invest in the strategy? Probably not, also considering the absence of known predictive factors. If the results of the phase II trial had been really promising, the subsequent phase III study should have been promptly conducted, but this was not the case. It seems that, this time, the bar for enthusiasm was already raised in the phase II setting. PMID:26958498

  2. The Deckled Incision: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Sarah J; Ngo, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Background Scar visibility is multifactorial and skin closure technique is thought to play an important role. It is an established principle in plastic surgery that Z plasties generally reduce scar contracture by breaking up the lines of tension in a wound. As an extension of this principle, it is postulated that irregular “deckled” skin incisions made during tumor excision would produce aesthetically superior scars. Objective The primary objective of this study is to assess both the clinician and patient opinion of scar quality using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS). Secondary objectives include the proportion of scars judged as good by the both the patient and clinician (less than or equal to 5 on the overall PSOAS scale), the number of adverse events, and the proportion of the scar visible at 1 meter. Methods The deckling study will be a patient-blinded, simple randomized controlled trial (RCT) at a single center institution. The two groups will be equally allocated on a 1:1 ratio into the control and treatment arms. All patients greater than 18 years of age undergoing a plastic surgery procedure involving excision of skin lesions will be enrolled. Any patients requiring re-excision through the wound or undergoing injectable corticosteroid therapy will be excluded. A total of 500 patients will be enrolled. The patients will be followed-up at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months post-operatively. Results The study is expected to begin enrolment in August 2016. We anticipate that the deckling study group will have superior scar outcomes when compared to the straight line incision. From clinical experience this is especially true for lesions involving the face and in those areas of the skin that have undergone radiation therapy. The study will be funded by the Plastics and Reconstructive Surgery Department at St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Ethics approval has been obtained for the study. Conclusion: We believe this will be an

  3. Stability and control of flexible satellites. II - Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. C.; Das, A.

    1980-01-01

    It is demonstrated that by monitoring the deformations of the flexible elements of a satellite, the effectiveness of the satellite control system can be increased considerably. A simple model of a flexible satellite was analyzed in the first part of this work. The same model is used here for digital computer simulations.

  4. Building Kindergartners' Number Sense: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Glutting, Joseph; Dyson, Nancy; Hassinger-Das, Brenna; Irwin, Casey

    2012-01-01

    Math achievement in elementary school is mediated by performance and growth in number sense during kindergarten. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of a targeted small-group number sense intervention for high-risk kindergartners from low-income communities. Children were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups (n = 44 in each…

  5. Fuzzy logic in control systems: Fuzzy logic controller. I, II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chuen Chien

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory and applications of fuzzy-logic controllers (FLCs) are examined in an analytical review. The fundamental principles of fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic are recalled; the basic FLC components (fuzzification and defuzzification interfaces, knowledge base, and decision-making logic) are described; and the advantages of FLCs for incorporating expert knowledge into a control system are indicated. Particular attention is given to fuzzy implication functions, the interpretation of sentence connectives (and, also), compositional operators, and inference mechanisms. Applications discussed include the FLC-guided automobile developed by Sugeno and Nishida (1985), FLC hardware systems, FLCs for subway trains and ship-loading cranes, fuzzy-logic chips, and fuzzy computers.

  6. Nigral stimulation for resistant axial motor impairment in Parkinson’s disease? A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Walach, Margarete; Meisner, Christoph; Fritz, Melanie; Scholten, Marlieke; Breit, Sorin; Plewnia, Christian; Bender, Benjamin; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Wächter, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Gait and balance disturbances typically emerge in advanced Parkinson’s disease with generally limited response to dopaminergic medication and subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Therefore, advanced programming with interleaved pulses was put forward to introduce concomittant nigral stimulation on caudal contacts of a subthalamic lead. Here, we hypothesized that the combined stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata improves axial symptoms compared with standard subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Twelve patients were enrolled in this 2 × 2 cross-over double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial and both the safety and efficacy of combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation were evaluated compared with standard subthalamic nucleus stimulation. The primary outcome measure was the change of a broad-scaled cumulative axial Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale score (Scale II items 13–15, Scale III items 27–31) at ‘3-week follow-up’. Secondary outcome measures specifically addressed freezing of gait, balance, quality of life, non-motor symptoms and neuropsychiatric symptoms. For the primary outcome measure no statistically significant improvement was observed for combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation at the ‘3-week follow-up’. The secondary endpoints, however, revealed that the combined stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata might specifically improve freezing of gait, whereas balance impairment remained unchanged. The combined stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata was safe, and of note, no clinically relevant neuropsychiatric adverse effect was observed. Patients treated with subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation revealed no ‘global’ effect on axial motor domains. However, this study opens the perspective that concomittant stimulation

  7. A randomized and controlled trial about the use of oral isotretinoin for photoaging.

    PubMed

    Bagatin, Ediléia; Parada, Meire O B; Miot, Hélio A; Hassun, Karime M; Michalany, Nilceo; Talarico, Sergio

    2010-02-01

    Topical retinoids are used to treat photoaging; oral isotretinoin is gold standard for acne; "off label" indications, including photoaging, have been reported with insufficient evidence of efficacy. This is a randomized controlled phase II trial with clinical and histological assessment to evaluate efficacy and safety of oral isotretinoin for photoaging. Study population was comprised of 32 menopausal or sterilized women, aged 40-55, divided in 2 groups: A (21) received 20mg isotretinoin, 3 times per week, nightly moisturizer, and daily sunscreen, for three months; B (11) just moisturizer/sunscreen. Main outcome measures were: overall clinical assessment; profilometry, corneometer and elasticity tests in periocular regions and left forearm; before/after biopsies from left forearm in patients of B and in 10 randomly selected of A. Microscopic blinded evaluation of epidermal thickness, dermal elastosis, new collagen, p53 epidermal expression was performed by quantitative digital image analysis. All data were submitted to statistical analysis. Clinical evaluation showed slight improvement; profilometry, corneometer and skin elasticity tests presented significant difference in pre/post values (P = 0.001 to 0.028), but no differences between A/B. Histological findings and p53 expression were comparable between groups before treatment (P > 0.1); microscopic analysis showed no differences between groups for most variables, after treatment. Slight but significant difference between A/B for p53 with major reduction post isotretinoin [0.66+/-0.31 vs. 0.94+/-0.34 respectively (P = 0.04) was observed. There were minor side effects and no significant laboratory test alterations. We concluded that no significant clinical, microscopic changes but p53 epidermal expression reduction were observed. The role of ultra-violet induced p53 mutation in skin carcinogenesis reinforces retinoids chemoprevention. Oral isotretinoin seemed safe but not effective to treat photoaging. Caution

  8. Randomized Phase II Trial of High-Dose Melatonin and Radiation Therapy for RPA Class 2 Patients With Brain Metastases (RTOG 0119)

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Lawrence . E-mail: Berklb@moffitt.usf.edu; Berkey, Brian; Rich, Tyvin; Hrushesky, William; Gallagher, Michael; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; McGarry, Ronald C.; Suh, John; Mehta, Minesh

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if high-dose melatonin for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 2 patients with brain metastases improved survival over historical controls, and to determine if the time of day melatonin was given affected its toxicity or efficacy. RTOG 0119 was a phase II randomized trial for this group of patients. Methods and Materials: RTOG RPA Class 2 patients with brain metastases were randomized to 20 mg of melatonin, given either in the morning (8-9 AM) or in the evening (8-9 PM). All patients received radiation therapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) in the afternoon. Melatonin was continued until neurologic deterioration or death. The primary endpoint was overall survival time. Neurologic deterioration, as reflected by the Mini-Mental Status Examination, was also measured. Results: Neither of the randomized groups had survival distributions that differed significantly from the historic controls of patients treated with whole-brain radiotherapy. The median survivals of the morning and evening melatonin treatments were 3.4 and 2.8 months, while the RTOG historical control survival was 4.1 months. Conclusions: High-dose melatonin did not show any beneficial effect in this group of patients.

  9. Controlling Random Lasing with Three-Dimensional Plasmonic Nanorod Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoxian; Meng, Xiangeng; Choi, Seung Ho; Knitter, Sebastian; Kim, Young L; Cao, Hui; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2016-04-13

    Plasmonics has brought revolutionary advances to laser science by enabling deeply subwavelength nanolasers through surface plasmon amplification. However, the impact of plasmonics on other promising laser systems has so far remained elusive. Here, we present a class of random lasers enabled by three-dimensional plasmonic nanorod metamaterials. While dense metallic nanostructures are usually detrimental to laser performance due to absorption losses, here the lasing threshold keeps decreasing as the volume fraction of metal is increased up to ∼0.07. This is ∼460 times higher than the optimal volume fraction reported thus far. The laser supports spatially confined lasing modes and allows for efficient modulation of spectral profiles by simply tuning the polarization of the pump light. Full-field speckle-free imaging at micron-scales has been achieved by using plasmonic random lasers as the illumination sources. Our findings show that plasmonic metamaterials hold potential to enable intriguing coherent optical sources. PMID:27023052

  10. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-Liang; Tan, Jing-Yu; Molassiotis, Alex; Suen, Lorna K. P.; Shi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS) in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment). Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs) were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA), body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects. PMID:26568767

  11. Acupuncture-Point Stimulation for Postoperative Pain Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Liang; Tan, Jing-Yu; Molassiotis, Alex; Suen, Lorna K P; Shi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Acupuncture-point stimulation (APS) in postoperative pain control compared with sham/placebo acupuncture or standard treatments (usual care or no treatment). Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Meta-analysis results indicated that APS interventions improved VAS scores significantly and also reduced total morphine consumption. No serious APS-related adverse effects (AEs) were reported. There is Level I evidence for the effectiveness of body points plaster therapy and Level II evidence for body points electroacupuncture (EA), body points acupressure, body points APS for abdominal surgery patients, auricular points seed embedding, manual auricular acupuncture, and auricular EA. We obtained Level III evidence for body points APS in patients who underwent cardiac surgery and cesarean section and for auricular-point stimulation in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that APS is an effective postoperative pain therapy in surgical patients, although the evidence does support the conclusion that APS can reduce analgesic requirements without AEs. The best level of evidence was not adequate in most subgroups. Some limitations of this study may have affected the results, possibly leading to an overestimation of APS effects. PMID:26568767

  12. Systemic oxygen therapy versus oral enalapril for treatment of diabetic macular ischemia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sharifipour, Farideh; Razzaghi, Mohammadreza; Ramezani, Alireza; Azarmina, Mohsen; Yaseri, Mehdi; Soheilian, Roham; Soheilian, Masoud

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural and functional effects of systemic oxygen therapy and enalapril in patients with diabetic macular ischemia (DMI). This randomized clinical trial consisted of 105 eyes with DMI divided into three groups. Group I received systemic oxygen by face mask at a flow rate of 10 L/min; Group II received 5 mg enalapril daily; and Group III received placebo tablets for 3 months. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central macular thickness (CMT) measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT), extent of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) on fluorescein angiograms, and electroretinograms (ERG) were obtained at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Overall, 102 patients completed the study. Baseline characteristics were not significantly different among groups. Significant improvement in BCVA and decrease in CMT and FAZ occurred at months 3 and 6 in oxygen group compared to deterioration in enalapril and control groups (All P values <0.001). ERG parameters were significantly better in oxygen group compared to enalapril group at months 3 and 6 and better than those in control group at month 3. Normobaric oxygen therapy for 3 months in DMI decreased CMT and FAZ and improved BCVA and ERG parameters. Enalapril did not show any favorable effect. PMID:26292645

  13. Demographic analysis: an update of randomized controlled studies in prostatic oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wehbi, Elias; Hersey, Karen; Finelli, Tony; Fleshner, Neil E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Results from randomized trials are least prone to systematic bias and represent the highest level of evidence in medical practice. We carried out a demographic analysis examining randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in prostate cancer. Particular emphasis was placed on newly conducted phase II/III RCTs between January 1997 and March 2006. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE database using the heading “prostate neoplasms” between January 1997 and March 2006. The results were then crossed with the MeSHs “Clinical trial.mp. OR clinical trial.pt. OR random:.mp. OR tu.xs;” this cross-checking is considered an optimal search strategy for detecting RCTs in MEDLINE® literature. The search yielded 7831 articles in total for the defined period. Of this total number, 7314 articles were manually analyzed and excluded as they did not represent RCTs. The qualifying 517 articles were then analyzed with emphasis on modality of therapy, cohort size, principal author, participating country and journal type. Results: Among the 517 randomized trials, most trials investigated medical therapies (42.7%). This was followed by diagnostic studies (13.2%), while the remaining categories made up 44.1%. A trend towards more completed RCTs is noted in the later years of the cohort. Cohort sizes were generally greater than 100 participants (63.1%). Urologists were the lead investigators in 48.2% of the trials. Trials were largely conducted in Europe and the United States (43.1% and 38.3%, respectively). About 7% of studies were based in Canada. Articles were generally published in surgical journals (48.4%), followed by medical journals (36.9%). Conclusions: Given that initial searches yielded nearly 8000 articles listed as RCTs in prostatic oncology, only a small percentage (5.4% to 8.6%) of these were actually RCTs which reported novel results. Most of the published data were either review articles or commentaries. It is abundantly clear that new recruitment strategies need

  14. Interference control training for PTSD: A randomized controlled trial of a novel computer-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B; Lang, Ariel J

    2015-08-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic and debilitating condition characterized by persistent intrusive memories. Although effective treatments exist for PTSD, there is a need for development of alternative treatments. Diminished ability to control proactive interference may contribute to re-experiencing symptoms and may be a novel intervention target. The present study tested an intervention designed to modify proactive interference control clinicaltrials.gov identifier: (NCT02139137). Forty-two women with PTSD were randomly assigned to a computerized cognitive training or a control condition. The impact of these programs on cognitive performance and symptoms was assessed. PTSD re-experiencing symptoms and interference control performance improved significantly more for individuals in the training group relative to those in the control group. Other PTSD and general distress symptoms improved equally over time in both groups. Cognitive training of this type may hold promise as a novel intervention for reducing PTSD symptoms, although the mechanism of action and implications for models of PTSD requires future study. PMID:26114901

  15. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  16. Surgical trial in traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (STITCH(Trauma)): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intracranial hemorrhage occurs in over 60% of severe head injuries in one of three types: extradural (EDH); subdural (SDH); and intraparenchymal (TICH). Prompt surgical removal of significant SDH and EDH is established and widely accepted. However, TICH is more common and is found in more than 40% of severe head injuries. It is associated with a worse outcome but the role for surgical removal remains undefined. Surgical practice in the treatment of TICHs differs widely around the world. The aim of early surgery in TICH removal is to prevent secondary brain injury. There have been trials of surgery for spontaneous ICH (including the STICH II trial), but none so far of surgery for TICH. Methods/Design The UK National Institutes of Health Research has funded STITCH(Trauma) to determine whether a policy of early surgery in patients with TICH improves outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It will include a health economics component and carry out a subgroup analysis of patients undergoing invasive monitoring. This is an international multicenter pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Patients are eligible if: they are within 48 h of injury; they have evidence of TICH on CT scan with a confluent volume of attenuation significantly raised above that of the background white and grey matter that has a total volume >10 mL; and their treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise. Patients will be ineligible if they have: a significant surface hematoma (EDH or SDH) requiring surgery; a hemorrhage/contusion located in the cerebellum; three or more separate hematomas fulfilling inclusion criteria; or severe pre-existing physical or mental disability or severe co-morbidity which would lead to poor outcome even if the patient made a full recovery from the head injury. Patients will be randomized via an independent service. Patients randomized to surgery receive surgery within 12 h. Both groups will be monitored according to standard neurosurgical

  17. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chloe E.; Robbins, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Art therapists have long held that art production causes reductions in stress and elevations in mood (Rubin, 1999). The authors examined this claim in a randomized, controlled trial. Fifty adults between the ages of 18 and 30 were randomly assigned to either create an art work or to view and sort a series of art prints. Three measures of overall…

  18. The Late Pretest Problem in Randomized Control Trials of Education Interventions. NCEE 2009-4033

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2008-01-01

    Pretest-posttest experimental designs are often used in randomized control trials (RCTs) in the education field to improve the precision of the estimated treatment effects. For logistic reasons, however, pretest data are often collected after random assignment, so that including them in the analysis could bias the posttest impact estimates. Thus,…

  19. The Late Pretest Problem in Randomized Control Trials of Education Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2010-01-01

    Pretest-posttest experimental designs often are used in randomized control trials (RCTs) in the education field to improve the precision of the estimated treatment effects. For logistic reasons, however, pretest data often are collected after random assignment, so that including them in the analysis could bias the posttest impact estimates. Thus,…

  20. What to Do when Data Are Missing in Group Randomized Controlled Trials. NCEE 2009-0049

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.; Olsen, Robert B.; Bell, Stephen H.; Price, Cristofer

    2009-01-01

    This NCEE Technical Methods report examines how to address the problem of missing data in the analysis of data in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) of educational interventions, with a particular focus on the common educational situation in which groups of students such as entire classrooms or schools are randomized. Missing outcome data are a…

  1. Brief Motivational Interventions for Heavy College Drinkers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Henson, James H.

    2006-01-01

    In this randomized controlled trial, the authors evaluated brief motivational interventions (BMIs) for at-risk college drinkers. Heavy drinking students (N = 509; 65% women, 35% men) were randomized into 1 of 6 intervention conditions formed by crossing the baseline Timeline Followback (TLFB) interview (present versus absent) and intervention type…

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Standardized Behavior Management Intervention for Students with Externalizing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Martin; Sundell, Knut; Morris, Richard J.; Karlberg, Martin; Melin, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the results from a Swedish randomized controlled trial of a standardized behavior management intervention. The intervention targeted students with externalizing behavior in a regular education setting. First- and second-grade students (N = 100) from 38 schools were randomly assigned to either the intervention or an active…

  3. Testing Links between Childhood Positive Peer Relations and Externalizing Outcomes through a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witvliet, Miranda; van Lier, Pol A. C.; Cuijpers, Pim; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors used a randomized controlled trial to explore the link between having positive peer relations and externalizing outcomes in 758 children followed from kindergarten to the end of 2nd grade. Children were randomly assigned to the Good Behavior Game (GBG), a universal classroom-based preventive intervention, or a control…

  4. Maternal Dietary Counseling Reduces Consumption of Energy-Dense Foods among Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitolo, Marcia Regina; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bo; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a dietary counseling in reducing the intake of energy-dense foods by infants. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting and Participants: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. Mothers and infants of a low-income-group population were randomized into intervention (n = 163) and received dietary counseling during 10 home…

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Preventive Intervention for Perinatal Depression in High-Risk Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral (CBT) intervention to prevent perinatal depression in high-risk Latinas. Method: A sample of 217 participants, predominantly low-income Central American immigrants who met demographic and depression risk criteria, were randomized into usual…

  6. A Parent-Adolescent Intervention to Increase Sexual Risk Communication: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarruel, Antonia M.; Cherry, Carol Loveland; Cabriales, Esther Gallegos; Ronis, David L.; Zhou, Yan

    2008-01-01

    This article reports results of a randomized controlled trial designed to test an intervention to increase parent-adolescent sexual risk communication among Mexican parents. Data were analyzed from parents (n = 791) randomly assigned to an HIV risk reduction or health promotion intervention. Measures were administered at pretest, posttest, and 6-…

  7. After-School Multifamily Groups: A Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Low-Income, Urban, Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Lynn; Moberg, D. Paul; Brown, Roger; Rodriguez-Espiricueta, Ismael; Flores, Nydia I.; Burke, Melissa P.; Coover, Gail

    2006-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial evaluated a culturally representative parent engagement strategy with Latino parents of elementary school children. Ten urban schools serving low-income children from mixed cultural backgrounds participated in a large study. Classrooms were randomly assigned either either to an after-school, multifamily support…

  8. Testing a Violence-Prevention Intervention for Incarcerated Women Using a Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott; Kim, Woo Jong; Fedock, Gina; Bybee, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Beyond Violence (BV), a new prevention program for women with assaultive offenses, demonstrated feasibility in previous studies. This study's purpose is to assess the efficacy of BV using a randomized control trial. Method: Eligible women were randomly assigned to treatment as usual (TAU) and the experimental condition (BV). Measures of…

  9. Evaluating the Collaborative Strategic Reading Intervention: An Overview of Randomized Controlled Trial Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, John H.; Kurki, Anja; Wilkins, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph; Gersten, Russell

    2009-01-01

    When attempting to determine if an intervention has a causal impact, the "gold standard" of program evaluation is the randomized controlled trial (RCT). In education studies random assignment is rarely feasible at the student level, making RCTs harder to conduct. School-level assignment is more common but this often requires considerable resources…

  10. Efficacy of tramadol and butorphanol pretreatment in reducing pain on propofol injection: A placebo-controlled randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinderpal; Sharma, Geeta; Gupta, Ruchi; Kumari, Anita; Tikko, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pain of propofol injection has been recalled by many patients as the most painful part of the induction of anesthesia. Tramadol and butorphanol are commonly used analgesics for perioperative analgesia in anesthesia practice. However, their potential to relieve propofol injection pain still needs to be explored. Material and Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II adult patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia with propofol as an induction agent. Consecutive sampling technique with random assignment was used to allocate three groups of 30 patients each. Group I patients received an injection of normal saline 3 ml intravenously (placebo) while Group II and Group III patients received injection of tramadol 50 mg and butorphanol 1 mg intravenously, respectively. Before induction of anesthesia patients were asked about the intensity of pain on propofol injection by using visual analog scale (VAS) before the loss of consciousness. Descriptive statistics and analysis of variance with Chi-square test were used to analyze the data. The value of P < 0.05 was considered as a significant and P < 0.0001 as highly significant. Results: The incidence of pain in Group I was observed in 80% of the patients, while it was observed in 23.33% and 20% of patients in Group II and III, respectively. Mean VAS scores were 2.27 ± 1.51, 1.14 ± 1.74, and 1.03 ± 1.72 in Group I, II, and Group III patients, respectively. The incidence of pruritus was 10% and 6.7% and erythema in 13.2% and 6.7% in Group II and III, respectively. Conclusion: Pretreatment with both butorphanol and tramadol significantly reduced pain on propofol injection; however, they exhibited comparable efficacy among each other. Thus, either of these two drugs can be considered for pretreatment to reduce propofol injection pain. PMID:27006549

  11. Rhodiola rosea versus sertraline for major depressive disorder: A randomized placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun J.; Xie, Sharon X.; Zee, Jarcy; Soeller, Irene; Li, Qing S.; Rockwell, Kenneth; Amsterdam, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Background We performed a proof of concept trial to evaluate relative safety and efficacy of Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) versus sertraline for mild to moderate major depressive disorder. Hypothesis We hypothesize that R. rosea would have similar therapeutic effects as sertraline but with less adverse events. Study Design Phase II randomized placebo controlled clinical trial Methods 57 subjects were randomized to 12 weeks of standardized R. rosea extract, sertraline, or placebo. Changes over time in Hamilton Depression Rating (HAM-D), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Clinical Global Impression Change (CGI/C) scores among groups were examined using mixed-effects models. Results Modest, albeit statistically non-significant, reductions were observed for HAM-D, BDI, and CGI/C scores for all treatment conditions with no significant difference between groups (p=0.79, p=0.28, and p=0.17, respectively). The decline in HAM-D scores was greater for sertraline (−8.2, 95% confidence interval [CI], −12.7 to −3.6) versus R. rosea (−5.1, 95% CI: −8.8 to −1.3) and placebo (−4.6, 95% CI: −8.6 to −0.6). While the odds of improving (versus placebo) were greater for sertraline (1.90 [0.44–8.20]; odds ratio [95% CI]) than R. rosea (1.39 [0.38–5.04]), more subjects on sertraline reported adverse events (63.2%) than R. rosea (30.0%) or placebo (16.7%) (p=0.012). Conclusions Although R. rosea produced less antidepressant effect versus sertraline, it also resulted in significantly fewer adverse events and was better tolerated. These findings suggest that R. rosea, although less effective than sertraline, may possess a more favorable risk to benefit ratio for individuals with mild to moderate depression. PMID:25837277

  12. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival. PMID:25867139

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Brief Interventions for Body Dissatisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Tracey; George, Wing Man; Atkinson, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relative effectiveness of 3 different approaches to the experience of body dissatisfaction compared to a control and ruminative attention control condition, with respect to increasing weight and appearance satisfaction. One hundred female undergraduates (mean age = 24.38, SD = 9.39) underwent a body dissatisfaction…

  14. Effects of the FITKids Randomized Controlled Trial on Executive Control and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Castelli, Darla M.; Khan, Naiman A.; Raine, Lauren B.; Scudder, Mark R.; Drollette, Eric S.; Moore, Robert D.; Wu, Chien-Ting; Kamijo, Keita

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of a physical activity (PA) intervention on brain and behavioral indices of executive control in preadolescent children. METHODS: Two hundred twenty-one children (7–9 years) were randomly assigned to a 9-month afterschool PA program or a wait-list control. In addition to changes in fitness (maximal oxygen consumption), electrical activity in the brain (P3-ERP) and behavioral measures (accuracy, reaction time) of executive control were collected by using tasks that modulated attentional inhibition and cognitive flexibility. RESULTS: Fitness improved more among intervention participants from pretest to posttest compared with the wait-list control (1.3 mL/kg per minute, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3 to 2.4; d = 0.34 for group difference in pre-to-post change score). Intervention participants exhibited greater improvements from pretest to posttest in inhibition (3.2%, 95% CI: 0.0 to 6.5; d = 0.27) and cognitive flexibility (4.8%, 95% CI: 1.1 to 8.4; d = 0.35 for group difference in pre-to-post change score) compared with control. Only the intervention group increased attentional resources from pretest to posttest during tasks requiring increased inhibition (1.4 µV, 95% CI: 0.3 to 2.6; d = 0.34) and cognitive flexibility (1.5 µV, 95% CI: 0.6 to 2.5; d = 0.43). Finally, improvements in brain function on the inhibition task (r = 0.22) and performance on the flexibility task correlated with intervention attendance (r = 0.24). CONCLUSIONS: The intervention enhanced cognitive performance and brain function during tasks requiring greater executive control. These findings demonstrate a causal effect of a PA program on executive control, and provide support for PA for improving childhood cognition and brain health. PMID:25266425

  15. Ethical Considerations for Conducting a Randomized Controlled Trial in Transport

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Andrew P.; Daly, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Although recent studies support the rapid transfer of patients experiencing time-sensitive emergencies, limited data exist to support the use of air transport for non-urgent patient transfers. The nature of medical transport and the heterogeneity of patients who are transferred present unique challenges in designing and conducting clinical research trials that could contribute to the evidence-based decision-making for patient care and transport. The current regulatory framework presents several barriers to conducting such research in the medical transport setting. We present a hypothetical study that randomizes patients to either ground or air transport as an exemplar. We discuss informed consent, risk, and the impracticality of conducting community consultations in a medical transport setting. Finally, recommendations for potential changes to current regulations are presented. These are directed at facilitating the conduct of emergency research through a system of oversight that integrates characteristics of quality improvement and health services research. PMID:25441519

  16. Randomized controlled trials for Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Teresi, Giulio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The continuous increase in elderly and oldest-old population, and subsequent rise in prevalence of chronic neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), are a major challenge for healthcare systems. These two conditions are the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in older persons and physicians should engage treatment for these patients. In this field, Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) specifically focused on elderly populations are still lacking. The aim of this study was to identify RCTs conducted among AD and PD and to examine the difference between mean age of enrollment and incidence of these two neurodegenerative diseases. We found that the scenario is different between PD and AD. In particular, the enrollment for PD trials seems to include younger persons than AD, although the incidence of both diseases is similar and highest after 80 years old. The consequence of these results could influence conclusive guidelines of treatment in older parkinsonian patients. PMID:27100346

  17. Complementary feeding: a Global Network cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inadequate and inappropriate complementary feeding are major factors contributing to excess morbidity and mortality in young children in low resource settings. Animal source foods in particular are cited as essential to achieve micronutrient requirements. The efficacy of the recommendation for regular meat consumption, however, has not been systematically evaluated. Methods/Design A cluster randomized efficacy trial was designed to test the hypothesis that 12 months of daily intake of beef added as a complementary food would result in greater linear growth velocity than a micronutrient fortified equi-caloric rice-soy cereal supplement. The study is being conducted in 4 sites of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research located in Guatemala, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Zambia in communities with toddler stunting rates of at least 20%. Five clusters per country were randomized to each of the food arms, with 30 infants in each cluster. The daily meat or cereal supplement was delivered to the home by community coordinators, starting when the infants were 6 months of age and continuing through 18 months. All participating mothers received nutrition education messages to enhance complementary feeding practices delivered by study coordinators and through posters at the local health center. Outcome measures, obtained at 6, 9, 12, and 18 months by a separate assessment team, included anthropometry; dietary variety and diversity scores; biomarkers of iron, zinc and Vitamin B12 status (18 months); neurocognitive development (12 and 18 months); and incidence of infectious morbidity throughout the trial. The trial was supervised by a trial steering committee, and an independent data monitoring committee provided oversight for the safety and conduct of the trial. Discussion Findings from this trial will test the efficacy of daily intake of meat commencing at age 6 months and, if beneficial, will provide a strong rationale

  18. The SafeBoosC II randomized trial: treatment guided by near-infrared spectroscopy reduces cerebral hypoxia without changing early biomarkers of brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Plomgaard, Anne M.; van Oeveren, Wim; Petersen, Tue H.; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Franz, Axel; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Hagmann, Cornelia; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Lemmers, Petra; Pellicer, Adelina; Pichler, Gerhard; Winkel, Per; Greisen, Gorm

    2016-01-01

    Background: The SafeBoosC phase II multicentre randomized clinical trial investigated the benefits and harms of monitoring cerebral oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with an evidence-based treatment guideline vs. no NIRS data and treatment as usual in the control group during the first 72 h of life. The trial demonstrated a significant reduction in the burden of cerebral hypoxia in the experimental group. We now report the blindly assessed and analyzed treatment effects on electroencephalographic (EEG) outcomes (burst rate and spectral edge frequency 95% (SEF95)) and blood biomarkers of brain injury (S100β, brain fatty acid-binding protein, and neuroketal). Methods: One hundred and sixty-six extremely preterm infants were randomized to either experimental or control group. EEG was recorded at 64 h of age and blood samples were collected at 6 and 64 h of age. Results: One hundred and thirty-three EEGs were evaluated. The two groups did not differ regarding burst rates (experimental 7.2 vs. control 7.7 burst/min) or SEF95 (experimental 18.1 vs. control 18.0 Hz). The two groups did not differ regarding blood S100β, brain fatty acid-binding protein, and neuroketal concentrations at 6 and 64 h (n = 123 participants). Conclusion: Treatment guided by NIRS reduced the cerebral burden of hypoxia without affecting EEG or the selected blood biomarkers. PMID:26679155

  19. Long-term treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Misra, S P; Thorat, V K; Sachdev, G K; Anand, B S

    1989-10-01

    To examine the long-term management of irritable bowel syndrome we conducted a two-part controlled therapeutic trial on 28 patients who had recovered completely after four to six weeks of treatment with ispaghula husk and propantheline. In part I patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group A received a placebo capsule while Group B continued with treatment as before. After six months the response to treatment was assessed according to a scoring system. The overall relapse rate in Group B was 46 per cent compared to 82 per cent in group A. With continued treatment patients in Group B became asymptomatic from the fourth month while patients in Group A continued to deteriorate. In part II, patients who had relapsed whilst on placebo received active treatment. Six of the seven who agreed to continue with the study became asymptomatic within four weeks. However, all the patients who were asymptomatic while on active treatment relapsed on discontinuation and again recovered on reinstitution of active treatment. We conclude that irritable bowel syndrome is a chronic relapsing disorder and that treatment with a combination of ispaghula husk and propantheline is effective, both in relieving symptoms and in the maintenance of remission. PMID:2697886

  20. Prenatal Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation and Offspring Development at 18 Months: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Stinger, Amanda; DiGirolamo, Ann M.; Martorell, Reynaldo; Neufeld, Lynnette M.; Rivera, Juan A.; Schnaas, Lourdes; Stein, Aryeh D.; Wang, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the effects of prenatal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation on offspring development at 18 months of age. Design Randomized placebo double-blind controlled trial. Settings Cuernavaca, Mexico. Participants and Methods We followed up offspring (n = 730; 75% of the birth cohort) of women in Mexico who participated in a trial of DHA supplementation during the latter half of pregnancy. We assessed the effect of the intervention on child development and the potential modifying effects of gravidity, gender, SES, and quality of the home environment. Interventions or Main Exposures 400 mg/day of algal DHA. Outcome Measures Child development at 18 months of age measured using the Spanish version of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II. We calculated standardized psychomotor and mental development indices, and behavior rating scale scores. Results Intent-to-treat differences (DHA-control) were: Psychomotor Developmental Index -0.90 (95% CI: -2.35, 0.56), Mental Developmental Index -0.26 (95% CI: -1.63, 1.10) and Behavior Rating Scale -0.01 (95% CI: -0.95, 0.94). Prenatal DHA intake attenuated the positive association between home environment and psychomotor development index observed in the control group (p for interaction = 0.03) suggesting potential benefits for children living in home environments characterized by reduced caregiver interactions and opportunities for early childhood stimulation. Conclusions Prenatal DHA supplementation in a population with low intakes of DHA had no effects on offspring development at 18 months of age although there may be some benefit for infants from poor quality home environments. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00646360 PMID:26262896

  1. Vitamins E and C in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Men: The Physicians’ Health Study II Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sesso, Howard D.; Buring, Julie E.; Christen, William G.; Kurth, Tobias; Belanger, Charlene; MacFadyen, Jean; Bubes, Vadim; Manson, JoAnn E.; Glynn, Robert J.; Gaziano, J. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Context Basic and observational studies suggest vitamins E or C may reduce risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, few long-term trials have evaluated men at initially low risk of CVD, and no previous trial in men has examined vitamin C alone in the prevention of CVD. Objective To test whether long-term vitamin E or C supplementation decreases risk of major cardiovascular events among men. Design, Setting, and Participants The Physicians’ Health Study II (PHS II) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled factorial trial of vitamins E and C that began in 1997 and continued until its scheduled completion on August 31, 2007. We enrolled 14,641 U.S. male physicians initially aged ≥50 years, including 754 (5.1%) men with prevalent CVD at randomization. Intervention Individual supplements of 400 IU vitamin E every other day and 500 mg vitamin C daily. Main Outcome Measures A composite endpoint of major cardiovascular events (nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), nonfatal stroke, and CVD death). Results During a mean follow-up of 8.0 years, there were 1,245 confirmed major cardiovascular events. Compared with placebo, vitamin E had no effect on the incidence of major cardiovascular events (both active and placebo vitamin E groups, 10.9 events per 1,000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90–1.13; P=0.86), as well as total MI (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.75–1.07; P=0.22), total stroke (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.89–1.29; P=0.45), and cardiovascular mortality (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.90–1.29; P=0.43). There was also no significant effect of vitamin C on major cardiovascular events (active and placebo vitamin E groups, 10.8 and 10.9 events per 1,000 person-years, respectively; HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.89–1.11; P=0.91), as well as total MI (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.87–1.24; P=0.65), total stroke (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.74–1.07; P=0.21), and cardiovascular mortality (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.85–1.21; P=0.86). Neither vitamin E (HR, 1.07; 95% CI

  2. Brief cognitive therapy for panic disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Clark, D M; Salkovskis, P M; Hackmann, A; Wells, A; Ludgate, J; Gelder, M

    1999-08-01

    Cognitive therapy (CT) is a specific and highly effective treatment for panic disorder (PD). Treatment normally involves 12-15 1-hr sessions. In an attempt to produce a more cost-effective version, a briefer treatment that made extensive use of between-sessions patient self-study modules was created. Forty-three PD patients were randomly allocated to full CT (FCT), brief CT (BCT), or a 3-month wait list. FCT and BCT were superior to wait list on all measures, and the gains obtained in treatment were maintained at 12-month follow-up. There were no significant differences between FCT and BCT. Both treatments had large (approximately 3.0) and essentially identical effect sizes. BCT required 6.5 hr of therapist time, including booster sessions. Patients' initial expectation of therapy success was negatively correlated with posttreatment panic-anxiety. Cognitive measures at the end of treatment predicted panic-anxiety at 12-month follow-up. PMID:10450630

  3. Deterministic quasi-random nanostructures for photon control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Emiliano R.; Li, Juntao; Liu, Yikun; Depauw, Valérie; Chen, Zhanxu; Zhou, Jianying; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2013-10-01

    Controlling the flux of photons is crucial in many areas of science and technology. Artificial materials with nano-scale modulation of the refractive index, such as photonic crystals, are able to exercise such control and have opened exciting new possibilities for light manipulation. An interesting alternative to such periodic structures is the class of materials known as quasi-crystals, which offer unique advantages such as richer Fourier spectra. Here we introduce a novel approach for designing such richer Fourier spectra, by using a periodic structure that allows us to control its Fourier components almost at will. Our approach is based on binary gratings, which makes the structures easy to replicate and to tailor towards specific applications. As an example, we show how these structures can be employed to achieve highly efficient broad-band light trapping in thin films that approach the theoretical (Lambertian) limit, a problem of crucial importance for photovoltaics.

  4. CoCo trial: Color-coded blood pressure Control, a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, Corinne; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Del Prete, Valerio; Steurer-Stey, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background Inadequate blood pressure (BP) control is a frequent challenge in general practice. The objective of this study was to determine whether a color-coded BP booklet using a traffic light scheme (red, >180 mmHg systolic BP and/or >110 mmHg diastolic BP; yellow, >140–180 mmHg systolic BP or >90–110 mmHg diastolic BP; green, ≤140 mmHg systolic BP and ≤90 mmHg diastolic BP) improves BP control and adherence with home BP measurement. Methods In this two-group, randomized controlled trial, general practitioners recruited adult patients with a BP >140 mmHg systolic and/or >90 mmHg diastolic. Patients in the control group received a standard BP booklet and the intervention group used a color-coded booklet for daily home BP measurement. The main outcomes were changes in BP, BP control (treatment goal <140/90 mmHg), and adherence with home BP measurement after 6 months. Results One hundred and twenty-one of 137 included patients qualified for analysis. After 6 months, a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic BP was achieved in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups (16.1/7.9 mmHg in the intervention group versus 13.1/8.6 mmHg in the control group, P=0.3/0.7). BP control (treatment target <140/90 mmHg) was achieved significantly more often in the intervention group (43% versus 25%; P=0.037; number needed to treat of 5). Adherence with home BP measurement overall was high, with a trend in favor of the intervention group (98.6% versus 96.2%; P=0.1) Conclusion Color-coded BP self-monitoring significantly improved BP control (number needed to treat of 5, meaning that every fifth patient utilizing color-coded self-monitoring achieved better BP control after 6 months), but no significant between-group difference was observed in BP change. A markedly higher percentage of patients achieved BP values in the normal range. This simple, inexpensive approach of color-coded BP self-monitoring is user-friendly and applicable in primary care

  5. Stochastic Control for a Class of Random Evolution Models

    SciTech Connect

    Hongler, Max-Olivier Soner, Halil Mete Streit, Ludwig

    2004-03-15

    We construct the explicit connection existing between a solvable model of the discrete velocities non-linear Boltzmann equation and the Hamilton-Bellman-Jacobi equation associated with a simple optimal control of a piecewise deterministic process. This study extends the known relation that exists between the Burgers equation and a simple controlled diffusion problem. In both cases the resulting partial differential equations can be linearized via a logarithmic transformation and hence offer the possibility to solve physically relevant non-linear field models in full generality.

  6. Design and analysis of randomized clinical trials requiring prolonged observation of each patient. II. analysis and examples.

    PubMed Central

    Peto, R.; Pike, M. C.; Armitage, P.; Breslow, N. E.; Cox, D. R.; Howard, S. V.; Mantel, N.; McPherson, K.; Peto, J.; Smith, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    Part I of this report appeared in the previous issue (Br. J. Cancer (1976) 34,585), and discussed the design of randomized clinical trials. Part II now describes efficient methods of analysis of randomized clinical trials in which we wish to compare the duration of survival (or the time until some other untoward event first occurs) among different groups of patients. It is intended to enable physicians without statistical training either to analyse such data themselves using life tables, the logrank test and retrospective stratification, or, when such analyses are presented, to appreciate them more critically, but the discussion may also be of interest to statisticians who have not yet specialized in clinical trial analyses. PMID:831755

  7. Behavior Therapy for Pediatric Trichotillomania: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Martin E.; Edson, Aubrey L.; Ledley, Deborah A.; Cahill, Shawn P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy and durability of a behavioral therapy (BT) protocol for pediatric TTM compared with a minimal attention control (MAC) condition. It was hypothesized that the BT condition would be superior to MAC at the end of acute treatment, and would also demonstrate durability of gains through the maintenance treatment…

  8. Does Playworks Work? Findings from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James-Burdumy, Susanne; Bleeker, Martha; Beyler, Nicholas; London, Rebecca A.; Westrich, Lisa; Stokes-Guinan, Katie; Castrechini, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Most school principals believe recess has a positive impact on the development of students' social skills and academic achievement. Research also suggests that physical activity and play during recess may be linked to improvements in both academic and prosocial behaviors (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2010). Recess, however, has been…

  9. Surface segregation of fluorinated moieties on random copolymer films controlled by random-coil conformation of polymer chains in solution.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dongwu; Wang, Xinping; Ni, Huagang; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Gi

    2009-02-17

    The relationship between solution properties, film-forming methods, and the solid surface structures of random copolymers composed of butyl methacrylate and dodecafluorheptyl methylacrylate (DFHMA) was investigated by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy, and surface tension measurements. The results, based on thermodynamic considerations, demonstrated that the random copolymer chain conformation at the solution/air interface greatly affected the surface structure of the resulting film, thereby determining the surface segregation of fluorinated moieties on films obtained by various film-forming techniques. When the fluorinated monomer content of the copolymer solution was low, entropic forces dominated the interfacial structure, with the perfluoroalkyl groups unable to migrate to the solution/air interface and thus becoming buried in a random-coil chain conformation. When employing this copolymer solution for film preparation by spin-coating, the copolymer chains in solution were likely extended due to centrifugal forces, thereby weakening the entropy effect of the polymer chains. Consequently, this resulted in the segregation of the fluorinated moieties on the film surface. For the films prepared by casting, the perfluoroalkyl groups were, similar to those in solution, incapable of segregating at the film surface and were thus buried in the random-coil chains. When the copolymers contained a high content of DFHMA, the migration of perfluoroalkyl groups at the solution/air interface was controlled by enthalpic forces, and the perfluoroalkyl groups segregated at the surface of the film regardless of the film-forming technique. The aim of the present work was to obtain an enhanced understanding of the formation mechanism of the chemical structure on the surface of the polymer film, while demonstrating that film-forming methods may be used in practice to promote the segregation of fluorinated

  10. A randomized, phase II study of afatinib versus cetuximab in metastatic or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck†

    PubMed Central

    Seiwert, T. Y.; Fayette, J.; Cupissol, D.; del Campo, J. M.; Clement, P. M.; Hitt, R.; Degardin, M.; Zhang, W.; Blackman, A.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Cohen, E. E. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Afatinib is an oral, irreversible ErbB family blocker that has shown activity in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated lung cancer. We hypothesized that the agent would have greater antitumor activity compared with cetuximab in recurrent or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, whose disease has progressed after platinum-containing therapy. Patients and methods An open-label, randomized, phase II trial was conducted in 43 centers; 124 patients were randomized (1 : 1) to either afatinib (50 mg/day) or cetuximab (250 mg/m2/week) until disease progression or intolerable adverse events (AEs) (stage I), with optional crossover (stage II). The primary end point was tumor shrinkage before crossover assessed by investigator (IR) and independent central review (ICR). Results A total of 121 patients were treated (61 afatinib, 60 cetuximab) and 68 crossed over to stage II (32 and 36 respectively). In stage I, mean tumor shrinkage by IR/ICR was 10.4%/16.6% with afatinib and 5.4%/10.1% with cetuximab (P = 0.46/0.30). Objective response rate was 16.1%/8.1% with afatinib and 6.5%/9.7% with cetuximab (IR/ICR). Comparable disease control rates were observed with afatinib (50%) and cetuximab (56.5%) by IR; similar results were seen by ICR. Most common grade ≥3 drug-related AEs (DRAEs) were rash/acne (18% versus 8.3%), diarrhea (14.8% versus 0%), and stomatitis/mucositis (11.5% versus 0%) with afatinib and cetuximab, respectively. Patients with DRAEs leading to treatment discontinuation were 23% with afatinib and 5% with cetuximab. In stage II, disease control rate (IR/ICR) was 38.9%/33.3% with afatinib and 18.8%/18.8% with cetuximab. Conclusion Afatinib showed antitumor activity comparable to cetuximab in R/M HNSCC in this exploratory phase II trial, although more patients on afatinib discontinued treatment due to AEs. Sequential EGFR/ErbB treatment with afatinib and cetuximab provided sustained clinical benefit in patients

  11. Pelvic Static Magnetic Stimulation to Control Urinary Incontinence in Older Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Marianne C.; Davies, Elizabeth A.; Thalib, Lukman; Griffiths, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the efficacy of non-invasive static magnetic stimulation (SMS) of the pelvic floor compared to placebo in the treatment of women aged 60 years and over with urinary incontinence for 6 months or more. Subjects and Methods A single-blinded randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. Subjects were excluded if they had an implanted electronic device, had experienced a symptomatic urinary tract infection, or had commenced pharmacotherapy for the same in the previous 4 weeks, or if they were booked for pelvic floor or gynecological surgery within the next 3 months. Once written consent was obtained, subjects were randomly assigned to the active SMS group (n=50) or the placebo group (n=51). Treatment was an undergarment incorporating 15 static magnets of 800–1200 Gauss anterior, posterior, and inferior to the pelvis for at least 12 hours a day for 3 months. Placebo was the same protocol with inert metal disks replacing the magnets. Primary outcome measure was cessation of incontinence as measured by a 24-hour pad test. Secondary outcomes were frequency and severity of symptoms as measured by the Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms questionnaire (BFLUTS-SF), the Incontinence Severity Index, a Bothersomeness Visual Analog scale, and a 24-hour bladder diary. Data were collected at baseline and 12 weeks later. Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups in any of the outcome measures from baseline to 12 weeks. Initial evidence of subjective improvement in the treatment group compared to the placebo group was not sustained with sensitivity analysis. Conclusion This study found no evidence that static magnets cure or decrease the symptoms of urinary incontinence. Additional work into the basic physics of the product and garment design is recommended prior to further clinical trials research. PMID:21817123

  12. Transdermal Wound Oxygen Therapy on Pressure Ulcer Healing: A Single-Blind Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Azimian, Jalil; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Pourkhaleghi, Enis; Ansari, Monireh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although healthcare quality has considerably improved in many countries, pressure ulcer is still a major health challenge worldwide. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of TWOT on the healing of pressure ulcers. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized controlled trial, and the convenient sample including 100 patients hospitalized in two university-affiliated medical-surgical intensive care units and one neurology unit located in Qazvin, Iran were studied. Patients with stage II-IV pressure ulcer on the sacral or ischial areas were randomly assigned to either the control or the experimental groups. The experimental group received a 12-day transdermal wound oxygen therapy. Wound status was assessed seven times before the intervention, as well as two, four, six, eight, ten, and twelve days after the intervention. Results: After 12 days of wound oxygen therapy, the number of patients with complete wound healing in the experimental group was significantly greater than that of the control group. Moreover, the total mean of wound area in the experimental group was significantly lower than that of the control group. Conclusions: Transdermal wound oxygen therapy can effectively promote wound healing in patients with pressure ulcers. PMID:26734476

  13. Linaclotide in Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Patients with Moderate to Severe Abdominal Bloating: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Schey, Ron; Shiff, Steven J.; Lavins, Bernard J.; Fox, Susan M.; Jia, Xinwei D.; Blakesley, Rick E.; Hao, Xinming; Cronin, Jacquelyn A.; Currie, Mark G.; Kurtz, Caroline B.; Johnston, Jeffrey M.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal bloating is a common and bothersome symptom of chronic idiopathic constipation. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of linaclotide in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation and concomitant moderate-to-severe abdominal bloating. Methods This Phase 3b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial randomized patients to oral linaclotide (145 or 290 μg) or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Eligible patients met Rome II criteria for chronic constipation upon entry with an average abdominal bloating score ≥5 (self-assessment: 0 10-point numerical rating scale) during the 14-day baseline period. Patients reported abdominal symptoms (including bloating) and bowel symptoms daily; adverse events were monitored. The primary responder endpoint required patients to have ≥3 complete spontaneous bowel movements/week with an increase of ≥1 from baseline, for ≥9 of 12 weeks. The primary endpoint compared linaclotide 145 μg vs. placebo. Results The intent-to-treat population included 483 patients (mean age=47.3 years, female=91.5%, white=67.7%). The primary endpoint was met by 15.7% of linaclotide 145 μg patients vs. 7.6% of placebo patients (P<0.05). Both linaclotide doses significantly improved abdominal bloating vs. placebo (P<0.05 for all secondary endpoints, controlling for multiplicity). Approximately one-third of linaclotide patients (each group) had ≥50% mean decrease from baseline in abdominal bloating vs. 18% of placebo patients (P<0.01). Diarrhea was reported in 6% and 17% of linaclotide 145 and 290 μg patients, respectively, and 2% of placebo patients. AEs resulted in premature discontinuation of 5% and 9% of linaclotide 145 μg and 290 μg patients, respectively, and 6% of placebo patients. Conclusions Once-daily linaclotide (145 and 290 μg) significantly improved bowel and abdominal symptoms in chronic idiopathic constipation patients with moderate-to-severe baseline abdominal

  14. Effect of paricalcitol on renin and albuminuria in non-diabetic stage III-IV chronic kidney disease: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D receptor activators reduce albuminuria, and may improve survival in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Animal studies suggest that these pleiotropic effects of vitamin D may be mediated by suppression of renin. However, randomized trials in humans have yet to establish this relationship. Methods In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded crossover study, the effect of oral paricalcitol (2 μg/day) was investigated in 26 patients with non-diabetic, albuminuric stage III-IV CKD. After treatment, plasma concentrations of renin (PRC), angiotensin II (AngII) and aldosterone (Aldo) were measured. GFR was determined by 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Assessment of renal NO dependency was performed by infusion of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Albumin excretion rate (AER) was analyzed in 24-h urine and during 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Results Paricalcitol did not alter plasma levels of renin, AngII, Aldo, or urinary excretion of sodium and potassium. A modest reduction of borderline significance was observed in AER, and paricalcitol abrogated the albuminuric response to L-NMMA. Conclusions In this randomized, placebo-controlled trial paricalcitol only marginally decreased AER and did not alter circulating levels of renin, AngII or Aldo. The abrogation of the rise in albumin excretion by paricalcitol during NOS blockade may indicate that favourable modulation of renal NO dependency could be involved in mediating reno-protection and survival benefits in CKD. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01136564 PMID:23889806

  15. The quality of control groups in non-randomized studies published in Journal of Hand Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shepard P.; Malay, Sunitha; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate control group selection in non-randomized studies published in the Journal of Hand Surgery American (JHS). Methods We reviewed all papers published in JHS in 2013 to identify studies that used non-randomized control groups. Data collected included type of study design and control group characteristics. We then appraised studies to determine if authors discussed confounding and selection bias and how they controlled for confounding. Results Thirty-seven non-randomized studies were published in JHS in 2013. The source of control was either the same institution as the study group, a different institution, a database, or not provided in the manuscript. Twenty-nine (78%) studies statistically compared key characteristics between control and study group. Confounding was controlled with matching, exclusion criteria, or regression analysis. Twenty-two (59%) papers explicitly discussed the threat of confounding and 18(49%) identified sources of selection bias. Conclusions In our review of non-randomized studies published in JHS, papers had well-defined controls that were similar to the study group, allowing for reasonable comparisons. However, we identified substantial confounding and bias that were not addressed as explicit limitations, which might lead the reader to overestimate the scientific validity of the data. Clinical relevance Incorporating a brief discussion of control group selection in scientific manuscripts should help readers interpret the study more appropriately. Authors, reviewers, and editors should strive to address this component of clinical importance. PMID:25447000

  16. Biases in Estimating Treatment Effects Due to Attrition in Randomized Controlled Trials and Cluster Randomized Controlled Trials: A Simulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Nianbo; Lipsey, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Attrition occurs when study participants who were assigned to the treatment and control conditions do not provide outcome data and thus do not contribute to the estimation of the treatment effects. It is very common in experimental studies in education as illustrated, for instance, in a meta-analysis studying "the effects of attrition on baseline…

  17. The Effect of The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Pharmacotherapy on Infertility Stress: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Pasha, Hajar; Esmailzadeh, Seddigheh; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Heidary, Shima; Afshar, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infertility has been described as creating a form of stress leading to a variety of psychological problems. Both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are effective treatments for infertility stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy along with fluoxetine for improvement infertility stress in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical trial, 89 infertile women with mild to moderate depression (Beck scores 10-47) were recruited into the following three groups: i. cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), ii. antidepressant therapy, and iii. control group. Twenty-nine participants in the CBT method received gradual relaxation training, restructuring, and eliminating of negative automatic thoughts and dysfunctional attitudes to infertility for 10 sessions. Thirty participants in the pharmacotherapy group took 20 mg fluoxetine daily for 90 days. Thirty individuals in control group did not receive any intervention. All participants completed fertility problem inventory (FPI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at the beginning and end of the study. We applied Chi-square paired t test, ANOVA and Turkey’s test to analyze the data. Results: The mean of the infertility stress scores in CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were as follows, respectively: 3.5 ± 0.62 vs.2.7 ± 0.62 (p<0.05), 3.5 ± 0.53 vs.3.2 ± 4.4 (p<0.05), and 3.4 ± 0.55 vs. 3.5 ± 0.48. In CBT group, the mean scores of social concern, sexual concern, marital concern, rejection of child-free lifestyle, and need for parenthood decreased meaningfully compared to those before starting the therapy. But in fluoxetine group, mean score of women sexual concern out of those five main problems of infertility reduced significantly. Also, fluoxetine and CBT reduced depression compared to the control group. Conclusion: CBT improved the social concerns, sexual concerns, marital concerns

  18. Distributed reservation control protocols for random access broadcasting channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, E. P.; Ephremides, A.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to a communication network consisting of an arbitrary number of nodes which can communicate with each other via a time-division multiple access (TDMA) broadcast channel. The reported investigation is concerned with the development of efficient distributed multiple access protocols for traffic consisting primarily of single packet messages in a datagram mode of operation. The motivation for the design of the protocols came from the consideration of efficient multiple access utilization of moderate to high bandwidth (4-40 Mbit/s capacity) communication satellite channels used for the transmission of short (1000-10,000 bits) fixed length packets. Under these circumstances, the ratio of roundtrip propagation time to packet transmission time is between 100 to 10,000. It is shown how a TDMA channel can be adaptively shared by datagram traffic and constant bandwidth users such as in digital voice applications. The distributed reservation control protocols described are a hybrid between contention and reservation protocols.

  19. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE TRAINING TO IMPROVE GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN OLDER ADULTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE-To determine the efficacy of high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) on glycemic control in older adults with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-We performed a 16-week randomized controlled trial in 62 Latino older adults (40 women and 22 men; mean +/- SE age 66 +/...

  20. Effects of a Worksite Weight-Control Programme in Obese Male Workers: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iriyama, Yae; Murayama, Nobuko

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a randomized controlled crossover trial to evaluate the effects of a new worksite weight-control programme designed for men with or at risk of obesity using a combination of nutrition education and nutrition environmental interventions. Subjects and methods: Male workers with or at risk of obesity were recruited for this…

  1. Effects of zinc supplementation on subscales of anorexia in children: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Khademian, Majid; Farhangpajouh, Neda; Shahsanaee, Armindokht; Bahreynian, Maryam; Mirshamsi, Mehran; Kelishadi, Roya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to assess the effects of zinc supplementation on improving the appetite and its subscales in children. Methods: This study was conducted in 2013 in Isfahan, Iran. It had two phases. At the first step, after validation of the Child Eating Behaviour Questionaire (CEBQ), it was completed for 300 preschool children, who were randomly selected. The second phase was conducted as a randomized controlled trial. Eighty of these children were randomly selected, and were randomly assigned to two groups of equal number receiving zinc (10 mg/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. Results: Overall 77 children completed the trial (39 in the case and 3 in the control group).The results showed that zinc supplement can improve calorie intake in children by affecting some CEBQ subscales like Emotional over Eating and Food Responsible. Conclusion: Zinc supplementation had positive impact in promoting the calorie intake and some subscales of anorexia. PMID:25674110

  2. Randomized Control Trial of a CBT Trauma Recovery Program in Palestinian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ian G.; Abdallah, Ghassan; Smith, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The current study aimed to assess the Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT) trauma recovery program within the context of ongoing violence. Utilizing a randomized controlled trial, 11-14-year-old students in Nablus, Palestine, were allocated by class to intervention or wait-list control conditions. Standardized measures assessed trauma exposure,…

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Hanen's "More than Words" in Toddlers with Early Autism Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Alice S.; Messinger, Daniel S.; Stone, Wendy L.; Celimli, Seniz; Nahmias, Allison S.; Yoder, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: This randomized controlled trial compared Hanen's "More than Words" (HMTW), a parent-implemented intervention, to a "business as usual" control group. Methods: Sixty-two children (51 boys and 11 girls; M age = 20 months; SD = 2.6) who met criteria for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their parents participated in the study. The HMTW…

  4. A Compound Herbal Preparation (CHP) in the Treatment of Children with ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, M.; Adar Levine, A.; Kol-Degani, H.; Kav-Venaki, L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the efficacy of a patented, compound herbal preparation (CHP) in improving attention, cognition, and impulse control in children with ADHD. Method: Design: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Setting: University-affiliated tertiary medical center. Participants: 120 children newly diagnosed with ADHD,…

  5. Parent Training for Young Children with Developmental Disabilities: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Laura Lee

    2008-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate a parent training intervention for caregivers with preschool-age children with developmental disabilities. The 21 families in the experimental group received usual care plus the 12-week Incredible Years Parent Training Program with developmental delay modifications. Families in the control group…

  6. Randomized Trial of Anger Control Training for Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome and Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukhdolsky, Denis G.; Vitulano, Lawrence A.; Carroll, Deirdre H.; McGuire, Joseph; Leckman, James F.; Scahill, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A randomized trial to examine the efficacy of anger control training for treating adolescents with Tourette's syndrome and disruptive behavior reveals that those administered with the anger control training showed a decrease in their Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale score by 52 percent as compared with a decrease of 11 percent in the treatment as…

  7. Effectiveness of "Primary Bereavement Care" for Widows: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jesus A.; Landa, Victor; Grandes, Gonzalo; Pombo, Haizea; Mauriz, Amaia

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-one family physicians, from 19 primary care teams in Biscay (Spain), were randomly assigned to intervention or control group. The 15 intervention family physicians, after training in primary bereavement care, saw 43 widows for 7 sessions, from the 4th to 13th month after their loss. The 16 control family physicians, without primary…

  8. Neural network based adaptive control of nonlinear plants using random search optimization algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a method for utilizing artificial neural networks for direct adaptive control of dynamic systems with poorly known dynamics. The neural network weights (controller gains) are adapted in real time using state measurements and a random search optimization algorithm. The results are demonstrated via simulation using two highly nonlinear systems.

  9. Strength and Agility Training in Adolescents with Down Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hsiu-Ching; Wuang, Yee-Pay

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a proposed strength and agility training program of adolescents with Down syndrome. Ninety-two adolescents were recruited and evenly randomized to two intervention groups (exercise group vs. control group). The mean age for the exercise and the control group was 10.6 plus or minus 3.2 and…

  10. Promoting Early Intervention Referral through a Randomized Controlled Home-Visiting Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Donald F.; O'Sullivan, Ann L.; Guinn, Judith; Mautone, Jennifer A.; Carlson, Elyse C.; Zhao, Huaqing; Zhang, Xuemei; Esposito, Tara L.; Askew, Megan; Radcliffe, Jerilynn

    2012-01-01

    The MOM Program is a randomized, controlled trial of an intervention to promote mothers' care for the health and development of their children, including accessing early intervention (EI) services. Study aims were to determine whether, relative to controls, this intervention increased receipt of and referral to EI services. Mothers (N = 302)…

  11. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sandhaus, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a condition caused by the inheritance of two mutated SERPINA1 gene alleles. Individuals with AATD are at increased risk of injury to the liver and lungs. The pulmonary manifestations include precocious onset of pulmonary emphysema and bronchiectasis. For nearly three decades, treatment has been available to individuals with emphysema caused by AATD, but this therapy-augmentation of plasma and tissue alpha-1 antitrypsin levels by intravenous administration of human plasma-derived protein-was approved by regulatory authorities based on its biochemical efficacy. This therapy appears to slow the progression of emphysema in patients with AATD. The medical, patient, and regulatory communities have sought assurance that this expensive therapy provides measurable clinical benefit. Documenting such benefit has been difficult because of the slow progression of the underlying lung disease in AATD, the rarity of this genetic condition, and the lack of direct quantitative measurements of emphysema progression. Over the past decade, quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry of the lungs has been found to correlate with severity and progression of emphysema. The recent publication of a well-powered, masked, placebo-controlled study using CT densitometry to evaluate the effectiveness of augmentation therapy at slowing the progression of emphysema has provided some assurance of the clinical efficacy of this therapy. PMID:27564674

  12. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Epidural Clonidine vs Bupivacaine for Pain Control During and After Lower Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Guirguis, Maged; DeWood, Mark S.; Zaky, Sherif S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists produce safe and effective analgesia, but most investigations studying the analgesic effect of alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists postoperatively included previous or concomitant administration of other analgesics. Because clonidine potentiates the effect of these drugs, its own intrinsic analgesic effect has been difficult to establish. This study was designed to compare the intraoperative and postoperative effects of epidural clonidine vs bupivacaine for patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 40 patients aged 18-50 who were scheduled for elective lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group I (n=20) received epidural clonidine; Group II (n=20) received epidural bupivacaine. Intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamics, pain scores, and complications were monitored. Results Mean pain scores were significantly lower in Group I compared to Group II (1.5 ± 0.5 compared to 3.4 ± 1.0, respectively) in the first 12 hours after surgery. Sedation was more prominent in Group I until 9 hours after surgery. Opioid requirements were significantly lower in Group I. Respiratory rate was similar in the 2 groups. Group I had larger decreases from baseline in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure than Group II. Heart rate in Group I was reduced from baseline, while it was increased in Group II. Less postoperative nausea and vomiting, urinary retention, pruritus, and shivering were observed in Group I. Conclusion Compared to bupivacaine, epidural clonidine provided effective intraoperative and postoperative analgesia in selected patients, resulting in a decreased intravenous pain medication requirement and prolonged duration of analgesia after epidural infusion was discontinued. PMID:26130975

  13. 78 FR 63479 - Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials (RCTs) for the Evaluation of Risk To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Meta-Analyses of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials (RCTs... scientific approaches for the conduct and assessment of meta-analyses of randomized controlled clinical... others from the general public, about the use of meta-analyses of randomized trials as a tool for...

  14. Effect of Probiotics on Glycemic Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Chen, Fangyao; Chen, Rongping; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous clinical trials indicate that probiotic consumption may improve blood glucose control, however, results from randomized trials on glycemic control have been inconsistent. Objective To investigate the effects of probiotics on glycemic control in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Data Sources PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrial.gov through October 2014. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2). Results Seventeen randomized controlled trials were included, in which 17 fasting blood glucose (n = 1105), 11 fasting plasma insulin (n = 788), 8 homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (n = 635) comparisons were reported. Probiotic consumption, compared with placebo, significantly reduced fasting glucose (MD = -0.31 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.56, 0.06; p = 0.02), fasting plasma insulin (MD = -1.29 μU/mL; 95% CI -2.17, -0.41; p = 0.004), and HOMA-IR (MD = 0.48; 95% CI -0.83, -0.13; p = 0.007). Conclusions Probiotic consumption may improve glycemic control modestly. Modification of gut microbiota by probiotic supplementation may be a method for preventing and control hyperglycemia in clinical practice. PMID:26161741

  15. Sharp-Hook Acupuncture (Feng Gou Zhen) for Patients with Periarthritis of Shoulder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Laixi; Wang, Haijun; Cao, Yuxia; Yan, Ping; Jin, Xiaofei; Nie, Peirui; Wang, Chaojian; Li, Rangqian; Zhang, Chunlong; Yang, Mingxiao; Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The Feng Gou Zhen (sharp-hook acupuncture) as a traditional form of ancient acupuncture is said to be particularly effective for managing periarthritis of shoulder. We conducted this randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Feng Gou Zhen as an add-on compared to conventional analgesics for patients with PAS. 132 patients were randomly assigned in a 1 : 1 ratio to either a acupuncture group receiving sharp-hook acupuncture plus acupoint injection with conventional analgesics or a control group. Patients from both groups were evaluated at week 0 (baseline), week 1, and week 4. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline shoulder pain, measured by Visual Analogue Scale at 7 days after treatment. Secondary outcome measures include the (i) function of shoulder joint and (ii) McGill pain questionnaire. The results showed that patients in acupuncture group had better pain relief and function recovery compared with control group (P < 0.05) at 1 week after treatment. Moreover, there were statistical differences between two groups in VAS and shoulder joint function and McGill pain questionnaire at 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.05). Therefore, the sharp-hook acupuncture helps to relieve the pain and restore the shoulder function for patients with periarthritis of shoulder. PMID:26640496

  16. Randomized, placebo-controlled trial of flax oil in pediatric bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gracious, Barbara L; Chirieac, Madalina C; Costescu, Stefan; Finucane, Teresa L; Youngstrom, Eric A; Hibbeln, Joseph R

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This clinical trial evaluated whether supplementation with flax oil, containing the omega-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid (α-LNA), safely reduced symptom severity in youth with bipolar disorder. Methods Children and adolescents aged 6-17 years with symptomatic bipolar I or bipolar II disorder (n = 51), manic, hypomanic, mixed, or depressed, were randomized to either flax oil capsules containing 550 mg α-LNA per 1 gram or an olive oil placebo adjunctively or as monotherapy. Doses were titrated to 12 capsules per day as tolerated over 16 weeks. Primary outcomes included changes in the Young Mania Rating Scale, Child Depression Rating Scale-Revised, and Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar ratings using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Results There were no significant differences in primary outcome measures when compared by treatment assignment. However, clinician-rated Global Symptom Severity was negatively correlated with final serum omega-3 fatty acid compositions: % α-LNA (r = −0.45, p < 0.007), % eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (r = −0.47, p < 0.005), and positively correlated with final arachidonic acid (AA) (r = 0.36, p < 0.05) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) n-6 (r = 0.48, p < 0.004). The mean duration of treatment for α-LNA was 11.8 weeks versus 8 weeks for placebo; however, the longer treatment duration for α-LNA was not significant after controlling for baseline variables. Subjects discontinued the study for continued depressive symptoms. Conclusions Studies of essential fatty acid supplementation are feasible and well tolerated in the pediatric population. Although flax oil may decrease severity of illness in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder who have meaningful increases in serum EPA percent levels and/or decreased AA and DPA n-6 levels, individual variations in conversion of α-LNA to EPA and docosahexaenoic acid as well as dosing burden favor the use of fish oil both for clinical trials and clinical practice. Additionally

  17. Effect of Amitriptyline and Escitalopram on Functional Dyspepsia: a Multi-Center, Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Nicholas J.; Locke, G. Richard; Saito, Yuri A.; Almazar, Ann E.; Bouras, Ernest P.; Howden, Colin W.; Lacy, Brian E.; DiBaise, John K.; Prather, Charlene M.; Abraham, Bincy P.; El-Serag, Hashem B.; Moayyedi, Paul; Herrick, Linda M.; Szarka, Lawrence A.; Camilleri, Michael; Hamilton, Frank A.; Schleck, Cathy D.; Tilkes, Katherine E.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Anti-depressants are frequently prescribed to treat functional dyspepsia (FD), a common disorder characterized by upper abdominal symptoms, including discomfort or post-prandial fullness. However, there is little evidence for the efficacy of these drugs in patients with FD. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of anti-depressant therapy effects on symptoms, gastric emptying (GE), and mealinduced satiety in patients with FD. Methods We performed a study at 8 North American sites of patients who met the Rome II criteria for FD and did not have depression or use anti-depressants. Subjects (n=292; 44±15 y old, 75% female, 70% with dysmotility-like FD, and 30% with ulcer-like FD) were randomly assigned to groups given placebo, 50 mg amitriptyline, or 10 mg escitalopram for 10 weeks. The primary endpoint was adequate relief of FD symptoms for ≥5 weeks of the last 10 weeks (out of 12). Secondary endpoints included GE time, maximum tolerated volume in a nutrient drink test, and FD-related quality of life. Results An adequate relief response was reported by 39 subjects given placebo (40%), 51 given amitriptyline (53%), and 37 given escitalopram (38%) (P=.05, following treatment, adjusted for baseline balancing factors including all subjects). Subjects with ulcer-like FD given amitriptyline were more than 3-fold more likely to report adequate relief than those given placebo (odds ratio=3.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–9.0). Neither amitriptyline nor escitalopram appeared to affect GE or meal-induced satiety after the 10 week period in any group. Subjects with delayed GE were less likely to report adequate relief than subjects with normal GE (odds ratio=0.4; 95% confidence interval, 0.2–0.8). Both anti-depressants improved overall quality-of-life. Conclusions Amitriptyline, but not escitalopram, appears to benefit some patients with FD— particularly those with ulcer-like (painful) FD. Patients

  18. A dietary supplement to improve the quality of sleep: a randomized placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of a dietary supplement containing polyunsaturated fatty acids, in association with Humulus lupulus extract, on the quality of sleep using the Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire (LSEQ) in subjects with moderate to severe sleep disorders. Methods Randomized placebo-controlled trial, in a Population-based setting. Participants were adult patients 25 to 65 years old with a chronic primary insomnia who volunteered for the study. The tested intervention consisted of two soft gelatine capsules per day, containing either the dietary supplement (active group) or olive oil (placebo group) for a month. Subjects could also volunteer for two ancillary studies on melatonin and actigraphy. Evaluation criteria included i) perception of the quality of sleep at the end of treatment using the LSEQ questionnaire, ii) sleep efficiency measured by one-week actigraphic movement measurement performed before and during the treatment in a subsample of subjects, iii) night melatonin and 6 sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6S) urine rates in a subsample of subjects. Results The average of Leeds score was similar in both groups (p = 0.95). A marked improvement in the quality of sleep was observed in both placebo (62%) and active (65%) group (p = 0.52). The evolution of urinary melatonin, aMT6S, and of the Mel/aMT6S ratio showed no differences between the two groups. Sleep efficiency, as measured by actigraphy, improved similarly in both groups during the treatment period, from 72% to 76% and 75% in the active and placebo group respectively (p = 0.91). Conclusions The dietary supplement had neither effect on the perceived quality of sleep, nor on the melatonin metabolism and sleep-wake cycle. Trial registration: clinical trials.gov:NCT00484497 PMID:20569455

  19. Analysis of random drop for gateway congestion control. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashem, Emam Salaheddin

    1989-01-01

    Lately, the growing demand on the Internet has prompted the need for more effective congestion control policies. Currently No Gateway Policy is used to relieve and signal congestion, which leads to unfair service to the individual users and a degradation of overall network performance. Network simulation was used to illustrate the character of Internet congestion and its causes. A newly proposed gateway congestion control policy, called Random Drop, was considered as a promising solution to the pressing problem. Random Drop relieves resource congestion upon buffer overflow by choosing a random packet from the service queue to be dropped. The random choice should result in a drop distribution proportional to the bandwidth distribution among all contending TCP connections, thus applying the necessary fairness. Nonetheless, the simulation experiments demonstrate several shortcomings with this policy. Because Random Drop is a congestion control policy, which is not applied until congestion has already occurred, it usually results in a high drop rate that hurts too many connections including well-behaved ones. Even though the number of packets dropped is different from one connection to another depending on the buffer utilization upon overflow, the TCP recovery overhead is high enough to neutralize these differences, causing unfair congestion penalties. Besides, the drop distribution itself is an inaccurate representation of the average bandwidth distribution, missing much important information about the bandwidth utilization between buffer overflow events. A modification of Random Drop to do congestion avoidance by applying the policy early was also proposed. Early Random Drop has the advantage of avoiding the high drop rate of buffer overflow. The early application of the policy removes the pressure of congestion relief and allows more accurate signaling of congestion. To be used effectively, algorithms for the dynamic adjustment of the parameters of Early Random Drop

  20. A scattering model for perfectly conducting random surfaces. I - Model development. II - Range of validity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Pan, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    The surface current on a perfectly conducting randomly rough surface is estimated by solving iteratively a standard integral equation, and the estimate is then used to compute the far-zone scattered fields and the backscattering coefficients for vertical, horizontal and cross polarizations. The model developed here yields a simple backscattering coefficient expression in terms of the surface parameters. The expression reduces analytically to the Kirchhoff and the first-order small-perturbation model in the high- and low-frequency regions, respectively. The range of validity of the model is determined.

  1. Jamming II: Edwards’ statistical mechanics of random packings of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Song, Chaoming; Jin, Yuliang; Makse, Hernán A.

    2011-02-01

    The problem of finding the most efficient way to pack spheres has an illustrious history, dating back to the crystalline arrays conjectured by Kepler and the random geometries explored by Bernal in the 1960s. This problem finds applications spanning from the mathematician’s pencil, the processing of granular materials, the jamming and glass transitions, all the way to fruit packing in every grocery. There are presently numerous experiments showing that the loosest way to pack spheres gives a density of ∼55% (named random loose packing, RLP) while filling all the loose voids results in a maximum density of ∼63%-64% (named random close packing, RCP). While those values seem robustly true, to this date there is no well-accepted physical explanation or theoretical prediction for them. Here we develop a common framework for understanding the random packings of monodisperse hard spheres whose limits can be interpreted as the experimentally observed RLP and RCP. The reason for these limits arises from a statistical picture of jammed states in which the RCP can be interpreted as the ground state of the ensemble of jammed matter with zero compactivity, while the RLP arises in the infinite compactivity limit. We combine an extended statistical mechanics approach ‘a la Edwards’ (where the role traditionally played by the energy and temperature in thermal systems is substituted by the volume and compactivity) with a constraint on mechanical stability imposed by the isostatic condition. We show how such approaches can bring results that can be compared to experiments and allow for an exploitation of the statistical mechanics framework. The key result is the use of a relation between the local Voronoi volumes of the constituent grains (denoted the volume function) and the number of neighbors in contact that permits us to simply combine the two approaches to develop a theory of volume fluctuations in jammed matter. Ultimately, our results lead to a phase diagram that

  2. A comparison of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sunil Kumar; Joshiraj, Bandi; Chaudhary, Lalita; Hayaran, Nitin; Kaur, Manpreet; Jain, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: We designed a study to compare the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone in search of an ideal sedation regime, which would achieve better intubating conditions, hemodynamic stability, and sedation for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 adult patients of age group 18-60 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II posted for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each in this prospective randomized controlled double-blinded study. Groups I and II patients received a bolus dose of dexmedetomidine at 1 mcg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine at 0.5 mcg/kg/h. Upon completion of the dexmedetomidine bolus, Group I patients received 15 mg of ketamine and an infusion of ketamine at 20 mg/h followed by awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation, while Group II patients upon completion of dexmedetomidine bolus received plain normal saline instead of ketamine. Hemodynamic variables like heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram changes, sedation score (modified Observer assessment of alertness/sedation score), intubation score (vocal cord movement and coughing), grimace score, time taken for intubation, amount of lignocaine used were noted during the course of study. Patient satisfaction score and level of recall were assessed during the postoperative visit the next day. Results: Group I patients maintained a stable HR and MAP (<10% fall when compared with the baseline value). Sedation score (3.47 vs. 3.93) and patient satisfaction score were better in Group I patients. There was no significant difference in intubation scores, grimace scores, oxygen saturation and level of recall when compared between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination in awake fiberoptic nasotracheal

  3. Homeopathy for Depression: A Randomized, Partially Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Four-Armed Study (DEP-HOM)

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Ubiratan C.; Krüger, Stephanie; Teut, Michael; Lüdtke, Rainer; Schützler, Lena; Martins, Friederike; Willich, Stefan N.; Linde, Klaus; Witt, Claudia M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The specific clinical benefit of the homeopathic consultation and of homeopathic remedies in patients with depression has not yet been investigated. Aims To investigate the 1) specific effect of individualized homeopathic Q-potencies compared to placebo and 2) the effect of an extensive homeopathic case taking (case history I) compared to a shorter, rather conventional one (case history II) in the treatment of acute major depression (moderate episode) after six weeks. Methods A randomized, partially double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-armed trial using a 2×2 factorial design with a six-week study duration per patient was performed. Results A total of 44 from 228 planned patients were randomized (2∶1∶2∶1 randomization: 16 homeopathic Q-potencies/case history I, 7 placebo/case history I, 14 homeopathic Q-potencies/case history II, 7 placebo/case history II). Because of recruitment problems, the study was terminated prior to full recruitment, and was underpowered for the preplanned confirmatory hypothesis testing. Exploratory data analyses showed heterogeneous and inconclusive results with large variance in the sample. The mean difference for the Hamilton-D after 6 weeks was 2.0 (95%CI −1.2;5.2) for Q-potencies vs. placebo and −3.1 (−5.9;−0.2) for case history I vs. case history II. Overall, no consistent or clinically relevant results across all outcomes between homeopathic Q-potencies versus placebo and homeopathic versus conventional case taking were observed. The frequency of adverse events was comparable for all groups. Conclusions Although our results are inconclusive, given that recruitment into this trial was very difficult and we had to terminate early, we cannot recommend undertaking a further trial addressing this question in a similar setting. Prof. Dr. Claudia Witt had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Trial registration

  4. Microcomputer-controlled high-power low-frequency random-signal generator

    SciTech Connect

    Baishusin, B.M.; Galin, I.A.; Galishnikov, Y.P.; Voznyi, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    This paper describes a generator of high-power low-frequency random signals that is controlled by a microcomputer and realizes polygaussian expansions. The generator provides random as well as determined periodic or single signals of any shape with a power of up to 25 kW at frequencies of 0-200 Hz. A schematic diagram of the interface is shown. It consists of an Elektronika D3-28 microcomputer, an interface, a control-pulse generator, a thyristor switch unit, and a parallel voltage divider.

  5. Joint Random Access and Power Control Game in Ad Hoc Networks with Noncooperative Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chengnian; Guan, Xinping

    We consider a distributed joint random access and power control scheme for interference management in wireless ad hoc networks. To derive decentralized solutions that do not require any cooperation among the users, we formulate this problem as non-cooperative joint random access and power control game, in which each user minimizes its average transmission cost with a given rate constraint. Using supermodular game theory, the existence and uniqueness of Nash equilibrium are established. Furthermore, we present an asynchronous distributed algorithm to compute the solution of the game based on myopic best response updates, which converges to Nash equilibrium globally.

  6. Digital servo control of random sound test excitation. [in reverberant acoustic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A digital servocontrol system for random noise excitation of a test object in a reverberant acoustic chamber employs a plurality of sensors spaced in the sound field to produce signals in separate channels which are decorrelated and averaged. The average signal is divided into a plurality of adjacent frequency bands cyclically sampled by a time division multiplex system, converted into digital form, and compared to a predetermined spectrum value stored in digital form. The results of the comparisons are used to control a time-shared up-down counter to develop gain control signals for the respective frequency bands in the spectrum of random sound energy picked up by the microphones.

  7. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  8. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  9. A randomized controlled trial adding fluvastatin to peginterferon and ribavirin for naïve genotype 1 hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Bader, T; Hughes, L D; Fazili, J; Frost, B; Dunnam, M; Gonterman, A; Madhoun, M; Aston, C E

    2013-09-01

    Fluvastatin or simvastatin has demonstrable antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) as monotherapy. The safety and efficacy of adding fluvastatin or simvastatin to peginterferon/ribavirin for 48 weeks was tested in HCV genotype 1 naïve-to-treatment veterans. Thirty-seven naïve-to-treatment genotype 1 HCV patients were randomized to either a control group (n = 20) to receive peginterferon alfa plus ribavirin or an experimental group (n = 18) to similarly receive peginterferon alfa plus ribavirin as well as fluvastatin 20 mg/day. In addition, seven patients who presented for HCV treatment already were on simvastatin and could not be withdrawn. These simvastatin users were not randomized but were entered into a concurrent prospective pilot arm. There were no unique safety issues with fluvastatin or simvastatin when these drugs were given with peginterferon/ribavirin for 48 weeks. Thirteen of 25 statin patients achieved sustained viral response (SVR), while 5 of 20 control patients achieved SVR. Analysis of SVR by intention-to-treat showed P = 0.078. In this phase 2 study, there were no safety issues with the addition of fluvastatin or simvastatin to peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks. There was a trend towards improvement in SVR when fluvastatin or simvastatin was administered with peginterferon/ribavirin. The size of the groups did not reach the prestudy size thought needed to show significant difference (type II error). These results support the significant results of two other larger randomized controlled trials reported using the same dose of fluvastatin in naïve-to-treatment genotype 1 HCV patients. PMID:23910646

  10. A cluster-randomized trial of insecticide-treated curtains for dengue vector control in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Audrey; Trongtokit, Yuwadee; Alexander, Neal; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Satimai, Wichai; Vanlerberghe, Veerle; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; McCall, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of insecticide-treated window curtains (ITCs) for dengue vector control was evaluated in Thailand in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. A total of 2,037 houses in 26 clusters was randomized to receive the intervention or act as control (no treatment). Entomological surveys measured Aedes infestations (Breteau index, house index, container index, and pupae per person index) and oviposition indices (mean numbers of eggs laid in oviposition traps) immediately before and after intervention, and at 3-month intervals over 12 months. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in entomological indices between intervention and control clusters, although oviposition indices were lower (P < 0.01) in ITC clusters during the wet season. It is possible that the open housing structures in the study reduced the likelihood of mosquitoes making contact with ITCs. ITCs deployed in a region where this house design is common may be unsuitable for dengue vector control. PMID:23166195

  11. A Cluster-Randomized Trial of Insecticide-Treated Curtains for Dengue Vector Control in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Audrey; Trongtokit, Yuwadee; Alexander, Neal; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Satimai, Wichai; Vanlerberghe, Veerle; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; McCall, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of insecticide-treated window curtains (ITCs) for dengue vector control was evaluated in Thailand in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. A total of 2,037 houses in 26 clusters was randomized to receive the intervention or act as control (no treatment). Entomological surveys measured Aedes infestations (Breteau index, house index, container index, and pupae per person index) and oviposition indices (mean numbers of eggs laid in oviposition traps) immediately before and after intervention, and at 3-month intervals over 12 months. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in entomological indices between intervention and control clusters, although oviposition indices were lower (P < 0.01) in ITC clusters during the wet season. It is possible that the open housing structures in the study reduced the likelihood of mosquitoes making contact with ITCs. ITCs deployed in a region where this house design is common may be unsuitable for dengue vector control. PMID:23166195

  12. Universal polarization terahertz phase controllers using randomly aligned liquid crystal cells with graphene electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    We present a universal polarization terahertz (THz) phase controller using a randomly aligned liquid crystal (LC) cell with graphene electrodes. The LC cell was fabricated using a nematic LC and two quartz substrates that were coated with a monolayer of graphene as the transparent electrode. The LC in the cell was prepared without any alignment treatments and was randomly aligned. The size of the random domains and the width of the disclination lines in the LC layer were several tens of microns. These textures disappeared when an alternating voltage was applied to the LC through the graphene layers. Using a THz time domain spectroscopic technique, we investigated the complex transmittance of the LC cell. The LC cell was highly transparent in the THz frequency range, and there was little change in the transmittance with the applied voltage. This indicated that the scattering loss originating in the randomly aligned LC molecules was small for the THz waves. We also demonstrated that the THz phase shift could be controlled by the applied voltage. The amplitude of the phase shift was explained by the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices of the LC. These LC cells with graphene electrodes can be used to realize universal polarization THz phase controllers because of the random alignment. PMID:25831380

  13. Use of Kampo Diagnosis in Randomized Controlled Trials of Kampo Products in Japan: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Motoo, Yoshiharu; Arai, Ichiro; Tsutani, Kiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Background The Committee for Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) of the Japan Society for Oriental Medicine started compiling Evidence Reports of Kampo Treatment (EKAT) in 2007. EKAT is a compilation of structured abstracts of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), along with comments by a third party reviewer. As of 31 December, 2012, there were 378 RCTs of Kampo medicines in Japan. The primary research question of this study is “How frequently is Kampo diagnosis used in RCTs of Kampo medicines?” The secondary research question is “When is Kampo diagnosis used in RCTs?” Materials and Methods The structured abstract (SA) of each RCT article was reviewed to examine how Kampo diagnosis was used in RCTs, especially how Kampo diagnosis was used in the randomization process. Results Kampo diagnosis was used before randomization in 27 RCTs (7.1%), after randomization in 31 RCTs (8.2%), and not used in 320 RCTs (84.7%). Before randomization, Kampo diagnosis was used as a criterion for inclusion in 10 RCTs, criterion for exclusion in 9 RCTs, and criteria for both inclusion and exclusion in 2 RCTs. Kampo formulas were determined according to Kampo diagnosis in 7 RCTs. After randomization, subgroup analyses according to Kampo diagnosis were done in 27 RCTs, and grade of disease severity at Kampo diagnosis was used for analysis as an endpoint in 4 RCTs. Conclusions Kampo diagnosis was used before randomization only in approximately 15% of RCTs, and the number of RCT articles using Kampo diagnosis after randomization was almost the same as that before randomization. Further studies to determine the good RCTs conforming to CONSORT requirements and good systematic reviews conforming to PRISMA requirements are needed to clarify the significance of Kampo diagnosis. PMID:25119187

  14. PDE-based random-valued impulse noise removal based on new class of controlling functions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Tang, Chen

    2011-09-01

    This paper is concerned with partial differential equation (PDE)-based image denoising for random-valued impulse noise. We introduce the notion of ENI (the abbreviation for "edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels") that denotes the number of homogeneous pixels in a local neighborhood and is significantly different for edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels. We redefine the controlling speed function and the controlling fidelity function to depend on ENI. According to our two controlling functions, the diffusion and fidelity process at edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels can be selectively carried out. Furthermore, a class of second-order improved and edge-preserving PDE denoising models is proposed based on the two new controlling functions in order to deal with random-valued impulse noise reliably. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed PDEs via application to five standard test images, corrupted by random-valued impulse noise with various noise levels and comparison with the related second-order PDE models and the other special filtering methods for random-valued impulse noise. Our two controlling functions are extended to automatically other PDE models. PMID:21435980

  15. Beam Loss Control for the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Choi, J.

    2011-03-28

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II storage ring is designed for the full injected beam losses in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but for the remainder of the ring its shielded for {le} 10% top-off injection beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses do not exceed these levels for time sufficient to cause excessive radiation exposure outside the shield walls. This beam Loss Control and Monitoring (LCM) system will control the beam losses to the more heavily shielded injection region while monitoring the losses outside this region. To achieve this scrapers are installed in the injection region to intercept beam particles that might be lost outside this region. The scrapers will be thin (< 1Xrad) that will allow low energy electrons to penetrate and the subsequent dipole will separate them from the stored beam. These thin scrapers will reduce the radiation from the scraper compared to thicker scrapers. The dipole will provide significant local shielding for particles that hit inside the gap and a source for the loss monitor system that will measure the amount of beam lost in the injection region.

  16. The effect of Valsalva maneuver in attenuating skin puncture pain during spinal anesthesia: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Sujeet Kumar Singh; Gupta, Devendra; Agarwal, Anil; Dhirraj, Sanjay; Khuba, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background Valsalva maneuver reduces pain by activating sinoaortic baroreceptor reflex arc. We planned this study to evaluate the role of valsalva in attenuating spinal needle-puncture pain. Methods Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I and II enrolled patients undergoing elective surgery were randomized into 3 groups of 30 each. Group I (Control): didn't blow; group II (Distraction): patients blew into rubber tube; Group III (Valsalva): blew into sphygmomanometer tube and raise mercury column up to 30 mmHg for at least 20 seconds. During above procedures, spinal puncture was performed with 25-gauge spinal needle. Results Eighty-two patient data were analyzed. Incidence of spinal puncture pain was reduced to 10% (3 of 27) in Valsalva group as compared to 100% (28 of 28 in control group and 27 of 27 in Distraction group) observed in other two groups (P < 0.05). Severity of lumbar puncture pain as assessed by visual analog scale (0−10; where 0 is no pain and 10 is the worst imaginable pain) presented as Median (Interquartile range) were significantly reduced in the Valsalva group (0.0 [0.0] as compared to other 2 groups 2.0 [0.0] in the Distraction group and 3.0 [0.8] in Control group) (P < 0.05). Regarding time taken by CSF to fill spinal needle hub, there was no difference among the three groups (P > 0.05). None patient of all groups had post dural puncture headache (P > 0.05). Conclusions Valsalva can be performed routinely in ASA I and II patients undergoing spinal anesthesia as it is safe, painless and non-pharmacological method of pain attenuation. PMID:26885298

  17. Coronally Advanced Flap with Different Designs in the Treatment of Gingival Recession: A Comparative Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Giovanni; Stefanini, M; Ganz, S; Mazzotti, Claudio; Mounssif, Ilham; Marzadori, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this parallel double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was to describe a modified approach using the coronally advanced flap (CAF) with triangular design and to compare its efficacy, in terms of root coverage and esthetics, with a trapezoidal type of CAF. A sample of 50 isolated Miller Class I and II gingival recessions with at least 1 mm of keratinized tissue apical to the defects were treated with CAF. Of these recessions, 25 were randomly treated with trapezoidal CAF (control group) while the other 25 (test group) were treated with a modified triangular CAF. The clinical and esthetic evaluations, made by the patient and an independent periodontist, were performed 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the surgery. No statistically significant difference was demonstrated between the two CAF groups in terms of recession reduction, complete root coverage, or 6-month and 1-year patient esthetic scores. Better 3-month patient esthetic evaluations and better periodontist root coverage, color match, and contiguity assessments were reported after triangular CAF. Trapezoidal CAF was associated with greater incidence of keloid formation. Single-type gingival recessions can be successfully covered with both types of CAF. The triangular CAF should be preferred for esthetically demanding patients. PMID:27100801

  18. Coping With Strain (CWS) course - its effects on depressive symptoms: A four-year longitudinal randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Saelid, Gry Anette; Czajkowski, Nikolai Olavi; Holte, Arne; Tambs, Kristian; Aarø, Leif Edvard

    2016-08-01

    The Coping With Strain (CWS) course is a modification of the Coping With Depression (CWD) course. CWD is by far the most studied psycho-educational intervention to reduce and prevent depression, but CWD has never been tested in a randomized controlled trial in the workplace. This study seeks to examine the extent to which CWS, on a short-term and a long-term basis, reduces depressive symptoms in employees. After advertising at workplaces, 119 employees were randomized into Intervention Group I (IG1), which immediately participated in CWS, or Intervention Group II (IG2), which functioned as a control group for six months until its participation in CWS. The follow up period lasted for four years in both IG1 and IG2. Linear mixed models were fitted to the data. Depressive symptoms were significantly reduced during the course. The reduction of depressive symptoms was maintained over a period of four years in both IG1 and IG2, although there is a slight increase towards the end of the follow-up period. CWS is effective in reducing depressive symptoms among employees. The effects are long lasting and may be maintained over a period of four years. PMID:27121277

  19. Sham Acupressure Controls Used in Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review and Critique

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jing-Yu; Suen, Lorna K. P.; Wang, Tao; Molassiotis, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the commonly utilized sham acupressure procedures in existing acupressure trials, and to assess whether different types of sham interventions yield different therapeutic outcomes, and, as far as possible, to identify directions for the future development of an adequate sham acupressure method. Methods Randomized controlled trials comparing true acupressure with sham interventions were included. Thirteen electronic databases were adopted to locate relevant studies from inception to July 3, 2014. Meanwhile, eight Chinese journals on complementary and alternative medicine were manually searched to locate eligible articles. In addition, eligible studies listed in the reference lists of the included papers and other related systematic reviews on acupressure were also screened to further search any potentially eligible trials. Methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated using the risk of bias assessment tool developed by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Descriptive analysis was adopted to summarize the therapeutic outcomes. Results Sixty-six studies with 7265 participants were included. Methodological quality of the included trials was generally satisfactory. Six types of sham acupressure approaches were identified and “non-acupoint” stimulation was the most frequently utilized sham point while an acupressure device was the most commonly used approach for administering sham treatments. Acupressure therapy was a beneficial approach in managing a variety of health problems and the therapeutic effect was found to be more effective in the true acupressure groups than that in the sham comparative groups. No clear association could be identified between different sham acupressure modalities and the reported treatment outcomes. Conclusions A great diversity of sham acupressure controls have been used in clinical practice and research. A solid conclusion whether different sham alternatives are related to different treatment outcomes

  20. The Public Repository of Xenografts Enables Discovery and Randomized Phase II-like Trials in Mice.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth C; Murakami, Mark A; Christodoulou, Alexandra; Christie, Amanda L; Köster, Johannes; DeSouza, Tiffany A; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Kallgren, Scott P; Liu, Huiyun; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Plana, Olivia; Montero, Joan; Stevenson, Kristen E; Rao, Prakash; Vadhi, Raga; Andreeff, Michael; Armand, Philippe; Ballen, Karen K; Barzaghi-Rinaudo, Patrizia; Cahill, Sarah; Clark, Rachael A; Cooke, Vesselina G; Davids, Matthew S; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Dorfman, David M; Eaton, Hilary; Ebert, Benjamin L; Etchin, Julia; Firestone, Brant; Fisher, David C; Freedman, Arnold S; Galinsky, Ilene A; Gao, Hui; Garcia, Jacqueline S; Garnache-Ottou, Francine; Graubert, Timothy A; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Halilovic, Ensar; Harris, Marian H; Herbert, Zachary T; Horwitz, Steven M; Inghirami, Giorgio; Intlekoffer, Andrew M; Ito, Moriko; Izraeli, Shai; Jacobsen, Eric D; Jacobson, Caron A; Jeay, Sébastien; Jeremias, Irmela; Kelliher, Michelle A; Koch, Raphael; Konopleva, Marina; Kopp, Nadja; Kornblau, Steven M; Kung, Andrew L; Kupper, Thomas S; LaBoeuf, Nicole; LaCasce, Ann S; Lees, Emma; Li, Loretta S; Look, A Thomas; Murakami, Masato; Muschen, Markus; Neuberg, Donna; Ng, Samuel Y; Odejide, Oreofe O; Orkin, Stuart H; Paquette, Rachel R; Place, Andrew E; Roderick, Justine E; Ryan, Jeremy A; Sallan, Stephen E; Shoji, Brent; Silverman, Lewis B; Soiffer, Robert J; Steensma, David P; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Stone, Richard M; Tamburini, Jerome; Thorner, Aaron R; van Hummelen, Paul; Wadleigh, Martha; Wiesmann, Marion; Weng, Andrew P; Wuerthner, Jens U; Williams, David A; Wollison, Bruce M; Lane, Andrew A; Letai, Anthony; Bertagnolli, Monica M; Ritz, Jerome; Brown, Myles; Long, Henry; Aster, Jon C; Shipp, Margaret A; Griffin, James D; Weinstock, David M

    2016-04-11

    More than 90% of drugs with preclinical activity fail in human trials, largely due to insufficient efficacy. We hypothesized that adequately powered trials of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) in mice could efficiently define therapeutic activity across heterogeneous tumors. To address this hypothesis, we established a large, publicly available repository of well-characterized leukemia and lymphoma PDXs that undergo orthotopic engraftment, called the Public Repository of Xenografts (PRoXe). PRoXe includes all de-identified information relevant to the primary specimens and the PDXs derived from them. Using this repository, we demonstrate that large studies of acute leukemia PDXs that mimic human randomized clinical trials can characterize drug efficacy and generate transcriptional, functional, and proteomic biomarkers in both treatment-naive and relapsed/refractory disease. PMID:27070704

  1. Lithographic analysis of distributed photomask defects: II. Random mask CD errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karklin, Linard

    2002-07-01

    information about the transmittance and phase of these defects at actinic wavelength using inspection and metrology tools. With a simulation study one can reconstruct such mask defects, and by varying defect phase and transmission one can learn about the impact of such mask defects on printed wafers. In addition, lithography simulation helps to better understand how mask defects behave under different lithography process conditions. In our previous research on photo mask distributed defects (this work was presented at 18th European mask conference, Munich 20021) we looked into several cases of distributed mask defects such as large chrome residuals and clustered pinholes on EAPSM. We found a relationship between photo mask defect transmissivity and resulting printed wafer critical dimension (CD) error.CD variations (systematic and random mask CD errors) across the photo mask represent a common type of yield killing distributed defects. Systematic errors can be analyzed and fixed by applying different corrective methods (e.g. LPC, OPC). The negative effect of random errors can be minimized by selecting the most robust manufacturing process, and by choosing optimal lithography options (RETs). In this paper we investigated randomly distributed CD errors. Monte Carlo simulation has been used to emulate large numbers (10000 - 40000) of mask random CD errors.

  2. Research Methods in Healthcare Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Stewardship: Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Deverick J; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCT) produce the strongest level of clinical evidence when comparing interventions. RCTs are technically difficult, costly, and require specific considerations including the use of patient- and cluster-level randomization and outcome selection. In this methods paper, we focus on key considerations for RCT methods in healthcare epidemiology and antimicrobial stewardship (HE&AS) research, including the need for cluster randomization, conduct at multiple sites, behavior modification interventions, and difficulty with identifying appropriate outcomes. We review key RCTs in HE&AS with a focus on advantages and disadvantages of methods used. A checklist is provided to aid in the development of RCTs in HE&AS. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:629-634. PMID:27108848

  3. 40 CFR 82.15 - Prohibitions for class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... person for that substance under the authority of this subpart at that time in that control period, unless... use production allowances to produce a quantity of class II controlled substance unless that person... class II controlled substance for which EPA has apportioned baseline production and...

  4. Acupuncture as a treatment for functional dyspepsia: design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Tian, Xiao-ping; Li, Ying; Liang, Fan-rong; Yu, Shu-guang; Liu, Xu-guang; Tang, Yong; Yang, Xu-guang; Yan, Jie; Sun, Guo-jie; Chang, Xiao-rong; Zhang, Hong-xing; Ma, Ting-ting; Yu, Shu-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is widely used in China to treat functional dyspepsia (FD). However, its effectiveness in the treatment of FD, and whether FD-specific acupoints exist, are controversial. So this study aims to determine if acupuncture is an effective treatment for FD and if acupoint specificity exists according to traditional acupuncture meridians and acupoint theories. Design This multicenter randomized controlled trial will include four acupoint treatment groups, one non-acupoint control group and one drug (positive control) group. The four acupoint treatment groups will focus on: (1) specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; (2) non-specific acupoints of the stomach meridian; (3) specific acupoints of alarm and transport points; and (4) acupoints of the gallbladder meridian. These four groups of acupoints are thought to differ in terms of clinical efficacy, according to traditional acupuncture meridians and acupoint theories. A total of 120 FD patients will be included in each group. Each patient will receive 20 sessions of acupuncture treatment over 4 weeks. The trial will be conducted in eight hospitals located in three centers of China. The primary outcomes in this trial will include differences in Nepean Dyspepsia Index scores and differences in the Symptom Index of Dyspepsia before randomization, 2 weeks and 4 weeks after randomization, and 1 month and 3 months after completing treatment. Discussion The important features of this trial include the randomization procedures (controlled by a central randomization system), a standardized protocol of acupuncture manipulation, and the fact that this is the first multicenter randomized trial of FD and acupuncture to be performed in China. The results of this trial will determine whether acupuncture is an effective treatment for FD and whether using different acupoints or different meridians leads to differences in clinical efficacy. Trial registration number Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT00599677

  5. A randomized phase II trial of interleukin 2 and interleukin 2-interferon alpha in advanced renal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Jayson, G. C.; Middleton, M.; Lee, S. M.; Ashcroft, L.; Thatcher, N.

    1998-01-01

    A randomized phase II trial was performed to compare the efficacy and toxicity of interleukin 2 (IL-2) with an IL-2 and interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) regimen for the treatment of metastatic renal carcinoma. Sixty patients with recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who had previously undergone a nephrectomy were randomized to receive three cycles of IL-2 or IL-2 with IFN-alpha2b. Eighteen MU of IL-2 were administered subcutaneously on Mondays-Fridays for 3 weeks out of 4. Those patients randomized to receive the combination received the same regimen of IL-2 with 9 MU of IFN-alpha2b subcutaneously on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays for 3 weeks out of 4. Thirty patients were randomized to receive each arm. Twenty-nine were evaluable in each arm. Twenty-two patients received three cycles of IL-2 but only 14 patients received three cycles of IL-2/IFN-alpha because of the greater toxicity of the combination. The principal toxicities included nausea, fatigue and fever. There were no complete responses in either arm and only two patients who were treated with IL-2 attained a partial response. Twelve patients in each arm had stable disease and 15 patients in the IL-2 arm and 16 patients in the IL-2/IFN-alpha arm progressed through treatment. There were no significant differences in survival. Ten patients who received IL-2 are alive with a median follow-up of 266 days, whereas six patients who received IL-2/IFN-alpha are alive after a median of 278 days. The median survival from the time of identification of metastatic disease is 444 days in the IL-2 arm and 381 days in the IL-2/IFN-alpha arm. The IL-2/IFN-alpha combination is more toxic than IL-2 alone and this resulted in a reduced number of cycles of treatment. However, the median survival of the two groups was the same, suggesting that further evaluation of the IL-2/IFN-alpha combination should be confined to large prospective randomized clinical trials. PMID:9703284

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Koru: A Mindfulness Program for College Students and Other Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeson, Jeffrey M.; Juberg, Michael K.; Maytan, Margaret; James, Kiera; Rogers, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Koru, a mindfulness training program for college students and other emerging adults. Participants: Ninety students (66% female, 62% white, 71% graduate students) participated between Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. Methods: Randomized controlled trial. It was hypothesized that Koru, compared with a wait-list…

  7. Thinking outside the Randomized Controlled Trials Experimental Box: Strategies for Enhancing Credibility and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2013-01-01

    Some evaluators employ randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as the gold standard of evidence-based practice (EBP). Critics of RCT designs argue that RCTs do not include the complexity of program participants' experiences or clinical expertise, and couple this with criticisms that it is difficult to transfer RCT findings from the laboratory to…

  8. Searching for Control: Priming Randomness Increases the Evaluation of Ritual Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legare, Cristine H.; Souza, André L.

    2014-01-01

    Reestablishing feelings of control after experiencing uncertainty has long been considered a fundamental motive for human behavior. We propose that rituals (i.e., socially stipulated, causally opaque practices) provide a means for coping with the aversive feelings associated with randomness due to the perception of a connection between ritual…

  9. Multisite Randomized Controlled Trial Examining Intelligent Tutoring of Structure Strategy for Fifth-Grade Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijekumar, Kausalai; Meyer, Bonnie J. F.; Lei, Pui-Wa; Lin, Yu-Chu; Johnson, Lori A.; Spielvogel, James A.; Shurmatz, Kathryn M.; Ray, Melissa; Cook, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a large scale randomized controlled trial to study the efficacy of a web-based intelligent tutoring system for the structure strategy designed to improve content area reading comprehension. The research was conducted with 128 fifth-grade classrooms within 12 school districts in rural and suburban settings. Classrooms within…

  10. An Empirical Comparison of Randomized Control Trials and Regression Discontinuity Estimations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera-Osorio, Felipe; Filmer, Deon; McIntyre, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and regression discontinuity (RD) studies both provide estimates of causal effects. A major difference between the two is that RD only estimates local average treatment effects (LATE) near the cutoff point of the forcing variable. This has been cited as a drawback to RD designs (Cook & Wong, 2008).…

  11. Training Anxious Children to Disengage Attention from Threat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Haim, Yair; Morag, Inbar; Glickman, Shlomit

    2011-01-01

    Background: Threat-related attention biases have been implicated in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. As a result, attention bias modification (ABM) protocols have been employed as treatments for anxious adults. However, they have yet to emerge for children. A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted to…

  12. Interpretation Training in Individuals with Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nader; Taylor, Charles T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of a multisession computerized interpretation modification program (IMP) in the treatment of generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD). Method: The sample comprised 49 individuals meeting diagnostic criteria for GSAD who were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial comparing IMP (n = 23)…

  13. 77 FR 26789 - Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... violation of section 337 in the infringement of certain patents. 73 FR 75131. The principal respondent was... order. 75 FR 44989-90 (July 30, 2010). The Commission also issued cease and desist orders against those... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers...

  14. Digestive Enzyme Supplementation for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munasinghe, Sujeeva A.; Oliff, Carolyn; Finn, Judith; Wray, John A.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effects of a digestive enzyme supplement in improving expressive language, behaviour and other symptoms in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial using crossover design over 6 months for 43 children, aged 3-8 years. Outcome measurement tools included monthly Global Behaviour Rating…

  15. Determinants of glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with T2DM to date. We examined estimates of insulin sensitivit...

  16. Mixed Results from Six Large Randomized Controlled Trials of Learning Communities in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Alexander K.; Weiss, Michael J.; Visher, Mary G.; Sommo, Colleen; Rudd, Timothy; Cullinan, Dan; Weissman, Evan; Wathington, Heather D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents research that explores similarities and differences across six randomized controlled trials of learning communities in community colleges that were conducted by MDRC and the National Center for Postsecondary Research. Five of these studies track students' progress in the program semester and two follow-up semesters, and one…

  17. Randomized, Controlled Trial of a Comprehensive Program for Young Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Helen E.; Falco, Ruth A.; Hanita, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, controlled trial, comparing the Comprehensive Autism Program (CAP) and business as usual programs, studied outcomes for 3-5 year old students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included 84 teachers and 302 students with ASD and their parents. CAP utilized specialized curricula and training components to implement…

  18. Vestibular Stimulation for ADHD: Randomized Controlled Trial of Comprehensive Motion Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David L.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Crowl, Lindsay; Bozzolo, Hernan; Peruggia, Mario; Ramadan, Yaser; Bornstein, Robert; Hollway, Jill A.; Thompson, Susan; Malone, Krista; Hall, Kristy L.; Shelton, Sara B.; Bozzolo, Dawn R.; Cook, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This research evaluates effects of vestibular stimulation by Comprehensive Motion Apparatus (CMA) in ADHD. Method: Children ages 6 to 12 (48 boys, 5 girls) with ADHD were randomized to thrice-weekly 30-min treatments for 12 weeks with CMA, stimulating otoliths and semicircular canals, or a single-blind control of equal duration and…

  19. Learning Mathematics in a Visuospatial Format: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Mental Abacus Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barner, David; Alvarez, George; Sullivan, Jessica; Brooks, Neon; Srinivasan, Mahesh; Frank, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Mental abacus (MA) is a technique of performing fast, accurate arithmetic using a mental image of an abacus; experts exhibit astonishing calculation abilities. Over 3 years, 204 elementary school students (age range at outset: 5-7 years old) participated in a randomized, controlled trial to test whether MA expertise (a) can be acquired in standard…

  20. Cancer Screening Knowledge Changes: Results from a Randomized Control Trial of Women with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Susan L.; Rose, Roderick A.; Luken, Karen; Swaine, Jamie G.; O'Hare, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    Background: Women with developmental disabilities are much less likely than nondisabled women to receive cervical and breast cancer screening according to clinical guidelines. One barrier to receipt of screenings is a lack of knowledge about preventive screenings. Method: To address this barrier, we used a randomized control trial (n = 175 women)…

  1. Factors Influencing Hand Washing Behaviour in Primary Schools: Process Evaluation within a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chittleborough, Catherine R.; Nicholson, Alexandra L.; Basker, Elaine; Bell, Sarah; Campbell, Rona

    2012-01-01

    This article explores factors that may influence hand washing behaviour among pupils and staff in primary schools. A qualitative process evaluation within a cluster randomized controlled trial included pupil focus groups (n = 16, aged 6-11 years), semi-structured interviews (n = 16 teachers) and observations of hand washing facilities (n = 57).…

  2. Fit 5 Kids TV reduction program for Latino preschoolers: A cluster randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing Latino preschoolers' TV viewing is needed to reduce their risk of obesity and other chronic diseases. This study's objective was to evaluate the Fit 5 Kids (F5K) TV reduction program's impact on Latino preschooler's TV viewing. The study design was a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT...

  3. Working Memory Training in Young Children with ADHD: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dongen-Boomsma, Martine; Vollebregt, Madelon A.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Until now, working memory training has not reached sufficient evidence as effective treatment for ADHD core symptoms in children with ADHD; for young children with ADHD, no studies are available. To this end, a triple-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was designed to assess the efficacy of Cogmed Working Memory Training…

  4. Randomized Controlled Trial: Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skill Intervention for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan W.; Ollendick, Thomas; Albano, Anne Marie; Oswald, Donald; Johnson, Cynthia; Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; Kim, Inyoung; Scahill, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is common among adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and may amplify the core social disability, thus necessitating combined treatment approaches. This pilot, randomized controlled trial evaluated the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of the Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skills Intervention (MASSI) program in a sample of 30…

  5. Escitalopram in the Treatment of Adolescent Depression: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Multisite Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emslie, Graham J.; Ventura, Daniel; Korotzer, Andrew; Tourkodimitris, Stavros

    2009-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that involves 312 male and female patients aged 12-17 reveal the effectiveness of escitalopram in the treatment of depressed adolescents. Eighty-three percent of the participants or 259 participants completed the 8 weeks therapy period.

  6. Service Learning in Medical and Nursing Training: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, A. Y. M.; Chan, S. S. C.; Kwan, C. W.; Cheung, M. K. T.; Leung, S. S. K.; Fong, D. Y. T.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the long term effect of a service learning project on medical and nursing students' knowledge in aging and their attitudes toward older adults. A total of 124 students were recruited and then randomized to intervention group (IG) and control group (CG). A pre-and-post-intervention design measured students'…

  7. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  8. A Randomized Control Study of Responsive Teaching with Young Turkish Children and Their Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaaslan, Ozcan; Diken, Ibrahim H.; Mahoney, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    A randomized control study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of responsive teaching (RT) with a sample of 19 Turkish preschool-age children with disabilities and their mothers over a 6-months period. RT is an early intervention curriculum that attempts to promote children's development by encouraging parents to engage in highly…

  9. Lower extremity power training in elderly subjects with moderate mobility limitations: A randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty-seven community-dwelling older adults were randomized to either high-velocity high-power training (POW), slow-velocity progressive resistance training (STR) or a control group of lower extremity stretching (CON). Training was performed three times per week for 12 weeks and subjects completed t...

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of Video Self-Modeling Following Speech Restructuring Treatment for Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cream, Angela; O'Brian, Sue; Jones, Mark; Block, Susan; Harrison, Elisabeth; Lincoln, Michelle; Hewat, Sally; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross; Onslow, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated the efficacy of video self-modeling (VSM) following speech restructuring treatment to improve the maintenance of treatment effects. Method: The design was an open-plan, parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants were 89 adults and adolescents who undertook intensive speech…

  11. Cycling Versus Continuous Mode In Neuromodulator Programming: A Crossover, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Beer, Gwendolyn M; Gurule, Margaret M; Komesu, Yuko M; Qualls, Clifford R; Rogers, Rebecca G

    2016-01-01

    This is a randomized, controlled, blind, crossover trial comparing cycling versus continuous programming of a sacral neuromodulator in women diagnosed with overactive bladder (OAB). At 6 months, treatment order significantly affected Overactive Bladder Questionnaire - Short Form (OABq-SF) symptom scores. The cycling followed by continuous stimulation group had superior OABq-SF scores (p > 0.02). PMID:27501593

  12. Mainstreaming Remedial Mathematics Students in Introductory Statistics: Results Using a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Alexandra W.; Watanabe-Rose, Mari

    2014-01-01

    This study used a randomized controlled trial to determine whether students, assessed by their community colleges as needing an elementary algebra (remedial) mathematics course, could instead succeed at least as well in a college-level, credit-bearing introductory statistics course with extra support (a weekly workshop). Researchers randomly…

  13. Attachment-Based Family Therapy for Adolescents with Suicidal Ideation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Guy S.; Wintersteen, Matthew B.; Brown, Gregory K.; Diamond, Gary M.; Gallop, Robert; Shelef, Karni; Levy, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is more effective than Enhanced Usual Care (EUC) for reducing suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms in adolescents. Method: This was a randomized controlled trial of suicidal adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17, identified in primary care and emergency departments. Of…

  14. Randomized Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial of a Telehealth Treatment for Chronic Stuttering: The Camperdown Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Onslow, Mark; Block, Susan; Jones, Mark; Packman, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although there are treatments that can alleviate stuttering in adults for clinically significant periods, in Australia there are barriers to the accessibility and availability of best-practice treatment. Aims: This parallel group, non-inferiority randomized controlled trial with multiple blinded outcome assessments investigated whether…

  15. Theory of Mind Training in Children with Autism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeer, Sander; Gevers, Carolien; Clifford, Pamela; Verhoeve, Manja; Kat, Kirstin; Hoddenbach, Elske; Boer, Frits

    2011-01-01

    Many children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) participate in social skills or Theory of Mind (ToM) treatments. However, few studies have shown evidence for their effectiveness. The current study used a randomized controlled design to test the effectiveness of a 16-week ToM treatment in 8-13 year old children with ASD and normal IQs (n = 40).…

  16. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Stephen; Bertoglio, Kiah; Ashwood, Paul; Bostrom, Alan; Hendren, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial to determine the feasibility and initial safety and efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids (1.3 g/day) for the treatment of hyperactivity in 27 children ages 3-8 with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). After 12 weeks, hyperactivity, as measured by the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, improved 2.7 (plus or minus…

  17. The Effectiveness of Healthy Start Home Visit Program: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Heung, Kitty

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study reported the effectiveness of a home visit program for disadvantaged Chinese parents with preschool children, using cluster randomized controlled trial design. Method: Participants included 191 parents and their children from 24 preschools, with 84 dyads (12 preschools) in the intervention group and 107 dyads (12 preschools) in…

  18. Learning What Works in ITS from Non-Traditional Randomized Controlled Trial Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardos, Zachary A.; Dailey, Matthew D.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2011-01-01

    The well established, gold standard approach to finding out what works in education research is to run a randomized controlled trial (RCT) using a standard pre-test and post-test design. RCTs have been used in the intelligent tutoring community for decades to determine which questions and tutorial feedback work best. Practically speaking, however,…

  19. Randomized Controlled Caregiver Mediated Joint Engagement Intervention for Toddlers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasari, Connie; Gulsrud, Amanda C.; Wong, Connie; Kwon, Susan; Locke, Jill

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if a joint attention intervention would result in greater joint engagement between caregivers and toddlers with autism. The intervention consisted of 24 caregiver-mediated sessions with follow-up 1 year later. Compared to caregivers and toddlers randomized to the waitlist control group the immediate treatment (IT)…

  20. Benefits and Harms of Sick Leave: Lack of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelsson, Inge; Marnetoft, Sven-Uno

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to try to identify those randomized controlled trials that compare sick leave with no sick leave or a different duration or degree of sick leave. A comprehensive, systematic, electronic search of Clinical Evidence, the Cochrane Library and PubMed, and a manual search of the Campbell Library and a journal supplement was…

  1. Installing the Communities that Care Prevention System: Implementation Progress and Fidelity in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinby, Rose K.; Hanson, Koren; Brooke-Weiss, Blair; Arthur, Michael W.; Hawkins, J. David; Fagan, Abigail A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the degree to which high fidelity implementation of the Communities That Care (CTC) prevention operating system was reached during the first 18 months of intervention in 12 communities in the Community Youth Development Study, a 5-year group randomized controlled trial designed to test the efficacy of the CTC system. CTC…

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of the Focus Parent Training for Toddlers with Autism: 1-Year Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterling, Iris; Visser, Janne; Swinkels, Sophie; Rommelse, Nanda; Donders, Rogier; Woudenberg, Tim; Roos, Sascha; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Buitelaar, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial compared results obtained after 12 months of nonintensive parent training plus care-as-usual and care-as-usual alone. The training focused on stimulating joint attention and language skills and was based on the intervention described by Drew et al. (Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatr 11:266-272, 2002). Seventy-five…

  3. Ice Hockey Players Using a Weighted Implement when Training on the Ice: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Timothy W.; Tvoric, Bojan; Walker, Bruce; Noonan, Dom; Sibla, Janeene

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for improving hockey players' performance using a weighted implement on the ice. Forty-eight players were tested using a grip strength dynamometer. They also were assessed on their abilities to stick-handle. The participants were randomly placed into a control or research group. The…

  4. Computerized Training of Working Memory in Children with ADHD-A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingberg, Torkel; Fernell, Elisabeth; Olesen, Pernille J.; Johnson, Mats; Gustafsson, Per; Dahlstrom, Kerstin; Gillberg, Christopher G.; Forssberg, Hans; Westerberg, Helena

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Deficits in executive functioning, including working memory (WM) deficits, have been suggested to be important in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). During 2002 to 2003, the authors conducted a multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial to investigate the effect of improving WM by computerized, systematic…

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial of Transdermal Secretin on Behavior of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff-Schaub, Karen; Carey, Tracy; Reeves, Gretchen; Rogers, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Previous trials of secretin for the treatment of autism have utilized a single or double dose administered intravenously. This is a report of a double-blind, randomized, controlled crossover trial of transdermally applied secretin in 15 children diagnosed with autism or pervasive developmental delay. Secretin or placebo was applied daily, in…

  6. Aquatic Physical Therapy for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Susan; McIntyre, Auburn; Plummer, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic therapy is an intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) that has not been investigated formally. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial to investigate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an aquatic therapy program to improve motor skills of children with DCD. Thirteen children (mean age 7…

  7. Melatonin Treatment in Individuals with Intellectual Disability and Chronic Insomnia: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braam, W.; Didden, R.; Smits, M.; Curfs, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: While several small-number or open-label studies suggest that melatonin improves sleep in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) with chronic sleep disturbance, a larger randomized control trial is necessary to validate these promising results. Methods: The effectiveness of melatonin for the treatment of chronic sleep…

  8. Teaching Third Graders about Real-Life Mathematical Problem Solving: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Finelli, Robin; Courey, Susan J.; Hamlett, Carol L.; Sones, Estelle M.; Hope, Susan K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of schema-broadening instruction (SBI), with and without explicit instruction in strategies for tackling the complexities involved in real-life (RL) math problems, on the math problem solving of third-grade students. Teachers (n = 30) were assigned randomly to 3 16-week conditions: control, SBI,…

  9. The Efficiency and Efficacy of Equivalence-Based Learning: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinn, Tracy E.; Newland, M. Christopher; Ritchie, Katie E.

    2015-01-01

    Because it employs an emergent-learning framework, equivalence-based instruction (EBI) is said to be highly efficient, but its presumed benefits must be compared quantitatively with alternative techniques. In a randomized controlled trial, 61 college students attempted to learn 32 pairs of proprietary and generic drug names using computer-based…

  10. Randomized, Controlled Trial to Examine the Impact of Providing Yogurt to Women Enrolled in WIC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Ellen B.; Ritchie, Lorrene D.; Walker, Brent H.; Gildengorin, Ginny; Crawford, Patricia B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Examine the impact of providing yogurt to women enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Design: Randomized, controlled intervention trial. Setting: Two California WIC local agency sites. Participants: 511 pregnant, breast-feeding, or postpartum women. Intervention: Substitution of…

  11. Effectiveness of a Parent Training Program in (Pre)Adolescence: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leijten, Patty; Overbeek, Geertjan; Janssens, Jan M. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of the parent training program Parents and Children Talking Together (PCTT) for parents with children in the preadolescent period who experience parenting difficulties. The program is focused on reducing child problem behavior by improving parents' communication and problem solving…

  12. Treatment Preferences Affect the Therapeutic Alliance: Implications for Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iacoviello, Brian M.; McCarthy, Kevin Scott; Barrett, Marna S.; Rynn, Moira; Gallop, Robert; Barber, Jacques P.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of treatment preferences on the development of the therapeutic alliance was investigated. Seventy-five patients were followed while participating in a randomized controlled trial comparing supportive-expressive psychotherapy with sertraline or pill placebo in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Therapeutic alliance was…

  13. Methylprednisolone in the management of spinal cord injuries: Lessons from randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Vincent; Hoshide, Reid; Bansal, Vishal; Kasper, Ekkehard; Chen, Clark C.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of glucocorticoid for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries remains a controversial topic. Differing medical societies have issued conflicting recommendations in this regard. Here we review the available randomized, controlled trial (RCT) data on this subject and offer a synthesis of these data sets. PMID:26392918

  14. EEG Neurofeedback for ADHD: Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Randomized Pilot Feasibility Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Lofthouse, Nicholas; Hersch, Sarah; Pan, Xueliang; Hurt, Elizabeth; Bates, Bethany; Kassouf, Kathleen; Moone, Stacey; Grantier, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Preparing for a definitive randomized clinical trial (RCT) of neurofeedback (NF) for ADHD, this pilot trial explored feasibility of a double-blind, sham-controlled design and adherence/palatability/relative effect of two versus three treatments/week. Method: Unmedicated 6- to 12-year-olds with "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  15. Group Lidcombe Program Treatment for Early Stuttering: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnott, Simone; Onslow, Mark; O'Brian, Sue; Packman, Ann; Jones, Mark; Block, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study adds to the Lidcombe Program evidence base by comparing individual and group treatment of preschoolers who stutter. Method: A randomized controlled trial of 54 preschoolers was designed to establish whether group delivery outcomes were not inferior to the individual model. The group arm used a rolling group model, in which a…

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Behavioral Economic Supplement to Brief Motivational Interventions for College Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James G.; Dennhardt, Ashley A.; Skidmore, Jessica R.; Borsari, Brian; Barnett, Nancy P.; Colby, Suzanne M.; Martens, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Behavioral economic theory suggests that a reduction in substance use is most likely when there is an increase in rewarding substance-free activities. The goal of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the incremental efficacy of a novel behavioral economic supplement (Substance-Free Activity Session [SFAS]) to a…

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial Study of the ABRACADABRA Reading Intervention Program in Grade 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Robert S.; Abrami, Philip; Hipps, Geoffrey; Deault, Louise

    2009-01-01

    This study reports a randomized controlled trial evaluation of a computer-based balanced literacy intervention, ABRACADABRA (http://grover.concordia.ca/abra/version1/abracadabra.html). Children (N = 144) in Grade 1 were exposed either to computer activities for word analysis, text comprehension, and fluency, alongside shared stories (experimental…

  18. Reconsidering Findings of "No Effects" in Randomized Control Trials: Modeling Differences in Treatment Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Bradford

    2016-01-01

    The primary technique that many researchers use to analyze data from randomized control trials (RCTs)--detecting the average treatment effect (ATE)--imposes assumptions upon the data that often are not correct. Both theory and past research suggest that treatments may have significant impacts on subgroups even when showing no overall effect.…

  19. Covariate Adjustment Strategy Increases Power in the Randomized Controlled Trial With Discrete-Time Survival Endpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safarkhani, Maryam; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, a decision needs to be made about the total number of subjects for adequate statistical power. One way to increase the power of a trial is by including a predictive covariate in the model. In this article, the effects of various covariate adjustment strategies on increasing the power is studied for discrete-time…

  20. Using Small-Scale Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate the Efficacy of New Curricular Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drits-Esser, Dina; Bass, Kristin M.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2014-01-01

    How can researchers in K-12 contexts stay true to the principles of rigorous evaluation designs within the constraints of classroom settings and limited funding? This paper explores this question by presenting a small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the efficacy of curricular supplemental materials on epigenetics. The…

  1. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of a School-Based Depression Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merry, Sally; McDowell, Heather; Wild, Chris J.; Bir, Julliet; Cunliffe, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a placebo-controlled study of the effectiveness of a universal school-based depression prevention program. Method: Three hundred ninety-two students age 13 to 15 from two schools were randomized to intervention (RAP-Kiwi) and placebo programs run by teachers. RAP-Kiwi was an 11-session manual-based program derived from…

  2. Computer-Assisted Learning in Elementary Reading: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Lisa Cassidy; Styers, Mary Koenig; Wilkerson, Stephanie Baird; Peery, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of Accelerated Reader, a computer-based learning program, at improving student reading. Accelerated Reader is a progress-monitoring, assessment, and practice tool that supports classroom instruction and guides independent reading. Researchers used a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the program with 344…

  3. Nasal Oxytocin for Social Deficits in Childhood Autism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadds, Mark R.; MacDonald, Elayne; Cauchi, Avril; Williams, Katrina; Levy, Florence; Brennan, John

    2014-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a surge in research investigating the application of oxytocin as a method of enhancing social behaviour in humans. Preliminary evidence suggests oxytocin may have potential as an intervention for autism. We evaluated a 5-day "live-in" intervention using a double-blind randomized control trial. 38 male…

  4. Attention Training in Individuals with Generalized Social Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nader; Beard, Courtney; Taylor, Charles T.; Klumpp, Heide; Elias, Jason; Burns, Michelle; Chen, Xi

    2009-01-01

    The authors conducted a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to examine the efficacy of an attention training procedure in reducing symptoms of social anxiety in 44 individuals diagnosed with generalized social phobia (GSP). Attention training comprised a probe detection task in which pictures of faces with either a threatening or…

  5. Fluoxetine, Smoking, and History of Major Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Bonnie; Doran, Neal; Pagoto, Sherry; McChargue, Dennis; Cook, Jessica Werth; Bailey, Katherine; Crayton, John; Hedeker, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The study was a randomized placebo-controlled trial testing whether fluoxetine selectively enhances cessation for smokers with a history of depression. Euthymic smokers with (H+, n = 109) or without (H-, n = 138) a history of major depression received 60 mg fluoxetine or placebo plus group behavioral quit-smoking treatment for 12 weeks. Fluoxetine…

  6. Laser acupuncture for adolescent smokers--a randomized double-blind controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yiming, C; Changxin, Z; Ung, W S; Lei, Z; Kean, L S

    2000-01-01

    A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of laser acupuncture treatment in adolescent smokers. Three hundred and thirty adolescent smokers at the Smoking Cessation Clinic of Child Guidance Clinic, Institute of Health, Singapore, were randomly assigned in equal numbers to laser acupuncture treatment and sham acupuncture (control) groups. The proportions of patients with complete smoking cessation after completing treatment for four weeks were 21.9% in the treatment group and 21.4% in the control group. At three months post-treatment, the rates for complete cessation were 24.8% and 26.2%, respectively. Thus, there was no significant difference in the rates of smoking cessation in the treatment and control groups. PMID:11154059

  7. Best (but oft-forgotten) practices: designing, analyzing, and reporting cluster randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew W; Li, Peng; Bohan Brown, Michelle M; Kaiser, Kathryn A; Keith, Scott W; Oakes, J Michael; Allison, David B

    2015-08-01

    Cluster randomized controlled trials (cRCTs; also known as group randomized trials and community-randomized trials) are multilevel experiments in which units that are randomly assigned to experimental conditions are sets of grouped individuals, whereas outcomes are recorded at the individual level. In human cRCTs, clusters that are randomly assigned are typically families, classrooms, schools, worksites, or counties. With growing interest in community-based, public health, and policy interventions to reduce obesity or improve nutrition, the use of cRCTs has increased. Errors in the design, analysis, and interpretation of cRCTs are unfortunately all too common. This situation seems to stem in part from investigator confusion about how the unit of randomization affects causal inferences and the statistical procedures required for the valid estimation and testing of effects. In this article, we provide a brief introduction and overview of the importance of cRCTs and highlight and explain important considerations for the design, analysis, and reporting of cRCTs by using published examples. PMID:26016864

  8. Effect of life-style modification on postmenopausal overweight and obese Indian women: A randomized controlled 24 weeks preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Vishal R.; Sharma, Sudhaa; Mahajan, Annil; Mahajan, Shagun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the effect of life-style modification on postmenopausal (PM) overweight and obese Indian women in a randomized controlled 24 week study. Materials and Methods: Two groups were formed Group I (n = 30) was designated as intervention (dietary and exercise group) and Group II (n = 24) served as control. Comparison of weight, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were made and compared among two groups at 4, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. Results: Mean age at menopause was 48.35 years versus 49.65 years; mean number of menopausal symptoms were 5.70 ± 1.76 versus 5.10 ± 1.56 and mean duration since menopause was 2.70 versus 2.90 years in Groups I and II respectively. When the effect of Group I and control on weight was compared at 4, 8, 16 and 24 weeks, there was no significant difference between them up to 8 week. At 8 weeks Group I caused a significant decrease in weight (P ≤ 0.05) when compared with control arm and which continued throughout the study period (P < 0.05) at both 16 and 24 weeks. Group I produced a significant reduction in WC from 8 weeks onwards up to 24 weeks (P ≤ 0.05). BMI was statistically significant in Group I and the effect started at 4th week (P ≤ 0.05) and the differences in BMI reduction were highly significant at 16th and 24th weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: The results of the present study strongly recommend the life-style management to be incorporated in daily style of postmenopausal women under controlled supervision. PMID:24672202

  9. A randomized phase II crossover study of imatinib or rituximab for cutaneous sclerosis after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Sally; Pidala, Joseph; Pusic, Iskra; Chai, Xiaoyu; Jaglowski, Samantha; Khera, Nandita; Palmer, Jeanne; Chen, George L; Jagasia, Madan H; Mayer, Sebastian A; Wood, William A; Green, Michael; Hyun, Teresa S.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Storer, Barry E; Miklos, David B; Shulman, Howard M.; Martin, Paul J; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Lee, Stephanie J; Flowers, Mary E D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cutaneous sclerosis (CS) occurs in 20% of patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and can compromise mobility and quality of life. Experimental design We conducted a prospective, multi-center, randomized, two-arm phase II crossover trial of imatinib (200 mg daily) or rituximab (375 mg/m2 intravenously weekly × 4 doses, repeatable after 3 months) for treatment of CS diagnosed within 18 months (NCT01309997). The primary endpoint was significant clinical response (SCR) at 6 months, defined as quantitative improvement in skin sclerosis or joint range of motion. Treatment success was defined as SCR at 6 months without crossover, recurrent malignancy or death. Secondary end points included changes of B cell profiles in blood (BAFF levels and cellular subsets), patient-reported outcomes, and histopathology between responders and non-responders with each therapy. Results SCR was observed in 9 of 35 (26%, 95% CI 13-43%) participants randomized to imatinib and 10 of 37 (27%, 95% CI 14-44%) randomized to rituximab. Six (17%, 95% CI 7-34%) patients in the imatinib arm and 5 (14%, 95% CI 5-29%) in the rituximab arm had treatment success. Higher percentages of activated B cells (CD27+) were seen at enrollment in rituximab-treated patients who had treatment success (p = 0.01), but not in imatinib-treated patients. Conclusion These results support the need for more effective therapies for CS and suggest that activated B cells define a subgroup of patients with CS who are more likely to respond to rituximab. PMID:26378033

  10. Context-free pairs of groups II — Cuts, tree sets, and random walks

    PubMed Central

    Woess, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This is a continuation of the study, begun by Ceccherini-Silberstein and Woess (2009) [5], of context-free pairs of groups and the related context-free graphs in the sense of Muller and Schupp (1985) [22]. The graphs under consideration are Schreier graphs of a subgroup of some finitely generated group, and context-freeness relates to a tree-like structure of those graphs. Instead of the cones of Muller and Schupp (1985) [22] (connected components resulting from deletion of finite balls with respect to the graph metric), a more general approach to context-free graphs is proposed via tree sets consisting of cuts of the graph, and associated structure trees. The existence of tree sets with certain “good” properties is studied. With a tree set, a natural context-free grammar is associated. These investigations of the structure of context free pairs, resp. graphs are then applied to study random walk asymptotics via complex analysis. In particular, a complete proof of the local limit theorem for return probabilities on any virtually free group is given, as well as on Schreier graphs of a finitely generated subgoup of a free group. This extends, respectively completes, the significant work of Lalley (1993, 2001) [18,20]. PMID:22267873

  11. Lineal-path function for random heterogeneous materials. II. Effect of polydispersivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, B. ); Torquato, S. Department of Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7910 )

    1992-05-15

    The lineal-path function {ital L}({ital z}) for two-phase heterogeneous media gives the probability of finding a line segment of length {ital z} wholly in one of the phases, say phase 1, when randomly thrown into the sample. The function {ital L}({ital z}) is equivalent to the area fraction of phase 1 measured from the projected image of a slab of the material of thickness {ital z} onto a plane. The lineal-path function is of interest in stereology and is an important morphological descriptor in determining the transport properties of heterogeneous media. We develop a means to represent and compute {ital L}({ital z}) for distributions of {ital D}-dimensional spheres with a polydispersivity in size, thereby extending an earlier analysis by us for monodispersed-sphere systems. Exact analytical expressions for {ital L}({ital z}) in the case of fully penetrable polydispersed spheres for arbitrary dimensionality are obtained. In the instance of totally impenetrable polydispersed spheres, we develop accurate approximations for the lineal-path function that apply over a wide range of volume fractions. The lineal-path function was found to be quite sensitive to polydispersivity for {ital D}{ge}2. We demonstrate how the measurement of the lineal-path function can yield the particle-size distribution of the particulate system, thus establishing a method to obtain the latter quantity.

  12. A Multicenter, Phase II, Randomized, Noncomparative Clinical Trial of Radiation and Temozolomide with or without Vandetanib in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eudocia Q.; Kaley, Thomas J.; Duda, Dan G.; Schiff, David; Lassman, Andrew B.; Wong, Eric T.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Purow, Benjamin W.; Muzikansky, Alona; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Huse, Jason T.; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Drappatz, Jan; Norden, Andrew D.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Weiss, Stephanie E.; Alexander, Brian M.; McCluskey, Christine S.; Gerard, Mary; Smith, Katrina H.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Ligon, Keith L.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Vandetanib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of KDR (VEGFR2), EGFR, and RET, may enhance sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a randomized, noncomparative, phase II study of radiation (RT) and temozolomide with or without vandetanib in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM). Experimental Design We planned to randomize a total of 114 newly diagnosed GBM patients in a ratio of 2:1 to standard RT and temozolomide with (76 patients) or without (38 patients) vandetanib 100 mg daily. Patients with age ≥ 18 years, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 60, and not on enzyme-inducing antiepileptics were eligible. Primary end-point was median overall survival (OS) from the date of randomization. Secondary endpoints included median progression-free survival (PFS), 12-month PFS, and safety. Correlative studies included pharmacokinetics as well as tissue and serum biomarker analysis. Results The study was terminated early for futility based on the results of an interim analysis. We enrolled 106 patients (36 in the RT/temozolomide arm and 70 in the vandetanib/RT/temozolomide arm). Median OS was 15.9 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 11.0–22.5 months] in the RT/temozolomide arm and 16.6 months (95% CI, 14.9–20.1 months) in the vandetanib/RT/temozolomide (log-rank P = 0.75). Conclusions The addition of vandetanib at a dose of 100 mg daily to standard chemoradiation in patients with newly diagnosed GBM or gliosarcoma was associated with potential pharmacodynamic biomarker changes and was reasonably well tolerated. However, the regimen did not significantly prolong OS compared with the parallel control arm, leading to early termination of the study. PMID:25910950

  13. Randomized controlled trials in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Police, Rachel L; Trask, Peter C; Wang, Jianmin; Olivares, Robert; Khan, Shahnaz; Abbe, Adeline; Colosia, Ann; Njue, Annete; Sherril, Beth; Ruiz-Soto, Rodrigo; Kaye, James A; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    This systematic literature review evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of interventions used in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Primary efficacy outcomes were objective response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival. Safety endpoints were grade 3/4 toxicities, serious adverse events and withdrawals or deaths due to toxicity. Studies were selected if they were randomized controlled trials reporting on the efficacy or safety of treatments for relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma, and if outcomes were reported separately from trials that included other lymphoid neoplasms. We used the Bucher method for conducting adjusted indirect comparisons within a meta-analysis. We identified 10 randomized controlled trials of treatments for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. The most prominent drug investigated (alone or in combination) was rituximab. Most trials did not report median overall survival. Two trials reported median event-free survival (range, 1.2-23.2 months). Six of ten trials reported objective response rate (range, 9-93%). Meta-analysis showed only one statistically significant result: rituximab + bortezomib yielded a significantly higher objective response rate than rituximab monotherapy (relative risk, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.47). Otherwise, there were no discernable differences in overall survival or progression-free survival, partly due to insufficient reporting of results in the clinical trials. The relatively small number of randomized controlled trials, few overlapping treatment arms, and variability in the randomized controlled trial features and in the endpoints studied complicate the formal comparison of therapies for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Additional well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to fully understand the relative outcomes of older and more recently developed therapies. PMID:26320127

  14. Brief Report: Staged-informed Consent in the Cohort Multiple Randomized Controlled Trial Design.

    PubMed

    Young-Afat, Danny A; Verkooijen, Helena A M; van Gils, Carla H; van der Velden, Joanne M; Burbach, Johannes P; Elias, Sjoerd G; van Delden, Jonannes J; Relton, Clare; van Vulpen, Marco; van der Graaf, Rieke

    2016-05-01

    The "cohort multiple randomized controlled trial," a new design for pragmatic trials, embeds multiple trials within a cohort. The cohort multiple RCT is an attractive alternative to conventional RCTs in fields where recruitment is slow, multiple new (competing) interventions for the same condition have to be tested, new interventions are highly preferred by patients and doctors, and the risk of disappointment bias, cross-over, and contamination is considerable. To prevent these unwanted effects, the cohort multiple RCT provides information on randomization to the intervention group/arm only, and only after randomization (i.e., prerandomization). To some, especially in a clinical setting, this is not ethically acceptable. In this article, we argue that prerandomization in the cohort multiple randomized controlled trial (cmRCT) can be avoided by adopting a staged-informed consent procedure. In the first stage, at entry into the cohort, all potential participants are asked for their informed consent to participate in a cohort study and broad consent to be either randomly selected to be approached for experimental interventions or to serve as control without further notice during participation in the cohort. In a second stage, at the initiation of an RCT within the cohort, informed consent to receive the intervention is then only sought in those randomly selected for the intervention arm. At the third stage, after completion of each RCT, all cohort participants receive aggregate disclosure of trial results. This staged-informed consent procedure avoids prerandomization in cmRCT and aims to keep participants actively engaged in the research process. PMID:27035689

  15. Influence of an e-mail with a drug information attachment on sales of prescribed drugs: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Edward, Christina; Himmelmann, Anders; Wallerstedt, Susanna M

    2007-01-01

    Background To provide doctors with producer-independent information to facilitate choice of treatment is an important task. The objective of the present study was to evaluate if an e-mail with a drug information attachment has effects on sales of prescribed drugs and if the design of the attachment is of importance. Methods The Swedish pharmaceutical benefit board found rizatriptan (Maxalt®) 10 mg to be the most cost-effective triptan. All 119 heads of primary care units in western Sweden were randomized to receive information concerning this conclusion via (i) e-mail with attachment I, (ii) e-mail with attachment II or (iii) no information (control). Attachment I was a short one (heading plus three lines text), whereas attachment II was a long one (heading plus one page text and one page with tables). The change in percentage rizatriptan of total triptans sold before and after the intervention (May – July 2004 and May – July 2005, respectively) was compared between the groups. Results Totally 48,229 (2004) and 50,674 (2005) defined daily doses of triptans were prescribed and sold during May – July in primary care units in the western part of Sweden. The absolute change in percentage rizatriptan was greater in the intervention groups compared with the control group 2 (25th – 75th percentile: -3 – 7) vs 0 (-7 - 5), P = 0.031). The absolute change in percentage rizatriptan did not differ between the two attachment groups (P = 0.93). Conclusion An e-mail with a drug information attachment may influence sales of prescribed drugs. No difference between different designs of the attachment could be detected. PMID:17942000

  16. A randomized controlled trial of knifelight and open carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, R; Birdsall, P D; Finn, P; Stothard, J

    2004-04-01

    A randomized controlled trial was done to compare the results of carpal tunnel decompression using the standard open approach and the Knifelight technique. Twenty-six patients with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome requiring operation were selected for the study and the operative technique was randomized for the first hand. Six weeks later, the second hand was operated upon using the alternate technique. There was little difference between the two techniques with regard to time taken to return to work, return of grip strength, symptom relief, complications, incidence of pillar pain and patient preference. However, the incidence of scar tenderness was significantly lower with the Knifelight technique. PMID:15010154

  17. Unicursal random maze tool path for computer-controlled optical surfacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunjin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Qiao

    2015-12-01

    A novel unicursal random maze tool path is proposed in this paper, which can not only implement uniform coverage of the polishing surfaces, but also possesses randomness and multidirectionality. The simulation experiments along with the practical polishing experiments are conducted to make the comparison of three kinds of paths, including maze path, raster path, and Hilbert path. The experimental results validate that the maze path can warrant uniform polishing and avoid the appearance of the periodical structures in the polished surface. It is also more effective than the Hilbert path in restraining the mid-spatial frequency error in computer-controlled optical surfacing process. PMID:26836670

  18. Luminosity distance in ``Swiss cheese'' cosmology with randomized voids. II. Magnification probability distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Éanna É.; Kumar, Naresh; Wasserman, Ira; Vanderveld, R. Ali

    2012-01-01

    We study the fluctuations in luminosity distances due to gravitational lensing by large scale (≳35Mpc) structures, specifically voids and sheets. We use a simplified “Swiss cheese” model consisting of a ΛCDM Friedman-Robertson-Walker background in which a number of randomly distributed nonoverlapping spherical regions are replaced by mass-compensating comoving voids, each with a uniform density interior and a thin shell of matter on the surface. We compute the distribution of magnitude shifts using a variant of the method of Holz and Wald , which includes the effect of lensing shear. The standard deviation of this distribution is ˜0.027 magnitudes and the mean is ˜0.003 magnitudes for voids of radius 35 Mpc, sources at redshift zs=1.0, with the voids chosen so that 90% of the mass is on the shell today. The standard deviation varies from 0.005 to 0.06 magnitudes as we vary the void size, source redshift, and fraction of mass on the shells today. If the shell walls are given a finite thickness of ˜1Mpc, the standard deviation is reduced to ˜0.013 magnitudes. This standard deviation due to voids is a factor ˜3 smaller than that due to galaxy scale structures. We summarize our results in terms of a fitting formula that is accurate to ˜20%, and also build a simplified analytic model that reproduces our results to within ˜30%. Our model also allows us to explore the domain of validity of weak-lensing theory for voids. We find that for 35 Mpc voids, corrections to the dispersion due to lens-lens coupling are of order ˜4%, and corrections due to shear are ˜3%. Finally, we estimate the bias due to source-lens clustering in our model to be negligible.

  19. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings. II. Correlation functions and density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Michael A; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In the first paper of this series, we introduced Voronoi correlation functions to characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings across length scales. In the present paper, we determine a variety of different correlation functions that arise in rigorous expressions for the effective physical properties of MRJ sphere packings and compare them to the corresponding statistical descriptors for overlapping spheres and equilibrium hard-sphere systems. Such structural descriptors arise in rigorous bounds and formulas for effective transport properties, diffusion and reactions constants, elastic moduli, and electromagnetic characteristics. First, we calculate the two-point, surface-void, and surface-surface correlation functions, for which we derive explicit analytical formulas for finite hard-sphere packings. We show analytically how the contact Dirac delta function contribution to the pair correlation function g_{2}(r) for MRJ packings translates into distinct functional behaviors of these two-point correlation functions that do not arise in the other two models examined here. Then we show how the spectral density distinguishes the MRJ packings from the other disordered systems in that the spectral density vanishes in the limit of infinite wavelengths; i.e., these packings are hyperuniform, which means that density fluctuations on large length scales are anomalously suppressed. Moreover, for all model systems, we study and compute exclusion probabilities and pore size distributions, as well as local density fluctuations. We conjecture that for general disordered hard-sphere packings, a central limit theorem holds for the number of points within an spherical observation window. Our analysis links problems of interest in material science, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. In the third paper of this series, we will evaluate bounds and estimates of a host of different physical properties of the MRJ sphere packings that are based on the

  20. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic dizziness: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness is one of the most challenging symptoms in medicine. No medication for dizziness in current use has well-established curative or prophylactic value or is suitable for long-term palliative use. Unconventional remedies, such as acupuncture, should be considered and scientifically evaluated. However, there has been relatively little evidence in randomized controlled clinical trials on acupuncture to treat chronic dizziness. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with dizziness. Methods/Design This trial is a randomized, single-blind, controlled study. A total of 80 participants will be randomly assigned to two treatment groups receiving acupuncture and sham acupuncture treatment, respectively, for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measures are the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS). Treatment will be conducted over a period of 4 weeks, at a frequency of two sessions per week. The assessment is at baseline (before treatment initiation), 4 weeks after the first acupuncture session, and 8 weeks after the first acupuncture session. Discussion The results from this study will provide clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in patients with chronic dizziness. Trial registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register: ISRCTN52695239 PMID:24330810

  1. Aerobic exercise in obese diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease: a randomized and controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with obesity, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are generally physically inactive, have a high mortality rate, and may benefit from an exercise program. Methods We performed a 24-week randomized controlled feasibility study comparing aerobic exercise plus optimal medical management to medical management alone in patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity (body mass index [BMI] > 30 kg/m2), and stage 2-4 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 15-90 mL/min/1.73 m2 with persistent proteinuria). Subjects randomized to exercise underwent thrice weekly aerobic training for 6 followed by 18 weeks of supervised home exercise. The primary outcome variable was change in proteinuria. Results Seven subjects randomized to exercise and 4 control subjects completed the study. Exercise training resulted in an increase in exercise duration during treadmill testing, which was accompanied by slight but insignificant decreases in resting systolic blood pressure and 24-hour proteinuria. Exercise did not alter GFR, hemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, serum lipids, or C-reactive protein (CRP). Caloric intake and body weight and composition also did not change with exercise training. Conclusion Exercise training in obese diabetic patients with CKD is feasible and may have clinical benefits. A large-scale randomized controlled trial to determine the effects of exercise on renal functions, cardiovascular fitness, inflammation, and oxidative stress in diabetic patients with CKD is planned. PMID:20003224

  2. Search on a hypercubic lattice using a quantum random walk. II. d=2

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Apoorva; Raghunathan, K. S.; Rahaman, Md. Aminoor

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the spatial search problem on the two-dimensional square lattice, using the Dirac evolution operator discretized according to the staggered lattice fermion formalism. d=2 is the critical dimension for the spatial search problem, where infrared divergence of the evolution operator leads to logarithmic factors in the scaling behavior. As a result, the construction used in our accompanying article [A. Patel and M. A. Rahaman, Phys. Rev. A 82, 032330 (2010)] provides an O({radical}(N)lnN) algorithm, which is not optimal. The scaling behavior can be improved to O({radical}(NlnN)) by cleverly controlling the massless Dirac evolution operator by an ancilla qubit, as proposed by Tulsi [Phys. Rev. A 78, 012310 (2008)]. We reinterpret the ancilla control as introduction of an effective mass at the marked vertex, and optimize the proportionality constants of the scaling behavior of the algorithm by numerically tuning the parameters.

  3. Randomized Controlled Trial for Behavioral Smoking and Weight Control Treatment: Effect of Concurrent Versus Sequential Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spring, Bonnie; Pagoto, Sherry; Pingitore, Regina; Doran, Neal; Schneider, Kristin; Hedeker, Don

    2004-01-01

    The authors compared simultaneous versus sequential approaches to multiple health behavior change in diet, exercise, and cigarette smoking. Female regular smokers (N = 315) randomized to 3 conditions received 16 weeks of behavioral smoking treatment, quit smoking at Week 5, and were followed for 9 months after quit date. Weight management was…

  4. Positive imagery cognitive bias modification (CBM) and internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT): A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alishia D.; O’Moore, Kathleen; Blackwell, Simon E.; Smith, Jessica; Holmes, Emily A.; Andrews, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Background Accruing evidence suggests that positive imagery-based cognitive bias modification (CBM) could have potential as a standalone targeted intervention for depressive symptoms or as an adjunct to existing treatments. We sought to establish the benefit of this form of CBM when delivered prior to Internet cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for depression Methods A randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a 1-week Internet-delivered positive CBM vs. an active control condition for participants (N=75, 69% female, mean age=42) meeting diagnostic criteria for major depression; followed by a 10-week iCBT program for both groups. Results Modified intent-to-treat marginal and mixed effect models demonstrated no significant difference between conditions following the CBM intervention or the iCBT program. In both conditions there were significant reductions (Cohen׳s d .57–1.58, 95% CI=.12–2.07) in primary measures of depression and interpretation bias (PHQ9, BDI-II, AST-D). Large effect size reductions (Cohen׳s d .81–1.32, 95% CI=.31–1.79) were observed for secondary measures of distress, disability, anxiety and repetitive negative thinking (K10, WHODAS, STAI, RTQ). Per protocol analyses conducted in the sample of participants who completed all seven sessions of CBM indicated between-group superiority of the positive over control group on depression symptoms (PHQ9, BDI-II) and psychological distress (K10) following CBM (Hedges g .55–.88, 95% CI=−.03–1.46) and following iCBT (PHQ9, K10). The majority (>70%) no longer met diagnostic criteria for depression at 3-month follow-up. Limitations The control condition contained many active components and therefore may have represented a smaller ‘dose’ of the positive condition. Conclusions Results provide preliminary support for the successful integration of imagery-based CBM into an existing Internet-based treatment for depression. PMID:25805405

  5. Mindfulness meditation in older adults with postherpetic neuralgia: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Meize-Grochowski, Robin; Shuster, George; Boursaw, Blake; DuVal, Michelle; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Schrader, Ron; Smith, Bruce W.; Herman, Carla J.; Prasad, Arti

    2015-01-01

    This parallel-group, randomized controlled pilot study examined daily meditation in a diverse sample of older adults with postherpetic neuralgia. Block randomization was used to allocate participants to a treatment group (n = 13) or control group (n = 14). In addition to usual care, the treatment group practiced daily meditation for six weeks. All participants completed questionnaires at enrollment in the study, two weeks later, and six weeks after that, at the study’s end. Participants recorded daily pain and fatigue levels in a diary, and treatment participants also noted meditation practice. Results at the .10 level indicated improvement in neuropathic, affective, and total pain scores for the treatment group, whereas affective pain worsened for the control group. Participants were able to adhere to the daily diary and meditation requirements in this feasibility pilot study. PMID:25784079

  6. Mindfulness meditation in older adults with postherpetic neuralgia: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Meize-Grochowski, Robin; Shuster, George; Boursaw, Blake; DuVal, Michelle; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Schrader, Ron; Smith, Bruce W; Herman, Carla J; Prasad, Arti

    2015-01-01

    This parallel-group, randomized controlled pilot study examined daily meditation in a diverse sample of older adults with postherpetic neuralgia. Block randomization was used to allocate participants to a treatment group (n = 13) or control group (n = 14). In addition to usual care, the treatment group practiced daily meditation for six weeks. All participants completed questionnaires at enrollment in the study, two weeks later, and six weeks after that, at the study's end. Participants recorded daily pain and fatigue levels in a diary, and treatment participants also noted meditation practice. Results at the 0.10 level indicated improvement in neuropathic, affective, and total pain scores for the treatment group, whereas affective pain worsened for the control group. Participants were able to adhere to the daily diary and meditation requirements in this feasibility pilot study. PMID:25784079

  7. A parent-adolescent intervention to increase sexual risk communication: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Villarruel, Antonia M; Cherry, Carol Loveland; Cabriales, Esther Gallegos; Ronis, David L; Zhou, Yan

    2008-10-01

    This article reports results of a randomized controlled trial designed to test an intervention to increase parent-adolescent sexual risk communication among Mexican parents. Data were analyzed from parents (n = 791) randomly assigned to an HIV risk reduction or health promotion intervention. Measures were administered at pretest, posttest, and 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Generalized estimation equation (GEE) analysis indicates parents in the HIV risk reduction intervention reported significantly more general communication (p < .005), more sexual risk communication (p < .001) and more comfort with communication (p < .001) than parents in the control intervention. Behavioral, normative, and control beliefs significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on all communication outcomes. This study demonstrates the efficacy of an intervention to increase the quality and quantity of parent-adolescent communication related to general and sex-specific communication. PMID:18956979

  8. In their own voices: Latinas' experiences with a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F; Genovez, Marta; Cardeli, Emma

    2013-06-01

    We conducted exit interviews with a random sample of 39 predominantly Central American immigrant mothers who had completed a longitudinal randomized controlled trial to prevent perinatal depression. We found that rates and levels of perinatal depression in the intervention and control groups were lower than expected and did not differ between groups at 1 year postpartum. Therefore, we conducted extensive semistructured interviews to (a) understand why these high-risk women had such low rates of major depressive episodes and depressive symptoms, and (b) determine if the mechanisms responsible for reductions in depression differed between the intervention and usual care groups. We discovered that the intervention group learned specific mood-management skills from their participation in the intervention, and that the control group experienced their participation in the study as a "low-dose" intervention. Our experience highlights the importance of conducting qualitative studies to understand quantitative outcomes of intervention studies. PMID:23539092

  9. Effects of online cognitive treatment for problematic anger: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Howie, Amanda J; Malouff, John M

    2014-01-01

    Problematic anger, which is common, has been associated with a wide range of negative interpersonal and intrapersonal consequences, including violent behaviour, relationship damage, health problems and low self-esteem. This article reports the results of the first randomized controlled trial of brief online cognitive treatment for anger. The sample included 75 adults who were randomly assigned to cognitive treatment or a waiting list control. The analyses with the 59 participants who completed the post-intervention assessment at four weeks after the beginning of the intervention showed that individuals who received the intervention reported significantly lower anger levels than the control group at post-assessment. The treatment group showed a substantial decrease in anger from pre to post. The results suggest that brief online cognitive treatment can be effective for reducing problematic anger in adults. These findings provide an initial support for the development of internet-based cognitive treatment for problematic anger. PMID:25065452

  10. Home-based alcohol prevention program for parents and children: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mares, S H W; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A; Verdurmen, J; Schulten, I; Engels, R C M E

    2016-07-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based alcohol prevention program to delay initiation of alcohol use in children. Methods In 2011, a total of 1349 sixth-grade children (M=12.15, SD=0.47) and their mothers who could read and write Dutch were recruited from primary schools in the northern part of the Netherlands. They participated in a cluster randomized controlled trial with two conditions; (1) intervention group (5 modules which families received by mail every 4weeks over 5months), (2) control group (a factsheet information brochure). An independent statistician allocated the schools to the conditions (allocation ratio (1:1)). Participants and data-analyst were blind to randomization. The primary outcome was alcohol initiation. Results Of the participants, 680 were randomized to the intervention and 669 to the control condition. In the intervention condition (N=540) 5.4% of the children drank alcohol compared to 7.1% in the control condition (N=601). The difference was not significant (OR=.99, 95% CI=.96-1.02, p=52). Conclusion The present study showed no effects of 'In control: No alcohol!' on alcohol initiation. A critical evaluation of program design and content, and future studies in different target groups, are suggested. The trial is registered at trialregister.nl, number NTR2474. PMID:27143498

  11. Predictors of Missed Research Appointments in a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Stéphanie J.E.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: The primary aim of this study was to determine predictors of missed research appointments in a prospective randomized placebo injection-controlled trial with evaluations 1 to 3 and 5 to 8 months after enrollment. Methods: This study represents a secondary use of data from 104 patients that were enrolled in a prospective randomized controlled trial of dexamethasone versus lidocaine (placebo) injection for various diagnoses. Patients were enrolled between June 2003 and February 2008. Sixty-three patients (61%) had lateral epicondylosis, 17 patients (16%) had trapeziometacarpal arthrosis, and 24 patients (23%) had de Quervain syndrome. Each patient completed a set of questionnaires at time of enrollment. Bivariable and multivariable analyses were used to determine factors associated with missed research appointments. Results: Fourteen patients (13%) did not return for the first follow-up and 33 patients (32%) did not return for the second follow-up. The best multivariable logistic regression model for missing the first research visit explained 35% of the variability and included younger age, belief that health can be controlled, and no college education. The best model for missing the second research visit explained 17% of the variability and included greater pain intensity, less personal responsibility for health, and diagnosis (trapeziometacarpal arthrosis and de Quervain syndrome). Conclusions: Younger patients with no college education, who believe their health can be controlled, are more likely to miss a research appointment when enrolled in a randomized placebo injection-controlled trial. PMID:25386581

  12. Random matrix treatment of intramolecular vibrational redistribution. II. Coriolis interactions in 1-butyne and ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Go, J.; Perry, D.S.

    1995-10-01

    The measures are the dilution factor {phi}{sub {ital d}}, the interaction width {Delta}{epsilon}, and the effective level density {rho}{sub eff}{sup {ital c}}. In the presence of multiple coupling mechanisms (near the best fit to the ethanol {nu}{sub 14} band), the correlations between {phi}{sub {ital d}} and {Delta}{epsilon} and the bright-bath Coriolis coupling mechanisms follow the expected trends. It was also found that {rho}{sub eff}{sup {ital c}} is sensitive to the {ital x}, {ital y} Coriolis coupling {ital among} the bath states. The results were not sensitive to the {ital z}-type Coriolis coupling among the bath states in the region of the ethanol simulation, but {rho}{sub eff}{sup {ital c}} was sensitive to it in the simulation of the 1-butyne {nu}{sub 16} band. Best-fit coupling parameters were obtained for both simulated bands. The rms bright-bath {ital z}-type Coriolis coupling was found to be 0.028{plus_minus}0.005 cm{sup {minus}1} which is about three times the value obtained from a naive approach which neglects the interaction of the multiple coupling mechanisms. A direct count vibrational level density, {rho}{sub vib}, provided good agreement with the experiments when a full treatment of the torsional modes was included and a 20% enhancement of the density from neglected diagonal anharmonicities was added. A method of quantifying the conservation of the rotational quantum number, {ital K}, is provided by the inequalities, {rho}{sub vib}{le}{rho}{sub eff}{sup {ital c}}{le}(2{ital J}+1){rho}{sub vib}. For 1-butyne, {rho}{sub eff}{sup {ital c}} is closer to {rho}{sub vib} than for ethanol indicating that {ital K} is more nearly conserved. While this work treats only anharmonic and Coriolis coupling, the random matrix formalism provides the ability to treat a wide variety of coupling schemes. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  13. Key analytic considerations in design and analysis of randomized controlled trials in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Losina, Elena; Ranstam, Jonas; Collins, Jamie; Schnitzer, Thomas J; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To highlight methodologic challenges pertinent to design, analysis, and reporting of results of randomized clinical trials in OA and offer practical suggestions to overcome these challenges. Design The topics covered in this paper include subject selection, randomization, approaches to handling missing data, subgroup analysis, sample size, and issues related to changing design mid-way through the study. Special attention is given to standardizing the reporting of results and economic analyses. Results Key findings include the importance of blinding and concealment, the distinction between superiority and non-inferiority trials, the need to minimize missing data, and appropriate analysis and interpretation of subgroup effects. Conclusion Investigators may use the findings and recommendations advanced in this paper to guide design and conduct of randomized controlled trials of interventions for osteoarthritis. PMID:25952341

  14. Can attention control conditions have detrimental effects in behavioral medicine randomized trials?

    PubMed Central

    Pagoto, Sherry; McDermott, Mary M.; Reed, George; Greenland, Philip; Mazor, Kathy M.; Ockene, Judith K.; Whited, Matt; Schneider, Kristin; Appelhans, Brad; Leung, Kathy; Merriam, Philip; Ockene, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Objective Attention control conditions are used to balance nonspecific attention in randomized trials of behavioral interventions. Very little guidance is available in the literature about which behavioral interventions and outcomes merit an attention control. The primary aim of the present paper is to demonstrate a scenario in which use of attention control in a behavioral randomized trial was unnecessary and possibly detrimental. Methods Exploratory analyses were performed in a randomized controlled trial that tested whether a patient-centered telephone counseling (PC) intervention reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in 355 participants with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), compared to attention control (AC) and usual care (UC) conditions. The PC intervention was designed to activate participants to ask their physician for lipid-lowering medication and/or increase dose intensity, increase medication adherence, and reduce fat intake. The AC condition involved attention-matched phone-delivered health education, and the UC condition consisted of an educational pamphlet. Results At 12-month follow-up, mean LDL-C changes were −11.1, and −6.8 mg/dl in the UC and AC conditions, respectively (p=.17). The proportion of participants who increased use or dose intensity of medication was significantly lower in AC than UC, 17.5% versus 30.5% (p=0.03). No significant difference between AC and UC were observed on other outcomes. Conclusions The AC had significantly worse medication outcomes and there was no indication of a therapeutic effect on other endpoints. Implications for use of attention control in behavioral randomized trials are discussed. PMID:23197844

  15. PONV in Ambulatory surgery: A comparison between Ramosetron and Ondansetron: a prospective, double-blinded, and randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Debasis; Das, Anjan; Majumdar, Saikat; Mandal, Rahul Deb; Dutta, Soumyadip; Mukherjee, Anindya; Chakraborty, Aparna; Chattopadhyay, Sandip

    2014-01-01

    Background: postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) frequently hampers implementation of ambulatory surgery in spite of so many antiemetic drugs and regimens. Aims: the study was carried out to compare the efficacy of Ramosetron and Ondansetron in preventing PONV after ambulatory surgery. Setting and Design: it was a prospective, double blinded, and randomized controlled study. Methods: 124 adult patients of either sex, aged 25-55, of ASA physical status I and II, scheduled for day care surgery, were randomly allocated into Group A [(n=62) receiving (IV) Ondansetron (4 mg)] and Group B [(n=62) receiving IV Ramosetron (0.3 mg)] prior to the induction of general anesthesia in a double-blind manner. Episodes of PONV were noted at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 h, 6, 12, and 18 h postoperatively. Statistical Analysis and Results: statistically significant difference between Groups A and B (P <0.05) was found showing that Ramosetron was superior to Ondansetron as antiemetic both regarding frequency and severity. Conclusion: it was evident that preoperative prophylactic administration of single dose IV Ramosetron (0.3 mg) has better efficacy than single dose IV Ondansetron (4 mg) in reducing the episodes of PONV over 18 h postoperatively in patients undergoing day-care surgery under general anesthesia. PMID:24665236

  16. Oral zinc sulphate supplementation for six months in SCA2 patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; Rodríguez-Chanfrau, Jorge; García-Rodríguez, Julio Cesar; Sánchez-Cruz, Gilberto; Aguilera-Rodríguez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Rodríguez-Díaz, Julio Cesar; Canales-Ochoa, Nalia; Gotay, Dennis Almaguer; Almaguer Mederos, Luis E; Laffita Mesa, José M; Porto-Verdecia, Marlene; Triana, Consuelo González; Pupo, Noemí Rodríguez; Batista, Idania Hidalgo; López-Hernandez, Orestes D; Polanco, Iverlis Díaz; Novas, Arelis Jayme

    2011-10-01

    Cuban patients with Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 2 (SCA2) have reduced concentrations of zinc in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). To assess the effect and safety of zinc supplementation, 36 Cuban SCA2 patients were randomly assigned to receive daily either 50 mg ZnSO(4) or placebo, together with neurorehabilitation therapy in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial during 6 months. Outcome measures included the changes of zinc levels in CSF and serum, ataxia score, oxidative stress and saccadic eye movements. At the end of the study, the Zinc-treated group showed: (i) a significant increase of the Zn levels in the CSF, (ii) mild decrease in the ataxia scale subscores for gait, posture, stance and dysdiadochocinesia (iii) reduction of lipid's oxidative damage, and (iv) reduction of saccadic latency when compared with the placebo group. The treatment was safe and well tolerated by all subjects. This study demonstrated the efficacy and safety of Zn supplementation, combined with neurorehabilitation for SCA2 patients and therefore it may encourage further studies on the clinical effect of zinc supplementation in SCA2 based in the conduction of future clinical trials with higher number of subjects. PMID:21562746

  17. Salivary antioxidants of male athletes after aerobic exercise and garlic supplementation on: A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Damirchi, Arsalan; Saati Zareei, Alireza; Sariri, Reyhaneh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species is a natural biological event in metabolism. However, the presence of antioxidants can highly reduce the negative effect of free radicals. Thus, the efficiency of antioxidant system in the physiology of exercise is very important. Design Considering the known antioxidant capacity of garlic, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect on combining 14 days aerobic exercise till exhaustion with garlic extract supplementation on the antioxidant capacity of saliva. Methods Sixteen young men volunteered to participate in this randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study and were randomly placed into two groups, placebo (Group I) and garlic extract (Group II). The participants performed exhaustive aerobic exercise on a treadmill before and after supplementation. Their unstimulated salivary samples were collected before, immediately after, and 1 h after the activity. The antioxidant activity in terms of peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) was then measured in the collected samples using their specific substrates. Results A significant increase in salivary antioxidant activity of SOD, POD, and CAT was observed in saliva of the supplement group compared to the placebo group (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion The findings from this study suggest that increased activity of antioxidant enzymes could possibly decrease exercise-induced oxidative damage in male athletes. PMID:26605139

  18. Intervention randomized controlled trials involving wrist and shoulder arthroscopy: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although arthroscopy of upper extremity joints was initially a diagnostic tool, it is increasingly used for therapeutic interventions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard for assessing treatment efficacy. We aimed to review the literature for intervention RCTs involving wrist and shoulder arthroscopy. Methods We performed a systematic review for RCTs in which at least one arm was an intervention performed through wrist arthroscopy or shoulder arthroscopy. PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were searched up to December 2012. Two researchers reviewed each article and recorded the condition treated, randomization method, number of randomized participants, time of randomization, outcomes measures, blinding, and description of dropouts and withdrawals. We used the modified Jadad scale that considers the randomization method, blinding, and dropouts/withdrawals; score 0 (lowest quality) to 5 (highest quality). The scores for the wrist and shoulder RCTs were compared with the Mann–Whitney test. Results The first references to both wrist and shoulder arthroscopy appeared in the late 1970s. The search found 4 wrist arthroscopy intervention RCTs (Kienböck’s disease, dorsal wrist ganglia, volar wrist ganglia, and distal radius fracture; first 3 compared arthroscopic with open surgery). The median number of participants was 45. The search found 50 shoulder arthroscopy intervention RCTs (rotator cuff tears 22, instability 14, impingement 9, and other conditions 5). Of these, 31 compared different arthroscopic treatments, 12 compared arthroscopic with open treatment, and 7 compared arthroscopic with nonoperative treatment. The median number of participants was 60. The median modified Jadad score for the wrist RCTs was 0.5 (range 0–1) and for the shoulder RCTs 3.0 (range 0–5) (p = 0.012). Conclusion Despite the increasing use of wrist arthroscopy in the treatment of various wrist disorders the efficacy of arthroscopically

  19. A randomized control trial: training program of university students as health promoters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported the following as determining factors for the adoption of healthy lifestyles among undergraduate students: gender, socioeconomic level, prior lifestyles, environment, parental lifestyles and health status, career choice, and healthy support networks. However, these factors are influenced by students’ knowledge about healthy lifestyles. Methods/design We will carry out a randomized trial in a sample of 280 new undergraduate students at the National Autonomous University of Mexico’s Faculty of Higher Studies-Zaragoza (FES-Zaragoza, UNAM). There will be an experimental group (n = 140), comprising 20 students from each of the seven university departments (careers); these students will receive training as university student health promoters through an e-learning course. This course will allow the topics necessary for such promoters to be reviewed. There will be a control group (n = 140), comprising 20 students from each of the seven departments (careers); these students will not undergo the training. Later, the students who comply satisfactorily with the e-learning course will replicate the course to 10 of their classmates. A healthy-lifestyle questionnaire will be given to all the participants, and the parameters established in the self-care card will be recorded before and after the training. The study variables are as follows: (i) independent variable—compliance with the e-learning course; (ii) dependent variables—lifestyles changes prior to the educative intervention (including healthy eating, physical activity, and addiction prevention) and parameters related to health status established in self-care (including weight, body mass index, waist circumference, and hip circumference). Data will be analyzed using Student’s t test and logistic regression analysis odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. The analysis of the open answers will be carried out with ATLAS. ti 5.5 software. Discussion Health promotion

  20. A randomized phase III trial comparing S-1 versus UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II/III rectal cancer (JFMC35-C1: ACTS-RC)

    PubMed Central

    Oki, E.; Murata, A.; Yoshida, K.; Maeda, K.; Ikejiri, K.; Munemoto, Y.; Sasaki, K.; Matsuda, C.; Kotake, M.; Suenaga, T.; Matsuda, H.; Emi, Y.; Kakeji, Y.; Baba, H.; Hamada, C.; Saji, S.; Maehara, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Preventing distant recurrence and achieving local control are important challenges in rectal cancer treatment, and use of adjuvant chemotherapy has been studied. However, no phase III study comparing adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for rectal cancer has demonstrated superiority of a specific regimen. We therefore conducted a phase III study to evaluate the superiority of S-1 to tegafur–uracil (UFT), a standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for curatively resected stage II/III rectal cancer in Japan, in the adjuvant setting for rectal cancer. Patients and methods The ACTS-RC trial was an open-label, randomized, phase III superiority trial conducted at 222 sites in Japan. Patients aged 20–80 with stage II/III rectal cancer undergoing curative surgery without preoperative therapy were randomly assigned to receive UFT (500–600 mg/day on days 1–5, followed by 2 days rest) or S-1 (80–120 mg/day on days 1–28, followed by 14 days rest) for 1 year. The primary end point was relapse-free survival (RFS), and the secondary end points were overall survival and adverse events. Results In total, 961 patients were enrolled from April 2006 to March 2009. The primary analysis was conducted in 480 assigned to receive UFT and 479 assigned to receive S-1. Five-year RFS was 61.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 57.1% to 65.9%] for UFT and 66.4% (95% CI 61.9% to 70.5%) for S-1 [P = 0.0165, hazard ratio (HR): 0.77, 95% CI 0.63–0.96]. Five-year survival was 80.2% (95% CI 76.3% to 83.5%) for UFT and 82.0% (95% CI 78.3% to 85.2%) for S-1. The main grade 3 or higher adverse events were increased alanine aminotransferase and diarrhea (each 2.3%) in the UFT arm and anorexia, diarrhea (each 2.6%), and fatigue (2.1%) in the S-1 arm. Conclusion One-year S-1 treatment is superior to UFT with respect to RFS and has therefore become a standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for stage II/III rectal cancer following curative resection. PMID:27056996

  1. Efficacy of Biofeedback Therapy before and after Sphincteroplasty for Fecal Incontinence because of Obstetric Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghahramani, Leila; Mohammadipour, Mastoureh; Roshanravan, Reza; Hajihosseini, Fahimeh; Bananzadeh, Alimohammad; Izadpanah, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a challenging condition in that it exerts various psychosocial impacts on daily life. Different treatment modalities have been suggested for fecal incontinence. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback therapy in combination with surgery in the management of fecal incontinence. The present randomized controlled trial was performed on 27 women with a complaint of fecal incontinence because of delivery trauma. The patients underwent sphincteroplasty and levatorplasty via the same method by 2 colorectal surgeons. In Group I, biofeedback therapy was performed 3 months before and 6 months after the surgery; in Group II, biofeedback therapy was applied only 6 months after the surgery; and in Group III, only surgical management was performed. The results revealed a significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative Wexner scores of incontinence in all the 3 groups. Additionally, the difference between the preoperative and postoperative scores was significant only in Group I and Group III, but not in Group II. The reduction in the Wexner score was significantly less in Group III. However, no significant difference was observed between the 3 groups concerning the mean difference of preoperative and postoperative manometry. The present study revealed no significant role for biofeedback therapy alone in the improvement of manometric evaluation. However, the Wexner score, which is an indicator of patient satisfaction, increased with biofeedback therapy following sphincteroplasty. In general, surgical treatment is now reserved for selected patients with fecal incontinence and has recently been developed with biofeedback therapy. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201206039936N1 PMID:26989283

  2. Search on a hypercubic lattice using a quantum random walk. II. d=2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Apoorva; Raghunathan, K. S.; Rahaman, Md. Aminoor

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the spatial search problem on the two-dimensional square lattice, using the Dirac evolution operator discretized according to the staggered lattice fermion formalism. d=2 is the critical dimension for the spatial search problem, where infrared divergence of the evolution operator leads to logarithmic factors in the scaling behavior. As a result, the construction used in our accompanying article [A. Patel and M. A. Rahaman, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.82.032330 82, 032330 (2010)] provides an O(NlnN) algorithm, which is not optimal. The scaling behavior can be improved to O(NlnN) by cleverly controlling the massless Dirac evolution operator by an ancilla qubit, as proposed by Tulsi [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.78.012310 78, 012310 (2008)]. We reinterpret the ancilla control as introduction of an effective mass at the marked vertex, and optimize the proportionality constants of the scaling behavior of the algorithm by numerically tuning the parameters.

  3. 40 CFR 82.15 - Prohibitions for class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prohibitions for class II controlled substances. 82.15 Section 82.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.15 Prohibitions for class II...

  4. 40 CFR 82.15 - Prohibitions for class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prohibitions for class II controlled substances. 82.15 Section 82.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.15 Prohibitions for class II...

  5. 40 CFR 82.16 - Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances. 82.16 Section 82.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.16 Phaseout schedule of class II...

  6. 40 CFR 82.16 - Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances. 82.16 Section 82.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.16 Phaseout schedule of class II...

  7. 40 CFR 82.23 - Transfers of allowances of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... class II controlled substance being converted multiplied by the quotient of the ozone depletion potential of the first class II controlled substance divided by the ozone depletion potential of the second... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption...

  8. 40 CFR 82.23 - Transfers of allowances of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... class II controlled substance being converted multiplied by the quotient of the ozone depletion potential of the first class II controlled substance divided by the ozone depletion potential of the second... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption...

  9. 76 FR 53817 - Minimum Internal Control Standards for Class II Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Parts 542 and 543 Minimum Internal Control Standards for Class II... delay of the effective date on the final rule for Minimum Internal Control Standards for Class II Gaming... the final rule published October 10, 2008 (73 FR 60492), delayed October 9, 2009 (74 FR 52138)...

  10. 40 CFR 82.16 - Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phaseout schedule of class II controlled substances. 82.16 Section 82.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls § 82.16 Phaseout schedule of class II...

  11. A Block Randomized Controlled Trial of a Brief Smoking Cessation Counselling and Advice through Short Message Service on Participants Who Joined the Quit to Win Contest in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sophia S. C.; Wong, David C. N.; Cheung, Yee Tak Derek; Leung, Doris Y. P.; Lau, Lisa; Lai, Vienna; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2015-01-01

    The present trial examined the effectiveness of brief interventions for smokers who joined the Hong Kong Quit to Win Contest to quit smoking. A block randomized controlled trial allocated 1003 adult daily smokers to three groups: (i) The TEL group (n = 338) received a 5-min nurse-led telephone counselling; (ii) The SMS group (n = 335) received…

  12. One-step receding horizon H(∞) control for networked control systems with random delay and packet disordering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andong; Yu, Li; Zhang, Wen-An

    2011-01-01

    The receding horizon H(∞) control (RHHC) problem is investigated in this paper for a class of networked control systems (NCSs) with random delay and packet disordering. A new model is proposed to describe the NCS with random delay which may be larger than one sampling period. The random delay is modeled as a Markov chain while the closed-loop system is described as a Markovian jump system. Sufficient conditions for the closed-loop NCS to be stochastically stable and the performance index to be upper bounded are derived by using the receding optimization principle. Furthermore, by solving a semi-definite programming (SDP) with linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) constraint, a piecewise-constant receding horizon H(∞) controller is obtained, and the designed piecewise-constant controller ensures that the closed-loop NCS achieves a prescribed H(∞) disturbance attenuation level. Finally, an illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:21036353

  13. A Randomized, Phase 3 Trial of Naltrexone SR/Bupropion SR on Weight and Obesity-related Risk Factors (COR-II)

    PubMed Central

    Apovian, Caroline M; Aronne, Louis; Rubino, Domenica; Still, Christopher; Wyatt, Holly; Burns, Colleen; Kim, Dennis; Dunayevich, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of naltrexone/bupropion (NB) combination therapy on weight and weight-related risk factors in overweight and obese participants. Design and Methods CONTRAVE Obesity Research-II (COR-II) was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 1,496 obese (BMI 30-45 kg/m2) or overweight (27-45 kg/m2 with dyslipidemia and/or hypertension) participants randomized 2:1 to combined naltrexone sustained-release (SR) (32 mg/day) plus bupropion SR (360 mg/day) (NB32) or placebo for up to 56 weeks. The co-primary endpoints were percent weight change and proportion achieving ≥5% weight loss at week 28. Results Significantly (P < 0.001) greater weight loss was observed with NB32 versus placebo at week 28 (−6.5% vs. −1.9%) and week 56 (−6.4% vs. −1.2%). More NB32-treated participants (P < 0.001) experienced ≥5% weight loss versus placebo at week 28 (55.6% vs. 17.5%) and week 56 (50.5% vs. 17.1%). NB32 produced greater improvements in various cardiometabolic risk markers, participant-reported weight-related quality of life, and control of eating. The most common adverse event with NB was nausea, which was generally mild to moderate and transient. NB was not associated with increased events of depression or suicidality versus placebo. Conclusion NB represents a novel pharmacological approach to the treatment of obesity, and may become a valuable new therapeutic option. PMID:23408728

  14. Amlodipine versus angiotensin II receptor blocker; control of blood pressure evaluation trial in diabetics (ADVANCED-J)

    PubMed Central

    Kawamori, Ryuzo; Daida, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasushi; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Kitagawa, Akira; Hayashi, Dobun; Kishimoto, Junji; Ikeda, Shunya; Imai, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Tsutomu

    2006-01-01

    Background The coexistence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study has shown that blood pressure control as well as blood glucose control is efficient for prevention of complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. However, some reports have shown that it is difficult to control the blood pressure and the concomitant use of a plurality of drugs is needed in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. In recent years renin-angiotensin system depressants are increasingly used for the blood pressure control in diabetic patients. Particularly in Japan, angiotensin II (A II) antagonists are increasingly used. However, there is no definite evidence of the point of which is efficient for the control, the increase in dose of A II antagonist or the concomitant use of another drug, in hypertensive patients whose blood pressure levels are inadequately controlled with A II antagonist. Methods/Design Hypertensive patients of age 20 years or over with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have been treated by the single use of AII antagonist at usual doses for at least 8 weeks or patients who have been treated by the concomitant use of AII antagonist and an antihypertensive drug other than calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors at usual doses for at least 8 weeks are included. Discussion We designed a multi-center, prospective, randomized, open label, blinded-endpoint trial, ADVANCED-J, to compare the increases in dose of A II antagonist and the concomitant use of a Ca-channel blocker (amlodipine) and A II antagonist in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus, whose blood pressure levels were inadequately controlled with A II antagonist. This study is different from the usual previous studies in that home blood pressures are assessed as indicators of evaluation of blood pressure. The ADVANCED-J study may have much influence on selection of antihypertensive drugs for

  15. Comparison of two purification products of shankha bhasma: A prospective randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Manjiri; Chary, Dingari Laxmana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Shankha bhasma is widely used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. Aim: To compare the efficacy of two purification methods of shankha bhasma in relieving GERD symptoms. In method A, purification was done with lemon juice and method B with sour gruel. Materials and Methods: Patients with heartburn since at least four days/week but who did undergo endoscopy to assess esophageal mucosa could participate. In this single-phase, single-center, prospective, randomized control trial, the patients were randomized to receive either shankha bhasma purified by method A or by method B. The primary efficacy variable was the proportion of patients with resolution of heartburn at week 4 and week 8. Design: Single-phase, single-center, prospective, randomized control trial in a hospital setting. Results: Of the total 70 patients who received samples A and B in a randomized double-blind manner, 65% of the patients showed resolution of symptoms in sample A and 28% in sample B at the end of four weeks, whereas, 71% of the patients showed resolution of symptoms in sample A and 31% in sample B at the end of eight weeks; P value was statistically significant for resolution of symptoms (P <0.005). Conclusion: Purification of shankha bhasma by lemon juice method is better than sour gruel method in terms of clinical outcome in GERD patients and is hence recommended. PMID:23633854

  16. Searching for control: priming randomness increases the evaluation of ritual efficacy.

    PubMed

    Legare, Cristine H; Souza, André L

    2014-01-01

    Reestablishing feelings of control after experiencing uncertainty has long been considered a fundamental motive for human behavior. We propose that rituals (i.e., socially stipulated, causally opaque practices) provide a means for coping with the aversive feelings associated with randomness due to the perception of a connection between ritual action and a desired outcome. Two experiments were conducted (one in Brazil [n = 40] and another in the United States [n = 94]) to evaluate how the perceived efficacy of rituals is affected by feelings of randomness. In a between-subjects design, the Scramble Sentence Task was used as a priming procedure in three conditions (i.e., randomness, negativity, and neutral) and participants were then asked to rate the efficacy of rituals used for problem-solving purposes. The results demonstrate that priming randomness increased participants' perception of ritual efficacy relative to negativity and neutral conditions. Implications for increasing our understanding of the relationship between perceived control and ritualistic behavior are discussed. PMID:23941272

  17. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118. PMID:27088040

  18. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118. PMID:27088040

  19. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials on sterilization methods of extracted human teeth

    PubMed Central

    Western, J. Sylvia; Dicksit, Daniel Devaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this Study: The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of different sterilization methods on extracted human teeth (EHT) by a systematic review of in vitro randomized controlled trials. Methodology: An extensive electronic database literature search concerning the sterilization of EHT was conducted. The search terms used were “human teeth, sterilization, disinfection, randomized controlled trials, and infection control.” Randomized controlled trials which aim at comparing the efficiency of different methods of sterilization of EHT were all included in this systematic review. Results: Out of 1618 articles obtained, eight articles were selected for this systematic review. The sterilization methods reviewed were autoclaving, 10% formalin, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% glutaraldehyde, 0.1% thymol, and boiling to 100°C. Data were extracted from the selected individual studies and their findings were summarized. Conclusion: Autoclaving and 10% formalin can be considered as 100% efficient and reliable methods. While the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% glutaraldehyde, 0.1% thymol, and boiling to 100°C was inefficient and unreliable methods of sterilization of EHT. PMID:27563183

  20. Application of dietary fiber in clinical enteral nutrition: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gang; Wu, Xiao-Ting; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Ying-Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of dietary fiber (DF) as a part of enteral nutrition (EN) formula on diarrhea, infection, and length of hospital stay. METHODS: Following electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials about DF: Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. RevMan 4.1 was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials with 400 pat-ients were included. The supplement of DF in EN was compared with standard enteral formula in five trials. Combined analysis did not show a significant reduction in occurrence of diarrhea, but there were valuable results for non-critically ill patients. Combined analysis of two trials observing the infection also did not show any valid evidence that DF could decrease the infection rate, though the length of hospital stay was reduced significantly. CONCLUSION: Based on the current eligible randomized controlled trials, there is no evidence that the value of DF in the diarrhea can be proved. Though length of hospital stay was shortened by the use of DF, there is no available evidence in preventing infection by DF. Further studies are needed for evaluating the value of DF in EN. PMID:15991297

  1. Creation and implementation of a historical controls database from randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jigar R; Bowen, Edward A; Danielson, Mark M; Allam, Rajasekhar R; Cantor, Michael N

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethical concerns about randomly assigning patients to suboptimal or placebo arms and the paucity of willing participants for randomization into control and experimental groups have renewed focus on the use of historical controls in clinical trials. Although databases of historical controls have been advocated, no published reports have described the technical and informatics issues involved in their creation. Objective To create a historical controls database by leveraging internal clinical trial data at Pfizer, focusing on patients who received only placebo in randomized controlled trials. Methods We transformed disparate clinical data sources by indexing, developing, and integrating clinical data within internal databases and archives. We focused primarily on trials mapped into a consistent standard and trials in the pain therapeutic area as a pilot. Results Of the more than 20 000 internal Pfizer clinical trials, 2404 completed placebo controlled studies with a parallel design were identified. Due to challenges with informed consent and data standards used in older clinical trials, studies completed before 2000 were excluded, yielding 1134 studies from which placebo subjects and associated clinical data were extracted. Conclusions It is technically feasible to pool portions of placebo populations through a stratification and segmentation approach for a historical placebo group database. A sufficiently large placebo controls database would enable previous distribution calculations on representative populations to supplement, not eliminate, the placebo arm of future clinical trials. Creation of an industry-wide placebo controls database, utilizing a universal standard, beyond the borders of Pfizer would add significant efficiencies to the clinical trial and drug development process. PMID:23449762

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-based Indoor Tanning Intervention: Acceptability and Preliminary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Jerod L.; Manne, Sharon L.; Darabos, Katie; Greene, Kathryn; Ray, Anne E.; Turner, Amber L.; Coups, Elliot J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This manuscript describes the acceptability and preliminary behavioral outcomes from a pilot randomized control trial of a web-based indoor tanning intervention for young adult women. The intervention targets indoor tanning user’s perceptions of then benefits and value of tanning and addresses the role of body image-related constructs in indoor tanning. Methods Participants were 186 young adult women who reported indoor tanning at least once in the past 12 months. The study design was a 2-arm randomized controlled trial with pre and post assessments and random assignment to an intervention or control condition. Intervention acceptability was assessed by obtaining participants’ evaluation of the intervention. Regression analyses were used to test for intervention condition differences in preliminary behavioral outcomes measured at 6-weeks post-intervention. Results Participants provided favorable evaluations of the intervention on several dimensions and a highly positive overall rating. Intervention participants were more likely to report abstaining from indoor tanning and indicated a lower likelihood of using indoor tanning in the future compared to control participants on the post-intervention assessment. No differences were found for sunburns. Conclusions The results of this pilot randomized controlled trial provide evidence that the indoor tanning intervention is acceptable to participants and may encourage cessation of indoor tanning behavior. The findings provide preliminary support for an indoor tanning intervention that engages tanners to challenge their beliefs about the benefits of indoor tanning. The use of a web-based indoor tanning intervention is unique and provides strong potential for dissemination. PMID:26651469

  3. Reinforcement Behavior Therapy by Kindergarten Teachers on Preschool Children’s Aggression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yektatalab, Shahrzad; Alipour, Abdolrasool; Edraki, Mitra; Tavakoli, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aggression is a kind of behavior that causes damage or harm to others. The prevalence of aggression is 8–20% in 3–6 years old children. The present study aimed to assess the effect of training kindergarten teachers regarding reinforcement behavior therapy on preschoolers’ aggression. Methods: In this cluster randomized control trial, 14 out of 35 kindergarten and preschool centers of Mohr city, Iran, were chosen using random cluster sampling and then randomly assigned to an intervention and a control group. All 370 kindergarten and preschool children in 14 kindergarten were assessed by preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire and 60 children who obtained a minimum aggression score of 117.48 for girls and 125.77 for boys were randomly selected. The teachers in the intervention group participated in 4 educational sessions on behavior therapy and then practiced this technique under the supervision of the researcher for two months. Preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire was computed in both intervention and control groups before and after a two-month period. Results: The results demonstrated a significant statistical difference in the total aggression score (P=0.01), verbal (P=0.02) and physical (P=0.01) aggression subscales scores in the intervention group in comparison to the control group after the intervention. But the scores of relational aggression (P=0.09) and impulsive anger (P=0.08) subscales were not statistically different in the intervention group compared to the controls. Conclusion: This study highlighted the importance of teaching reinforcement behavior therapy by kindergarten teachers in decreasing verbal and physical aggression in preschoolers. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014042617436N1 PMID:26793733

  4. A RANDOMIZED PHASE II TRIAL OF THE MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE INHIBITOR BMS-275291 IN HORMONE-REFRACTORY PROSTATE CANCER PATIENTS WITH BONE METASTASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: BMS-275291 is a selective matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (MMPI) that does not inhibit sheddases implicated in the dose-limiting arthritis of older MMPIs. We conducted a randomized phase II trail of two doses of BMS-275291 (1,200 versus 2,400 mg) in hormone-refractory prostate cancer ...

  5. A Comparison of Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia With Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Management After Major Gynecologic Oncologic Surgeries: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Farnaz; Rasooli, Sousan; Baybordi, Ali; Golzari, Samad E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain after major open gynecologic surgeries requires appropriate pain management. Objectives: This study aimed at comparing perioperative patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) and patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) after gynecologic oncology surgeries. Patients and Methods: In this clinical trial study, 90 patients with American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II scheduled for gynecologic oncologic surgeries were randomly allocated to two groups (45 patients each group) to receive: patient-controlled epidural analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl (PCEA group), or patient controlled intravenous analgesia (IV PCA group) with fentanyl, pethidine and ondansetron. Postoperative pain was assessed over 48 hours using the visual analog scale (VAS). The frequency of rescue analgesia was recorded. Occurrence of any concomitant events such as nausea, vomiting, ileus, purities, sedation and respiratory complications were recorded postoperatively. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in demographic data including; age, weight, ASA physical status, duration of surgery, intraoperative bleeding, and the amount of blood transfusion (P > 0.05), between the two studied groups. Severity of postoperative pain was not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05); however, after first patient mobilization, pain was significantly lower in the epidural group than the IV group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the incidence of complications such as nausea, vomiting, purities or ileus (P > 0.05). Nevertheless, the incidence and severity of sedation was significantly higher in the IV group (P < 0.001). Respiratory depression was higher in the IV group than the epidural group; this difference, however, was not significant (P = 0.11). In the epidural group, only 10 patients (22.2%) had mild and transient lower extremities parenthesis. Conclusions

  6. Three phase III randomized controlled trials of topical resiquimod 0.01-percent gel to reduce anogenital herpes recurrences.

    PubMed

    Mark, Karen E; Spruance, Spotswood; Kinghorn, George R; Sacks, Stephen L; Slade, Herbert B; Meng, Tze-Chiang; Selke, Stacy; Magaret, Amalia; Wald, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Resiquimod, a Toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonist, stimulates production of cytokines that promote an antigen-specific T helper type 1 acquired immune response. Animal and phase II human trials showed posttreatment efficacy in reducing recurrent herpes lesion days and/or time to first recurrence. Three phase III randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled trials of topical resiquimod to reduce anogenital herpes recurrences were conducted in healthy adults with ≥4 recurrences within the prior year. Participants applied resiquimod 0.01% gel or vehicle gel 2 times per week for 3 weeks to each recurrence for 12 months. Trials 1 and 2 had 2:1 resiquimod-vehicle randomization. Trial 3 had 1:1:1 randomization for resiquimod and 500 mg valacyclovir orally twice daily for 5 days (RESI-VAL), resiquimod and oral placebo (RESI-PLA), and vehicle and oral placebo (VEH-PLA). The median time to first recurrence was similar for resiquimod and vehicle (trial 1, 60 and 56 days, P=0.7; trial 2, 54 and 48 days, P=0.47; trial 3, 51 [RESI-VAL], 55 [RESI-PLA], and 44 [VEH-PLA] days, P=not significant [NS]). The median time to healing of initial treated recurrence was longer for resiquimod (trial 1, 18 compared to 10 days, P<0.001; trial 2, 19 compared to 13 days, P=0.16; trial 3, 14 [RESI-VAL], 16 [RESI-PLA], and 8 [VEH-PLA] days, P<0.001). In trials 1 and 2, moderate to severe erythema and erosion/ulceration at the application site were more common in resiquimod recipients. In conclusion, no posttreatment efficacy of resiquimod 0.01% gel was observed. Increased application site reactions and initial recurrence healing time are consistent with resiquimod-induced cytokine effects. PMID:24709264

  7. A randomized comparison study of Aquacel Ag and Glucan II as donor site dressings with regard to healing time, cosmesis, infection rate, and patient's perceived pain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Suzanne; Carmean, Melissa; Cinat, Marianne; Burton, Kimberly; Lane, Christopher; Malinoski, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare pain, healing time, infection rate, and cosmetic outcome between Aquacel Ag (Convatec) and Glucan II (Brennan Medical) as donor site dressings. The authors performed a prospective, randomized, patient-controlled study. Eligible patients had two donor sites harvested. One site was dressed with Aquacel Ag and the other site with Glucan II. Patients were followed at set time points for 6 months to determine the rate of epithelialization, patient's perceived pain, infection rate, and the cosmetic outcome. A total of 20 patients were enrolled in the study. All patient data were collected through reepithelialization. The average time to wound healing for Aquacel Ag was 12.5 ± 2.07 days compared with Glucan II 12.7 ± 1.99 days. Perceived pain scores for each donor site were recorded. On postoperative day 5, patients reported significantly less pain with the Aquacel Ag site (Aquacel Ag 1.75 vs Glucan II 2.5, P = .02). Three donor sites showed clinical signs of infection (two Glucan II and one Aquacel Ag) prompting culture and dressing removal. There was no statistically significant difference in cosmetic outcomes of the donor sites at any time point. When comparing Aquacel Ag and Glucan II, our study has determined that there is no significant difference with regard to healing time, infection rates, and cosmetic outcomes. Both dressings are comparable with regard to ease of application and postoperative care. PMID:21844815

  8. Randomized Open-Label Phase II Study of Decitabine in Patients With Low- or Intermediate-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Faderl, Stefan; Estrov, Zeev; Yang, Hui; Maddipoti, Sirisha; Godley, Lucy A.; Gabrail, Nashat; Berdeja, Jesus G.; Nadeem, Ahmed; Kassalow, Laurent; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This open-label, randomized phase II trial assessed efficacy and tolerability of two low-dose regimens of subcutaneous (SC) decitabine in patients with low- or intermediate-1–risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients and Methods Patients received decitabine 20 mg/m2 SC per day for 3 consecutive days on days 1, 2, and 3 every 28 days (schedule A) or 20 mg/m2 SC per day once every 7 days on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days (schedule B) for up to 1 year. Primary efficacy end point was overall improvement rate (OIR: complete remission [CR], partial remission [PR], marrow CR [mCR], or hematologic improvement [HI]). Secondary end points were HI, transfusion independence, cytogenetic response, overall survival (OS), and time to acute myeloid leukemia or death. Results Efficacy and safety populations were identical: schedule A, n = 43; schedule B, n = 22. Median time from MDS diagnosis to treatment was 3.6 months; 89% had de novo MDS. The trial was terminated early on achievement of protocol-defined OIR superiority of schedule A over schedule B; OIR was 23% for schedule A (seven CRs, three HIs) and 23% for schedule B (one mCR, one PR, three HIs). No differences were observed in secondary end points. Median OS was not reached; approximately 70% of patients were alive at 500 days. Patients in schedule A (67%) and schedule B (59%) were RBC/platelet independent on study. The most frequent drug-related adverse events overall were neutropenia (28% v 36%), anemia (23% v 18%), and thrombocytopenia (16% v 32%). Conclusion In this phase II study, low-dose decitabine showed promising results in patients with low- or intermediate-1–risk MDS. PMID:23733767

  9. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume II: Control Technology and General Source Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume II, explains in detail the following: technology of source control, modification of operations, particulate control equipment, sulfur dioxide removal systems for power plants, and control equipment for gases and vapors; inspection procedures for general sources, fuel…

  10. The effectiveness of group positive psychotherapy on depression and happiness in breast cancer patients: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dowlatabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Ahmadi, Seyed Mojtaba; Sorbi, Mohammad Hossein; Beiki, Omid; Razavi, Tayebeh Khademeh; Bidaki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in women in the world. It causes fear, despair, and takes a tremendous toll on psychological status. Objective To determine the effectiveness of group positive psychotherapy on the depression and happiness of breast cancer patients. Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted with 42 breast cancer patients in The Oncology Center at Kermanshah, Iran in 2015. The Data were gathered before intervention and ten weeks afterwards. The data were collected using Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Oxford’s happiness Inventory (OHI). The data were analyzed by SPSS-16, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S), chi-squared, and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Results The results showed a significant reduction in the depression of the group on positive psychotherapy compared with the control group. Also the positive psychotherapy group experienced a significant increase in the patients’ happiness, while there was no significant increase in the control group. Conclusion The results of this research showed the effectiveness of positive psychotherapy on the reduction of mental pressure and the improvement of the mental status of breast cancer patients. This economical therapy can be used to increase patients’ psychological health. Clinical Trial Registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRST) with the identification number IRCT2013101410063N4. Funding The authors received financial support for the research from Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. PMID:27123227

  11. The Effects of School Gardens on Children's Science Knowledge: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Low-Income Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Nancy M.; Myers, Beth M.; Todd, Lauren E.; Barale, Karen; Gaolach, Brad; Ferenz, Gretchen; Aitken, Martha; Henderson, Charles R.; Tse, Caroline; Pattison, Karen Ostlie; Taylor, Cayla; Connerly, Laura; Carson, Janet B.; Gensemer, Alexandra Z.; Franz, Nancy K.; Falk, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial or "true experiment" examines the effects of a school garden intervention on the science knowledge of elementary school children. Schools were randomly assigned to a group that received the garden intervention (n?=?25) or to a waitlist control group that received the garden intervention at the end of the…

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluation of an After-School Prosocial Behavior Program in an Area of Socioeconomic Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, Liam; Biggart, Andy; Kerr, Karen; Connolly, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate the effects of a prosocial behavior after-school program called Mate-Tricks for 9- and 10-year-old children and their parents living in an area of significant socioeconomic disadvantage. The children were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 220) or a control group (n = 198). Children were…

  13. Speed synchronization control for integrated automotive motor-transmission powertrain system with random delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Hui; Fang, Zongde

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a robust speed synchronization controller design for an integrated motor-transmission powertrain system in which the driving motor and multi-gearbox are directly coupled. As the controller area network (CAN) is commonly used in the vehicle powertrain system, the possible network-induced random delays in both feedback and forward channel are considered and modeled by using two Markov chains in the controller design process. For the application perspective, the control law adopted here is a generalized proportional-integral (PI) control. By employing the system-augmentation technique, a delay-free stochastic closed-loop system is obtained and the generalized PI controller design problem is converted to a static output feedback (SOF) controller design problem. Since there are external disturbances involved in the closed-loop system, the energy-to-peak performance is considered to guarantee the robustness of the controller. And the controlled output is chosen as the speed synchronization error. To further improve the transient response of the closed-loop system, the pole placement is also employed in the energy-to-peak performance based speed synchronization control. The mode-dependent control gains are obtained by using an iterative linear matrix inequality (LMI) algorithm. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  14. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  15. Are Randomized Controlled Trials the (G)old Standard? From Clinical Intelligence to Prescriptive Analytics.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Thomeer, Michiel; Heath, John; Vukicevic, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Despite the accelerating pace of scientific discovery, the current clinical research enterprise does not sufficiently address pressing clinical questions. Given the constraints on clinical trials, for a majority of clinical questions, the only relevant data available to aid in decision making are based on observation and experience. Our purpose here is 3-fold. First, we describe the classic context of medical research guided by Poppers' scientific epistemology of "falsificationism." Second, we discuss challenges and shortcomings of randomized controlled trials and present the potential of observational studies based on big data. Third, we cover several obstacles related to the use of observational (retrospective) data in clinical studies. We conclude that randomized controlled trials are not at risk for extinction, but innovations in statistics, machine learning, and big data analytics may generate a completely new ecosystem for exploration and validation. PMID:27383622

  16. Randomized controlled trial of nettle sting for treatment of base-of-thumb pain.

    PubMed Central

    Randall, C; Randall, H; Dobbs, F; Hutton, C; Sanders, H

    2000-01-01

    There are numerous published references to use of nettle sting for arthritis pain but no randomized controlled trials have been reported. We conducted a randomized controlled double-blind crossover study in 27 patients with osteoarthritic pain at the base of the thumb or index finger. Patients applied stinging nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) daily for one week to the painful area. The effect of this treatment was compared with that of placebo, white deadnettle leaf (Lamium album), for one week after a five-week washout period. Observations of pain and disability were recorded for the twelve weeks of the study. After one week's treatment with nettle sting, score reductions on both visual analogue scale (pain) and health assessment questionnaire (disability) were significantly greater than with placebo (P = 0.026 and P = 0.0027). PMID:10911825

  17. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir–Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems. PMID:26096622

  18. Estimating optimal treatment regimes via subgroup identification in randomized control trials and observational studies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haoda; Zhou, Jin; Faries, Douglas E

    2016-08-30

    With new treatments and novel technology available, personalized medicine has become an important piece in the new era of medical product development. Traditional statistics methods for personalized medicine and subgroup identification primarily focus on single treatment or two arm randomized control trials. Motivated by the recent development of outcome weighted learning framework, we propose an alternative algorithm to search treatment assignments which has a connection with subgroup identification problems. Our method focuses on applications from clinical trials to generate easy to interpret results. This framework is able to handle two or more than two treatments from both randomized control trials and observational studies. We implement our algorithm in C++ and connect it with R. Its performance is evaluated by simulations, and we apply our method to a dataset from a diabetes study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26892174

  19. Filtering random matrices: the effect of incomplete channel control in multiple scattering.

    PubMed

    Goetschy, A; Stone, A D

    2013-08-01

    We present an analytic random matrix theory for the effect of incomplete channel control on the measured statistical properties of the scattering matrix of a disordered multiple-scattering medium. When the fraction of the controlled input channels, m1, and output channels, m2, is decreased from unity, the density of the transmission eigenvalues is shown to evolve from the bimodal distribution describing coherent diffusion, to the distribution characteristic of uncorrelated Gaussian random matrices, with a rapid loss of access to the open eigenchannels. The loss of correlation is also reflected in an increase in the information capacity per channel of the medium. Our results have strong implications for optical and microwave experiments on diffusive scattering media. PMID:23971574

  20. Building social resilience in soldiers: A double dissociative randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Cacioppo, John T; Adler, Amy B; Lester, Paul B; McGurk, Dennis; Thomas, Jeffrey L; Chen, Hsi-Yuan; Cacioppo, Stephanie

    2015-07-01

    Can social resilience be trained? We report results of a double-dissociative randomized controlled study in which 48 Army platoons were randomly assigned to social resilience training (intervention condition) or cultural awareness training (active control group). The same surveys were administered to all platoons at baseline and after the completion of training to determine the short-term training effects, generalization effects beyond training, and possible adverse effects. Multilevel modeling analyses indicated that social resilience, compared with cultural awareness, training produced small but significant improvements in social cognition (e.g., increased empathy, perspective taking, & military hardiness) and decreased loneliness, but no evidence was found for social resilience training to generalize beyond these training foci nor to have adverse effects. Moreover, as predicted, cultural awareness, compared with social resilience, training produced increases in knowledge about and decreases in prejudice toward Afghans. Additional research is warranted to determine the long-term durability, safety, and generalizability of social resilience training. PMID:26098588

  1. Acupoint Stimulation on Weight Reduction for Obesity: A Randomized Sham-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Mei-Ling; Chu, Nain-Feng; Hsu, Man-Ying F; Hsu, Chin-Che; Chung, Yu-Chu

    2015-12-01

    Auricular acupoint stimulation has become a popular weight loss method. However, its efficacy for obesity treatment has not been fully studied. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a 10-week intervention of auricular electrical stimulation combined with auricular acupressure on weight reduction in obese outpatients. In this single-blind randomized sham-controlled study, 134 participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group receiving stimulation at true acupoints, or a sham group receiving stimulation delivered in the same manner but at sham acupoints. Each participant received nutrition counseling by a nutritionist weekly. The results showed significant differences in body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin or adiponectin over time within the group, but not between the groups. This study could not exclude the effect of placebo and dietary consultation. Further study that adds a control group receiving no treatment is therefore needed to confirm the effects of auricular acupressure. PMID:25183702

  2. Prayer and healing: A medical and scientific perspective on randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv

    2009-01-01

    Religious traditions across the world display beliefs in healing through prayer. The healing powers of prayer have been examined in triple-blind, randomized controlled trials. We illustrate randomized controlled trials on prayer and healing, with one study in each of different categories of outcome. We provide a critical analysis of the scientific and philosophical dimensions of such research. Prayer has been reported to improve outcomes in human as well as nonhuman species, to have no effect on outcomes, to worsen outcomes and to have retrospective healing effects. For a multitude of reasons, research on the healing effects of prayer is riddled with assumptions, challenges and contradictions that make the subject a scientific and religious minefield. We believe that the research has led nowhere, and that future research, if any, will forever be constrained by the scientific limitations that we outline. PMID:20048448

  3. Are Randomized Controlled Trials the (G)old Standard? From Clinical Intelligence to Prescriptive Analytics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the accelerating pace of scientific discovery, the current clinical research enterprise does not sufficiently address pressing clinical questions. Given the constraints on clinical trials, for a majority of clinical questions, the only relevant data available to aid in decision making are based on observation and experience. Our purpose here is 3-fold. First, we describe the classic context of medical research guided by Poppers’ scientific epistemology of “falsificationism.” Second, we discuss challenges and shortcomings of randomized controlled trials and present the potential of observational studies based on big data. Third, we cover several obstacles related to the use of observational (retrospective) data in clinical studies. We conclude that randomized controlled trials are not at risk for extinction, but innovations in statistics, machine learning, and big data analytics may generate a completely new ecosystem for exploration and validation. PMID:27383622

  4. A Randomized Phase II Chemoprevention Trial of 13-CIS Retinoic Acid with Or without α Tocopherol or Observation in Subjects at High Risk for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Karen; Kittelson, John; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Kennedy, Timothy C.; Klein, Catherine E.; Keith, Robert L.; Dempsey, Edward C.; Lewis, Marina; Jackson, Mary K.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Bunn, Paul A.; Miller, York E.

    2011-01-01

    No chemoprevention strategies have been proven effective for lung cancer. We evaluated the effect of 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA), with or without α tocopherol, as a lung cancer chemoprevention agent in a phase II randomized controlled clinical trial of adult subjects at high risk for lung cancer as defined by the presence of sputum atypia, history of smoking, and airflow obstruction, or a prior surgically cured nonsmall cell lung cancer (disease free, >3 years). Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 13-cis RA, 13-cis RA plus α tocopherol (13-cis RA/α toco) or observation for 12 months. Outcome measures are derived from histologic evaluation of bronchial biopsy specimens obtained by bronchoscopy at baseline and follow-up. The primary outcome measure is treatment “failure” defined as histologic progression (any increase in the maximum histologic score) or failure to return for follow-up bronchoscopy. Seventy-five subjects were randomized (27/22/26 to obervations/13-cis RA/13-cis RA/α toco); 59 completed the trial; 55 had both baseline and follow-up bronchoscopy. The risk of treatment failure was 55.6% (15 of 27) and 50% (24 of 48) in the observation and combined (13 cis RA plus 13 cis RA/α toco) treatment arms, respectively (odds ratio adjusted for baseline histology, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.36–2.66; P = 0.95). Among subjects with complete histology data, maximum histology score in the observation arm increased by 0.37 units and by 0.03 units in the treated arms (difference adjusted for baseline, −0.18; 95% confidence interval, −1.16 to 0.81; P = 0.72). Similar (nonsignificant) results were observed for treatment effects on endobronchial proliferation as assessed by Ki-67 immunolabeling. Twelve-month treatment with 13-cis RA produced nonsignificant changes in bronchial histology, consistent with results in other trials. Agents advancing to phase III randomized trials should produce greater histologic changes. The addition of

  5. Conservative management of cesarean scar pregnancies: a prospective randomized controlled trial at a single center

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Yang, Zhiling; Li, Yunming; Chen, Biliang; Wang, Jian; Ma, Xiangdong; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess clinical outcomes related to conservative management of women with cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs), specifically through uterine artery embolization (UAE) with local and systemic methotrexate (MTX) treatment (UAE-MTX), or ultrasound-guided local and systemic MTX treatment (USG-MTX). Methods: Forty-five patients with CSP were randomly allocated to receive UAE-MTX (n = 24) or USG-MTX (n = 21). Participants’ clinical outcomes were compared, and clinical characteristics of failed cases were evaluated relative to successful cases. Results: The 2 groups were similar in clinical characteristics, success rate (83.3% cf. 80.9%), time to normalization of serum beta (β) human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG), and percentage of patients receiving multiple doses of systemic MTX. However, within the failed cases, the percentages of patients with gestational sac > 5 cm (87.5%), or type II CSP (75.0%) was significantly higher than in the successful cases (13.5% and 18.9%, respectively; P < 0.001, both), without regard to treatment group. According to the logistic regression model, a gestational sac diameter > 5 cm or type II CSP were independent risk factors for failed CSP management (gestational sac > 5 cm: OR 51.87, 95% CI 3.48-775.91, P < 0.01; type II CSP: OR 15.54, 95% CI 1.25-193.36, P < 0.05). Conclusion: The conservative treatments UAE-MTX and USG-MTX were similarly effective in treating CSP patients. Either treatment was likely to fail for CSP patients with gestational sac > 5 cm or type II CSP. PMID:26770522

  6. Defining a Clinically Meaningful Effect for the Design and Interpretation of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Helena C.; Epstein, Robert S.; Frank, Ellen; Haynes, Ginger; Laughren, Thomas P.; Mcnulty, James; Reed, Shelby D.; Sanchez, Juan; Leon, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article captures the proceedings of a meeting aimed at defining clinically meaningful effects for use in randomized controlled trials for psychopharmacological agents. Design: Experts from a variety of disciplines defined clinically meaningful effects from their perspectives along with viewpoints about how to design and interpret randomized controlled trials. Setting: The article offers relevant, practical, and sometimes anecdotal information about clinically meaningful effects and how to interpret them. Participants: The concept for this session was the work of co-chairs Richard Keefe and the late Andy Leon. Faculty included Richard Keefe, PhD; James McNulty, AbScB; Robert S. Epstein, MD, MS; Shelby D. Reed, PhD; Juan Sanchez, MD; Ginger Haynes, PhD; Andrew C. Leon, PhD; Helena Chmura Kraemer, PhD; Ellen Frank, PhD, and Kenneth L. Davis, MD. Results: The term clinically meaningful effect is an important aspect of designing and interpreting randomized controlled trials but can be particularly difficult in the setting of psychopharmacology where effect size may be modest, particularly over the short term, because of a strong response to placebo. Payers, regulators, patients, and clinicians have different concerns about clinically meaningful effects and may describe these terms differently. The use of moderators in success rate differences may help better delineate clinically meaningful effects. Conclusion: There is no clear consensus on a single definition for clinically meaningful differences in randomized controlled trials, and investigators must be sensitive to specific concerns of stakeholders in psychopharmacology in order to design and execute appropriate clinical trials. PMID:23882433

  7. A systematic mapping review of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) in care homes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A thorough understanding of the literature generated from research in care homes is required to support evidence-based commissioning and delivery of healthcare. So far this research has not been compiled or described. We set out to describe the extent of the evidence base derived from randomized controlled trials conducted in care homes. Methods A systematic mapping review was conducted of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in care homes. Medline was searched for “Nursing Home”, “Residential Facilities” and “Homes for the Aged”; CINAHL for “nursing homes”, “residential facilities” and “skilled nursing facilities”; AMED for “Nursing homes”, “Long term care”, “Residential facilities” and “Randomized controlled trial”; and BNI for “Nursing Homes”, “Residential Care” and “Long-term care”. Articles were classified against a keywording strategy describing: year and country of publication; randomization, stratification and blinding methodology; target of intervention; intervention and control treatments; number of subjects and/or clusters; outcome measures; and results. Results 3226 abstracts were identified and 291 articles reviewed in full. Most were recent (median age 6 years) and from the United States. A wide range of targets and interventions were identified. Studies were mostly functional (44 behaviour, 20 prescribing and 20 malnutrition studies) rather than disease-based. Over a quarter focussed on mental health. Conclusions This study is the first to collate data from all RCTs conducted in care homes and represents an important resource for those providing and commissioning healthcare for this sector. The evidence-base is rapidly developing. Several areas - influenza, falls, mobility, fractures, osteoporosis – are appropriate for systematic review. For other topics, researchers need to focus on outcome measures that can be compared and collated. PMID:22731652

  8. Dramatic reduction of read disturb through pulse width control in spin torque random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihui; Wang, Xiaobin; Gan, Huadong; Jung, Dongha; Satoh, Kimihiro; Lin, Tsann; Zhou, Yuchen; Zhang, Jing; Huai, Yiming; Chang, Yao-Jen; Wu, Te-ho

    2013-09-01

    Magnetizations dynamic effect in low current read disturb region is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Dramatic read error rate reduction through read pulse width control is theoretically predicted and experimentally observed. The strong dependence of read error rate upon pulse width contrasts conventional energy barrier approach and can only be obtained considering detailed magnetization dynamics at long time thermal magnetization reversal region. Our study provides a design possibility for ultra-fast low current spin torque random access memory.

  9. Reliable H∞ control of discrete-time systems against random intermittent faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuan; Shen, Dong; Fang, Mengqi; Wang, Youqing

    2016-07-01

    A passive fault-tolerant control strategy is proposed for systems subject to a novel kind of intermittent fault, which is described by a Bernoulli distributed random variable. Three cases of fault location are considered, namely, sensor fault, actuator fault, and both sensor and actuator faults. The dynamic feedback controllers are designed not only to stabilise the fault-free system, but also to guarantee an acceptable performance of the faulty system. The robust H∞ performance index is used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. In terms of linear matrix inequality, the sufficient conditions of the existence of controllers are given. An illustrative example indicates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control method.

  10. An Eight Month Randomized Controlled Exercise Intervention Alters Resting State Synchrony in Overweight Children

    PubMed Central

    Krafft, Cynthia E.; Pierce, Jordan E.; Schwarz, Nicolette F.; Chi, Lingxi; Weinberger, Abby L.; Schaeffer, David J.; Rodrigue, Amanda L.; Camchong, Jazmin; Allison, Jerry D.; Yanasak, Nathan E.; Liu, Tianming; Davis, Catherine L.; McDowell, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Children with low aerobic fitness have altered brain function compared to higher-fit children. This study examined the effect of an 8-month exercise intervention on resting state synchrony. Twenty-two sedentary, overweight (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) children 8–11 years old were randomly assigned to one of two after-school programs: aerobic exercise (n=13) or sedentary attention control (n=9). Before and after the 8-month programs, all subjects participated in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Independent components analysis identified several networks, with four chosen for between-group analysis: salience, default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks. The default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks showed more spatial refinement over time in the exercise group compared to controls. The motor network showed increased synchrony in the exercise group with the right medial frontal gyrus compared to controls. Exercise behavior may enhance brain development in children. PMID:24096138

  11. An eight month randomized controlled exercise intervention alters resting state synchrony in overweight children.

    PubMed

    Krafft, C E; Pierce, J E; Schwarz, N F; Chi, L; Weinberger, A L; Schaeffer, D J; Rodrigue, A L; Camchong, J; Allison, J D; Yanasak, N E; Liu, T; Davis, C L; McDowell, J E

    2014-01-01

    Children with low aerobic fitness have altered brain function compared to higher-fit children. This study examined the effect of an 8-month exercise intervention on resting state synchrony. Twenty-two sedentary, overweight (body mass index ≥85th percentile) children 8-11 years old were randomly assigned to one of two after-school programs: aerobic exercise (n=13) or sedentary attention control (n=9). Before and after the 8-month programs, all subjects participated in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Independent components analysis identified several networks, with four chosen for between-group analysis: salience, default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks. The default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks showed more spatial refinement over time in the exercise group compared to controls. The motor network showed increased synchrony in the exercise group with the right medial frontal gyrus compared to controls. Exercise behavior may enhance brain development in children. PMID:24096138

  12. A genotype-specific, randomized controlled behavioral intervention to improve the neuroemotional outcome of cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgery is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide with >700,000 surgeries in 2006 in the US alone. Cardiac surgery results in a considerable exposure to physical and emotional stress; stress-related disorders such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder are the most common adverse outcomes of cardiac surgery, seen in up to 20% of patients. Using information from a genome-wide association study to characterize genetic effects on emotional memory, we recently identified a single nucleotide polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (the Bcll single nucleotide polymorphism) as a significant genetic risk factor for traumatic memories from cardiac surgery and symptoms of post-traumaticstress disorder. The Bcll high-risk genotype (Bcll GG) has a prevalence of 16.6% in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and is associated with increased glucocorticoid receptor signaling under stress. Concomitant animal experiments have confirmed an essential role of glucocorticoid receptor activation for traumatic memory formation during stressful experiences. Early cognitive behavioral intervention has been shown to prevent stress-related disorders after heart surgery. Methods/Design The proposed study protocol is based on the above mentioned earlier findings from animal experiments and preclinical studies in volunteers. Patients (n = 872) will be genotyped for the Bcll single nucleotide polymorphism before surgery, which should result in 120 homozygous high-risk carriers of the Bcll GG allele and 240 randomly selected low-risk heterozygous or non-carriers of the single nucleotide polymorphism. All patients will then undergo randomization to either cognitive behavioral intervention or a control intervention consisting of non-specific general information about the role of stress in heart disease. The primary efficacy endpoint will be post-traumatic stress levels at one year after surgery as determined by a standardized

  13. Effect of pravastatin on survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, S; Yamasaki, E; Nagase, T; Inui, Y; Ito, N; Matsuda, Y; Inada, M; Tamura, S; Noda, S; Imai, Y; Matsuzawa, Y

    2001-01-01

    Chemotherapy is not effective for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HMG-CoA redutase inhibitors have cytostatic activity for cancer cells, but their clinical usefulness is unknown. To investigate whether pravastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, prolongs survival in patients with advanced HCC, this randomized controlled trial was conducted between February 1990 and February 1998 at Osaka University Hospital. 91 consecutive patients <71 years old (mean age 62) with unresectable HCC were enroled in this study. 8 patients were withdrawn because of progressive liver dysfunction; 83 patients were randomized to standard treatment with or without pravastatin. All patients underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) followed by oral 5-FU 200 mg−1d for 2 months. Patients were then randomly assigned to control (n = 42) and pravastatin (n = 41) groups. Pravastatin was administered at a daily dose of 40 mg. The effect of pravastatin on tumour growth was assessed by ultrasonography. Primary endpoint was death due to progression of HCC. The duration of pravastatin administration was 16.5 ± 9.8 months (mean ± SD). No patients in either group were lost to follow-up. Median survival was 18 months in the pravastatin group versus 9 months in controls (P = 0.006). The Cox proportional hazards model showed that pravastatin was a significant factor contributing to survival. Pravastatin prolonged the survival of patients with advanced HCC, suggesting its value for adjuvant treatment. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11286466

  14. Reducing HIV-Related Stigma in Health Care Settings: A Randomized Controlled Trial in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zunyou; Liang, Li-Jung; Guan, Jihui; Jia, Manhong; Rou, Keming; Yan, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of the intervention was to reduce service providers’ stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors toward people living with HIV. Methods. The randomized controlled trial was conducted in 40 county-level hospitals in 2 provinces of China between October 2008 and February 2010. Forty-four service providers were randomly selected from each hospital, yielding a total of 1760 study participants. We randomized the hospitals to either an intervention condition or a control condition. In the intervention hospitals, about 15% of the popular opinion leaders were identified and trained to disseminate stigma reduction messages. Results. We observed significant improvements for the intervention group in reducing prejudicial attitudes (P < .001), reducing avoidance intent towards people living with HIV (P < .001), and increasing institutional support in the hospitals (P = .003) at 6 months after controlling for service providers’ background factors and clinic-level characteristics. The intervention effects were sustained and strengthened at 12 months. Conclusions. The intervention reduced stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors among service providers. It has the potential to be integrated into the health care systems in China and other countries. PMID:23237175

  15. Virtual reality robotic surgery simulation curriculum to teach robotic suturing: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Daniel J; Gotlieb, Walter H; Lau, Susie; Zeng, Xing; Samouelian, Vanessa; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Zakrzewski, Helena; Brin, Sonya; Fraser, Shannon A; Korsieporn, Pira; Drudi, Laura; Press, Joshua Z

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this randomized, controlled trial was to assess whether voluntary participation in a proctored, proficiency-based, virtual reality robotic suturing curriculum using the da Vinci(®) Skills Simulator™ improves robotic suturing performance. Residents and attending surgeons were randomized to participation or non-participation during a 5 week training curriculum. Robotic suturing skills were evaluated before and after training using an inanimate vaginal cuff model, which participants sutured for 10 min using the da Vinci(®) Surgical System. Performances were videotaped, anonymized, and subsequently graded independently by three robotic surgeons. 27 participants were randomized. 23 of the 27 completed both the pre- and post-test, 13 in the training group and 10 in the control group. Mean training time in the intervention group was 238 ± 136 min (SD) over the 5 weeks. The primary outcome (improvement in GOALS+ score) and the secondary outcomes (improvement in GEARS, total knots, satisfactory knots, and the virtual reality suture sponge 1 task) were significantly greater in the training group than the control group in unadjusted analysis. After adjusting for lower baseline scores in the training group, improvement in the suture sponge 1 task remained significantly greater in the training group and a trend was demonstrated to greater improvement in the training group for the GOALS+ score, GEARS score, total knots, and satisfactory knots. PMID:26531197

  16. An effective group psychoeducational intervention for improving compliance with vaginal dilation: A randomized controlled trial

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, Sherryl A.; Robinson, John W. . E-mail: johnrobi@cancerboard.ab.ca; Craighead, Peter S.; Keats, Melanie R.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal dilation is often recommended to minimize or prevent vaginal scarring after pelvic radiotherapy, compliance with this recommendation has historically been very low. Therefore, effective intervention strategies are needed to enhance compliance with vaginal dilation after radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of a psychoeducational intervention specifically designed to increase compliance with vaginal dilation. The information-motivation-behavioral skills model of enhancing compliance with behavioral change was the basis for the intervention design. Forty-two sexually active women, 21 to 65 years of age, diagnosed with Stages Ic-III cervical or endometrial cancer, who received pelvic radiotherapy, were randomized to either the experimental psychoeducational group or the information-only control group. Assessment via questionnaire occurred before treatment and at 6-week, 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Assessment via interview also occurred at 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Results: The psychoeducational intervention was successful in increasing compliance with vaginal dilation. Conclusions: This study is the first randomized controlled study to demonstrate the effectiveness of an intervention in increasing compliance with the use of vaginal dilators.

  17. Testing a workplace physical activity intervention: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased physical activity levels benefit both an individuals' health and productivity at work. The purpose of the current study was to explore the impact and cost-effectiveness of a workplace physical activity intervention designed to increase physical activity levels. Methods A total of 1260 participants from 44 UK worksites (based within 5 organizations) were recruited to a cluster randomized controlled trial with worksites randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition. Measurement of physical activity and other variables occurred at baseline, and at 0 months, 3 months and 9 months post-intervention. Health outcomes were measured during a 30 minute health check conducted in worksites at baseline and 9 months post intervention. The intervention consisted of a 3 month tool-kit of activities targeting components of the Theory of Planned Behavior, delivered in-house by nominated facilitators. Self-reported physical activity (measured using the IPAQ short-form) and health outcomes were assessed. Results and discussion Multilevel modelling found no significant effect of the intervention on MET minutes of activity (from the IPAQ) at any of the follow-up time points controlling for baseline activity. However, the intervention did significantly reduce systolic blood pressure (B = -1.79 mm/Hg) and resting heart rate (B = -2.08 beats) and significantly increased body mass index (B = .18 units) compared to control. The intervention was found not to be cost-effective, however the substantial variability round this estimate suggested that further research is warranted. Conclusions The current study found mixed support for this worksite physical activity intervention. The paper discusses some of the tensions involved in conducting rigorous evaluations of large-scale randomized controlled trials in real-world settings. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08807396 PMID:21481265

  18. Distributed control of cluster synchronisation in networks with randomly occurring non-linearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Aihua; Cao, Jinde; Hu, Manfeng; Guo, Liuxiao

    2016-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the issue of mean square cluster synchronisation in complex networks, which consist of non-identical nodes with randomly occurring non-linearities. In order to guarantee synchronisation, distributed controllers depending on the information from the neighbours in the same cluster are applied to each node, meanwhile, the control gains are supposed to be updated according to the given laws. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, the sufficient synchronisation conditions are derived and proved theoretically. Finally, a numerical example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the results.

  19. The anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy on patients awaiting ambulatory surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ni, Cheng-Hua; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Chang, Ming-Li; Yu, Lee-Fen; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if aromatherapy could reduce preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. A total of 109 preoperative patients were randomly assigned to experimental (bergamot essential oil) and control (water vapor) conditions and their responses to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and vital signs were monitored. Patients were stratified by previous surgical experience, but that did not influence the results. All those exposed to bergamot essential oil aromatherapy showed a greater reduction in preoperative anxiety than those in the control groups. Aromatherapy may be a useful part of a holistic approach to reducing preoperative anxiety before ambulatory surgery. PMID:24454517

  20. A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of an Interpersonal Violence Prevention Program With a Mexican American Community

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Patricia J.; Lesser, Janna; Cheng, An-Lin; Osóos-Sánchez, Manuel; Martinez, Elisabeth; Pineda, Daniel; Mancha, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Using methods of community-based participatory research, a prospective randomized controlled trial of a violence prevention program based on Latino cultural values was implemented with elementary school children in a Mexican American community. Community members participated in intervention program selection, implementation, and data collection. High-risk students who participated in the program had greater nonviolent self-efficacy and demonstrated greater endorsement of program values than did high-risk students in the control group. This collaborative partnership was able to combine community-based participatory research with a rigorous study design and provide sustained benefit to community partners. PMID:20531101

  1. A Chinese Mind-Body Exercise Improves Self-Control of Children with Autism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes S.; Sze, Sophia L.; Siu, Nicolson Y.; Lau, Eliza M.; Cheung, Mei-chun

    2013-01-01

    Self-control problems commonly manifest as temper outbursts and repetitive/rigid/impulsive behaviors, in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which often contributes to learning difficulties and caregiver burden. The present study aims to compare the effect of a traditional Chinese Chan-based mind-body exercise, Nei Yang Gong, with that of the conventional Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) technique in enhancing the self-control of children with ASD. Forty-six age- and IQ-matched ASD children were randomly assigned to receive group training in Nei Yang Gong (experimental group) or PMR (control group) twice per week for four weeks. The participants’ self-control was measured by three neuropsychological tests and parental rating on standardized questionnaires, and the underlying neural mechanism was assessed by the participants’ brain EEG activity during an inhibitory-control task before and after intervention. The results show that the experimental group demonstrated significantly greater improvement in self-control than the control group, which concurs with the parental reports of reduced autistic symptoms and increased control of temper and behaviors. In addition, the experimental group showed enhanced EEG activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region that mediates self-control, whereas the PMR group did not. The present findings support the potential application of Chinese Chan-based mind-body exercises as a form of neuropsychological rehabilitation for patients with self-control problems. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry; Registration No.: ChiCTR-TRC-12002561; URL: www.chictr.org. PMID:23874533

  2. Effect of pharmacist-led patient education on glycemic control of type 2 diabetics: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Farsaei, Shadi; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Zargarzadeh, Amir Hooshang; Amini, Massoud

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a clinical pharmacist-led patient education program for type 2 diabetic patients at Isfahan Endocrine & Metabolism Research Center (IEMRC) from April 2008 to January 2009. METHODS: In a randomized controlled clinical trial, a total of 172 patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes were selected and randomly allocated into control and intervention groups. After taking informed written consent, the intervention group received an educational program about oral anti-hyperglycemic medications, adherence, diabetes dairy log and pill box usage. Patient's glycemic control in the intervention group was followed for three months through either telephone or face to face interviews with the pharmacist. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c were measured at the start and end of the pharmacistled drug education program for both intervention and control groups. RESULTS: After a three months follow-up, mean fasting blood glucose and HbA1c of the patients in the intervention group decreased significantly compared to control group (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates an improvement in diabetes management of type 2 diabetics by involving a pharmacist in the multidisciplinary teams in the outpatient clinics. The results suggest the benefits of adding adherence education to the diabetic education programs. PMID:21448382

  3. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Removal of [123I]Ioflupane From Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes [123I]ioflupane from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after an opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, [123I]ioflupane was, by definition, a schedule II controlled substance because it is derived from cocaine via ecgonine, both of which are schedule II controlled substances. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle [123I]ioflupane. PMID:26364325

  4. Evaluating the optimal timing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections are the most common hospital-acquired infections among surgical patients. The administration of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis reduces the risk of surgical site infections . The optimal timing of this procedure is still a matter of debate. While most studies suggest that it should be given as close to the incision time as possible, others conclude that this may be too late for optimal prevention of surgical site infections. A large observational study suggests that surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered 74 to 30 minutes before surgery. The aim of this article is to report the design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial investigating the optimal timing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. Methods/Design In this bi-center randomized controlled trial conducted at two tertiary referral centers in Switzerland, we plan to include 5,000 patients undergoing general, oncologic, vascular and orthopedic trauma procedures. Patients are randomized in a 1:1 ratio into two groups: one receiving surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the anesthesia room (75 to 30 minutes before incision) and the other receiving surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the operating room (less than 30 minutes before incision). We expect a significantly lower rate of surgical site infections with surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis administered more than 30 minutes before the scheduled incision. The primary outcome is the occurrence of surgical site infections during a 30-day follow-up period (one year with an implant in place). When assuming a 5% surgical site infection risk with administration of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the operating room, the planned sample size has an 80% power to detect a relative risk reduction for surgical site infections of 33% when administering surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the anesthesia room (with a two-sided type I error of 5%). We expect the study to be completed within three

  5. Robotic-assisted versus laparoscopic colorectal surgery: a meta-analysis of four randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Robotic-assisted laparoscopy is popularly performed for colorectal disease. The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare the safety and efficacy of robotic-assisted colorectal surgery (RCS) and laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) for colorectal disease based on randomized controlled trial studies. Methods Literature searches of electronic databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library) were performed to identify randomized controlled trial studies that compared the clinical or oncologic outcomes of RCS and LCS. This meta-analysis was performed using the Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.2) that is provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. The data used were mean differences and odds ratios for continuous and dichotomous variables, respectively. Fixed-effects or random-effects models were adopted according to heterogeneity. Results Four randomized controlled trial studies were identified for this meta-analysis. In total, 110 patients underwent RCS, and 116 patients underwent LCS. The results revealed that estimated blood losses (EBLs), conversion rates and times to the recovery of bowel function were significantly reduced following RCS compared with LCS. There were no significant differences in complication rates, lengths of hospital stays, proximal margins, distal margins or harvested lymph nodes between the two techniques. Conclusions RCS is a promising technique and is a safe and effective alternative to LCS for colorectal surgery. The advantages of RCS include reduced EBLs, lower conversion rates and shorter times to the recovery of bowel function. Further studies are required to define the financial effects of RCS and the effects of RCS on long-term oncologic outcomes. PMID:24767102

  6. Psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavior therapy of chronic depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite limited effectiveness of short-term psychotherapy for chronic depression, there is a lack of trials of long-term psychotherapy. Our study is the first to determine the effectiveness of controlled long-term psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral (CBT) treatments and to assess the effects of preferential vs. randomized assessment. Methods/design Patients are assigned to treatment according to their preference or randomized (if they have no clear preference). Up to 80 sessions of psychodynamic or psychoanalytically oriented treatments (PAT) or up to 60 sessions of CBT are offered during the first year in the study. After the first year, PAT can be continued according to the ‘naturalistic’ usual method of treating such patients within the system of German health care (normally from 240 up to 300 sessions over two to three years). CBT therapists may extend their treatment up to 80 sessions, but focus mainly maintenance and relapse prevention. We plan to recruit a total of 240 patients (60 per arm). A total of 11 assessments are conducted throughout treatment and up to three years after initiation of treatment. The primary outcome measures are the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms (QIDS, independent clinician rating) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) after the first year. Discussion We combine a naturalistic approach with randomized controlled trials(RCTs)to investigate how effectively chronic depression can be treated on an outpatient basis by the two forms of treatment reimbursed in the German healthcare system and we will determine the effects of treatment preference vs. randomization. Trial registration http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN91956346 PMID:22834725

  7. A randomized phase II presurgical trial of transdermal 4-Hydroxytamoxifen gel versus oral tamoxifen in women with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Oukseub; Page, Katherine; Ivancic, David; Helenowski, Irene; Parimi, Vamsi; Sullivan, Megan; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Chatterton, Robert T.; Jovanovic, Borko; Dunn, Barbara K.; Heckman-Stoddard, Brandy M.; Foster, Kathleen; Muzzio, Miguel; Shklovskaya, Julia; Skripkauskas, Silvia; Kulesza, Piotr; Green, David; Hansen, Nora M.; Bethke, Kevin P.; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.; Bergan, Raymond; Khan, Seema A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Local transdermal therapy to the breast may achieve effective target-organ drug delivery, while diminishing systemic effects. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial comparing transdermal 4-hydroxytamoxifen gel (4-OHT) to oral tamoxifen (oral-T) in women with ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS). Methods 27pre and postmenopausal women were randomized to 4-OHT (4mg/day) or oral-T (20mg/day) for 6-10 weeks before surgery. Plasma, nipple aspirate fluid, and breast adipose tissue concentrations of tamoxifen and its major metabolites were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The primary endpoint was Ki67 labeling in DCIS lesions, measured by immunohistochemistry. In plasma, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and coagulation protein concentrations were determined. Results Post-therapy Ki-67 decreased by 3.4% in the 4-OHT and 5.1% in the oral-T group (p < 0.03 in both, between-group p=0. 99). Mean plasma 4-OHT was 0.2 and 1.1 ng/mL in 4-OHT and oral groups, respectively (p=0.0003), while mean breast adipose tissue concentrations of 4-OHT were 5.8 ng/g in the 4-OHT group and 5.4 ng/g in the oral group (p=0.88). There were significant increases in plasma SHBG, Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor and a significant decrease in plasma IGF-1 with oral-T, but not with 4-OHT. The incidence of hot flashes was similar in both groups. Conclusions The anti-proliferative effect of 4-OHT gel applied to breast skin was similar to that of oral-T, but effects on endocrine and coagulation parameters were reduced. These findings support the further evaluation of local transdermal therapy for DCIS and breast cancer prevention. PMID:25028506

  8. [Caries prevention strategies for 6-year-olds. A randomized controlled study].

    PubMed

    Vermaire, J H; van Loveren, C

    2015-04-01

    A randomized controlled study of caries prevention strategies was conducted on patients with a mixed socioeconomic status in a large general dental practice in the Netherlands. A group of children following a non-operative caries treatment programme (NOCTP) was compared to a control group and a group that also received 2 topical fluoride applications (IPFA) as a supplement to the control programme (receiving a dental check-up twice a year with topical fluoride applications and routinely sealing of the first permanent molars). A total of 230 6-year-old children were randomly assigned to one of these groups. After 3 years, 179 children were studied again (54 NOCTP, 62 IPFA and 63 controls). Caries-increment was lowest in the NOCTP group (0.15 DMFS). In the IPFA group and the control group DMFS-increments were 0.34 and 0.47 respectively. Although the results of this study are very promising, a follow-up study on a larger scale is required to make clear whether the application of NOCTP is more effective than standard prevention in general practice. PMID:26210120

  9. Supported Employment for the Reintegration of Disability Pensioners with Mental Illnesses: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Viering, Sandra; Jäger, Matthias; Bärtsch, Bettina; Nordt, Carlos; Rössler, Wulf; Warnke, Ingeborg; Kawohl, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Work is beneficial for the recovery from mental illness. Although the approach of individual placement and support (IPS) has been shown to be effective in Europe, it has not yet been widely implemented in European health care systems. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the effectiveness of IPS for disability pensioners with mental illnesses new on disability benefits in Switzerland. In the study at hand, 250 participants were randomly assigned to either the control or the intervention group. The participants in the intervention group received job coaching according to IPS during 2 years. The control group received no structured support. Both groups were interviewed at baseline and followed up every 6 months (baseline, 6, 12, 16, 18, 24 months) for 2 years. Primary outcome was to obtain a job in the competitive employment. IPS was more effective for the reintegration into the competitive employment market for disability pensioners than the control condition. Thirty-two percent of the participants of the intervention group and 12% of the control group obtained new jobs in the competitive employment. IPS is also effective for the reintegration into competitive employment of people with mental illness receiving disability pensions. PMID:26539425

  10. Trends in the methodological quality of published randomized controlled trials on antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Falagas, Matthew E; Pitsouni, Eleni I; Bliziotis, Ioannis A

    2008-01-01

    AIM To investigate the trends of the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antimicrobial agents published during the last 30 years. METHODS We randomly selected from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database 70 RCTs of antibacterial agents that were published during a 30-year study period (1975–2005); specifically, we randomly selected 10 RCTs published during each of the following years: 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000 and 2005. In each of the selected RCTs, we searched for information on various methodological aspects and graded the methodological quality of the RCTs to evaluate trends for possible improvement. RESULTS No improvement was noted in most of the analysed methodological aspects of the RCTs during the 30-year study period. Description of randomization, double blinding, description of the blinding, and allocation concealment were rather scarce among the evaluated RCTs, without observing a trend for improvement during the study period. We noted improvement in reporting power of the study calculations, baseline data as well as in reporting the presence or not of statistical significance and the statistical cut-off of significance. In only 1/70 RCTs were all 13 of the examined methodological quality aspects met and in one more RCT 12 of them were met. CONCLUSIONS We did not observe considerable improvement in the quality of the reporting and methodology of RCTs on antibacterial agents during the last 30 years. The methodological quality aspects that need most improvement are those that help safeguard against various types of biases. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are believed to be one of the best methods of clinical research because they can minimize systematic errors of various types. Temporal trends in the various aspects of RCTs have been studied in several medical fields (e.g. nephrology, hepatology, oncology). However, there is lack of data regarding the

  11. Randomized Phase II Study of 5-Fluorouracil Hepatic Arterial Infusion with or without Antineoplastons as an Adjuvant Therapy after Hepatectomy for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Yutaka; Matono, Keiko; Tsuda, Hideaki; Ushijima, Masataka; Uchida, Shinji; Akagi, Yoshito; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Antineoplastons are naturally occurring peptides and amino acid derivatives found in human blood and urine. Antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 reportedly control neoplastic growth and do not significantly inhibit normal cell growth. Antineoplastons contain 3-phenylacetylamino-2, 6-piperidinedione (A10), phenylacetylglutamine plus phenylacetylisoglutamine (A10-I), and phenylacetylglutamine plus phenylacetate (AS2-1). This open label, non- blinded randomized phase II study compared the efficacy of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) with 5-fluorouracil,with or without antineoplastons as a postoperative therapy for colorectal metastasis to the liver. Methods Sixty-five patients with histologically confirmed metastatic colon adenocarcinoma in liver, who had undergone hepatectomy, and/or thermal ablation for liver metastases were enrolled between 1998- 2004 in Kurume University Hospital. Patients were randomly assigned to receive systemic antineoplastons (A10-I infusion followed by per-oral AS2-1) plus HAI (AN arm) or HAI alone (control arm) based on the number of metastases and presence/ absence of extra-hepatic metastasis at the time of surgery. Primary endpoint was cancer-specific survival (CSS); secondary endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS), status and extent of recurrence, salvage surgery (rate) and toxicity. Findings Overall survival was not statistically improved (p=0.105) in the AN arm (n=32). RFS was not significant (p=0.343). Nevertheless, the CSS rate was significantly higher in the AN arm versus the control arm (n=33) with a median survival time 67 months (95%CI 43-not calculated) versus 39 months (95%CI 28-47) (p=0.037) and 5 year CSS rate 60% versus 32% respectively. Cancer recurred more often in a single organ than in multiple organs in the AN arm versus the control arm. The limited extent of recurrent tumours in the AN arm meant more patients remained eligible for salvage surgery. Major adverse effects of antineoplastons were fullness of the

  12. A randomized, controlled trial of spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis in chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain [ISRCTN 16558617

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Boswell, Mark V; Rivera, Jose J; Pampati, Vidya Sagar; Damron, Kim S; McManus, Carla D; Brandon, Doris E; Wilson, Sue R

    2005-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis may contribute to between 5% to 60% of the poor surgical outcomes following decompressive surgery. Correlations have been reported between epidural scarring and radicular pain, poor surgical outcomes, and a lack of any form of surgical treatment. The use of spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis in recent years in the management of chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain has been described. Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial was conducted to determine the outcome of spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis to reduce pain and improve function and psychological status in patients with chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain. A total of 83 patients were evaluated, with 33 patients in Group I and 50 patients in Group II. Group I served as the control, with endoscopy into the sacral level without adhesiolysis, followed by injection of local anesthetic and steroid. Group II received spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis, followed by injection of local anesthetic and steroid. Results Among the 50 patients in the treatment group receiving spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis, significant improvement without adverse effects was shown in 80% at 3 months, 56% at 6 months, and 48% at 12 months. The control group showed improvement in 33% of the patients at one month and none thereafter. Based on the definition that less than 6 months of relief is considered short-term and longer than 6 months of relief is considered long-term, a significant number of patients obtained long-term relief with improvement in pain, functional status, and psychological status. Conclusion Spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis with targeted delivery of local anesthetic and steroid is an effective treatment in a significant number of patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain without major adverse effects. PMID:16000173

  13. Massage Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Cancer: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Maria; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Davis, Roger B.; Walton, Tracy; Kahn, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objectives were to determine the feasibility and effects of providing therapeutic massage at home for patients with metastatic cancer. Design This was a randomized controlled trial. Settings/location Patients were enrolled at Oncology Clinics at a large urban academic medical center; massage therapy was provided in patients' homes. Subjects Subjects were patients with metastatic cancer. Interventions There were three interventions: massage therapy, no-touch intervention, and usual care. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were pain, anxiety, and alertness; secondary outcomes were quality of life and sleep. Results In this study, it was possible to provide interventions for all patients at home by professional massage therapists. The mean number of massage therapy sessions per patient was 2.8. A significant improvement was found in the quality of life of the patients who received massage therapy after 1-week follow-up, which was not observed in either the No Touch control or the Usual Care control groups, but the difference was not sustained at 1 month. There were trends toward improvement in pain and sleep of the patients after therapeutic massage but not in patients in the control groups. There were no serious adverse events related to the interventions. Conclusions The study results showed that it is feasible to provide therapeutic massage at home for patients with advanced cancer, and to randomize patients to a no-touch intervention. Providing therapeutic massage improves the quality of life at the end of life for patients and may be associated with further beneficial effects, such as improvement in pain and sleep quality. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to substantiate these findings. PMID:23368724

  14. Attachment as Moderator of Treatment Outcome in Major Depression: A Randomized Control Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Carolina; Atkinson, Leslie; Quilty, Lena C.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety and avoidance dimensions of adult attachment insecurity were tested as moderators of treatment outcome for interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Fifty-six participants with major depression were randomly assigned to these treatment conditions. Beck Depression Inventory-II, Six-Item Hamilton Rating Scale…

  15. Differential Effect of Taekwondo Training on Knee Muscle Strength and Reactive and Static Balance Control in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Chung, Joanne W. Y.; Chow, Lina P. Y.; Ma, Ada W. W.; Tsang, William W. N.

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the effect of short-term intensive TKD training on the isokinetic knee muscle strength and reactive and static balance control of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Among the 44 children with DCD (mean age: 7.6 plus or minus 1.3 years) recruited, 21 were randomly assigned…

  16. Treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria with levamisole: a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Shan, C; Hua, Z; Zhao, P; Zhang, H

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of treating chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) with levamisole in combination with levocetirizine. This was a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial that included 132 patients with active CIU who were treated for 6 weeks with either levocetirizine alone (control group; n = 65) or levamisole plus levocetirizine (treatment group; n = 67). Response to therapy was evaluated by measuring the efficacy rate. After 2 weeks of treatment, there was no significant difference in the efficacy rate between the treatment and control groups (54.84% and 42.37%, respectively). After 6 weeks of treatment, a statistically significant difference in the efficacy rate was observed between the groups (76.27% and 54.39% for the treatment and control groups, respectively). This study demonstrated that a combination of levamisole plus levocetirizine is more effective than levocetirizine alone and potentially provides a new, promising approach to the treatment of CIU. PMID:19761700

  17. Randomized-Control Screening Trials to Lower Gall Bladder Cancer Mortality in High Risk Populations.

    PubMed

    Krishnatreya, Manigreeva; Kataki, Amal Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Gall bladder cancer is generally fatal. The high morbidity and mortality due to gall bladder cancer exerts a significant impact on efforts towards cancer control in high risk populations of the World and a rationale program for control of gall bladder cancer mortality has remained as an unmet need in these populations. Currently there are no effective strategies for controlling gall bladder cancer mortality. This mini review is to highlight the need and feasibility for secondary prevention of gall bladder cancer by screening in high risk populations. A way forward is to assess the role of secondary prevention of gall bladder cancers by conducting randomized- controlled screening trials in high risk populations. PMID:27221939

  18. Bedside charting of pain levels in hospitalized patients with cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, R L; Delafield, J P; Hays, R D; Drazin, R; Conolly, M

    1996-02-01

    Despite advances in the technology of cancer pain assessment and control, cancer pain often remains undertreated even in hospital settings. To determine whether a graphical display of cancer patients' pain levels might improve their treatment, the investigators conducted a randomized controlled trial. Patients assigned to the intervention group (N = 40) had periodic pain assessments by study staff, who graphically recorded their reported pain-intensity levels on bedside wall charts. Control group patients (N = 38) had periodic pain assessments by study staff but did not have this information displayed. The results failed to show a significant beneficial effect of the intervention on pain control, sleep, cancer-related symptoms, or analgesic dosing, but confidence intervals were broad. More research is needed to improve the quality of care for inpatients with cancer-related pain. PMID:8907138

  19. Mindfulness-based therapy in adults with an autism spectrum disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Spek, Annelies A; van Ham, Nadia C; Nyklíček, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that depression and anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric concern in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) has been found effective in reducing anxiety and depression symptoms, however research in autism is limited. Therefore, we examined the effects of a modified MBT protocol (MBT-AS) in high-functioning adults with ASD. 42 participants were randomized into a 9-week MBT-AS training or a wait-list control group. Results showed a significant reduction in depression, anxiety and rumination in the intervention group, as opposed to the control group. Furthermore, positive affect increased in the intervention group, but not in the control group. Concluding, the present study is the first controlled trial to demonstrate that adults with ASD can benefit from MBT-AS. PMID:22964266

  20. Antihypertensive treatments in adult autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: network meta-analysis of the randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bing; Yu, Shengqiang; Xu, Chenggang; Mao, Zhiguo; Ye, Chaoyang; Chen, Dongping; Zhao, Xuezhi; Wu, Jun; Chen, Wansheng; Mei, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) control is one of the most important treatments of Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The comparative efficacy of antihypertensive treatments in ADPKD patients is inconclusive. Methods Network meta-analysis was used to evaluate randomized controlled trials (RCT) which investigated antihypertensive treatments in ADPKD. PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane Collaboration were searched. The primary outcome was estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Secondary outcomes were serum creatinine (Scr), urinary albumin excretion (UAE), systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean artery pressure (MAP) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Results We included 10 RCTs with 1386 patients and six interventions: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI), Angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), combination of ACEI and ARB, calcium channel blockers (CCB), β-blockers and dilazep. There was no difference of eGFR in all the treatments in both network and direct comparisons. No significant differences of Scr, SBP, DBP, MAP, and LVMI were found in network comparisons. However, ACEI significantly reduced SBP, DBP, MAP and LVMI when compared to CCB. Significantly increased UAE was observed in CCB compared with ACEI or ARB. Bayesian probability analysis found ARB ranked first in the surrogate measures of eGFR, UAE and SBP. Conclusions There is little evidence to detect differences of antihypertensive treatments on kidney disease progression in ADPKD patients. More RCTs will be needed in the future. Use of ARB may be an optimal choice in clinical practice. PMID:26636542

  1. Effects of exercise intervention in breast cancer survivors: a meta-analysis of 33 randomized controlled trails

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guoqing; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Yulan; Xiong, Huizi; Zhao, Yinghui; Sun, Fenyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise is associated with favorable outcomes in cancer survivors. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to comprehensively summarize the effects of exercise intervention in breast cancer survivors. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, Elsevier, and Google scholar was conducted up to March 2015. References from relevant meta-analyses and reviews were also checked. Results Thirty-three randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis, including 2,659 breast cancer survivors. Compared with the control group, quality of life was significantly improved in exercise intervention group, especially in mental health and general health subscales of short form 36 questionnaire, as well as emotion well-being and social well-being subscales of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy. Besides, exercise alleviated the symptoms of depression and anxiety in the exercise group. Furthermore, exercise was also associated with positive outcomes in body mass index, lean mass, and muscle strength. In addition, the serum concentration of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-II, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 was significantly reduced in exercise intervention group. However, based on the current data of this meta-analysis, there were no significant differences in sleep dysfunction or fatigue between groups. Conclusion Our study suggested that exercise intervention was beneficial to breast cancer survivors. Therefore, exercise should be recommended to this patient group. PMID:27110131

  2. The effect of Neuragen PN® on Neuropathic pain: A randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the naturally derived topical oil, "Neuragen PN®" for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Methods Sixty participants with plantar cutaneous (foot sole) pain due to all cause peripheral neuropathy were recruited from the community. Each subject was randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments (Neuragen PN® or placebo) per week in a crossover design. The primary outcome measure was acute spontaneous pain level as reported on a visual analog scale. Results There was an overall pain reduction for both treatments from pre to post application. As compared to the placebo, Neuragen PN® led to significantly (p < .05) greater pain reduction. Fifty six of sixty subjects (93.3%) receiving Neuragen PN® reported pain reduction within 30 minutes. This reduction within 30 minutes occurred in only twenty one of sixty (35.0%) subjects receiving the placebo. In a break out analysis of the diabetic only subgroup, 94% of subjects in the Neuragen PN® group achieved pain reduction within 30 minutes vs 11.0% of the placebo group. No adverse events were observed. Conclusions This randomized, placebo controlled, clinical trial with crossover design revealed that the naturally derived oil, Neuragen PN®, provided significant relief from neuropathic pain in an all cause neuropathy group. Participants with diabetes within this group experienced similar pain relief. Trial registration ISRCTN registered: ISRCTN13226601 PMID:20487567

  3. Herbal Medicines for Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hun; Cho, Ki-Ho; Jung, Woo-Sang; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective We conducted systematic review to evaluate current evidence of herbal medicines (HMs) for Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods Along with hand searches, relevant literatures were located from the electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsycInfo, CNKI, 7 Korean Medical Databases and J-East until August, 2010 without language and publication status. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomized controlled trials and randomized crossover trials, which evaluate HMs for idiopathic PD were selected for this review. Two independent authors extracted data from the relevant literatures and any disagreement was solved by discussion. Results From the 3432 of relevant literatures, 64 were included. We failed to suggest overall estimates of treatment effects on PD because of the wide heterogeneity of used herbal recipes and study designs in the included studies. When compared with placebo, specific effects were not observed in favor of HMs definitely. Direct comparison with conventional drugs suggested that there was no evidence of better effect for HMs. Many studies compared combination therapy with single active drugs and combination therapy showed significant improvement in PD related outcomes and decrease in the dose of anti-Parkinson's drugs with low adverse events rate. Conclusion Currently, there is no conclusive evidence about the effectiveness and efficacy of HMs on PD. For establishing clinical evidence of HMs on PD, rigorous RCTs with sufficient statistical power should be promoted in future. PMID:22615738

  4. Perioperative Continuous Ropivacaine Wound Infusion in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized Controlled Double-blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Fassoulaki, Argyro; Vassi, Emilia; Korkolis, Dimitrios; Zotou, Marianna

    2016-02-01

    Wound infusion with local anesthetics has been used for postoperative pain relief with variable results. This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial examines the effect of ropivacaine infusion on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A total of 110 patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups. After induction of anesthesia a 75-mm catheter was inserted subcutaneously and connected to an elastomeric pump containing either 0.75% ropivacaine (ropivacaine group) or normal saline (control group) for 24 hours postoperatively. Before skin closure, each hole was infiltrated with 2 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine or normal saline according to randomization. Pain at rest, pain during cough, and analgesic consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit and at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Analgesic requirements and pain scores were recorded 1 and 3 months after surgery. The ropivacaine group reported less pain during cough (P=0.044) in the postanesthesia care unit (P=0.017) and 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.038). Ropivacaine wound infusion had no effect on late and chronic pain. PMID:26679680

  5. The Safety of Yoga: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Holger; Ward, Lesley; Saper, Robert; Fishbein, Daniel; Dobos, Gustav; Lauche, Romy

    2015-08-15

    As yoga has gained popularity as a therapeutic intervention, its safety has been questioned in the lay press. Thus, this review aimed to systematically assess and meta-analyze the frequency of adverse events in randomized controlled trials of yoga. MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and IndMED were screened through February 2014. Of 301 identified randomized controlled trials of yoga, 94 (1975-2014; total of 8,430 participants) reported on adverse events. Life-threatening, disabling adverse events or those requiring intensive treatment were defined as serious and all other events as nonserious. No differences in the frequency of intervention-related, nonserious, or serious adverse events and of dropouts due to adverse events were found when comparing yoga with usual care or exercise. Compared with psychological or educational interventions (e.g., health education), more intervention-related adverse events (odds ratio = 4.21, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 17.67; P = 0.05) and more nonserious adverse events (odds ratio = 7.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.91, 27.92; P < 0.01) occurred in the yoga group; serious adverse events and dropouts due to adverse events were comparable between groups. Findings from this review indicate that yoga appears as safe as usual care and exercise. The adequate reporting of safety data in future randomized trials of yoga is crucial to conclusively judge its safety. PMID:26116216

  6. The differential influences of positive affect, random reward, and performance-contingent reward on cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Fröber, Kerstin; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2014-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that positive affect and reward have differential effects on cognitive control. So far, however, these effects have never been studied together. Here, the authors present one behavioral study investigating the influences of positive affect and reward (contingent and noncontingent) on proactive control. A modified version of the AX-continuous performance task, which has repeatedly been shown to be sensitive to reward and affect manipulations, was used. In a first phase, two experimental groups received either neutral or positive affective pictures before every trial. In a second phase, the two halves of a given affect group additionally received, respectively, performance-contingent or random rewards. The results replicated the typical affect effect, in terms of reduced proactive control under positive as compared to neutral affect. Also, the typical reward effects associated with increased proactive control were replicated. Most interestingly, performance-contingent reward counteracted the positive affect effect, whereas random reward mirrored that effect. In sum, this study provides first evidence that performance-contingent reward, on the one hand, and positive affect and performance-noncontingent reward, on the other hand, have oppositional effects on cognitive control: Only performance-contingent reward showed a motivational effect in terms of a strategy shift toward increased proactive control, whereas positive affect alone and performance-noncontingent reward reduced proactive control. Moreover, the integrative design of this study revealed the vulnerability of positive affect effects to motivational manipulations. The results are discussed with respect to current neuroscientific theories of the effects of dopamine on affect, reward, and cognitive control. PMID:24659000

  7. The effects of motivation feedback in patients with severe mental illness: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Eline C; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van Dam, Arno; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of providing clinicians with regular feedback on the patient’s motivation for treatment in increasing treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness. Methods Design: cluster randomized controlled trial (Dutch Trials Registry NTR2968). Participants: adult outpatients with a primary diagnosis of a psychotic disorder or a personality disorder and their clinicians, treated in 12 community mental health teams (the clusters) of two mental health institutions in the Netherlands. Interventions: monthly motivation feedback (MF) generated by clinicians additional to treatment as usual (TAU) and TAU by the community mental health teams. Primary outcome: treatment engagement at patient level, assessed at 12 months by clinicians. Randomization: teams were allocated to MF or TAU by a computerized randomization program that randomized each team to a single treatment by blocks of varying size. All participants within these teams received similar treatment. Clinicians and patients were not blind to treatment allocation at the 12-month assessment. Results The 294 randomized patients (148 MF, 146 TAU) and 57 clinicians (29 MF, 28 TAU) of 12 teams (6 MF, 6 TAU) were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups on treatment engagement were found (adjusted mean difference =0.1, 95% confidence interval =−2.2 to 2.3, P=0.96, d=0). Preplanned ancillary analyses showed statistically significant interaction effects between treatment group and primary diagnosis on treatment motivation and quality of life (secondary outcomes), which were beneficial for patients with a primary diagnosis of a personality disorder but not for those with a psychotic disorder. There were no reports of adverse events. Conclusion The current findings imply that monitoring and discussing the patient’s motivation is insufficient to improve motivation and treatment engagement, and

  8. Effectiveness of a smartphone application for improving healthy lifestyles, a randomized clinical trial (EVIDENT II): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New technologies could facilitate changes in lifestyle and improve public health. However, no large randomized, controlled studies providing scientific evidence of the benefits of their use have been made. The aims of this study are to develop and validate a smartphone application, and to evaluate the effect of adding this tool to a standardized intervention designed to improve adherence to the Mediterranean diet and to physical activity. An evaluation is also made of the effect of modifying habits upon vascular structure and function, and therefore on arterial aging. Methods/Design A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, parallel group clinical trial will be carried out. A total of 1215 subjects under 70 years of age from the EVIDENT trial will be included. Counseling common to both groups (control and intervention) will be provided on adaptation to the Mediterranean diet and on physical activity. The intervention group moreover will receive training on the use of a smartphone application designed to promote a healthy diet and increased physical activity, and will use the application for three months. The main study endpoints will be the changes in physical activity, assessed by accelerometer and the 7-day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) interview, and adaptation to the Mediterranean diet, as evaluated by an adherence questionnaire and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Evaluation also will be made of vascular structure and function based on central arterial pressure, the radial augmentation index, pulse velocity, the cardio-ankle vascular index, and carotid intima-media thickness. Discussion Confirmation that the new technologies are useful for promoting healthier lifestyles and that their effects are beneficial in terms of arterial aging will have important clinical implications, and may contribute to generalize their application in favor of improved population health. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02016014 PMID:24628961

  9. A Phase II, Randomized, Safety and Immunogenicity Trial of a Re-Derived, Live-Attenuated Dengue Virus Vaccine in Healthy Children and Adults Living in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Kristen; Esquilin, Ines O.; Cornier, Alberto Santiago; Thomas, Stephen J.; Quintero del Rio, Ana I.; Bertran-Pasarell, Jorge; Morales Ramirez, Javier O.; Diaz, Clemente; Carlo, Simon; Eckels, Kenneth H.; Tournay, Elodie; Toussaint, Jean-Francois; De La Barrera, Rafael; Fernandez, Stefan; Lyons, Arthur; Sun, Wellington; Innis, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled, phase II clinical trial, two dose study of re-derived, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus (TDEN) vaccine (two formulations) or placebo in subjects 1–50 years of age. Among the 636 subjects enrolled, 331 (52%) were primed, that is, baseline seropositive to at least one dengue virus (DENV) type. Baseline seropositivity prevalence increased with age (10% [< 2 years], 26% [2–4 years], 60% [5–20 years], and 93% [21–50 years]). Safety profiles of TDEN vaccines were similar to placebo regardless of priming status. No vaccine-related serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported. Among unprimed subjects, immunogenicity (geometric mean antibody titers [GMT] and seropositivity rates) for each DENV increased substantially in both TDEN vaccine groups with at least 74.6% seropositive for four DENV types. The TDEN vaccine candidate showed an acceptable safety and immunogenicity profile in children and adults ranging from 1 to 50 years of age, regardless of priming status. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00468858. PMID:26175027

  10. Design and conduct of a large obstetric or neonatal randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tarnow-Mordi, William; Cruz, Melinda; Morris, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    As event rates fall, if mortality and disability are to improve further there is increasing need for large, well-designed trials. These should enroll more patients, more rapidly and at lower cost, with better representation of infants at highest risk and greater integration with routine care. This may require simpler datasets, linkage with routinely collected data, and international collaboration. It may be helpful to draw attention to recent evidence that participation in Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is at least as safe as receiving established care. Nationally coordinated clinical research networks employing local research staff may be the single most effective strategy to integrate clinical trials into routine practice. Other goals are: international standardization of outcomes; consensus on composite endpoints, biomarkers, surrogates and measures of disability; greater efficiency through randomized factorial designs and cluster or cross-over cluster RCTs; and equipping parents as partners in all aspects of the conduct of RCTs and in implementing their results. PMID:26522427

  11. Effect of visual biofeedback to acquire supraglottic swallow in healthy individuals: a randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Imada, Miho; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Ishiguro, Yuriko; Kato, Miho; Inamoto, Yoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Shibata, Seiko; Saitoh, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback therapy in acquiring supraglottic swallow (SGS) in a randomized-controlled trial with healthy individuals. Eighteen individuals (mean age, 26 years) who could not close or keep closed the vocal folds before and during the swallow in SGS were allocated randomly to either a visual biofeedback group (eight individuals) or a nonbiofeedback group (10 individuals). A videoendoscope was inserted intranasally and an SGS exercise, using 4 ml of green-colored water, was performed 30 times per day up to 5 days. When the participant failed to perform SGS, the result was provided only to the participants in the visual biofeedback group. The median length of time until acquiring SGS was 1.5 days in the visual biofeedback group and 3.5 days in the nonbiofeedback group (P=0.040). We concluded that visual biofeedback effectively enabled participants to acquire SGS earlier. PMID:26795716

  12. Blinding Techniques in Randomized Controlled Trials of Laser Therapy: An Overview and Possible Solution

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Roberta; Pirotta, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy has evidence accumulating about its effectiveness in a variety of medical conditions. We reviewed 51 double blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of laser treatment. Analysis revealed 58% of trials showed benefit of laser over placebo. However, less than 5% of the trials had addressed beam disguise or allocation concealment in the laser machines used. Many of the trials used blinding methods that rely on staff cooperation and are therefore open to interference or bias. This indicates significant deficiencies in laser trial methodology. We report the development and preliminary testing of a novel laser machine that can blind both patient and operator to treatment allocation without staff participation. The new laser machine combines sealed preset and non-bypassable randomization codes, decoy lights and sound, and a conical perspex tip to overcome laser diode glow detection. PMID:18955233

  13. The case for randomized controlled trials to assess the impact of clinical information systems

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    There is a persistent view of a significant minority in the medical informatics community that the randomized controlled trial (RCT) has a limited role to play in evaluating clinical information systems. A common reason voiced by skeptics is that these systems are fundamentally different from drug interventions, so the RCT is irrelevant. There is an urgent need to promote the use of RCTs, given the shift to evidence-based policy and the need to demonstrate cost-effectiveness of these systems. The authors suggest returning to first principles and argue that what is required is clarity about how to match methods to evaluation questions. The authors address common concerns about RCTs, and the extent to which they are fallacious, and also discuss the challenges of conducting RCTs in informatics and alternative study designs when randomized trials are infeasible. While neither a perfect nor universal evaluation method, RCTs form an important part of an evaluator's toolkit. PMID:21270132

  14. Aggressive parenteral nutrition in sick very low birth weight babies: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tagare, Amit; Walawalkar, Meenal; Vaidya, Umesh

    2013-10-01

    Survival of preterm neonates in developing world has improved. Developing countries lag behind in nutritional management in NICU especially parenteral nutrition (PN). This randomized controlled trial was done to evaluate the effect of aggressive parenteral nutrition on nitrogen retention of sick VLBW and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies. From September 2009 to February 2010, total 34 babies were randomized to receive aggressive parenteral nutrition (APN)(n=17) or standard parenteral nutrition (SPN) (n=17). The average daily total and PN calory intake of babies in APN group was significantly higher during first week. APN was well-tolerated; however, nitrogen retention was not significantly higher in APN group. Aggressive parenteral nutrition in sick VLBW babies is feasible in developing world, though it did not improve nitrogen retention in first week of life. PMID:23798635

  15. Quality and Reporting of Cluster Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Occupational Therapy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tokolahi, Ema; Hocking, Clare; Kersten, Paula; Vandal, Alain C.

    2015-01-01

    Growing use of cluster randomized control trials (RCTs) in health care research requires careful attention to study designs, with implications for the development of an evidence base for practice. The objective of this study is to investigate the characteristics, quality, and reporting of cluster RCTs evaluating occupational therapy interventions to inform future research design. An extensive search of cluster RCTs evaluating occupational therapy was conducted in several databases. Fourteen studies met our inclusion criteria; four were protocols. Eleven (79%) justified the use of a cluster RCT and accounted for clustering in the sample size and analysis. All full studies reported the number of clusters randomized, and five reported intercluster correlation coefficients (50%): Protocols had higher compliance. Risk of bias was most evident in unblinding of participants. Statistician involvement was associated with improved trial quality and reporting. Quality of cluster RCTs of occupational therapy interventions is comparable with those from other areas of health research and needs improvement. PMID:27504689

  16. Two Self-management Interventions to Improve Hypertension Control: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, Hayden B.; Olsen, Maren K.; Grubber, Janet M.; Neary, Alice M.; Orr, Melinda M.; Powers, Benjamin J.; Adams, Martha B.; Svetkey, Laura P.; Reed, Shelby D.; Li, Yanhong; Dolor, Rowena J.; Oddone, Eugene Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background Less than 40% of Americans with hypertension have adequate blood pressure (BP) control. Objectives To compare two self-management interventions for improving BP control among hypertensive patients. Design A 2 by 2 randomized trial stratified by enrollment site and patient literacy status with two-year follow-up (5/2004-1/2008). Setting Two university-affiliated primary care clinics. Patients 636 patients were randomized (31% recruitment rate) among the 2060 eligible hypertensive patients. Interventions Research assistants randomized eligible patients via a centralized blinded and stratified randomization algorithm to receive either: 1) usual care; 2) bi-monthly tailored nurse-administered telephone intervention targeting hypertension-related behaviors; 3) BP monitoring consisting of measuring BP three times per week, or; 4) a combination of the two interventions. Measurements The primary outcome was BP control evaluated at six-month intervals over 24 months. 475 (75%) completed the 24-month BP follow-up. Results Improvements in proportion of BP control for the intervention groups relative to the usual care group at 24 months were: behavioral group, 4.3% (95% CI: −4.5%, 12.9); home BP monitoring group, 7.6% (95% CI: −1.9%, 17.0%); and, combined interventions, 11.0% (95% CI: 1.9%, 19.8%). For systolic BP, relative to usual care, the 24 month difference was, +0.6 mmHg (95% CI: −2.2, 3.4) for the behavioral intervention group, −0.6 mmHg (95% CI: −3.6, 2.3) for the home monitoring group, and −3.9 mmHg (95% CI: −6.9, −0.9) for the combined interventions. Similar patterns were observed for diastolic BP at 24 months. Limitations Changes in medication use and diet were only monitored in intervention participants; 25% lacked 24 month outcome data; 73% had adequate BP control at baseline; the study setting was an academic health center, all factors that potentially limit generalizability. Conclusion Combined home BP monitoring and tailored

  17. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab for the treatment of malignant ascites due to epithelial cancer: Results of a prospective randomized phase II/III trial

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Markus M; Murawa, Pawel; Koralewski, Piotr; Kutarska, Elzbieta; Kolesnik, Olena O; Ivanchenko, Vladimir V; Dudnichenko, Alexander S; Aleknaviciene, Birute; Razbadauskas, Arturas; Gore, Martin; Ganea-Motan, Elena; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Wimberger, Pauline; Schmittel, Alexander; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Burges, Alexander; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Lindhofer, Horst; Lahr, Angelika; Parsons, Simon L

    2010-01-01

    Malignant ascites is a common manifestation of advanced cancers, and treatment options are limited. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab (anti-epithelial cell-adhesion molecule x anti-CD3) represents a targeted immunotherapy for the intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers. In this phase II/III trial (EudraCT 2004-000723-15; NCT00836654), cancer patients (n = 258) with recurrent symptomatic malignant ascites resistant to conventional chemotherapy were randomized to paracentesis plus catumaxomab (catumaxomab) or paracentesis alone (control) and stratified by cancer type (129 ovarian and 129 nonovarian). Catumaxomab was administered as an i.p. infusion on Days 0, 3, 7 and 10 at doses of 10, 20, 50 and 150 μg, respectively. The primary efficacy endpoint was puncture-free survival. Secondary efficacy parameters included time to next paracentesis, ascites signs and symptoms and overall survival (OS). Puncture-free survival was significantly longer in the catumaxomab group (median 46 days) than the control group (median 11 days) (hazard ratio = 0.254: p < 0.0001) as was median time to next paracentesis (77 versus 13 days; p < 0.0001). In addition, catumaxomab patients had fewer signs and symptoms of ascites than control patients. OS showed a positive trend for the catumaxomab group and, in a prospectively planned analysis, was significantly prolonged in patients with gastric cancer (n = 66; 71 versus 44 days; p = 0.0313). Although adverse events associated with catumaxomab were frequent, they were manageable, generally reversible and mainly related to its immunologic mode of action. Catumaxomab showed a clear clinical benefit in patients with malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers, especially gastric cancer, with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:20473913

  18. Back massage intervention for relieving lower back pain in puerperal women: A randomized control trial study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiu-Jung; Ko, Yi-Li

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of a back massage (BM) intervention in relieving lower back pain (LBP) in post-partum women.This is a randomized controlled trial study. Sixty normal spontaneous delivery women (response rate: 96.7%), who gave birth at our hospital, participated in this study from February to May of 2012. We randomly assigned 30 women to the experimental group and 30 women to the control group. During the 1 month post-partum period, the women in the experimental group received a BM for 5 consecutive days, whereas the women in the control group received routine care only. The LBP score was assessed according to a pain visual analog scale. After 5 days of intervention, the experimental group (n = 30) experienced significantly less LBP than did the control group (n = 30) (2.97 ± 1.71 vs. 4.43 ± 1.77, t = 3.26, P = 0.002). BM therapy can effectively reduce LBP during the first post-partum month. Additional studies are required to confirm the effects of BM therapy during extended post-partum periods. PMID:26125572

  19. Insulation workers in Belfast. 1. Comparison of a random sample with a control population1

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, William F. M.; Langlands, Jean H. M.

    1971-01-01

    Wallace, W. F. M., and Langlands, J. H. M. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 211-216. Insulation workers in Belfast. 1. Comparison of a random sample with a control population. A sample of 50 men was chosen at random from the population of asbestos insulators in Belfast and matched with a control series of men of similar occupational group with respect to age, height, and smoking habit. Significantly more of the insulators complained of cough and sputum and had basal rales on examination. Clubbing was assessed by means of measurements of the hyponychial angle of both index fingers. These angles were significantly greater in the group of insulators. Twenty-one insulators had ϰ-rays which showed pleural calcification with or without pulmonary fibrosis; one control ϰ-ray showed pulmonary fibrosis. The insulators had no evidence of airways obstruction but static lung volume was reduced and their arterial oxygen tension was lower than that of the controls and their alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient was greater. PMID:5557841

  20. Preventing College Women's Sexual Victimization Through Parent Based Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joseph H.; Livingston, Jennifer A.; Turrisi, Rob

    2010-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial, using parent-based intervention (PBI) was designed to reduce the incidence of alcohol-involved sexual victimization among first-year college students. The PBI, adapted from Turrisi et al. (2001), was designed to increase alcohol-specific and general communication between mother and daughter. Female graduating high school seniors and their mothers were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to one of four conditions: Alcohol PBI (n=305), Enhanced Alcohol + Sex PBI (n= 218), Control (n=288) or Unmeasured Control (n=167). Mothers in the intervention conditions were provided an informational handbook and encouraged to discuss its contents with their daughters prior to college matriculation. Consistent with hypotheses, PBI, either standard or enhanced, was associated with lower incidence of incapacitated rape in the first year of college relative to controls. Path analysis revealed support for a hypothesized indirect effects model, by which intervention increased mother-daughter communication, which predicted lower frequency of first semester heavy episodic drinking, resulting in lower rates of alcohol-involved sexual victimization in the first year of college. PMID:20169410