Science.gov

Sample records for ii star formation

  1. H II REGIONS: WITNESSES TO MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-10

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  2. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schombert, James; McGaugh, Stacy; Maciel, Tamela E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu

    2013-08-01

    The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.

  3. STAR FORMATION IN RELIC H II REGIONS OF THE FIRST STARS: BINARITY AND OUTFLOW DRIVING

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: machiam@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.j

    2009-11-01

    Star formation in relic H II regions of the first stars is investigated using magnetohydrodynamical simulations with a nested-grid method that covers approx10 orders of magnitude in spatial scale and approx20 orders of magnitude in density contrast. Due to larger fraction of H{sub 2} and HD molecules, its prestellar thermal evolution is considerably different from that in the first star formation. Reflecting the difference, two hydrostatic cores appear in a nested manner: a protostar is enclosed by a transient hydrostatic core, which appears during the prestellar collapse. If the initial natal core rotates fast at a rate with rotational to gravitational energy ratio beta{sub 0} approx> 0.01-0.1, the transient hydrostatic core fragments to approx10 M {sub sun} subcores at density approx10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}. With smaller rotation energy, fragmentation occurs at higher density while a single protostar forms without fragmentation if rotation is extremely slow with beta{sub 0} approx< 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -5}. If magnetic field is present, these threshold values of beta{sub 0} are boosted owing to angular momentum transport by the magnetic breaking. Magnetic field also drives the protostellar outflows. With strong magnetic field, two distinct outflows are observed: the slower one emanates from the transient hydrostatic core, while the faster one from the protostar. These flows may affect the final stellar mass by ejecting some of masses in the initial core, and also may play some role in driving and maintenance of interstellar turbulence in young galaxies.

  4. An investigation of the role of the H II region environment on star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Kevin Robert

    Data from the Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Two Micron All Sky Survey are used to investigate low-mass star formation in the vicinity of HII regions. The gas in H II regions is strongly affected by massive stars through their intense ultraviolet radiation and winds. The H II region environment is expected to affect the process of star formation, from triggering the collapse of cloud cores within the molecular cloud to truncating circumstellar disks in the interior of the H II region. Massive stars end their lives as supernovae, injecting freshly synthesized radionuclides and large amounts of radiant and kinetic energy into their surroundings. Most stars in the Galaxy form in such environments and recent measurements of meteorites demonstrate that the Solar System formed in this setting. The first part of this work describes a Very Large Array survey of water masers in portions of six H II regions. Previous observational studies demonstrate the link between star formation and water maser activity. This study uses high-resolution observations of water masers to pinpoint the sites of star formation in crowded or confused regions. The water maser survey identifies several sites of star formation that are very close to the ionization fronts being driven into the surrounding molecular cloud. The locations and numbers of these water masers indicate that the H II region environment may trigger the formation of protostars, but that the passage of the ionization front may play a role in prematurely terminating infall. Later evolutionary stages of star formation are characterized by infrared emission from circumstellar disks. Near-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey is used to show that stars with circumstellar disks in the star-forming region NGC 6357 cluster near ionization fronts, strongly suggesting exposure to the H II region environment rapidly (~10 4 years) evaporates circumstellar gas and dust. Hubble Space Telescope images in the

  5. TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS. II. COMPARING STAR FORMATION IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF NGC 2782

    SciTech Connect

    Knierman, Karen A.; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Christopher; Mullan, Brendan; Charlton, Jane; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Knezek, Patricia M. E-mail: paul.scowen@asu.edu E-mail: cgroppi@asu.edu E-mail: iraklis@aao.gov.au

    2013-09-10

    The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a minor merger with a mass ratio {approx}4: 1 occurring {approx}200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun. However, deep UBVR and H{alpha} narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail, though it lacks massive star clusters and cluster complexes. Using Herschel PACS spectroscopy, we discover 158 {mu}m [C II] emission at the location of the three most luminous H{alpha} sources in the eastern tail, but not at the location of the even brighter H{alpha} source in the western tail. The western tail is found to have a normal star formation efficiency (SFE), but the eastern tail has a low SFE. The lack of CO and [C II] emission suggests that the western tail H II region may have a low carbon abundance and be undergoing its first star formation. The western tail is more efficient at forming stars, but lacks massive clusters. We propose that the low SFE in the eastern tail may be due to its formation as a splash region where gas heating is important even though it has sufficient molecular and neutral gas to make massive star clusters. The western tail, which has lower gas surface density and does not form high-mass star clusters, is a tidally formed region where gravitational compression likely enhances star formation.

  6. Molecular Clouds and Star Formation in the Southern H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Reiko; Saito, Hiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Mine, Yoshihiro; Mizuno, Akira; Ogawa, Hideo; Fukui, Yasuo

    1999-12-01

    We have carried out extensive 13CO(J = 1-0) observations toward 23 southern H II regions associated with bright-rimmed clouds. In total, 95 molecular clouds have been identified to be associated with the H II regions. Among the 95, 57 clouds \\ are found to be associated with 204 IRAS point sources which are candidates for young stellar objects. There is a significant increase of star-formation efficiency on the side facing to the H II regions; the luminosity-to-mass ratio, defined as the ratio of the stellar luminosity to the molecular cloud mass, is higher by an order of magnitude on the near side of the H II \\ regions than that on the far side. This indicates that molecular gas facing to the H II regions is more actively forming massive s\\ tars whose luminosity is >~ 103 LO . In addition, the number density of the IRAS point sources increases by a factor of 2 on the near side of the H II regions compared with on the far side. These results strongly suggest that the active formation of massive stars on the near side of the H II regions is due to the effects of the H II regions, such as the compression of molecular material by the ionization/shock fronts. For the whole Galaxy, we estimate that the present star-formation rate under such effects is at least 0.2-0.4 MO yr-1, corresponding to a few 10% by mass.

  7. Multi-wavelength study of triggered star formation around 25 H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jun-Jie; Ning, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Chuan-Peng

    2014-01-01

    We investigate 25 H II regions that show bubble morphology in 13CO(1-0) and infrared data, to search for quantitative evidence of triggered star formation by processes described by the collect and collapse (CC) and radiatively driven implosion (RDI) models. These H II regions display the morphology of a complete or partial bubble at 8 μm, and are all associated with the molecular clouds that surround them. We found that the electron temperature ranges from 5627 K to 6839 K in these H II regions, and the average electron temperature is 6083 K. The age of these H II regions is from 3.0 × 105 yr to 1.7 × 106 yr, and the mean age is 7.7 × 105 yr. Based on the morphology of the associated molecular clouds, we divide these H II regions into three groups, which may support CC and RDI models. We select 23 young IRAS sources which have an infrared luminosity of > 103Lsolar in 19 H II regions. In addition, we identify some young stellar objects (including Class I sources), which are only concentrated in H II regions G29.007+0.076, G44.339-0.827 and G47.028+0.232. The poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions of the three H II regions all show a cometary globule. Comparing the age of each H II region with the characteristic timescales for star formation, we suggest that the three H II regions can trigger clustered star formation by an RDI process. In addition, we detect seven molecular outflows in the five H II regions for the first time. These outflow sources may be triggered by the corresponding H II regions.

  8. H II regions and star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kennicutt, R.C.,JR.; Hodge, P.W.

    1986-07-01

    Photoelectrically calibrated maps of the H-alpha emission in the Magellanic Clouds have been used to measure integrated fluxes for several hundred H II regions and to study the properties of the H II region populations in the galaxies. The H II regions span a range of 10,000 in luminosity, from objects on the scale of the Orion Nebula to the 30 Doradus complex. The H-alpha luminosity function is well represented over this entire range by a power law function, indicating that there is no characteristic luminosity scale for the H II regions. The distributions of nebular diameters, on the other hand, are fitted well by exponential functions, with a scale length of 80 pc. Approximate fluxes for several of the extended filamentary networks in the galaxies have also been measured. This extended component probability contributes 15-25 percent of the total H-alpha luminosity of the galaxies. 42 references.

  9. H II regions and star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.; Hodge, P. W.

    1986-07-01

    Photoelectrically calibrated maps of the H-alpha emission in the Magellanic Clouds have been used to measure integrated fluxes for several hundred H II regions and to study the properties of the H II region populations in the galaxies. The H II regions span a range of 10,000 in luminosity, from objects on the scale of the Orion Nebula to the 30 Doradus complex. The H-alpha luminosity function is well represented over this entire range by a power law function, indicating that there is no characteristic luminosity scale for the H II regions. The distributions of nebular diameters, on the other hand, are fitted well by exponential functions, with a scale length of 80 pc. Approximate fluxes for several of the extended filamentary networks in the galaxies have also been measured. This extended component probability contributes 15-25 percent of the total H-alpha luminosity of the galaxies.

  10. Star Formation Activity in the Galactic H II Region Sh2-297

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.; Dewangan, L. K.; Tamura, M.

    2012-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm-3 and 9.15 × 105 cm-6 pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area ~7farcm5 × 7farcm5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the Hα emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H - K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be ~0.1-2 M ⊙ and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V-I) and NIR (J/J-H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be ~1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

  11. A multiwavelength investigation of the H II region S311: young stellar population and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Mallick, K. K.; Jose, J.; Ogura, K.; Richichi, Andrea; Irawati, Puji; Kobayashi, N.; Eswaraiah, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of the young stellar population and star formation activities around the H II region Sharpless 311. Using our deep near-infrared observations and archival Spitzer-IRAC observations, we have detected a total of 125 young stellar objects (YSOs) in an area of ˜86 arcmin2. The YSO sample includes eight Class I and 117 Class II candidate YSOs. The mass completeness of the identified YSO sample is estimated to be 1.0 M⊙. The ages and masses of the majority of the candidate YSOs are estimated to be in the range ˜0.1-5 Myr and ˜0.3-6 M⊙, respectively. The 8-μm image of S311 displays an approximately spherical cavity around the ionizing source, which was possibly created by the expansion of the H II region. The spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs reveals that a significant number of them are distributed systematically along the 8-μm emission with a majority clustered around the eastern border of the H II region. Four clumps/compact H II regions are detected in the radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, which may have been formed during the expansion of the H II region. The estimated dynamical age of the region, main-sequence lifetime of the ionizing source, the spatial distribution and ages of the candidate YSOs indicate triggered star formation in the complex.

  12. Dynamical Expansion of Ionization and Dissociation Front around a Massive Star. II. On the Generality of Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2006-07-01

    We analyze the dynamical expansion of the H II region, photodissociation region, and the swept-up shell, solving the UV and far-UV radiative transfer and the thermal and chemical processes in the time-dependent hydrodynamics code. Following our previous paper, we investigate the time evolutions with various ambient number densities and central stars. Our calculations show that basic evolution is qualitatively similar among our models with different parameters. The molecular gas is finally accumulated in the shell, and the gravitational fragmentation of the shell is generally expected. The quantitative differences among models are well understood with analytic scaling relations. The detailed physical and chemical structure of the shell is mainly determined by the incident far-UV flux and the column density of the shell, which also follow the scaling relations. The time of shell fragmentation and the mass of the gathered molecular gas are sensitive to the ambient number density. In the case of a low density, the shell fragmentation occurs over a longer timescale, and the accumulated molecular gas is more massive than in the case of a high density. The variations with different central stars are more moderate. The time of the shell fragmentation differs by a factor of several with the various stars of M*=12-101 Msolar. According to our numerical results, we conclude that the expanding H II region should be an efficient trigger for star formation in molecular clouds if the mass of the ambient molecular material is large enough.

  13. Is the First Epoch of Star Formation in Satellite Galaxies Universal? - Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan

    2014-10-01

    We propose to derive detailed star formation and chemical enrichment histories of a representative sample of M31 dwarf spheroidal (dSph) companions in order to compare directly the timing, duration, and strength of their first episodes of star formation to those of the Milky Way (MW) satellites. Compared to the MW companion dSphs, the M31 companion dSphs have significantly different horizontal branch morphologies and a different range in structural parameters. We hypothesize that these differences are connected to the evolutionary histories of their host galaxies. The proposed deep HST imaging is the only means to accurately measure the early star formation histories of the Andromeda companions and thus to test our hypothesis. Fundamentally, we will be testing the assumption that the early evolution of the Milky Way satellites was typical and therefore representative of dSphs in general. The M31 dSphs are our only option.We have designed a representative sample of six galaxies which optimizes coverage in galaxy properties and observing efficiency. From cycle 20 observations of two of these galaxies (And II & XVI) we have discovered that - despite a factor of ~100 difference in mass - both galaxies show similar SFHs with star formation extending until intermediate ages and a synchronous termination in star formation ~5 Gyr ago. There are no MW satellite analogs to the lower luminosity M31 dSph And XVI. Here we propose observations of the rest of the sample, allowing direct inner/outer comparisons, comparison of SFHs as a function of luminosity and membership in substructures, and determination whether the synchronous truncation is observed in more of the M31 dSphs.

  14. Triggered massive-star formation on the borders of Galactic H II regions. III. Star formation at the periphery of Sh2-219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deharveng, L.; Lefloch, B.; Massi, F.; Brand, J.; Kurtz, S.; Zavagno, A.; Caplan, J.

    2006-10-01

    Context: .Massive-star formation triggered by the expansion of H ii regions. Aims: .To understand if sequential star formation is taking place at the periphery of the H ii region Sh2-219. Methods: .We present 12CO J=2→ 1 line observations of this region, obtained at the IRAM 30-m telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain). Results: .In the optical, Sh2-219 is spherically symmetric around its exciting star; furthermore it is surrounded along three quarters of its periphery by a ring of atomic hydrogen. This spherical symmetry breaks down at infrared and millimetre wavelengths. A molecular cloud of about 2000 M_⊙ lies at the southwestern border of Sh2-219, in the H i gap. Two molecular condensations, elongated along the ionization front, probably result from the interaction between the expanding H ii region and the molecular cloud. In this region of interaction there lies a cluster containing many highly reddened stars, as well as a massive star exciting an ultracompact H ii region. More surprisingly, the brightest parts of the molecular cloud form a "chimney", perpendicular to the ionization front. This chimney is closed at its south-west extremity by Hα walls, thus forming a cavity. The whole structure is 7.5 pc long. A luminous Hα emission-line star, lying at one end of the chimney near the ionization front, may be responsible for this structure. Confrontation of the observations with models of H ii region evolution shows that Sh2-219 is probably 105 yr old. The age and origin of the near-IR cluster observed on the border of Sh2-219 remain unknown.

  15. [C II] 158 μm EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION TRACER

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Wolfire, M. G.; Smith, J. D.; Croxall, K. V.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Boquien, M.; Calzetti, D.; Helou, G.; Walter, F.; Meidt, S. E.; Leroy, A. K.; Draine, B.; Brandl, B. R.; Armus, L.; Sandstrom, K. M.; Dale, D. A.; Aniano, G.; Hunt, L. K.; Galametz, M.; and others

    2015-02-10

    The [C II] 157.74 μm transition is the dominant coolant of the neutral interstellar gas, and has great potential as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. Using the Herschel KINGFISH sample of 46 nearby galaxies, we investigate the relation of [C II] surface brightness and luminosity with SFR. We conclude that [C II] can be used for measurements of SFR on both global and kiloparsec scales in normal star-forming galaxies in the absence of strong active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The uncertainty of the Σ{sub [C} {sub II]} – Σ{sub SFR} calibration is ±0.21 dex. The main source of scatter in the correlation is associated with regions that exhibit warm IR colors, and we provide an adjustment based on IR color that reduces the scatter. We show that the color-adjusted Σ{sub [C} {sub II]} – Σ{sub SFR} correlation is valid over almost five orders of magnitude in Σ{sub SFR}, holding for both normal star-forming galaxies and non-AGN luminous infrared galaxies. Using [C II] luminosity instead of surface brightness to estimate SFR suffers from worse systematics, frequently underpredicting SFR in luminous infrared galaxies even after IR color adjustment (although this depends on the SFR measure employed). We suspect that surface brightness relations are better behaved than the luminosity relations because the former are more closely related to the local far-UV field strength, most likely the main parameter controlling the efficiency of the conversion of far-UV radiation into gas heating. A simple model based on Starburst99 population-synthesis code to connect SFR to [C II] finds that heating efficiencies are 1%-3% in normal galaxies.

  16. The massive star population in M101. II. Spatial variations in the recent star formation history

    SciTech Connect

    Grammer, Skyler; Humphreys, Roberta M. E-mail: roberta@umn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We investigate star formation history (SFH) as a function of radius in M101 using archival Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry. We derive the SFH from the resolved stellar populations in five 2' wide annuli. Binning the SFH into time frames corresponding to stellar populations traced by Hα, far-ultraviolet, and near-ultraviolet emission, we find that the fraction of stellar populations young enough to contribute in Hα is 15%-35% in the inner regions, compared to less than 5% in the outer regions. This provides a sufficient explanation for the lack of Hα emission at large radii. We also model the blue to red supergiant ratio in our five annuli, examine the effects that a metallicity gradient and variable SFH have on the predicted ratios, and compare to the observed values. We find that the radial behavior of our modeled blue to red supergiant ratios is highly sensitive to both spatial variations in the SFH and metallicity. Incorporating the derived SFH into modeled ratios, we find that we are able to reproduce the observed values at large radii (low metallicity), but at small radii (high metallicity) the modeled and observed ratios are discrepant.

  17. An Evolutionary Model for Collapsing Molecular Clouds and their Star Formation Activity. II. Mass Dependence of the Star Formation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M max <~ 104 M ⊙) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ~104 M ⊙ Myr-1, although their time-averaged SFR is only langSFRrang ~ 102 M ⊙ Myr-1. The corresponding efficiencies are SFEfinal <~ 60% and langSFErang <~ 1%. For more massive clouds (M max >~ 105 M ⊙), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, langSFRrang and langSFErang are well represented by the fits langSFRrang ≈ 100(1 + M max/1.4 × 105 M ⊙)1.68 M ⊙ Myr-1 and langSFErang ≈ 0.03(M max/2.5 × 105 M ⊙)0.33, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao & Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  18. Massive Star Formation of the SGR a East H (sub II) Regions Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Lacy, J. H.; Wardle, M.; Whitney, B.; Bushouse, H.; Roberts, D. A.; Arendt, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    A group of four compact H II regions associated with the well-known 50 km/s molecular cloud is the closest site of on-going star formation to the dynamical center of the Galaxy, at a projected distance of approximately 6 pc. We present a study of ionized gas based on the [Ne II] (12.8 micron) line, as well as multi-frequency radio continuum, Hubble Space Telescope Pa alpha, and Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations of the most compact member of the H II group, Sgr A East H II D. The radio continuum image at 6 cm shows that this source breaks up into two equally bright ionized features, D1 and D2. The spectral energy distribution of the D source is consistent with it being due to a 25 =/- 3 solar mass star with a luminosity of 8 +/- 3 x 10(exp 4) Solar luminosity . The inferred mass, effective temperature of the UV source, and the ionization rate are compatible with a young O9-B0 star. The ionized features D1 and D2 are considered to be ionized by UV radiation collimated by an accretion disk. We consider that the central massive star photoevaporates its circumstellar disk on a timescale of 3x (exp 4) years giving a mass flux approximately 3 x 10(exp -5) Solar Mass / year and producing the ionized material in D1 and D2 expanding in an inhomogeneous medium. The ionized gas kinematics, as traced by the [Ne II] emission, is difficult to interpret, but it could be explained by the interaction of a bipolar jet with surrounding gas along with what appears to be a conical wall of lower velocity gas. The other H II regions, Sgr A East A-C, have morphologies and kinematics that more closely resemble cometary flows seen in other compact H II regions, where gas moves along a paraboloidal surface formed by the interaction of a stellar wind with a molecular cloud.

  19. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION OF THE SGR A EAST H II REGIONS NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Lacy, J. H.; Wardle, M.; Whitney, B.; Bushouse, H.; Roberts, D. A.; Arendt, R. G.

    2010-12-20

    A group of four compact H II regions associated with the well-known 50 km s{sup -1} molecular cloud is the closest site of on-going star formation to the dynamical center of the Galaxy, at a projected distance of {approx}6 pc. We present a study of ionized gas based on the [Ne II] (12.8 {mu}m) line, as well as multi-frequency radio continuum, Hubble Space Telescope Pa{alpha}, and Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations of the most compact member of the H II group, Sgr A East H II D. The radio continuum image at 6 cm shows that this source breaks up into two equally bright ionized features, D1 and D2. The spectral energy distribution of the D source is consistent with it being due to a 25 {+-} 3 M{sub sun} star with a luminosity of 8 {+-} 3 x 10{sup 4} L{sub sun}. The inferred mass, effective temperature of the UV source, and the ionization rate are compatible with a young O9-B0 star. The ionized features D1 and D2 are considered to be ionized by UV radiation collimated by an accretion disk. We consider that the central massive star photoevaporates its circumstellar disk on a timescale of 3 x 10{sup 4} years giving a mass flux {approx}3 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and producing the ionized material in D1 and D2 expanding in an inhomogeneous medium. The ionized gas kinematics, as traced by the [Ne II] emission, is difficult to interpret, but it could be explained by the interaction of a bipolar jet with surrounding gas along with what appears to be a conical wall of lower velocity gas. The other H II regions, Sgr A East A-C, have morphologies and kinematics that more closely resemble cometary flows seen in other compact H II regions, where gas moves along a paraboloidal surface formed by the interaction of a stellar wind with a molecular cloud.

  20. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. II. The pre-main-sequence G star HDE 283572

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, F.M.; Brown, A.; Linsky, J.L.; Rydgren, A.E.; Vrba, F.

    1987-03-01

    This paper reports the detection of HDE 283572, a ninth-magnitude G star 8 arcmin south of RY Tau, as a bright X-ray source. The observations reveal this object to be a fairly massive (about 2 solar masses) pre-main-sequence star associated with the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. It exhibits few of the characteristics of the classical T Tauri stars and is a good example of a naked T Tauri star. The star is a mid-G subgiant, of about three solar radii and rotates with a period of 1.5 d. The coronal and chromospheric surface fluxes are similar to those of the most active late type stars (excluding T Tauri stars). The X-ray and UV lines most likely arise in different atmospheric structures. Radiative losses are some 1000 times the quiet solar value and compare favorably with those of T Tauri stars. 49 references.

  1. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. II - The pre-main-sequence G star HDE 283572

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.; Brown, A.; Linsky, J. L.; Rydgren, A. E.; Vrba, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the detection of HDE 283572, a ninth-magnitude G star 8 arcmin south of RY Tau, as a bright X-ray source. The observations reveal this object to be a fairly massive (about 2 solar masses) pre-main-sequence star associated with the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. It exhibits few of the characteristics of the classical T Tauri stars and is a good example of a 'naked' T Tauri star. The star is a mid-G subgiant, of about three solar radii and rotates with a period of 1.5 d. The coronal and chromospheric surface fluxes are similar to those of the most active late type stars (excluding T Tauri stars). The X-ray and UV lines most likely arise in different atmospheric structures. Radiative losses are some 1000 times the quiet solar value and compare favorably with those of T Tauri stars.

  2. An evolutionary model for collapsing molecular clouds and their star formation activity. II. Mass dependence of the star formation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M {sub max} ≲ 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ∼10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}, although their time-averaged SFR is only (SFR) ∼ 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}. The corresponding efficiencies are SFE{sub final} ≲ 60% and (SFE) ≲ 1%. For more massive clouds (M {sub max} ≳ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, (SFR) and (SFE) are well represented by the fits (SFR) ≈ 100(1 + M {sub max}/1.4 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 1.68} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} and (SFE) ≈ 0.03(M {sub max}/2.5 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 0.33}, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao and Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  3. Heavily reddened z ˜ 2 Type 1 quasars - II. H α star formation constraints from SINFONI IFU observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghband-Zadeh, S.; Banerji, Manda; Hewett, Paul C.; McMahon, Richard G.

    2016-06-01

    We use near-infrared integral field unit spectroscopy to search for H α emission associated with star formation in a sample of 28 heavily reddened (E(B - V) ≃ 0.5-1.9), hyperluminous (log({{L}}_{bol}/erg s^{-1})≃ 47-48) broad-line quasars at z ≃ 1.4-2.7. 16 of the 28 quasars show evidence for star formation with an average extinction-corrected star formation rate (SFR) of 320 ± 70 M⊙ yr-1. A stacked spectrum of the detections shows weak [N II], consistent with star formation as the origin of the narrow H α emission. The star-forming regions are spatially unresolved in 11 of the 16 detections and constrained to lie within ˜6 kpc of the quasar emission. In the five resolved detections we find the star-forming regions are extended on scales of ˜8 kpc around the quasar emission. The prevalence of high SFRs is consistent with the identification of the heavily reddened quasar population as representing a transitional phase from apparent `starburst galaxies' to optically luminous quasars. Upper limits are determined for 10 quasars in which star formation is undetected. In two of the quasars the SFR is constrained to be relatively modest, <50 M⊙ yr-1, but significantly higher levels of star formation could be present in the other eight quasars. The combination of the 16 strong star formation detections and the eight high SFR limits means that high levels of star formation may be present in the majority of the sample. Higher spatial resolution data, of multiple emission lines, will allow us to better understand the interplay between star formation and active galactic nucleus activity in these transitioning quasars.

  4. Star formation activity in the southern Galactic H II region G351.63-1.25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vig, S.; Ghosh, S. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Verma, R. P.; Tamura, M.

    2014-06-01

    The southern Galactic high-mass star-forming region, G351.63-1.25, is an H II region-molecular cloud complex with a luminosity of ˜2.0 × 105 L⊙, located at a distance of 2.4 kpc from the Sun. In this paper, we focus on the investigation of the associated H II region, embedded cluster and the interstellar medium in the vicinity of G351.63-1.25. We address the identification of exciting source(s) as well as the census of the stellar populations, in an attempt to unfold star formation activity in this region. The ionized gas distribution has been mapped using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, India, at three frequencies: 1280, 610 and 325 MHz. The H II region shows an elongated morphology and the 1280 MHz map comprises six resolved high-density regions encompassed by diffuse emission spanning 1.4 × 1.0 pc2. Based on the measurements of flux densities at multiple radio frequencies, the brightest ultracompact core has electron temperature Te˜7647 {±} 153 K and emission measure, EM˜2.0 {±} 0.8×107 cm-6 pc. The zero-age main-sequence spectral type of the brightest radio core is O7.5. We have carried out near-infrared observations in the JHKs bands using the SIRIUS camera on the 1.4 m Infrared Survey Facility telescope. The near-infrared images reveal the presence of a cluster embedded in nebulous fan-shaped emission. The log-normal slope of the K-band luminosity function of the embedded cluster is found to be ˜0.27 ± 0.03, and the fraction of the near-infrared excess stars is estimated to be 43 per cent. These indicate that the age of the cluster is consistent with ˜1 Myr. Other available data of this region show that the warm (mid-infrared) and cold (millimetre) dust emission peak at different locations indicating progressive stages of star formation process. The champagne flow model from a flat, thin molecular cloud is used to explain the morphology of radio emission with respect to the millimetre cloud and infrared brightness.

  5. Star formation - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. J., II

    1985-01-01

    Methods for studying star formation are reviewed. Stellar clusters and associations, as well as field stars, provide a fossil record of the star formation process. Regions of current star formation provide a series of snapshots of different epochs of star formation. A simplified picture of individual star formation as it was envisioned in the late 1970s is contrasted with the results of recent observations, in particular the outflow phenomenon.

  6. ON THE LINK BETWEEN ASSOCIATED Mg II ABSORBERS AND STAR FORMATION IN QUASAR HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue; Menard, Brice E-mail: menard@pha.jhu.edu

    2012-04-01

    A few percent of quasars show strong associated Mg II absorption, with velocities (v{sub off}) lying within a few thousand km s{sup -1} from the quasar systemic redshift. These associated absorption line (AAL) systems are usually interpreted as absorbers that are either intrinsic to the quasar and its host, or arising from external galaxies clustering around the quasar. Using composite spectra of {approx}1800 Mg II AAL quasars selected from SDSS DR7 at 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 2, we show that quasars with AALs with v{sub off} < 1500 km s{sup -1} have a prominent excess in [O II] {lambda}3727 emission (detected at >7{sigma}) at rest relative to the quasar host, compared to unabsorbed quasars. We interpret this [O II] excess as due to enhanced star formation in the quasar host. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of AALs with v{sub off} < 1500 km s{sup -1} are physically associated with the quasar and its host. AAL quasars also have dust reddening lying between normal quasars and the so-called dust-reddened quasars. We suggest that the unique properties of AAL quasars can be explained if they are the transitional population from heavily dust-reddened quasars to normal quasars in the formation process of quasars and their hosts. This scenario predicts a larger fraction of young bulges, disturbed morphologies, and interactions of AAL quasar hosts compared to normal quasars. The intrinsic link between associated absorbers and quasar hosts opens a new window to probe massive galaxy formation and galactic-scale feedback processes, and provides a crucial test of the evolutionary picture of quasars.

  7. Deep Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of IC 1613. II. The Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Saha, Abhijit; Gallagher, J. S.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Mateo, Mario

    2003-10-01

    We have taken deep images of an outlying field in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 with the WFPC2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the standard broadband F555W (V, 8 orbits) and F814W (I, 16 orbits) filters. The photometry reaches to V=27.7 (MV=+3.4) and I=27.1 (MI=+2.8) at the 50% completeness level, the deepest to date for an isolated dwarf irregular galaxy. We analyze the resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and compare it with CMDs created from theoretical stellar models using three different methods to derive a star formation history (SFH) as well as constrain the chemical evolution for IC 1613. All three methods find an enhanced star formation rate (SFR), at roughly the same magnitude (factor of 3), over roughly the same period (from 3 to 6 Gyr ago). Additionally, all three methods were driven to similar age-metallicity relationships (AMR) that show an increase from [Fe/H]~-1.3 at earliest times to [Fe/H]~-0.7 at present. Good agreement is found between the AMR which is derived from the CMD analysis and that which can be inferred from the derived SFH at all but the earliest ages. The agreement between the three models and the self-consistency of the derived chemical enrichment history support the reality of the derived SFH of IC 1613 and, more generally, are supportive of the practice of constructing galaxy SFHs from CMDs. A comparison of the newly observed outer field with an earlier studied central field of IC 1613 shows that the SFR in the outer field has been significantly depressed during the last Gyr. This implies that the optical scale length of the galaxy has been decreasing with time and that comparison of galaxies at intermediate redshift with present-day galaxies should take this effect into account. Comparing the CMD of the outer field of IC 1613 with CMDs of Milky Way dSph companions, we find strong similarities between IC 1613 and the more distant dSph companions (Carina, Fornax, Leo I, and Leo II) in that all are dominated

  8. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies. II: The Effects of Star Formation Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Forbes, John C.

    2016-08-01

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre Q parameters to ∼1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies’ star formation rates by a factor of ∼5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular interstellar medium. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the rate of inward mass transport. Nevertheless, we find that, even with feedback included, our galactic disks self-regulate to Q ∼ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to supply a substantial fraction of the inner disk star formation. We argue that gravitational instability is therefore likely to be the dominant source of turbulence and transport in galactic disks, and that it is responsible for fueling star formation in the inner parts of galactic disks over cosmological times.

  9. The double galaxy cluster Abell 2465 - II. Star formation in the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, Gary A.; Chu, Devin S.; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the star formation rate and its location in the major merger cluster Abell 2465 at z = 0.245. Optical properties of the cluster are described in Paper I. Measurements of the Hα and infrared dust emission of galaxies in the cluster were made with an interference filter centred on the redshifted line at a wavelength of 817 nm and utilized data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer satellite 12 μm band. Imaging in the Johnson U and B bands was obtained, and along with Sloan Digital Sky Survey u and r was used to study the blue fraction, which appears enhanced, as a further signature of star formation in the cluster. Star formation rates were calculated using standard calibrations. The total star formation rate normalized by the cluster mass, ΣSFR/Mcl compared to compilations for other clusters indicate that the components of Abell 2465 lie above the mean z and Mcl relations, suggestive that interacting galaxy clusters have enhanced star formation. The projected radial distribution of the star-forming galaxies does not follow an NFW profile and is relatively flat indicating that fewer star-forming galaxies are in the cluster centre. The morphologies of the Hα sources within R200 for the cluster as a whole indicate that many are disturbed or merging, suggesting that a combination of merging or harassment is working.

  10. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  11. Spitzer Follow-up of HST Observations of Star Formation in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Jeff; Bally, John; Desch, Steve; Healy, Kevin; Snider, Keely

    2005-06-01

    Images of regions of star formation taken with HST have given us an extraordinary view of young stellar objects and their natal environments. These views differ tremendously between low-mass YSOs seen in regions of isolated low-mass star formation such as Taurus-Auriga, and the proplyds, EGGs, and other structures seen in regions of massive star formation. While YSOs in Taurus spend their adolescence buried in the dark interiors of molecular clouds, YSOs near massive stars quickly find themselves overrun by ionization fronts and exposed to the intense UV radiation from nearby massive stars. This difference in environment has a profound effect on the way in which the protoplanetary disk around a star evolves -- a fact that is of great importance to us, given the strength of the evidence suggesting that the Sun formed near a massive star. But HST while HST can inform us about the evolution of YSOs in HII region environments once they are overrun by ionization fronts, it cannot show us the birth of the stars themselves. These remain hidden in the dense molecular material beyond the ionized volumes of these regions. Only Spitzer can show us the properties of the YSOs that lie hidden in the dark shadows of HST images of HII regions, and only Spitzer can provide us with information about PDRs, warm dust, and other tracers of the interaction of massive stars with their surroundings. The combination of HST and Spitzer observations of star forming regions is far greater than the sum of its parts. If we are to build a complete picture of low-mass star formation and the evolution of disks near massive stars, we need to combine HST and Spitzer observations of the same regions. In this proposal we request time to obtain both IRAC and MIPS 24 micron images of each HII region that has been observed by HST, but has yet to be observed with Spitzer. Together with previous images obtained from the archives, this will comprise an indispensible data set for testing hypotheses about

  12. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION AROUND MID-INFRARED BUBBLES IN THE G8.14+0.23 H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chakraborti, S.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2012-09-10

    Mid-infrared shells or bubbles around expanding H II regions have received much attention due to their ability to initiate a new generation of star formation. We present multi-wavelength observations around two bubbles associated with a southern massive star-forming region G8.14+0.23, to investigate the triggered star formation signature on the edges of the bubbles by the expansion of the H II region. We have found observational signatures of the collected molecular and cold dust material along the bubbles and the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) velocity map reveals that the molecular gas in the bubbles is physically associated around the G8.14+0.23 region. We have detected 244 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region and about 37% of these YSOs occur in clusters. Interestingly, these YSO clusters are associated with the collected material on the edges of the bubbles. We have found good agreement between the dynamical age of the H II region and the kinematical timescale of bubbles (from the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) line data) with the fragmentation time of the accumulated molecular materials to explain possible 'collect and collapse' process around the G8.14+0.23 region. However, one cannot entirely rule out the possibility of triggered star formation by compression of the pre-existing dense clumps by the shock wave. We have also found two massive embedded YSOs (about 10 and 22 M{sub Sun }) which are associated with the dense fragmented clump at the interface of the bubbles. We conclude that the expansion of the H II region is also leading to the formation of these two young massive embedded YSOs in the G8.14+0.23 region.

  13. SPITZER ANALYSIS OF H II REGION COMPLEXES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS: DETERMINING A SUITABLE MONOCHROMATIC OBSCURED STAR FORMATION INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, B.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Babler, B.; Bracker, S.; Meade, M.; Block, M.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Misselt, K.; Bolatto, A. D.; Carlson, L. R.; Hora, J. L.; Robitaille, T.; Indebetouw, R.; Madden, S. C.; Oliveira, J. M.; Vijh, U. P. E-mail: kgordon@stsci.ed

    2010-06-10

    H II regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. To study the H II regions, we compute the bolometric infrared flux, or total infrared (TIR), by integrating the flux from 8 to 500 {mu}m. The TIR provides a measure of the obscured star formation because the UV photons from hot young stars are absorbed by dust and re-emitted across the mid-to-far-infrared (IR) spectrum. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the TIR and produces an accurate obscured SFR over large spatial scales. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) H II region complexes using the Spitzer Space Telescope's IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 8 {mu}m) and MIPS (24, 70, 160 {mu}m) bands. Ultraviolet rocket data (1500 and 1900 A) and SHASSA H{alpha} data are also included. All data are convolved to the MIPS 160 {mu}m resolution (40 arcsec full width at half-maximum), and apertures have a minimum radius of 35''. The IRAC, MIPS, UV, and H{alpha} spatial analysis are compared with the spatial analysis of the TIR. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC H II region spectral energy distributions (SEDs) peak around 70 {mu}m at all radii, from {approx}10 to {approx}400 pc from the central ionizing sources. As a result, we find the following: the sizes of H II regions as probed by 70 {mu}m are approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR ({approx}70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70 {mu}m flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70 {mu}m {approx} 0.45TIR); the 1{sigma} standard deviation of the 70 {mu}m fluxes, normalized by TIR, is a lower fraction of the mean (0.05-0.12 out to {approx}220 pc) than the normalized 8, 24, and 160 {mu}m normalized fluxes (0

  14. STAR FORMATION IN SELF-GRAVITATING DISKS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. EPISODIC FORMATION OF BROAD-LINE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    WangJianmin; Du Pu; Ge Junqiang; Hu Chen; Baldwin, Jack A.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-02-20

    This is the second in a series of papers discussing the process and effects of star formation in the self-gravitating disk around the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have previously suggested that warm skins are formed above the star-forming (SF) disk through the diffusion of warm gas driven by supernova explosions. Here we study the evolution of the warm skins when they are exposed to the powerful radiation from the inner part of the accretion disk. The skins initially are heated to the Compton temperature, forming a Compton atmosphere (CAS) whose subsequent evolution is divided into four phases. Phase I is the duration of pure accumulation supplied by the SF disk. During phase II clouds begin to form due to line cooling and sink to the SF disk. Phase III is a period of preventing clouds from sinking to the SF disk through dynamic interaction between clouds and the CAS because of the CAS overdensity driven by continuous injection of warm gas from the SF disk. Finally, phase IV is an inevitable collapse of the entire CAS through line cooling. This CAS evolution drives the episodic appearance of broad-line regions (BLRs). We follow the formation of cold clouds through the thermal instability of the CAS during phases II and III, using linear analysis. Since the clouds are produced inside the CAS, the initial spatial distribution of newly formed clouds and angular momentum naturally follow the CAS dynamics, producing a flattened disk of clouds. The number of clouds in phases II and III can be estimated, as well as the filling factor of clouds in the BLR. Since the cooling function depends on the metallicity, the metallicity gradients that originate in the SF disk give rise to different properties of clouds in different radial regions. We find from the instability analysis that clouds have column density N{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} in the metal-rich regions whereas they have N{sub H} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} in the

  15. Galaxy formation in the Planck cosmology - II. Star-formation histories and post-processing magnitude reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, Sorour; Thomas, Peter A.; Henriques, Bruno M.; Tojeiro, Rita; Lemson, Gerard; Oliver, Seb J.; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    We adapt the L-GALAXIES semi-analytic model to follow the star formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies - by which we mean a record of the formation time and metallicities of the stars that are present in each galaxy at a given time. We use these to construct stellar spectra in post-processing, which offers large efficiency savings and allows user-defined spectral bands and dust models to be applied to data stored in the Millennium data repository. We contrast model SFHs from the Millennium Simulation with observed ones from the VESPA algorithm as applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey 7 (SDSS-7) catalogue. The overall agreement is good, with both simulated and SDSS galaxies showing a steeper SFH with increased stellar mass. The SFHs of blue and red galaxies, however, show poor agreement between data and simulations, which may indicate that the termination of star formation is too abrupt in the models. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of model galaxies is well defined and is accurately modelled by a double power law at all redshifts: SFR ∝ 1/(x-1.39 + x1.33), where x = (ta - t)/3.0 Gyr, t is the age of the stars and ta is the lookback time to the onset of galaxy formation; above a redshift of unity, this is well approximated by a gamma function: SFR ∝ x1.5e-x, where x = (ta - t)/2.0 Gyr. Individual galaxies, however, show a wide dispersion about this mean. When split by mass, the SFR peaks earlier for high-mass galaxies than for lower mass ones, and we interpret this downsizing as a mass-dependence in the evolution of the quenched fraction: the SFHs of star-forming galaxies show only a weak mass-dependence.

  16. THE X-FACTOR IN GALAXIES. II. THE MOLECULAR-HYDROGEN-STAR-FORMATION RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, Robert; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V. E-mail: feldmann@fnal.gov

    2012-10-20

    There is ample observational evidence that the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}, is closely correlated with the surface density of molecular hydrogen, {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}. This empirical relation holds both for galaxy-wide averages and for individual {approx}>kpc sized patches of the interstellar medium, but appears to degrade substantially at a sub-kpc scale. Identifying the physical mechanisms that determine the scale-dependent properties of the observed {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}-{Sigma}{sub SFR} relation using a set of cosmological, galaxy formation simulations with a peak resolution of {approx}100 pc. These simulations include a chemical network for molecular hydrogen, a model for the CO emission, and a simple, stochastic prescription for star formation that operates on {approx}100 pc scales. Specifically, star formation is modeled as a Poisson process in which the average SFR is directly proportional to the present mass of H{sub 2}. The predictions of our numerical model are in good agreement with the observed Kennicutt-Schmidt and {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}-{Sigma}{sub SFR} relations. We show that observations based on CO emission are ill suited to reliably measure the slope of the latter relation at low ({approx}< 20 M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2}) H{sub 2} surface densities on sub-kpc scales. Our models also predict that the inferred {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}-{Sigma}{sub SFR} relation steepens at high H{sub 2} surface densities as a result of the surface density dependence of the CO/H{sub 2} conversion factor. Finally, we show that on sub-kpc scales most of the scatter of the relation is a consequence of discreteness effects of the star formation process. In contrast, variations of the CO/H{sub 2} conversion factor are responsible for most of the scatter measured on super-kpc scales.

  17. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. II. Searching for signatures of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10{sup 4} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, and Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted 'true fossils' identified by Bovill and Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environmental effects and reionization, the best reionization fossil candidates are quenched low mass field galaxies (e.g., KKR 25).

  18. Panel Discussion II. Reconciling Observations and Modeling of Star Formation at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    This is the written account of the second of two panel discussions, on Reconciling observations and modeling of star formation at high redshifts. The chair of the panel was Pavel Kroupa, and panel members were Marc Balcells, John Beckman, Christopher Conselice, and Joseph Silk. After a short introduction by each of the panelists, panel and audience entered into a lively discussion, centered around the following six themes: the mass function of pre-stellar gas clouds; a possible top-heavy initial mass function at high redshifts versus mini-quasars as the first sources of ionization; the integrated galactic initial mass function; possible differences in specific star formation rates in disks and in massive galaxies; whether merging rates yield a wrong prediction for massive galaxies, and what is the physics behind the onset of the red sequence of galaxies; and the case of dark matter-dominated dwarf galaxies versus tidal dwarf galaxies.

  19. Massive Star Formation in a Gravitationally-Lensed H II Galaxy at z = 3.357

    SciTech Connect

    Villar-Martin, M; Stern, D; Hook, R N; Rosati, P; Lombardi, M; Humphrey, A; Fosbury, R; Stanford, S A; Holden, B P

    2004-03-02

    The Lynx arc, with a redshift of 3.357, was discovered during spectroscopic follow-up of the z = 0.570 cluster RX J0848+4456 from the ROSAT Deep Cluster Survey. The arc is characterized by a very red R - K color and strong, narrow emission lines. Analysis of HST WFPC 2 imaging and Keck optical and infrared spectroscopy shows that the arc is an H II galaxy magnified by a factor of {approx} 10 by a complex cluster environment. The high intrinsic luminosity, the emission line spectrum, the absorption components seen in Ly{alpha} and C IV, and the restframe ultraviolet continuum are all consistent with a simple H II region model containing {approx} 10{sup 6} hot O stars. The best fit parameters for this model imply a very hot ionizing continuum (T{sub BB} {approx} 80, 000 K), high ionization parameter (log U {approx} -1), and low nebular metallicity (Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}} {approx} 0.05). The narrowness of the emission lines requires a low mass-to-light ratio for the ionizing stars, suggestive of an extremely low metallicity stellar cluster. The apparent overabundance of silicon in the nebula could indicate enrichment by past pair instability supernovae, requiring stars more massive than {approx}140M{sub {circle_dot}}.

  20. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  1. Comparative internal kinematics of the H II regions in interacting and isolated galaxies: implications for massive star formation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Beckman, John E.; Font, Joan; García-Lorenzo, Begoña; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Fathi, Kambiz; James, Philip A.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Cisternas, Mauricio

    2015-08-01

    We have observed 12 interacting galaxy pairs using the Fabry-Perot interferometer GH αFaS (Galaxy H α Fabry-Perot system) on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma. We present here the Hα surface brightness, velocity and velocity dispersion maps for the 10 systems we have not previously observed using this technique, as well as the physical properties (sizes, Hα luminosities and velocity dispersion) of 1259 H II regions from the full sample. We also derive the physical properties of 1054 H II regions in a sample of 28 isolated galaxies observed with the same instrument in order to compare the two populations of H II regions. We find a population of the brightest H II regions for which the scaling relations, for example the relation between the Hα luminosity and the radius, are clearly distinct from the relations for the regions of lower luminosity. The regions in this bright population are more frequent in the interacting galaxies. We find that the turbulence, and also the star formation rate (SFR), are enhanced in the H II regions in the interacting galaxies. We have also extracted the Hα equivalent widths for the H II regions of both samples, and we have found that the distribution of H II region ages coincides for the two samples of galaxies. We suggest that the SFR enhancement is brought about by gas flows induced by the interactions, which give rise to gravitationally bound gas clouds which grow further by accretion from the flowing gas, producing conditions favourable to star formation.

  2. Dark influences II. Gas and star formation in minor mergers of dwarf galaxies with dark satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, T. K.; Helmi, A.; Sales, L. V.

    2016-03-01

    Context. It has been proposed that mergers induce starbursts and lead to important morphological changes in galaxies. Most studies so far have focused on large galaxies, but dwarfs might also experience such events, since the halo mass function is scale-free in the concordance cosmological model. Notably, because of their low mass, most of their interactions will be with dark satellites. Aims: In this paper we follow the evolution of gas-rich disky dwarf galaxies as they experience a minor merger with a dark satellite. We aim to characterize the effects of such an interaction on the dwarf's star formation, morphology, and kinematical properties. Methods: We performed a suite of carefully set-up hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxies that include dark matter, gas, and stars merging with a satellite consisting solely of dark matter. For the host system we vary the gas fraction, disk size and thickness, halo mass, and concentration, while we explore different masses, concentrations, and orbits for the satellite. Results: We find that the interactions cause strong starbursts of both short and long duration in the dwarfs. Their star formation rates increase by factors of a few to 10 or more. They are strongest for systems with extended gas disks and high gas fractions merging with a high-concentration satellite on a planar, radial orbit. In contrast to analogous simulations of Milky Way-mass galaxies, many of the systems experience strong morphological changes and become spheroidal even in the presence of significant amounts of gas. Conclusions: The simulated systems compare remarkably well with the observational properties of a large selection of irregular dwarf galaxies and blue compact dwarfs. This implies that mergers with dark satellites might well be happening but not be fully evident, and may thus play a role in the diversity of the dwarf galaxy population.

  3. Star formation towards the southern cometary H II region IRAS 17256-3631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veena, V. S.; Vig, S.; Tej, A.; Varricatt, W. P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Chandrasekhar, T.; Ashok, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    IRAS 17256-3631 is a southern Galactic massive star-forming region located at a distance of 2 kpc. In this paper, we present a multiwavelength investigation of the embedded cluster, the H II region, as well as the parent cloud. Radio images at 325, 610 and 1372 MHz were obtained using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, India while the near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy were carried out using United Kingdom Infrared Telescope and Mt. Abu Infrared Telescope, India. The near-infrared K-band image reveals the presence of a partially embedded infrared cluster. The spectral features of the brightest star in the cluster, IRS-1, spectroscopically agree with a late O or early B star and could be the driving source of this region. Filamentary H2 emission detected towards the outer envelope indicates the presence of highly excited gas. The parent cloud is investigated at far-infrared to millimetre wavelengths and 18 dust clumps have been identified. The spectral energy distributions of these clumps have been fitted as modified blackbodies and the best-fitting peak temperatures are found to range from 14 to 33 K, while the column densities vary from 0.7 to 8.5 × 1022 cm-2. The radio maps show a cometary morphology for the distribution of ionized gas that is density bounded towards the north-west and ionization bounded towards the south-east. This morphology is better explained with the champagne flow model as compared to the bow-shock model. Using observations at near-, mid- and far-infrared, submillimetre and radio wavelengths, we examine the evolutionary stages of various clumps.

  4. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. II. Signatures of gravitational collapse of IRDCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Tremblin, P.; Ossenkopf, V.; Peretto, N.; Simon, R.; Bontemps, S.; Federrath, C.

    2015-06-01

    We analyse column density and temperature maps derived from Herschel dust continuum observations of a sample of prominent, massive infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) i.e. G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, G28.37+0.07, and G28.53-0.25. We disentangle the velocity structure of the clouds using 13CO 1→0 and 12CO 3→2 data, showing that these IRDCs are the densest regions in massive giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and not isolated features. The probability distribution function (PDF) of column densities for all clouds have a power-law distribution over all (high) column densities, regardless of the evolutionary stage of the cloud: G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, and G28.37+0.07 contain (proto)-stars, while G28.53-0.25 shows no signs of star formation. This is in contrast to the purely log-normal PDFs reported for near and/or mid-IR extinction maps. We only find a log-normal distribution for lower column densities, if we perform PDFs of the column density maps of the whole GMC in which the IRDCs are embedded. By comparing the PDF slope and the radial column density profile of three of our clouds, we attribute the power law to the effect of large-scale gravitational collapse and to local free-fall collapse of pre- and protostellar cores for the highest column densities. A significant impact on the cloud properties from radiative feedback is unlikely because the clouds are mostly devoid of star formation. Independent from the PDF analysis, we find infall signatures in the spectral profiles of 12CO for G28.37+0.07 and G11.11-0.12, supporting the scenario of gravitational collapse. Our results are in line with earlier interpretations that see massive IRDCs as the densest regions within GMCs, which may be the progenitors of massive stars or clusters. At least some of the IRDCs are probably the same features as ridges (high column density regions with N> 1023 cm-2 over small areas), which were defined for nearby IR-bright GMCs. Because IRDCs are only confined to the densest (gravity dominated

  5. A study of four galactic small H II regions: Searching for spontaneous and sequential star formation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung-Ju

    This thesis describes observational studies of four small star-forming H II regions (KR 7, KR 81, KR 120 and KR 140) and star-formation scenario associated with the Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in each region. In addition to that, we also present an analysis of HCO+ (J=3→2) and H13CO+ (J=3→2) observations of the Massive (M ˜ 20 M[special character omitted] ) submillimeter/infrared source IRAS 01202+6133 located on the periphery of the H II region. In this research, we improved existing 1-D radiative transfer model for a collapsing core that happens in the early phase -- Class I protostar -- of star formation. The molecular gas surrounding an H II region is thought to be a place where star formation can be induced. We selected four small H II region in order to minimize the feedbacks and dynamics from multiple exciting sources. These regions are very young and ionized by the single O or B spectral type stars. A space based telescope Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) used for identifying and classifying the YSOs population surrounding a sample of H II regions. First, we used WISE data from AllWISE catalog with some constrains such as spatial coordinates, signal-to-noise ratio and contaminations. After we retrieved sources from catalog in each region, we classified YSOs with two different methods; color-color diagram and spectral index (alpha). Based on the color-color diagram using WISE 3.4 mum, 4.6 mum and 12 mum bands, we classified the YSOs as Class I, Class II and using 3.4 mum, 4.6 mum and 22 mum, we were able to classify Transition Disks and Class III YSOs. 2MASS and WISE combined color-color diagram also used in order to compare the classification only use of WISE color-color diagram. Considering a reddening effect from 2MASS Ks band, the classification from both WISE only and 2MASS, WISE combined color-colordiagram. A spectral index (alpha) also can be used as classifying YSOs. Based on the WISE magnitude, spectral index (alpha) can be derived

  6. Near-infrared radiation background, gravitational wave background, and star formation rate of Pop III and Pop II during cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. P.; Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The transition from Population III (Pop III) to Population II (Pop II) stars plays an important role in the history of the Universe. The huge amount of ionizing photons generated by Pop III stars begin to ionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) at the early stage of reionization. Meanwhile, the feedback from reionization and metal enrichment changes the evolution of different populations. The near-infrared radiation background (NIRB) and the stochastic background of gravitational waves (SBGWs) from these early stars will provide important information about the transition form Pop III to Pop II stars. Aims: We obtain the NIRB and SBGWs from the early stars, which are constrained by the observation of reionization and star formation rate (SFR). Methods: We studied the transition from Pop III to Pop II stars via the star formation model of different populations, which takes into account the reionization and the metal enrichment evolution. We calculated the two main metal pollution channels arising from the supernova-driven protogalactic outflows and genetic channel. We obtained the SFRs of Pop III and Pop II and their NIRB and SBGWs radiation. Results: We predict that the upper limit of metallicity in metal-enriched IGM (the galaxies that are polluted via the genetic channel) reaches Zcrit = 10-3.5 Z⊙ at z ~ 13 (z ~ 11), which is consistent with our star formation model. We constrain the SFR of Pop III stars from reionization observations. The peak intensity of NIRB is about 0.03 - 0.2 nWm-2 sr-1 at ~1 μm for z> 6. The predicted NIRB signal is consistent with the metallicity evolution. We also obtain the gravitational wave background from the black holes formed by these early stars. The predicted gravitational wave background has a peak amplitude of ΩGW ≃ 8 × 10-9 at ν = 158 Hz for Pop II star remnants. However, the background generated by Pop III.2 stars is much lower than that of Pop II stars, with a peak amplitude of ΩGW ≃ 1.2 × 10-11 at ν = 28

  7. Chemical evolution in the early phases of massive star formation. II. Deuteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, T.; Shirley, Y. L.; Beuther, H.; Semenov, D.; Linz, H.; Albertsson, T.; Henning, Th.

    2015-07-01

    The chemical evolution in high-mass star-forming regions is still poorly constrained. Studying the evolution of deuterated molecules allows distinguishing between subsequent stages of high-mass star formation regions based on the strong temperature dependence of deuterium isotopic fractionation. We observed a sample of 59 sources including 19 infrared dark clouds, 20 high-mass protostellar objects, 11 hot molecular cores and 9 ultra-compact Hii regions in the (3-2) transitions of the four deuterated molecules, DCN, DNC, DCO+, and N2D+ as well as their non-deuterated counterparts. The overall detection fraction of DCN, DNC, and DCO+ is high and exceeds 50% for most of the stages. N2D+ was only detected in a few infrared dark clouds and high-mass protostellar objects. This may be related to problems in the bandpass at the transition frequency and to low abundances in the more evolved, warmer stages. We find median D/H ratios of 0.02 for DCN, 0.005 for DNC, 0.0025 for DCO+, and 0.02 for N2D+. While the D/H ratios of DNC, DCO+, and N2D+ decrease with time, DCN/HCN peaks at the hot molecular core stage. We only found weak correlations of the D/H ratios for N2D+ with the luminosity of the central source and the FWHM of the line, and no correlation with the H2 column density. In combination with a previously observed set of 14 other molecules (Paper I), we fitted the calculated column densities with an elaborate 1D physico-chemical model with time-dependent D-chemistry including ortho- and para-H2 states. Good overall fits to the observed data were obtained with the model. This is one of the first times that observations and modeling were combined to derive chemically based best-fit models for the evolution of high-mass star formation including deuteration. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. NGC 147, NGC 185 and CassII: a genetic approach to orbital properties, star formation and tidal debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Veronica; Guglielmo, Magda; Fernando, Nuwanthika; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bate, Nicholas F.; Conn, Anthony; Irwin, Mike J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Martin, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    NGC 147, NGC 185 and Cassiopeia II (CassII) have similar positions in the sky, distances and measured line-of-sight velocities. This proximity in phase space suggests that these three satellites of M31 form a subgroup within the Local Group. Nevertheless, the differences in their star formation history and interstellar medium, and the recent discovery of a stellar stream in NGC 147, combined with the lack of tidal features in the other two satellites, are all indications of complex and diverse interactions between M31 and these three satellites. We use a genetic algorithm to explore the different orbits that these satellites can have and select six sets of orbits that could best explain the observational features of the NGC 147, NGC 185 and CassII satellites. The parameters of these orbits are then used as a starting point for N-body simulations. We present models for which NGC 147, NGC 185 and CassII are a bound group for a total time of at least 1 Gyr but still undergo different interactions with M31 and as a result NGC 147 has a clear stellar stream, whereas the other two satellites have no significant tidal features. This result shows that it is possible to find solutions that reproduce the contrasting properties of the satellites and for which NGC 147-NGC 185-CassII have been gravitationally bound.

  9. Rotating Stars and the Formation of Bipolar Planetary Nebulae. II. Tidal Spin-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segura, G.; Villaver, E.; Manchado, A.; Langer, N.; Yoon, S.-C.

    2016-06-01

    We present new binary stellar evolution models that include the effects of tidal forces, rotation, and magnetic torques with the goal of testing planetary nebulae (PNs) shaping via binary interaction. We explore whether tidal interaction with a companion can spin-up the asymptotic giant brach (AGB) envelope. To do so, we have selected binary systems with main-sequence masses of 2.5 M ⊙ and 0.8 M ⊙ and evolve them allowing initial separations of 5, 6, 7, and 8 au. The binary stellar evolution models have been computed all the way to the PNs formation phase or until Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) is reached, whatever happens first. We show that with initial separations of 7 and 8 au, the binary avoids entering into RLOF, and the AGB star reaches moderate rotational velocities at the surface (∼3.5 and ∼2 km s‑1, respectively) during the inter-pulse phases, but after the thermal pulses it drops to a final rotational velocity of only ∼0.03 km s‑1. For the closest binary separations explored, 5 and 6 au, the AGB star reaches rotational velocities of ∼6 and ∼4 km s‑1, respectively, when the RLOF is initiated. We conclude that the detached binary models that avoid entering the RLOF phase during the AGB will not shape bipolar PNs, since the acquired angular momentum is lost via the wind during the last two thermal pulses. This study rules out tidal spin-up in non-contact binaries as a sufficient condition to form bipolar PNs.

  10. Molecules in star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, F. H.

    The author reviews current ideas and models in the problem of star formation from molecular cloud cores that are relatively isolated from the influences of other forming stars. He discusses the time scales, flow dynamics, and density and temperature structures applicable to each of the four stages of the entire process: (1) formation of a magnetized cloud core by ambipolar diffusion and evolution to a pivotal state of gravomagneto catastrophe; (2) self-similar collapse of the pivotal configuration and the formation of protostars, disks, and pseudo-disks; (3) onset of a magnetocentrifugally driven, lightly ionized wind from the interaction of an accretion disk and the magnetosphere of the central star, and the driving of bipolar molecular outflows; (4) evolution of pre-main-sequence stars surrounded by dusty accretion disks. For each of these stages and processes, he considers the characteristics of the molecular diagnostics needed to investigate the crucial aspects of the observational problem.

  11. A test of star formation laws in disk galaxies. II. Dependence on dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-05-20

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, Σ {sub g}, and molecular, Σ{sub H2}, gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σ{sub sfr}, of the molecular-rich (Σ{sub H2} ≥ Σ{sub HI}/2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a 'Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)' law, Σ{sub sfr}=A{sub g}Σ{sub g,2}{sup 1.5}; a 'Constant Molecular' law, Σ{sub sfr} = A {sub H2}Σ{sub H2,2}; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz and McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson (KMT09); a 'Gas-Ω' law, Σ{sub sfr}=B{sub Ω}Σ{sub g}Ω; and a shear-driven 'giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision' law, Σ{sub sfr} = B {sub CC}Σ {sub g}Ω(1-0.7β), where β ≡ d ln v {sub circ}/d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to β), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  12. H II Region G46.5-0.2: The Interplay between Ionizing Radiation, Molecular Gas, and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Li, Jin Zeng; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju

    2015-06-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey (13CO J = 1-0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive (12CO, 13CO, C18O J = 3-2, HCO+, and HCN J = 4-3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10‧ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  13. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    . Complementing this study of normal star-forming galaxies, my study of quasar host galaxies utilizes narrow- and medium-band images of eight Palomar-Green (PG) quasars from the WFPC2 and NICMOS instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Using images of a point-spread function (PSF) star in the same filters, I subtract the PSF of the quasar from each of the target images. The residual light images clearly show the host galaxies of the respective quasars. The narrow-band images were chosen to be centered on the Hbeta, [O II ], [O III], and Paalpha emission lines, allowing the use of line ratios and luminosities to create extinction and star formation maps. Additionally, I utilize the line-ratio maps to distinguish AGN-powered line emission from star formation powered line emission with line-diagnostic diagrams. I find star formation in each of the eight quasar host galaxies in my study. The bulk star-formation rates are lower than expected, suggesting that quasar host galaxies may be dynamically more advanced than previously believed. Seven of the eight quasar host galaxies in this study have higher-than-typical mass-specific star-formation rates. Additionally, I see evidence of shocked gas, supporting the hypotheses presented in earlier works that suggest that AGN activity quenches star formation in its host galaxy by disrupting its gas reservoir.

  14. Enhancement of CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) ratios and star formation efficiencies in supergiant H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Rie E.; Espada, Daniel; Komugi, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Kosuke; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Tosaki, Tomoka; Hirota, Akihiko; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Kuno, Nario; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Onodera, Sachiko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-20

    We present evidence that super giant H II regions (GHRs) and other disk regions of the nearby spiral galaxy, M33, occupy distinct locations in the correlation between molecular gas, Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, and the star formation rate surface density, Σ{sub SFR}. This result is based on wide-field and high-sensitivity CO(3-2) observations at 100 pc resolution. Star formation efficiencies (SFEs), defined as Σ{sub SFR}/Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, in GHRs are found to be ∼1 dex higher than in other disk regions. The CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) integrated intensity ratio, R {sub 3-2/1-0}, is also higher than the average over the disk. Such high SFEs and R {sub 3-2/1-0} can reach the values found in starburst galaxies, which suggests that GHRs may be the elements building up a larger-scale starburst region. Three possible contributions to high SFEs in GHRs are investigated: (1) the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor, (2) the dense gas fraction traced by R {sub 3-2/1-0}, and (3) the initial mass function (IMF). We conclude that these starburst-like properties in GHRs can be interpreted by a combination of both a top-heavy IMF and a high dense gas fraction, but not by changes in the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor.

  15. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  16. Comparing M31 and Milky Way satellites: The extended star formation histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio; McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Irwin, Mike; Martin, Nicolas F.; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio F.

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; M{sub V} = –12.0; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; M{sub V} = –7.5; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ∼5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context.

  17. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  18. Early phases of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok, B. J.

    1981-04-01

    Five broad areas of potential star formation in our galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds are presented. The role of gravitational collapse in concentrating matter into eventual stars is examined briefly. The five areas of research are: (1) giant molecular clouds with dimensions of 50 to 100 parsecs and masses equivalent to 100,000 or more suns; (2) the proximity of an H II emission nebula with an embedded or attached cluster of association of O and B stars to a large molecular cloud; (3) the larger so-called globules, notably the roundish and often isolated dark nebulae called Barnard objects, of which 200 or so have been identified within 500 parsecs of the sun; (4) close passage or collisions between interstellar clouds; and (5) supernova explosions. The Large Magellanic Clouds are also examined as an example of an area of potential star formation without the protection of a cosmic dust cloud. Finally, the likelihood that many new stars might possess planets and perhaps even life is discussed.

  19. Embedded Protostellar Disks Around (Sub-)Solar Stars. II. Disk Masses, Sizes, Densities, Temperatures, and the Planet Formation Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2011-03-01

    We present basic properties of protostellar disks in the embedded phase of star formation (EPSF), which is difficult to probe observationally using available observational facilities. We use numerical hydrodynamics simulations of cloud core collapse and focus on disks formed around stars in the 0.03-1.0 M sun mass range. Our obtained disk masses scale near-linearly with the stellar mass. The mean and median disk masses in the Class 0 and I phases (M mean d,C0 = 0.12 M sun, M mdn d,C0 = 0.09 M sun and M mean d,CI = 0.18 M sun, M mdn d,CI = 0.15 M sun, respectively) are greater than those inferred from observations by (at least) a factor of 2-3. We demonstrate that this disagreement may (in part) be caused by the optically thick inner regions of protostellar disks, which do not contribute to millimeter dust flux. We find that disk masses and surface densities start to systematically exceed that of the minimum mass solar nebular for objects with stellar mass as low as M * = 0.05-0.1 M sun. Concurrently, disk radii start to grow beyond 100 AU, making gravitational fragmentation in the disk outer regions possible. Large disk masses, surface densities, and sizes suggest that giant planets may start forming as early as in the EPSF, either by means of core accretion (inner disk regions) or direct gravitational instability (outer disk regions), thus breaking a longstanding stereotype that the planet formation process begins in the Class II phase.

  20. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  1. Multiple star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam L.

    2010-11-01

    In this thesis, I present a study of the formation and evolution of stars, particularly multiple stellar systems. Binary stars provide a key constraint on star formation because any successful model should reproduce the mass-dependent frequency, distribution of separations, and distribution of mass ratios. I have pursued a number of surveys for different ranges of parameter space, all yielding one overarching conclusion: binary formation is fundamentally tied to mass. Solar-mass stars have a high primordial binary frequency (50%--75%) and a wide range of separations (extending to >10,000 AU), but as the system mass decreases, the frequency and separation distribution also decrease. For brown dwarfs, binaries are rare (~10%--15%) and have separations of <5 AU. Inside of this outer separation cutoff, the separation distribution appears to be log-flat for solar-mass stars, and perhaps for lower-mass systems. Solar-mass binary systems appear to have a flat mass ratio distribution, but for primary masses <0.3 Msun, the distribution becomes increasingly biased toward similar-mass companions. My results also constrain the binary formation timescale and the postformation evolutionary processes that sculpt binary populations. The dynamical interaction timescale in sparse associations like Taurus and Upper Sco is far longer than their ages, which suggests that those populations are dynamically pristine. However, binary systems in denser clusters undergo significant dynamical processing that strips outer binary companions; the difference in wide binary properties between my sample and the field is explained by the composite origin of the field population. I also have placed the individual components of young binary systems on the HR diagram in order to infer their coevality. In Taurus, binary systems are significantly more coeval (Δτ~0.5 Myr) than the association as a whole (Δτ~3--5 Myr). Finally, my survey of young very-low-mass stars and brown dwarfs found no planetary

  2. Processes and problems in secondary star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I.; Whitaker, R.W.; Sandford M.T. II

    1984-03-01

    Recent developments relating the conditions in molecular clouds to star formation triggered by a prior stellar generation are reviewed. Primary processes are those that lead to the formation of a first stellar generation. The secondary processes that produce stars in response to effects caused by existing stars are compared and evaluated in terms of the observational data presently available. We discuss the role of turbulence to produce clumpy cloud structures and introduce new work on colliding inter-cloud gas flows leading to non-linear inhomogeneous cloud structures in an intially smooth cloud. This clumpy morphology has important consequences for secondary formation. The triggering processes of supernovae, stellar winds, and H II regions are discussed with emphasis on the consequences for radiation driven implosion as a promising secondary star formation mechanism. Detailed two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamic calculations of radiation driven implosion are discussed. This mechanism is shown to be highly efficient in synchronizing the formation of new stars in congruent to 1-3 x 10/sup 4/ years and could account for the recent evidence for new massive star formation in several UCHII regions. It is concluded that, while no single theory adequately explains the variety of star formation observed, a uniform description of star formation is likely to involve several secondary processes. Advances in the theory of star formation will require multiple dimensional calculations of coupled processes. The important non-linear interactions include hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and magnetic fields.

  3. Star-formation in the Coalsack Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golev, V.; Kaltcheva, N.

    The giant Galactic H II region known as the Coalsack Loop, which is associated with the H I supershell GSH 305+01-24, provides a unique opportunity to study the OB-star influence on the surrounding interstellar material. The bright OB-stars within this region contribute a sufficient wind injection energy consistent with the observed size and expansion velocity of the supershell. The derived age distribution of the OB-stars is suggestive for a continuous star-formation where the youngest stars are located at the supershell's periphery.

  4. Herschel Observations of the W3 GMC (II): Clues to the Formation of Clusters of High-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Martin, P. G.; Polychroni, D.; Schneider, N.; Motte, F.; Bontemps, S.; Hennemann, M.; Men'shchikov, A.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Zavagno, A.; André, Ph.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Di Francesco, J.; Fallscheer, C.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Marston, A.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.

    2015-08-01

    The W3 giant molecular cloud is a prime target for investigating the formation of high-mass stars and clusters. This second study of W3 within the HOBYS Key Program provides a comparative analysis of subfields within W3 to further constrain the processes leading to the observed structures and stellar population. Probability density functions (PDFs) and cumulative mass distributions (CMDs) were created from dust column density maps, quantified as extinction {A}{{V}}. The shape of the PDF, typically represented with a lognormal function at low {A}{{V}} “breaking” to a power-law tail at high {A}{{V}}, is influenced by various processes including turbulence and self-gravity. The breaks can also be identified, often more readily, in the CMDs. The PDF break from lognormal ({A}{{V}}(SF) ≈ \\6-10 mag) appears to shift to higher {A}{{V}} by stellar feedback, so that high-mass star-forming regions tend to have higher PDF breaks. A second break at {A}{{V}}\\gt 50 mag traces structures formed or influenced by a dynamic process. Because such a process has been suggested to drive high-mass star formation in W3, this second break might then identify regions with potential for hosting high-mass stars/clusters. Stellar feedback appears to be a major mechanism driving the local evolution and state of regions within W3. A high initial star formation efficiency in a dense medium could result in a self-enhancing process, leading to more compression and favorable star formation conditions (e.g., colliding flows), a richer stellar content, and massive stars. This scenario would be compatible with the “convergent constructive feedback” model introduced in our previous Herschel study.

  5. Gaining Insight into Star Formation: Resolved Star Formation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebst, Kelley; Scowen, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Until recently astronomers have used star formation laws to measure the star formation rate and star formation efficiency of galaxies only on global scales because of the poor resolution of available data. What I am now capable of producing is a spatially resolved star formation law that can provide direct insight into the physical processes that govern star formation and assess the short-term nature of bursts of star formation and the longer-term nature of larger-scale events that can dictate the global distribution of stars and the ultimate fate of a galaxy as a whole. I am using exquisite narrowband optical data from a variety of sources, including the Hubble Space Telescope, and Kitt Peak National Observatory, etc., in conjunction with infrared data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey and the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, neutral gas data from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, and molecular gas data from the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association Survey of Nearby Galaxies, to provide star formation rates and star formation efficiencies on previously inaccessible small spatial scales across a suite of galaxies that represent a range of star formation environments and scales. My sample includes 18 spiral galaxies ranging from 2.1 to 15.1 Mpc in distance and offers a large range of morphological types (i.e. a large range of star formation environments). I am using these data to test different models of star formation modes under a variety of physical conditions and relate the variations I observe to the known local physical conditions and the associated star formation histories for each locale within each galaxy.This is the heart of the matter - that the nature and evolution of the local physical environment intimately influences how stars can form, how quickly and how massive those stars are allowed to form, and as a result how they shape the local conditions for subsequent star formation. It is this tracking of the stellar ecology that is vital for

  6. Multi-wavelength studies of spectacular ram-pressure stripping of a galaxy. II. Star formation in the tail

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Masafumi; Gu, Liyi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo; Fujita, Yutaka; Akahori, Takuya; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2013-12-01

    With multiband photometric data in public archives, we detected four intracluster star-forming regions in the Virgo Cluster. Two of them were at a projected distance of 35 kpc from NGC 4388 and the other two were 66 kpc away. Our new spectroscopic observations revealed that their recessional velocities were comparable to the ram-pressure-stripped tail of NGC 4388 and confirmed the association. The stellar mass of the star-forming regions ranged from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 4.5} M {sub ☉} except for that of the faintest one, which was <10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The metallicity was comparable to a solar abundance and the age of the stars was ∼10{sup 6.8} yr. Their young stellar age meant that the star formation should have started after the gas was stripped from NGC 4388. This implied in situ condensation of the stripped gas. We also found that two star-forming regions were located near the leading edge of a filamentary dark cloud. The extinction of the filament was smaller than that derived from the Balmer decrement of the star-forming regions, implying that the dust in the filament would be locally dense around the star-forming regions.

  7. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cotton, W. D.; Chandler, C.; Churchwell, E. B.; Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T.; Dougherty, S. M.; Fender, R. P.; Gledhill, T. M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Hindson, L.; Jackson, J. M.; Kurtz, S. E.; Marti, J. [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  8. He II emitters in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: Population III star formation or peculiar stellar populations in galaxies at 2 < z < 4.6?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Adami, C.; Bardelli, S.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B.; Maccagni, D.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to identify He II emitters at 2 < z < 4.6 and to constrain the source of the hard ionizing continuum that powers the He II emission. Methods: We assembled a sample of 277 galaxies with a highly reliable spectroscopic redshift at 2 < z < 4.6 from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) Deep and Ultra-Deep data, and we identified 39 He II λ1640 emitters. We studied their spectral properties, measuring the fluxes, equivalent widths (EW), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) for most relevant lines, including He II λ1640, Lyα line, Si II λ1527, and C IV λ1549. Results: About 10% of galaxies at z ~ 3 and iAB ≤ 24.75 show He II in emission, with rest frame equivalent widths EW0 ~ 1-7 Å, equally distributed between galaxies with Lyα in emission or in absorption. We find 11 (3.9% of the global population) reliable He II emitters with unresolved He II lines (FWHM0 < 1200 km s-1), 13 (4.6% of the global population) reliable emitters with broad He II emission (FWHM0 > 1200 km s-1), 3 active galactic nuclei (AGN), and an additional 12 possible He II emitters. The properties of the individual broad emitters are in agreement with expectations from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) model. Instead, the properties of the narrow emitters are not compatible with this model, nor with predictions of gravitational cooling radiation produced by gas accretion, unless this is severely underestimated by current models by more than two orders of magnitude. Rather, we find that the EW of the narrow He II line emitters are in agreement with expectations for a Population III (PopIII) star formation, if the episode of star formation is continuous, and we calculate that a PopIII star formation rate (SFR) of 0.1-10 M⊙ yr-1 alone is enough to sustain the observed He II flux. Conclusions: We conclude that narrow He II emitters are powered either by the ionizing flux from a stellar population rare at z ~ 0 but much more common at z ~ 3, or by PopIII star formation. As proposed by

  9. APERTURE SYNTHESIS OBSERVATIONS OF CO, HCN, AND 89 GHz CONTINUUM EMISSION TOWARD NGC 604 IN M33: SEQUENTIAL STAR FORMATION INDUCED BY A SUPERGIANT H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Rie; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Kurono, Yasutaka; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Tosaki, Tomoka; Tamura, Yoichi; Kuno, Nario; Kawabe, Ryohei; Sakamoto, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    We present the results from new Nobeyama Millimeter Array observations of CO(1-0), HCN(1-0), and 89 GHz continuum emission toward NGC 604, known as the supergiant H II region in the nearby galaxy M33. Our high spatial resolution images (4.''2 x 2.''6, corresponding to 17 pc x 11 pc physical size) of CO emission allowed us to uncover 10 individual molecular clouds that have masses of (0.8-7.4) x10{sup 5} M{sub sun} and sizes of 5-29 pc, comparable to those of typical Galactic giant molecular clouds. Moreover, we detected for the first time HCN emission in the two most massive clouds and 89 GHz continuum emission at the rims of the 'H{alpha} shells'. The HCN and 89 GHz continuum emission are offset from the CO peak and are distributed in the direction of the central cluster. Three out of ten CO clouds are well correlated with the H{alpha} shells both in spatial and velocity domains, implying an interaction between molecular gas and the expanding H II region. The CO clouds show varieties in star formation efficiencies (SFEs), which are estimated from the 89 GHz emission and combination of H{alpha} and Spitzer 24 {mu}m data. Furthermore, we found that the SFEs decrease with increasing projected distance measured from the heart of the central OB star cluster in NGC 604, suggesting radial changes in the evolutionary stages of the molecular clouds in the course of stellar cluster formation. Our results provide further support to the picture of sequential star formation in NGC 604 initially proposed by Tosaki et al. with the higher spatially resolved molecular clouds, in which an isotropic expansion of the H II region pushes gases outward, which accumulates to form dense molecular clouds, and then induces massive star formations.

  10. Ultraviolet studies of the Magellanic Clouds. II - Internal extinction, formation of massive stars, comparison with other galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Lequeux, J.; Maucherat-Joubert, M.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.

    1980-10-01

    The absolute integrated UV fluxes of the Magellanic Clouds measured by the D 2 B-Aura satellite (Maucherat-Joubert et al., 1980, Paper I) are corrected from interstellar extinction. For the purpose of this correction, we give a detailed discussion of the internal extinction in these galaxies. The corrected fluxes at 1690 Å are compared to the flux calculated for the solar neighbourhood, and used to compare the rate of massive star formation in the three regions. The rate per unit mass of gas is similar in the Large Magellanic Cloud and near the Sun, but 4 times smaller in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We also build quantitative upper HR diagrams and we find that the number of stars contained in similar portions of these diagrams and normalized to the far UV luminosity is roughly the same in all three objects. However, the Small Cloud appears to have relatively more of the brightest stars than the Large Cloud, and the latter than the Galaxy. We discuss the inference of these results on the rate of star formation and the Initial Mass Function. We discuss also for the sake of comparison the case of the irregular galaxies IC 1613, NGC 1569, 4449, 4490, 6822, and of the blue compact galaxy IZw 18.

  11. Star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2009-03-15

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  12. Physics of primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    The study of primordial star formation has a history of nearly sixty years. It is generally thought that primordial stars are one of the key elements in a broad range of topics in astronomy and cosmology, from Galactic chemical evolution to the formation of super-massive blackholes. We review recent progress in the theory of primordial star formation. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation posits that the present-day rich structure of the Universe developed through gravitational amplification of tiny matter density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang. It has become possible to study primordial star formation rigorously within the framework of the standard cosmological model. We first lay out the key physical processes in a primordial gas. Then, we introduce recent developments in computer simulations. Finally, we discuss prospects for future observations of the first generation of stars.

  13. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  14. Embedded star clusters and the formation of the Oort cloud. II. The effect of the primordial solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasser, R.; Duncan, M. J.; Levison, H. F.

    2007-11-01

    This paper deals with Oort cloud formation while the Sun was in an embedded cluster and surrounded by its primordial nebula. This work is a continuation of Brasser et al. [Brasser, R., Duncan, M., Levison, H., 2006. Icarus 184, 59-82], building on the model presented therein, and adding the aerodynamic drag and gravitational potential of the primordial solar nebula. Results are presented of numerical simulations of comets subject to the gravitational influence of the Sun, Jupiter, Saturn, star cluster and primordial solar nebula; some of the simulations included the gravitational influence of Uranus and Neptune as well. The primordial solar nebula was approximated by the minimum-mass Hayashi model [Hayashi, C., Nakozawa, K., Nakagawa, Y., 1985. In: Black, D.C., Matthews, M.S. (Eds.). Protostars and Planets II. Univ. of Arizona Press, Tucson, AZ] whose inner and outer radii have been truncated at various distances from the Sun. A comet size of 1.7 km was used for most of our simulations. In all of our simulations, the density of the primordial solar nebula decayed exponentially with an e-folding time of 2 Myr. It turns out that when the primordial solar nebula extends much beyond Saturn or Neptune, virtually no material will end up in the Oort cloud (OC) during this phase. Instead, the majority of the material will be on circular orbits inside of Jupiter if the inner edge of the disk is well inside Jupiter's orbit. If the disk's inner edge is beyond Jupiter's orbit, most comets end up on orbits in exterior mean-motion resonances with Saturn when Uranus and Neptune are not present. In those cases where the outer edge of the disk is close to Saturn or Neptune, the fraction of material that ends up in the subsequently formed OC is much less than that found in Brasser et al. [Brasser, R., Duncan, M., Levison, H., 2006. Icarus 184, 59-82] for the same cluster densities. This implies that for comets of roughly 2 km in size, the presence of the primordial solar nebula

  15. Star formation in Galactic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M < 100 M⊙), and up to sizes approaching 10 pc for higher mass regions (M > 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  16. Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. II. The Star-formation History of the Starburst Region NGC 2070 in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cignoni, M.; Sabbi, E.; van der Marel, R. P.; Tosi, M.; Zaritsky, D.; Anderson, J.; Lennon, D. J.; Aloisi, A.; de Marchi, G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Smith, L. J.; Zeidler, P.

    2015-10-01

    We present a study of the recent star formation (SF) of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the panchromatic imaging survey Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. In this paper we focus on the stars within 20 pc of the center of 30 Doradus, the starburst region NGC 2070. We recovered the SF history by comparing deep optical and near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with state-of-the-art synthetic CMDs generated with the latest PAdova and TRieste Stellar Evolution Code (PARSEC) models, which include all stellar phases from pre-main-sequence to post-main-sequence. For the first time in this region we are able to measure the SF using intermediate- and low-mass stars simultaneously. Our results suggest that NGC 2070 experienced prolonged activity. In particular, we find that the SF in the region (1) exceeded the average LMC rate ≈ 20 Myr ago, (2) accelerated dramatically ≈ 7 Myr ago, and (3) reached a peak value 1-3 Myr ago. We did not find significant deviations from a Kroupa initial mass function down to 0.5 {M}⊙ . The average internal reddening E(B-V) is found to be between 0.3 and 0.4 mag. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  17. The interstellar medium and star formation in edge-on galaxies. II. NGC 4157, 4565, and 5907

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Kijeong; Wong, Tony; Xue, Rui; Rand, Richard J.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Hulst, J. M. van der; Benjamin, Robert; Murphy, Eric J.

    2014-12-01

    We present a study of the vertical structure of the gaseous and stellar disks in a sample of edge-on galaxies (NGC 4157, 4565, and 5907) using BIMA/CARMA {sup 12}COJ=1→0, VLA Hi, and Spitzer 3.6 μm data. In order to take into account projection effects when we measure the disk thickness as a function of radius, we first obtain the inclination by modeling the radio data. Using the measurement of the disk thicknesses and the derived radial profiles of gas and stars, we estimate the corresponding volume densities and vertical velocity dispersions. Both stellar and gas disks have smoothly varying scale heights and velocity dispersions, contrary to assumptions of previous studies. Using the velocity dispersions, we find that the gravitational instability parameter Q follows a fairly uniform profile with radius and is ⩾1 across the star-forming disk. The star formation law has a slope that is significantly different from those found in more face-on galaxy studies, both in deprojected and pixel-by-pixel plots. Midplane gas pressure based on the varying scale heights and velocity dispersions appears to roughly hold a power-law correlation with the midplane volume density ratio.

  18. Modes of clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfalzner, S.; Kaczmarek, T.; Olczak, C.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The recent realization that most stars form in clusters, immediately raises the question of whether star and planet formation are influenced by the cluster environment. The stellar density in the most prevalent clusters is the key factor here. Whether dominant modes of clustered star formation exist is a fundamental question. Using near-neighbour searches in young clusters, Bressert and collaborators claim this not to be the case. They conclude that - at least in the solar neighbourhood - star formation is continuous from isolated to densely clustered environments and that the environment plays a minor role in star and planet formation. Aims: We investigate under which conditions near-neighbour searches in young clusters can distinguish between different modes of clustered star formation. Methods: Model star clusters with different memberships and density distributions are set up and near-neighbour searches are performed. We investigate the influence of the combination of different cluster modes, observational biases, and types of diagnostic on the results. Results: We find that the specific cluster density profile, the relative sample sizes, the limitations of the observation, and the choice of diagnostic method decide, whether modelled modes of clustered star formation are detected by near-neighbour searches. For density distributions that are centrally concentrated but span a wide density range (for example, King profiles), separate cluster modes are only detectable under ideal conditions (sample selection, completeness) if the mean density of the individual clusters differs by at least a factor of ~65. Introducing a central cut-off can lead to an underestimate of the mean density by more than a factor of ten especially in high density regions. The environmental effect on star and planet formation is similarly underestimated for half of the population in dense systems. Conclusions: Local surface-density distributions are a very useful tool for single

  19. Characterizing Spiral Arm and Interarm Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, K.; Blanc, G. A.; Schinnerer, E.; Groves, B.; Adamo, A.; Hughes, A.; Meidt, S.

    2016-08-01

    Interarm star formation contributes significantly to a galaxy’s star formation budget and provides an opportunity to study stellar birthplaces unperturbed by spiral arm dynamics. Using optical integral field spectroscopy of the nearby galaxy NGC 628 with VLT/MUSE, we construct Hα maps including detailed corrections for dust extinction and stellar absorption to identify 391 H ii regions at 35 pc resolution over 12 kpc2. Using tracers sensitive to the underlying gravitational potential, we associate H ii regions with either arm (271) or interarm (120) environments. Using our full spectral coverage of each region, we find that most physical properties (luminosity, size, metallicity, ionization parameter) of H ii regions are independent of environment. We calculate the fraction of Hα luminosity due to the background of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) contaminating each H ii region, and find the DIG surface brightness to be higher within H ii regions than in the surroundings, and slightly higher within arm H ii regions. Use of the temperature-sensitive [S ii]/Hα line ratio instead of the Hα surface brightness to identify the boundaries of H ii regions does not change this result. Using the dust attenuation as a tracer of the gas, we find depletion times consistent with previous work (2 × 109 yr) with no differences between the arm and interarm, but this is very sensitive to the DIG correction. Unlike molecular clouds, which can be dynamically affected by the galactic environment, we see fairly consistent properties of H ii regions in both arm and interarm environments. This suggests either a difference in star formation and feedback in arms or a decoupling of dense star-forming clumps from the more extended surrounding molecular gas.

  20. Star Formation in the First Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromm, V.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of the first stars and galaxies mark the end of the cosmic dark ages, thus transforming the universe from its initial, pristine state into one of increasing complexity. We will review the current understanding, based on numerical simulations, of this crucial transition in early cosmic history. Specifically, the epoch of first light is predicted to be a two-stage process, where predominantly massive Population III stars form out of pure hydrogen-helium gas in small dark-matter minihalos, followed by Population II stars out of already metal-enriched material inside more massive host halos. Observations with upcoming next-generation telescopes promise to test our emerging theoretical picture of star formation in the first galaxies in ever inceasing detail.

  1. Star formation in the inner Galaxy - a far-infrared and radio study of two H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, D.F.; Dinerstein, H.L.; Harvey, P.M.; Evans, N.J. II; Werner, M.W.

    1985-09-01

    Far-infrared and radio continuum maps have been made of two inner-Galaxy H II region complexes, G30.8-0.0 and G25.4-0.2, along with radio and molecular line measurements at selected positions. The far-IR emission from each region is dominated by two sources. For both G25.4 and G30.8, the distribution of the emission is similar to that of the radio emission, indicating that OB stars provide most of the heating. There is evidence that extinction plays an important role in G30.8, even in the far-IR. A near-IR point source has been detected in G30.8 at the position of peak far-IR color temperature. This source may be the ionizing star for the core of G30.8. Measurement of forbidden S III 9532 A from G25.4SE indicates that the extinction toward this source is very low, which is difficult to reconcile with previously determined distance measurements to this source. 49 references.

  2. DWARF GALAXY FORMATION WITH H{sub 2}-REGULATED STAR FORMATION. II. GAS-RICH DARK GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Madau, Piero; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-10-10

    We present a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of dwarf galaxies at redshifts z ∼> 2.5 using a physically motivated model for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation. Our simulation, performed using the Enzo code and reaching a peak resolution of 109 proper parsecs at z = 2.5, extends the results of Kuhlen et al. to significantly lower redshifts. We show that a star formation prescription regulated by the local H{sub 2} abundance leads to the suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxy halos with M{sub h} ∼< 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} and to a large population of gas-rich 'dark galaxies' at z = 2.5 with low star formation efficiencies and gas depletion timescales >20 Gyr. The fraction of dark galaxies is 60% at M{sub h} ≅ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} and increases rapidly with decreasing halo mass. Dark galaxies form late and their gaseous disks never reach the surface densities, ∼> 5700 M{sub ☉} pc{sup –2} (Z/10{sup –3} Z{sub ☉}){sup –0.88}, that are required to build a substantial molecular fraction. Despite this large population of dark galaxies, we show that our H{sub 2}-regulated simulation is consistent with both the observed luminosity function of galaxies and the cosmological mass density of neutral gas at z ∼> 2.5. Moreover, our results provide a theoretical explanation for the recent detection in fluorescent Lyα emission of gaseous systems at high redshift with little or no associated star formation. We further propose that H{sub 2}-regulation may offer a fresh solution to a number of outstanding 'dwarf galaxy problems' in ΛCDM. In particular, H{sub 2}-regulation leads galaxy formation to become effectively stochastic on mass scales of M{sub h} ∼ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, and thus these massive dwarfs are not 'too big to fail'.

  3. High-Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilke, P.

    2016-05-01

    A review on current theories and observations of high-mass star formation is given. Particularly the influence of magnetic fields and feedback mechanisms, and of varying initial conditions on theories are discussed. The, in my biased view, most important observations to put strong constraints on models of high-mass star formation are presented, in particular bearing on the existence and properties of high-mass starless cores, the role of filaments in the mass transport to high-mass cores, and the properties of disks around high-mass stars.

  4. PROBING THE LOW-REDSHIFT STAR FORMATION RATE AS A FUNCTION OF METALLICITY THROUGH THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENTS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, R.; Stanek, K. Z.; Pogge, R. W.; Prieto, J. L.

    2013-08-10

    Type II supernovae (SNe) can be used as a star formation tracer to probe the metallicity distribution of global low-redshift star formation. We present oxygen and iron abundance distributions of Type II SN progenitor regions that avoid many previous sources of bias. Because iron abundance, rather than oxygen abundance, is of key importance for the late stage evolution of the massive stars that are the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, and because iron enrichment lags oxygen enrichment, we find a general conversion from oxygen abundance to iron abundance. The distributions we present here are the best yet observational standard of comparison for evaluating how different classes of supernovae depend on progenitor metallicity. We spectroscopically measure the gas-phase oxygen abundance near a representative subsample of the hosts of Type II SNe from the first-year Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) SN search, using a combination of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra near the SN location (9 hosts) and new longslit spectroscopy (25 hosts). The median metallicity of these 34 hosts at or near the SN location is 12+log(O/H) = 8.65, with a median error of 0.09. The median host galaxy stellar mass from fits to SDSS photometry is 10{sup 9.9} M{sub Sun }. They do not show a systematic offset in metallicity or mass from a redshift-matched sample of the MPA/JHU value-added catalog. In contrast to previous SN host metallicity studies, this sample is drawn from a single survey. It is also drawn from an areal rather than a targeted survey, so SNe in the lowest-mass galaxies are not systematically excluded. Indeed, the PTF SN search has a slight bias toward following up transients in low mass galaxies. The progenitor region metallicity distribution we find is statistically indistinguishable from the metallicity distribution of Type II SN hosts found by targeted surveys and by samples from multiple surveys with different selection functions. Using the relationship between

  5. Star formation in unperturbed LIRGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Carrera, I.; Olguín, L.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; Verley, S.; Rosado, M.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Repetto, P.; Vázquez, C.; Aguilera, V.

    2011-10-01

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are galaxies with L_{FIR} > 10^11 L_{sun} (Sanders & Mirabel 1996). For a star-forming galaxy to emit at a LIRG level, it must have a very high star formation rate (SFR). In the local Universe, the star formation (SF) is primarily triggered by interactions. However, at intermediate redshift, a large fraction of LIRGs are disk galaxies with little sign of recent merger activity (Zheng et al. 2004). The question arises whether the intermediate redshift LIRGs are ``triggered'' or experiencing ``normal'', if elevated, SF. Understanding these SF processes is important since this type of systems may have contributed to 20% or more of the cosmic star-formation rate in the early Universe (Blain & Phillips 2002).

  6. THE M81 GROUP DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY DDO 165. II. CONNECTING RECENT STAR FORMATION WITH INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM STRUCTURES AND KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; Most, Hans P.; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Warren, Steven R. E-mail: hmost@macalester.edu E-mail: dweisz@astro.umn.edu

    2011-07-01

    We compare the stellar populations and complex neutral gas dynamics of the M81 group dIrr galaxy DDO 165 using data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Array. Cannon et al. in Paper I of this series identified two kinematically distinct H I components, multiple localized high velocity gas features, and eight H I holes and shells (the largest of which spans {approx}2.2 x 1.1 kpc). Using the spatial and temporal information from the stellar populations in DDO 165, we compare the patterns of star formation (SF) over the past 500 Myr with the H I dynamics. We extract localized star formation histories within 6 of the 8 H I holes identified in Paper I, as well as 23 other regions that sample a range of stellar densities and neutral gas properties. From population synthesis modeling, we derive the energy outputs (from stellar winds and supernovae) of the stellar populations within these regions over the last 100 Myr, and compare with refined estimates of the energies required to create the H I holes. In all cases, we find that 'feedback' is energetically capable of creating the observed structures in the interstellar medium (ISM). Numerous regions with significant energy inputs from feedback lack coherent H I structures but show prominent localized high velocity gas features; this feedback signature is a natural product of temporally and spatially distributed SF. In DDO 165, the extended period of heightened SF activity (lasting more than 1 Gyr) is energetically capable of creating the observed holes and high velocity gas features in the neutral ISM.

  7. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. II. Spectral line formation in the atmosphere of a giant located near the RGB tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Ivanauskas, A.; Klevas, J.; Prakapavičius, D.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the role of convection in the formation of atomic and molecular lines in the atmosphere of a red giant star. For this purpose we study the formation properties of spectral lines that belong to a number of astrophysically important tracer elements, including neutral and singly ionized atoms (Li I, N I, O I, Na I, Mg I, Al I, Si I, Si II, S I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, Ti I, Ti II, Cr I, Cr II, Mn I, Fe I, Fe II, Co I, Ni I, Zn I, Sr II, Ba II, and Eu II), and molecules (CH, CO, C2, NH, CN, and OH). Methods: We focus our investigation on a prototypical red giant located close to the red giant branch (RGB) tip (Teff = 3660 K, log g = 1.0, [M/H] = 0.0). We used two types of model atmospheres, 3D hydrodynamical and classical 1D, calculated with the CO5BOLD and LHD stellar atmosphere codes, respectively. Both codes share the same atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, equation of state, and opacities, which allowed us to make a strictly differential comparison between the line formation properties predicted in 3D and 1D. The influence of convection on the spectral line formation was assessed with the aid of 3D-1D abundance corrections, which measure the difference between the abundances of chemical species derived with the 3D hydrodynamical and 1D classical model atmospheres. Results: We find that convection plays a significant role in the spectral line formation in this particular red giant. The derived 3D-1D abundance corrections rarely exceed ± 0.1 dex when lines of neutral atoms and molecules are considered, which is in line with the previous findings for solar-metallicity red giants located on the lower RGB. The situation is different with lines that belong to ionized atoms, or to neutral atoms with high ionization potential. In both cases, the corrections for high-excitation lines (χ > 8 eV) may amount to Δ3D-1D ~ -0.4 dex. The 3D-1D abundance corrections generally show a significant wavelength dependence; in most cases they are smaller in

  8. Star formation in Taurus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, C. A.; Jarrett, Tom

    1994-01-01

    Data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) prototype camera were obtained in a 2.3 sq. deg region in Taurus containing Heiles Cloud 2, a region known from Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) observations to contain a number of very young solar type stars. Data at 1.25 (J), 1.65 (H), and 2.2 (K(sub s)) micrometers are presented. These data are representative of the type and quality of data expected from the planned near-IR surveys, 2MASS and Deep Near-Infrared Survey (DENIS). Near-IR surveys will be useful for determining the large scale variation of extinction with clouds, for determining the luminosity function in nearby clouds down to ranges of 0.1-1.0 solar luminosity, and for finding highly extincted T Tauri stars missed by IRAS because the bulk of their luminosity is emitted shortward of 12 micrometers.

  9. Triggered massive and clustered star formation by combined H II regions G38.91-0.44 and G39.30-1.04

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Lan

    2013-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the triggered star formation occurring in the infrared dark clouds (IRDC) G38.95-0.47 between H II regions G38.91-0.44 and G39.30-1.04, and study the detailed morphology, distribution, and physical parameters of the molecular gas and dust in this region. Methods: We present the radio continuum, infrared, and CO molecular observations of IRDC G38.95-0.47 and its adjacent H II regions G38.91-0.44 (N74), G38.93-0.39 (N75), and G39.30-1.04. The Purple Mountain Observation (PMO) 13.7 m radio telescope was used to detect 12CO J = 1-0, 13CO J = 1-0 and C18O J = 1-0 lines. The carbon monoxide (CO) molecular observations can ensure the real association between the ionized gas and the neutral material observed nearby. To select young stellar objects (YSOs) associated this region, we used the GLIMPSE I catalog. Results: The 13CO J = 1-0 emission presents two large cloud clumps. The clump consistent with IRDC G38.95-0.47 shows a triangle-like shape, and has a steep integrated-intensity gradient toward H II regions G38.91-0.44 and G39.30-1.04, suggesting that the two H II regions have expanded into the IRDC. Four submillmeter continuum sources have been detected in the IRDC G38.95-0.47. Only the G038.95-00.47-M1 source with a mass of 117 M⊙ has outflow and infall motions, indicating a newly forming massive star. We detected a new collimated outflow in the clump compressed by G38.93-0.39. The derived ages of the three H II regions are 6.1 × 105 yr, 2.5 × 105 yr, and 9.0 × 105 yr, respectively. In the IRDC G38.95-0.47, the significant enhancement of several Class I YSOs indicates the presence of some recently formed stars. Comparing the ages of these H II regions with YSOs (Class I sources and massive G038.95-00.47-M1 source), we suggest that YSOs may be triggered by G38.91-0.44 and G39.30-1.04 together, which supports the radiatively driven implosion model. It may be the first time that the triggered star formation has occurred in the IRDC compressed by

  10. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet

  11. Supershells and propagating star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclow, M. M.; Mccray, R.; Kafatos, M.

    1986-01-01

    Correlated supernovae from an OB association can carve large cavities (greater than 100 pc) in the interstellar medium (ISM), and can punch holes completely through the disk of a spiral galaxy. Supernova remnant energy within such a cavity is thermalized before the shock reaches the supershell. Thus stellar wind theory may be used to model these superbubbles. We describe how the evolution of the superbubble depends on the density distribution of the galactic disk gas and the rate of supernovae in the OB association. At a radius of 100 to 300 pc, the supershell becomes gravitationally unstable, forming giant molecular clouds which are the sites for new star formation. This gravitational instability of the supershells provides a physical mechanism for propagating star formation and may account for the observation of bursts of star formation in galaxies.

  12. Angular momentum and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, P. A.

    The present investigation is mainly concerned with the importance of high angular resolution observations in studies of star formation and, in particular, with elucidating the role which angular momentum plays in the process. A brief report is included on recent high angular resolution observations made with the Steward Observatory speckle camera system. A consideration of the angular momentum in interstellar clouds indicates that rotation precludes quasi-spherical contraction. A number of solutions to this angular momentum problem are examined, taking into account questions concerning the help provided by high angular resolution observations for an elucidation of the various possible scenarios of star formation. Technical aspects involved in obtaining suitable data are investigated. It is concluded that high angular resolution observations hold considerable promise for solving at least some of the problems associated with the role of angular momentum in star formation.

  13. Formation of the first stars.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ~10(6) M⊙ and collapsing at redshifts z ≈ 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ~2018, and for 'stellar archaeology', which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae. PMID:24168986

  14. Star formation and gas supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catinella, B.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of how gas cycles in and around galaxies, and how it depends on galaxy properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate, is crucial to understand galaxy formation and evolution. We take advantage of the most sensitive surveys of cold gas in massive galaxies, GASS and COLD GASS, as well as of the state-of-the-art HI blind survey ALFALFA to investigate how molecular and atomic hydrogen reservoirs vary along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies.

  15. Star formation and its triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.

    2016-06-01

    The relation between star formation and gas density appears linear for galaxies on the main sequence, and when the molecular gas is considered. However, the star formation efficiency (SFE) defined as the ratio of SFR to gas surface densities, can be much higher when SF is triggered by a dynamical process such as galaxy interaction or mergers, or even secular evolution and cold gas accretion. I review recent work showing how the SFE can vary as a function of morphological type, environment, or redshift. Physical processes able to explain positive and negative feedback from supernovae or AGN are discussed.

  16. Coevolution of metallicity and star formation in galaxies to z ≃ 3.7. II. A theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie; Dayal, Pratika; Magrini, Laura; Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Recent work suggests that galaxy evolution, and the build-up of stellar mass (M★) over cosmic time, is characterized by changes with redshift of star formation rate (SFR) and oxygen abundance (O/H). In a companion paper, we have compiled a large dataset to study Metallicity Evolution and Galaxy Assembly (MEGA), consisting of ˜1000 galaxies to z ≃ 3.7 with a common O/H calibration. Here we interpret the MEGA scaling relations of M★, SFR, and O/H with an updated version of the model presented by Dayal et al. (2013). This model successfully reproduces the observed O/H ratio of ˜80 000 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to within 0.05-0.06 dex. By extending the model to the higher redshift MEGA sample, we find that although the specific mass loading of outflows does not change measurably during the evolution, the accretion rate and gas content of galaxies increase significantly with redshift. These two effects can explain, either separately or possibly in tandem, the observed lower metal abundance of high-z galaxies.

  17. Absorption of gamma-ray photons in a vacuum neutron star magnetosphere: II. The formation of 'lightnings'

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, Ya. N. Sob'yanin, D. N.

    2011-10-15

    The absorption of a high-energy photon from the external cosmic gamma-ray background in the inner neutron star magnetosphere triggers the generation of a secondary electron-positron plasma and gives rise to a lightning-a lengthening and simultaneously expanding plasma tube. It propagates along magnetic fields lines with a velocity close to the speed of light. The high electron-positron plasma generation rate leads to dynamical screening of the longitudinal electric field that is provided not by charge separation but by electric current growth in the lightning. The lightning radius is comparable to the polar cap radius of a radio pulsar. The number of electron-positron pairs produced in the lightning in its lifetime reaches 10{sup 28}. The density of the forming plasma is comparable to or even higher than that in the polar cap regions of ordinary pulsars. This suggests that the radio emission from individual lightnings can be observed. Since the formation time of the radio emission is limited by the lightning lifetime, the possible single short radio bursts may be associated with rotating radio transients (RRATs).

  18. Star formation in distant galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca-Volmerange, B.

    Scenarios of galactic evolution, essentially based on our knowledge of nearby galaxies have been proposed. Star formation laws, initial mass function, metallicity are the main parameters. The author shortly reviews the present status of these parameters in distant galaxies and gives some deductive conclusions from a comparison with the most distant (z ≥ 3) galaxies.

  19. BUDHIES II: a phase-space view of H I gas stripping and star formation quenching in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Smith, Rory; Candlish, Graeme N.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the effect of ram-pressure from the intracluster medium on the stripping of H I gas in galaxies in a massive, relaxed, X-ray bright, galaxy cluster at z = 0.2 from the Blind Ultra Deep H I Environmental Survey (BUDHIES). We use cosmological simulations, and velocity versus position phase-space diagrams to infer the orbital histories of the cluster galaxies. In particular, we embed a simple analytical description of ram-pressure stripping in the simulations to identify the regions in phase-space where galaxies are more likely to have been sufficiently stripped of their H I gas to fall below the detection limit of our survey. We find a striking agreement between the model predictions and the observed location of H I-detected and non-detected blue (late-type) galaxies in phase-space, strongly implying that ram-pressure plays a key role in the gas removal from galaxies, and that this can happen during their first infall into the cluster. However, we also find a significant number of gas-poor, red (early-type) galaxies in the infall region of the cluster that cannot easily be explained with our model of ram-pressure stripping alone. We discuss different possible additional mechanisms that could be at play, including the pre-processing of galaxies in their previous environment. Our results are strengthened by the distribution of galaxy colours (optical and UV) in phase-space, that suggests that after a (gas-rich) field galaxy falls into the cluster, it will lose its gas via ram-pressure stripping, and as it settles into the cluster, its star formation will decay until it is completely quenched. Finally, this work demonstrates the utility of phase-space diagrams to analyse the physical processes driving the evolution of cluster galaxies, in particular H I gas stripping.

  20. The Three-mm Ultimate Mopra Milky Way Survey. II.Cloud and Star Formation near the Filamentary Ministarburst RCW 106

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hans; Nguyen-Luong, Quang; Martin, Peter G.; Barnes, Peter J.; Muller, Erik; Lowe, Vicki; Lo, Nadia; Cunningham, Maria; Motte, Frédérique; Indermühle, B.; O'Dougherty, Stefan N.; Hernandez, Audra K.; Fuller, Gary A.

    2015-10-01

    We report here a study of gas, dust, and star formation rates (SFRs) in the molecular cloud complexes (MCCs) surrounding the giant H ii region RCW 106 using 12CO and 13CO(1-0) data from the Three-mm Ultimate Mopra Milky way Survey and archival data. We separate the emission in the Galactic Plane around l = 330°-335° and b = -1°-1° into two main MCCs: the RCW 106 (VLSR = -48 km s-1) complex and the MCC331-90 (VLSR = -90 km s-1) complex. While RCW 106 (M ˜ 5.9× {10}6 {M}⊙ ) is located in the Scutum-Centaurus arm at a distance of 3.6 kpc, MCC331-90 (M ˜ 2.8× {10}6 {M}⊙ ) is in the Norma arm at a distance of 5 kpc. Their molecular gas mass surface densities are ˜220 and ˜130 {M}⊙ pc-2, respectively. For the RCW 106 complex, using the 21 cm continuum fluxes and dense clumps counting, we obtain immediate past (˜-0.2 Myr) and immediate future (˜+0.2 Myr) SFRs of {0.25}-0.023+0.09 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1 and 0.12+/- 0.1 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. This results in an immediate past SFR density of {9.5}-0.9+3.4 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1 {{kpc}}-2 and an immediate future SFR density of {4.8}-3.8+3.8 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1 {{kpc}}-2. As both SFRs are higher than the ministarburst threshold, they must be undergoing a ministarburst event although burst peak has already passed. This is one of the most active star forming complexes in the southern sky that is ideal for further investigations of massive star formation and potentially shedding light on the physics of high-redshift starbursts.

  1. Star formation at z=1.47 from HiZELS: an H>α+[O II] double-blind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, David; Best, Philip N.; Matsuda, Yuichi; Smail, Ian; Geach, James E.; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents the results from the first wide and deep dual narrow-band survey to select Hα and [O II] line emitters at z= 1.47 ± 0.02, exploiting synergies between the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope and the Subaru telescope by using matched narrow-band filters in the H and z' bands. The Hα survey at z= 1.47 reaches a 3σ flux limit of FHα≈ 7 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 (corresponding to a limiting star formation rate (SFR) in Hα of ≈7 M⊙ yr-1) and detects ≈200 Hα emitters over 0.7 deg2, while the much deeper [O II] survey reaches an effective flux of ≈7 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 (SFR in [O II] of ˜1 M⊙ yr-1), detecting ≈1400 z= 1.47 [O II] emitters in a matched comoving volume of ˜2.5 × 105 Mpc3. The combined survey results in the identification of 190 simultaneous Hα and [O II] emitters at z= 1.47. Hα and [O II] luminosity functions are derived and both are shown to evolve significantly from z˜ 0 in a consistent way. The SFR density of the Universe at z= 1.47 is evaluated, with the Hα analysis yielding ρSFR= 0.16 ± 0.05 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 and the [O II] analysis ρSFR= 0.17 ± 0.04 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3. The measurements are combined with other studies, providing a self-consistent measurement of the star formation history of the Universe over the last ˜11 Gyr. By using a large comparison sample at z˜ 0.1, derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), [O II]/Hα line ratios are calibrated as probes of dust extinction. Hα emitters at z˜ 1.47 show on average AHα≈ 1 mag, the same as found by SDSS in the local Universe. It is shown that although dust extinction correlates with SFR, the relation evolves by about ˜0.5 mag from z˜ 1.5 to ˜0, with local relations overpredicting the dust extinction corrections at high z by that amount. Stellar mass is found to be a much more fundamental extinction predictor, with the same relation between mass and dust extinction being valid at both z˜ 0 and ˜1.5, at least for low and moderate stellar

  2. Measuring Star Formation Rate and Far-infrared Color in High-redshift Galaxies Using the CO(7-6) and [N II] 205 μm Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Nanyao; Zhao, Yinghe; Xu, C. Kevin; Gao, Yu; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Inami, Hanae; Howell, Justin; Liu, Lijie; Armus, Lee; Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Privon, George C.; Lord, Steven D.; Sanders, David B.; Schulz, Bernhard; van der Werf, Paul P.

    2015-03-01

    To better characterize the global star formation activity in a galaxy, one needs to know not only the star formation rate (SFR) but also the rest-frame, far-infrared color (e.g., the 60-100 μm color, C(60/100)) of the dust emission. The latter probes the average intensity of the dust heating radiation field and scales statistically with the effective SFR surface density in star-forming galaxies including (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs). To this end, here we exploit a new spectroscopic approach involving only two emission lines: CO(7-6) at 372 μm and [N ii] at 205 μm([N ii]205μm). For local (U)LIRGs, the ratios of the CO(7-6) luminosity (LCO(7-6)) to the total infrared luminosity (LIR; 8-1000 μm) are fairly tightly distributed (to within ˜0.12 dex) and show little dependence on C(60/100). This makes LCO(7-6) a good SFR tracer, which is less contaminated by active galactic nuclei than LIR and may also be much less sensitive to metallicity than LCO(1-0). Furthermore, the logarithmic [N ii]205μm/CO(7-6) luminosity ratio depends fairly strongly (at a slope of ˜ -1.4) on C(60/100), with a modest scatter (˜0.23 dex). This makes it a useful estimator on C(60/100) with an implied uncertainty of ˜0.15 (or ≲4 K in the dust temperature (Tdust) in the case of a graybody emission with Tdust ≳ 30 K and a dust emissivity index β ≥ 1). Our locally calibrated SFR and C(60/100) estimators are shown to be consistent with the published data of (U)LIRGs of z up to ˜6.5. Based on Herschel observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  3. Collective Properties of Neutron-star X-Ray Binary Populations of Galaxies. II. Pre-low-mass X-Ray Binary Properties, Formation Rates, and Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadkamkar, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our exploration of the collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binaries in the stellar fields (i.e., outside globular clusters) of normal galaxies. In Paper I of this series, we considered high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this paper (Paper II), we consider low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whose evolutionary scenario is very different from that of HMXBs. We consider the evolution of primordial binaries up to the stage where the neutron star just formed in the supernova explosion of the primary is in a binary with its low-mass, unevolved companion, and this binary has circularized tidally, producing what we call a pre-low-mass X-ray binary (pre-LMXB). We study the constraints on the formation of such pre-LMXBs in detail (since these are low-probability events), and calculate their collective properties and formation rates. To this end, we first consider the changes in the binary parameters in the various steps involved, viz., the common-envelope phase, the supernova, and the tidal evolution. This naturally leads to a clarification of the constraints. We then describe our calculation of the evolution of the distributions of primordial binary parameters into those of pre-LMXB parameters, following the standard evolutionary scenario for individual binaries. We display the latter as both bivariate and monovariate distributions, discuss their essential properties, and indicate the influences of some essential factors on these. Finally, we calculate the formation rate of these pre-LMXBs. The results of this paper will be used in a subsequent one to compute the expected X-ray luminosity function of LMXBs.

  4. Are long gamma-ray bursts biased tracers of star formation? Clues from the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of bright LGRBs. II. Star formation rates and metallicities at z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japelj, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Salvaterra, R.; D'Avanzo, P.; Mannucci, F.; Fernandez-Soto, A.; Boissier, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Atek, H.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Cristiani, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Flores, H.; Gallego, J.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gomboc, A.; Hammer, F.; Perley, D. A.; Pescalli, A.; Petitjean, P.; Puech, M.; Rafelski, M.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and might therefore be a potentially powerful tool for tracing cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z< 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the effect of the environment on GRB formation. Methods: We studied host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z< 1 bright LGRBs. We used the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR), and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplemented the data set with previously measured stellar masses M⋆. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M⋆ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies. Results: We find that LGRB hosts at z< 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to 12 +log ≤ft( frac{OHright)} 8.4-8.5, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are consistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of an increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z< 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless, the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevents us from investigating more quantitatively whether the starburst incidence is such as expected

  5. Influence of Stellar Multiplicity on Planet Formation. II. Planets are Less Common in Multiple-star Systems with Separations Smaller than 1500 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-01

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  6. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. II. Planets are less common in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-20

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  7. Star formation in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Paresce, F.; Sirianni, M.; Spezzi, L.; Andersen, M.; Panagia, N.; Mutchler, M.; SOC, WFC3

    2010-01-01

    We report on the preliminary results of our investigation of the properties of star formation in the 30 Doradus region, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This study makes use of the panchromatic observations recently obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the HST in a number of broad- and narrow-band filters at visible and near infrared wavelengths (U, B, V, Halpha, I, J, H). The data clearly reveal the presence of considerable differential extinction across the field. We characterise and quantify this effect using both young main sequence stars and old red giants, showing that the two populations have different extinction properties, and use this information to derive a statistical reddening correction for each star in the field. We then search for pre-main sequence stars looking for objects with a strong (> 5 sigma) Halpha excess emission and find more than 1000 of them over the entire field. Comparison of their location in the H-R diagram with theoretical pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks reveals that about half of these objects have an age of 3 Myr, compatible with that of the massive stars in the field, whereas the rest have an age of 15 Myr, indicating that more than one episode of star formation has taken place in the recent past in this area. This paper is based on Early Release Science observations made by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this programme.

  8. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  9. Star Formation in Camelopardalis: Cam OB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyder, David Anthony

    Star formation in the Cam OB1 region is investigated. Star formation, in general, is considered in terms of three elements: (a) the structural relationship between the parent molecular clouds and newly formed stars, (b) the temporal evolution of the parent molecular clouds, and (c) the probability of the occurrence of star formation. Star formation in Cam OB1, over the range in l and b considered in this work, is concentrated in the vicinity of Cam R1 and appears to have led to the formation of three distinct stellar groups: (a) Group I, formed ~1 - 50 × 10 6 yr ago, and located spatially and kinematically between two CO complexes, (b) Group II, formed ~1 - 3 × 106 yr ago, and coincident with one of the previously mentioned complexes, and (c) Group III, the youngest group, formed ~1 - 20 × 104 yr ago, and located at the current point of intersection between the two complexes in (a). The mass function (MF) for Groups I and II is similar to the cloud mass function of the parent molecular clouds, i.e., a power-law with exponent α ~ 2. A similar analysis for the Group III stars and associated molecular clouds cannot be performed due to the relatively small numbers in both samples. The star forming efficiency (SFE) in all cases is ~1%. It is proposed that cloud-cloud collisions between the CO complexes in the region triggered the formation of Groups I and III, while Group II was produced by a shock induced by the radiation pressure and stellar winds from the stars in Group I. An analysis of the molecular cloud structure in Cam OB1 and the background Perseus arm also shows that the clouds in both regions are turbulent, and typical of clouds seen elsewhere in the Galaxy. However, the clouds in Cam OB1 show a large dispersion in the degree with which they are self-gravitating, with the larger, warmer clouds being gravitationally bound. The principal data set for this work comprises fully sampled 12CO (J=1-0) observations of the western half of Cam OB1, which were

  10. Feedback During Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen

    2016-01-01

    We present models of photoionization of massive protostellar cores, and show the impact of this ionization feedback on the efficiency of star formation and its observational features. Based on the Core Accretion scenario, we construct the collapse model of rotating massive-protostellar cloud cores together with a protostellar evolutional calculation, including feedback effects from a MHD disk wind, photoionization and radiation pressure. First, the MHD wind creates a bipolar outflow whose opening angle increases over the timescale of mass accretion. The ionizing luminosity dramatically increases after the protostar reaches ~ 5 Msun due to Kelvin-Helmholz contraction, and the MHD wind is photoionized when the protostellar mass reaches ~ 10 - 20 Msun. As the ionizing and bolometric luminosities increase, the outflow opening angle becomes wider due to radiation pressure feedback. By this combination of feedback processes, the envelope is eroded and the mass infall rate is significantly reduced to that arriving only from the disk-shielded equatorial region. At a protostellar mass of ~ 50 - 100 Msun, depending on the initial core properties, the mass accretion is halted by disk photoevaporation. In this way, feedback significantly reduces the star formation efficiency when forming massive stars from massive cloud cores, which could produce a cutoff at the high-mass end of the initial mass function. Along this evolutionary calculation, we also compute the detailed structure of the photoionized regions using a ray-tracing radiative transfer code and evaluate their emission signatures. Their free-free continuum and recombination line emissions are consistent with the variety of observed radio sources associated with massive protostars, i.e., jets and ultra/hyper-compact HII regions. The comparison between our models and such observations enables us to better define the evolutionary sequence of massive star formation.

  11. A HERSCHEL SURVEY OF THE [N II] 205 {mu}m LINE IN LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: THE [N II] 205 {mu}m EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION RATE INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yinghe; Gao Yu; Lu, Nanyao; Xu, C. Kevin; Lord, S.; Howell, J.; Appleton, P.; Mazzarella, J.; Schulz, B.; Isaak, K. G.; Charmandaris, V.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Evans, A.; Iwasawa, K.; Leech, J.; Petric, A. O.; Sanders, D. B.; Van der Werf, P. P.

    2013-03-01

    We present, for the first time, a statistical study of [N II] 205 {mu}m line emission for a large sample of local luminous infrared galaxies using Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE FTS) data. For our sample of galaxies, we investigate the correlation between the [N II] luminosity (L{sub [N{sub II]}}) and the total infrared luminosity (L{sub IR}), as well as the dependence of L{sub [N{sub II]}}/L{sub IR} ratio on L{sub IR}, far-infrared colors (IRAS f{sub 60}/f{sub 100}), and the [O III] 88 {mu}m to [N II] luminosity ratio. We find that L{sub [N{sub II]}} correlates almost linearly with L{sub IR} for non-active galactic nucleus galaxies (all having L{sub IR} < 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) in our sample, which implies that L{sub [N{sub II]}} can serve as a star formation rate tracer which is particularly useful for high-redshift galaxies that will be observed with forthcoming submillimeter spectroscopic facilities such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Our analysis shows that the deviation from the mean L{sub [N{sub II]}}-L{sub IR} relation correlates with tracers of the ionization parameter, which suggests that the scatter in this relation is mainly due to the variations in the hardness, and/or ionization parameter, of the ambient galactic UV field among the sources in our sample.

  12. Fast H-alpha variations on a rapidly rotating, cool main-sequence star. II - Cloud formation and ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier Cameron, A.; Robinson, R. D.

    1989-05-01

    Time resolved H-alpha spectra of AB Doradus are presented that confirm a model in which large prominence-like condensations of neutral material are trapped in corotation with the stellar magnetic field. The results suggest that the entire confining field is deformed outward by the increasing centrifugal force acting on the corotating cloud materials as the cloud density increases. The angular momentum loss rate from the cloud ejections is shown to be sufficient to brake the rotation of the star's convective envelope on a time-scale of no more than 10 to the 8th yr.

  13. LINE PROFILES OF CORES WITHIN CLUSTERS. II. SIGNATURES OF DYNAMICAL COLLAPSE DURING HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S.; Beuther, Henrik; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2013-07-01

    Observations of atomic or molecular lines can provide important information about the physical state of star-forming regions. In order to investigate the line profiles from dynamical collapsing massive star-forming regions (MSFRs), we model the emission from hydrodynamic simulations of a collapsing cloud in the absence of outflows. By performing radiative transfer calculations, we compute the optically thick HCO{sup +} and optically thin N{sub 2}H{sup +} line profiles from two collapsing regions at different epochs. Due to large-scale collapse, the MSFRs have large velocity gradients, reaching up to 20 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1} across the central core. The optically thin lines typically contain multiple velocity components resulting from the superposition of numerous density peaks along the line of sight. The optically thick lines are only marginally shifted to the blue side of the optically thin line profiles, and frequently do not have a central depression in their profiles due to self-absorption. As the regions evolve, the lines become brighter and the optically thick lines become broader. The lower-order HCO{sup +} (1-0) transitions are better indicators of collapse than the higher-order (4-3) transitions. We also investigate how the beam sizes affect profile shapes. Smaller beams lead to brighter and narrower lines that are more skewed to the blue in HCO{sup +} relative to the true core velocity, but show multiple components in N{sub 2}H{sup +}. High-resolution observations (e.g., with Atacama Large Millimeter Array) can test these predictions and provide insights into the nature of MSFRs.

  14. Star Formation in Henize 206

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    explosion millions of years ago. The shock waves from that explosion impacted a cloud of nearby hydrogen gas, compressed it, and started a new generation of star formation. The death of one star led to the birth of many new stars. This is particularly evident in the MIPS inset, where the 24-micron emission peaks correspond to newly formed stars. The ultraviolet and visible-light photons from the new stars are absorbed by surrounding dust and re-radiated at longer infrared wavelengths, where it is detected by Spitzer.

    This emission nebula was cataloged by Karl Henize (HEN-eyes) while spending 1948-1951 in South Africa doing research for his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Michigan. Henize later became a NASA astronaut and, at age 59, became the oldest rookie to fly on the Space Shuttle during an eight-day flight of the Challenger in 1985. He died just short of his 67th birthday in 1993 while attempting to climb the north face of Mount Everest, the world's highest peak.

  15. Relativistic jets and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Wagner, Alex; Slatyer Sutherland, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    We are conducting simulations of jets interacting with molecular and atomic gas on scales of a few kpc in forming galaxies. Competing processes, such as the dispersion of gas in the galaxy and star formation in the high-pressure environment determine whether positive or negative feedback predominates. We shall present our new simulations including an assessment of these different effects. Our simulations also predict the velocity and velocity dispersion of atomic and molecular gas in galaxies, which are undergoing interaction with relativistic jets. These results are of interest to radio and optical spectral imaging observations of galaxies undergoing feedback.

  16. Star formation: Sibling rivalry begins at birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2015-02-01

    High-resolution astronomical observations of a nearby molecular gas cloud have revealed a quadruplet of stars in the act of formation. The system is arguably the youngest multiple star system detected so far. See Letter p.213

  17. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN NGC 2074

    SciTech Connect

    Fleener, Christine E.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Payne, James T.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2010-01-15

    Spitzer observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have revealed a large population of young stellar objects (YSOs), but complementary high-resolution images in the optical or near-IR wavelengths are still needed to resolve the multiplicity and immediate environments of the YSOs. The Hubble Space Telescope imaged the star-forming region NGC 2074 in the LMC during its 100,000th orbit, providing an opportunity to more closely examine the YSOs and their environments in this region. We have studied the 10 YSO candidates identified from Spitzer observations, confirming their nature and determining their physical parameters by modeling their spectral energy distributions. The majority of the YSOs and central stars of ultracompact H II regions in NGC 2074 have masses consistent with spectral types of early B to late O. The co-existence of massive early-type O stars and the less massive YSOs indicates that their formation may have started at a similar time, a few 10{sup 5} yr ago. NGC 2074 provides an opportunity to study the evolution of massive stars at their infancy.

  18. STAR FORMATION IN 30 DORADUS

    SciTech Connect

    De Marchi, Guido; Spezzi, Loredana; Sirianni, Marco; Andersen, Morten; Paresce, Francesco; Panagia, Nino; Mutchler, Max; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard; Beccari, Giacomo; Balick, Bruce; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Marcella Carollo, C.; Disney, Michael J.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.

    2011-09-20

    Using observations obtained with the Wide-Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have studied the properties of the stellar populations in the central regions of 30 Dor in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The observations clearly reveal the presence of considerable differential extinction across the field. We characterize and quantify this effect using young massive main-sequence stars to derive a statistical reddening correction for most objects in the field. We then search for pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars by looking for objects with a strong (>4{sigma}) H{alpha} excess emission and find about 1150 of them over the entire field. Comparison of their location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks for the appropriate metallicity reveals that about one-third of these objects are younger than {approx}4 Myr, compatible with the age of the massive stars in the central ionizing cluster R 136, whereas the rest have ages up to {approx}30 Myr, with a median age of {approx}12 Myr. This indicates that star formation has proceeded over an extended period of time, although we cannot discriminate between an extended episode and a series of short and frequent bursts that are not resolved in time. While the younger PMS population preferentially occupies the central regions of the cluster, older PMS objects are more uniformly distributed across the field and are remarkably few at the very center of the cluster. We attribute this latter effect to photo-evaporation of the older circumstellar disks caused by the massive ionizing members of R 136.

  19. Star Formation in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Paresce, Francesco; Panagia, Nino; Beccari, Giacomo; Spezzi, Loredana; Sirianni, Marco; Andersen, Morten; Mutchler, Max; Balick, Bruce; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C. Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Saha, Abhijit; Silk, Joseph I.; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Young, Erick T.

    2011-09-01

    Using observations obtained with the Wide-Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have studied the properties of the stellar populations in the central regions of 30 Dor in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The observations clearly reveal the presence of considerable differential extinction across the field. We characterize and quantify this effect using young massive main-sequence stars to derive a statistical reddening correction for most objects in the field. We then search for pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars by looking for objects with a strong (>4σ) Hα excess emission and find about 1150 of them over the entire field. Comparison of their location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks for the appropriate metallicity reveals that about one-third of these objects are younger than ~4 Myr, compatible with the age of the massive stars in the central ionizing cluster R 136, whereas the rest have ages up to ~30 Myr, with a median age of ~12 Myr. This indicates that star formation has proceeded over an extended period of time, although we cannot discriminate between an extended episode and a series of short and frequent bursts that are not resolved in time. While the younger PMS population preferentially occupies the central regions of the cluster, older PMS objects are more uniformly distributed across the field and are remarkably few at the very center of the cluster. We attribute this latter effect to photo-evaporation of the older circumstellar disks caused by the massive ionizing members of R 136. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  20. Orion and theories of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, R. B.

    1982-10-01

    Small-scale phenomena involved in the formation of stars and molecular clouds are discussed in connection with formation processes occurring in the Orion nebula. The Orion region is noted to display a large scale filamentary structure and complex velocity field, suggesting a turbulent formation process. The effects of gravity, shock compression, and tidal processes are considered, including the sequence of accelerated star formation within a molecular cloud once stars have formed the cloud. It is suggested that massive stars are forming in the centrally located IR source 0.1 pc from the Trapezium and will blow away the surrounding gas relatively soon. Mass spectra from T Tauri and Orion stars are compared, indicating the Orion young star cluster is more evolved, with the associated gas cloud having become denser as massive star formation accelerates accretion.

  1. A possible formation channel for blue hook stars in globular cluster II - Effects of metallicity, mass ratio, tidal enhancement efficiency and helium abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenxin; Zhao, Gang; Zeng, Aihua; Shen, Lihua; Lan, Zhongjian; Jiang, Dengkai; Han, Zhanwen

    2016-09-01

    Employing tidally enhanced stellar wind, we studied in binaries the effects of metallicity, mass ratio of primary to secondary, tidal enhancement efficiency and helium abundance on the formation of blue hook (BHk) stars in globular clusters (GCs). Totally, 28 sets of binary models combined with different input parameters are studied. For each set of binary model, we presented the range of initial orbital periods which is needed to produce BHk stars in binaries. All the binary models could produce BHk stars within different range of initial orbital periods. We also compared our results with the observation in the Teff-logg diagram of GC NGC 2808 and ω Cen. Most of the BHk stars in these two GCs locate well in the region predicted by our theoretical models, especially when C/N enhanced model atmospheres is considered. We found that mass ratio of primary to secondary and tidal enhancement efficiency have little effects on the formation of BHk stars in binaries, while metallicity and helium abundance would play important roles, especially for helium abundance. Specifically, with helium abundance increasing in binary models, the space range of initial orbital periods needed to produce BHk stars becomes obviously wider, regardless of other input parameters adopted. Our results were discussed with recent observations and other theoretical models.

  2. Infrared observations of OB star formation in NGC 6334

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, P. M.; Gatley, I.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared photometry and maps from 2 to 100 microns are presented for three of the principal far infrared sources in NGC 6334. Each region is powered by two or more very young stars. The distribution of dust and ionized gas is probably strongly affected by the presence of the embedded stars; one of the sources is a blister H II region, another has a bipolar structure, and the third exhibits asymmetric temperature structure. The presence of protostellar objects throughout the region suggests that star formation has occurred nearly simultaneously in the whole molecular cloud rather than having been triggered sequentially from within. Previously announced in STAR as N83-16263

  3. Star formation sustained by gas accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy

    2014-07-01

    Numerical simulations predict that metal-poor gas accretion from the cosmic web fuels the formation of disk galaxies. This paper discusses how cosmic gas accretion controls star formation, and summarizes the physical properties expected for the cosmic gas accreted by galaxies. The paper also collects observational evidence for gas accretion sustaining star formation. It reviews evidence inferred from neutral and ionized hydrogen, as well as from stars. A number of properties characterizing large samples of star-forming galaxies can be explained by metal-poor gas accretion, in particular, the relationship among stellar mass, metallicity, and star-formation rate (the so-called fundamental metallicity relationship). They are put forward and analyzed. Theory predicts gas accretion to be particularly important at high redshift, so indications based on distant objects are reviewed, including the global star-formation history of the universe, and the gas around galaxies as inferred from absorption features in the spectra of background sources.

  4. Triggered star formation in the environment of young massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Naab, T.; Heitsch, F.; Burkert, A.

    Recent observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope show clear evidence that star formation takes place in the surrounding of young massive O-type stars, which are shaping their environment due to their powerful radiation and stellar winds. In this work we investigate the effect of ionising radiation of massive stars on the ambient interstellar medium (ISM): In particular we want to examine whether the UV-radiation of O-type stars can lead to the observed pillar-like structures and can trigger star formation. We developed a new implementation, based on a parallel Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code (VINE), that allows an efficient treatment of the effect of ionising radiation from massive stars on their turbulent gaseous environment. Here we present first results at very high resolution. We show that ionising radiation can trigger the collapse of an otherwise stable molecular cloud. The arising structures resemble observed structures (e.g. the pillars of creation in the Eagle Nebula (M16) or the Horsehead Nebula B33). Including the effect of gravitation we find small regions that can be identified as formation places of individual stars. We conclude that ionising radiation from massive stars alone can trigger substantial star formation in molecular clouds.

  5. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  6. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS PAIRS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. II. EVIDENCE FOR TIDALLY ENHANCED STAR FORMATION AND BLACK HOLE ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xin; Shen Yue; Strauss, Michael A.

    2012-01-20

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are occasionally seen in pairs, suggesting that tidal encounters are responsible for the accretion of material by both central supermassive black holes (BHs). In Paper I of this series, we selected a sample of AGN pairs with projected separations r{sub p} < 100 h{sup -1}{sub 70} kpc and velocity offsets <600 km s{sup -1} from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and quantified their frequency. In this paper, we address the BH accretion and recent star formation properties in their host galaxies. AGN pairs experience stronger BH accretion, as measured by their [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosities (corrected for contribution from star formation) and Eddington ratios, than do control samples of single AGNs matched in redshift and host-galaxy stellar mass. Their host galaxies have stronger post-starburst activity and younger mean stellar ages, as indicated by stronger H{delta} absorption and smaller 4000 A break in their spectra. The BH accretion and recent star formation in the host galaxies both increase with decreasing projected separation in AGN pairs, for r{sub p} {approx}< 10-30 h{sup -1}{sub 70} kpc. The intensity of BH accretion, the post-starburst strength, and the mean stellar ages are correlated between the two AGNs in a pair. The luminosities and Eddington ratios of AGN pairs are correlated with recent star formation in their host galaxies, with a scaling relation consistent with that observed in single AGNs. Our results suggest that galaxy tidal interactions enhance both BH accretion and host-galaxy star formation in close AGN pairs, even though the majority of low-redshift AGNs are not coincident with on-going interactions.

  7. Star formation around isolated T Tauri stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, W.; Pfau, W.; Henning, T.

    1996-02-01

    The authors want to present their search for young stellar objects around the two isolated T Tau stars TW Hya (Rucinski and Krautter 1983) and CoD -29°8887 (de la Reza et al. 1989). From the known spectroscopic features of these objects, TW Hya is to be classified as a classical T Tau star (CTTS), but it is not associated with a dark cloud region like all other known CTTSs. The same situation turns out for the weak-line T Tau star (WTTS) CoD -29°8887. One possible explanation for their isolated position is that they have formed from small dark clouds or globules, which were later destroyed. The authors carried out two ROSAT PSPC observations pointing at TW Hya and CoD -29°8887 and used a source detection procedure considering all the standard ROSAT energy bands to test this hypothesis. Spectroscopic follow-up observations were made for 24 possible T Tauri candidates, but there are no further low-mass young stellar objects in the vicinity of the two targets. The study shows that the objects are definitely not formed in a cluster at the positions of the objects.

  8. Studying the evolution of galaxies in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr - II. The importance of environment in the suppression of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsakis, T.; Dultzin, D.; Ciesla, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Appleton, P. N.; Charmandaris, V.; Krongold, Y.; Guillard, P.; Alatalo, K.; Zezas, A.; González, J.; Lanz, L.

    2016-06-01

    We present an in depth study on the evolution of galaxy properties in compact groups over the past 3 Gyr. We are using the largest multiwavelength sample to-date, comprised 1770 groups (containing 7417 galaxies), in the redshift range of 0.01 < z < 0.23. To derive the physical properties of the galaxies, we rely on ultraviolet (UV)-to-infrared spectral energy distribution modelling, using CIGALE. Our results suggest that during the 3 Gyr period covered by our sample, the star formation activity of galaxies in our groups has been substantially reduced (3 to 10 times). Moreover, their star formation histories as well as their UV-optical and mid-infrared colours are significantly different from those of field and cluster galaxies, indicating that compact group galaxies spend more time transitioning through the green valley. The morphological transformation from late-type spirals to early-type galaxies occurs in the mid-infrared transition zone rather than in the UV-optical green valley. We find evidence of shocks in the emission line ratios and gas velocity dispersions of the late-type galaxies located below the star forming main sequence. Our results suggest that in addition to gas stripping, turbulence and shocks might play an important role in suppressing the star formation in compact group galaxies.

  9. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING). II. Molecular Gas Star Formation Law and Depletion Time across the Blue Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A.; Ott, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kiloparsec and kiloparsec scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ({\\Sigma _H_2}\\gtrsim 20 M ⊙ pc-2) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, N mol ~ 0.96 ± 0.16, with a molecular gas depletion time, τmol dep ~ 2.30 ± 1.32 Gyr. We show that in the molecular regions of our galaxies there are no clear correlations between τmol dep and the free-fall and effective Jeans dynamical times throughout the sample. We do not find strong trends in the power-law index of the spatially resolved molecular gas star formation law or the molecular gas depletion time across the range of galactic stellar masses sampled (M * ~ 109.7-1011.5 M ⊙). There is a trend, however, in global measurements that is particularly marked for low-mass galaxies. We suggest that this trend is probably due to the low surface brightness CO J = 1-0, and it is likely associated with changes in CO-to-H2 conversion factor.

  10. A simple theory of bimodal star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, J.

    1987-01-01

    A model of bimodal star formation is presented, wherein massive stars form in giant molecular clouds (GNC), at a rate regulated by supernovae energy feedback through the interstellar medium, the heat input also ensuring that the initial mass function (IMF) remains skewed towards massive stars. The low mass stars form at a constant rate. The formation of the GMC is governed by the dynamics of the host galaxy through the rotation curve and potential perturbations such as a spiral density wave. The characteristic masses, relative normalizations, and rates of formation of the massive and low mass modes of star formation may be tightly constrained by the requirements of the chemical evolution in the Solar Neighborhood. Good fits were obtained for the age metallicity relation and the metallicity structure of thin disk and spheroid stars only for a narrow range of these parameters.

  11. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Cote, Stephanie; Schade, David E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2012-09-20

    We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

  12. Star-forming galaxy models: Blending star formation into TREESPH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated star-formation algorithms into a hybrid N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (TREESPH) in order to describe the star forming properties of disk galaxies over timescales of a few billion years. The models employ a Schmidt law of index n approximately 1.5 to calculate star-formation rates, and explicitly include the energy and metallicity feedback into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Modeling the newly formed stellar population is achieved through the use of hybrid SPH/young star particles which gradually convert from gaseous to collisionless particles, avoiding the computational difficulties involved in creating new particles. The models are shown to reproduce well the star-forming properties of disk galaxies, such as the morphology, rate of star formation, and evolution of the global star-formation rate and disk gas content. As an example of the technique, we model an encounter between a disk galaxy and a small companion which gives rise to a ring galaxy reminiscent of the Cartwheel (AM 0035-35). The primary galaxy in this encounter experiences two phases of star forming activity: an initial period during the expansion of the ring, and a delayed phase as shocked material in the ring falls back into the central regions.

  13. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Qin Shengli

    2012-05-20

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and kinematic temperature {approx}20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.

  14. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Waller, William H.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Patten, Brian M.; Tamura, Motohide E-mail: william.waller@tufts.edu E-mail: bpatten@nsf.gov

    2009-03-15

    At {approx} 400 pc, the Horsehead Nebula (B33) is the closest radiatively sculpted pillar to the Sun, but the state and extent of star formation in this structure is not well understood. We present deep near-infrared (IRSF/SIRIUS JHK {sub S}) and mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) observations of the Horsehead Nebula to characterize the star-forming properties of this region and to assess the likelihood of triggered star formation. Infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are used to identify young stars based on infrared excess emission and positions to the right of the zero-age main sequence, respectively. Of the 45 sources detected at both near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, three bona fide and five candidate young stars are identified in this 7' x 7' region. Two bona fide young stars have flat infrared spectral energy distributions and are located at the western irradiated tip of the pillar. The spatial coincidence of the protostars at the leading edge of this elephant trunk is consistent with the radiation-driven implosion model of triggered star formation. There is no evidence, however, for sequential star formation within the immediate {approx} 1.'5 (0.17 pc) region from the cloud/H II region interface.

  15. Properties and Formation of Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharina, M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Many key problems in astrophysics involve research on the properties of star clusters, for example: stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, the history of star formation in galaxies, formation dynamics of galaxies and their subsystems, the calibration of the fundamental distance scale in the universe, and the luminosity functions of stars and star clusters. This review is intended to familiarize the reader with modern observational and theoretical data on the formation and evolution of star clusters in our galaxy and others. Unsolved problems in this area are formulated and research on ways to solve them is discussed. In particular, some of the most important current observational and theoretical problems include: (1) a more complete explanation of the physical processes in molecular clouds leading to the formation and evolution of massive star clusters; (2) observation of these objects in different stages of evolution, including protoclusters, at wavelengths where interstellar absorption is minimal; and, (3) comparison of the properties of massive star clusters in different galaxies and of galaxies during the most active star formation phase at different red shifts. The main goal in solving these problems is to explain the variations in the abundance of chemical elements and in the multiple populations of stars in clusters discovered at the end of the twentieth century.

  16. The Embedded Phase of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tak, Floris

    2000-11-01

    This thesis studies the physical and chemical structure of a set of massive young stars which are surrounded by a thick envelope of dust and gas, the earliest known phase of massive star formation. The primary scientific questions addressed are: (i) What is the evolutionary order of the phenomena associated with massive star formation? (ii) What is the physical and chemical structure of the envelopes of massive young stars? How do they compare to those of low-mass stars? Do specific molecules trace different stages? (iii) What are the masses of any circumstellar disks, and on what time scales are they dispersed? To answer these questions, a sample of infrared and submillimeter sources has been selected on high luminosity, close distance, isolated location and high mid-infrared flux. We present observations of these sources with single-dish submillimeter antennas, millimeter interferometers and near-infrared spectroscopy, and also discuss ISO spectra. For the interpretation, we have developed models with a detailed physical structure, combined with chemical differentiation, which is strongly coupled to the temperature. Some of the conclusions are: The envelopes of massive young stars are well described by centrally heated spherical models, with masses of ~ 100-1000 Modot within radii of ~0.1 pc. For a power-law density structure n(r) = n0 (r / r0)-α, we find α = 1.0-1.5 for the younger sources, significantly lower than α ≅ 2 found for the envelopes of low-mass stars at a comparable stage of evolution. This difference may indicate that the support against gravitational collapse in high-mass cores is by nonthermal (e.g., turbulent) pressure, and in low-mass cores by thermal pressure. For the more evolved sources, α = 1.5-2.0 fits the data best. Unlike in low-mass star formation, the near-infrared emission decreases as the envelope warms up, indicates that the hot dust close to the star is destroyed and/or pushed out by stellar radiation or mass loss. The

  17. RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF ORION-LIKE STAR CLUSTERS. II. THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION FROM WINDS, TURBULENCE, AND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2012-07-20

    We report a series of simulations of the formation of a star cluster similar to the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), including both radiative transfer and protostellar outflows, and starting from both smooth and self-consistently turbulent initial conditions. Each simulation forms >150 stars and brown dwarfs, yielding a stellar mass distribution that ranges from <0.1 M{sub Sun} to >10 M{sub Sun }. We show that a simulation that begins with self-consistently turbulent density and velocity fields embedded in a larger turbulent volume, and that includes protostellar outflows, produces an initial mass function (IMF) that is consistent both with that of the ONC and the Galactic field, at least within the statistical power provided by the number of stars formed in our simulations. This is the first simulation published to date that reproduces the observed IMF in a cluster large enough to contain massive stars, and where the peak of the mass function is determined by a fully self-consistent calculation of gas thermodynamics rather than a hand-imposed equation of state. This simulation also produces a star formation rate that, while still somewhat too high, is much closer to observed values than if we omit either the larger turbulent volume or the outflows. Moreover, we show that the combination of outflows, self-consistently turbulent initial conditions, and turbulence continually fed by motions on scales larger than that of the protocluster yields an IMF that is in agreement with observations and invariant with time, resolving the 'overheating' problem in which simulations without these features have an IMF peak that shifts to progressively higher masses over time as more and more of the gas is heated, inconsistent with the observed invariance of the IMF. The simulation that matches the observed IMF also qualitatively reproduces the observed trend of stellar multiplicity strongly increasing with mass. We show that this simulation produces massive stars from distinct massive

  18. Star formation in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromm, Volker

    We investigate the formation of the first stars in the universe. In the context of hierarchical models of structure formation, these Population III stars are expected to form in high or peaks of mass ˜106 M⊙ , collapsing at redshifts ≃20-30. We present an exploratory survey, based on numerical simulations using the SPH method. The main results are: (1) Just before the onset of gravitational instability, the primordial gas attains a characteristic temperature of a few 100 K, and a density of 103-104cm-3, with corresponding Jeans mass MJ of ˜10 3 M⊙ . These characteristic values have robust explanation in the microphysics of H2 cooling, related to the minimum temperature that can be reached with the H2 coolant, and to the critical density at which the transition takes place between levels being populated according to NLTE, and according to LTE. The gas fragments into clumps with initial masses close to MJ. This result is remarkably insensitive to the initial conditions, and suggests that the first stars might have been quite massive. (2) The later evolutionary stages, during which the clumps grow in mass due to accretion and merging with other clumps, are quite sensitive to the initial conditions. The key process in building up very massive clumps, with masses up to a few times 104 M⊙ , is merging. (3) We follow the collapse of a clump up to central densities of ˜1014cm-3. Three-body reactions are very efficient in converting the hydrogen into fully molecular form. A central core of ˜102 M⊙ is in a state of free-fall, leaving behind an extended envelope with an isothermal profile. No further subfragmentation is seen. (4) We calculate the generic spectral signature of a population of massive stars at high redshifts. The production rate of ionizing radiation per stellar mass by stars more massive than ˜100 M⊙ is larger by ˜1 order of magnitude for hydrogen and He I, and by ˜2 orders of magnitude for He II, than the emission from a Salpeter IMF.

  19. The Star Formation Relation in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schruba, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    I review observational studies of the large-scale star formation process in nearby galaxies. A wealth of new multi-wavelength data provide an unprecedented view on the interplay of the interstellar medium and (young) stellar populations on a few hundred parsec scale in 100+ galaxies of all types. These observations enable us to relate detailed studies of star formation in the Milky Way to the zoo of galaxies in the distant universe. Within the disks of spiral galaxies, recent star formation strongly scales with the local amount of molecular gas (as traced by CO) with a molecular gas depletion time of ˜2 Gyr. This is consistent with the picture that stars form in giant molecular clouds that have about universal properties. Galaxy centers and star-bursting galaxies deviate from this normal trend as they show enhanced star formation per unit gas mass suggesting systematic changes in the molecular gas properties and especially the dense gas fraction. In the outer disks of spirals and in dwarf galaxies, the decreasing availability of atomic gas inevitably limits the amount of star formation, though with large local variations. The critical step for the gas-stars cycle seems therefore to be the formation of a molecular gas phase, a process that shows complex dependencies on various environmental properties and is being investigated by intensive simulational work.

  20. Star formation in the Magellanic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frogel, Jay A.

    1987-01-01

    Because of their proximity, the Magellanic Clouds provide the opportunity to conduct a detailed study of the history and current state of star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies. There is considerable evidence that star formation in the Clouds was and is proceeding in a manner different from that found in a typical well-ordered spiral galaxy. Star formation in both Clouds appears to have undergone a number of relatively intense bursts. There exist a number of similarities and differences in the current state of star formation in the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way. Examination of Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) sources with ground based telescopes allows identification of highly evolved massive stars with circumstellar shells as well as several types of compact emission line objects.

  1. Star formation rate in the solar neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cignoni, Michele

    2006-08-01

    This thesis develops a method for obtaining the star formation histories of a mixed, resolved population through the use of color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). The method is applied to the derivation of the local star formation rate, modeling observations of the Hipparcos satellite wigth synthetic CMDs computed for different star formation histories with an updated stellar evolution library. Parallax and photometric uncertainties are included explicitly and corrected using the Bayesian Richardson-Lucy algorithm. We find that the solar neighborhood star formation rate has a characteristic timescale for variation of about 6 Gyr, with a maximum activity close to 3 Gyr ago. This suggests a global, rather than local, star forming event. The summary and conclusions are included here, the full thesis is available at the URL listed above.

  2. The void galaxy survey: Star formation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygu, B.; Kreckel, K.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Peletier, R.; van de Weygaert, R.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the star formation properties of 59 void galaxies as part of the Void Galaxy Survey (VGS). Current star formation rates are derived from H α and recent star formation rates from near-UV imaging. In addition, infrared 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 μm Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer emission is used as star formation and mass indicator. Infrared and optical colours show that the VGS sample displays a wide range of dust and metallicity properties. We combine these measurements with stellar and H I masses to measure the specific SFRs (SFR/M*) and star formation efficiencies ({SFR/{M }_H I}). We compare the star formation properties of our sample with galaxies in the more moderate density regions of the cosmic web, `the field'. We find that specific SFRs of the VGS galaxies as a function of stellar and H I mass are similar to those of the galaxies in these field regions. Their SFR α is slightly elevated than the galaxies in the field for a given total H I mass. In the global star formation picture presented by Kennicutt-Schmidt, VGS galaxies fall into the regime of low average star formation and correspondingly low H I surface density. Their mean {SFR α /{M}_{H I} and SFR α/M* are of the order of 10- 9.9 yr- 1. We conclude that while the large-scale underdense environment must play some role in galaxy formation and growth through accretion, we find that even with respect to other galaxies in the more mildly underdense regions, the increase in star formation rate is only marginal.

  3. Nonuniversal Star Formation Efficiency in Turbulent ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Vadim A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of a star formation prescription in which star formation efficiency (SFE) depends on local gas density and turbulent velocity dispersion, as suggested by direct simulations of SF in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We test the model using a simulation of an isolated Milky-Way-sized galaxy with a self-consistent treatment of turbulence on unresolved scales. We show that this prescription predicts a wide variation of local SFE per free-fall time, {ε }{ff} ∼ 0.1%–10%, and gas depletion time, {t}{dep} ∼ 0.1–10 Gyr. In addition, it predicts an effective density threshold for star formation due to suppression of {ε }{ff} in warm diffuse gas stabilized by thermal pressure. We show that the model predicts star formation rates (SFRs) in agreement with observations from the scales of individual star-forming regions to the kiloparsec scales. This agreement is nontrivial, as the model was not tuned in any way and the predicted SFRs on all scales are determined by the distribution of the GMC-scale densities and turbulent velocities σ in the cold gas within the galaxy, which is shaped by galactic dynamics. The broad agreement of the star formation prescription calibrated in the GMC-scale simulations with observations both gives credence to such simulations and promises to put star formation modeling in galaxy formation simulations on a much firmer theoretical footing.

  4. Nonuniversal Star Formation Efficiency in Turbulent ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Vadim A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of a star formation prescription in which star formation efficiency (SFE) depends on local gas density and turbulent velocity dispersion, as suggested by direct simulations of SF in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We test the model using a simulation of an isolated Milky-Way-sized galaxy with a self-consistent treatment of turbulence on unresolved scales. We show that this prescription predicts a wide variation of local SFE per free-fall time, {ɛ }{ff} ˜ 0.1%–10%, and gas depletion time, {t}{dep} ˜ 0.1–10 Gyr. In addition, it predicts an effective density threshold for star formation due to suppression of {ɛ }{ff} in warm diffuse gas stabilized by thermal pressure. We show that the model predicts star formation rates (SFRs) in agreement with observations from the scales of individual star-forming regions to the kiloparsec scales. This agreement is nontrivial, as the model was not tuned in any way and the predicted SFRs on all scales are determined by the distribution of the GMC-scale densities and turbulent velocities σ in the cold gas within the galaxy, which is shaped by galactic dynamics. The broad agreement of the star formation prescription calibrated in the GMC-scale simulations with observations both gives credence to such simulations and promises to put star formation modeling in galaxy formation simulations on a much firmer theoretical footing.

  5. Infrared observations of OB star formation in NGC 6334

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, P. M.; Gatley, I.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared photometry and maps from 2 to 100 microns are presented for three of the principal far infrared sources in NGC 6334. Each region is powered by two or more very young stars. The distribution of dust and ionized gas is probably strongly affected by the presence of the embedded stars; one of the sources is a blister H II region, another has a bipolar structure, and the third exhibits asymmetric temperature structure. The presence of protostellar objects throughout the region suggests that star formation has occurred nearly simultaneously in the whole molecular cloud rather than having been triggered sequentially from within.

  6. CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). II. MOLECULAR GAS STAR FORMATION LAW AND DEPLETION TIME ACROSS THE BLUE SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Xue Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A.; Ott, Juergen

    2012-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kiloparsec and kiloparsec scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}>20 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, N{sub mol} {approx} 0.96 {+-} 0.16, with a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} {approx} 2.30 {+-} 1.32 Gyr. We show that in the molecular regions of our galaxies there are no clear correlations between {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} and the free-fall and effective Jeans dynamical times throughout the sample. We do not find strong trends in the power-law index of the spatially resolved molecular gas star formation law or the molecular gas depletion time across the range of galactic stellar masses sampled (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 9.7}-10{sup 11.5} M{sub Sun }). There is a trend, however, in global measurements that is particularly marked for low-mass galaxies. We suggest that this trend is probably due to the low surface brightness CO J = 1-0, and it is likely associated with changes in CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor.

  7. The Center for Star Formation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D.; Bell, K. R.; Laughlin, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Center for Star Formation Studies, a consortium of scientists from the Space Science Division at Ames and the Astronomy Departments of the University of California at Berkeley and Santa Cruz, conducts a coordinated program of theoretical research on star and planet formation. Under the directorship of D. Hollenbach (Ames), the Center supports postdoctoral fellows, senior visitors, and students; meets regularly at Ames to exchange ideas and to present informal seminars on current research; hosts visits of outside scientists; and conducts a week-long workshop on selected aspects of star and planet formation each summer.

  8. FINE-STRUCTURE Fe II* EMISSION AND RESONANT Mg II EMISSION IN z {approx} 1 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kornei, Katherine A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Martin, Crystal L.; Coil, Alison L.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of the prevalence, strength, and kinematics of ultraviolet Fe II and Mg II emission lines in 212 star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 selected from the DEEP2 survey. We find Fe II* emission in composite spectra assembled on the basis of different galaxy properties, indicating that Fe II* emission is common at z {approx} 1. In these composites, Fe II* emission is observed at roughly the systemic velocity. At z {approx} 1, we find that the strength of Fe II* emission is most strongly modulated by dust attenuation, and is additionally correlated with redshift, star formation rate, and [O II] equivalent width, such that systems at higher redshifts with lower dust levels, lower star formation rates, and larger [O II] equivalent widths show stronger Fe II* emission. We detect Mg II emission in at least 15% of the individual spectra and we find that objects showing stronger Mg II emission have higher specific star formation rates, smaller [O II] linewidths, larger [O II] equivalent widths, lower dust attenuations, and lower stellar masses than the sample as a whole. Mg II emission strength exhibits the strongest correlation with specific star formation rate, although we find evidence that dust attenuation and stellar mass also play roles in the regulation of Mg II emission. Future integral field unit observations of the spatial extent of Fe II* and Mg II emission in galaxies with high specific star formation rates, low dust attenuations, and low stellar masses will be important for probing the morphology of circumgalactic gas.

  9. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  10. Educational Applications of Star Formation Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, William; Clemens, Cathy; Green, Paul

    2005-07-01

    Research into the formation of stars involves many exciting physical processes -- from vast magnetized clouds collapsing under their own weight, to thermonuclear reactions igniting inside dense stellar cores, to powerful jets being shot from proto-planetary disks. Star formation research also touches on many aspects of the educational enterprise that is ongoing in schools, museums, and other community venues. In this presentation, we will (1) show how the science of star formation relates to the various learning goals and standards that currently underlie formal K-14 science and technology education, (2) describe the various opportunities that exist for space scientists to get involved in educational outreach, and (3) provide some examples of available resources that support educational outreach involving star formation.

  11. THE JAMES CLERK MAXWELL TELESCOPE NEARBY GALAXIES LEGACY SURVEY. II. WARM MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN THREE FIELD SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, B. E.; Wilson, C. D.; Sinukoff, E.; Israel, F. P.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Serjeant, S.; Bendo, G. J.; Clements, D. L.; Brinks, E.; Irwin, J. A.; Knapen, J. H.; Leech, J.; Tan, B. K.; Matthews, H. E.; Muehle, S.; Mortimer, A. M. J.; Petitpas, G.; Spekkens, K.; Tilanus, R. P. J.; Usero, A. E-mail: wilson@physics.mcmaster.c E-mail: israel@strw.leidenuniv.n

    2010-05-01

    We present the results of large-area {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 emission mapping of three nearby field galaxies, NGC 628, NGC 3521, and NGC 3627, completed at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey. These galaxies all have moderate to strong {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 detections over large areas of the fields observed by the survey, showing resolved structure and dynamics in their warm/dense molecular gas disks. All three galaxies were part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample, and as such have excellent published multiwavelength ancillary data. These data sets allow us to examine the star formation properties, gas content, and dynamics of these galaxies on sub-kiloparsec scales. We find that the global gas depletion time for dense/warm molecular gas in these galaxies is consistent with other results for nearby spiral galaxies, indicating this may be independent of galaxy properties such as structures, gas compositions, and environments. Similar to the results from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey, we do not see a correlation of the star formation efficiency with the gas surface density consistent with the Schmidt-Kennicutt law. Finally, we find that the star formation efficiency of the dense molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 is potentially flat or slightly declining as a function of molecular gas density, the {sup 12}CO J = 3-2/J = 1-0 ratio (in contrast to the correlation found in a previous study into the starburst galaxy M83), and the fraction of total gas in molecular form.

  12. Star formation relations in nearby molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Neal J. II; Heiderman, Amanda; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin

    2014-02-20

    We test some ideas for star formation relations against data on local molecular clouds. On a cloud by cloud basis, the relation between the surface density of star formation rate and surface density of gas divided by a free-fall time, calculated from the mean cloud density, shows no significant correlation. If a crossing time is substituted for the free-fall time, there is even less correlation. Within a cloud, the star formation rate volume and surface densities increase rapidly with the corresponding gas densities, faster than predicted by models using the free-fall time defined from the local density. A model in which the star formation rate depends linearly on the mass of gas above a visual extinction of 8 mag describes the data on these clouds, with very low dispersion. The data on regions of very massive star formation, with improved star formation rates based on free-free emission from ionized gas, also agree with this linear relation.

  13. How Galactic Environment Regulates Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidt, Sharon E.

    2016-02-01

    In a new simple model I reconcile two contradictory views on the factors that determine the rate at which molecular clouds form stars—internal structure versus external, environmental influences—providing a unified picture for the regulation of star formation in galaxies. In the presence of external pressure, the pressure gradient set up within a self-gravitating turbulent (isothermal) cloud leads to a non-uniform density distribution. Thus the local environment of a cloud influences its internal structure. In the simple equilibrium model, the fraction of gas at high density in the cloud interior is determined simply by the cloud surface density, which is itself inherited from the pressure in the immediate surroundings. This idea is tested using measurements of the properties of local clouds, which are found to show remarkable agreement with the simple equilibrium model. The model also naturally predicts the star formation relation observed on cloud scales and at the same time provides a mapping between this relation and the closer-to-linear molecular star formation relation measured on larger scales in galaxies. The key is that pressure regulates not only the molecular content of the ISM but also the cloud surface density. I provide a straightforward prescription for the pressure regulation of star formation that can be directly implemented in numerical models. Predictions for the dense gas fraction and star formation efficiency measured on large-scales within galaxies are also presented, establishing the basis for a new picture of star formation regulated by galactic environment.

  14. A Galaxy Blazes With Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are studying the colors of star clusters to determine the age and history of starburst galaxies, a technique somewhat similar to the process of learning the age of a tree by counting its rings. One such galaxy, Galaxy NGC 3310, a hotbed of star formation showcased in this HST photograph, is forming clusters of stars at a prodigious rate. The image shows several hundred star clusters, visible as the bright blue diffuse objects tracing the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young stars can be seen throughout the galaxy. The star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show their ages range between about one million and more that one hundred million years. This suggests the starburst 'turned on' more than 100 million years ago.

  15. Dissecting star formation in N159

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indebetouw, Remy

    2013-10-01

    We propose to investigate star formation as a function of time, space, and mass in the Large Magellanic Cloud star formation region N159. We will combine HST photometry in V, I, J, H, and Halpha equivalent filters with our already scheduled Atacama Large {sub} Millimeter Array {ALMA; PI Fukui} and our existing Australia Telescope Compact Array {ATCA; PI Seale and PI Chen} observations. These datasets will allow us for the first time to completely characterize protostars, HII regions, and molecular gas in this reduced-metallicity region. The region is a remarkable laboratory, containing at once a spontaneously cluster-forming giant molecular cloud {GMC}, an arguably triggered star-forming GMC, and a more quiescent GMC.We will use color-magnitude diagram {CMD} and spectral energy distribution {SED} modeling to separate redenning, circumstellar dust emission, and pre-main-sequence spectral type for each star, mapping not only current star formation activity but its history {over the last 50Myr using pre-main-sequence stars, and over a Hubble time using classical CMD fitting}. We will use Halpha excess to further characterize the HII regions and all currently accreting protostars with ages up to 50 Myr. We will resolve many limitations of previous Spitzer-based star formation studies, and search for variations in the stellar initial mass function. We will test whether there is a gas density threshold for star formation, and investigate the extent to which environment and feedback also play a role in how galaxies evolve by turning gas into stars.

  16. Induced star formation in interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennicutt, R. C.; Roettiger, K. A.; Keel, W. C.; Vanderhulst, J. M.; Hummel, E.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of H alpha emission line fluxes and FIR fluxes in approx. 100 interacting spirals were used to investigate the effects of close tidal interactions on the disk and nuclear star formation rates in galaxies. Two samples of interacting spirals were studied, a complete sample of close pairs, and a set of strongly perturbed systems from the Arp atlas. Both the integrated H alpha luminosities and FIR luminosities are enhanced in the interacting galaxies, indicating that the encounters indeed trigger massive star formation in many cases. The response of individual galaxies is highly variable, however. A majority of the interacting spirals exhibit normal star formation rates, while a small fraction are undergoing bursts with luminosities which are rarely, if ever, observed in noninteracting systems. Virtually all of the latter are in the Arp sample, indicating that the Arp atlas is heavily biased to the most active star forming systems.

  17. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  18. STAR FORMATION IN TWO LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Ashburn, Allison; Wright, Teresa; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Rubin, Vera C.; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Struve, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We examined star formation in two very luminous (M{sub V} = –22 to –23) Sc-type spiral galaxies, NGC 801 and UGC 2885, using ultra-deep Hα images. We combine these Hα images with UBV and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey JHK images and H I maps to explore the star formation characteristics of disk galaxies at high luminosity. Hα traces star formation in these galaxies to 4-6 disk scale lengths, but the lack of detection of Hα further out is likely due to the loss of Lyman continuum photons. Considering gravitational instabilities alone, we find that the gas and stars in the outer regions are marginally stable in an average sense, but considering dissipative gas and radial and azimuthal forcing, the outer regions are marginally unstable to forming spiral arms. Star formation is taking place in spiral arms, which are regions of locally higher gas densities. Furthermore, we have traced smooth exponential stellar disks over four magnitudes in V-band surface brightness and 4-6 disk scale lengths, in spite of a highly variable gravitational instability parameter. Thus, gravitational instability thresholds do not seem relevant to the stellar disk. One possibility for creating an exponential disk is that the molecular cloud densities and star formation rates have exponential profiles and this fact forces the stellar disk to build up such a profile. Another possibility is that the stellar disk is continuously adjusted to an exponential shape regardless of the star formation profile, for example, through global dynamical processes that scatter stars. However, such scattering processes are only known to operate in spiral systems, in which case they cannot explain the same dilemma of smooth exponential disks observed in dwarf irregular galaxies.

  19. Nearby regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Cunningham, Nathaniel; Moeckel, Nickolas; Smith, Nathan

    Observations of the nearest regions of massive star formation such as Orion are reviewed. Early-type stars in the local OB associations, as well as their superbubbles and supershells provide a fossil record of massive star birth in the Solar vicinity over about the last 40 Myr. This record shows that most massive stars are born from dense, high-pressure, hot cores which spawn transient clusters that dissipate into the field soon after formation. A large fraction (15 to 30%) of massive stars are high-velocity runaways moving at more than 20 km s^{-1}. High-mass stars have a larger companion fraction than their lower-mass siblings. The Orion star forming complex contains the nearest site of on-going massive star formation. Studies of the Orion Nebula and the dense molecular cloud core located immediately behind the HII region provide our sharpest view of massive star birth. This region has formed a hierarchy of clusters within clusters. The Trapezium, OMC-1S, and OMC-1 regions represent three closely spaced sub-clusters within the more extended Orion Nebula Cluster. The oldest of these sub-clusters, which consists of the Trapezium stars, has completely emerged from its natal core. The OMC-1S and OMC-1 regions, are still highly embedded and forming clusters of additional moderate and high mass stars. Over a dozen YSOs embedded in OMC-1S are driving jets and outflows, many of which are injecting energy and momentum into the Orion Nebula. Recent proper motion measurements indicate that the Becklin-Neugebauer object is a high-velocity star moving away from the OMC1 core with a velocity of 30 km s^{-1}, making it the youngest high-velocity star known. Source I may be moving in the opposite direction with a velocity of about 12 km s^{-1}. The projected separation between source I and BN was less than few hundred AU about 500 years ago. The spectacular bipolar molecular outflow and system of shock-excited H_2 fingers emerging from OMC-1 has a dynamical age of about 1100

  20. High mass star formation in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoville, N. Z.; Good, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    The Galactic distributions of HI, H2, and HII regions are reviewed in order to elucidate the high mass star formation occurring in galactic spiral arms and in active galactic nuclei. Comparison of the large scale distributions of H2 gas and radio HII regions reveals that the rate of formation of OB stars depends on (n sub H2) sup 1.9 where (n sub H2) is the local mean density of H2 averaged over 300 pc scale lengths. In addition the efficiency of high mass star formation is a decreasing function of cloud mass in the range 200,000 to 3,000,000 solar mass. These results suggest that high mass star formation in the galactic disk is initiated by cloud-cloud collisions which are more frequent in the spiral arms due to orbit crowding. Cloud-cloud collisions may also be responsible for high rates of OB star formation in interacting galaxies and galactic nuclei. Based on analysis of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) and CO data for selected GMCs in the Galaxy, the ratio L sub IR/M sub H2 can be as high as 30 solar luminosity/solar mass for GMCs associated with HII regions. The L sub IR/M sub H2 ratios and dust temperature obtained in many of the high luminosity IRAS galaxies are similar to those encountered in galactic GMCs with OB star formation. High mass star formation is therefore a viable explanation for the high infrared luminosity of these galaxies.

  1. Local-density-driven clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, G.; Pfalzner, S.

    2013-01-01

    Context. A positive power-law trend between the local surface densities of molecular gas, Σgas, and young stellar objects, Σ ⋆ , in molecular clouds of the solar neighbourhood has recently been identified. How it relates to the properties of embedded clusters, in particular to the recently established radius-density relation, has so far not been investigated. Aims: We model the development of the stellar component of molecular clumps as a function of time and initial local volume density. Our study provides a coherent framework able to explain both the molecular-cloud and embedded-cluster relations quoted above. Methods: We associate the observed volume density gradient of molecular clumps to a density-dependent free-fall time. The molecular clump star formation history is obtained by applying a constant star formation efficiency per free-fall time, ɛff. Results: For the volume density profiles typical of observed molecular clumps (i.e. power-law slope ≃ -1.7), our model gives a star-gas surface-density relation of the form Σ⋆ ∝ Σgas2, which agrees very well with the observations. Taking the case of a molecular clump of mass M0 ≃ 104 M⊙ and radius R ≃ 6 pc experiencing star formation during 2 Myr, we derive what star formation efficiency per free-fall time matches the normalizations of the observed and predicted (Σ ⋆ , Σgas) relations best. We find ɛff ≃ 0.1. We show that the observed growth of embedded clusters, embodied by their radius-density relation, corresponds to a surface density threshold being applied to developing star-forming regions. The consequences of our model in terms of cluster survivability after residual star-forming gas expulsion are that, owing to the locally high star formation efficiency in the inner part of star-forming regions, global star formation efficiency as low as 10% can lead to the formation of bound gas-free star clusters.

  2. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Chambers, John; Duncan, Martin J.; Adams, Fred

    2003-01-01

    Most stars reside in multiple star systems; however, virtually all models of planetary growth have assumed an isolated single star. Numerical simulations of the collapse of molecular cloud cores to form binary stars suggest that disks will form within such systems. Observations indirectly suggest disk material around one or both components within young binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such circumstellar disks, they can remain in stable orbits within the binary star systems for eons. We are simulating the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets within binary star systems, using a new, ultrafast, symplectic integrator that we have developed for this purpose. We show that the late stages of terrestrial planet formation can indeed take place in a wide variety of binary systems and we have begun to delineate the range of parameter space for which this statement is true. Results of our initial simulations of planetary growth around each star in the alpha Centauri system and other 'wide' binary systems, as well as around both stars in very close binary systems, will be presented.

  3. Using young massive star clusters to understand star formation and feedback in high-redshift-like environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmore, S.; Barnes, A.; Battersby, C.; Bally, J.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Dale, J.; Henshaw, J.; Walker, D.; Rathborne, J.; Testi, L.; Ott, J.; Ginsburg, A.

    2016-05-01

    The formation environment of stars in massive stellar clusters is similar to the environment of stars forming in galaxies at a redshift of 1 - 3, at the peak star formation rate density of the Universe. As massive clusters are still forming at the present day at a fraction of the distance to high-redshift galaxies they offer an opportunity to understand the processes controlling star formation and feedback in conditions similar to those in which most stars in the Universe formed. Here we describe a system of massive clusters and their progenitor gas clouds in the centre of the Milky Way, and outline how detailed observations of this system may be able to: (i) help answer some of the fundamental open questions in star formation and (ii) quantify how stellar feedback couples to the surrounding interstellar medium in this high-pressure, high-redshift analogue environment.

  4. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  5. Complex organic molecules and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmann, A.; Faure, A.

    2014-12-01

    Star forming regions are characterised by the presence of a wealth of chemical species. For the past two to three decades, ever more complex organic species have been detected in the hot cores of protostars. The evolution of these molecules in the course of the star forming process is still uncertain, but it is likely that they are partially incorporated into protoplanetary disks and then into planetesimals and the small bodies of planetary systems. The complex organic molecules seen in star forming regions are particularly interesting since they probably make up building blocks for prebiotic chemistry. Recently we showed that these species were also present in the cold gas in prestellar cores, which represent the very first stages of star formation. These detections question the models which were until now accepted to account for the presence of complex organic molecules in star forming regions. In this article, we shortly review our current understanding of complex organic molecule formation in the early stages of star formation, in hot and cold cores alike and present new results on the formation of their likely precursor radicals.

  6. ON STAR FORMATION RATES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Genzel, Reinhard; Magnelli, Benjamin; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Altieri, Bruno; Andreani, Paola; Aussel, Herve; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Cimatti, Andrea; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maiolino, Roberto; McGrath, Elizabeth J.

    2011-09-01

    We compare multi-wavelength star formation rate (SFR) indicators out to z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-South field. Our analysis uniquely combines U to 8 {mu}m photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24 {mu}m and PACS 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m photometry from the PEP, and H{alpha} spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24 {mu}m to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of L{sub IR} that are in the median consistent with the L{sub IR} derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low-to-intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV} ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR{sub UV+IR} {approx}> 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and redshifts (z {approx}> 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that H{alpha}-based SFRs at 1.5 < z < 2.6 are consistent with SFR{sub SED} and SFR{sub UV+IR} provided extra attenuation toward H II regions is taken into account (A{sub V,neb} = A{sub V,continuum}/0.44). With the cross-calibrated SFR indicators in hand, we perform a consistency check on the star formation histories inferred from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling. We compare the observed SFR-M relations and mass functions at a range of redshifts to equivalents that are computed by evolving lower redshift galaxies backward in time. We find evidence for underestimated stellar ages when no stringent constraints on formation epoch are applied in SED modeling. We demonstrate how resolved SED modeling, or alternatively deep UV data, may help to overcome this bias. The age bias is most severe for galaxies with young stellar populations and reduces toward older systems. Finally, our analysis suggests that SFHs typically vary on timescales that are long (at least several 100 Myr) compared to the galaxies' dynamical time.

  7. Star Formation through the Chemical Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, K.

    2013-09-01

    Star formation is the process that connects the physical and the observable universe, that lights up the stars and creates planets. Yet to this day our understanding of it remains highly uncertain: the mechanism that is responsible for the fragmentation of star-forming clouds and that regulates the contraction of interstellar gas to form pre-stellar objects and protostars remains the subject of intense debate. At the heart of the problem lies the difficulty in observing star-forming sites and obtaining directly the initial conditions of star formation: molecular hydrogen, the raw material of star formation and the dominant constituent of interstellar clouds that act as stellar nurseries, does not have any transitions that are excitable and thus observable at the chillingly low temperatures of molecular clouds. For this reason, observations of star-forming sites rely heavily on the use of molecular tracers? chemical compounds present in molecular clouds. However, the abundance of these tracers is not constant: it is a result of a complex network of chemical reactions, and it depends on the age, density, and dynamical history of the star-forming site. In this talk, I will discuss how the coupling between chemistry and dynamics can help us probe the initial conditions of star formation and the origin of protostars. To this end, we have studied a variety of dynamical models describing the evolution of prestellar molecular cloud cores that cover the entire spectrum of proposed mechanisms, including pure hydrodynamical collapse and magnetically mediated collapse at various levels of importance of the magnetic field in the cloud dynamics. These models have been coupled to a network of chemical reactions that follow the relative abundances for ~100 molecular species, by solving the nonequilibrium chemical reactions for the first time simultaneously with the dynamical equations. I will present highlights from the results of this work, including newly proposed observables

  8. Star Formation from Galaxies to Globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2002-09-01

    The origin of the empirical laws of galactic scale star formation is considered in view of the self-similar nature of interstellar gas and the observation that most local clusters are triggered by specific high-pressure events. The empirical laws suggest that galactic scale gravity is involved in the first stages of star formation, but they do not identify the actual triggering mechanisms for clusters in the final stages. Many triggering processes satisfy the empirical laws, including turbulence compression and expanding shell collapse. The self-similar nature of the gas and associated young stars suggests that turbulence is more directly involved, but the energy source for this turbulence is not clear, and the small-scale morphology of gas around most embedded clusters does not look like a random turbulent flow. Most clusters appear to be triggered by other nearby stars. Such a prominent local influence makes it difficult to understand the universality of the Kennicutt and Schmidt laws on galactic scales. A unified view of multiscale star formation avoids most of these problems. The Toomre and Kennicutt surface density thresholds, along with the large-scale gas and star formation morphology, imply that ambient self-gravity produces spiral arms and giant cloud complexes and at the same time drives much of the turbulence that leads to self-similar structures. Localized energy input from existing clusters and field supernovae drives turbulence and cloud formation too, while triggering clusters directly in preexisting clouds. The hierarchical structure in the gas made by turbulence ensures that the triggering time scales with size, thereby giving the Schmidt law over a wide range of scales and the size-duration correlation for young star fields. Reanalysis of the Schmidt law from a local point of view suggests that the efficiency of star formation is determined by the fraction of the gas above a critical density of around 105 m(H2) cm-3. Such high densities probably

  9. Cepheid Associates: Star Formation and Distance Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remage Evans, Nancy

    2013-10-01

    XMM-Newton observations are powerful discriminants between young stars and the old field population because of the well known relation between the age of low mass stars and their X-ray strength. We use this property to identify young resolved physical companions of Cepheids and also low mass members of clusters containing Cepheids. This will probe the maximum separation in Cepheid binaries, a diagnostic of star formation. The target list contains the 5 brightest Cepheids in the recent analysis of Cepheids in clusters (Anderson, et al. 2013). This project will identify low mass cluster members which provide a calibration of the distances of clusters.

  10. WINGS-SPE II: A catalog of stellar ages and star formation histories, stellar masses and dust extinction values for local clusters galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Moretti, A.; Bettoni, D.; Bressan, A.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.

    2011-02-01

    Context. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy clusters Survey (wings) is a project whose primary goal is to study the galaxy populations in clusters in the local universe (z < 0.07) and of the influence of environment on their stellar populations. This survey has provided the astronomical community with a high quality set of photometric and spectroscopic data for 77 and 48 nearby galaxy clusters, respectively. Aims: In this paper we present the catalog containing the properties of galaxies observed by the wings SPEctroscopic (wings-spe) survey, which were derived using stellar populations synthesis modelling approach. We also check the consistency of our results with other data in the literature. Methods: Using a spectrophotometric model that reproduces the main features of observed spectra by summing the theoretical spectra of simple stellar populations of different ages, we derive the stellar masses, star formation histories, average age and dust attenuation of galaxies in our sample. Results: ~ 5300 spectra were analyzed with spectrophotometric techniques, and this allowed us to derive the star formation history, stellar masses and ages, and extinction for the wings spectroscopic sample that we present in this paper. Conclusions: The comparison with the total mass values of the same galaxies derived by other authors based on sdss data, confirms the reliability of the adopted methods and data. Based on observations taken at the Anglo Australian Telescope (3.9 m- AAT), and at the William Herschel Telescope (4.2 m- WHT).Full Table 2 is available in electronic form both at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/526/A45, and by querying the wings database at http://web.oapd.inaf.it/wings/new/index.html

  11. Formation Channels for Blue Straggler Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Melvyn B.

    In this chapter we consider two formation channels for blue straggler stars: (1) the merger of two single stars via a collision, and (2) those produced via mass transfer within a binary. We review how computer simulations show that stellar collisions are likely to lead to relatively little mass loss and are thus effective in producing a young population of more-massive stars. The number of blue straggler stars produced by collisions will tend to increase with cluster mass. We review how the current population of blue straggler stars produced from primordial binaries decreases with increasing cluster mass. This is because exchange encounters with third, single stars in the most massive clusters tend to reduce the fraction of binaries containing a primary close to the current turn-off mass. Rather, their primaries tend to be somewhat more massive and have evolved off the main sequence, filling their Roche lobes in the past, often converting their secondaries into blue straggler stars (but more than 1 Gyr or so ago and thus they are no longer visible today as blue straggler stars).

  12. STARS MDT-II targets mission

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, B.A.; White, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    The Strategic Target System (STARS) was launched successfully on August 31, 1996 from the Kauai Test Facility (KTF) at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF). The STARS II booster delivered a payload complement of 26 vehicles atop a post boost vehicle. These targets were designed and the mission planning was achieved to provide for a dedicated mission for view by the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Satellite Sensor Suite. Along with the MSX Satellite, other corollary sensors were involved. Included in these were the Airborne Surveillance Test Bed (AST) aircraft, the Cobra Judy sea based radar platform, Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR), and the Kiernan Reentry Measurements Site (KREMS). The launch was a huge success from all aspects. The STARS Booster flew a perfect mission from hardware, software and mission planning respects. The payload complement achieved its desired goals. All sensors (space, air, ship, and ground) attained excellent coverage and data recording.

  13. Low-metallicity Star Formation (IAU S255)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    Preface; SOC and LOC; Participants; Life at the conference; Conference photo; Session I. Population III and Metal-Free Star Formation: 1. Open questions in the study of population III star formation S. C. O. Glover, P. C. Clark, T. H. Greif, J. L. Johnson, V. Bromm, R. S. Klessen and A. Stacy; 2. Protostar formation in the early universe Naoki Yoshida; 3. Population III.1 stars: formation, feedback and evolution of the IMF Jonathan C. Tan; 4. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation T. H. Greif, D. R. G. Schleicher, J. L. Johnson, A.-K. Jappsen, R. S. Klessen, P. C. Clark, S. C. O. Glover, A. Stacy and V. Bromm; 5. Low-metallicity star formation: the characteristic mass and upper mass limit Kazuyuki Omukai; 6. Dark stars: dark matter in the first stars leads to a new phase of stellar evolution Katherine Freese, Douglas Spolyar, Anthony Aguirre, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo, J. A. Sellwood and Naoki Yoshida; 7. Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars F. Iocco, A. Bressan, E. Ripamonti, R. Schneider, A. Ferrara and P. Marigo; 8. Searching for Pop III stars and galaxies at high redshift Daniel Schaerer; 9. The search for population III stars Sperello di Serego Alighieri, Jaron Kurk, Benedetta Ciardi, Andrea Cimatti, Emanuele Daddi and Andrea Ferrara; 10. Observational search for population III stars in high-redshift galaxies Tohru Nagao; Session II. Metal Enrichment, Chemical Evolution, and Feedback: 11. Cosmic metal enrichment Andrea Ferrara; 12. Insights into the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation Henry Lee, Eric F. Bell and Rachel S. Somerville; 13. LSD and AMAZE: the mass-metallicity relation at z > 3 F. Mannucci and R. Maiolino; 14. Three modes of metal-enriched star formation at high redshift Britton D. Smith, Matthew J. Turk, Steinn Sigurdsson, Brian W. O'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 15. Primordial supernovae and the assembly of the first galaxies Daniel Whalen, Bob Van Veelen, Brian W. O

  14. THE FIRST GALAXIES: CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT, MIXING, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Greif, Thomas H.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Bromm, Volker

    2010-06-10

    Using three-dimensional cosmological simulations, we study the assembly process of one of the first galaxies, with a total mass of {approx}10{sup 8} M {sub sun}, collapsing at z {approx_equal} 10. Our main goal is to trace the transport of the heavy chemical elements produced and dispersed by a pair-instability supernova exploding in one of the minihalo progenitors. To this extent, we incorporate an efficient algorithm into our smoothed particle hydrodynamics code that approximately models turbulent mixing as a diffusion process. We study this mixing with and without the radiative feedback from Population III (Pop III) stars that subsequently form in neighboring minihalos. Our simulations allow us to constrain the initial conditions for second-generation star formation, within the first galaxy itself, and inside of minihalos that virialize after the supernova explosion. We find that most minihalos remain unscathed by ionizing radiation or the supernova remnant, while some are substantially photoheated and enriched to supercritical levels, likely resulting in the formation of low-mass Pop III or even Population II (Pop II) stars. At the center of the newly formed galaxy, {approx}10{sup 5} M {sub sun} of cold, dense gas uniformly enriched to {approx}10{sup -3} Z {sub sun} is in a state of collapse, suggesting that a cluster of Pop II stars will form. The first galaxies, as may be detected by the James Webb Space Telescope, would therefore already contain stellar populations familiar from lower redshifts.

  15. Resolved star formation on sub-galactic scales in a merger at z = 1.7

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Rigby, Jane R.; Teng, Stacy H.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren; Wuyts, Eva

    2014-08-01

    We present a detailed analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) G141 grism spectroscopy for seven star-forming regions of the highly magnified lensed starburst galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609 at z = 1.704. We measure the spatial variations of the extinction in RCS0327 through the observed Hγ/Hβ emission line ratios, finding a constant average extinction of E(B – V){sub gas} = 0.40 ± 0.07. We infer that the star formation is enhanced as a result of an ongoing interaction, with measured star formation rates derived from demagnified, extinction-corrected Hβ line fluxes for the individual star-forming clumps falling >1-2 dex above the star formation sequence. When combining the HST/WFC3 [O III] λ5007/Hβ emission line ratio measurements with [N II]/Hα line ratios from Wuyts et al., we find that the majority of the individual star-forming regions fall along the local 'normal' abundance sequence. With the first detections of the He I λ5876 and He II λ4686 recombination lines in a distant galaxy, we probe the massive-star content of the star-forming regions in RCS0327. The majority of the star-forming regions have a He I λ5876 to Hβ ratio consistent with the saturated maximum value, which is only possible if they still contain hot O-stars. Two regions have lower ratios, implying that their last burst of new star formation ended ∼5 Myr ago. Together, the He I λ5876 and He II λ4686 to Hβ line ratios provide indirect evidence for the order in which star formation is stopping in individual star-forming knots of this high-redshift merger. We place the spatial variations of the extinction, star formation rate and ionization conditions in the context of the star formation history of RCS0327.

  16. Fragmentation of interstellar clouds and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The principal issues are addressed: the fragmentation of molecular clouds into units of stellar mass and the impact of star formation on molecular clouds. The observational evidence for fragmentation is summarized, and the gravitational instability described of a uniform spherical cloud collapsing from rest. The implications are considered of a finite pressure for the minimum fragment mass that is attainable in opacity-limited fragmentation. The role of magnetic fields is discussed in resolving the angular momentum problem and in making the collapse anisotropic, with notable consequences for fragmentation theory. Interactions between fragments are described, with emphasis on the effect of protostellar winds on the ambient cloud matter and on inhibiting further star formation. Such interactions are likely to have profound consequences for regulating the rate of star formation and on the energetics and dynamics of molecular clouds.

  17. A LAW FOR STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Escala, Andres

    2011-07-01

    We study the galactic-scale triggering of star formation. We find that the largest mass scale not stabilized by rotation, a well-defined quantity in a rotating system and with clear dynamical meaning, strongly correlates with the star formation rate in a wide range of galaxies. We find that this relation can be understood in terms of self-regulation toward marginal Toomre stability and the amount of turbulence allowed to sustain the system in this self-regulated quasi-stationary state. We test such an interpretation by computing the predicted star formation rates for a galactic interstellar medium characterized by a lognormal probability distribution function and find good agreement with the observed relation.

  18. Formation of star tracking reticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. O.; Toft, A. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The present application is directed towards a process for producing high resolution, substantially non-reflective reticles or choppers suitable for use for transmitting in both the visible and near ultra-violet regions, able to withstand reasonable handling and extreme environmental conditions, and capable of operating at speeds of from 2800 to about 9000 revolutions per minute without distortion. In particular, the present invention is directed towards the production or reticles having a quartz base vacuum coated with chromium, chromium-silver alloy, and silver with electrodeposited copper and black chromium thereon, respectively, in the form of a reticle pattern. The quartz permits the transmission of light while the pattern is opaque to light. The reticles of the present invention are intended for use in optical trackers, such as star trackers used in outer space.

  19. Star formation around supermassive black holes.

    PubMed

    Bonnell, I A; Rice, W K M

    2008-08-22

    The presence of young massive stars orbiting on eccentric rings within a few tenths of a parsec of the supermassive black hole in the galactic center is challenging for theories of star formation. The high tidal shear from the black hole should tear apart the molecular clouds that form stars elsewhere in the Galaxy, and transport of stars to the galactic center also appears unlikely during their lifetimes. We conducted numerical simulations of the infall of a giant molecular cloud that interacts with the black hole. The transfer of energy during closest approach allows part of the cloud to become bound to the black hole, forming an eccentric disk that quickly fragments to form stars. Compressional heating due to the black hole raises the temperature of the gas up to several hundred to several thousand kelvin, ensuring that the fragmentation produces relatively high stellar masses. These stars retain the eccentricity of the disk and, for a sufficiently massive initial cloud, produce an extremely top-heavy distribution of stellar masses. This potentially repetitive process may explain the presence of multiple eccentric rings of young stars in the presence of a supermassive black hole. PMID:18719276

  20. The H II Region of a Primordial Star

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Tom; Wise, John H.; Bryan, Greg L.; /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2006-06-07

    The concordance model of cosmology and structure formation predicts the formation of isolated very massive stars at high redshifts in dark matter dominated halos of 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} Msun. These stars photo-ionize their host primordial molecular clouds, expelling all the baryons from their halos. When the stars die, a relic H II region is formed within which large amounts of molecular hydrogen form which will allow the gas to cool efficiently when gravity assembles it into larger dark matter halos. The filaments surrounding the first star hosting halo are largely shielded and provide the pathway for gas to stream into the halo when the star has died. We present the first fully three dimensional cosmological radiation hydrodynamical simulations that follow all these effects. A novel adaptive ray casting technique incorporates the time dependent radiative transfer around point sources. This approach is fast enough so that radiation transport, kinetic rate equations, and hydrodynamics are solved self-consistently. It retains the time derivative of the transfer equation and is explicitly photon conserving. This method is integrated with the cosmological adaptive mesh refinement code enzo, and runs on distributed and shared memory parallel architectures. Where applicable the three dimensional calculation not only confirm expectations from earlier one dimensional results but also illustrate the multi-fold hydrodynamic complexities of H II regions. In the absence of stellar winds the circumstellar environments of the first supernovae and putative early gamma-ray bursts will be of low density {approx}1 cm{sup -3}. Albeit marginally resolved, ionization front instabilities lead to cometary and elephant trunk like small scale structures reminiscent of nearby star forming regions.

  1. The H II Region of a Primordial Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Tom; Wise, John H.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2007-04-01

    The concordance model of cosmology and structure formation predicts the formation of isolated, very massive stars at high redshifts in dark matter-dominated halos of 105-106 Msolar. These stars photoionize their host primordial molecular clouds, expelling all the baryons from their halos. When the stars die, a relic H II region is formed within which large amounts of molecular hydrogen form that will allow the gas to cool efficiently when gravity assembles it into larger dark matter halos. The filaments surrounding the first star-hosting halo are largely shielded and provide the pathway for gas to stream into the halo when the star has died. We present the first fully three-dimensional cosmological radiation hydrodynamical simulations that follow all these effects. A novel adaptive ray-casting technique incorporates the time-dependent radiative transfer around point sources. This approach is fast enough so that radiation transport, kinetic rate equations, and hydrodynamics are solved self-consistently. It retains the time derivative of the transfer equation and is explicitly photon-conserving. This method is integrated with the cosmological adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo and runs on distributed and shared memory parallel architectures. Where applicable, the three-dimensional calculation not only confirms expectations from earlier one-dimensional results but also illustrates the multifold hydrodynamic complexities of H II regions. In the absence of stellar winds, the circumstellar environments of the first supernovae and putative early gamma-ray bursts will be of low density, ~1 cm-3. Albeit marginally resolved, ionization front instabilities lead to cometary- and elephant trunk-like small-scale structures reminiscent of nearby star-forming regions.

  2. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    Preface; SOC and LOC; Participants; Life at the conference; Conference photo; Session I. Population III and Metal-Free Star Formation: 1. Open questions in the study of population III star formation S. C. O. Glover, P. C. Clark, T. H. Greif, J. L. Johnson, V. Bromm, R. S. Klessen and A. Stacy; 2. Protostar formation in the early universe Naoki Yoshida; 3. Population III.1 stars: formation, feedback and evolution of the IMF Jonathan C. Tan; 4. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation T. H. Greif, D. R. G. Schleicher, J. L. Johnson, A.-K. Jappsen, R. S. Klessen, P. C. Clark, S. C. O. Glover, A. Stacy and V. Bromm; 5. Low-metallicity star formation: the characteristic mass and upper mass limit Kazuyuki Omukai; 6. Dark stars: dark matter in the first stars leads to a new phase of stellar evolution Katherine Freese, Douglas Spolyar, Anthony Aguirre, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo, J. A. Sellwood and Naoki Yoshida; 7. Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars F. Iocco, A. Bressan, E. Ripamonti, R. Schneider, A. Ferrara and P. Marigo; 8. Searching for Pop III stars and galaxies at high redshift Daniel Schaerer; 9. The search for population III stars Sperello di Serego Alighieri, Jaron Kurk, Benedetta Ciardi, Andrea Cimatti, Emanuele Daddi and Andrea Ferrara; 10. Observational search for population III stars in high-redshift galaxies Tohru Nagao; Session II. Metal Enrichment, Chemical Evolution, and Feedback: 11. Cosmic metal enrichment Andrea Ferrara; 12. Insights into the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation Henry Lee, Eric F. Bell and Rachel S. Somerville; 13. LSD and AMAZE: the mass-metallicity relation at z > 3 F. Mannucci and R. Maiolino; 14. Three modes of metal-enriched star formation at high redshift Britton D. Smith, Matthew J. Turk, Steinn Sigurdsson, Brian W. O'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 15. Primordial supernovae and the assembly of the first galaxies Daniel Whalen, Bob Van Veelen, Brian W. O

  3. Far-IR selected star formation regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.; Harper, D. A.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Moran, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed far-IR observations and complemenary submillimeter, 5 GHz continuum and c(18)0 observations of a sample of far-IR selected luminous regions of star formation. The clouds and that the exciting stars lie deep within these condensations. The far-IR sources have diversely shaped 40 micron to 180 micron spectra even through their 60 micron to 100 micron color temperatures are similar. The radio and far-IR results together show that the exciting stars are in clusters containing either zero-age main sequence and pre-main sequence stars or consisting entirely of premain sequence objects. C(18)0 and submillimeter observations imply gas densities approximately .00005 - high enough to make t(sub dust) approximately t(sub gas).

  4. Far-infrared selected star formation regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, D. A.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Moran, J. M.; Jaffe, D. T.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed far-IR observations and complementary submillimeter, 5 GHz continuum and C(O-18) observations of a sample of eight far-IR selected luminous regions of star formation are presented. The observations show that the sources of luminosity coincide with density peaks in the molecular clouds and that the exciting stars lie deep within these condensations. The far-IR sources have diversely shaped 40-180 micron spectra even though their 60-100 micron color temperatures are similar. The radio and far-IR results together show that the exciting stars are in clusters containing either zero-age main-sequence and pre-main-sequence stars or consisting entirely of pre-main-sequence objects. C(O-18) and submillimeter observations imply gas densities approximately 100,000-high enough to make T(dust) approximately T(gas).

  5. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Quintana, E. V.; Adams, F. C.; Chambers, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Most stars reside in binary/multiple star systems; however, previous models of planet formation have studied growth of bodies orbiting an isolated single star. Disk material has been observed around one or both components of various young close binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such disks, they can remain dynamically stable for very long times. We have simulated the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets in both circumbinary disks around 'close' binary star systems with stellar separations ($a_B$) in the range 0.05 AU $\\le a_B \\le$ 0.4 AU and binary eccentricities in the range $0 \\le e \\le 0.8$ and circumstellar disks around individual stars with binary separations of tens of AU. The initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and around individual stars in the Alpha Centauri system (Quintana et al. 2002, A.J., 576, 982); giant planets analogous to Jupiter and Saturn are included if their orbits are stable. The planetary systems formed around close binaries with stellar apastron distances less than or equal to 0.2 AU with small stellar eccentricities are very similar to those formed in the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn, whereas planetary systems formed around binaries with larger maximum separations tend to be sparser, with fewer planets, especially interior to 1 AU. Likewise, when the binary periastron exceeds 10 AU, terrestrial planets can form over essentially the entire range of orbits allowed for single stars with Jupiter-like planets, although fewer terrestrial planets tend to form within high eccentricity binary systems. As the binary periastron decreases, the radial extent of the terrestrial planet systems is reduced accordingly. When the periastron is 5 AU, the formation of Earth-like planets near 1 AU is compromised.

  6. Grain processes in massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, M. G.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that stars greater than 100 M(solar) exist in the Galaxy and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), however classical star formation theory predicts stellar mass limits of only approx. 60 M(solar). A protostellar accretion flow consists of inflowing gas and dust. Grains are destroyed as they are near the central protostar creating a dust shell or cocoon. Radiation pressure acting on the grain can halt the inflow of material thereby limiting the amount of mass accumulated by the protostar. We first consider rather general constraints on the initial grain to gas ratio and mass accretion rates that permit inflow. We further constrain these results by constructing a numerical model. Radiative deceleration of grains and grain destruction processes are explicitly accounted for in an iterative solution of the radiation-hydrodynamic equations. Findings seem to suggest that star formation by spherical accretion requires rather extreme preconditioning of the grain and gas environment.

  7. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation in Soft X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF)) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF))from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF) derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3sigma confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne ii]12.8 micron and [O iv]26 micron lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L(sub x,SF) and L(sub x,AGN) at the 3 sigma level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  8. DISENTANGLING AGN AND STAR FORMATION IN SOFT X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-10-20

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF}) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3{sigma} confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m and [O IV]26 {mu}m lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L{sub x,SF} and L{sub x,AGN} at the 3{sigma} level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  9. A study of star formation in the disks of Sa galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, N.; Kennicutt, R.; Phillips, A.C.; Schommer, R.A. Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ Washington Univ., Seattle Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ )

    1991-04-01

    This paper compares the luminosity functions of the H II regions in several Sa galaxies with those of later-type galaxies. Broad UV measurements confirm expectations that the knots associated with the regions are very blue; the converse is also true. The H II region luminosity functions are very steep. The total H-alpha luminosities for the galaxies are computed and used to derive the current star-formation rates. It is found that, in contrast to the late-type galaxies, the current star-formation rates in Sa disks are less than one-tenth of the average rate over the last 15 Gyr. The formal depletion times of gas through star formation are longer than a Hubble time. If the star formation in late-type galaxies takes on the character of that currently seen in the Sas, star formation in such galaxies could continue for much longer than the usual estimate of 5 Gyr. 35 refs.

  10. Star Formation at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Could stars be forming in the inhospitable environment near Sagittarius A* in the heart of the Milky Way? A possible signature of low-mass star formation has recently been found just two light-years from the black hole at the center of our galaxy — a region that was previously thought to be too hostile for such activity. Searching for Signatures: Previous observations of the central few light-years of the Milky Way had focused on a population of about 200 massive, young and very bright stars in tight orbits around Sgr A*. These stars are only a few million years old and prompted scientists to wonder: have they somehow managed to form in situ, in spite of their close proximity to the black hole, or did they form further out and then migrate in? Motivated by this mystery, Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University and collaborators looked for evidence of even younger stars close to Sagittarius A*, which would demonstrate that star formation in the area is an ongoing process. Using the Very Large Array (VLA), the collaboration discovered several small sources in one arm of activity near Sgr A*. This 34-GHz image provides a close-up view of two protoplanetary disk candidates (labeled P26 and P8) located near Sgr A*. These objects are outlined on the right side by a bow shock caused by impacting stellar wind that streams from the young, hot stars closer to the Galactic center. The disks are thought to contain recently-formed, low-mass stars. (Credit: Yusef-Zadeh et al., 2015) Heated Disks: The team identified these sources as candidate photoevaporative protoplanetary disks, or “proplyds” — areas of dense, ionized gas and dust surrounding young, newly formed stars. The proplyd candidates are between 10,000 and 100,000 years old, and they lie along the edge of a large molecular cloud. It is likely that this cloud produced the disks by providing a reservoir of gas to feed the star-formation activity. The region surrounding these proplyds is blasted with harsh

  11. Star formation across cosmic time and its influence on galactic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundlich, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Observations show that ten billion years ago, galaxies formed their stars at rates up to twenty times higher than now. As stars are formed from cold molecular gas, a high star formation rate means a significant gas supply, and galaxies near the peak epoch of star formation are indeed much more gas-rich than nearby galaxies. Is the decline of the star formation rate mostly driven by the diminishing cold gas reservoir, or are the star formation processes also qualitatively different earlier in the history of the Universe? Ten billion years ago, young galaxies were clumpy and prone to violent gravitational instabilities, which may have contributed to their high star formation rate. Stars indeed form within giant, gravitationally-bound molecular clouds. But the earliest phases of star formation are still poorly understood. Some scenarii suggest the importance of interstellar filamentary structures as a first step towards core and star formation. How would their filamentary geometry affect pre-stellar cores? Feedback mechanisms related to stellar evolution also play an important role in regulating star formation, for example through powerful stellar winds and supernovae explosions which expel some of the gas and can even disturb the dark matter distribution in which each galaxy is assumed to be embedded. This PhD work focuses on three perspectives: (i) star formation near the peak epoch of star formation as seen from observations at sub-galactic scales; (ii) the formation of pre-stellar cores within the filamentary structures of the interstellar medium; and (iii) the effect of feedback processes resulting from star formation and evolution on the dark matter distribution.

  12. Galaxy Interactions with FIRE: Mapping Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We utilize a suite of 75 simulations of galaxies in idealised major mergers (stellar mass ratio ~2.5:1), with a wide range of orbital parameters, to investigate the spatial extent of interaction-induced star formation. Two versions are used, one based on a Kennicult-like subgrid model (Gadget, Springel & Hernquist 2003); the other based on the new Feedback In Realistic Environments model (FIRE, Hopkins et al. 2014). Although the total star formation in galaxy encounters is generally elevated relative to isolated galaxies, we find that this elevation is a combination of intense enhancements within the central kpc and moderately suppressed activity at large galacto-centric radii. This effect appears to be stronger in the older Gadget model. Suppression is the disk is also found in the FIRE runs, but at larger scales. This is because tidal torques are weaker in the newer FIRE model, leading to a more extended nuclear starburt. Our predictions of the radial dependence of triggered star formation, and specifically the suppression of star formation beyond kpc-scales, will be testable with the next generation of integral-field spectroscopic surveys.

  13. Externally fed star formation: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Motahareh; Stahler, Steven W.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate, through a series of numerical calculations, the evolution of dense cores that are accreting external gas up to and beyond the point of star formation. Our model clouds are spherical, unmagnetized configurations with fixed outer boundaries, across which gas enters subsonically. When we start with any near-equilibrium state, we find that the cloud's internal velocity also remains subsonic for an extended period, in agreement with observations. However, the velocity becomes supersonic shortly before the star forms. Consequently, the accretion rate building up the protostar is much greater than the benchmark value c_s^3/G, where cs is the sound speed in the dense core. This accretion spike would generate a higher luminosity than those seen in even the most embedded young stars. Moreover, we find that the region of supersonic infall surrounding the protostar races out to engulf much of the cloud, again in violation of the observations, which show infall to be spatially confined. Similar problematic results have been obtained by all other hydrodynamic simulations to date, regardless of the specific infall geometry or boundary conditions adopted. Low-mass star formation is evidently a quasi-static process, in which cloud gas moves inward subsonically until the birth of the star itself. We speculate that magnetic tension in the cloud's deep interior helps restrain the infall prior to this event.

  14. Neutral hydrogen and star formation in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, Evan D.

    1987-01-01

    The Very Large Array and WSTR H I synthesis observations of seven irregular galaxies are presented. The total H I images of four Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies and three larger more distant irregular galaxies are constructed at the identical resolution of 500 pc. When compared to H II region distributions derived from H alpha images, all galaxies studied show an excellent correlation between the H I surface density and the presence of H II regions. This correlation is most easily interpreted in terms of a requisite threshold H I surface density for massive star formation. This threshold is 1 x 10 to the 21st power H I atoms/sq cm for a resolution of 500 pc. Giant extragalactic H II regions are only found near H I surface densities of a factor of 3 to 5 times this threshold level. The observed threshold implies a Jeans length of 150 pc, which is the same as the size scale at which the structure in the H I complexes correlates well with the H II region distribution. This, combined with the fact that in none of the galaxies observed is there H I above the threshold level with concomitant H II regions, implies an exclusively gravitational origin for the star formation events. That is, there is no need to involve a trigger as in the SSPSF theory (Seiden 1983) or feedback as in Dopita (1985).

  15. ANALYTICAL STAR FORMATION RATE FROM GRAVOTURBULENT FRAGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-12-20

    We present an analytical determination of the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds, based on a time-dependent extension of our analytical theory of the stellar initial mass function. The theory yields SFRs in good agreement with observations, suggesting that turbulence is the dominant, initial process responsible for star formation. In contrast to previous SFR theories, the present one does not invoke an ad hoc density threshold for star formation; instead, the SFR continuously increases with gas density, naturally yielding two different characteristic regimes, thus two different slopes in the SFR versus gas density relationship, in agreement with observational determinations. Besides the complete SFR derivation, we also provide a simplified expression, which reproduces the complete calculations reasonably well and can easily be used for quick determinations of SFRs in cloud environments. A key property at the heart of both our complete and simplified theory is that the SFR involves a density-dependent dynamical time, characteristic of each collapsing (prestellar) overdense region in the cloud, instead of one single mean or critical freefall timescale. Unfortunately, the SFR also depends on some ill-determined parameters, such as the core-to-star mass conversion efficiency and the crossing timescale. Although we provide estimates for these parameters, their uncertainty hampers a precise quantitative determination of the SFR, within less than a factor of a few.

  16. Predictions from star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2010-03-15

    We compute trivariate probability distributions in the landscape, scanning simultaneously over the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, and spatial curvature. We consider two different measures for regulating the divergences of eternal inflation, and three different models for observers. In one model, observers are assumed to arise in proportion to the entropy produced by stars; in the others, they arise at a fixed time (5 or 10x10{sup 9} years) after star formation. The star formation rate, which underlies all our observer models, depends sensitively on the three scanning parameters. We employ a recently developed model of star formation in the multiverse, a considerable refinement over previous treatments of the astrophysical and cosmological properties of different pocket universes. For each combination of observer model and measure, we display all single and bivariate probability distributions, both with the remaining parameter(s) held fixed and marginalized. Our results depend only weakly on the observer model but more strongly on the measure. Using the causal diamond measure, the observed parameter values (or bounds) lie within the central 2{sigma} of nearly all probability distributions we compute, and always within 3{sigma}. This success is encouraging and rather nontrivial, considering the large size and dimension of the parameter space. The causal patch measure gives similar results as long as curvature is negligible. If curvature dominates, the causal patch leads to a novel runaway: it prefers a negative value of the cosmological constant, with the smallest magnitude available in the landscape.

  17. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Fang; Li, Jin-Zeng

    2013-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the H II region IC 1396 and its star forming activity, in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the near- and far-infrared were employed. The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H II region, HD 206267. The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission, selected based on archived 2MASS data, reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region. One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37. The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H II region. All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data. An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I, 15 CLASS II and 15 CLASS III sources in IC 1396. Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis. Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages, the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one. This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region. Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE, on the other hand, indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111, which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation. So we infer that the star formation process in this H II region was not continuous but rather episodic.

  18. The cosmic history of star formation.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, James S

    2011-07-01

    Major advances in observational astronomy over the past 20 years have revolutionized our view of cosmic history, transforming our understanding of how the hot, smooth, early universe evolved into the complex and beautiful universe of stars and galaxies in which we now live. I describe how astronomers have used a range of complementary techniques to map out the rise and fall of star formation over 95% of cosmic time, back to the current observational frontier only ~500 million years after the Big Bang. PMID:21737733

  19. Shocks, star formation and the JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, A.

    2015-12-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) is constantly evolving due to unremitting injection of energy in various forms. Energetic radiation transfers energy to the ISM: from the UV photons, emitted by the massive stars, to X- and γ-ray ones. Cosmic rays are another source of energy. Finally, mechanical energy is injected through shocks or turbulence. Shocks are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium of galaxies. They are associated to star formation (through jets and bipolar outflows), life (via stellar winds), and death (in AGB stellar winds or supernovae explosion). The dynamical processes leading to the formation of molecular clouds also generate shocks where flows of interstellar matter collide. Because of their ubiquity, the study of interstellar shocks is also a useful probe to the other mechanisms of energy injection in the ISM. This study must be conducted in order to understand the evolution of the interstellar medium as a whole, and to address various questions: what is the peculiar chemistry associated to shocks, and what is their contribution to the cycle of matter in galaxies ? What is the energetic impact of shocks on their surroundings on various scales, and hence what is the feedback of stars on the galaxies ? What are the scenarios of star formation, whether this star formation leads to the propagation of shocks, or whether it is triggered by shock propagation ? What is the role of shocks in the acceleration of cosmic rays ? Can they shed light on their composition and diffusion processes ? In order to progress on these questions, it is paramount to interpret the most precise observations with the most precise models of shocks. From the observational point of view, the James Webb Space Telescope represents a powerful tool to better address the above questions, as it will allow to observe numerous shock tracers in the infrared range at an unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution.

  20. Triggered Star Formation From Shock to Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Triggered star formation {TSF} occurs when supersonic flows generated by distant supernova blast waves, stellar winds {wind blown bubbles} or ionization fronts {D-type fronts in HII regions} sweep over a stable cloud. TSF may play a role in massive regions of star formation where winds, HII regions and, eventually, blast-waves sweep through dense, heterogeneous molecular material. In addition TSF has played an important role in discussions of the formation of our own solar system because it offers a natural way of injecting short lived radioactive isotopes {SLRI's} like 26^Al into material which will then form planetary bodies.The purpose of this proposal is to use advanced numerical tools to explore the physics of TSF in greater detail than has been attempted before. Previous studies have not been able to follow triggering past the early stages before a star forms. Our 3-D Adaptive Mesh Refinement {AMR} MHD code contains well tested physics modules which will allow us to track the influence of self-gravity, radiation-transport, cooling by molecules/neutrals/atoms and, finally, the collapse of gas into stars {i.e.condensed gravitating point-like objects or "sink-particles"}. With this tool we will follow triggering well past the formation of the star to explore the creation of accretion disks and their properties. In addition the microphysics routines in the code allow us to make detailed contact with HST observations such as the pillars in the Carina nebula via synthetic observations of line profiles, proper motions, Position-Velocity diagrams and statistics.

  1. Constraints to the magnetospheric properties of T Tauri stars - II. The Mg II ultraviolet feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Martínez, Fatima; Gómez de Castro, Ana Inés

    2015-03-01

    The atmospheric structure of T Tauri stars (TTSs) and its connection with the large-scale outflow is poorly known. Neither the effect of the magnetically mediated interaction between the star and the disc is well understood. The Mg II multiplet is a fundamental tracer of TTSs atmospheres and outflows, and is the strongest feature in the near-ultraviolet spectrum of TTSs. The International Ultraviolet Explorer and Hubble Space Telescope data archives provide a unique set to study the main physical compounds contributing to the line profile and to derive the properties of the line formation region. The Mg II profiles of 44 TTSs with resolution 13 000-30 000 are available in these archives. In this work, we use this data set to measure the main observables: flux, broadening, asymmetry, terminal velocity of the outflow, and the velocity of the discrete absorption components. For some few sources repeated observations are available and variability has been studied. There is a warm wind that at sub-au scales absorbs the blue wing of the Mg II profiles. The main result found in this work is the correlation between the line broadening, Mg II flux, terminal velocity of the flow and accretion rate. Both outflow and magnetospheric plasma contribute to the Mg II flux. The flux-flux correlation between Mg II and C IV or He II is confirmed; however, no correlation is found between the Mg II flux and the UV continuum or the H2 emission.

  2. Molecular cloud-scale star formation in NGC 300

    SciTech Connect

    Faesi, Christopher M.; Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan; Menten, Karl M.; Bouy, Hervé

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a galaxy-wide study of molecular gas and star formation in a sample of 76 H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 300. We have measured the molecular gas at 250 pc scales using pointed CO(J = 2-1) observations with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope. We detect CO in 42 of our targets, deriving molecular gas masses ranging from our sensitivity limit of ∼10{sup 5} M {sub ☉} to 7 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}. We find a clear decline in the CO detection rate with galactocentric distance, which we attribute primarily to the decreasing radial metallicity gradient in NGC 300. We combine Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet, Spitzer 24 μm, and Hα narrowband imaging to measure the star formation activity in our sample. We have developed a new direct modeling approach for computing star formation rates (SFRs) that utilizes these data and population synthesis models to derive the masses and ages of the young stellar clusters associated with each of our H II region targets. We find a characteristic gas depletion time of 230 Myr at 250 pc scales in NGC 300, more similar to the results obtained for Milky Way giant molecular clouds than the longer (>2 Gyr) global depletion times derived for entire galaxies and kiloparsec-sized regions within them. This difference is partially due to the fact that our study accounts for only the gas and stars within the youngest star-forming regions. We also note a large scatter in the NGC 300 SFR-molecular gas mass scaling relation that is furthermore consistent with the Milky Way cloud results. This scatter likely represents real differences in giant molecular cloud physical properties such as the dense gas fraction.

  3. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  4. What the Spatial Distribution of Stars tells us about Star Formation and Massive Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressert, Eli; Bastian, N.; Testi, L.; Patience, J.; Longmore, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a dissertation study on two recent results regarding the clustering properties of young stars. First, we discuss a global study of young stellar object (YSO) surface densities in star forming regions based on a comprehensive collection of Spitzer Space Telescope surveys, which encompasses nearly all star formation in the solar neighbourhood. It is shown that the distribution of YSO surface densities is a smooth distribution, being adequately described by a lognormal function from a few to 103 YSOs pc-2, with a peak at 22 YSOs pc-2 and a dispersion of 0.85. We find no evidence for multiple discrete modes of star-formation (e.g. clustered and distributed) and that not all stars form in clusters. A Herschel Space Observatory study confirms the YSO surface density results by observing and analyzing the prestellar core population in several star forming regions. Secondly, we propose that bound stellar clusters primarily form from dense clouds having escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized gas. A list of giant molecular clumps with masses >103 M⊙ that have escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized plasma is compiled from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. In these clumps, radiative feedback in the form of gas ionization is bottled up, enabling star formation to proceed to sufficiently high efficiency so that the resulting star cluster remains bound even after gas removal. We present over ten candidates that will most likely form >103 M⊙ star clusters and two of them that are comparable to NGC 3603 (>104 M⊙). Thus, providing us with an outlook on the next generation of star clusters in the Milky Way and clues to the initial conditions of massive cluster formation.

  5. Turbulence and Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollyday, Gigja; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Little Things Team

    2015-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the nature and role of turbulence in the interstellar medium of dwarf irregular galaxies. Turbulence, resulting from a variety of processes, is a potential source for cloud formation, and thus star formation. We have undertaken an indirect analysis of turbulence via the third (skewness) and fourth (kurtosis) moments of the distribution of atomic hydrogen gas densities using the LITTLE THINGS data for a 40-count sample of nearby (<10.3 Mpc) dwarf galaxies. We followed the formulism used by Burkhart et al. (2010) in a study of the SMC. We found that there is evidence of turbulence in dwarf galaxies at a level comparable to that found in the SMC, but we have found no correlation between integrated star formation rates and integrated kurtosis values nor a clear correlation between kurtosis as a function of radius with gas surface density and star formation profiles. We are grateful for a summer internship provided by the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program at Northern Arizona University, run by Dr. Kathy Eastwood and Dr. David Trilling and funded by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1004107.

  6. Killing Star Formation in Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    When a dwarf galaxy falls into the halo of a large galaxy like the Milky Way, how is star formation in the dwarf affected? A collaboration led by Andrew Wetzel (California Institute of Technology and Carnegie Observatories) recently set out to answer this question using observations of nearby galaxies and simulations of the infall process. Observed Quenching: Isolated dwarf galaxies tend to be gas-rich and very actively star-forming. In contrast, most dwarf galaxies within 300 kpc of us (the Milky Way's virial radius) contain little or no cold gas, and they're quiescent: there's not much star formation happening. And this isn't just true of the Milky Way; we observe the same difference in the satellite galaxies surrounding Andromeda galaxy. Once a dwarf galaxy has moved into the gravitational realm of a larger galaxy, the satellite's gas vanishes rapidly and its star formation is shut off — but how, and on what timescale? The known dwarf galaxies in the Local Group (out to 1.6 Mpc) are plotted by their distance from their host vs. their stellar mass. Blue stars indicate actively star-forming dwarfs and red circles indicate quiescent ones. Credit: Wetzel et al. 2015. Timescales for Quiescence: To answer these questions, the authors explored the process of galaxy infall using Exploring the Local Volume in Simulations (ELVIS), a suite of cosmological N-body simulations intended to explore the Local Group. They combined the infall times from the simulations with observational knowledge of the fraction of nearby galaxies that are currently quiescent, in order to determine what timescales are required for different processes to deplete the gas in the dwarf galaxies and quench star formation. Based on their results, two types of quenching culprits are at work: gas consumption (where a galaxy simply uses up its immediate gas supply and doesn't have access to more) and gas stripping (where external forces like ram pressure remove gas from the galaxy). These processes

  7. Did the Solar system form in a sequential triggered star formation event?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard J.; Dale, James E.

    2016-02-01

    The presence and abundance of the short-lived radioisotopes (SLRs) 26Al and 60Fe during the formation of the Solar system is difficult to explain unless the Sun formed in the vicinity of one or more massive star(s) that exploded as supernovae. Two different scenarios have been proposed to explain the delivery of SLRs to the protosolar nebula: (i) direct pollution of the protosolar disc by supernova ejecta, and (ii) the formation of the Sun in a sequential star formation event in which supernovae shockwaves trigger further star formation which is enriched in SLRs. The sequentially triggered model has been suggested as being more astrophysically likely than the direct pollution scenario. In this paper, we investigate this claim by analysing a combination of N-body and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of star formation. We find that sequential star formation would result in large age spreads (or even bi-modal age distributions for spatially coincident events) due to the dynamical relaxation of the first star formation event(s). Secondly, we discuss the probability of triggering spatially and temporally discrete populations of stars and find this to be only possible in very contrived situations. Taken together, these results suggest that the formation of the Solar system in a triggered star formation event is as improbable, if not more so, than the direct pollution of the protosolar disc by a supernova.

  8. GAS, STARS, AND STAR FORMATION IN ALFALFA DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G. E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jarle@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: susan.g.neff@nasa.gov

    2012-06-15

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and H I components of 229 low H I mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H I masses <10{sup 7.7} M{sub Sun} and H I line widths <80 km s{sup -1}. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M{sub *}) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M{sub *} obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper H I mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M{sub *} than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H I depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that H I disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  9. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses <10(sup 7.7) solar mass and Hi line widths <80 kilometers per second. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  10. Star Formation and the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bally, John; Boss, Alan; Papanastassiou, Dimitri; Sandford, Scott; Sargent, Anneila

    1988-01-01

    We have seen that studies of nearby star-forming regions are beginning to reveal the first signs of protoplanetary disks. Studies of interstellar and interplanetary grains are starting to provide clues about the processing and incorporation of matter into the Solar System. Studies of meteorites have yielded isotopic anomalies which indicate that some of the grains and inclusions in these bodies are very primitive. Although we have not yet detected a true interstellar grain, some of these materials have not been extensively modified since their removal from the ISM. We are indeed close to seeing our interstellar heritage. The overlap between astronomical and Solar System studies is in its infancy. What future experiments, observations, and missions can be performed in the near future that will greatly enhance our understanding of star formation and the formation of the Solar System?

  11. Astrochemical diagnostics of star and planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Paola

    2016-06-01

    Stars like our Sun and planets like our Earth form out of diffuse interstellar material, which first accumulates to form molecular clouds and then it fragments into cold (~10 K) and dense (~105 H2 molecules per cc) cloud cores, the cradle of future stellar systems. The physical structure and chemical composition of these dense cores set the stage for the next steps: gravitational contraction and the formation of protostars and protoplanetary disks. Molecules are unique tracers of the dynamical evolution of interstellar clouds and astrochemistry is needed to guide and interpret our observations. In this talk I will review work done on the early stages of star and planet formation, underlying how astrochemical diagnostics have helped us to shed light on chemical and physical processes important to constraints theories and to find connections with our Solar System. ALMA results will be highlighted.

  12. Dust in regions of massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, Mark G.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested that protostars increase mass by accreting the surrounding gas and dust. Grains are destroyed as they near the central protostar creating a dust shell or cocoon. Radiation pressure acting on the grains can halt the inflow of material thereby limiting the amount of mass accumulated by the protostar. General constraints were considered on the initial dust-to-gas ratio and mass accretion rates that permit inflow. These results were constrained further by constructing a numerical model, including radiative deceleration on grains and grain destruction processes. Also the constraints on dust properties were investigated which allow the formation of massive stars. The obtained results seem to suggest that massive star formation requires rather extreme preconditioning of the grain and gas environment.

  13. Reconstructing Star Formation Histories of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritze-v. Alvensleben, U.; Lilly, T.

    2007-12-01

    We present a methodological study to find out how far back and to what precision star formation histories of galaxies can be reconstructed from CMDs, from integrated spectra and Lick indices, and from integrated multi-band photometry. Our evolutionary synthesis models GALEV allow to describe the evolution of galaxies in terms of all three approaches and we have assumed typical observational uncertainties for each of them and then investigated to what extent and accuracy different star formation histories can be discriminated. For a field in the LMC bar region with both a deep CMD from HST observations and a trailing slit spectrum across exactly the same field of view we could test our modelling results against real data.

  14. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  15. Quenching star formation in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranu, Dan S.; Hudson, Michael J.; Balogh, Michael L.; Smith, Russell J.; Power, Chris; Oman, Kyle A.; Krane, Brad

    2014-05-01

    In order to understand the processes that quench star formation in cluster galaxies, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. We combine these orbits with models of star formation followed by environmental quenching, comparing model predictions with observed bulge and disc colours and stellar absorption line-strength indices of luminous cluster galaxies. Models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc is quenched upon infall are acceptable fits to the data. An exponential disc quenching time-scale of 3-3.5 Gyr is preferred. Quenching in lower mass groups prior to infall (`pre-processing') provides better fits, with similar quenching time-scales. Models with short (≲1 Gyr) quenching time-scales yield excessively steep cluster-centric gradients in disc colours and Balmer line indices, even if quenching is delayed for several Gyr. The data slightly prefer models where quenching occurs only for galaxies falling within ˜0.5r200. These results imply that the environments of rich clusters must impact star formation rates of infalling galaxies on relatively long time-scales, indicative of gentler quenching mechanisms such as slow `strangulation' over more rapid ram-pressure stripping.

  16. The star formation history of the Sagittarius stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Belokurov, V.; Koposov, S.

    2015-08-01

    We present the first detailed quantitative study of the stellar populations of the Sagittarius (Sgr) streams within the Stripe 82 region, using photometric and spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The star formation history (SFH) is determined separately for the bright and faint Sgr streams, to establish whether both components consist of a similar stellar population mix or have a distinct origin. Best-fitting SFH solutions are characterized by a well-defined, tight sequence in age-metallicity space, indicating that star formation occurred within a well-mixed, homogeneously enriched medium. Star formation rates dropped sharply at an age of ≈5-7 Gyr, possibly related to the accretion of Sgr by the MW. Finally, the Sgr sequence displays a change of slope in age-metallicity space at an age between 11 and 13 Gyr consistent with the Sgr α-element knee, indicating that supernovae Type Ia started contributing to the abundance pattern ≈1-3 Gyr after the start of star formation. Results for both streams are consistent with being drawn from the parent Sgr population mix, but at different epochs. The SFH of the bright stream starts from old, metal-poor populations and extends to a metallicity of [Fe/H] ≈ -0.7, with peaks at ≈7 and 11 Gyr. The faint SFH samples the older, more metal-poor part of the Sgr sequence, with a peak at ancient ages and stars mostly with [Fe/H] < -1.3 and age > 9 Gyr. Therefore, we argue in favour of a scenario where the faint stream consists of material stripped (i) earlier, and (ii) from the outskirts of the Sgr dwarf.

  17. Early Star Formation and High-Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Matthias; Peterson, B. M.

    2007-12-01

    We are investigating for a sample of about 30 high-redshift quasars, with redshifts up to z=6, the gas chemical metallicity based on emission line ratios and employing the FeII UV/MgII line ratio, we probe the differential metal enrichment timescale between iron and alpha-elements at these early epochs. The quasars show enhanced solar metallicities ( 5 times solar) in their broad emission-line region and no indication of a metallicity evolution up to redshifts z=6. The measured FeII UV/MgII ratios range from 3 to 5, typical for high redshift quasars, with a weighted mean of about 4. However, there is a weak tendency for a lower mean ratio at z>4.7. For the first time, we will compare the gas metallicity and the FeII UV/MgII ratio for high redshift quasars. In concert, the gas metallicity, the FeII UV/MgII ratio, and model-based estimated time scales for enriching the gas and building up the super-massive black holes suggest that a violent episode of star formation and the main growth of the black hole occur roughly contemporaneously beginning at redshifts z = 8 to 13. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant HST-GO-10792 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  18. A GALAXY BLAZES WITH STAR FORMATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but members of a rare class known as 'starburst' galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are perfecting a technique to determine the history of starburst activity in galaxies by using the colors of star clusters. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue, and older stars redder, the colors can be related to the ages, somewhat similar to counting the rings in a fallen tree trunk in order to determine the tree's age. The galaxy NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. Astronomer Gerhardt Meurer of The Johns Hopkins University leads a team of collaborators who are studying several starburst galaxies, including NGC 3310, which is showcased in this month's Hubble Heritage image. There are several hundred star clusters in NGC 3310, visible in the Heritage image as the bright blue diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy. Once formed, the star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show that they have ages ranging from about one million up to more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' over 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when a companion galaxy collided with NGC 3310. These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once thought to be brief episodes, resulting from catastrophic events like a galactic collision. However, the wide range of cluster ages in NGC 3310 suggests that the starbursting can continue for an extended interval, once

  19. The Extended Star-Forming Environments of Galactic H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.

    2009-01-01

    H II regions are the bright beacons marking active sites of star formation throughout the Milky Way and other galaxies. The GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL Galactic plane surveys with the Spitzer Space Telescope have provided new views of the structure of H II regions and their relationship to extended star-forming environments in molecular cloud complexes. M17 is an excellent example of a well-studied H II region that is the most prominent part of a much larger star-formation event. We have found that the M17 H II region lies on the rim of a large shell structure, 0.5° in diameter ( 18 pc at 2.1 kpc), that is outlined both in diffuse IR emission from dust and in CO line emission near v=20 km/s. The molecular shell is best interpreted as an extended, expanding bubble outlining the photodissociation region of a faint, diffuse H II region several Myr old. We identify several candidate ionizing stars lying inside the bubble. We also find a concentration of candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) on the rim of the bubble. These location of these YSOs with respect to the diffuse IR and CO line emission indicates that star formation was triggered when the expanding bubble compressed one edge of an otherwise quiescent molecular cloud. The expansion of this precursor H II region may also have helped trigger the formation of the massive cluster ionizing the M17 H II region itself. The star formation history of the M17 extended molecular cloud environment has been punctuated by successive waves of massive star formation propagating through a giant molecular cloud complex.

  20. SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lanz, Lauranne; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Appleton, Philip N.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Nyland, Kristina; Meier, David S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Chang, Philip; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Martín, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    NGC 1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy that harbors a massive outflow of molecular gas powered by the mechanical energy of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been speculated that such outflows hinder star formation (SF) in their host galaxies, providing a form of feedback to the process of galaxy formation. Previous studies, however, indicated that only jets from extremely rare, high-power quasars or radio galaxies could impart significant feedback on their hosts. Here we present detailed observations of the gas and dust continuum of NGC 1266 at millimeter wavelengths. Our observations show that molecular gas is being driven out of the nuclear region at M-dot {sub out}≈110 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1}, of which the vast majority cannot escape the nucleus. Only 2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} is actually capable of escaping the galaxy. Most of the molecular gas that remains is very inefficient at forming stars. The far-infrared emission is dominated by an ultra-compact (≲ 50 pc) source that could either be powered by an AGN or by an ultra-compact starburst. The ratio of the SF surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) to the gas surface density (Σ{sub H{sub 2}}) indicates that SF is suppressed by a factor of ≈50 compared to normal star-forming galaxies if all gas is forming stars, and ≈150 for the outskirt (98%) dense molecular gas if the central region is powered by an ultra-compact starburst. The AGN-driven bulk outflow could account for this extreme suppression by hindering the fragmentation and gravitational collapse necessary to form stars through a process of turbulent injection. This result suggests that even relatively common, low-power AGNs are able to alter the evolution of their host galaxies as their black holes grow onto the M-σ relation.

  1. Recent star formation in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Paresce, F.; Panagia, N.; Beccari, G.; Spezzi, L.; Sirianni, M.; Andersen, M.; SOC, WFC3

    2011-01-01

    Using observations obtained with the WFC3 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have studied the star formation properties of the central regions of 30 Dor, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The observations clearly reveal the presence of considerable differential extinction across the field. We characterise and quantify this effect using young massive main sequence stars to derive a statistical reddening correction for each object in the field. We then search for pre-main sequence (PMS) stars by looking for objects with a strong (>5 sigma) Halpha excess emission and find about 1200 of them over the entire field. Comparison of their location in the Hertzprung--Russell diagram with theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks for the appropriate metallicity reveals that about one third of these objects have an age of < 3 Myr, compatible with that of the massive stars in the central ionising cluster R136, whereas the rest have ages up to 30 Myr, with a median of 10 Myr. This indicates that star formation has proceeded over an extended period of time, although we cannot discriminate between an extended episode and a series of short and frequent bursts that are not resolved in time. While the younger PMS population preferentially occupies the central regions of the cluster, older PMS objects are more uniformly distributed across the field and are remarkably few at the very centre of the cluster. We attribute this latter effect to photoevaporation of the older circumstellar discs caused by the massive ionising members of R136. This paper is based on Early Release Science observations made by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program.

  2. The FMOS-COSMOS survey of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6. II. The mass-metallicity relation and the dependence on star formation rate and dust extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Sanders, D. B.; Chu, J.; Hasinger, G.; Kashino, D.; Silverman, J. D.; Kewley, L. J.; Daddi, E.; Renzini, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Nagao, T.; Arimoto, N.; Kartaltepe, J.; Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Maier, C.; Geller, M. J.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Kajisawa, M.; Collaboration: COSMOS Team; and others

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the relationships between stellar mass, gas-phase oxygen abundance (metallicity), star formation rate (SFR), and dust content of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6 using Subaru/FMOS spectroscopy in the COSMOS field. The mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at z ∼ 1.6 is steeper than the relation observed in the local universe. The steeper MZ relation at z ∼ 1.6 is mainly due to evolution in the stellar mass where the MZ relation begins to turnover and flatten. This turnover mass is 1.2 dex larger at z ∼ 1.6. The most massive galaxies at z ∼ 1.6 (∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) are enriched to the level observed in massive galaxies in the local universe. The MZ relation we measure at z ∼ 1.6 supports the suggestion of an empirical upper metallicity limit that does not significantly evolve with redshift. We find an anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR for galaxies at a fixed stellar mass at z ∼ 1.6, which is similar to trends observed in the local universe. We do not find a relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR that is independent of redshift; rather, our data suggest that there is redshift evolution in this relation. We examine the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and dust extinction, and find that at a fixed stellar mass, dustier galaxies tend to be more metal rich. From examination of the stellar masses, metallicities, SFRs, and dust extinctions, we conclude that stellar mass is most closely related to dust extinction.

  3. HIERARCHICAL STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY LEGUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Adamo, Angela; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Bright, Stacey N.; Cignoni, Michele; Lee, Janice; Sabbi, Elena; Andrews, Jennifer; Calzetti, Daniela; Annibali, Francesca; Evans, Aaron S.; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher III, John S.; Grebel, Eva K.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Kim, Hwihyun; Smith, Linda J.; Thilker, David; and others

    2014-05-20

    Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ∼1 to ∼200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in seven galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarfs would follow from the observed structure if cloud and stellar subregions more readily coalesce when self-gravity in the unit cell contributes more to the total gravitational potential.

  4. Hierarchical Star Formation in Nearby LEGUS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Adamo, Angela; Aloisi, Alessandra; Andrews, Jennifer; Annibali, Francesca; Bright, Stacey N.; Calzetti, Daniela; Cignoni, Michele; Evans, Aaron S.; Gallagher, John S., III; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Grebel, Eva K.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Johnson, Kelsey; Kim, Hwihyun; Lee, Janice; Sabbi, Elena; Smith, Linda J.; Thilker, David; Tosi, Monica; Ubeda, Leonardo

    2014-05-01

    Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ~1 to ~200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in seven galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarfs would follow from the observed structure if cloud and stellar subregions more readily coalesce when self-gravity in the unit cell contributes more to the total gravitational potential.

  5. Coeval Intermediate-mass Star Formation in N4W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shaobo; Zhang, Miaomiao; Jiang, Zhibo; Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi

    2016-05-01

    Protostars are mostly found in star-forming regions, where the natal molecular gas still remains. At about 5\\prime west of the molecular bubble N4, N4W is identified as a star-forming clump hosting three Class II (IRS 1–3), and one Class I (IRS 4) young stellar objects (YSOs), as well as a submillimeter source SMM1. The near-IR polarization imaging data of N4W reveal two infrared reflection nebulae close to each other, which are in favor of the outflows of IRS 1 and IRS 2. The bipolar mid-IR emission centered on IRS 4 and the arc-like molecular gas shell are lying on the same axis, indicating a bipolar molecular outflow from IRS 4. There are two dust temperature distributions in N4W. The warmer one is widely distributed and has a temperature of {T}{{d}}≳ 28 {{K}}, with the colder one being from the embedded compact submillimeter source SMM1. N4W’s mass is estimated to be ˜ 2.5× {10}3 {M}ȯ , and the mass of SMM1 is ˜ 5.5× {10}2 {M}ȯ at {T}{{d}}=15 {{K}}, calculated from the CO 1 ‑ 0 emission and 870 μm dust continuum emission, respectively. Based on the estimates of the bolometric luminosity of IRS 1–4, these four sources are intermediate-mass YSOs at least. SMM1 is gravitationally bound, and is capable of forming intermediate-mass stars or even possibly massive stars. The co-existence of the IR bright YSOs and the submillimeter source represents potential sequential star formation processes separated by ˜0.5 Myr in N4W. This small age spread implies that the intermediate-mass star formation processes happening in N4W are almost coeval.

  6. Star Formation in the Taurus-Auriga Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Catherine L.

    The era of space astronomy has given researchers new insight into pre-main sequence evolution. IUE, Einstein, and IRAS have already revolutionized this topic by identification of new classes of PMS stars and by yielding detailed information on chromospheres, coronae, winds, and disks. One approach to understanding PMS evolution involves the detailed study of individual objects; this is the basis of nearly all IUE programs to date. Another approach is to perform a statistical study of a number of stars. This avenue is essential to establish the generality of individual studies, and to find trends and correlations among the stars involving differences in age, angular momentum, mass, and so forth. The ultraviolet provides essential diagnostics of the chromosphere and transition region and of the accretion disk boundary layer. However, of the various data sets, the IUE data on pre-main sequence stars is the most incomplete (a natural limitation of a pointed instrument). The limitations of the data set, especially the bias toward the brighter, more massive, less typical PMS stars, make the statistical analysis of the IUE data difficult. We propose to survey a prototypical low-mass star-formation region, the Taurus-Auriga dark clouds, with IUE. We find that it is feasible to obtain IUE data down to specific limiting magnitudes for the various classes of objects (T Tauri stars, "weak" T Tauri stars, SU Aurigae stars, Herbig Ae/Be stars). Doing so would result in a substantial improvement in the data set for this region. The data would include Mg II fluxes, long-wavelength UV "continuum" spectra, and far-ultraviolet emission-line fluxes in order to study chromospheric emission, winds, and disks, either active or passive. New and archival IUE data will be combined with satellite and ground-based data at all wavelength regimes for statistical analysis. We will examine the indicators of various phenomena (chromospheres winds, disks), study their occurence in the various

  7. Featured Image: A Bubble Triggering Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This remarkable false-color, mid-infrared image (click for the full view!) was produced by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). It captures a tantalizing view of Sh 2-207 and Sh 2-208, the latter of which is one of the lowest-metallicity star-forming regions in the Galaxy. In a recent study led by Chikako Yasui (University of Tokyo and the Koyama Astronomical Observatory), a team of scientists has examined this region to better understand how star formation in low-metallicity environments differs from that in the solar neighborhood. The authors analysis suggests that sequential star formation is taking place in these low-metallicity regions, triggered by an expanding bubble (the large dashed oval indicated in the image) with a ~30 pc radius. You can find out more about their study by checking out the paper below!CitationChikako Yasui et al 2016 AJ 151 115. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/151/5/115

  8. Investigation of Star Formation: Instrumentation and Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veach, Todd Justin

    A thorough exploration of star formation necessitates observation across the electromagnetic spectrum. In particular, observations in the submillimeter and ultra-violet allow one to observe very early stage star formation and to trace the evolution from molecular cloud collapse to stellar ignition. Submillimeter observations are essential for piercing the heart of heavily obscured stellar nurseries to observe star formation in its infancy. Ultra-violet observations allow one to observe stars just after they emerge from their surrounding environment, allowing higher energy radiation to escape. To make detailed observations of early stage star formation in both spectral regimes requires state-of-the-art detector technology and instrumentation. In this dissertation, I discuss the calibration and feasibility of detectors developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and specially processed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to increase their quantum efficiency at far-ultraviolet wavelengths. A cursory treatment of the delta-doping process is presented, followed by a thorough discussion of calibration procedures developed at JPL and in the Laboratory for Astronomical and Space Instrumentation at ASU. Subsequent discussion turns to a novel design for a Modular Imager Cell forming one possible basis for construction of future large focal plane arrays. I then discuss the design, fabrication, and calibration of a sounding rocket imaging system developed using the MIC and these specially processed detectors. Finally, I discuss one scientific application of sub-mm observations. I used data from the Heinrich Hertz Sub-millimeter Telescope and the Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) to observe sub-millimeter transitions and continuum emission towards AFGL 2591. I tested the use of vibrationally excited HCN emission to probe the protostellar accretion disk structure. I measured vibrationally excited HCN line ratios in order to elucidate the appropriate excitation mechanism. I find

  9. A search for technetium (Tc II) in barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched without success for the lines of Tc II at 2647.02, 2610.00 and 2543.24 A in IUE spectra of the barium stars HR 5058, Omicron Vir, and Zeta Cap. The lack of Tc II implies that the observed s-process enhancements were produced more than half a million years ago and supports the suggestion that the spectral peculiarities of barium stars are probably related to the binary nature of the stars.

  10. On the Formation of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Sonnhalter, Cordula

    2002-04-01

    We calculate numerically the collapse of slowly rotating, nonmagnetic, massive molecular clumps of masses 30, 60, and 120 Msolar, which conceivably could lead to the formation of massive stars. Because radiative acceleration on dust grains plays a critical role in the clump's dynamical evolution, we have improved the module for continuum radiation transfer in an existing two-dimensional (axial symmetry assumed) radiation hydrodynamic code. In particular, rather than using ``gray'' dust opacities and ``gray'' radiation transfer, we calculate the dust's wavelength-dependent absorption and emission simultaneously with the radiation density at each wavelength and the equilibrium temperatures of three grain components: amorphous carbon particles, silicates, and ``dirty ice''-coated silicates. Because our simulations cannot spatially resolve the innermost regions of the molecular clump, however, we cannot distinguish between the formation of a dense central cluster or a single massive object. Furthermore, we cannot exclude significant mass loss from the central object(s) that may interact with the inflow into the central grid cell. Thus, with our basic assumption that all material in the innermost grid cell accretes onto a single object, we are able to provide only an upper limit to the mass of stars that could possibly be formed. We introduce a semianalytical scheme for augmenting existing evolutionary tracks of pre-main-sequence protostars by including the effects of accretion. By considering an open outermost boundary, an arbitrary amount of material could, in principal, be accreted onto this central star. However, for the three cases considered (30, 60, and 120 Msolar originally within the computation grid), radiation acceleration limited the final masses to 31.6, 33.6, and 42.9 Msolar, respectively, for wavelength-dependent radiation transfer and to 19.1, 20.1, and 22.9 Msolar for the corresponding simulations with gray radiation transfer. Our calculations

  11. Star formation triggering and its influence on ISM: multiwavelength view on the nearby galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, O. V.; Lozinskaya, T. A.; Moiseev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We report the results of our study of the ionized and neutral gas morphology and kinematics in the regions of triggered star formation in nearby galaxies. The main goal of our study was to answer the questions: which processes are responsible for the triggering of star formation at global scale and how the feedback from new regions of star formation influences on ISM for each individual galaxy studied. In this poster we mostly focus on our recent findings about two galaxies: IC 2574 and Holmberg II.

  12. Interstellar MHD Turbulence and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    This chapter reviews the nature of turbulence in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and its connections to the star formation (SF) process. The ISM is turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating, and is subject to heating and cooling processes that control its thermodynamic behavior, causing it to behave approximately isobarically, in spite of spanning several orders of magnitude in density and temperature. The turbulence in the warm and hot ionized components of the ISM appears to be trans- or subsonic, and thus to behave nearly incompressibly. However, the neutral warm and cold components are highly compressible, as a consequence of both thermal instability (TI) in the atomic gas and of moderately-to-strongly supersonic motions in the roughly isothermal cold atomic and molecular components. Within this context, we discuss: (1) the production and statistical distribution of turbulent density fluctuations in both isothermal and polytropic media; (2) the nature of the clumps produced by TI, noting that, contrary to classical ideas, they in general accrete mass from their environment in spite of exhibiting sharp discontinuities at their boundaries; (3) the density-magnetic field correlation (and, at low densities, lack thereof) in turbulent density fluctuations, as a consequence of the superposition of the different wave modes in the turbulent flow; (4) the evolution of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio (MFR) in density fluctuations as they are built up by dynamic compressions; (5) the formation of cold, dense clouds aided by TI, in both the hydrodynamic (HD) and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) cases; (6) the expectation that star-forming molecular clouds are likely to be undergoing global gravitational contraction, rather than being near equilibrium, as generally believed, and (7) the regulation of the star formation rate (SFR) in such gravitationally contracting clouds by stellar feedback which, rather than keeping the clouds from collapsing, evaporates and disperses

  13. A SIMPLE LAW OF STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Padoan, Paolo; Haugbolle, Troels; Nordlund, Ake E-mail: haugboel@nbi.dk

    2012-11-10

    We show that supersonic MHD turbulence yields a star formation rate (SFR) as low as observed in molecular clouds, for characteristic values of the free-fall time divided by the dynamical time, t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}, the Alfvenic Mach number, M{sub a}, and the sonic Mach number, M{sub s}. Using a very large set of deep adaptive-mesh-refinement simulations, we quantify the dependence of the SFR per free-fall time, {epsilon}{sub ff}, on the above parameters. Our main results are (1) that {epsilon}{sub ff} decreases exponentially with increasing t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}, but is insensitive to changes in M{sub s}, for constant values of t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn} and M{sub a}. (2) Decreasing values of M{sub a} (stronger magnetic fields) reduce {epsilon}{sub ff}, but only to a point, beyond which {epsilon}{sub ff} increases with a further decrease of M{sub a}. (3) For values of M{sub a} characteristic of star-forming regions, {epsilon}{sub ff} varies with M{sub a} by less than a factor of two. We propose a simple star formation law, based on the empirical fit to the minimum {epsilon}{sub ff}, and depending only on t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}: {epsilon}{sub ff} Almost-Equal-To {epsilon}{sub wind}exp (- 1.6 t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}). Because it only depends on the mean gas density and rms velocity, this law is straightforward to implement in simulations and analytical models of galaxy formation and evolution.

  14. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  15. Star formation along the Hubble sequence. Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Pérez, E.; García-Benito, R.; López Fernández, R.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Amorim, A. L.; Vale Asari, N.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.; Mast, D.; Alves, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The spatially resolved stellar population content of today's galaxies holds important information for understanding the different processes that contribute to the star formation and mass assembly histories of galaxies. The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by a uniquely rich and diverse data set drawn from the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses ranging from M⋆ ~ 109 to 7 × 1011 M⊙. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to derive 2D maps and radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past (ΣSFR), as well as related properties, such as the local specific star formation rate (sSFR), defined as the ratio between ΣSFR and the stellar mass surface density (μ⋆). To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF), we stack the individual radial profiles in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd), and several stellar masses. Our main results are: (a) the intensity of the star formation rate shows declining profiles that exhibit very small differences between spirals with values at R = 1 half light radius (HLR) within a factor two of ΣSFR ~ 20 M⊙Gyr-1pc-2. The dispersion in the ΣSFR(R) profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals (Sbc, Sc, Sd). This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant ΣSFR. (b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outward with a steeper slope in the inner 1 HLR. This behavior suggests that galaxies are quenched inside-out and that this process is faster in the central, bulge-dominated part than in the disks. (c) As a whole and at all radii, E and S0 are off the MSSF with SFR much smaller than spirals of the

  16. The Ionizing Star Clusters of Giant H II Regions in NGC 2403

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drissen, Laurent; Roy, Jean-René; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shara, Michael M.

    1999-03-01

    We present the results of a study on the massive star population down to about M_V~-3.1, or 12-15 M_solar, of the most luminous giant H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2403, based on Hubble Space Telescope images and ground-based spectrograms. Particular emphasis is placed on the distribution of the Wolf-Rayet and red supergiant stars and the information they provide about the recent star-forming history of these large complexes. We find direct evidence for the presence of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in five of the six giant H II regions investigated; 25-40 WR stars are inferred for the sole NGC 2403-I giant H II region. Red supergiant (RSG) stars are mainly distributed over a more extended halo, while the young blue stars and most WR stars are in or close to a compact core. One appears to be seeing young cores of O and WR stars surrounded by older halos containing red supergiants. We propose a scenario in which RSG stars belonging to an early phase of star formation were followed by a more recent burst corresponding to a very blue mean sequence. Delayed trigger with preheating over several 100 pc by the first generation of massive stars allowed the build-up of the required confinement for the production of parsec-scale cluster cores with luminosity up to a few times 10^6 L_solar. Finally, we present some interesting objects found in the field of NGC 2403 outside the giant H II regions, such as field WR stars, globular clusters and background galaxies.

  17. Hierarchical Star Formation in LEGUS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra M.; Elmegreen, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Star formation generally follows a hierarchical distribution in galaxies from kpc scales in giant star complexes down to sub-pc scales in embedded clusters. This hierarchy corresponds to a power law distribution function for the number of star forming regions as a function of size or luminosity. Using the Legacy ExtraGalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS), we examine six galaxies, NGC 1566, NGC 1705, NGC 2500, NGC 5253, NGC 5477, and IC 4247, which span types from grand design and flocculent spirals to irregulars and starburst irregulars. Power law size and luminosity distributions were measured from Gaussian-blurred images in the NUV and UV using SExtractor. Slopes ranged from -1 to -1.8, with the steepest slopes corresponding to the starburst galaxies. The slopes did not vary from the NUV to the UV. The fraction of light contained within the largest scales ranged from 85 to 95 percent, independent of galaxy type. We acknowledge support from grant HST-GO-13364.

  18. Calibration of Evolutionary Diagnostics in High-mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, S.; Merello, M.; Elia, D.; Cesaroni, R.; Testi, L.; Robitaille, T.

    2016-07-01

    The evolutionary classification of massive clumps that are candidate progenitors of high-mass young stars and clusters relies on a variety of independent diagnostics based on observables from the near-infrared to the radio. A promising evolutionary indicator for massive and dense cluster-progenitor clumps is the L/M ratio between the bolometric luminosity and the mass of the clumps. With the aim of providing a quantitative calibration for this indicator, we used SEPIA/APEX to obtain CH3C2H(J = 12–11) observations, which is an excellent thermometer molecule probing densities ≥slant {10}5 cm‑3, toward 51 dense clumps with M≥slant 1000 M {}ȯ and uniformly spanning ‑2 ≲ Log(L/M) [L {}ȯ /M {}ȯ ] ≲ 2.3. We identify three distinct ranges of L/M that can be associated to three distinct phases of star formation in massive clumps. For L/M ≤slant 1 no clump is detected in CH3C2H, suggesting an inner envelope temperature below ∼30K. For 1 ≲ L/M ≲ 10 we detect 58% of the clumps with a temperature between ∼30 and ∼35 K independently from the exact value of L/M; such clumps are building up luminosity due to the formation of stars, but no star is yet able to significantly heat the inner clump regions. For L/M ≳ 10 we detect all the clumps with a gas temperature rising with Log(L/M), marking the appearance of a qualitatively different heating source within the clumps; such values are found toward clumps with UCH ii counterparts, suggesting that the quantitative difference in T versus L/M behavior above L/M ∼ 10 is due to the first appearance of ZAMS stars in the clumps.

  19. Calibration of Evolutionary Diagnostics in High-mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, S.; Merello, M.; Elia, D.; Cesaroni, R.; Testi, L.; Robitaille, T.

    2016-07-01

    The evolutionary classification of massive clumps that are candidate progenitors of high-mass young stars and clusters relies on a variety of independent diagnostics based on observables from the near-infrared to the radio. A promising evolutionary indicator for massive and dense cluster-progenitor clumps is the L/M ratio between the bolometric luminosity and the mass of the clumps. With the aim of providing a quantitative calibration for this indicator, we used SEPIA/APEX to obtain CH3C2H(J = 12–11) observations, which is an excellent thermometer molecule probing densities ≥slant {10}5 cm‑3, toward 51 dense clumps with M≥slant 1000 M {}ȯ and uniformly spanning ‑2 ≲ Log(L/M) [L {}ȯ /M {}ȯ ] ≲ 2.3. We identify three distinct ranges of L/M that can be associated to three distinct phases of star formation in massive clumps. For L/M ≤slant 1 no clump is detected in CH3C2H, suggesting an inner envelope temperature below ˜30K. For 1 ≲ L/M ≲ 10 we detect 58% of the clumps with a temperature between ˜30 and ˜35 K independently from the exact value of L/M; such clumps are building up luminosity due to the formation of stars, but no star is yet able to significantly heat the inner clump regions. For L/M ≳ 10 we detect all the clumps with a gas temperature rising with Log(L/M), marking the appearance of a qualitatively different heating source within the clumps; such values are found toward clumps with UCH ii counterparts, suggesting that the quantitative difference in T versus L/M behavior above L/M ˜ 10 is due to the first appearance of ZAMS stars in the clumps.

  20. Late Pop III Star Formation During the Epoch of Reionization: Results from the Renaissance Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; O’Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.

    2016-06-01

    We present results on the formation of Population III (Pop III) stars at redshift 7.6 from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich radiation transport hydrodynamics cosmological adaptive-mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. In a survey volume of about 220 comoving Mpc3, we found 14 Pop III galaxies with recent star formation. The surprisingly late formation of Pop III stars is possible due to two factors: (i) the metal enrichment process is local and slow, leaving plenty of pristine gas to exist in the vast volume; and (ii) strong Lyman–Werner radiation from vigorous metal-enriched star formation in early galaxies suppresses Pop III formation in (“not so”) small primordial halos with mass less than ˜3 × 107 M ⊙. We quantify the properties of these Pop III galaxies and their Pop III star formation environments. We look for analogs to the recently discovered luminous Ly α emitter CR7, which has been interpreted as a Pop III star cluster within or near a metal-enriched star-forming galaxy. We find and discuss a system similar to this in some respects, however, the Pop III star cluster is far less massive and luminous than CR7 is inferred to be.

  1. Effects of Ionization Feedback in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, R.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present 3D high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation. We model the collapse of a massive molecular cloud core forming a high-mass star in its center. We use a version of the FLASH code that has been extended by including sink particles which are a source of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The sink particles evolve according to a prestellar model which determines the stellar and accretion luminosities. Radiation transfer is done using the hybrid characteristics raytracing approach on the adaptive mesh developed by Rijkhorst et al. (2006). The radiative transfer module has been augmented to allow simulations with arbitrarily high resolution. Our highest resolution models resolve the disk scale height by at least 16 zones. Opacities for non-ionizing radiation have been added to account for the accretion heating, which is expected to be strong at the initial stage of star formation and believed to prevent fragmentation. Studies of collapsing massive cores show the formation of a gravitationally highly unstable disk. The accretion heating is not strong enough to suppress this instability. The ionizing radiation builds up an H II region around the protostar, which destroys the accretion disk close to it. We describe preliminary results, with a focus on how long the H II region remains confined by the accretion flow, and whether it can ever cut off accretion entirely. Thomas Peters acknowledges support from a Kade Fellowship for his visit to the American Museum of Natural History. He is a fellow of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg and the Heidelberg Graduate School of Fundamental Physics. We also thank the DFG for support via the Emmy Noether Grant BA 3607/1 and the individual grant KL1358/5.

  2. The case against bimodal star formation in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, B. K.

    1996-02-01

    We consider the present-day photometric and chemical properties of elliptical galaxies, adopting the bimodal star formation scenario of Elbaz, Arnaud & Vangioni-Flam. These models utilize an initial mass function (IMF) biased heavily toward massive stars during the early phases of galactic evolution, leading to early Type II supernovae-driven galactic winds. A subsequent lengthy, milder star formation phase with a normal IMF ensues, supposedly responsible for the stellar population observed today. Based upon chemical evolution arguments alone, this scenario has been invoked to explain the observed metal mass, and their abundance ratios, in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. Building upon the recent compilations of metallicity-dependent isochrones for simple stellar populations, we have constructed a coupled photometric and chemical evolution package for composite stellar populations in order to quantify the effects of such a model upon the photochemical properties of the resultant elliptical galaxies. We demonstrate that these predicted properties are incompatible with those observed at the current epoch.

  3. Star Formation and Young Stellar Content in the W3 Giant Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Polychroni, Danae; Moore, Toby J. T.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we have carried out an in-depth analysis of the young stellar content in the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC). The young stellar object (YSO) population was identified and classified in the Infrared Array Camera/Multiband Imaging Photometer color-magnitude space according to the "Class" scheme and compared to other classifications based on intrinsic properties. Class 0/I and II candidates were also compared to low-/intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars selected through their colors and magnitudes in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We find that a reliable color/magnitude selection of low-mass PMS stars in the infrared requires prior knowledge of the protostar population, while intermediate-mass objects can be more reliably identified. By means of the minimum spanning tree algorithm and our YSO spatial distribution and age maps, we investigated the YSO groups and the star formation history in W3. We find signatures of clustered and distributed star formation in both triggered and quiescent environments. The central/western parts of the GMC are dominated by large-scale turbulence likely powered by isolated bursts of star formation that triggered secondary star formation events. Star formation in the eastern high-density layer (HDL) also shows signs of quiescent and triggered stellar activity, as well as extended periods of star formation. While our findings support triggering as a key factor for inducing and enhancing some of the major star-forming activity in the HDL (e.g., W3 Main/W3(OH)), we argue that some degree of quiescent or spontaneous star formation is required to explain the observed YSO population. Our results also support previous studies claiming a spontaneous origin for the isolated massive star(s) powering KR 140.

  4. STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG STELLAR CONTENT IN THE W3 GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Polychroni, Danae; Moore, Toby J. T.

    2011-12-10

    In this work, we have carried out an in-depth analysis of the young stellar content in the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC). The young stellar object (YSO) population was identified and classified in the Infrared Array Camera/Multiband Imaging Photometer color-magnitude space according to the 'Class' scheme and compared to other classifications based on intrinsic properties. Class 0/I and II candidates were also compared to low-/intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars selected through their colors and magnitudes in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We find that a reliable color/magnitude selection of low-mass PMS stars in the infrared requires prior knowledge of the protostar population, while intermediate-mass objects can be more reliably identified. By means of the minimum spanning tree algorithm and our YSO spatial distribution and age maps, we investigated the YSO groups and the star formation history in W3. We find signatures of clustered and distributed star formation in both triggered and quiescent environments. The central/western parts of the GMC are dominated by large-scale turbulence likely powered by isolated bursts of star formation that triggered secondary star formation events. Star formation in the eastern high-density layer (HDL) also shows signs of quiescent and triggered stellar activity, as well as extended periods of star formation. While our findings support triggering as a key factor for inducing and enhancing some of the major star-forming activity in the HDL (e.g., W3 Main/W3(OH)), we argue that some degree of quiescent or spontaneous star formation is required to explain the observed YSO population. Our results also support previous studies claiming a spontaneous origin for the isolated massive star(s) powering KR 140.

  5. Star formation and chemical abundances in clumpy irregular galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, A.M.; Edwards, S.; Heidmann, J.

    1982-01-15

    Clumpy irregular galaxies consist of several bright clumps which are huge H II complexes (about 100 times brighter and more massive than 30 Doradus) and contain about 10/sup 5/ O and B stars. Image-tube spectrograms with 1--3 A resolution have been obtained of the brightest emission regions of three clumpy galaxies and one candidate clumpy galaxy with the Mauna Kea 2.24 m telescope. The electron temperatures were found to be in the range 7000--9000 K and electron densities a few hundred cm/sup 3/: quite typical for normal H II regions. The abundances of O, N. S in Mrk 432 are comparable to those in Orion, while the three clumpy galaxies are slightly deficient in O and S (by factors of 2 to 4) and N (by factors of 3 to 6). The galaxies appear to be normal (like Sc galaxies) in mass and composition. Supernovae remnants are indicated by the high (S II)/H..cap alpha.. ratio. Possible triggering mechanisms for the exceptional star formation activity are discussed.

  6. Metallicity and star formation history of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei; Ma, Er

    1993-01-01

    Using population synthesis method, the star formation history in globular clusters has been studied. No single star formation mode with a constant star formation rate (SER) and an invariable initial mass function (IMF) can fit the observations of globular clusters. There are at least two stages of star formation: a pollution stage and a starburst stage. In the pollution stage, either the IMF is very peculiar (only form massive stars), or its SFR is so small that the low-mass stars form only a little. A starburst then follows to form most stars in the globular cluster. Within the framework of Fall and Rees'model, the collisions between warm clouds in the two phase medium may provide a suitable external cause to stimulate the starburst.

  7. Metallicity and star formation history of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei; Ma, Er

    1993-03-01

    Using population synthesis method, the star formation history in globular clusters has been studied. No single star formation mode with a constant star formation rate (SER) and an invariable initial mass function (IMF) can fit the observations of globular clusters. There are at least two stages of star formation: a pollution stage and a starburst stage. In the pollution stage, either the IMF is very peculiar (only form massive stars), or its SFR is so small that the low-mass stars form only a little. A starburst then follows to form most stars in the globular cluster. Within the framework of Fall and Rees' model, the collisions between warm clouds in the two phase medium may provide a suitable external cause to stimulate the starburst.

  8. The Origin of MN II Emission in the Spectra of Chemically Peculiar Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigut, T. A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Emission from Mn II multiplet 13 (λλ6122-6132) in the spectrum of the 3He star 3 Centauri A and the hot, mild, HgMn star 46 Aquilae can be naturally explained by interlocked non-LTE effects. However, reproduction of the strength of the Mn II emission in both stars requires vertical stratification of the manganese abundance, with manganese concentrated high in the photosphere (column mass <~10-2 g cm-2). If this formation picture is correct, several additional transitions of Mn II with λ>8000 Å should also be present in emission in the spectrum of 3 Cen A. The wide range in the strength of Mn II multiplet 13 among upper main-sequence stars (ranging from absorption to emission) is made possible by the interplay in the non-LTE radiative transfer solution of the stellar Teff, manganese abundance, and manganese stratification profile. In particular, emission is strongly suppressed by a large manganese overabundance in the photosphere. This explains why the hot, mild, HgMn star 46 Aql, which has only a modest manganese enhancement, is detected in emission in Mn II multiplet 13 while other HgMn stars of similar Teff but with large photospheric manganese overabundances, such as κ Cancri, present Mn II multiplet 13 in absorption.

  9. Recovering the Star Formation Rate in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cignoni, M.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Moroni, P. G. P.; Shore, S. N.

    2007-11-01

    This paper develops a method for obtaining the star formation histories of a mixed, resolved population through the use of color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). The method is applied to the derivation of the local star formation rate, analyzing the observations of the Hipparcos satellite through a comparison with synthetic CMDs computed for different star formation histories with an updated stellar evolution library. Parallax and photometric uncertainties are included explicitly and corrected using the Bayesian Richardson-Lucy algorithm. We find that the solar neighborhood star formation rate has a characteristic timescale for variation of about 6 Gyr, with a maximum activity close to 3 Gyr ago.

  10. Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies: Life in a Rough Neighborhood

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S

    2003-10-16

    Star formation within dwarf galaxies is governed by several factors. Many of these factors are external, including ram-pressure stripping, tidal stripping, and heating by external UV radiation. The latter, in particular, may prevent star formation in the smallest systems. Internal factors include negative feedback in the form of UV radiation, winds and supernovae from massive stars. These act to reduce the star formation efficiency within dwarf systems, which may, in turn, solve several theoretical and observational problems associated with galaxy formation. In this contribution, we discuss our recent work being done to examine the importance of the many factors in the evolution of dwarf galaxies.