Sample records for ii upper stage

  1. Fairing installed around Stardust and upper stage of Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers check the lower fittings of the fairing installed around the Stardust spacecraft and upper stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch at 4:06:42 p.m. on Feb. 6, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  2. Fairing installed around Stardust and upper stage of Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin placing the fairing around the Stardust spacecraft and upper stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch at 4:06:42 p.m. on Feb. 6, Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon- based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  3. Fairing installed around Stardust and upper stage of Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the Stardust spacecraft waits for installation of the fairing (behind, right) that will enclose the spacecraft and the upper stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch at 4:06:42 p.m. on Feb. 6, Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre- solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  4. Short-term morbidity of the upper limb after sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection for Stage I or II breast carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johan S. Rietman; Pieter U. Dijkstra; Jan H. B. Geertzen; Peter Baas; Jaap de Vries; Wil Dolsma; Johan W. Groothoff; Willem H. Eisma; Harald J. Hoekstra

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The goals of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) are to improve axillary staging and reduce unnecessary axillary lymph node dissections (ALND), thereby reducing treatment-related upper-limb morbidity. In the current prospec- tive study, short-term upper-limb morbidity was assessed after SLNB and\\/or ALND. METHODS. The study comprised 204 patients with Stage I\\/II breast carcinoma. Mean patient age was 55.6 years (standard

  5. Ares I Upper Stage Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The Upper Stage Element of NASA's Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) is a "clean-sheet" approach that is being designed and developed in-house, with Element management at MSFC. The Upper Stage Element concept is a self-supporting cylindrical structure, approximately 84' long and 18' in diameter. While the First Stage Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) design has changed since the CLV inception, the Upper Stage Element design has remained essentially a clean-sheet design approach. A clean-sheet upper stage design does offer many advantages: a design for increased reliability; built-in evolvability to allow for commonality/growth without major redesign; incorporation of state-of-the-art materials and hardware; and incorporation of design, fabrication, and test techniques and processes to facilitate a more operable system.

  6. Ariane-5 upper stage EPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holsten, Horst; Kollien, Juergen

    1989-08-01

    The requirements, present configuration, and potential future applications of the Ariane 5 upper stage (EPS) are described. The main characteristics of this upper stage are as follows: four tanks storing 7200 kg of N2O4/MMH propellant, and a 27.5 KN engine allowing for multiple reignition equipped with a retroburn for deorbitation/reentry. The adaptability of the EPS concept for future use within the ATV (Ariane Transfer Vehicle) and Hermes programs is outlined.

  7. Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. J.; Cook, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    The Agency s Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) will be the first human rated space transportation system developed in the United States since the Space Shuttle. The CLV will utilize existing Shuttle heritage hardware and systems combined with a "clean sheet design" for the Upper Stage. The Upper Stage element will be designed and developed by a team of NASA engineers managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The team will design the Upper Stage based on the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) Team s point of departure conceptual design as illustrated in the figure below. This concept is a self-supporting cylindrical structure, approximately 1 15 feet long and 216 inches in diameter. While this "clean-sheet" upper stage design inherently carries more risk than utilizing a modified design, the approach also has many advantages. This paper will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of pursuing a "clean-sheet" design for the new CLV Upper Stage as well as describe in detail the overall design of the Upper Stage and its integration into NASA s CLV.

  8. CRYOGENIC UPPER STAGE SYSTEM SAFETY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. Kenneth; French, James V.; LaRue, Peter F.; Taylor, James L.; Pollard, Kathy (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Exploration Initiative will require development of many new systems or systems of systems. One specific example is that safe, affordable, and reliable upper stage systems to place cargo and crew in stable low earth orbit are urgently required. In this paper, we examine the failure history of previous upper stages with liquid oxygen (LOX)/liquid hydrogen (LH2) propulsion systems. Launch data from 1964 until midyear 2005 are analyzed and presented. This data analysis covers upper stage systems from the Ariane, Centaur, H-IIA, Saturn, and Atlas in addition to other vehicles. Upper stage propulsion system elements have the highest impact on reliability. This paper discusses failure occurrence in all aspects of the operational phases (Le., initial burn, coast, restarts, and trends in failure rates over time). In an effort to understand the likelihood of future failures in flight, we present timelines of engine system failures relevant to initial flight histories. Some evidence suggests that propulsion system failures as a result of design problems occur shortly after initial development of the propulsion system; whereas failures because of manufacturing or assembly processing errors may occur during any phase of the system builds process, This paper also explores the detectability of historical failures. Observations from this review are used to ascertain the potential for increased upper stage reliability given investments in integrated system health management. Based on a clear understanding of the failure and success history of previous efforts by multiple space hardware development groups, the paper will investigate potential improvements that can be realized through application of system safety principles.

  9. Treatment-Related Upper Limb Morbidity 1 Year after Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy or Axillary Lymph Node Dissection for Stage I or II Breast Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Rietman; P. U. Dijkstra; J. H. B. Geertzen; P. Baas; J. de Vries; W. V. Dolsma; J. W. Groothoff; W. H. Eisma; H. J. Hoekstra

    2004-01-01

    Background: In a prospective study, upper limb morbidity and perceived disability\\/activities of daily life (ADLs) were assessed before and 1 year after sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND).Methods: A total of 204 patients with stage I\\/II breast cancer (mean age, 55.6 years; SD, 11.6 years) entered the study, and 189 patients (93%) could be evaluated

  10. Inertial upper stage - Development status and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringe, G. T.; Bangsund, E. L.

    1980-04-01

    A two-stage inertial upper stage (IUS) design, its subsystems, and its integration into an orbiter system are described along with the resulting capabilities. Ground, pre-flight, and orbital operations are discussed. Services to the spacecraft provided by IUS are presented. Status of the IUS program is summarized, and the activities required in the near term to support the first launches of a Titan III (34)D and STS/IUS configuration are described.

  11. Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) mission analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Frye

    1997-01-01

    Solar thermal propulsion and propulsion\\/power systems were identified as key technologies by the Operational Effectiveness and Cost Comparison Study. These technologies were found to be pervasively cost effective with short transfer times and very good performance across a wide range of missions (Feuchter 1996). The on-going Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) Program sponsored by Phillips Laboratory represents development of one

  12. Upper stages for a space transportation system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. P. Harwood

    1986-01-01

    Design features of a flexible use upper stage for the STS are described, noting that potential users must become interested if the system is to be developed. Based on the design for the low-energy Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), the system would be required to utilize the Orbiter payload bay, have reattachable separation devices, have replaceable external propellant tanks, and have

  13. Uprated OMS engine for upper stage propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, William C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a pre-development component demonstration program on the use of a gas generator-driven turbopump that increases the Space Shuttle's Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) operating pressure are given. Tests and analysis confirm the the capability of the concept to meet or exceed performance and life requirements. Storable propellant upper stage concepts are also discussed.

  14. Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage/Upper Stage Engine Element Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McArthur, J. Craig

    2008-01-01

    The Ares I upper stage is an integral part of the Constellation Program transportation system. The upper stage provides guidance, navigation and control (GN and C) for the second stage of ascent flight for the Ares I vehicle. The Saturn-derived J-2X upper stage engine will provide thrust and propulsive impulse for the second stage of ascent flight for the Ares I launch vehicle. Additionally, the upper stage is responsible for the avionics system of the the entire Ares I. This brief presentation highlights the requirements, design, progress and production of the upper stage. Additionally, test facilities to support J-2X development are discussed and an overview of the operational and manufacturing flows are provided. Building on the heritage of the Apollo and Space Shuttle Programs, the Ares I Us and USE teams are utilizing extensive lessons learned to place NASA and the US into another era of space exploration. The NASA, Boeing and PWR teams are integrated and working together to make progress designing and building the Ares I upper stage to minimize cost, technical and schedule risks.

  15. Delta interim upper stage system study. Volume 2: Technical report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Dawson; J. F. Meyers; R. C. Doiron; R. G. Monger

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle System will require an upper stage (Space Tug, or OOS - Orbit-to-Orbit Shuttle) to achieve maximum effectiveness. A reusable upper stage, although highly desirable, requires a greater initial cash outlay, which would compete for early Shuttle development program funds. Hence, an expendable upper stage, to be used in the interim, has been the subject of various government

  16. Commercial launch vehicles and upper stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahon, J.; Wild, J.

    1984-01-01

    Since the beginning of the space age in October 1957, a family of expendable launch vehicles, capable of launching a wide range of payloads, was developed along with the Space Shuttle and a number of upper stages. A brief description is presented of selected orbits which have proved to be most useful for initial or conceptual understanding of space operations, taking into account direct injection and Hohman transfers, and synchronous and sun-synchronous orbits. Early American boosters are discussed along with current expendable launch vehicles, giving attention to the Vanguard, Redstone and Juno, Saturn 1B and Saturn V, Scout, the Atlas booster, Atlas Centaur, Delta, Titan IIIC, and Ariane. Details regarding the Space Shuttle are considered along with PAM-D, PAM-A, PAM-DII, TOS, IUS, Centaur-G, and Syncom-IV and Intelsat-VI.

  17. Upper stages for a space transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, O. P.

    1986-08-01

    Design features of a flexible use upper stage for the STS are described, noting that potential users must become interested if the system is to be developed. Based on the design for the low-energy Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), the system would be required to utilize the Orbiter payload bay, have reattachable separation devices, have replaceable external propellant tanks, and have standard mechanical and functional interfaces. Implementation of an open grid triangular lattice structure covered with standardized aluminum plates would allow for the system to be tailored to specific missions at standardized increments of size. The system would tilt out of the bay and deploy all necessary appendages before ascent to GEO. A small bi-propellant engine is recommended as a prototype propulsion system to meet launch and mass constraints, particularly for GEO boosts.

  18. Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Element Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McArthur, J. Craig

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of NASA's Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Element. The topics include: 1) What is NASA s Mission?; 2) NASA s Exploration Roadmap What is our time line?; 3) Building on a Foundation of Proven Technologies Launch Vehicle Comparisons; 4) Ares I Upper Stage; 5) Upper Stage Primary Products; 6) Ares I Upper Stage Development Approach; 7) What progress have we made?; 8) Upper Stage Subsystem Highlights; 9) Structural Testing; 10) Common Bulkhead Processing; 11) Stage Installation at Stennis Space Center; 12) Boeing Producibility Team; 13) Upper Stage Low Cost Strategy; 14) Ares I and V Production at Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF); 15) Merged Manufacturing Flow; and 16) Manufacturing and Assembly Weld Tools.

  19. Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion for Spacecraft and Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Gilchrist, Brian; Estes, Robert D.; Lorenzini, Rnrico; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Sanmartin, Juan

    1998-01-01

    Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to 'push' against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant. The groundwork has been laid for this type of propulsion. Important recent milestones include retrieval of a tether in space (TSS-1, 1992), successful deployment of a 20-km-long tether in space (SEDS-1, 1993), and operation of an electrodynamic tether with tether current driven in both directions (PMG, 1993). The planned Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) experiment will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a 5 km bare copper tether from a Delta II upper stage to achieve approximately 0.4 N drag thrust, thus deorbiting the stage. The experiment will use a predominantly 'bare' tether for current collection in lieu of the endmass collector and insulated tether approach used on previous missions. The flight experiment is a precursor to utilization of the technology on the International Space Station for reboost and the electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes, all using electrodynamic thrust. In addition, the use of this type of propulsion may be attractive for future missions at Jupiter.

  20. The IRIS-GUS Shuttle Borne Upper Stage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooley, Craig; Houghton, Martin; Bussolino, Luigi; Connors, Paul; Broudeur, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the Italian Research Interim Stage - Gyroscopic Upper Stage (IRIS-GUS) upper stage system that will be used to launch NASA's Triana Observatory from the Space Shuttle. Triana is a pathfinder earth science mission being executed on rapid schedule and small budget, therefore the mission's upper stage solution had to be a system that could be fielded quickly at relatively low cost and risk. The building of the IRIS-GUS system wa necessary because NASA lost the capability to launch moderately sized upper stage missions fro the Space Shuttle when the PAM-D system was retired. The IRIS-GUS system restores this capability. The resulting system is a hybrid which mates the existing, flight proven IRIS (Italian Research Interim Stage) airborne support equipment to a new upper stage, the Gyroscopic Upper Stage (GUS) built by the GSFC for Triana. Although a new system, the GUS exploits flight proven hardware and design approaches in most subsystems, in some cases implementing proven design approaches with state-of-the-art electronics. This paper describes the IRIS-GUS upper stage system elements, performance capabilities, and payload interfaces.

  1. Expendable solid rocket motor upper stages for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. P.; Jones, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    A family of expendable solid rocket motor upper stages has been conceptually defined to provide the payloads for the Space Shuttle with performance capability beyond the low earth operational range of the Shuttle Orbiter. In this concept-feasibility assessment, three new solid rocket motors of fixed impulse are defined for use with payloads requiring levels of higher energy. The conceptual design of these motors is constrained to limit thrusting loads into the payloads and to conserve payload bay length. These motors are combined in various vehicle configurations with stage components derived from other programs for the performance of a broad range of upper-stage missions from spin-stabilized, single-stage transfers to three-axis stabilized, multistage insertions. Estimated payload delivery performance and combined payload mission loading configurations are provided for the upper-stage configurations.

  2. Ares I Upper Stage Parachute Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  3. Ares I Upper Stage Parachute Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  4. Which way to Shuttle upper stages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. O. Tischler

    1975-01-01

    Suitable approaches for obtaining a cost-efficient space transportation system which in supplementing the Space Shuttle will permit payload insertion into high-altitude orbits are discussed. Attention is given to a low-cost geosynchronous payload deployment\\/retrieval propulsion system. The system comprises two expendable solid-rocket stages, one for the perigee and one for the apogee kick. It is pointed out that the perigee and

  5. Collaborative Stage Manual Part II

    Cancer.gov

    SEER Program Coding and Staging Manual 2004, Revision 1 Appendix C Site-Specific Coding Modules C-299 Collaborative Staging Codes Nasal Cavity C30.0 C30.0 Nasal cavity (excludes nose, NOS C76.0) Note: Laterality must be coded for this site,

  6. Melanocytic Neoplasms II: Molecular Staging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Murphy; J. Andrew Carlson

    \\u000a The TNM staging categories and groupings of the updated 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Melanoma Staging System\\u000a are outlined in Tables 6.1 and 6.2 [1]. “T ?” parameters are defined by primary tumor thickness, ulceration, and mitotic status; “N” parameters by the number of lymph nodes with metastatic disease and extent of metastatic burden; and “M” parameters by

  7. Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) engine ground demonstration (EGD)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles T. Kudija; Patrick E. Frye

    1998-01-01

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) Engine Ground Demonstration (EGD) Program sponsored by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL) conducted a full-up ground demonstration of a solar thermal power and propulsion system at NASA Lewis Research Center in mid-1997. This test validated system capability in a relevant environment, bringing ISUS to a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 6, and paving

  8. Orbit decay analysis of STS upper stage boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, O. F., Jr.; Mueller, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    An orbit decay analysis of the space transportation system upper stage boosters is presented. An overview of the computer trajectory programs, DSTROB, algorithm is presented. Atmospheric drag and perturbation models are described. The development of launch windows, such that the transfer orbit will decay within two years, is discussed. A study of the lifetimes of geosynchronous transfer orbits is presented.

  9. NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davusm Daniel J.; McArthur, J. Craig

    2008-01-01

    By incorporating rigorous engineering practices, innovative manufacturing processes and test techniques, a unique multi-center government/contractor partnership, and a clean-sheet design developed around the primary requirements for the International Space Station (ISS) and Lunar missions, the Upper Stage Element of NASA's Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), the "Ares I," is a vital part of the Constellation Program's transportation system.

  10. Attitude controller design for the advanced upper stage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cui Nai-gang; Zhang Li-bin; Pu Jia-lun

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed design method and performance of the digital autopilot for attitude control of the advanced upper stage. The reaction control system (RCS) of the attitude control system (ACS) is used for attitude control, reignition operations and large angle attitude maneuvers. The RCS control laws employ parabolic switch curves in their phase plane logic to obtain fast

  11. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  12. ARES I Upper Stage Subsystems Design and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frate, David T.; Senick, Paul F.; Tolbert, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    From 2005 through early 2011, NASA conducted concept definition, design, and development of the Ares I launch vehicle. The Ares I was conceived to serve as a crew launch vehicle for beyond-low-Earth-orbit human space exploration missions as part of the Constellation Program Architecture. The vehicle was configured with a single shuttle-derived solid rocket booster first stage and a new liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen upper stage, propelled by a single, newly developed J-2X engine. The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle was to be mated to the forward end of the Ares I upper stage through an interface with fairings and a payload adapter. The vehicle design passed a Preliminary Design Review in August 2008, and was nearing the Critical Design Review when efforts were concluded as a result of the Constellation Program s cancellation. At NASA Glenn Research Center, four subsystems were developed for the Ares I upper stage. These were thrust vector control (TVC) for the J-2X, electrical power system (EPS), purge and hazardous gas (P&HG), and development flight instrumentation (DFI). The teams working each of these subsystems achieved 80 percent or greater design completion and extensive development testing. These efforts were extremely successful representing state-of-the-art technology and hardware advances necessary to achieve Ares I reliability, safety, availability, and performance requirements. This paper documents the designs, development test activity, and results.

  13. Comparative evaluation of existing expendable upper stages for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weyers, V. J.; Sagerman, G. D.; Borsody, J.; Lubick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The use of existing expendable upper stages in the space shuttle during its early years of operation is evaluated. The Burner 2, Scout, Delta, Agena, Transtage, and Centaur were each studied under contract by their respective manufacturers to determine the extent and cost of the minimum modifications necessary to integrate the stage with the shuttle orbiter. A comparative economic analysis of thirty-five different families of these stages is discussed. Results show that the overall transportation system cost differences between many of the families are quite small. However, by considering several factors in addition to cost, it is possible to select one family as being representative of the capability of the minimum modification existing stage approach. The selected family meets all of the specified mission requirements during the early years of shuttle operation.

  14. Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Upper Stage Configuration Selection Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Daniel J.; Coook, Jerry R.

    2006-01-01

    The Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), a key component of NASA's blueprint for the next generation of spacecraft to take humans back to the moon, is being designed and built by engineers at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The vehicle s design is based on the results of NASA's 2005 Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS), which called for development of a crew-launch system to reduce the gap between Shuttle retirement and Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Initial Operating Capability, identification of key technologies required to enable and significantly enhance these reference exploration systems, and a reprioritization of near- and far-term technology investments. The Upper Stage Element (USE) of the CLV is a clean-sheet approach that is being designed and developed in-house, with element management at MSFC. The USE concept is a self-supporting cylindrical structure, approximately 115' long and 216" in diameter, consisting of the following subsystems: Primary Structures (LOX Tank, LH2 Tank, Intertank, Thrust Structure, Spacecraft Payload Adaptor, Interstage, Forward and Aft Skirts), Secondary Structures (Systems Tunnel), Avionics and Software, Main Propulsion System, Reaction Control System, Thrust Vector Control, Auxiliary Power Unit, and Hydraulic Systems. The ESAS originally recommended a CEV to be launched atop a four-segment Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) CLV, utilizing an RS-25 engine-powered upper stage. However, Agency decisions to utilize fewer CLV development steps to lunar missions, reduce the overall risk for the lunar program, and provide a more balanced engine production rate requirement prompted engineers to switch to a five-segment design with a single Saturn-derived J-2X engine. This approach provides for single upper stage engine development for the CLV and an Earth Departure Stage, single Reusable Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) development for the CLV and a Cargo Launch Vehicle, and single core SSME development. While the RSRB design has changed since the CLV Project's inception, the USE design has remained essentially a clean-sheet approach. Although a clean-sheet upper stage design inherently carries more risk than a modified design, it does offer many advantages: a design for increased reliability; built-in extensibility to allow for commonality/growth without major redesign; and incorporation of state-of-the-art materials, hardware, and design, fabrication, and test techniques and processes to facilitate a potentially better, more reliable system. Because consideration was given in the ESAS to both clean-sheet and modified USE designs, this paper will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches and provide a detailed discussion of trades/selections made that led to the final upper stage configuration.

  15. Mission applications of an Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, F.G. III [Air Force Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Jacox, M.G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) Program at the US Air Force`s Phillips Laboratory is directing its efforts to solving endemic national spacelift architecture problems. Air Force Space Command has called spacelift both unaffordable and nonresponsive; today`s space launch systems are descendants of 1950`s era ICBM technologies and require prolonged on-pad processing. Advanced propulsion techniques, reusability, and modular architectures have not been generally incorporated into US systems. The ISUS system is an advanced, integrated upper stage concept that would permit payload realignment, allowing large payloads to be moved to smaller, less expensive boosters; such realignment both reduces cost and enhances responsiveness, as smaller boosters cost less to launch and require less vehicle and payload processing time. Three ISUS operational concepts are discussed, allowing the realignment of payloads currently launched aboard Titan IV/Centaur, Atlas IIAS, and Delta 2. A space demonstration of ISUS is examined. The Integrated Solar Upper Stage is a single piece of hardware that provides electric power and orbit transfer propulsion to a spacecraft. There are three major subsystems that comprise the ISUS; the receiver/absorber/converter or RAC, the concentrators, and the hydrogen tankage and feed subsystem.

  16. Cluster II quartet take the stage together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    This is the only occasion on which all four of ESA's Cluster II spacecraft will be on display together in Europe. Four Spacecraft, One Mission The unique event takes place near the end of the lengthy assembly and test programme, during which each individual spacecraft is being assembled in sequence, one after the other. Two have already completed their assembly and systems testing and are about to be stored in special containers at IABG prior to shipment to the Baikonur launch site in Kazakhstan next spring. In the case of the other two, flight models 5 and 8, installation of the science payloads has finished, but their exhaustive series of environmental tests at IABG have yet to begin. Following delivery to the launch site next April, the satellites will be launched in pairs in June and July 2000. Two Soyuz rockets, each with a newly designed Fregat upper stage, are being provided by the Russian-French Starsem company. This will be the first time ESA satellites have been launched from the former Soviet Union. Cluster II is a replacement for the original Cluster mission, which was lost during the maiden launch of Ariane 5 in June 1996. ESA, given the mission's importance in its overall strategy in the area of the Sun-Earth connection, decided to rebuild this unique project. ESA member states supported that proposal. On 3 April 1997, the Agency's Science Programme Committee agreed. Cluster II was born. European Teamwork Scientific institutions and industrial enterprises in almost all the 14 ESA member states and the United States are taking part in the Cluster II project. Construction of the eight Cluster / Cluster II spacecraft has been a major undertaking for European industry. Built into each 1200 kg satellite are six propellant tanks, two pressure tanks, eight thrusters, 80 metres of pipework, about 5 km of wiring, 380 connectors and more than 14 000 electrical contacts. All the spacecraft were assembled in the giant clean room at the Friedrichshafen plant of prime contractor Dornier Satellitensysteme. On completion, they were sent to IABG in Ottobrunn, near Munich, for intensive vibration, thermal, vacuum and magnetic testing. The European ground segment for the mission is just as important. A vast amount of data - equivalent to 290 million printed pages - will be returned to Earth over the mission's two-year lifetime. Signals to and from the spacecraft will be sent via a 15 metre antenna at Villafranca in Spain and processed at the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) at Darmstadt, Germany. The main control room at ESOC will be used during the launch and early phases of the mission, with teams of operators working round the clock. About two weeks after the second Cluster II pair are placed in their operational orbits, mission operations will switch to a smaller, dedicated control room at ESOC. The Joint Science Operations Centre at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK will co-ordinate the scientific investigations. Its main task will be to combine all requirements from the 11 science instrument teams into an overall plan. The flow of information returned by the 44 instruments will be distributed to eight national data centres, six in Europe, one in the USA and the other in China. Solar Maximum Cluster II is part of an international programme to find out more about how the Sun influences the Earth. The four Cluster II satellites will join an armada of spacecraft from many countries, which are already studying the Sun and high speed wind of charged particles (mainly electrons and protons) which it continually blasts into space. Ulysses and SOHO, both joint ESA-NASA missions, and ESA's Cluster II , when it will be there, are the flagships of this armada. The timing of the mission is ideal, since it will take place during a period of peak activity in the Sun's 11-year cycle, when sunspots and solar radiation reach a maximum. Cluster II will measure the effects of this activity on near-Earth space as incoming energetic particles subject the magnetosphere - the region dominated by the Earth's magnetic field - to a

  17. Lenalidomide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-18

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  18. NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McArthur, J. Craig

    2008-01-01

    By incorporating rigorous engineering practices, innovative manufacturing processes and test techniques, a unique multi-center government/contractor partnership, and a clean-sheet design developed around the primary requirements for the International Space Station (ISS) and Lunar missions, the Upper Stage Element of NASA's Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), the "Ares I," is a vital part of the Constellation Program's transportation system. Constellation's exploration missions will include Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles required to place crew and cargo in low-Earth orbit (LEO), crew and cargo transportation systems required for human space travel, and transportation systems and scientific equipment required for human exploration of the Moon and Mars. Early Ares I configurations will support ISS re-supply missions. A self-supporting cylindrical structure, the Ares I Upper Stage will be approximately 84' long and 18' in diameter. The Upper Stage Element is being designed for increased supportability and increased reliability to meet human-rating requirements imposed by NASA standards. The design also incorporates state-of-the-art materials, hardware, design, and integrated logistics planning, thus facilitating a supportable, reliable, and operable system. With NASA retiring the Space Shuttle fleet in 2010, the success of the Ares I Project is essential to America's continued leadership in space. The first Ares I test flight, called Ares I-X, is scheduled for 2009. Subsequent test flights will continue thereafter, with the first crewed flight of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), "Orion," planned for no later than 2015. Crew transportation to the ISS will follow within the same decade, and the first Lunar excursion is scheduled for the 2020 timeframe.

  19. J-2X Upper Stage Engine: Hardware and Testing 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzell, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Mission: Common upper stage engine for Ares I and Ares V. Challenge: Use proven technology from Saturn X-33, RS-68 to develop the highest Isp GG cycle engine in history for 2 missions in record time . Key Features: LOX/LH2 GG cycle, series turbines (2), HIP-bonded MCC, pneumatic ball-sector valves, on-board engine controller, tube-wall regen nozzle/large passively-cooled nozzle extension, TEG boost/cooling . Development Philosophy: proven hardware, aggressive schedule, early risk reduction, requirements-driven.

  20. Shuttle/IUS performance for planetary missions. [Interim Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cork, M. J.; Driver, J. M.; Wright, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Potential requirements for planetary missions in the 1980s, capabilities of the Interim Upper Stage (IUS) candidates to perform those missions, and Shuttle/IUS mission profile options for performance enhancement are examined. The most demanding planetary missions are the Pioneer Saturn/Uranus/Titan Probe and the Mariner-class orbiters of Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn. Options available to designers of these missions will depend on the specific IUS selected for development and the programmatic phasing of the IUS and the NASA Tug. Use of Shuttle elliptic orbits as initial conditions for IUS ignition offers significant performance improvements; specific values are mission dependent.

  1. Trade studies on Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, J.D. [Babcock and Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Jacox, M.G.; Kennedy, F.G. [Air Force Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) Program at the USAF Phillips Laboratory is directed at demonstrating a solar bimodal power and propulsion system for military applications. Trades were performed to examine the potential performance of the ISUS stage combined with the proposed LLV-3 launch vehicle. Variation in ISUS thermal power directly affects the trip time from LEO to GEO. These variations can be altered by changing average propellant temperature raising or lowering the average specific impulse. If the ISUS system is sized for the spacecraft`s electrical power requirements, this can result in long trip times for high mass satellites with low electrical power requirements. The ISUS can be sized, however, for a suitable thermal power to allow more rapid trip times with minimum impact on delivered mass. Such a system can place significantly more payload in GEO than a solid chemical stage. The mass advantages of the ISUS increase as electrical power requirements increase, rising from 46% improvement at 0 kW(e) to 179% improvement at 3 kW(e).

  2. Taming Liquid Hydrogen: The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Centaur is one of the most powerful rockets in the world. As an upper-stage rocket for the Atlas and Titan boosters it has been a reliable workhorse for NASA for over forty years and has played an essential role in many of NASA's adventures into space. In this CD-ROM you will be able to explore the Centaur's history in various rooms to this virtual museum. Visit the "Movie Theater" to enjoy several video documentaries on the Centaur. Enter the "Interview Booth" to hear and read interviews with scientists and engineers closely responsible for building and operating the rocket. Go to the "Photo Gallery" to look at numerous photos of the rocket throughout its history. Wander into the "Centaur Library" to read various primary documents of the Centaur program. Finally, stop by the "Observation Deck" to watch a virtual Centaur in flight.

  3. Solar thermal upper stage: Economic advantage and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Alan M.

    1995-06-01

    A solar thermal upper stage (STUS) is envisioned as a propulsive concept for the future. The STUS will be used for low Earth orbit (LEO) to geostationary-Earth orbit (GEO) transfer and for planetary exploration missions. The STUS offers significant performance gains over conventional chemical propulsion systems. These performance gains translate into a more economical, more efficient method of placing useful payloads in space and maximizing the benefits derived from space activity. This paper will discuss the economical advantages of an STUS compared to conventional chemical propulsion systems, the potential market for an STUS, and the recent activity in the development of an STUS. The results of this assessment combined with the performance gains, will provide a strong justification for the development of an STUS.

  4. Solar thermal upper stage: Economic advantage and development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Alan M.

    1995-01-01

    A solar thermal upper stage (STUS) is envisioned as a propulsive concept for the future. The STUS will be used for low Earth orbit (LEO) to geostationary-Earth orbit (GEO) transfer and for planetary exploration missions. The STUS offers significant performance gains over conventional chemical propulsion systems. These performance gains translate into a more economical, more efficient method of placing useful payloads in space and maximizing the benefits derived from space activity. This paper will discuss the economical advantages of an STUS compared to conventional chemical propulsion systems, the potential market for an STUS, and the recent activity in the development of an STUS. The results of this assessment combined with the performance gains, will provide a strong justification for the development of an STUS.

  5. Testing for the J-2X Upper Stage Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzell, James C.

    2010-01-01

    NASA selected the J-2X Upper Stage Engine in 2006 to power the upper stages of the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. Based on the proven Saturn J-2 engine, this new engine will provide 294,000 pounds of thrust and a specific impulse of 448 seconds, making it the most efficient gas generator cycle engine in history. The engine's guiding philosophy emerged from the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) in 2005. Goals established then called for vehicles and components based, where feasible, on proven hardware from the Space Shuttle, commercial, and other programs, to perform the mission and provide an order of magnitude greater safety. Since that time, the team has made unprecedented progress. Ahead of the other elements of the Constellation Program architecture, the team has progressed through System Requirements Review (SRR), System Design Review (SDR), Preliminary Design Review (PDR), and Critical Design Review (CDR). As of February 2010, more than 100,000 development engine parts have been ordered and more than 18,000 delivered. Approximately 1,300 of more than 1,600 engine drawings were released for manufacturing. A major factor in the J-2X development approach to this point is testing operations of heritage J-2 engine hardware and new J-2X components to understand heritage performance, validate computer modeling of development components, mitigate risk early in development, and inform design trades. This testing has been performed both by NASA and its J-2X prime contractor, Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR). This body of work increases the likelihood of success as the team prepares for testing the J-2X powerpack and first development engine in calendar 2011. This paper will provide highlights of J-2X testing operations, engine test facilities, development hardware, and plans.

  6. Risk Assessment Challenges in the Ares I Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stott, James E.; Ring, Robert W.; Elrada, Hassan A.; Hark, Frank

    2007-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently at work developing hardware and systems for the Ares I rocket that will send future astronauts into orbit. Built on cutting-edge launch technologies, evolved powerful Apollo and Space Shuttle propulsion elements, and decades of NASA spaceflight experience, Ares I is the essential core of a safe, reliable, cost-effective space transportation system -- one that will carry crewed missions back to the moon, on to Mars and out into the solar system. Ares I is an in-line, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Orion crew vehicle and its launch abort system. In addition to the vehicle's primary mission -carrying crews of four to six astronauts to Earth orbit --Ares I may also use its 25-ton payload capacity to deliver resources and supplies to the International Space Station, or to "park" payloads in orbit for retrieval by other spacecraft bound for the moon or other destinations. Crew transportation to the International Space Station is planned to begin no later than 2014. The first lunar excursion is scheduled for the 2020 timeframe. This paper presents the challenges in designing the Ares I upper stage for reliability and safety while minimizing weight and maximizing performance.

  7. Stir Friction Welding Used in Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The aluminum panels are subjected to confidence panel tests during which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  8. Stir Friction Welding Used in Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The panels are subjected to confidence tests in which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  9. Stir Friction Welding Used in Ares I Upper Stage Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts the preparation and placement of a confidence ring for friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The aluminum panels are manufactured and subjected to confidence tests during which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  10. Seal Analysis for the Ares-I Upper Stage Fuel Tank Manhole Covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Wingate, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Naflex seals have long history of use in launch vehicle components, including Saturn stages and Space Shuttle External Tank. Ares-I Upper Stage tank pressures are higher than ET pressures, requiring performance verification of heritage seal design in new manhole cover configurations. Heritage external tank analyses are reviewed for potential application to Upper Stage.

  11. Hosted non-deployed payloads on upper stages for enhanced space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulk, T. A.; Lindas, K.; Pitchford, B.; Szatkowski, J.

    With the growing market of “ hosted payloads” on Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous (GEO) satellites, the capability exists to leverage the excess performance on existing upper stages to provide similar or enhanced opportunities for science experiments or low TRL instruments. Leveraging the capabilities of the Atlas V Centaur and Delta IV upper stages, Special Aerospace Services (SAS) and United Launch Alliance (ULA) are investigating hosting non-deployed systems on these existing upper stages.

  12. NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Avionics and Software Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, Charles L.; Blue, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Building on the heritage of the Saturn and Space Shuttle Programs for the Design, Development, Test, and Evaluation (DDT and E) of avionics and software for NASA's Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), the Ares I Upper Stage Element is a vital part of the Constellation Program's transportation system. The Upper Stage Element's Avionics Subsystem is actively proceeding toward its objective of delivering a flight-certified Upper Stage Avionics System for the Ares I CLV.

  13. Preventing Accidental Ignition of Upper-Stage Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, John; Morgan, Herbert; Cooper, Michael; Murbach, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a proposal to reduce the risk of accidental ignition of certain upper-stage rocket motors or other high energy hazardous systems. At present, mechanically in-line initiators are used for initiation of many rocket motors and/or other high-energy hazardous systems. Electrical shorts and/or mechanical barriers, which are the basic safety devices in such systems, are typically removed as part of final arming or pad preparations while personnel are present. At this time, static discharge, test equipment malfunction, or incorrect arming techniques can cause premature firing. The proposal calls for a modular out-of-line ignition system incorporating detonating-cord elements, identified as the donor and the acceptor, separated by an air gap. In the safe configuration, the gap would be sealed with two shields, which would prevent an accidental firing of the donor from igniting the system. The shields would be removed to enable normal firing, in which shrapnel generated by the donor would reliably ignite the acceptor to continue the ordnance train. The acceptor would then ignite a through bulkhead initiator (or other similar device), which would ignite the motor or high-energy system. One shield would be remotely operated and would be moved to the armed position when a launch was imminent or conversely returned to the safe position if the launch were postponed. In the event of failure of the remotely operated shield, the other shield could be inserted manually to safe the system.

  14. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  15. STS spin-stabilized upper stage study (study 2.6). Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Spinning solid propellant upper stage rocket engines designed for geosynchronous satellite payloads are investigated. Factors considered include: impact of the spinning stages on the payloads; applicability to 1981-1991 NASA mission model; and cost effectiveness.

  16. Lenalidomide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-04

    Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  17. Management of stage II endometrial adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, E.L.; Jones, H.W. III

    1988-03-01

    Charts of 36 patients with clinical stage II endometrial adenocarcinoma over ten years were reviewed. All were staged before any treatment, in accordance with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) guidelines. Although details of treatment varied, two main protocols were used. Fourteen patients were treated with the standard protocol involving external whole-pelvis radiation, followed by intracavitary cesium and then hysterectomy. In 1981, a modified protocol was introduced, which called for a hysterectomy immediately following intrauterine and vaginal cesium. External radiation therapy was given only to those patients found to have deep myometrial invasion or cervical involvement. Of 14 patients treated by this protocol, seven had no surgical indication for postoperative external radiation. There was no increase in recurrence in these patients, and the five-year survival rate was 76% for patients treated with the modified protocol compared with 65% for those who had standard therapy. Morbidity related to external radiation therapy occurred in two patients with the standard protocol and one patient who received pelvic radiation on the modified protocol.

  18. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Cryogen System Engineering Checkout Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, A. D; Cady, E. C.; Jenkins, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    The Solar Thermal Upper Stage technology (STUSTD) program is a solar thermal propulsion technology program cooperatively sponsored by a Boeing led team and by NASA MSFC. A key element of its technology program is development of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage and supply system which employs multi-layer insulation, liquid acquisition devices, active and passive thermodynamic vent systems, and variable 40W tank heaters to reliably provide near constant pressure H2 to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity of space operation. The LH2 storage and supply system is designed to operate as a passive, pressure fed supply system at a constant pressure of about 45 psia. During operation of the solar thermal engine over a small portion of the orbit the LH2 storage and supply system propulsively vents through the enjoy at a controlled flowrate. During the long coast portion of the orbit, the LH2 tank is locked up (unvented). Thus, all of the vented H2 flow is used in the engine for thrust and none is wastefully vented overboard. The key to managing the tank pressure and therefore the H2 flow to the engine is to manage and balance the energy flow into the LH2 tank with the MLI and tank heaters with the energy flow out of the LH2 tank through the vented H2 flow. A moderate scale (71 cu ft) LH2 storage and supply system was installed and insulated at the NASA MSFC Test Area 300. The operation of the system is described in this paper. The test program for the LH2 system consisted of two parts: 1) a series of engineering tests to characterize the performance of the various components in the system: and 2) a 30-day simulation of a complete LEO and GEO transfer mission. This paper describes the results of the engineering tests, and correlates these results with analytical models used to design future advanced Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicles.

  19. Two BRM promoter insertion polymorphisms increase the risk of early-stage upper aerodigestive tract cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kit Man; Qiu, Xiaoping; Cheng, Dangxiao; Azad, Abul Kalam; Habbous, Steven; Palepu, Prakruthi; Mirshams, Maryam; Patel, Devalben; Chen, Zhuo; Roberts, Heidi; Knox, Jennifer; Marquez, Stephanie; Wong, Rebecca; Darling, Gail; Waldron, John; Goldstein, David; Leighl, Natasha; Shepherd, Frances A; Tsao, Ming; Der, Sandy; Reisman, David; Liu, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Brahma (BRM) has a key function in chromatin remodeling. Two germline BRM promoter insertion–deletion polymorphisms, BRM-741 and BRM-1321, have been previously associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in smokers and head and neck cancer. To further evaluate their role in cancer susceptibility particularly in early disease, we conducted a preplanned case–control study to investigate the association between the BRM promoter variants and stage I/II upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers (i.e., lung, esophageal, head and neck), a group of early-stage malignancies in which molecular and genetic etiologic factors are poorly understood. The effects of various clinical factors on this association were also studied. We analyzed 562 cases of early-stage UADT cancers and 993 matched healthy controls. The double homozygous BRM promoter variants were associated with a significantly increased risk of early stage UADT cancers (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–3.8). This association was observed in lung (aOR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.5–4.9) and head and neck (aOR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.4–5.6) cancers, but not significantly in esophageal cancer (aOR, 1.66; 95% CI, 0.7–5.8). There was a nonsignificant trend for increased risk in the heterozygotes or single homozygotes. The relationship between the BRM polymorphisms and early-stage UADT cancers was independent of age, sex, smoking status, histology, and clinical stage. These findings suggest that the BRM promoter double insertion homozygotes may be associated with an increased risk of early-stage UADT cancers independent of smoking status and histology, which must be further validated in other populations. PMID:24519853

  20. Physics Identity Development: A Snapshot of the Stages of Development of Upper-Level Physics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Paul W.; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal study into identity development in upper-level physics students a phenomenographic research method is employed to assess the stages of identity development of a group of upper-level students. Three categories of description were discovered which indicate the three different stages of identity development for this group…

  1. Vorinostat, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-05

    Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  2. Ulysses spacecraft and its upper stage system are deployed during STS-41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft and its upper stage system consisting of a two-stage inertial upper stage (IUS) (gold-colored with rocket nozzle visible) and the payload assist module-Shuttle (PAM-S) (middle section) drift against the blackness of space after deployment from Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB) during STS-41. The airborne support equipment (ASE) extending from the spacecraft at the PAM-S/IUS mating interface is visible.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of common upper stages for multistage solid rocket boosters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Tiwari; Mark Umansky; Steven Bryant; Gerald E. Hanson; James R. Krakus

    1993-01-01

    The 'Advanced Terminal Interceptor Design' code is presently used in conjunction with the 'Aerojet Interceptor Design and Evaluation' and 'Near-Earth Mission Analysis Routine' codes to ascertain the cost-effectiveness of common versus optimized upper stages for multistage solid rocket boosters at equal payloads. It is thereby established that the development and production costs of a three-stage booster with common upper stages

  4. Advanced launch vehicle upper stages using liquid propulsion and metallized propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    Metallized propellants are liquid propellants with a metal additive suspended in a gelled fuel or oxidizer. Typically, aluminum particles are the metal additives. These propellants provide increase in the density and/or the specific impulse of the propulsion system. Using metallized propellants for volume- and mass-constrained upper stages can deliver modest increases in performance for Low Earth Orbit to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit and other Earth orbital transfer missions. Metallized propellants, however, can enable very fast planetary missions with a single-stage upper stage system. Trade studies comparing metallized propellant stage performance with non-metallized upper stages and the Inertial Upper Stage are presented. These upper stages are both one- and two-stage vehicles that provide the added energy to send payloads to altitudes and onto trajectories that are unattainable with only the launch vehicle. The stage designs are controlled by the volume and the mass constraints of the Space Transportation System and Space Transportation System-Cargo launch vehicles. The influences of the density and specific impulse increases enabled by metallized propellants are examined for a variety of different stage and propellant combinations.

  5. Advanced Launch Vehicle Upper Stages Using Liquid Propulsion and Metallized Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    Metallized propellants are liquid propellants with a metal additive suspended in a gelled fuel or oxidizer. Typically, aluminum (Al) particles are the metal additive. These propellants provide increase in the density and/or the specific impulse of the propulsion system. Using metallized propellant for volume-and mass-constrained upper stages can deliver modest increases in performance for low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit (LEO-GEO) and other earth orbital transfer missions. Metallized propellants, however, can enable very fast planetary missions with a single-stage upper stage system. Trade studies comparing metallized propellant stage performance with non-metallized upper stages and the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) are presented. These upper stages are both one- and two-stage vehicles that provide the added energy to send payloads to altitudes and onto trajectories that are unattainable with only the launch vehicle. The stage designs are controlled by the volume and the mass constraints of the Space Transportation System (STS) and Space Transportation System-Cargo (STS-C) launch vehicles. The influences of the density and specific impulse increases enabled by metallized propellants are examined for a variety of different stage and propellant combinations.

  6. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  7. Seal Analysis for the Ares-I Upper Stage Fuel Tank Manhole Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Wingate, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Techniques for studying the performance of Naflex pressure-assisted seals in the Ares-I Upper Stage liquid hydrogen tank manhole cover seal joint are explored. To assess the feasibility of using the identical seal design for the Upper Stage as was used for the Space Shuttle External Tank manhole covers, a preliminary seal deflection analysis using the ABAQUS commercial finite element software is employed. The ABAQUS analyses are performed using three-dimensional symmetric wedge finite element models. This analysis technique is validated by first modeling a heritage External Tank liquid hydrogen tank manhole cover joint and correlating the results to heritage test data. Once the technique is validated, the Upper Stage configuration is modeled. The Upper Stage analyses are performed at 1.4 times the expected pressure to comply with the Constellation Program factor of safety requirement on joint separation. Results from the analyses performed with the External Tank and Upper Stage models demonstrate the effects of several modeling assumptions on the seal deflection. The analyses for Upper Stage show that the integrity of the seal is successfully maintained.

  8. Reusable Agena study. Volume 1: Executive summary. [space shuttle Agena upper stage tug concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The shuttle Agena upper stage interim tug concept is based on a building block approach. These building block concepts are extensions of existing ascent Agena configurations. Several current improvements, have been used in developing the shuttle/Agena upper stage concepts. High-density acid is used as the Agena upper stage oxidizer. The baffled injector is used in the main engine. The DF-224 is a fourth generation computer currently in development and will be flight proven in the near future. The Agena upper stage building block concept uses the current Agena as a baseline, adds an 8.5-inch (21.6 cm) extension to the fuel tank for optimum mixture ratio, uses monomethyl hydrazine as fuel, exchanges a 150:1 nozzle extension for the existing 45:1, exchanges an Autonetics DF-224 for the existing Honeywell computer, and adds a star sensor for guidance update. These modifications to the current Agena provide a 5-foot (1.52m) diameter shuttle/Agena upper stage that will fly all Vandenberg Air Force Base missions in the reusable mode without resorting to a kick motor. The delta V velocity of the Agena is increased by use of a strap-on propellant tank option. This option provides a shuttle/Agena upper stage with the capability to place almost 3900 pounds (1769 kg) into geosynchronous orbit (24 hour period) without the aid of kick motors.

  9. Rituximab, Lenalidomide, and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-28

    Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  10. The low cost development, test, and production of a commercial STS upper stage: TOS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. W. White; B. E. Thompson; J. R. Grubbs

    1985-01-01

    The Space Transportation System (STS) has to compete for commercial payload launches with a variety of expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). Many of these payloads have to be placed into a final orbit which cannot be provided by the Shuttle Orbiter. An upper stage booster is, therefore, needed. The Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) is being developed to satisfy this need at

  11. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  12. Preliminary design of a guidance and control system for a pressure-fed cryogenic upper stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, E. M.

    1982-09-01

    The configurations for tomorrow's launch vehicles require high-performing, lightweight, low-cost upper stages. This report presents a preliminary guidance and control system design for an inertially guided, pressure-fed cryogenic upper stage utilizing a dual-thrust engine concept. The dust-thrust concept, capable of generating sufficient propulsive force during both the coast and powered portions of flight, requires a unique control system design to provide the necessary vehicle stability. The combination of the inertial guidance system and the on-board flight computer provides total autonomy for this advanced propulsion system.

  13. Subsystem Hazard Analysis Methodology for the Ares I Upper Stage Source Controlled Items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Winner, David R.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes processes involved in developing subsystem hazard analyses for Source Controlled Items (SCI), specific components, sub-assemblies, and/or piece parts, of the NASA ARES I Upper Stage (US) project. SCIs will be designed, developed and /or procured by Boeing as an end item or an off-the-shelf item. Objectives include explaining the methodology, tools, stakeholders and products involved in development of these hazard analyses. Progress made and further challenges in identifying potential subsystem hazards are also provided in an effort to assist the System Safety community in understanding one part of the ARES I Upper Stage project.

  14. Testing of a Receiver-Absorber-Converter (RAC) for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt O. Westerman; Barry J. Miles

    1998-01-01

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar bi-modal system based on a concept developed by Babcock & Wilcox in 1992. ISUS will provide advanced power and propulsion capabilities that will enable spacecraft designers to either increase the mass to orbit or decrease the cost to orbit for their satellites. In contrast to the current practice of using chemical

  15. The Integrated Solar Upper Stage engine ground demonstration power management and distribution subsystem design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anastacio N. Baez; Greg L. Kimnach

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL), and the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) in a joint effort are developing technologies for a solar bimodal system. A solar bimodal system combines thermal propulsion and electric power generation in a single integrated system. A spacecraft Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) bimodal system combines orbital transfer

  16. Upper stage rocket guidance and control using discontinuous reaction control thrusters via sliding modes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Tournes; Y. B. Shtessel; E. Wells

    1997-01-01

    In spring 1995 a very significant academic project took place at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. This integrated project supported by NASA Marshal Flight Center and major aerospace, companies aimed at designing the MSLS upper stage, based on an hybrid rocket design. This project included the design of the avionics system, and of the guidance and control subsystem (G&C).

  17. Upper extremity lymphangiography as an aid to treatment planning for stage 1A epitrochlear Hodgkin's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack E. Meyer; Edward C. Halperin; Rita M. Linggood

    1982-01-01

    A 6-year-old girl with Stage 1A Hodgkin's disease confined to the right epitrochlear area is described. An upper extremity\\u000a lymphangiogram, for planning primary radiation therapy, demonstrated a lymph node adjacent to the medial midhumeral shaft.\\u000a The implication of this finding and the role of the lymphangiogram in treatment planning are discussed.

  18. Design, capability, and cost of a Versatile Upper Stage /VUS/ family of vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haltermann, R. L.; Nelson, L. M.

    1973-01-01

    Trade-off studies and a preliminary design were accomplished to investigate the Versatile Upper Stage (VUS) concept. This concept entails the development by one contractor of a family of stages with a great deal of commonality to perform a spectrum of potential unmanned automated missions planned through 1990. The trade studies and analyses revealed areas where the penalty for commonality between stages was excessive in weight and performance loss. This occurred in the selection of the vehicle structural shell. In many of the expensive subsystems, especially astrionics, it was found that establishing the requirements for all family members and the application of commonality in subsystem selection could result in significant savings.

  19. Lessons Learned from Ares I Upper Stage Structures and Thermal Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq

    2012-01-01

    The Ares 1 Upper Stage was part of the vehicle intended to succeed the Space Shuttle as the United States manned spaceflight vehicle. Although the Upper Stage project was cancelled, there were many lessons learned that are applicable to future vehicle design. Lessons learned that are briefly detailed in this Technical Memorandum are for specific technical areas such as tank design, common bulkhead design, thrust oscillation, control of flight and slosh loads, purge and hazardous gas system. In addition, lessons learned from a systems engineering and vehicle integration perspective are also included, such as computer aided design and engineering, scheduling, and data management. The need for detailed systems engineering in the early stages of a project is emphasized throughout this report. The intent is that future projects will be able to apply these lessons learned to keep costs down, schedules brief, and deliver products that perform to the expectations of their customers.

  20. Analytical Approach for Estimating Preliminary Mass of ARES I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin

    2007-01-01

    In January 2004, President Bush gave the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) a vision for Space Exploration by setting our sight on a bold new path to go back to the Moon, then to Mars and beyond. In response to this vision, NASA started the Constellation Program, which is a new exploration launch vehicle program. The primary mission for the Constellation Program is to carry out a series of human expeditions ranging from Low Earth Orbit to the surface of Mars and beyond for the purposes of conducting human exploration of space, as specified by the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE). The intent is that the information and technology developed by this program will provide the foundation for broader exploration activities as our operational experience grows. The ARES I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) has been designated as the launch vehicle that will be developed as a "first step" to facilitate the aforementioned human expeditions. The CLV Project is broken into four major elements: First Stage, Upper Stage Engine, Upper Stage (US), and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is responsible for the design of the CLV and has the prime responsibility to design the upper stage of the vehicle. The US is the second propulsive stage of the CLV and provides CEV insertion into low Earth orbit (LEO) after separation from the First Stage of the Crew Launch Vehicle. The fully integrated Upper Stage is a mix of modified existing heritage hardware (J-2X Engine) and new development (primary structure, subsystems, and avionics). The Upper Stage assembly is a structurally stabilized cylindrical structure, which is powered by a single J-2X engine which is developed as a separate Element of the CLV. The primary structure includes the load bearing liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellant tanks, a Forward Skirt, the Intertank structure, the Aft Skirt and the Thrust Structure. A Systems Tunnel, which carries fluid and electrical power functions to other Elements of the CLV, is included as secondary structure. The MSFC has an overall responsibility for the integrated US element as well as structural design an thermal control of the fuel tanks, intertank, interstage, avionics, main propulsion system, Reaction Control System (RCS) for both the Upper Stage and the First Stage. MSFC's Spacecraft and Vehicle Department, Structural and Analysis Design Division is developing a set of predicted mass of these elements. This paper details the methodology, criterion and tools used for the preliminary mass predictions of the upper stage structural assembly components. In general, weight of the cylindrical barrel sections are estimated using the commercial code Hypersizer, whereas, weight of the domes are developed using classical solutions. HyperSizer is software that performs automated structural analysis and sizing optimization based on aerospace methods for strength, stability, and stiffness. Analysis methods range from closed form, traditional hand calculations repeated every day in industry to more advanced panel buckling algorithms. Margin-of-safety reporting for every potential failure provides the engineer with a powerful insight into the structural problem. Optimization capabilities include finding minimum weight panel or beam concepts, material selections, cross sectional dimensions, thicknesses, and lay-ups from a library of 40 different stiffened and sandwich designs and a database of composite, metallic, honeycomb, and foam materials. Multiple different concepts (orthogrid, isogrid, and skin stiffener) were run for multiple loading combinations of ascent design load with and with out tank pressure as well as proof pressure condition. Subsequently, selected optimized concept obtained from Hypersizer runs was translated into a computer aid design (CAD) model to account for the wall thickness tolerance, weld land etc for developing the most probable weight of the components. The flow diram summarizes the analysis steps used in developing these predicted mass.

  1. Upper Stage Flight Experiment 10K Engine Design and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R.; Morgan, D.; Crockett, D.; Martinez, L.; Anderson, W.; McNeal, C.

    2000-01-01

    A 10,000 lbf thrust chamber was developed for the Upper Stage Flight Experiment (USFE). This thrust chamber uses hydrogen peroxide/JP-8 oxidizer/fuel combination. The thrust chamber comprises an oxidizer dome and manifold, catalyst bed assembly, fuel injector, and chamber/nozzle assembly. Testing of the engine was done at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) to verify its performance and life for future upper stage or Reusable Launch Vehicle applications. Various combinations of silver screen catalyst beds, fuel injectors, and combustion chambers were tested. Results of the tests showed high C* efficiencies (97% - 100%) and vacuum specific impulses of 275 - 298 seconds. With fuel film cooling, heating rates were low enough that the silica/quartz phenolic throat experienced minimal erosion. Mission derived requirements were met, along with a perfect safety record.

  2. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  3. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  4. Materials, Processes and Manufacturing in Ares 1 Upper Stage: Integration with Systems Design and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    2008-01-01

    Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage is designed and developed based on sound systems engineering principles. Systems Engineering starts with Concept of Operations and Mission requirements, which in turn determine the launch system architecture and its performance requirements. The Ares I-Upper Stage is designed and developed to meet these requirements. Designers depend on the support from materials, processes and manufacturing during the design, development and verification of subsystems and components. The requirements relative to reliability, safety, operability and availability are also dependent on materials availability, characterization, process maturation and vendor support. This paper discusses the roles and responsibilities of materials and manufacturing engineering during the various phases of Ares IUS development, including design and analysis, hardware development, test and verification. Emphasis is placed how materials, processes and manufacturing support is integrated over the Upper Stage Project, both horizontally and vertically. In addition, the paper describes the approach used to ensure compliance with materials, processes, and manufacturing requirements during the project cycle, with focus on hardware systems design and development.

  5. From Paper to Production: An Update on NASA's Upper Stage Engine for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kynard, Mike

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, NASA selected an evolved variant of the proven Saturn/Apollo J-2 upper stage engine to power the Ares I crew launch vehicle upper stage and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle Earth departure stage (EDS) for the Constellation Program. Any design changes needed by the new engine would be based where possible on proven hardware from the Space Shuttle, commercial launchers, and other programs. In addition to the thrust and efficiency requirements needed for the Constellation reference missions, it would be an order of magnitude safer than past engines. It required the J-2X government/industry team to develop the highest performance engine of its type in history and develop it for use in two vehicles for two different missions. In the attempt to achieve these goals in the past five years, the Upper Stage Engine team has made significant progress, successfully passing System Requirements Review (SRR), System Design Review (SDR), Preliminary Design Review (PDR), and Critical Design Review (CDR). As of spring 2010, more than 100,000 experimental and development engine parts have been completed or are in various stages of manufacture. Approximately 1,300 of more than 1,600 engine drawings have been released for manufacturing. This progress has been due to a combination of factors: the heritage hardware starting point, advanced computer analysis, and early heritage and development component testing to understand performance, validate computer modeling, and inform design trades. This work will increase the odds of success as engine team prepares for powerpack and development engine hot fire testing in calendar 2011. This paper will provide an overview of the engine development program and progress to date.

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen for stage I and II femoral head osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Koren, Lior; Ginesin, Eyal; Melamed, Yehuda; Norman, Doron; Levin, Daniel; Peled, Eli

    2015-03-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a suggested joint-preserving treatment for symptomatic early-stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Limited studies of this treatment have been published. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment in a relatively large patient cohort. The authors reviewed the files of 68 patients with 78 symptomatic joints with Steinberg stage I and II osteonecrosis of the femoral head. All patients were treated with hyperbaric oxygen at the authors' medical health center. Pretreatment and immediate posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compared. On follow-up, a telephone interview was conducted to determine the survival of the joint. Modified Harris Hip Score and Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) questionnaires of the start of treatment and at follow-up were obtained and evaluated for statistically significant differences. Half of the joints were stage 1 and half were stage II. Seventy-four joints underwent both pre- and posttreatment MRI. Eighty-eight percent of joints showed improvement posttreatment. On follow-up at a mean of 11.1±5.1 years, 54 patients (58 joints) were located and answered the questionnaires. At the time of follow-up, 93% of the joints survived. Mean Harris Hip Score improved from 21 to 81 (P<.0001), the mean physical component of the SF-12 improved from 24 to 46 (P<.0001), and the mean mental component of the SF-12 improved from 54 to 59 (P<.0001). The authors concluded that hyperbaric oxygen treatment is effective in preserving the hip joint in stage I and II osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:25760507

  7. The Inertial Upper Stage - A space transportation system element nearing first flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbaugh, D. J.; Redd, F. J.; Van Rensselaer, F.

    1981-01-01

    The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) developed by the USAF and NASA is a highly reliable, cost-effective solid propellant upper stage, with inherent flexibility and adaptability for integration with the Space Shuttle. The propulsion system is simple, utilizing safe, solid rocket motors with extremely light-weight nonmetallic cases and nozzles. The IUS can deliver 2268 kg from the Shuttle to geosynchronous altitude; it consists of a 9700 kg propellant weight first stage, an interstage structure, a 2720 kg propellant weight second stage, and an equipment support section. The avionics system includes the electronic and electrical hardware used to perform all signal conditioning, data processing, and software formatting associated with navigation, guidance, control, data management, and redundancy management. The generic thermal design of the IUS is suited to a wide range of thermal environments; the software design provides for selectable thermal maneuvers (rotisserie, reciprocating, toasting, space facing, sun facing) to satisfy different payload thermal requirements. A 1982 launch with the Titan 34D and a 1983 launch with the Shuttle Orbiter are planned.

  8. Waterhammer Testing and Modeling of the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. Hunter; Holt, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Ares I rocket is the agency's first step in completing the goals of the Constellation Program, which plans to deliver a new generation of space explorers into low earth orbit for future missions to the International Space Station, the moon, and other destinations within the solar system. Ares I is a two-stage rocket topped by the Orion crew capsule and its service module. The launch vehicle's First Stage is a single, five-segment reusable solid rocket booster (RSRB), derived from the Space Shuttle Program's four segment RSRB. The vehicle's Upper Stage, being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), is propelled by a single J-2X Main Engine fueled with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. During active Upper Stage flight of the Ares I launch vehicle, the Upper Stage Reaction Control System (US ReCS) will perform attitude control operations for the vehicle. The US ReCS will provide three-axis attitude control capability (roll, pitch, and yaw) for the Upper Stage while the J-2X is not firing and roll control capability while the engine is firing. Because of the requirements imposed upon the system, the design must accommodate rapid pulsing of multiple thrusters simultaneously to maintain attitude control. In support of these design activities and in preparation for Critical Design Review, analytical models of the US ReCS propellant feed system have been developed using the Thermal Hydraulic Library of MSC.EASY5 v.2008, herein referred to as EASY5. EASY5 is a commercially available fluid system modeling package with significant history of modeling space propulsion systems. In Fall 2009, a series of development tests were conducted at MSFC on a cold-flow test article for the US ReCS, herein referred to as System Development Test Article (SDTA). A subset of those tests performed were aimed at examining the effects of waterhammer on a flight-representative system and to ensure that those effects could be quantified with analytical models and incorporated into the design of the flight system. This paper presents an overview of the test article and the test approach, along with a discussion of the analytical modeling methodology. In addition, the results of that subset of development tests, along with analytical model pre-test predictions and post-test model correlations, will also be discussed in detail.

  9. ESC-B: The Cryogenic Upper Stage for Europe's Heavy Lift Launcher Ariane 5ECB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhls, A.

    2002-01-01

    -A. Juhls, Astrium GmbH -M. Lepelletier, Snecma Moteurs -JM. Bahu, CNES -C. Poincheval, CNES. In the year 1998 the European ministerial council decided to initiate the Ariane 5 Plus programme in order to upgrade the European heavy lift launcher Ariane 5. The market was changing more rapidly than predicted showing steadily growing satellite mass and the demand for flexible missions while strong competitors were intensifying their preparations to enter the commercial business. The answer was to improve the Ariane 5 launcher by modifying the cryogenic first (or lower ?) stage and the solid boosters and by introducing two cryogenic upper stages in two steps: In order to cope with the short term need of a significant growth of GTO lift capacity up to 10 t the first denoted ESC-A shall enter commercial service in 2002. Four years later a more powerful second version shall take over enabling a GTO performance of 12 t and providing versatile mission capability. The paper will focus on this new cryogenic upper stage denoted ESC-B giving first a general description of main characteristics and constituents. The article will highlight different challenging aspects of the ESC-B development: Ambitious economical conditions regarding both limited development budgets and the strong need to reduce production cost require improved working methods and an adjustment of the conventional development logic, in particular regarding new verification methods. Furthermore Europe is now facing the complex combination of versatile mission capability together with a powerful cryogenic upper stage. The paper will present the approach to define reasonable mission scenarios in order to cover customer demands while avoiding too stringent system requirements. Along with VINCI, Europe's first expander cycle type engine featuring an extendable nozzle dedicated subsystems will be described which allow 4 re-ignitions and 6 hours of ballistic flight. The paper concludes with the summary of the development planning aiming at a first launch of ESC-B in 2006.

  10. Non-toxic propulsion for spaceplane ``pop-up'' upper stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, James B.; Wiswell, Robert L.; Haberman, Eugene G.

    1998-01-01

    Military spaceplane operations scenarios envision using the ``Pop-Up'' employment profile to significantly increase the payload to orbit capability of the vehicle. Previous studies have investigated a range of propulsion system and stage design options for a pop-up upper stage (Cotta 1996). Operationally it is desirable to have the upper stage and payload stored as a wooden round that is quickly loaded on the spaceplane when needed. The current study therefore focuses on non-toxic (less-toxic), storable propellant options. These are compared to the use of conventional (toxic) storable bi-propellant, Nitrogen Tetroxide/Monomethyl Hydrazine (N2O4/MMH), and cryogenic oxidizer bi-propellant, (LO2/RP1), options. The non-toxic oxidizers investigated include Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) and Hydroxyammonium Nitroformate (HANF). The non-toxic fuels include hydrocarbon jet fuel (JP-4), Quadricyclane (C7H8), and Methylcubane (C9H10). The impact of H2O2 purity (90% to 100%) and various fuel blends are also evaluated. The comparison includes payload delivery performance, propellant handling issues and technology development needs. The results show that there are propellant combinations that are less toxic than N2O4/MMH and yet deliver comparable payload delivery performance. However, there are propellant handling issues and technology development needs that must be addressed. These are discussed.

  11. Characterization of the 2012-044C Briz-M Upper Stage Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. J.; Hamilton, J.; Horstman, M.; Papanyan, V.

    2013-01-01

    On 6 August, 2012, Russia launched two commercial satellites aboard a Proton rocket, and attempted to place them in geosynchronous orbit using a Briz-M upper stage (2012-044C, SSN 38746). Unfortunately, the upper stage failed early in its burn and was left stranded in an elliptical orbit with a perigee in low Earth orbit (LEO). Because the stage failed with much of its fuel on board, it was deemed a significant breakup risk. These fears were confirmed when it broke up 16 October, creating a large cloud of debris with perigees below that of the International Space Station. The debris cloud was tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN), which can reliably detect and track objects down to about 10 cm in size. Because of the unusual geometry of the breakup, there was an opportunity for NASA Orbital Debris Program Office to use specialized radar assets to characterize the extent of the debris cloud in sizes smaller than the standard debris tracked by the SSN. This paper will describe the observation campaign to measure the small particle distributions of this cloud, and presents the results of the analysis of the data. We shall compare the data to the modelled size distribution, number, and shape of the cloud, and what implications this may have for future breakup debris models. We shall conclude the paper with a discussion how this measurement process can be improved for future breakups.

  12. Preliminary Performance of Lithium-ion Cell Designs for Ares I Upper Stage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas B.; Reid, Concha M.; Kussmaul, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) baselined lithium-ion technology for the Upper Stage (US). Under this effort, the NASA Glenn Research Center investigated three different aerospace lithium-ion cell suppliers to assess the performance of the various lithium-ion cell designs under acceptance and characterization testing. This paper describes the overall testing approaches associated with lithium-ion cells, their ampere-hour capacity as a function of temperature and discharge rates, as well as their performance limitations for use on the Ares I US vehicle.

  13. Operations analysis (study 2.1): Shuttle upper stage software requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation of software costs related to space shuttle upper stage operations with emphasis on the additional costs attributable to space servicing was conducted. The questions and problem areas include the following: (1) the key parameters involved with software costs; (2) historical data for extrapolation of future costs; (3) elements of the basic software development effort that are applicable to servicing functions; (4) effect of multiple servicing on complexity of the operation; and (5) are recurring software costs significant. The results address these questions and provide a foundation for estimating software costs based on the costs of similar programs and a series of empirical factors.

  14. Correlation of upper Bajocian-Bathonian zones in Siberia with the stage standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meledina, S. V.; Nal'Nyaeva, T. I.; Shurygin, B. N.

    2009-06-01

    The suggestions to transfer the Arcticoceras ishmae Zone from the middle to the lower Bathonian and the Arctocephalites arcticus Zone from the lower Bathonian to the upper Bajocian put forward by some researchers, are critically considered. These suggestions are based on paleontological records from the Sokur quarry near Saratov. Based on paleontological data from Siberia represented in a number of regional ammonite, belemnite, and retroceram zonations, we infer that the proposed zonal subdivision of the Jurassic in the Sokur quarry to be untrue and believe the revision of the correlation of the above-mentioned zones with the stage and zonal standard to be premature because of insufficient argumentation.

  15. Visualizing group II intron catalysis through the stages of splicing

    PubMed Central

    Marcia, Marco; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that share a reaction mechanism and a common ancestor with the eukaryotic spliceosome, thereby providing a model system for understanding the chemistry of pre-mRNA splicing. Here we report fourteen crystal structures of a group II intron at different stages of catalysis. We provide a detailed mechanism for the first step of splicing, we describe a reversible conformational change between the first and the second steps of splicing, and we present the ligand-free intron structure after splicing, in an active state that corresponds to the retrotransposable form of the intron. During each reaction, the reactants are aligned and activated by a heteronuclear four-metal-ion center that contains a metal cluster and obligate monovalent cations, adopting a structural arrangement similar to that of protein endonucleases. Based on our data, we propose a model for the splicing cycle and show that it is applicable to the eukaryotic spliceosome. PMID:23101623

  16. Design and Analysis of a Turbopump for a Conceptual Expander Cycle Upper-Stage Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Griffin, Lisa W.; Thornton, Randall J.; Forbes, John C.; Skelly, Stephen E.; Huber, Frank W.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the development of technologies for rocket engines that will power spacecraft to the Moon and Mars, a program was initiated to develop a conceptual upper stage engine with wide flow range capability. The resulting expander cycle engine design employs a radial turbine to allow higher pump speeds and efficiencies. In this paper, the design and analysis of the pump section of the engine are discussed. One-dimensional meanline analyses and three-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed for the pump stage. Configurations with both vaneless and vaned diffusers were investigated. Both the meanline analysis and computational predictions show that the pump will meet the performance objectives. Additional details describing the development of a water flow facility test are also presented.

  17. A palynological biozonation for the Maastrichtian Stage (Upper Cretaceous) of South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christopher, R.A.; Prowell, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    Three palynological biozones are proposed for the Maastrichtian Stage of South Carolina. In ascending stratigraphic order, the biozones are the Carolinapollis triangularis (Ct) Interval Biozone, the Holkopollenites chemardensis (Hc) Interval Biozone, and the Sparganiaceaepollenites uniformis (Su) Interval Biozone. Integration of the biostratigraphy with lithologic and geophysical log data suggests that within the study area, the upper and lower boundaries of each zone are bounded by regional unconformities, and that a three-fold subdivision of the Maastrichtian Stage is warranted. The biozonation is based on the analysis of 114 samples from 24 subsurface and three outcrop sections from the Coastal Plain of South Carolina; samples from an additional seven subsurface and 18 outcrop sections from North Carolina and Georgia were examined to evaluate the geographic extent of the biozones. One new genus and five new species of pollen are described, and emendations are presented for two genera and one species of pollen. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Combination Chemo, Rituximab, and Bevacizumab in Older Patients With Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-06

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  19. Modeling and Simulation of the ARES UPPER STAGE Transportation, Lifting, Stacking and Mating Operations Within the Vehicle Assembly Building at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kromis, Phillip A.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the modeling and simulation of the Ares Upper Stage Transportation, lifting, stacking, and mating operations within the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). An aerial view of KSC Launch Shuttle Complex, two views of the Delmia process control layout, and an upper stage move subroutine and breakdown are shown. An overhead image of the VAB and the turning basin along with the Pegasus barge at the turning basin are also shown. This viewgraph presentation also shows the actual design and the removal of the mid-section spring tensioners, the removal of the AFT rear and forward tensioners tie downs, and removing the AFT hold down post and mount. US leaving the Pegasus Barge, the upper stage arriving at transfer aisle, upper stage receiving/inspection in transfer aisle, and an overhead view of upper stage receiving/inspection in transfer aisle are depicted. Five views of the actual connection of the cabling to the upper stage aft lifting hardware are shown. The upper stage transporter forward connector, two views of the rotation horizontal to vertical, the disconnection of the rear bolt ring cabling, the lowering of the upper stage to the inspection stand, disconnection of the rear bolt ring from the upper stage, the lifting of the upper stage and inspection of AFT fange, and the transfer of upper stage in an integrated stack are shown. Six views of the mating of the upper stage to the first stage are depicted. The preparation, inspection, and removal of the forward dome are shown. The upper stage mated on the integrated stack and crawler is also shown. This presentation concludes with A Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) utilizing male and female models for assessing risk factors to the upper extremities of human beings in an actual physical environment.

  20. Distribution of early life history stages of fishes in selected pools of the upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Effective management of the fishery resources of the Upper Mississippi River and successful mitigation of the loss of critical habitat depend in part on an understanding of the reproductive and early life history requirements of the affected fishes. However, little is known about the use of nursery areas by fishes in the river. Of the nearly 130 species identified in the adult ichthyofauna, only a few are represented proportionally in the available data on early life stages because study designs have not included consideration of the early stages, collection gears have not adequately sampled the young, and eggs and larvae of some species are difficult to sample by conventional approaches. For the species collected, information is available on seasonal variations in total densities, composition, and catch among different habitat types. However, the data are most accurate for species with buoyant early life stages, such as freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) and gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum). Eggs and larvae of freshwater drum dominate collections made in the main channel, whereas other larval fishes are usually most abundant in backwater habitats. The species found there usually deposit eggs on the substrate or on vegetation. Habitat preferences (as indicated by relative abundance) often shift as development proceeds and physical and behavioral changes occur in the larvae. Only limited information is available on the distribution of larvae within habitats, but it is clear that variations within habitats are significant.

  1. Reflections on Centaur Upper Stage Integration by the NASA Lewis (Glenn) Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Glenn (then Lewis) Research Center (GRC) led several expendable launch vehicle (ELV) projects from 1963 to 1998, most notably the Centaur upper stage. These major, comprehensive projects included system management, system development, integration (both payload and stage), and launch operations. The integration role that GRC pioneered was truly unique and highly successful. Its philosophy, scope, and content were not just invaluable to the missions and vehicles it supported, but also had significant Agency-wide benefits. An overview of the NASA Lewis Research Center (now the NASA Glenn Research Center) philosophy on ELV integration is provided, focusing on Atlas/Centaur, Titan/Centaur, and Shuttle/Centaur vehicles and programs. The necessity of having a stable, highly technically competent in-house staff is discussed. Significant depth of technical penetration of contractor work is another critical component. Functioning as a cohesive team was more than a concept: GRC senior management, NASA Headquarters, contractors, payload users, and all staff worked together. The scope, content, and history of launch vehicle integration at GRC are broadly discussed. Payload integration is compared to stage development integration in terms of engineering and organization. Finally, the transition from buying launch vehicles to buying launch services is discussed, and thoughts on future possibilities of employing the successful GRC experience in integrating ELV systems like Centaur are explored.

  2. Reflections on Centaur Upper Stage Integration by the NASA Lewis (Glenn) Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Glenn (then Lewis) Research Center (GRC) led several expendable launch vehicle (ELV) projects from 1963 to 1998, most notably the Centaur upper stage. These major, comprehensive projects included system management, system development, integration (both payload and stage), and launch operations. The integration role that GRC pioneered was truly unique and highly successful. Its philosophy, scope, and content were not just invaluable to the missions and vehicles it supported, but also had significant Agencywide benefits. An overview of the NASA Lewis Research Center (now the NASA Glenn Research Center) philosophy on ELV integration is provided, focusing on Atlas/Centaur, Titan/Centaur, and Shuttle/Centaur vehicles and programs. The necessity of having a stable, highly technically competent in-house staff is discussed. Significant depth of technical penetration of contractor work is another critical component. Functioning as a cohesive team was more than a concept: GRC senior management, NASA Headquarters, contractors, payload users, and all staff worked together. The scope, content, and history of launch vehicle integration at GRC are broadly discussed. Payload integration is compared to stage development integration in terms of engineering and organization. Finally, the transition from buying launch vehicles to buying launch services is discussed, and thoughts on future possibilities of employing the successful GRC experience in integrating ELV systems like Centaur are explored.

  3. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-05

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  4. Integrin genetic variants and stage-specific tumor recurrence in patients with stage II and III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Bohanes, P; Yang, D; Loupakis, F; LaBonte, M J; Gerger, A; Ning, Y; Lenz, C; Lenz, F; Wakatsuki, T; Zhang, W; Benhaim, L; El-Khoueiry, A; El-Khoueiry, R; Lenz, H-J

    2015-06-01

    Integrins (ITGs) are key elements in cancer biology, regulating tumor growth, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis through interactions of the tumor cells with the microenvironment. Moving from the hypothesis that ITGs could have different effects in stage II and III colon cancer, we tested whether a comprehensive panel of germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ITG genes could predict stage-specific time to tumor recurrence (TTR). A total of 234 patients treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy at the University of Southern California were included in this study. Whole-blood samples were analyzed for germline SNPs in ITG genes using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism or direct DNA sequencing. In the multivariable analysis, stage II colon cancer patients with at least one G allele for ITGB3 rs4642 had higher risk of recurrence (hazard ratio (HR)=4.027, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.556-10.421, P=0.004). This association was also significant in the combined stage II-III cohort (HR=1.975, 95% CI 1.194-3.269, P=0.008). The predominant role of ITGB3 rs4642 in stage II diseases was confirmed using recursive partitioning, showing that ITGB3 rs4642 was the most important factor in stage II diseases. In contrast, in stage III diseases the combined analysis of ITGB1 rs2298141 and ITGA4 rs7562325 allowed to identify three distinct prognostic subgroups (P=0.009). The interaction between stage and the combined ITGB1 rs2298141 and ITGA4 rs7562325 on TTR was significant (P=0.025). This study identifies germline polymorphisms in ITG genes as independent stage-specific prognostic markers for stage II and III colon cancer. These data may help to select subgroups of patients who may benefit from ITG-targeted treatments. PMID:25487679

  5. First flight performance of the control system of the inertial upper stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, A. K.; Vono, C.

    The results of a flight performance data analyses from the first flight of an Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) with a Titan 34D booster are reported. The IUS has solid rocket motors, a monopropellant hydrazine reaction control system (RCS), and is separated from the spacecraft when the desired higher energy orbit is reached. Steering is guided by a mission sequencing function that indicates the proper reference attitude quaternions, which are compared with the navigation or current attitude quaternion to form a control error quaternion. Telemetry contact with the spacecraft and IUS failed during an initial boost phase; however, the desired orbit was achieved. Performance was as predicted, except for an increased rate of fuel consumption due to failure to include atmospheric drag in the preflight simulations of conditions in the LEO parking orbit. The effects are expected to be less with a Shuttle launch, and will in any case be offset by an overly adequate propellant supply.

  6. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Liquid Hydrogen Pressure Control Testing and Analytical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, A. D.; Cady, E. C.; Jenkins, D. S.; Chandler, F. O.; Grayson, G. D.; Lopez, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Flachbart, R. H.; Pedersen, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    The demonstration of a unique liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage and feed system concept for solar thermal upper stage was cooperatively accomplished by a Boeing/NASA Marshall Space Flight Center team. The strategy was to balance thermodynamic venting with the engine thrusting timeline during a representative 30-day mission, thereby, assuring no vent losses. Using a 2 cubic m (71 cubic ft) LH2 tank, proof-of-concept testing consisted of an engineering checkout followed by a 30-day mission simulation. The data were used to anchor a combination of standard analyses and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Dependence on orbital testing has been incrementally reduced as CFD codes, combined with standard modeling, continue to be challenged with test data such as this.

  7. Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator Compartment Pressure Comparisons During Ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs. William J.; Kirchner, Robert D.; McLachlan, Blair G.; Hand, Lawrence A.; Nelson, Stuart L.

    2011-01-01

    Predictions of internal compartment pressures are necessary in the design of interstage regions, systems tunnels, and protuberance covers of launch vehicles to assess potential burst and crush loading of the structure. History has proven that unexpected differential pressure loads can lead to catastrophic failure. Pressures measured in the Upper Stage Simulator (USS) compartment of Ares I-X during flight were compared to post-flight analytical predictions using the CHCHVENT chamber-to-chamber venting analysis computer program. The measured pressures were enveloped by the analytical predictions for most of the first minute of flight but were outside of the predictions thereafter. This paper summarizes the venting system for the USS, discusses the probable reasons for the discrepancies between the measured and predicted pressures, and provides recommendations for future flight vehicles.

  8. Weld Residual Stress and Distortion Analysis of the ARES I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury; Dawicke, David; Cheston, Derrick; Phillips, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The Ares system of space launch vehicles is the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration s plan for replacement of the aging space shuttle. The new Ares space launch system is somewhat of a combination of the space shuttle system and the Saturn launch vehicles used prior to the shuttle. Here, a series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on fatigue and fracture life. While the main focus of this paper is a discussion of the weld modeling procedures and results for the USS, a short summary of the CIFS assessment is provided.

  9. BTX concentrations near a stage II implemented petrol station.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Flesca, Norbert; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Cicolella, André

    2002-01-01

    A combined monitoring and dispersion modelling methodology was applied for assessing air quality at three different levels of proximity to the selected service station: (I) next to the fuel pumps, (II) in the surrounding environment, and (III) in the background. Continuous monitoring and passive sampling were used for achieving high temporal and spatial resolution, respectively. A Gaussian dispersion model (CALINE4) was used for assessing the road traffic contribution to the local concentrations under different meteorological conditions. It was established that Stage 2 vapour recovery reduces BTX concentrations not only near the pumps, but also in their surrounding environment. However, there is evidence that the efficiency of the system is wind speed dependent. The modelling simulation of the worst case wind scenario revealed the significance of local traffic emissions. It was shown that the traffic contribution even from a single road in the vicinity of the station can, under certain conditions, be higher than the contribution of the station itself to the local BTX levels. Finally, after comparison with previous studies, the concentrations measured near the service station (which was situated in a rural environment) appear to be lower than those observed in busy street canyons in city centres. It can be concluded, although Stage 2 recovery system effectively reduces working VOC losses in service stations, that it will only have a limited positive impact on local air quality if the service station is located in a heavily polluted area. PMID:12094529

  10. Taming Liquid Hydrogen: The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket, 1958-2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Virginia P.; Bowles, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    During its maiden voyage in May 1962, a Centaur upper stage rocket, mated to an Atlas booster, exploded 54 seconds after launch, engulfing the rocket in a huge fireball. Investigation revealed that Centaur's light, stainless-steel tank had split open, spilling its liquid-hydrogen fuel down its sides, where the flame of the rocket exhaust immediately ignited it. Coming less than a year after President Kennedy had made landing human beings on the Moon a national priority, the loss of Centaur was regarded as a serious setback for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). During the failure investigation, Homer Newell, Director of Space Sciences, ruefully declared: "Taming liquid hydrogen to the point where expensive operational space missions can be committed to it has turned out to be more difficult than anyone supposed at the outset." After this failure, Centaur critics, led by Wernher von Braun, mounted a campaign to cancel the program. In addition to the unknowns associated with liquid hydrogen, he objected to the unusual design of Centaur. Like the Atlas rocket, Centaur depended on pressure to keep its paper-thin, stainless-steel shell from collapsing. It was literally inflated with its propellants like a football or balloon and needed no internal structure to give it added strength and stability. The so-called "pressure-stabilized structure" of Centaur, coupled with the light weight of its high- energy cryogenic propellants, made Centaur lighter and more powerful than upper stages that used conventional fuel. But, the critics argued, it would never become the reliable rocket that the United States needed.

  11. Visualizing group II intron catalysis through the stages of splicing.

    PubMed

    Marcia, Marco; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2012-10-26

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that share a reaction mechanism and a common ancestor with the eukaryotic spliceosome, thereby providing a model system for understanding the chemistry of pre-mRNA splicing. Here we report 14 crystal structures of a group II intron at different stages of catalysis. We provide a detailed mechanism for the first step of splicing, we describe a reversible conformational change between the first and the second steps of splicing, and we present the ligand-free intron structure after splicing in an active state that corresponds to the retrotransposable form of the intron. During each reaction, the reactants are aligned and activated by a heteronuclear four-metal-ion center that contains a metal cluster and obligate monovalent cations, and they adopt a structural arrangement similar to that of protein endonucleases. Based on our data, we propose a model for the splicing cycle and show that it is applicable to the eukaryotic spliceosome. PMID:23101623

  12. MIDDLE TO UPPER ATLANTIC REGIONAL ASSESSMENT (PHASE II)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this assessment activity is to enhance the ability of decision-makers and other stakeholders in the Middle to Upper Atlantic Region who are vulnerable to land use change and climate change to access and use the best scientific information when making decisions th...

  13. Epistaxis in end stage liver disease masquerading as severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M; Matthews, Jason D; Ohning, Gordon V; Kovacs, Thomas O; Jutabha, Rome; Ghassemi, Kevin A; Machicado, Gustavo A; Dulai, Gareth S

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of end stage liver disease (ESLD) patients with severe epistaxis thought to be severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH). METHODS: This observational single center study included all consecutive patients with ESLD and epistaxis identified from consecutive subjects hospitalized with suspected UGIH and prospectively enrolled in our databases of severe UGIH between 1998 and 2011. RESULTS: A total of 1249 patients were registered for severe UGIH in the data basis, 461 (36.9%) were cirrhotics. Epistaxis rather than UGIH was the bleeding source in 20 patients. All patients had severe coagulopathy. Epistaxis was initially controlled in all cases. Fifteen (75%) subjects required posterior nasal packing and 2 (10%) embolization in addition to correction of coagulopathy. Five (25%) patients died in the hospital, 12 (60%) received orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), and 3 (15%) were discharged without OLT. The mortality rate was 63% in patients without OLT. CONCLUSION: Severe epistaxis in patients with ESLD is (1) a diagnosis of exclusion that requires upper endoscopy to exclude severe UGIH; and (2) associated with a high mortality rate in patients not receiving OLT. PMID:25320538

  14. From Paper to Production: An Update on NASA's Upper Stage Engine for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kynard, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The NASA/industry team responsible for developing the J-2X Upper Stage Engine for the Constellation Program's Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles has made significant progress toward moving the design from paper to production during the past year. The J-2X exemplifies the Constellation goal of using proven technology and experience from more than 50 years of United States spaceflight experience and seeking where possible to employ common hardware in the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The J-2X will power the Ares I upper stage to place the Orion crew vehicle in orbit. For the Ares V, the J-2X will place the Earth departure stage (EDS) and lunar lander in orbit and later re-start to send the Orion and lander to the Moon. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) is under contract to develop and produce the engine, leveraging its flight-proven LH2/LOX, gas generator cycle J-2 and RS-68 engine capabilities, recent experience with the X-33 aerospike XRS-2200 engine, and development knowledge of the J-2S tap-off cycle engine. The J-2X employs a gas generator operating cycle designed to produce 294,000 pounds of thrust in primary operating mode for the Ares I and Ares V ascent phases. It also has a secondary mode, during which it operates at 80 percent thrust by altering its mixture ratio to perform the TLI burn for the Ares V lunar sortie and lunar cargo missions. The J-2X development philosophy is based on proven hardware, an aggressive development schedule, and early risk reduction. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and PWR began development of the J-2X in June 2006. The government/industry team of more than 600 people within NASA and PWR successfully completed the Critical Design Review (CDR) in November 2008, following extensive risk mitigation testing. The team is working toward a first flight of the J-2X on the Orion 1 mission in 2014. This paper will discuss the J-2X development background and provide top-level information on design and testing to date. Details will be provided on overcoming challenges such as gas generator instability, turbine blade life, and nozzle extension selection and materials.

  15. Shuttle program standard maneuver sequences for orbiter/upper-stage separation SSUS-A, SSUS-D, and IUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    Descriptions of standard post-ejection maneuver sequences for the deployment of IUS, SSUS-A, and SSUS-D upper stages from the space shuttle orbiter are presented. The sequences were designed to satisfy requirements for limiting the damage inflicted on the orbiter by upper-stage exhaust particles, subject to a further requirement for minimizing the impingement of orbiter thruster plumes on the deployed payload. In all cases it was assumed that the orbital maneuvering system engines would be used to apply the orbiter's major separation velocity increment.

  16. System Characterization of MAHI EXO-II: A Robotic Exoskeleton for Upper Extremity Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    French, James A.; Rose, Chad G.; O'Malley, Marcia K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the performance characterization of the MAHI Exo-II, an upper extremity exoskeleton for stroke and spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation, as a means to validate its clinical implementation and to provide depth to the literature on the performance characteristics of upper extremity exoskeletons. Individuals with disabilities arising from stroke and SCI need rehabilitation of the elbow, forearm, and wrist to restore the ability to independently perform activities of daily living (ADL). Robotic rehabilitation has been proposed to address the need for high intensity, long duration therapy and has shown promising results for upper limb proximal joints. However, upper limb distal joints have historically not benefitted from the same focus. The MAHI Exo-II, designed to address this shortcoming, has undergone a static and dynamic performance characterization, which shows that it exhibits the requisite qualities for a rehabilitation robot and is comparable to other state-of-the-art designs. PMID:25984380

  17. KAP@FREGAT - A Carrier for New Technology In -Orbit Demonstration using FREGAT Upper Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, C.; Pfeuffer, H.; Pont, G.; Smirnow, A.; Ishin, S.

    2008-08-01

    The success of the Kayser-Threde test satellite MAQSAT-B2 on Ariane L521 in February 2005 (2nd Ariane 5 ECA qualification flight) and its instrument platform equipped with experiments, sensors and an autonomous telemetry system has led to the development of a new autonomous experiment platform called KAP. KAP stands for Kayser-Threde Auxiliary Platform carrier and is a direct spin-off product out of Kayser-Threde Ariane 5 post projects and experience. The main idea is to use the available remaining payload capacity of the launcher to provide a flexible and low- cost test facility for scientific experiments and In-Orbit Demonstration of new technologies remaining attached to the launcher upper stage. KAP is a fully autonomous kit providing the complete necessary infrastructure (power, data acquisition and telemetry) to minimize constraints and interactions with the launch vehicle, increasing significantly the possibility for regular flight opportunities. Two different mission scenarios are foreseen. One with KAP only working during the launch phase itself, referred to as Short Mission (SM), the other as Medium Mission (MM), to be switched on after upper stage passivation for up to 7 days in orbit. Different accommodations for KAP are foreseen in order to ease its integration on various launchers including Ariane 5, SOYUZ and Vega. KAP can either be mounted on an additional load-carrying raising cylinder located underneath the launcher payload adaptor (MFD type), or integrated on a platform for auxiliary payloads (ASAP-5 type). The technical concept for both mechanical and electrical subsystems for space segment and ground support equipment is mainly based on existing and space qualified technologies from the successful MAQSAT-B2 project and Kayser-Threde's sounding rocket programme TEXUS/MAXUS. In particular, the data acquisition and telemetry unit as back bone of the KAP experimental payload infrastructure, is a direct adaptation from these programmes to the specific mission needs. A version to be accommodated onto SOYUZ-FREGAT named KAP@FREGAT, based on an octagonal raising cylinder, was recently manufactured in collaboration with our Russian partner, Lavochkin Association. The KAP kit including equipment and experimental payload will be mounted on this octagonal structure mated underneath the primary passenger. The robust capabilities of the FREGAT Upper Stage are a true asset for KAP providing features such as low-gravity environment, platform orientation and stabilization. Finally, the KAP programme is planned to have one flight opportunity per year on alternating launchers depending on the flight opportunities availability and on the auxiliary payloads requirements (orbits, low-gravity, separation, etc.). The present paper summarizes the latest status of the KAP development, including system design and mission scenarios, and provides information regarding the first mission onboard SOYUZ-FREGAT scheduled beginning 2010.

  18. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  20. Flight Results of the Chandra X-ray Observatory Inertial Upper Stage Space Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillotson, R.; Walter, R.

    2000-01-01

    Under contract to NASA, a specially configured version of the Boeing developed Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster was provided by Boeing to deliver NASA's 1.5 billion dollar Chandra X-Ray Observatory satellite into a highly elliptical transfer orbit from a Shuttle provided circular park orbit. Subsequently, the final orbit of the Chandra satellite was to be achieved using the Chandra Integral Propulsion System (IPS) through a series of IPS burns. On 23 July 1999 the Shuttle Columbia (STS-93) was launched with the IUS/Chandra stack in the Shuttle payload bay. Unfortunately, the Shuttle Orbiter was unexpectantly inserted into an off-nominal park orbit due to a Shuttle propulsion anomaly occurring during ascent. Following the IUS/Chandra on-orbit deployment from the Shuttle, at seven hours from liftoff, the flight proven IUS GN&C system successfully injected Chandra into the targeted transfer orbit, in spite of the off-nominal park orbit. This paper describes the IUS GN&C system, discusses the specific IUS GN&C mission data load development, analyses and testing for the Chandra mission, and concludes with a summary of flight results for the IUS part of the Chandra mission.

  1. Overview of the Development Progress of the Ariane 5 Upper Stage VINCI Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliot, P.; Dalbies, E.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the major results of the VINCI engine development program at mid-2002. The VINCI engine will power the Ariane 5 ESC-B upper stage and will contribute to provide a 12 t payload capability in geo-stationary transfer orbit to the Ariane 5 launch system. It will also provide a multiple firing capability and therefore the potential to perform a broad array of missions. The VINCI engine is a cryogenic expander cycle engine combining the required features of this cycle, i.e. high performance chamber cooling and high performance hydrogen turbopump, with proven design concepts based on the accumulated experience from previous European cryogenic engines such as the HM7 and the Vulcain. High performance along with a constant focus on reliability, low cost and simplicity of architecture are the design goals of the VINCI program. The proposed paper will recall how the engine design choices were made taking into account these sometimes potentially conflicting criteria and using design to cost methods. The paper will also present the major achievements of the program over the 2001 - 2002 period, i.e. the completion of the engine detailed design, the manufacturing of the first subsystems, the first component and subsystem tests.

  2. Reconstruction of columella, membranous septum, and upper lip in a single stage operation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hayati Akba?; Mustafa Keskin; Ethem Güneren; Lütfi Ero?lu; Ahmet Demir

    2003-01-01

    Reconstruction options for columellar defects together with membranous septum, nasal base, and upper lip are restricted. We present a case successfully treated with bilateral cheek advancement flaps with upper medial, perialar skin flaps to reconstruct the upper lip, columella, nasal base and membranous septum in a single session. This method provides adequate tissue with minimal cosmetic deformity in a single

  3. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  4. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, and Urologic Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma; Ureter Cancer

  5. Development of an innovative sandwich common bulkhead for cryogenic upper stage propellant tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szelinski, B.; Lange, H.; Röttger, C.; Sacher, H.; Weiland, S.; Zell, D.

    2012-12-01

    In the frame of the Future Launcher Preparatory Program (FLPP) investigating advancing technologies for the Next Generation of Launchers (NGL) a number of novel key technologies are presently under development for significantly improving vehicle performance in terms of payload capacity and mission versatility. As a respective ESA guided technology development program, Cryogenic Upper Stage Technologies (CUST) has been launched within FLPP that hosts among others the development of a common bulkhead to separate liquid hydrogen from the liquid oxygen compartment. In this context, MT Aerospace proposed an advanced sandwich design concept which is currently in the development phase reaching for TRL4 under MT Aerospace responsibility. Key components of this sandwich common bulkhead are a specific core material, situated in-between two thin aluminum face sheets, and an innovative thermal decoupling element at the equatorial region. The combination of these elements provides excellent thermal insulation capabilities and mechanical performance at a minimum weight, since mechanical and thermal functions are merged in the same component. This improvement is expressed by substantial performance figures of the proposed concept that include high resistance against reverse pressure, an optimized heat leak and minimized mass, involving the sandwich dome structure and the adjacent interface rings. The development of single sub-technologies, all contributing to maturate the sandwich common bulkhead towards the desired technology readiness level (TRL), is described in the context of the given design constraints as well as technical, functional and programmatic requirements, issued from the stage level. This includes the thermal and mechanical characterization of core materials, manufacturing issues as well as non-destructive testing and the thermal and structural analyses and dimensioning of the complete common bulkhead system. Dedicated TRL assessments in the Ariane 5 Mid-life Evolution (A5-ME) program track the progress of these technology developments and analyze their applicability in time for A5-ME. In order to approximate A5-ME concerned preconditions, activities are initiated aiming at harmonization of the available specifications. Hence, a look-out towards a further technology step approaching TRL6 in a subsequent phase is given, briefly addressing topics of full scale manufacture and appropriate thermo-mechanical testing of an entire sandwich common bulkhead.

  6. The Integrated Solar Upper Stage engine ground demonstration power management and distribution subsystem design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, Anastacio N.; Kimnach, Greg L.

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL), and the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) in a joint effort are developing technologies for a solar bimodal system. A solar bimodal system combines thermal propulsion and electric power generation in a single integrated system. A spacecraft Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) bimodal system combines orbital transfer propulsion, electric power generation, and on-board propulsion into one overall system. A key benefit of such integrated system is the augmentation of payload to spacecraft mass ratio thus resulting in lower launch vehicle requirements. Scaling down to smaller launch vehicles increases space access by reducing overall mission cost. The NASA/PL/DSWA ISUS program is concentrating efforts on a near-term ground test demonstration of the bimodal concept. A successful ground demonstration of the ISUS various technologies will enable a full system flight demonstration of the bimodal concept. NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland Ohio will be the site for the engine ground demonstrator (EGD). The ISUS bimodal system uses solar concentrators to focus solar energy into an integrated receiver, absorber, and converter (RAC) power plant. The power plant main body is a graphite blackbody that stores thermal energy within a cavity in its main core. During the propulsion phase of the bimodal system a propellant flows into the graphite main core and is distributed uniformly through axial flow channels in the heated cavity. The blackbody core heats the propellant that is then discharged into an output tube thus creating thrust. An array of thermionic generators encircles the graphite core cavity and provides electrical energy conversion functions during the power generation phase. The power management and distribution subsystem's main functions are to condition raw electrical power generated by the RAC power plant and deliver it to the spacecraft payloads. This paper presents a detail description of the power management and distribution subsystem design for the ISUS ground demonstration program.

  7. Testing of a Receiver-Absorber-Converter (RAC) for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerman, Kurt O.; Miles, Barry J.

    1998-01-01

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) is a solar bi-modal system based on a concept developed by Babcock & Wilcox in 1992. ISUS will provide advanced power and propulsion capabilities that will enable spacecraft designers to either increase the mass to orbit or decrease the cost to orbit for their satellites. In contrast to the current practice of using chemical propulsion for orbit transfer and photovoltaic conversion/battery storage for electrical power, ISUS uses a single collection, storage, and conversion system for both the power and propulsion functions. The ISUS system is currently being developed by the Air Force's Phillips Laboratory. The ISUS program consists of a systems analysis, design, and integration (SADI) effort, and three major sub-system development efforts: the Concentrator Array and Tracking (CATS) sub-system which tracks the sun and collects/focuses the energy; the Receiver-Absorber-Converter (RAC) sub-system which receives and stores the solar energy, transfers the stored energy to the propellant during propulsion operations, and converts the stored energy to electricity during power operations; and the Cryogenic Storage and Propellant Feed Sub-system (CSPFS) which stores the liquid hydrogen propellant and provides it to the RAC during propulsion operations. This paper discuses the evolution of the RAC sub-system as a result of the component level testing, and provides the initial results of systems level ground testing. A total of 5 RACs were manufactured as part of the Phillips Laboratory ISUS Technology Development program. The first series of component tests were carried out at the Solar Rocket Propulsion Laboratory at Edwards AFB, California. These tests provided key information on the propulsion mode of operations. The second series of RAC tests were performed at the Thermionic Evaluation Facility (TEF) in Albuquerque, New Mexico and provided information on the electrical performance of the RAC. The systems level testing was performed at the NASA Lewis Research Center Solar Simulator Facility (Tank 6) in Cleveland, OH.

  8. The J-2X Upper Stage Engine: From Design to Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    NASA is well on its way toward developing a new generation of launch vehicles to support of national space policy to retire the Space Shuttle fleet, complete the International Space Station, and return to the Moon as the first step in resuming this nation s exploration of deep space. The Constellation Program is developing the launch vehicles, spacecraft, surface systems, and ground systems to support those plans. Two launch vehicles will support those ambitious plans the Ares I and Ares V. (Figure 1) The J-2X Upper Stage Engine is a critical element of both of these new launchers. This paper will provide an overview of the J-2X design background, progress to date in design, testing, and manufacturing. The Ares I crew launch vehicle will lift the Orion crew exploration vehicle and up to four astronauts into low Earth orbit (LEO) to rendezvous with the space station or the first leg of mission to the Moon. The Ares V cargo launch vehicle is designed to lift a lunar lander into Earth orbit where it will be docked with the Orion spacecraft, and provide the thrust for the trans-lunar journey. While these vehicles bear some visual resemblance to the 1960s-era Saturn vehicles that carried astronauts to the Moon, the Ares vehicles are designed to carry more crew and more cargo to more places to carry out more ambitious tasks than the vehicles they succeed. The government/industry team designing the Ares rockets is mining a rich history of technology and expertise from the Shuttle, Saturn and other programs and seeking commonality where feasible between the Ares crew and cargo rockets as a way to minimize risk, shorten development times, and live within the budget constraints of its original guidance.

  9. Performance of 15-Stage Experimental J71 Axial-Flow Compressor: II - Individual Stage Performance Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, James G.; Filippi, Richard E.

    1954-01-01

    The first four stages were found to cause a major part of the poor low-speed efficiency of this compressor. The low design-speed over-all pressure ratio at surge was caused by the first and the twelfth to fifteenth stages. The multiple over-all performance curves in the intermediate-speed range were at least partly the result of double-branched characteristic curves for the third and seventh stages.

  10. Social Development Training Project. Stage I and Stage II. [The Granville Project].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riches, Vivienne C., Ed.

    The book presents a training program developed at the Granville Work Preparation Centre in Australia, to teach mildly retarded adolescents basic social skills and competencies. The program is divided into two stages, with a total of 17 different skill areas. Stage 1 covers self-awareness, social/interpersonal skills, relaxation and behavioral self…

  11. A 20k Payload Launch Vehicle Fast Track Development Concept Using an RD-180 Engine and a Centaur Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toelle, Ronald (compiler)

    1995-01-01

    A launch vehicle concept to deliver 20,000 lb of payload to a 100-nmi orbit has been defined. A new liquid oxygen/kerosene booster powered by an RD-180 engine was designed while using a slightly modified Centaur upper stage. The design, development, and test program met the imposed 40-mo schedule by elimination of major structural testing by increased factors of safety and concurrent engineering concepts. A growth path to attain 65,000 lb of payload is developed.

  12. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-10

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  13. Measurements of lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric water vapor by the SAGE II instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary, unvalidated data are discussed from early measurements of water vapor profiles in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere by means of SAGE II satellite sensors. Zonal means for April 1985 are discussed and compared with previous, separate data sets for water vapor profiles for the 100 mbar and 300 mbar levels determined from space-based IR and rawinsonde data. Techniques employed to correct for noisy measurements due to the presence of clouds in the SAGE II scenes are described, noting the slant path transmission methods applied to generate the water vapor profiles.

  14. Reconstructing Northern Hemisphere upper-level fields during World War II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Brönnimann; J. Luterbacher

    2004-01-01

    Monthly mean fields of temperature and geopotential height (GPH) from 700 to 100 hPa were statistically reconstructed for the extratropical Northern Hemisphere for the World War II period. The reconstruction was based on several hundred predictor variables, comprising temperature series from meteorological stations and gridded sea level pressure data (1939-1947) as well as a large amount of historical upper-air data

  15. Evolutionary stages of a mid-Proterozoic carbonate basin as inferred from the upper marble, Adirondack Lowlands, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, K.L.; Grant, N.K. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Mineral abundances for Upper Marble protoliths, obtained through least-squares multiple regression calculations, and trace element concentrations for 112 samples from two drill cores, exhibit stratigraphic variations that are interpretable in terms of stages in the development of the original carbonate basin. Factor analysis with varimax rotation reveals three dominant factors; dolomite, calcite + Sr, and quartz; and five minor factors: clastics, anhydrite + Sr, magnesite, ore + Sr, and illite. When the factor affiliations of samples are considered with respect to their stratigraphic arrangement, the result can be interpreted in terms of a seven-stage model of basin evolution that possesses elements common to both Proterozoic and Phanerozoic carbonate basins. According to this model, stage 1 was dominated by widespread penecontemporaneous dolomitization punctuated by brief periods of increased basin restriction. Stage 2 involved increasing basin restriction during which dolomitization was progressively inhibited by increasing Ca[sup 2+] and/or sulfate levels. Stage 3 was characterized by further basin restriction and episodes of anhydrite precipitation during which dolomitization resumed briefly because of lowered Ca[sup 2+] and/or sulfate levels. Stage 4 and 5 involved decreasing restriction and brine concentrations which allowed large-scale dolomitization to resume during stage 5, and abundant chert was formed in these sediments subsequent to dolomitization. Stage 6 was characterized by increasing restriction and progressive inhibition of dolomitization. Finally, stage 7 saw rapid increases in aluminosilicate sedimentation that ended further carbonate deposition. Sr abundances throughout the cores reflect control by carbonate mineralogy, which was in turn controlled by the degree of basin restriction.

  16. Rituximab and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  17. SAGE II long-term measurements of stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.H.; Kent, G.S. [Science and Technology Corp., Hampton, VA (United States); McCormick, M.P.; Thomason, L.W. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

    1995-12-31

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II solar occultation instrument has been making measurements on stratospheric aerosols and gases continually since October 1984. Observations from the SAGE II instrument provide a valuable long-term data set for study of the aerosol in the stratosphere and aerosol and cloud in the upper troposphere. The period of observation covers the decay phase of material injected by the El Chichon volcanic eruption in 1982, the years 1988--1990 when stratospheric aerosol levels approached background levels, and the period after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. The Mount Pinatubo eruption caused the largest perturbation in stratospheric aerosol loading in this century, with effects on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry. The SAGE II data sequence shows the global dispersion of aerosols following the Mount Pinatubo eruption, as well as the changes occurring in stratospheric aerosol mass and surface area. The downward transfer of stratospheric aerosols into the upper troposphere following the earlier eruption of El Chichon is clearly visible. Estimates have been made of the amount of volcanic material lying in the upper troposphere and the way in which this varies with latitude and season.

  18. Large-Scale Liquid Hydrogen Tank Rapid Chill and Fill Testing for the Advanced Shuttle Upper Stage Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hedayat, A.; Holt, K. A.; Sims, J.; Johnson, E. F.; Hastings, L. J.; Lak, T.

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenic upper stages in the Space Shuttle program were prohibited primarily due to a safety risk of a 'return to launch site' abort. An upper stage concept addressed this concern by proposing that the stage be launched empty and filled using shuttle external tank residuals after the atmospheric pressure could no longer sustain an explosion. However, only about 5 minutes was allowed for tank fill. Liquid hydrogen testing was conducted within a near-ambient environment using the multipurpose hydrogen test bed 638.5 ft3 (18m3) cylindrical tank with a spray bar mounted longitudinally inside. Although the tank was filled within 5 minutes, chilldown of the tank structure was incomplete, and excessive tank pressures occurred upon vent valve closure. Elevated tank wall temperatures below the liquid level were clearly characteristic of film boiling. The test results have substantial implications for on-orbit cryogen transfer since the formation of a vapor film would be much less inhibited due to the reduced gravity. However, the heavy tank walls could become an asset in normal gravity testing for on-orbit transfer, i.e., if film boiling in a nonflight weight tank can be inhibited in normal gravity, then analytical modeling anchored with the data could be applied to reduced gravity environments with increased confidence.

  19. Distribution of early life history stages of fishes in selected pools of the Upper Mississippi River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie E. Holland

    1986-01-01

    Effective management of the fishery resources of the Upper Mississippi River and successful mitigation of the loss of critical habitat depend in part on an understanding of the reproductive and early life history requirements of the affected fishes. However, little is known about the use of nursery areas by fishes in the river. Of the nearly 130 species identified in

  20. Sensory nerve conduction in the upper limbs at various stages of diabetic neuropathy 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Noël

    1973-01-01

    In 59 diabetic patients, sensory nerve potentials were recorded at various sites along the course of the median nerve. Pathological responses were characterized by reduced amplitude, desynchronization and decreased conduction velocity (CV). Four groups of patients with increasingly severe nerve dysfunction were distinguished. The presence and severity of clinical neuropathy in the upper limbs could be related to decreased maximal

  1. Influence of River Stage on Shoreline Electrofishing Catches in the Upper Mississippi River

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodney B. Pierce; Daniel W. Coble; Scott D. Corley

    1985-01-01

    The numbers of fish and fish species caught per unit of electrofishing effort along main-channel shorelines in pool 13 of the upper Mississippi River were inversely related to water level. Four species contributed predominantly to the relation between catch rate and water level: Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus; freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens; white bass Morone chrysops; and sauger Stizostedion canadense. There was

  2. General Description and Design of the Configuration of the Juno I and Juno II Launching Vehicles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bill B. Greever

    1960-01-01

    The Juno I Vehicle consists of a modified Redstone Booster with three solid propellant upper stages. The second and third stages are made up by clustering the same rocket used as the fourth stage. The upper stages are contained in a spinning launcher. The spinning provides stability during flight. The Juno II vehicle uses the same upper stages as the

  3. Large Scale Testing of a Foam/Multilayer Insulation Thermal Control System (TCS) for Cryogenic Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Leon; Martin, James

    1998-01-01

    The development of high energy cryogenic upper stages is essential for the efficient delivery of large payloads to various destinations envisioned in future programs. A key element in such upper stages is cryogenic fluid management (CFM) advanced development/technology. Due to the cost of and limited opportunities for orbital experiments, ground testing must be employed to the fullest extent possible. Therefore, a system level test bed termed the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB), which is representative in size and shape (3 meter diameter by 3 meter long with a volume of 18 cubic meters) of a fully integrated space transportation vehicle liquid hydrogen propellant tank has been established. To date, upper stage studies have often baselined the foam/multilayer insulation (FMLI) combination concept; however, hardware experience with the concept is minimal and was therefore selected for the MHTB. The foam element (isofoam SS-1 171 with an average thickness of 3.5 centimeters) is designed to protect against ground hold/ascent flight environments, and allows for the use of a dry nitrogen purge as opposed to the more complex/heavy helium purge subsystem normally required with MLI in cryogenic applications. The MLI (45 layers of Double Aluminized Mylar with Dacron spacers) provides protection in the vacuum environment of space and is designed for an on-orbit storage period of 45 days. Several unique features were incorporated in the MLI concept and included: variable density MLI (reduces weight and radiation losses by changing the layer density), larger but fewer DAM perforations for venting during ascent to orbit (reduces radiation losses), and roll wrap installation of the MLI with a commercially established process to lower assembly man-hours and reduce seam heat leak. Thermal performance testing of the MHTB TCS was conducted during three test series conducted between September 1995 and May 1996. Results for the ground hold portion of the tests were as expected producing an average heat leak of 63 WattS/M2 at an average foam surface temperature of 170 K. The results of the simulated orbit hold test interval produced heat leaks ranging from 0.085 to 0.22 Watts/squareM at warm boundary temperatures of 164K and 305K, respectively. When compared to the performance for a traditional MLI system, a 60% reduction in orbital heat leak or boiloff was measured. Overall, the MHTB TCS demonstrated satisfactory performance for all mission phases required of a cryogenic upper stage.

  4. DRAFT Lower Columbia Salmon and Steelhead Recovery and Subbasin Plan UPPER COWLITZ II, 7-1 May 2004

    E-print Network

    DRAFT Lower Columbia Salmon and Steelhead Recovery and Subbasin Plan UPPER COWLITZ II, 7-1 May 2004. The basin is part of WRIA 26. The upper Cowlitz basin will play key role in the recovery of salmon steelhead, and coho. Today, chinook and steelhead are listed as threatened under the ESA. Coho salmon

  5. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Three-dimensional transient thermal analysis of a receiver-absorber-converter system in the Integrated Solar Upper Stage Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.

    1999-12-01

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) program is directing its efforts at solving endemic national spacecraft architecture problems. The ISUS is an advanced, integrated upper stage concept that would permit payload realignment, allowing large payloads to be moved by smaller and less expensive boosters. A receiver-absorber-converter (RAC) system in the ISUS unit is designed to convert solar energy to kinetic energy in the propulsion phase or electrical energy in the power generation phase for spacecraft control and operation. In this study a three-dimensional, transient, turbulent hydrogen gas flow through the RAC system was simulated using a finite element thermal-hydraulic model. With this model, transient temperature, pressure, and flow fields in the RAC system were obtained. Numerical results of the mass flow rate distribution through hydrogen heating channels reveal that higher mass flow rates occur through those channels near either the hydrogen channels reveal that higher mass flow rates occur through those channels near either the hydrogen inlet or exit. It takes about 18.5 min for the hydrogen exhaust temperature to drop below 2,000 K. The results obtained from this work have been applied for validating and optimizing the present RAC design, as well as for performing the thermal stress analysis.

  7. Identification of Risk Factors for Recurrence in High-Risk Stage II Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Satoshi; Ishida, Hideyuki; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Haga, Norihiro; Miura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    To identify risk factors for recurrence in patients with stage II colon cancer, Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed in 194 patients with stage II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery between April 1997 and December 2008. Thirteen clinical and pathologic factors, including use of fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy in 113 of the patients (58.2%), were assessed. By multivariate analysis, only obstruction, perforation, and T4-level invasion were identified as independent risk factors affecting disease-free survival (DFS) (P < 0.01). The 5-year DFS rate was 70.6% in patients with one or more risk factors (n = 68) and 96.0% in patients with no risk factors (n = 126) (P < 0.01). These results suggest that obstruction, perforation, and T4-level invasion are suitable candidates for prediction of tumor recurrence in patients with stage II colon cancer. The oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy, which has been reported to be effective in stage III colon cancer patients, may improve the prognosis in high-risk stage II colon cancer patients. PMID:23701145

  8. Battleship tank firing test of H-II launch vehicle second stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Masahiro; Kazama, Hiroo; Nakatsuji, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Isao; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Toshihiko

    The objectives, facilities, articles, and results are presented of a series of battleship tank firing tests on the second stage propulsion systems of the H-II launch vehicle. The test series included 11 hot firing tests under first burn conditions, restart conditions, and idle mode conditions. Oscillatory perturbations were added to the LOX flow in some cases to obtain data concerning POGO oscillation. The results verify the functions of the second stage propulsion system.

  9. Decadal-Scale Responses in Middle and Upper Stratospheric Ozone From SAGE II Version 7 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) version 7 (v7) ozone profiles are analyzed for their decadal-scale responses in the middle and upper stratosphere for 1991 and 1992-2005 and compared with those from its previous version 6.2 (v6.2). Multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis is applied to time series of its ozone number density vs. altitude data for a range of latitudes and altitudes. The MLR models that are fit to the time series data include a periodic 11 yr term, and it is in-phase with that of the 11 yr, solar UV (Ultraviolet)-flux throughout most of the latitude/ altitude domain of the middle and upper stratosphere. Several regions that have a response that is not quite in-phase are interpreted as being affected by decadal-scale, dynamical forcings. The maximum minus minimum, solar cycle (SClike) responses for the ozone at the low latitudes are similar from the two SAGE II data versions and vary from about 5 to 2.5% from 35 to 50 km, although they are resolved better with v7. SAGE II v7 ozone is also analyzed for 1984-1998, in order to mitigate effects of end-point anomalies that bias its ozone in 1991 and the analyzed results for 1991-2005 or following the Pinatubo eruption. Its SC-like ozone response in the upper stratosphere is of the order of 4%for 1984-1998 vs. 2.5 to 3%for 1991-2005. The SAGE II v7 results are also recompared with the responses in ozone from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) that are in terms of mixing ratio vs. pressure for 1991-2005 and then for late 1992- 2005 to avoid any effects following Pinatubo. Shapes of their respective response profiles agree very well for 1992-2005. The associated linear trends of the ozone are not as negative in 1992-2005 as in 1984-1998, in accord with a leveling off of the effects of reactive chlorine on ozone. It is concluded that the SAGE II v7 ozone yields SC-like ozone responses and trends that are of better quality than those from v6.2.

  10. Now on display: a gallery of group II intron structures at different stages of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Marcia, Marco; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile genetic elements that self-splice and retrotranspose into DNA and RNA. They are considered evolutionary ancestors of the spliceosome, the ribonucleoprotein complex essential for pre-mRNA processing in higher eukaryotes. Over a 20-year period, group II introns have been characterized first genetically, then biochemically, and finally by means of X-ray crystallography. To date, 17 crystal structures of a group II intron are available, representing five different stages of the splicing cycle. This review provides a framework for classifying and understanding these new structures in the context of the splicing cycle. Structural and functional implications for the spliceosome are also discussed. PMID:23634971

  11. Radiation therapy of stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Zierhut; C. Bettscheider; K. Schubert; M. van Kampen; M. Wannenmacher

    2001-01-01

    Surgery is the preferred and standard treatment for patients with resectable stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Survival rates of local surgery are unbeaten by other treatment modalities. Up to 70% of these patients survive 5 years or longer. However, there is a subset of patients who either are inoperable due to the presence of severe associated

  12. Preliminary battleship tank firing test of H-II launch vehicle first stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Masahiro; Kazama, Hiroo; Nakatsuji, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Isao; Maemura, Takashi; Atsumi, Masahiro

    The development, objectives, facilities, and results of a preliminary battleship tank firing test series of the first stage propulsion system of the H-II rocket are discussed. The test series included two engine chilldown tests and 12 short-duration hot firing tests. The results verify the basic compatibility of the tank system and the LE-7 engine.

  13. Allelic loss on chromosome 18q as a prognostic marker in stage II colorectal cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Martínez-López; Albert Abad; Mariano Monzó; Isabel Ojanguren; Alex Pifarré; José Javier Sánchez; Cristina Martín; Rafael Rosell

    1998-01-01

    Background & Aims: Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 18q is frequent in colorectal cancer (CRC) and has been associated with poor prognosis in stage II tumors. This study investigated the frequency of LOH in sporadic CRC and its effect on patient prognosis. Methods: One hundred forty-four patients were screened for LOH at 18q by polymerase chain reaction using three

  14. CD44v6 expression in patients with stage II or stage III sporadic colorectal cancer is superior to CD44 expression for predicting progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, LH; Lin, QL; Wei, J; Huai, YL; Wang, KJ; Yan, HY

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently, it is difficult to predict the prognosis of patients exhibiting stage II or stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) and to identify those patients most likely to benefit from aggressive treatment. The current study was performed to examine the clinicopathological significance of CD44 and CD44v6 protein expression in these patients. Study design: We retrospectively investigated 187 consecutive patients who underwent surgery with curative intent for stage II to III CRC from 2007 to 2013 in the Beijing Civil Aviation Hospital. CD44 and CD44v6 protein expression levels were determined using immunohistochemistry and compared to the clinicopathological data. Results: Using immunohistochemical detection, CD44 expression was observed in 108 (57.75%) of the CRC patients; and its detection was significantly associated with greater invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, angiolymphatic invasion, and a more advanced pathological tumor-lymph node-metastasis (TNM) stage. CD44v6 expression was observed in 135 (72.19%) of the CRC patients; and its expression was significantly associated with a poorly differentiated histology, greater invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, angiolymphatic invasion, and a more advanced pathological TNM stage. Expression of CD44v6 was higher than that of CD44 in stage II and stage III sporadic CRC. Conclusion: CD44v6 is a more useful marker for predicting a poor prognosis in stage II and stage III sporadic CRC as compared to CD44. PMID:25755763

  15. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-12

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  16. Propulsion and aerodynamic analysis of the Beta II two-stage-to-orbit vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davic, James R.; Midea, Anthony C.

    1992-08-01

    A study of a revised version of the Beta II two-stage-to-orbit vehicle has been undertaken. The goal of the study was to modify and refine critical components of the NASA/Boeing/Wright Laboratory Beta II booster design to better define a successful baseline vehicle that can provide routine access to space. The vehicle geometry was modified and corresponding aerodynamics were predicted. The propulsion system was improved by refining the nacelle design which included incorporating a variable capture area inlet, replacing the five High Speed Civil Transport derived turbine bypass turbojet engines with four variable cycle turbofan engines per nacelle, and removing the bypass duct system. The ramjet performance was adjusted for the change in airflow due to the variable capture area inlet. The second stage wing-body orbiter design was not modified for this study. The total Beta II takeoff weight which resulted was approximately 1.0 million pounds.

  17. An Updated Zero Boil-Off Cryogenic Propellant Storage Analysis Applied to Upper Stages or Depots in a LEO Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David; Kittel, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Previous efforts have shown the analytical benefits of zero boil-off (ZBO) cryogenic propellant storage in launch vehicle upper stages of Mars transfer vehicles for conceptual Mars Missions. However, recent NASA mission investigations have looked at a different and broad array of missions, including a variety of orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) propulsion concepts, some requiring cryogenic storage. For many of the missions, this vehicle will remain for long periods (greater than one week) in low earth orbit (LEO), a relatively warm thermal environment. Under this environment, and with an array of tank sizes and propellants, the performance of a ZBO cryogenic storage system is predicted and compared with a traditional, passive-only storage concept. The results show mass savings over traditional, passive-only cryogenic storage when mission durations are less than one week in LEO for oxygen, two weeks for methane, and roughly 2 months for LH2. Cryogenic xenon saves mass over passive storage almost immediately.

  18. Computer program for post-flight evaluation of a launch vehicle upper-stage on-off reaction control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauber, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a FORTRAN IV coded computer program for post-flight evaluation of a launch vehicle upper stage on-off reaction control system. Aerodynamic and thrust misalignment disturbances are computed as well as the total disturbing moments in pitch, yaw, and roll. Effective thrust misalignment angle time histories of the rocket booster motor are calculated. Disturbing moments are integrated and used to estimate the required control system total inpulse. Effective control system specific inpulse is computed for the boost and coast phases using measured control fuel useage. This method has been used for more than fifteen years for analyzing the NASA Scout launch vehicle second and third-stage reaction control system performance. The computer program is set up in FORTRAN IV for a CDC CYBER 175 system. With slight modification it can be used on other machines having a FORTRAN compiler. The program has optional CALCOMP plotting output. With this option the program requires 19K words of memory and has 786 cards. Running time on a CDC CYBER 175 system is less than three (3) seconds for a typical problem.

  19. Advanced space engine preliminary design. [liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen upper stage engine for space tug application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachary, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis and design of an optimum LO2/LH2, combustion topping cycle, 88,964 Newtons (20,000-pound) thrust, liquid rocket engine was conducted. The design selected is well suited to high-energy, upper-stage engine applications such as the Space Tug and embodies features directed toward optimization of vehicle performance. A configuration selection was conducted based on prior Air Force Contracts, and additional criteria for optimum stage performance. Following configuration selection, analyses and design of the major components and engine systems were conducted to sufficient depth to provide layout drawings suitable for subsequent detailing. In addition, engine packaging to a common interface and a retractable nozzle concept were defined. Alternative development plans and related costs were also established. The design embodies high-performance, low-weight, low NPSH requirements (saturated propellant inlet conditions at start), idle-mode operation, and autogenous pressurization. The design is the result of the significant past and current LO2/LH2 technology efforts of the NASA centers and the Air Force, as well as company-funded programs.

  20. Combined modality treatment for stage I-II non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: CVP versus BACOP chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bajetta, E.; Valagussa, P.; Bonadonna, G.; Lattuada, A.; Buzzoni, R.; Rilke, F.; Banfi, A.

    1988-07-01

    This paper reports the 5-year results of a prospective randomized study beginning in 1976 on 177 evaluable patients with pathologic Stage I-IE and II-IIE non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with diffuse histology according to the Rappaport classification. Treatment consisted of either CVP or BACOP chemotherapy (3 cycles) followed by regional radiotherapy (40 to 50 Gy) and further cycles of either combination. In both arms, complete remission at the end of combined treatment was high (CVP 93%, BACOP 98%) regardless of age, stage or bulky disease. At 5 years, the comparative freedom from first progression was 62% for CVP vs 78% for BACOP (p = 0.02), respectively. Clinically relevant differences favoring BACOP chemotherapy were essentially documented in patients with large cell lymphomas (International Working Formulation), those with Stage II having more than three involved anatomical sites, bulky disease and age over 60 years. Recurrence within radiation fields was documented in only 5% of complete responders. Combined treatment was, in general, well tolerated particularly when BACOP was used. In only 2 patients given CVP post radiation cutaneous fibrosis was documented. Second solid tumors were detected in 4 patients. One patient started on CVP died because of brain stem necrosis after 45 Gy. We conclude that in Stage I-II patients with nodal and extranodal diffuse non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, particularly large cell lymphomas, combined modality approach with primary Adriamycin and bleomycin containing regimen, such as BACOP, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy offers high chances of cure with minimal toxicity.

  1. Empirical impact evaluation of the energy savings resulting from BPA's Stage II irrigation system retrofit program: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Tawil, J.W.; Lyke, A.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Edin, E.S.; Bailey, B.M.

    1987-07-01

    This report documents the results of an evaluation of the impacts on irrigation system energy consumption of conservation measures installed under the Bonneville Power Administration's Stage II retrofit program. Historical billing data and other farm records provided the basis for this evaluation. A number of different statistical techniques were used to estimate the actual energy savings resulting from the Stage II conservation measures. Results of the study reveal that the methodology used in predicting energy savings resulting from the Stage II program is accurate. The basis for energy savings predictions in the Stage II program are changes in brake horsepower, and, in this study, a 1% change in brake horsepower was found to result in slightly more than a 1% change in energy consumption. Overall, Stage II program conservation measures were found to reduce irrigation system energy use by an average of 34%. The average costs of obtaining these savings were 6 mills (.6 cents) per kWh saved.

  2. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald, E-mail: lescodan@crh1.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Selz, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Labib, Alain [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Bruant, Sarah [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie-Hopital Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Serum Hyaluronic Acid, FIBROSpect II, and YKL-40 for Discriminating Fibrosis Stages in Chronic Hepatitis C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Preeti Mehta; Robert Ploutz-Snyder; Jyotirmoy Nandi; Sekou R. Rawlins; Schuyler O. Sanderson; Robert A. Levine

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:Noninvasive serum markers of liver fibrosis are being used as an alternative to liver biopsy. Currently available tests distinguish, with accuracy, only absent\\/minimal fibrosis (Ishak stages 0–1) and advanced fibrosis\\/cirrhosis (Ishak stages 4–6), but not intermediate fibrosis (Ishak stages 2–3). Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of hyaluronic acid (HA), FIBROSpect II (FS-II), and YKL-40 (chondrex, human cartilage

  4. Stages I and II non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of Waldeyer's ring and the neck

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, J.S.; Fuller, L.M.; Butler, J.J.; Barton, J.H.; Robbins, K.T.; Velasquez, W.M.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1984-12-01

    In a previous communication results were reported for patients with localized extranodal presentations of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of the head and neck who were admitted between 1961-1969. This review describes the larger experience from 1947-1982 in treating 137 Stages I and II Waldeyer's ring patients whose slides were available for reclassification according to the modified Rappaport System. All of these patients were treated definitively as follows: radiotherapy only, 113 patients; radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy, 17 patients; chemotherapy only, seven patients. The overall 5-year survival was 50%. Significant differences were determined for specific subgroups. For patients staged after lymphangiography, the 5-year survival was 67% as compared with 32% for non-lymphangiogram staged patients. Stage (Ann Arbor) also influenced results. The 5-year survival figure for Stage I was 70% as compared with 42% for Stage II. The combination of extent of disease in Waldeyer's ring and the status of the neck had a major impact on survival. When the disease was staged according to the TNMAJCC System, the 5-year survivals were: 75% for T1-T2-TX N0; 53% for T1-T2-TX N+; 54% for T3-T4 N0; and 36% for T3-T4 N+. Also, results for tonsil (52%) and base of tongue (66%) disease were better than for disease involving the nasopharynx (39%) or multiple sites (25%). Treatment also influenced survivals and disease-free survivals. The best results were obtained in patients who were treated with radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy. The 5-year survival and disease-free survival figures were 78% and 69%, respectively.

  5. Dinosaur Census Reveals Abundant Tyrannosaurus and Rare Ontogenetic Stages in the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation (Maastrichtian), Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Horner, John R.; Goodwin, Mark B.; Myhrvold, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Background A dinosaur census recorded during the Hell Creek Project (1999–2009) incorporates multiple lines of evidence from geography, taphohistory, stratigraphy, phylogeny and ontogeny to investigate the relative abundance of large dinosaurs preserved in the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation of northeastern Montana, USA. Overall, the dinosaur skeletal assemblages in the Hell Creek Formation (excluding lag-influenced records) consist primarily of subadult or small adult size individuals. Small juveniles and large adults are both extremely rare, whereas subadult individuals are relatively common. We propose that mature individuals of at least some dinosaur taxa either lived in a separate geographic locale analogous to younger individuals inhabiting an upland environment where sedimentation rates were relatively less, or these taxa experienced high mortality before reaching terminal size where late stage and often extreme cranial morphology is expressed. Methodology/Principal Findings Tyrannosaurus skeletons are as abundant as Edmontosaurus, an herbivore, in the upper Hell Creek Formation and nearly twice as common in the lower third of the formation. Smaller, predatory dinosaurs (e.g., Troodon and dromaeosaurids) are primarily represented by teeth found in microvertebrate localities and their skeletons or identifiable lag specimens were conspicuously absent. This relative abundance suggests Tyrannosaurus was not a typical predator and likely benefited from much wider food choice opportunities than exclusively live prey and/or specific taxa. Tyrannosaurus adults may not have competed with Tyrannosaurus juveniles if the potential for selecting carrion increased with size during ontogeny. Conclusions/Significance Triceratops is the most common dinosaur and isolated skulls contribute to a significant portion of this census. Associated specimens of Triceratops consisting of both cranial and postcranial elements remain relatively rare. This rarity may be explained by a historical collecting bias influenced by facies and taphonomic factors. The limited discovery of postcranial elements may also depend on how extensive a fossil quarry is expanded after a skull is collected. PMID:21347420

  6. Vasomotor Effects of Transcutaneous CO2 in Stage II Peripheral Occlusive Arterial Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Etienne Savin; Olivier Bailliart; Philippe Bonnin; Mario Bedu; Jean Cheynel; Jean Coudert; Jean-Paul Martineaud

    1995-01-01

    Vasomotor effects of skin exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) have been described in normal subjects. It was of interest, therefore, to determine whether percutaneous CO2 is of therapeutic benefit. In a randomized, double-blind study, 10 patients with lower limb arteriopathy (stage II) were investigated before and after local exposure for twenty minutes to CO2-rich spa gas or to water-vapor-saturated air

  7. Lymphatic spread in stage Ib and II cervical carcinoma: Anatomy and surgical implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy Michel; Philippe Morice; Damienne Castaigne; Marc Leblanc; Annie Rey; Pierre Duvillard

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and topography of pelvic and para-aortic node involvement in cervical carcinoma and to identify the appropriate level for resection of the lymphatic chains.Methods: Between 1985 and 1994, 421 women with stage Ib or II cervical carcinoma were treated by surgery in combination with irradiation. Each underwent a radical hysterectomy with systematic pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy.Results:

  8. Interest of Pelvic and Paraaortic Lymphadenectomy in Patients with Stage IB and II Cervical Carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Morice; Damienne Castaigne; Patricia Pautier; Annie Rey; Christine Haie-Meder; Marc Leblanc; Pierre Duvillard

    1999-01-01

    Objectives.The objectives of this study were to evaluate the interest and the potential therapeutic value of systematic pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy in patients with stage Ib and II cervical carcinoma.Methods.This was a prospective study including 421 patients with cervical cancer treated, from 1985 to 1994, by combined radiation therapy and surgery with systematic pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy.Results.The overall rate of

  9. Ankle and Foot Kinematics Associated with Stage II PTTD During Stance

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Jeff R.; Neville, Christopher G.; Tome, Josh; Flemister, Adolph S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Subjects with stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) exhibit abnormal foot kinematics; however, how individual segment kinematics (hindfoot (HF) or first metatarsal (first MET) segments) influence global foot kinematics is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare foot and ankle kinematics and sagittal plane HF and first MET segment kinematics between stage II PTTD and controls. Materials and Methods Thirty patients with stage II PTTD and 15 healthy controls were evaluated. Kinematic data from the tibia, calcaneus, and first MET were collected during walking using three dimensional motion analysis techniques. A threesegment foot model (HF, calcaneus; first MET, first metatarsal, and tibia) was used to calculate relative angles (ankle, HF relative to tibia; midfoot, first MET relative to HF) and segment angles (HF and first MET relative to the global). A mixed effect ANOVA model was utilized to compare angles between groups for each variable. Results Patients with PTTD showed greater ankle plantarflexion (p = 0.02) by 6.8 degrees to 8.4 degrees prior to or at 74% of stance; greater HF eversion (p < 0.01) across stance (mean difference = 4.5 degrees); and greater first MET dorsiflexion (p < 0.01) across stance (mean difference = 8.8 degrees). HF and first MET segment angles revealed greater HF dorsiflexion (p = 0.01) during early stance and greater first MET dorsiflexion (p = 0.001) across stance. Conclusion Abnormal HF and first MET segment kinematics separately influence both ankle and midfoot movement during walking in subjects with stage II PTTD. Clinical Relevance These abnormal kinematics may serve as another measure of response to clinical treatment and/or guide for clinical strategies (exercise, orthotics, and surgery) seeking to improve foot kinematics. PMID:19486631

  10. Development of a Clinically Feasible Molecular Assay to Predict Recurrence of Stage II Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuqiu; Casey, Graham; Lavery, Ian C.; Zhang, Yi; Talantov, Dmitri; Martin-McGreevy, Michelle; Skacel, Marek; Manilich, Elena; Mazumder, Abhijit; Atkins, David; Delaney, Conor P.; Wang, Yixin

    2008-01-01

    The 5-year survival rate for patients with Stage II colon cancer is approximately 75%. However, there is no clinical test available to identify the 25% of patients at high risk of recurrence. We have previously identified a 23-gene signature that predicts individual risk for recurrence. The present study tested this gene signature in an independent group of 123 Stage II patients, and the 23-gene signature was highly informative in identifying patients with distant recurrence in both univariate (hazard ratio [HR] 2.51) and multivariate analyses (HR, 2.40). The composition of this representative patient group also allowed us to refine the 23-gene signature to a 7-gene signature that exhibited a similar prognostic power in both univariate (HR, 2.77) and multivariate analyses (HR, 2.87). Furthermore, we developed this prognostic signature into a clinically feasible test with real-time quantitative PCR using standard fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues. When a 110-patient cohort was evaluated with the PCR assay, the 7-gene signature, demonstrated to be a strong prognostic factor in both univariate (HR, 6.89) and multivariate analyses (HR, 14.2). These results clearly show the prognostic value of the predefined gene signature for Stage II colon cancer patients. The ability to identify colon cancer patients with an unfavorable outcome may help patients at high risk for recurrence to seek more aggressive therapy. PMID:18556775

  11. FISH COMMUNITIES IN LAKE IN SUBREGION 2B (UPPER PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN) IN RELATION TO LAKE ACIDITY: VOLUME II. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of fish community status were conducted in summer 1987 in 49 lakes in Subregion 20, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, as part of Phase II of the Eastern Lake Survey. Lake selection involved a variable probability sampling design. Fish communities were surveyed using gill n...

  12. Computer program for prediction of capture maneuver probability for an on-off reaction controlled upper stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauber, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program which computes the capture transient of a launch vehicle upper stage at the ignition and/or separation event is presented. It is for a single degree-of-freedom on-off reaction jet attitude control system. The Monte Carlo method is used to determine the statistical value of key parameters at the outcome of the event. Aerodynamic and booster induced disturbances, vehicle and control system characteristics, and initial conditions are treated as random variables. By appropriate selection of input data pitch, yaw and roll axes can be analyzed. Transient response of a single deterministic case can be computed. The program is currently set up on a CDC CYBER 175 computer system but is compatible with ANSI FORTRAN computer language. This routine has been used over the past fifteen (15) years for the SCOUT Launch Vehicle and has been run on RECOMP III, IBM 7090, IBM 360/370, CDC6600 and CDC CYBER 175 computers with little modification.

  13. The upper Tortonianlower Messinian at Monte dei Corvi (Northern Apennines, Italy): Completing a Mediterranean reference section for the Tortonian Stage

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    The upper Tortonian­lower Messinian at Monte dei Corvi (Northern Apennines, Italy): Completing Accepted 5 March 2009 Available online 23 April 2009 Editor: P. DeMenocal Keywords: Monte dei Corvi Miocene and cyclostratigraphy is presented for the upper Tortonian and lower Messinian (Upper Miocene) at Monte dei Corvi

  14. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Stage II-IV T-Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Exact two-stage designs for phase II activity trials with rank-based endpoints.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Gregory E; Shan, Guogen; Hutson, Alan D

    2012-03-01

    Features common to phase II clinical trials include limited knowledge of the experimental treatment being evaluated, design components reflecting ethical considerations, and small to moderate sample sizes as a result of resource constraints. It is for these reasons that there exist many two-stage designs proposed in the literature for use in this context. The majority of these designs are for binary endpoints and based on exact probability calculations, or are for continuous endpoints and rooted in asymptotic approximations to the null distribution. We present exact two-stage Mann-Whitney designs in the context of two-arm randomized clinical trials. In addition to describing the designs, we present tables of decision rules under a variety of assumed realities for use in trial planning. PMID:22074983

  16. Positron Emission Tomography Using Fluoromisonidazole F 18 and Fludeoxyglucose F 18 to Find Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  17. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I–II Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I) dose-escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II) the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation; and (III) the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife). Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low-dose rate brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL) outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After 5?years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I–II prostate cancer. PMID:25905037

  18. Cell kinetics: an independent prognostic variable in stage II melanoma of the skin.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, A.; Silvestrini, R.; Mezzanotte, G.; Vaglini, M.; Grignolio, E.; Clemente, C.; Cascinelli, N.

    1990-01-01

    The prognostic role of cell kinetics (expressed as 3H-thymidine labelling index, 3H-TdR LI) was assessed on 145 patients with pathologic stage II melanoma subjected only to therapeutic lymph node dissection. The 3H-TdR LI determined on metastatic nodes was related to relapse-free survival and to survival. In particular, 3-year relapse-free survival was significantly different from patients with slowly and rapidly proliferating melanomas (40% vs 22%, P = 0.007), and this finding was consistently found for overall survival (68% vs 46%, P = 0.007). Moreover, in patients with high 3H-TdR LI tumours, the risk of relapse and death within the first year from lymphadenectomy was two-fold that of patients with low 3H-TdR LI tumours. Multiple regression analysis showed that 3H-TdR LI retained its prognostic significance on relapse-free and on overall survival even when the number of involved nodes and type of nodal metastases were considered. Present findings suggest that 3H-TdR LI can contribute to select high-risk stage II melanoma patients. PMID:2245175

  19. The Upper Paleolithic of Northern Asia: Achievements, problems, and perspectives. II. Central and Eastern Siberia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vitality Larichev; Uriy Khol'ushkin; Inna Laricheva

    1990-01-01

    Earlier scholars believed that the Upper Paleolithic of Central and Eastern Siberia appeared very late. However, modern research has shown that not only was there a local Middle Paleolithic, but also there was a very early series of sites in Central Siberia which show both Middle and early Upper Paleolithic traits. These are called the Makarovo horizon and may be

  20. Experience of curing serious obstruction of advanced-stage upper digestive tract tumor using laser under endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Man-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Qiang; Zhang, Feng-Qiu; Kong, De-Jia; Tang, Li-Bin

    1998-11-01

    The patients who suffer from upper digestive tract tumor, such as cancer of esophagus, cancer of cardia, all have serious obstruction and fail to get nutrition and can not bear the strike of the radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In order to reduce the obstruction symptom and suffering of the patients and to prolong their life time, since 1989, our hospital used the laser to cure the upper digestive tract tumor 11 cases with serious obstruction and got remarkable curative effect.

  1. One-stage reconstruction of the entire upper lip and the columella with a modified bilateral nasolabial flap

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kai Johannes Lorenz; Heinz Maier

    2010-01-01

    The functional and cosmetic reconstruction of the upper lip after a subtotal defect is a highly demanding challenge, especially\\u000a when the columella is involved. In the majority of cases, the surgical techniques described in the literature are suitable\\u000a only for restoring the function and appearance of the upper lip but not for reconstructing adjacent areas. In this article,\\u000a we present

  2. Test Firing of the Saturn V S-II S (Second Stage) at the Mississippi Test Facility (MTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph shows a test firing of the the Saturn V S-II (second) stage at the Mississippi Test Facility's (MTF) S-II test stand. When the Saturn V booster stage (S-IC) burns out and drops away, power for the Saturn will be provided by the 82-foot-long and 33-foot-diameter S-II stage. Developed by the Space Division of North American Aviation under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the stage utilized five J-2 engines, each producing 200,000 pounds of thrust. The engine used liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen as its propellants. Static test of ground test versions of the S-II stage were conducted at North American Aviation's Santa Susana, California test site. All flight stages were tested at the Mississippi Test Facility, Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The MTF was renamed to the National Space Technology Laboratory (NSTL) in 1974 and later to the Sternis Space Center (SSC) in May 1988.

  3. Test Firing of the Saturn V S-II (Second) Stage at the Mississippi Test Facility (MTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph shows a test firing of the the Saturn V S-II (second) stage at the Mississippi Test Facility's (MTF) S-II test stand. When the Saturn V booster stage (S-IC) burns out and drops away, power for the Saturn will be provided by the 82-foot-long and 33-foot-diameter S-II stage. Developed by the Space Division of North American Aviation under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the stage utilized five J-2 engines, each producing 200,000 pounds of thrust. The engines used liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen as propellants. Static test of ground test versions of the S-II stage were conducted at North American Aviation's Santa Susana, California test site. All flight stages were tested at the Mississippi Test Facility, Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. MTF was renamed to the National Space Technology Laboratory (NSTL) in 1974 and later to the Sternis Space Center in May 1988.

  4. Physical workload in various types of work: Part II. Neck, shoulder and upper arm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gert-Åke Hansson; Istvan Balogh; Kerstina Ohlsson; Lothy Granqvist; Catarina Nordander; Inger Arvidsson; Ingrid Åkesson; Jeannette Unge; Ralf Rittner; Ulf Strömberg; Staffan Skerfving

    2010-01-01

    To explore the correlation between, and the variation in, various measures of exposure to potential risk factors for work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders (UE-WMSDs), physical workload was measured in 43 types of work (713 individuals), using inclinometry for the head and upper arms, and electromyography (EMG) for the trapezius muscles.Many exposure measures were highly correlated. Head flexion (90th percentile), extension

  5. The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of stage I-II diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Belinda A

    2013-09-01

    The role of radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of Stage I-II diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is controversial: consolidation RT improves local control, but does this translate into an overall survival benefit? The paucity of randomized clinical trials means that the debate surrounding the benefit of consolidation RT remains unresolved. To date, the published literature demonstrates that consolidation RT has dual advantages in patients stage I-II DLBCL: (1) to improve local control and progression-free survival, and (2) to spare additional cycles of chemotherapy in patient with favourable-risk disease. Critics of consolidation RT are often influenced by the profile of late toxicities that are associated with outdated RT techniques. In the current era of molecular-based targeted therapy and functional imaging, prospective randomized studies are required to answer this research question and to investigate risk-adapted treatment strategies for patients with stage I-II DLBCL. PMID:23901002

  6. Predictors of timing of adjuvant chemotherapy in older women with hormone receptor–negative, stages II–III breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie B. Wheeler; William R. Carpenter; Jeffrey Peppercorn; Anna P. Schenck; Morris Weinberger; Andrea K. Biddle

    Adherence to consensus guidelines for cancer care may vary widely across health care settings and contribute to differences\\u000a in cancer outcomes. For some women with breast cancer, omission of adjuvant chemotherapy or delays in its initiation may contribute\\u000a to differences in cancer recurrence and mortality. We studied adjuvant chemotherapy use among women with stage II or stage\\u000a III, hormone receptor–negative

  7. Effect of preoperative neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio on the surgical outcomes of stage II colon cancer patients who do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hsin-Yuan Hung; Jinn-Shiun Chen; Chien Yuh Yeh; Chung-Rong Changchien; Reiping Tang; Pao-Shiu Hsieh; Wen-Sy Tasi; Jeng-Fu You; Yau-Tong You; Chung-Wei Fan; Jeng-Yi Wang; Jy-Ming Chiang

    Background and aims  Selection of appropriate stage II colon cancer patients for adjuvant chemotherapy is critical for improving survival outcome.\\u000a With the aim of identifying more high risk factors for stage II colon cancer, this study aimed to determine whether the neutrophil–lymphocyte\\u000a ratio (NLR) is a predictor of surgical outcomes in patients with stage II colon cancer who do not receive

  8. Annual variations of water vapor in the stratosphere and upper troposphere observed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chiou, E. W.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Larsen, J. C.; Rind, D.; Oltmans, S.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II are presented, showing annual variations of water vapor in the stratosphere and the upper troposphere. The altitude-time cross sections of water vapor were found to exhibit annually repeatable patterns in both hemispheres, with a yearly minimum in water vapor appearing in both hemispheres at about the same time, supporting the concept of a common source for stratospheric dry air. A linear regression analysis was applied to the three-year data set to elucidate global values and variations of water vapor ratio.

  9. Video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy (VAT-T) with lateral thoracotomy for stage II and III thymoma.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kyoji; Ibi, Takayuki; Bessho, Ryuzo; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Thymoma has malignant potential and is the most common anterior mediastinal tumor. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which is less invasive surgical procedure, is a good option for resecting Masaoka stage I tumors. Whether VATS is appropriate, depends on the surgeon's judgment and accurate imaging diagnosis. We introduce a technique involving a combination of video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy (VAT-T) and lateral thoracotomy for stage II and some stage III thymomas that have locally invaded the lung and/or pericardium. PMID:22850091

  10. Computer program for prediction of fuel consumption statistical data for an upper stage three-axes stabilized on-off control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program and method to predict the reaction control fuel consumption statistics for a three axis stabilized rocket vehicle upper stage is described. A Monte Carlo approach is used which is more efficient by using closed form estimates of impulses. The effects of rocket motor thrust misalignment, static unbalance, aerodynamic disturbances, and deviations in trajectory, mass properties and control system characteristics are included. This routine can be applied to many types of on-off reaction controlled vehicles. The pseudorandom number generation and statistical analyses subroutines including the output histograms can be used for other Monte Carlo analyses problems.

  11. Aerodynamic Models for Hurricanes II. Model of the upper hurricane layer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arkady I. Leonov

    2008-01-01

    This second paper of the series (see the first one in [1]) models the dynamics and structure of upper hurricane layer in adiabatic approximation. Formulation of simplified aerodynamic model allows analytically express the radial istributions of pressure and wind speed components. The vertical evolution of these distributions and hurricane structure in the layer are described by a coupled set of

  12. Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 16171638 Upper circulation patterns in the Ulleung Basin

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    2005-01-01

    /East Sea between June 1999 and July 2001 are used to examine the upper temperature and current patterns-dimensional (x; y; p) time-series of daily, synoptically mapped current and temperature fields. During the two-year measurement period, at least five non-repeating persistent flow patterns are found. The patterns during

  13. Staging of Regional Nodes in AJCC Stage I and II Melanoma: 18FDG PET Imaging versus Sentinel Node Detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    FDG PET

    Primary Purpose. The staging of regional nodes by means of sentinel node detection has been shown to accu- rately detect subclinical nodal metastases from cutaneous melanoma. On the other hand, the oncological applications of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomog- raphy ( 18 FDG PET) are, nowadays, firmly established. However, the sensitivity of such metabolic imaging for stag- ing the regional

  14. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fowble, Barbara L., E-mail: bfowble@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Einck, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Kim, Danny N. [Athena Breast Health Network, Program Management Office, San Francisco, CA (United States); McCloskey, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mayadev, Jyoti [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yashar, Catheryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Chen, Steven L. [Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Hwang, E. Shelley [Department of Surgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having {<=}10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  15. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire [Department of Radiation Oncology, Val d'Aurelle Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Azria, David, E-mail: azria@valdorel.fnclcc.f [Department of Radiation Oncology, Val d'Aurelle Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); INSERM, U896, IRCM, Val d'Aurelle Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie [Biostatistics Unit, Val d'Aurelle Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard [Department of Surgical and Reconstructive Oncology, Val d'Aurelle Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal [Radiophysics Unit, Val d'Aurelle Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Dubois, Jean-Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Val d'Aurelle Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); INSERM, U896, IRCM, Val d'Aurelle Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France)

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  16. Geochemical make-up of oceanic peridotites from NW Turkey and the multi-stage melting history of the Tethyan upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, ?brahim; ?en, A. Dündar; Ersoy, E. Yalç?n; Dilek, Yildirim; Saka, Samet; Zaccarini, Federica; Escayola, Monica; Karsl?, Orhan

    2014-02-01

    We present the whole-rock and the mineral chemical data for upper mantle peridotites from the Harmanc?k region in NW Turkey and discuss their petrogenetic-tectonic origin. These peridotites are part of a Tethyan ophiolite belt occurring along the ?zmir-Ankara-Ercincan suture zone in northern Turkey, and include depleted lherzolites and refractory harzburgites. The Al2O3 contents in orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene from the depleted lherzolite are high, and the Cr-number in the coexisting spinel is low falling within the abyssal field. However, the orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene in the harzburgites have lower Al2O3 contents for a given Cr-number of spinel, and plot within the lower end of the abyssal field. The whole-rock geochemical and the mineral chemistry data imply that the Harmanc?k peridotites formed by different degrees of partial melting (~%10-27) of the mantle. The depleted lherzolite samples have higher MREE and HREE abundances than the harzburgitic peridotites, showing convex-downward patterns. These peridotites represent up to ~16 % melting residue that formed during the initial seafloor spreading stage of the Northern Neotethys. On the other hand, the more refractory harzburgites represent residues after ~4-11 % hydrous partial melting of the previously depleted MOR mantle, which was metasomatized by slab-derived fluids during the early stages of subduction. The Harmanc?k peridotites, hence, represent the fragments of upper mantle rocks that formed during different stages of the tectonic evolution of the Tethyan oceanic lithosphere in Northern Neotethys. We infer that the multi-stage melting history of the Harmanc?k peridotites reflect the geochemically heterogeneous character of the Tethyan oceanic lithosphere currently exposed along the ?zmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone.

  17. Efficacy of computed tomography of the thorax and upper abdomen and whole-body gallium scintigraphy for staging of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    MacMahon, H.; Scott, W.; Ryan, J.W.; Montner, S.M.; Little, A.G.; Hoffman, P.C.; Ferguson, M.K.; Golomb, H.M. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

    1989-10-01

    To assess the efficacy of performing both computed tomography (CT) of the thorax and upper abdomen and whole-body gallium scintigraphy for staging lung cancer, the results of each test were compared with those obtained by chest radiography and clinical examination in 100 patients. Clinical efficacy was defined in terms of accuracy in staging the tumor based either on surgery, biopsy, or clinical and radiologic follow-up. The CT provided significantly superior accuracy in 27 patients and minor additional staging information in 17 patients compared with the gallium scan. Whole-body gallium scintigraphy provided important additional information in nine patients and minor additional information in a further eight. The diagnostic yield of CT and gallium scanning was considered equivalent in 39 cases. Of the nine cases in which gallium was significantly superior to CT, clinical findings which suggested the presence of metastases had been noted before the scan in four cases. The authors' results confirm the utility of CT for staging lung cancer and indicate that the additional yield from gallium scintigraphy is relatively low provided a thorough history and physical examination have been performed.

  18. [Use of mucolytic preparations (Mucosolvan) in selected diseases of the upper respiratory tract. Part II].

    PubMed

    Szmeja, Z; Golusi?ski, W; Mielcarek-Kuchta, D; Laczkowska-Przybylska, J

    1997-01-01

    The majority of publications in the recent years emphasizes the importance of mucolytic preparations in the upper respiratory tract diseases. There have been very few report about the important role which mucolytic drugs may play in the diseases of the upper respiratory tract. This paper undertakes the task of attempting to evaluate the usefulness of Mucosolvan preparation in laryngological diseases. The main condition of the successful treatment of otolaryngological diseases is maintaining the efficient mechanism of the clearing of upper respiratory tract. This is achieved by means of the mucocilia apparatus, namely cilia and mucosa protecting the epithelium from harmful factors. Tests were carried out on 60 patients with paranasal sinuses and ear diseases. The first group comprised 45 patients who were qualified on the basis of inflammatory changes in paranasal sinuses. The second group comprised 12 children and 3 adults with otitis media with effusion. Mucosolvan which was used in the supplementary treatment fulfilled our expectations. The use of the mucolytic drug accelerated the healing process, proper regeneration of the epithelium and the reduction of the period of drug administration. PMID:9557050

  19. Prognostic Significance of Microvessel Density Determining by Endoglin in Stage II Rectal Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martinovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Drazen; Martinovic, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Background. The role of endoglin in the Dukes B rectal cancer is still unexplored. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of endoglin (CD105) in resected rectal cancer and to evaluate the relationship between microvessels density (MVD), clinicopathological factors, and survival rates. Methods. The study included 95 primary rectal adenocarcinomas, corresponding to 67 adjacent and 73 distant normal mucosa specimens from surgical resection samples. Tumor specimens were paraffin-embedded and immunohistochemical staining for the CD105 endothelial antigen was performed to count CD105-MVD. For exact measurement of the CD105-MVD used a computer-integrated system Alphelys Spot Browser 2 was used. Results. The intratumoral CD105-MVD was significantly higher compared with corresponding adjacent mucosa (P < 0.0001) and distant mucosa specimens (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the CD105-MVD according to patients age, gender, tumor location, grade of differentiation, histological type, depth of tumor invasion, and tumor size. The overall survival rate was significantly higher in the low CD105-MVD group of patients than in the high CD105-MVD group of patients (log-rank test, P = 0.0406). Conclusion. CD105-assessed MVD could help to identify patients with possibility of poor survival in the group of stage II RC.

  20. [Effect of PSK on recurrence of stage II/III gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Kubo, Naoshi; Amano, Ryosuke; Noda, Eiji; Yamada, Nobuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Sawada, Tetsuji; Ohira, Masaichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuro; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2010-11-01

    Protein-bound polysaccharide K (PSK) is derived from the CM-101 strain of the fungus Coriolus versicolor. Several clinical studies have demonstrated that PSK has antitumor properties. In Japan, PSK has been used as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic drug against gastric cancer. However, there is little evidence about the effectiveness of PSK in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of PSK on postoperative recurrence in patients with gastric cancer. The patients with Stage II/III gastric cancer who underwent a surgical curative resection between 1999 and 2008 at the Department of Surgical Oncology, Osaka City University were included in this retrospective study. All patients received oral fluorinated pyrimidine anti-metabolites with or without PSK after surgical operation. We analyzed clinicopathological features and evaluated the impact of PSK on postoperative recurrence. One hundred thirty eight patients received oral anti-metabolized alone (control group) and 116 patients received PSK (PSK group). No significant difference between control and PSK group in relapse free survival was detected. In PSK group, venous invasion was an independent factor for postoperative recurrence (p=0. 004, HR 1. 538, 95% CI 1. 152 to 2.054). Our results suggested that a population with venous infiltration of primary lesion should be at risk of recurrence after surgery even if PSK was administered as postoperative adjuvant therapy. PMID:21224540

  1. The benefit of microsatellite instability is attenuated by chemotherapy in stage II and stage III gastric cancer: Results from a large cohort with subgroup analyses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Choi, Yoon Young; An, Ji Yeong; Shin, Hyun Beak; Jo, Ara; Choi, Hyeji; Seo, Sang Hyuk; Bang, Hui-Jae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-08-15

    We previously reported that the prognosis of microsatellite instability high (MSI-H) gastric cancer is similar to that of MSI-low/microsatellite stable (MSI-L/MSS) gastric cancer. The reason for this seemed to be related to the effects of chemotherapy. To verify this hypothesis, we expanded the study population and reanalyzed the prognosis of MSI-H gastric cancer. Data from 1,276 patients with Stage II and III gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy with curative intent between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. The prognosis of MSI-H tumors in comparison with MSI-L/MSS tumors was analyzed, according to the administration of chemotherapy and other clinicopathologic features. A total of 361 (28.3%) patients did not receive chemotherapy (MSI-H?=?47 and MSI-L/MSS?=?314), whereas 915 (71.7%) patients did receive chemotherapy (MSI-H?=?58 and MSI-L/MSS?=?857). The hazard ratio of MSI-H versus MSI-L/MSS was 0.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.94, p?=?0.031) when chemotherapy was not received and 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 0.78-1.71, p?=?0.466) when chemotherapy was received. In subgroup analyses, the prognosis of MSI-H was better in Stage III, women, with lymph node metastasis, and undifferentiated histology subgroups when chemotherapy was not received. However, in patients treated with chemotherapy, prognosis was worse for MSI-H tumors in Stage III, undifferentiated histology, and diffuse type subgroups of gastric cancer. In conclusion, MSI-H tumors were associated with a good prognosis in Stage II and III gastric cancer when patients were treated by surgery alone, and the benefits of MSI-H status were attenuated by chemotherapy. PMID:25614197

  2. Aerodynamic Models for Hurricanes II. Model of the upper hurricane layer

    E-print Network

    Leonov, Arkady I

    2008-01-01

    This second paper of the series (see the first one in [1]) models the dynamics and structure of upper hurricane layer in adiabatic approximation. Formulation of simplified aerodynamic model allows analytically express the radial istributions of pressure and wind speed components. The vertical evolution of these distributions and hurricane structure in the layer are described by a coupled set of equations for the vertical mass flux and vertical momentum balance, averaged over the eye wall cross section. Several realistic predictions of the model are demonstrated, including the change of directions for the component of radial wind speed and angular velocity of hurricane with altitude.

  3. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  4. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-22

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  5. Winter water relations of New England conifers and factors influencing their upper elevational limits. II. Modeling.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Richard L; Vostral, Chandra B; Friedland, Andrew J

    2002-08-01

    We used the water relations model, WINWAT, to model winter water relations of three conifer species-eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.), eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and red pine (P. resinosa Ait.)-growing at their upper elevational limits on Mt. Ascutney, Vermont, USA, in the winters of 1997 and 1999. Modeled relative water contents remained above 60% in the two youngest foliar age classes of all three species during both winters, indicating that desiccation stress in winter is not responsible for setting the upper elevational limits of these species at this site under present climatic conditions. WINWAT indicated that winter water relations of these low-elevational species were sensitive to low relative humidity, which increased transpiration rates, and low temperatures, which inhibited recharge, but are much less sensitive to summer climate than in the case of subalpine conifers in Colorado. Our results indicate that summer and winter temperatures and relative humidities (or precipitation/potential evapotranspiration ratios) should be incorporated into climate change models designed to simulate future tree distributions. PMID:12184984

  6. Non-muscle myosin II takes centre stage in cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Ma, Xuefei; Adelstein, Robert S.; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2010-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II (NM II) is an actin-binding protein that has actin cross-linking and contractile properties and is regulated by the phosphorylation of its light and heavy chains. The three mammalian NM II isoforms have both overlapping and unique properties. Owing to its position downstream of convergent signalling pathways, NM II is central in the control of cell adhesion, cell migration and tissue architecture. Recent insight into the role of NM II in these processes has been gained from loss-of-function and mutant approaches, methods that quantitatively measure actin and adhesion dynamics and the discovery of NM II mutations that cause monogenic diseases. PMID:19851336

  7. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Spacelab 2 Upper Atmospheric Modification Experiment over Arecibo. II - Plasma dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Swartz, W. E.; Kelly, M. C.; Sulzer, M. P.; Noble, S. T.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experiment performed on Spacelab 2 over Arecibo to study the neutral gas dynamics of supersonic flows in a rarefield atmosphere and to modify the plasma density by releasing chemically reactive vapors. Exhaust vapor was released at an altitude of 317 km, where the plasma density was 300,000/cu cm. Observations were made with high resolution incoherent scatter radar. A localized depletion formed in the ionosphere. The depletion fell and eventually disappeared within the bottomside F-region ionosphere. The dynamics of the evolution of the depletion are discussed. Optical and radar data are compared, setting an upper limit of 3 percent for the branching ratio to produce O(D-1) from dissociative recombination of CO(2+) and electrons.

  9. Ellerman Bombs at high resolution: II. Visibility, triggering and effect on upper atmosphere

    E-print Network

    Vissers, Gregal J M; Rutten, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    We use high-resolution imaging spectroscopy with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) to study the transient brightenings of the wings of the Balmer Halpha line in emerging active regions that are called Ellerman bombs. Simultaneous sampling of Ca II 854.2 nm with the SST confirms that most Ellerman bombs occur also in the wings of this line, but with markedly different morphology. Simultaneous images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) show that Ellerman bombs are also detectable in the photospheric 170 nm continuum, again with differing morphology. They are also observable in 160 nm SDO images, but with much contamination from C IV emission in transition-region features. Simultaneous SST spectropolarimetry in Fe I 630.1 nm shows that Ellerman bombs occur at sites of strong-field magnetic flux cancelation between small bipolar strong-field patches that rapidly move together over the solar surface. Simultaneous SDO images in He II 30.4 nm, Fe IX 17.1 nm, and Fe XIV 21.1 nm show no clear effect of the E...

  10. ELLERMAN BOMBS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. II. TRIGGERING, VISIBILITY, AND EFFECT ON UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Vissers, Gregal J. M.; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc H. M.; Rutten, Robert J., E-mail: g.j.m.vissers@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-09-01

    We use high-resolution imaging spectroscopy with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) to study the transient brightenings of the wings of the Balmer H{alpha} line in emerging active regions that are called Ellerman bombs. Simultaneous sampling of Ca II 8542 A with the SST confirms that most Ellerman bombs also occur in the wings of this line, but with markedly different morphology. Simultaneous images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) show that Ellerman bombs are also detectable in the photospheric 1700 A continuum, again with differing morphology. They are also observable in 1600 A SDO images, but with much contamination from C IV emission in transition-region features. Simultaneous SST spectropolarimetry in Fe I 6301 A shows that Ellerman bombs occur at sites of strong-field magnetic flux cancellation between small bipolar strong-field patches that rapidly move together over the solar surface. Simultaneous SDO images in He II 304 A, Fe IX 171 A, and Fe XIV 211 A show no clear effect of the Ellerman bombs on the overlying transition region and corona. These results strengthen our earlier suggestion, based on H{alpha} morphology alone, that the Ellerman bomb phenomenon is a purely photospheric reconnection phenomenon.

  11. Impact of Diabetes Status and Medication on Presentation, Treatment, and Outcome of Stage II Colon Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Susie; Wong, Hui-Li; Tie, Jeanne; Desai, Jayesh; Field, Kathryn; Kosmider, Suzanne; Fourlanos, Spiros; Jones, Ian; Skinner, Iain; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for colorectal cancer and several reports suggest worse cancer-specific outcomes in diabetes patients. Recent studies in multiple tumour types indicate metformin may positively impact on cancer-specific and overall survival. A population-based series of stage II colorectal cancer patients treated and followed from 2000 to 2013 were analysed for baseline characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. 1116 patients with stage II colon cancer were identified, 55.5% were male and median age was 70.9 years (range 20.5–101.2). The diabetes patients (21.6%, n = 241) were older than nondiabetes patients (median 74.0 versus 69.6, p = 0.0001). There was no impact of diabetes on cancer presentation or pathology. Diabetes patients were less likely to receive adjuvant treatment (13.7 versus 24.8%, p = 0.002) but were equally likely to complete treatment (69.7 versus 67.7%, p = 1.00). Diabetes did not significantly impact cancer recurrence (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.71–1.63) or overall survival (HR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.88–1.72), adjusted for age. Diabetes medication did not impact cancer recurrence or survival. Cancer presentation and outcomes in diabetes patients are comparable to those of nondiabetes patients in those with stage II colon cancer. The effect of metformin merits further evaluation in patients with colon cancer.

  12. Evaluation of the dosimetric impact of applying flattening filter-free beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage upper thoracic carcinoma of oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Zhixiong; Yang, Zhining; Fang, Weisheng; Lai, Peibo; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Vincent WC

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flattening filter-free (FFF) radiation beams have recently become clinically available on modern linear accelerators in radiation therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric impact of using FFF beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer. Methods Eleven patients with primary stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer were recruited. For each patient, two IMRT plans were computed using conventional beams (Con-P) and FFF beams (FFF-P), respectively. Both plans employed a five-beam arrangement and were prescribed with 64 Gy to (planning target volume) PTV1 and 54 Gy to PTV2 in 32 fractions using 6 MV photons. The dose parameters of the target volumes and organs at risks (OARs), and treatment parameters including the monitor units (MU) and treatment time (TT) for Con-P and FFF-P were recorded and compared. Results The mean D5 of PTV1 and PTV2 were higher in FFF-P than Con-P by 0.4 Gy and 0.3 Gy, respectively. For the OARs, all the dose parameters did not show significant difference between the two plans except the mean V5 and V10 of the lung in which the FFF-P was lower (46.7% vs. 47.3% and 39.1% vs. 39.6%, respectively). FFF-P required 54% more MU but 18.4% less irradiation time when compared to Con-P. Conclusion The target volume and OARs dose distributions between the two plans were comparable. However, FFF-P was more effective in sparing the lung from low dose and reduced the mean TT compared with Con-P. Long-term clinical studies are suggested to evaluate the radiobiological effects of FFF beams.

  13. Seismic wavefield calculation for laterally heterogeneous earth models-II. The influence of upper mantle heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumura, M.; Kennett, B. L. N.; Furumura, T.

    1999-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that the Earth's mantle is laterally heterogeneous on a broad range of scales, but the character of smaller-scale heterogeneity has to be deduced indirectly. The aim of the present paper is to examine the influence of a variety of stochastic representations of heterogeneity on seismic wave behaviour to help constrain the nature of the variations in seismic properties in the upper mantle. For each of the models, the seismic wavefield is simulated using a pseudospectral method in a 2-D cylindrical coordinate system. The presence of stochastic heterogeneity is particularly important for those parts of the seismic wavefield where a significant portion of the propagation path in the upper mantle is close to horizontal, such as the PP and SS phases, and fundamental-mode and higher-mode surface waves. The effects are noticeable traveltime anomalies and waveform changes for the body waves (particularly associated with phase triplications), and significant phase shifts for Rayleigh waves. A variety of styles of stochastic heterogeneity models are compared for the same source and station configurations using wavefield snapshots and the character of the calculated seismograms. The influence of heterogeneity on body waves and on longer-period Rayleigh waves increases as the scale length increases compared to the wavelength of the seismic waves. The aspect ratio of the heterogeneity has a pronounced effect on the coherence and amplitude of traveltime fluctuations and waveform changes across stations at the surface, which depend on the structures encountered along the propagation paths to the specific receivers. The effect of nearly isotropic heterogeneity is to induce small, short-scale variations in traveltime fluctuations and waveform changes. As the heterogeneity becomes more `plate-like' the fluctuations are on a broader scale and of larger amplitude because the individual patches of heterogeneity have a stronger influence. The effects of broad-scale and stochastic heterogeneity are compared for a model built from a slice through a tomographic model derived from delay-time inversion for the Himalayan region. As would be expected the influence of the deterministic heterogeneity derived from the tomography study has the result of introducing systematic traveltime variations for body waves and noticeable phase shifts for surface waves when compared with the results for the background reference model. The addition of a moderate level of small-scale stochastic heterogeneity, which could not be resolved in the tomography study, has a limited effect on the seismic wavefield at longer periods but is much more significant for periods of less than 4 s when the heterogeneity scale is of the order of 40 km.

  14. Expression and prognostic significance of TAp73 and ?Np73 in FIGO stage I-II cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, WEIPEI; PAN, XIAOHONG; YANG, ZHUJUAN; XING, PENGFEI; ZHANG, YONGSHEN; LI, FENG; LU, XUEGUAN

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the expression of TAp73 and ?Np73 in cervical squamous cancer cells, and to evaluate the prognostic significance of TAp73 and ?Np73 expression in patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage I-II cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The immunohistochemical expression of TAp73 and ?Np73 was evaluated in 59 FIGO stage I-II cervical SCC tumor samples. Correlations with clinicopathological characteristics were determined by ?2 test. The prognostic impact of TAp73 and ?Np73 expression with regard to overall survival (OS) was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. High TAp73 and ?Np73 expression was detected in 79.7% (47/59) and 76.3% (45/59) of patients, respectively. The expression of TAp73 and ?Np73 was not associated with age, FIGO stage, pathological differentiation or lymph node metastasis. The 3-year OS rates associated with low and high TAp73 expression were 75.0 and 83.0%, respectively (?2=0.33; P=0.568), whereas those associated with low and high ?Np73 expression were 100.0 and 75.6%, respectively (?2=3.90; P=0.048). High expression levels of TAp73 and ?Np73 were frequently observed in the cervical squamous cancer cells. Overall, high expression levels of ?Np73 may indicate an unfavorable prognosis in patients with early-stage cervical SCC.

  15. Unraveling hominin behavior at another anthropogenic site from Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania): new archaeological and taphonomic research at BK, Upper Bed II

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Domínguez-Rodrigo; A. Mabulla; H. T. Bunn; R. Barba; F. Diez-Martín; C. P. Egeland; E. Espílez; A. Egeland; J. Yravedra; P. Sánchez

    2009-01-01

    New archaeological excavations and research at BK, Upper Bed II (Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania) have yielded a rich and unbiased collection of fossil bones. These new excavations show that BK is a stratified deposit formed in a riverine setting close to an alluvial plain. The present taphonomic study reveals the second-largest collection of hominin-modified bones from Olduvai, with abundant cut marks

  16. Angiotensin II receptors: Localization of type I and type II in rat epididymides of different developmental stages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. S. Leung; H. C. Chan; L. X. M. Fu; P. Y. Leung; S. B. C. Chew; P. Y. D. Wong

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have provided evidence for the existence of a local reninangiotensin system in the rat\\u000a epididymis. Evidence has also accumulated, indicating that locally formed angiotensin II from the rat epididymis may play\\u000a a paracrine and\\/or autocrine role in regulating epididymal electrolyte and fluid transport. In the present study, specific\\u000a antipeptide antibodies against the second extracellular loops

  17. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-20

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  18. 78 FR 28776 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Kentucky; Stage II Requirements for Enterprise...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ...II Requirements for Enterprise Holdings, Inc. at Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky International...purpose of exempting Enterprise Holdings, Inc., facility from the Clean Air Act (CAA...requirements. The Enterprise Holdings, Inc., facility is currently being...

  19. The Modelling of Intermediate Age Stellar Populations. II. Average spectra for upper AGB stars, and their use

    E-print Network

    A. Lancon; M. Mouhcine

    2002-06-14

    The upper Asymptotic Giant Branch is populated with oxygen rich and carbon rich Long Period Variables. These stars are essential contributors to the near-IR light of intermediate age stellar populations. Individual observed spectra of LPVs are so diverse that they cannot be used directly in the synthesis of galaxy spectra. In this paper, the library of individual spectra of Lancon and Wood (2000) is used to construct averages that can be incorporated conveniently in population synthesis work. The connection between such spectra and stellar evolution tracks is discussed [...]. For instance, we address: (i) the bolometric corrections and temperature scales needed to associate a spectrum with a given point on a theoretical stellar evolution track (or isochrone), (ii) the simplifying assumptions that will be implicitely made when using the average spectra, (iii) potential biases in the sample of Lan\\c{c}on & Wood and their effects, (iv) the small contribution of LPVs to the interstellar hydrogen emission lines in galaxies. It is emphasized that an a posteriori calibration of the effective temperature scale remains necessary, until consistent models for the evolution, the pulsation and the spectral appearance of LPVs become available.

  20. Efficacy of Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil Therapy for Patients with EMAST-Positive Stage II/III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamaya, Yasushi; Guarinos, Carla; Tseng-Rogenski, Stephanie S.; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Das, Ritabrata; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni; Llor, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Carethers, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated Microsatellite Alterations at Selected Tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) is a genetic signature found in up to 60% of colorectal cancers (CRCs) that is caused by somatic dysfunction of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein hMSH3. We have previously shown in vitro that recognition of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) within DNA and subsequent cytotoxicity was most effective when both hMutS? (hMSH2-hMSH6 heterodimer) and hMutS? (hMSH2-hMSH3 heterodimer) MMR complexes were present, compared to hMutS? > hMutS? alone. We tested if patients with EMAST CRCs (hMutS? defective) had diminished response to adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, paralleling in vitro findings. We analyzed 230 patients with stage II/III sporadic colorectal cancers for which we had 5-FU treatment and survival data. Archival DNA was analyzed for EMAST (>2 of 5 markers mutated among UT5037, D8S321, D9S242, D20S82, D20S85 tetranucleotide loci). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and multivariate analysis was used to determine contribution to risk. We identified 102 (44%) EMAST cancers. Ninety-four patients (41%) received adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, and median follow-up for all patients was 51 months. Patients with EMAST CRCs demonstrated improved survival with adjuvant 5FU to the same extent as patients with non-EMAST CRCs (P<0.05). We observed no difference in survival between patients with stage II/III EMAST and non-EMAST cancers (P = 0.36). There is improved survival for stage II/III CRC patients after adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy regardless of EMAST status. The loss of contribution of hMSH3 for 5-FU cytotoxicity may not adversely affect patient outcome, contrasting patients whose tumors completely lack DNA MMR function (MSI-H). PMID:25996601

  1. Deciphering tectonic, climatic-induced and hydrothermal signals in the late-stage exhumation history of the upper Rhône valley (Swiss Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, Pierre; Rahn, Meinert; Shuster, David; van der Beek, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Neogene exhumation of the European Alps is understood as the interplay between tectonics and climatic-induced erosion. While the former has been influenced by a decrease in plate convergence, the latter has been suggested to be affected by climatic variation and the onset of Plio-Quaternary glaciations, leading to relief amplification. However, even though geomorphologic and sedimentologic studies both suggest topographic relief change and transition from fluvial to oscillations between glacial/fluvial conditions, precise quantification on both the timing and magnitude of this transition are yet sparse. Our study focuses on the upper Rhône valley (Swiss Central Alps) within the Visp-Brig area (Aar massif). This area encompasses some of the most spectacular reliefs within the Alps with several nearby summits around or above 4000 m crosscut by the glacially overdeepened Rhône valley. It also shows among the highest late Neogene exhumation rates within the Western-Central European Alps, influenced by tectonic activity along the major Simplon-Rhône extensional fault system. Moreover, the upper Rhône valley has experienced enhanced glacial erosion associated with strong relief development during the Pliocene-Quaternary period. Finally, structural inheritance, late-stage tectonics and rapid exhumation may have promoted recent hydrothermal activity in this region, although timing of its onset and its precise causes remain poorly understood. We investigated the late-stage cooling history by using different low-temperature thermochronometers along a pseudo-vertical bedrock profile (elevation between 600 and 2900 m) and additional samples from an on-site 500-m geothermal well, resulting in a total elevation difference of nearly 3 km. Apatite fission-track (AFT) ages and track-length data have been added to previously published and new apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He (AHe) and 4He/3He data. Our results confirm high-exhumation rates (0.6 to 0.9 km/Myr) within late-Cenozoic to Pliocene times. Combined with AFT data from the literature, our age pattern reveals no exhumation difference across the Simplon fault system during the last 6-8 Ma, suggesting only strike-slip detachment activity of the structure during that period. Thermal modelling using HeFTy confirms rapid exhumation and evidences a late-stage cooling contrast between high-elevation and valley-bottom/geothermal well samples, in agreement with previous 4He/3He data. This late-stage exhumation is associated to the onset of major Alpine glaciation triggering the Rhône valley carving at ~1 Ma. Apatite track length measurements suggest that the well samples have been affected by recent hydrothermal activity. This agrees well with the present-day observation of high geothermal activity below the Rhône valley floor, whose origin has been primarily linked to structural inheritance (Simplon-Rhône extensional fault system). Our thermochronology data helps to put constrain on the onset timing of this geothermal activity, which we propose to be concordant with the onset of major alpine glaciations, glacial erosion and bedrock-fracture development promoting localized fluid circulation and hydrothermal activity below the Rhône valley floor.

  2. Clinical and biological characteristics of clear cell carcinomas of the ovary in FIGO stages I-II.

    PubMed

    Skírnisdóttir, Ingirídur; Seidal, Tomas; Karlsson, Mats G; Sorbe, Bengt

    2005-01-01

    Clear cell carcinoma of the ovary is considered to be a specific subtype among the epithelial ovarian malignancies. To characterize clear cell carcinomas in early FIGO stages (I-II) with regard to clinical and biological properties, a retrospective study was performed to compare these tumors with other histological subtypes. From a complete series of 226 patients with epithelial ovarian carcinomas in FIGO stages I-II, 28 patients with clear cell carcinomas were selected and the clinical and biological characteristics of these tumors were compared with the remaining non-clear cell carcinomas. All patients underwent primary staging laparotomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The apoptosis regulators p53, bcl-2 and bax, and the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER-2/neu were analyzed by immunohistochemical techniques and DNA analysis was performed by flow cytometry. Clear cell carcinomas stained negative for p53 significantly more often than other histological subtypes. Positive EGFR staining was seen more frequently in serous carcinomas than in the clear cell carcinomas. Aneuploid DNA status was seen more frequently in clear cell carcinomas than in other histological subtypes and tetraploid tumors made up 50% of the non-diploid tumors. Clear cell tumors were frequently (64%) found in FIGO stages IC and IIC and this was more common than for non-clear cell tumors. No difference was found in the rate of tumor recurrences or survival for patients with clear cell and non-clear cell carcinomas. Clear cell carcinomas of the ovary should be regarded as a separate entity among the epithelial ovarian carcinomas and they differ with regard to both clinical and biological characteristics when compared with non-clear cell tumors. PMID:15586238

  3. Intralesional administration of L19-IL2/L19-TNF in stage III or stage IVM1a melanoma patients: results of a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Riccardo; Patuzzo, Roberto; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Gallino, Gianfranco; Maurichi, Andrea; Di Florio, Annabella; Cutaia, Ornella; Lazzeri, Andrea; Fazio, Carolina; Miracco, Clelia; Giovannoni, Leonardo; Elia, Giuliano; Neri, Dario; Maio, Michele; Santinami, Mario

    2015-08-01

    The intratumoral injection of cytokines, in particular IL2, has shown promise for cutaneous melanoma patients with unresectable disease or continuous recurrence despite surgery. We recently reported that the intralesional injection of L19-IL2, an immunocytokine combining IL2 and the human monoclonal antibody fragment L19, resulted in efficient regional control of disease progression, increased time to distant metastasis and evidence of effect on circulating immune cell populations. We have also shown in preclinical models of cancer a remarkable synergistic effect of the combination of L19-IL2 with L19-TNF, a second clinical-stage immunocytokine, based on the same L19 antibody fused to TNF. Here, we describe the results of a phase II clinical trial based on the intralesional administration of L19-IL2 and L19-TNF in patients with stage IIIC and IVM1a metastatic melanoma, who were not candidate to surgery. In 20 efficacy-evaluable patients, 32 melanoma lesions exhibited complete responses upon intralesional administration of the two products, with mild side effects mainly limited to injection site reactions. Importantly, we observed complete responses in 7/13 (53.8 %) non-injected lesions (4 cutaneous, 3 lymph nodes), indicating a systemic activity of the intralesional immunostimulatory treatment. The intralesional administration of L19-IL2 and L19-TNF represents a simple and effective method for the local control of inoperable melanoma lesions, with a potential to eradicate them or make them suitable for a facile surgical removal of the residual mass. PMID:25971540

  4. Is adjuvant radiotherapy in early stages (FIGO I-II) of epithelial ovarian cancer a treatment of the past?

    PubMed

    Skirnisdottir, Ingiridur; Nordqvist, Sarah; Sorbe, Bengt

    2005-08-01

    External abdomino-pelvic irradiation after primary surgery in early stages of epithelial ovarian carcinoma has been used as adjuvant therapy. The aims of this study were to evaluate efficacy and tolerability of abdomino-pelvic radiotherapy in ovarian carcinomas and to find predictive factors for recurrent disease. From January 1979 to December 1993, 215 patients with FIGO stage IA-IIC epithelial ovarian carcinoma were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Whole-abdominal irradiation or lower abdomino-pelvic irradiation were used. The dose of specification was 20 Gy to the upper part of the abdominal cavity and 40 Gy to the lower part of the abdomen and the pelvic region. Primary cure was achieved in 210 patients (98%). During the period of follow-up, 79 tumor recurrences (38%) were recorded. Abdomino-pelvic metastases were most frequent (22%). The overall 5-year and 10-year survival rate for the complete series was 60 and 41%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, FIGO-stage, histopathological type and tumor grade were independent prognostic factors with recurrent-free survival as the end-point. Among the histopathological subtypes, the highest survival rate (80%) was found for the subgroup of 24 patients with clear cell carcinomas. Early radiation reactions of any type were noted in 85% of the cases. The incidence of severe late bowel toxicity was 12% and, in 11 patients (5%), surgery was necessary due to late radiation complications of the intestine. In conclusion, adjuvant abdomino-pelvic radiotherapy is a treatment option in early stages of ovarian carcinoma together with chemotherapy. However, further studies are needed to find the subgroup of patients who specifically might benefit from radiotherapy in this setting. PMID:16012740

  5. Correlates of benefit finding in men treated for stage I or II prostate cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jose A. Sandoval

    2005-01-01

    The present study used hierarchical linear modeling to examine correlates of benefit finding at study entry and individuals trajectories of benefit finding over time among men treated for early stage prostate cancer (n = 261). Correlates associated with benefit finding at study entry included intrinsic religiosity, perceived social support, perceived present control, approach coping, use of emotional support, avoidant coping,

  6. Use of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire and Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II in neurodevelopmental follow-up of extremely low birth weight infants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B J Woodward; L-A Papile; J R Lowe; V L Laadt; M L Shaffer; R Montman; K L Watterberg

    2011-01-01

    Objective:For infants born with extremely low birth weight (ELBW), we examined the (1) correlation between results on the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) and the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II) at 18 to 22 months corrected age; (2) degree to which earlier ASQ assessments predict later BSID-II results; (3) impact of ASQ use on follow-up study return rates.Study Design:ASQ

  7. Reducing sample sizes in two-stage phase II cancer trials by using continuous tumour shrinkage end-points.

    PubMed

    Wason, James M S; Mander, Adrian P; Eisen, Tim G

    2011-05-01

    Reducing the number of patients required for a clinical trial is important for shortening development time. Phase II cancer trials assess the tumour-shrinking effect of a novel compound through a binary end-point formed from the percentage change in total lesion diameter. We compare single-arm two-stage designs which use the binary end-point to those which directly use the continuous end-point. Using the continuous end-point results in lower expected and maximum sample sizes. For larger trials the reduction is around 37%. This assumes that the dichotomisation point of the continuous end-point is chosen to give the best sample size, with the trial design using the binary end-point performing even worse otherwise. We consider a previous trial designed using a Simon two-stage design and show that if the continuous end-point had been used, the expected and maximum sample sizes of the trial would be reduced by around 50%. Using the continuous end-point in a two-stage cancer trial results in large sample size reductions. The methods discussed in this paper work best when the number of complete responses is low, as is true in several types of cancer. We discuss what could be done if this is not the case. PMID:21239164

  8. Influence of oceanographic processes on the early life stages of the blue shrimp ( Litopenaeus stylirostris) in the Upper Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon-Aguilera, L. E.; Marinone, S. G.; Aragón-Noriega, E. A.

    2003-02-01

    The possible relationship between circulation patterns and the recruitment of early stages of penaeid shrimp in the Upper Gulf of California was explored by collecting postlarvae (mesh size 0.505 mm) simultaneously in two locations, one off the coast of Sonora (Golfo de Santa Clara: 31°44'49?N-114°33'12?W) and the other off the Baja California peninsula (San Felipe: 31°11'8.3? N-114°53'13.9?W) during two complete fortnightly cycles (July 12-27, 1995 and June 30-July 16, 1996). Individuals with cephalothoracic length from 0.8 to 3.91 mm without a clear size-increasing pattern were found throughout the sampling period, suggesting continuous recruitment to the area. The circulation in the study area was simulated with a three-dimensional baroclinic model forced with tides and climatological hydrography at the mouth of the Gulf of California, and winds and heat and freshwater fluxes at the sea-air interface. Spawning stock surveys have shown that maximum concentration of mature females is near the coast of Sonora (mainland Mexico). The model predicts surface currents of about 8 cm s -1 and suggests that postlarvae found off the coast of the peninsula may come from a different reproductive unit than those found off the mainland coast. This may explain why postlarvae found in Golfo de Santa Clara (mainland) are larger (and, presumably, older) than those found in San Felipe (Baja California). Possible relationships among circulation patterns, lunar cycle, former Colorado River runoffs and time of spawning are discussed.

  9. Vestibular side effects in the orbital stage of Skylab II and III missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II; Homick, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    None of the six astronauts were motion sick when tested (on or after Mission Day 8) in the workshop under experimental conditions which elicited motion sickness preflight and postflight. Skylab III but not Skylab II astronauts experienced motion sickness under operational conditions aloft. There were individual differences in the severity of the symptoms and susceptibility to motion sickness persisted for three to five days. The discussion centers around the reasons for the greater susceptibility to motion sickness under operational than experimental conditions aloft and the implication of Skylab findings for future manned space missions.

  10. Battleship tank firing test of H-II launch vehicle - First stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Atsutaro; Endo, Mamoru; Yamazaki, Isao; Maemura, Takashi; Namikawa, Tatsuo

    1991-06-01

    The H-II launch vehicle capable of placing 2-ton-class payloads on geostationary orbits is outlined, and focus is placed on its propulsion system. The development status of the project, including component development, preliminary battleship tank firing test (BFT-1), battleship tank firing test (BFT-2), and flight-type tank firing test (CFT) is discussed. The configuration and schematic diagram of BFT-2 are presented, and the firing test results of BFT-2 first series are analyzed, including engine performance, interface compatibility, and pressurization of subsystems.

  11. The influence of micrometastases on prognosis and survival in stage I-II colon cancer patients: the Enroute? Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The presence of lymph node metastases remains the most reliable prognostic predictor and the gold indicator for adjuvant treatment in colon cancer (CC). In spite of a potentially curative resection, 20 to 30% of CC patients testing negative for lymph node metastases (i.e. pN0) will subsequently develop locoregional and/or systemic metastases within 5 years. The presence of occult nodal isolated tumor cells (ITCs) and/or micrometastases (MMs) at the time of resection predisposes CC patients to high risk for disease recurrence. These pN0micro+ patients harbouring occult micrometastases may benefit from adjuvant treatment. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the subset of pN0 patients with micrometastases (pN0micro+) and evaluate the benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy in pN0micro+ CC patients. Methods/design EnRoute+ is an open label, multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial. All CC patients (age above 18 years) without synchronous locoregional lymph node and/or systemic metastases (clinical stage I-II disease) and operated upon with curative intent are eligible for inclusion. All resected specimens of patients are subject to an ex vivo sentinel lymph node mapping procedure (SLNM) following curative resection. The investigation for micrometastases in pN0 patients is done by extended serial sectioning and immunohistochemistry for pan-cytokeratin in sentinel lymph nodes which are tumour negative upon standard pathological examination. Patients with ITC/MM-positive sentinel lymph nodes (pN0micro+) are randomized for adjuvant chemotherapy following the CAPOX treatment scheme or observation. The primary endpoint is 3-year disease free survival (DFS). Discussion The EnRoute+ study is designed to improve prognosis in high-risk stage I/II pN0 micro+ CC patients by reducing disease recurrence by adjuvant chemotherapy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01097265 PMID:21569373

  12. Pathologic Factors Associated with Prognosis after Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II/III Microsatellite-Unstable Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ho; Bae, Jeong Mo; Oh, Hyeon Jeong; Lee, Hye Seung; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although there are controversies regarding the benefit of fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with microsatellite instability–high (MSI-H) colorectal cancer (CRC), the pathologic features affecting postchemotherapeutic prognosis in these patients have not been fully identified yet. Methods: A total of 26 histopathologic and immunohistochemical factors were comprehensively evaluated in 125 stage II or III MSI-H CRC patients who underwent curative resection followed by fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy. We statistically analyzed the associations of these factors with disease-free survival (DFS). Results: Using a Kaplan- Meier analysis with log-rank test, we determined that ulceroinfiltrative gross type (p=.003), pT4 (p<.001), pN2 (p=.002), perineural invasion (p=.001), absence of peritumoral lymphoid reaction (p=.041), signet ring cell component (p=.006), and cribriform comedo component (p=.004) were significantly associated with worse DFS in patients receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy (n=45). By contrast, pT4 (p<.001) and tumor budding-positivity (p=.032) were significant predictors of poor survival in patients receiving non-oxaliplatin–based adjuvant chemotherapy (n=80). In Cox proportional hazards regression model-based univariate and multivariate analyses, pT category (pT1-3 vs pT4) was the only significant prognostic factor in patients receiving non-oxaliplatin–based adjuvant chemotherapy, whereas pT category, signet ring cell histology and cribriform comedo histology remained independent prognostic factors in patients receiving oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions: pT4 status is the most significant pathologic determinant of poor outcome after fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II/III MSI-H CRC.

  13. Long-term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic vs open surgery for stages II and III rectal cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen-Xu; Zhao, Li-Ying; Lin, Tian; Liu, Hao; Deng, Hai-Jun; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Yan, Jun; Li, Guo-Xin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the 5-year survival after laparoscopic surgery vs open surgery for stages II and III rectal cancer. METHODS: This study enrolled 406 consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for stages II and III rectal cancer between January 2000 and December 2009 [laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR), n = 152; open rectal resection (ORR), n = 254]. Clinical characteristics, operative outcomes, pathological outcomes, postoperative recovery, and 5-year survival outcomes were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Most of the clinical characteristics were similar except age (59 years vs 55 years, P = 0.033) between the LRR group and ORR group. The proportion of anterior resection was higher in the LRR group than that in the ORR group (81.6% vs 66.1%, P = 0.001). The LRR group had less estimated blood loss (50 mL vs 200 mL, P < 0.001) and a lower rate of blood transfusion (4.6% vs 11.8%, P = 0.019) compared to the ORR group. The pathological outcomes of the two groups were comparable. The LRR group was associated with faster recovery of bowel function (2.8 d vs 3.7 d, P < 0.001) and shorter postoperative hospital stay (11.7 d vs 13.7 d, P < 0.001). The median follow-up time was 63 mo in the LRR group and 65 mo in the ORR group. As for the survival outcomes, the 5-year local recurrence rate (16.0% vs 16.4%, P = 0.753), 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate (63.0% vs 63.1%, P = 0.589), and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate (68.1% vs 63.5%, P = 0.682) were comparable between the LRR group and the ORR group. Stage by stage, there were also no statistical differences between the LRR group and the ORR group in terms of the 5-year local recurrence rate (stage II: 6.3% vs 8.7%, P = 0.623; stage III: 26.4% vs 23.2%, P = 0.747), 5-year DFS rate (stage II: 77.5% vs 77.6%, P = 0.462; stage III: 46.5% vs 50.9%, P = 0.738), and 5-year OS rate (stage II: 81.4% vs 74.3%, P = 0.242; stage III: 53.9% vs 54.1%, P = 0.459). CONCLUSION: LRR for stages II and III rectal cancer can yield comparable long-term survival while achieving short-term benefits compared to open surgery. PMID:25987773

  14. Genes associated with metabolic syndrome predict disease-free survival in stage II colorectal cancer patients. A novel link between metabolic dysregulation and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Ramos, Ricardo; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B; Reglero, Guillermo; Feliu, Jaime; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2014-12-01

    Studies have recently suggested that metabolic syndrome and its components increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Both diseases are increasing in most countries, and the genetic association between them has not been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to assess the association between genetic risk factors of metabolic syndrome or related conditions (obesity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes mellitus type 2) and clinical outcome in stage II colorectal cancer patients. Expression levels of several genes related to metabolic syndrome and associated alterations were analysed by real-time qPCR in two equivalent but independent sets of stage II colorectal cancer patients. Using logistic regression models and cross-validation analysis with all tumour samples, we developed a metabolic syndrome-related gene expression profile to predict clinical outcome in stage II colorectal cancer patients. The results showed that a gene expression profile constituted by genes previously related to metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with clinical outcome of stage II colorectal cancer patients. This metabolic profile was able to identify patients with a low risk and high risk of relapse. Its predictive value was validated using an independent set of stage II colorectal cancer patients. The identification of a set of genes related to metabolic syndrome that predict survival in intermediate-stage colorectal cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy and avoid the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low risk. Our results also confirm the linkage between metabolic disorder and colorectal cancer and suggest the potential for cancer prevention and/or treatment by targeting these genes. PMID:25001263

  15. Prognostic impact of clinicopathologic parameters in stage II\\/III breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant docetaxel and doxorubicin chemotherapy: paradoxical features of the triple negative breast cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bhumsuk Keam; Seock-Ah Im; Hee-Jun Kim; Do-Youn Oh; Jee Hyun Kim; Se-Hoon Lee; Eui Kyu Chie; Wonshik Han; Dong-Wan Kim; Woo Kyung Moon; Tae-You Kim; In Ae Park; Dong-Young Noh; Dae Seog Heo; Sung Whan Ha; Yung-Jue Bang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prognostic factors in locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy differ from those of early breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical significance of potential predictive and prognostic factors in breast cancer patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy. METHODS: A total of 145 stage II and III breast cancer patients received neoadjuvant docetaxel\\/doxorubicin chemotherapy

  16. Stage II/III rectal cancer with intermediate response to preoperative radiochemotherapy: Do we have indications for individual risk stratification?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is very heterogeneous. Pathologic complete response (pCR) is accompanied by a favorable outcome. However, most patients show incomplete response. The aim of this investigation was to find indications for risk stratification in the group of intermediate responders to RCT. Methods From a prospective database of 496 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, 107 patients with stage II/III cancers and intermediate response to preoperative 5-FU based RCT (ypT2/3 and TRG 2/3), treated within the German Rectal Cancer Trials were studied. Surgical treatment comprised curative (R0) total mesorectal excision (TME) in all cases. In 95 patients available for statistical analyses, residual transmural infiltration of the mesorectal compartment, nodal involvement and histolologic tumor grading were investigated for their prognostic impact on disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Residual tumor transgression into the mesorectal compartment (ypT3) did not influence DFS and OS rates (p = 0.619, p = 0.602, respectively). Nodal involvement after preoperative RCT (ypN1/2) turned out to be a valid prognostic factor with decreased DFS and OS (p = 0.0463, p = 0.0236, respectively). Persistent tumor infiltration of the mesorectum (ypT3) and histologic tumor grading of residual tumor cell clusters were strongly correlated with lymph node metastases after neoadjuvant treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions Advanced transmural tumor invasion after RCT does not affect prognosis when curative (R0) resection is achievable. Residual nodal status is the most important predictor of individual outcome in intermediate responders to preoperative RCT. Furthermore, ypT stage and tumor grading turn out to be additional auxiliary factors. Future clinical trials for risk-adapted adjuvant therapy should be based on a synopsis of clinicopathologic parameters. PMID:20388220

  17. Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part II: Assessing the ECMWF Humidity Analysis

    E-print Network

    Lombardi, John R.

    ), the authors introduced a data source--Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft of upper- tropospheric humidity (UTH) variation. A comparison of moisture flux divergence is conducted of the interannual variation of UTWV during the 1997/98 ENSO event as an illustration that UTWV variations are more

  18. Phase II trial of docetaxel in Asian patients with inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Goh, B C; Lehnert, M; Lim, H L; Ng, A W; Chan, C C; Kong, H L; Lee, S C; Wee, J; Chua, E T; Wong, J E

    2000-01-01

    Docetaxel has a response rate of greater than 30% in first-line treatment of Western patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The goal of this open-label. phase II study was to evaluate the activity and safety profile of docetaxel in Asian patients with inoperable untreated stage III NSCLC. Docetaxel was given at 100 mg/m2 as a 1-h infusion every 3 weeks. Prophylactic dexamethasone was given to reduce hypersensitivity reactions and edema. Thirty-five patients were enrolled in the study. The response rate was 34% (95% CI, 19%-50%) according to intent-to-treat analysis. No complete response was observed. Twenty-four patients (69%) had grade 3 or 4 neutropenia in cycle 1, and febrile neutropenia was seen in 12 patients. Six patients (17%) experienced mild fluid retention. Docetaxel is an active agent in first-line treatment of Asian patients with locally advanced NSCLC, with the main toxicity being neutropenia. Fluid retention was a minor problem in this study. PMID:10859016

  19. Activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway correlates with prognosis in stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malinowsky, K; Nitsche, U; Janssen, K-P; Bader, F G; Späth, C; Drecoll, E; Keller, G; Höfler, H; Slotta-Huspenina, J; Becker, K-F

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with UICC/AJCC stage II colon cancer have a high 5-year overall survival rate after surgery. Nevertheless, a significant subgroup of patients develops tumour recurrence. Currently, there are no clinically established biomarkers available to identify this patient group. We applied reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA) for phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase pathway activation mapping to stratify patients according to their risk of tumour recurrence after surgery. Methods: Full-length proteins were extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 118 patients who underwent curative resection. RPPA technology was used to analyse expression and/or phosphorylation levels of six major factors of the phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase pathway. Oncogenic mutations of KRAS and BRAF, and DNA microsatellite status, currently discussed as prognostic markers, were analysed in parallel. Results: Expression of phospho-AKT (HR=3.52; P=0.032), S6RP (HR=6.3; P=0.044), and phospho-4E-BP1 (HR=4.12; P=0.011) were prognostic factors for disease-free survival. None of the molecular genetic alterations were significantly associated with prognosis. Conclusions: Our data indicate that activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway evidenced on the protein level might be a valuable prognostic marker to stratify patients for their risk of tumour recurrence. Beside adjuvant chemotherapy targeting of upregulated PI3K/AKT signalling may be an attractive strategy for treatment of high-risk patients. PMID:24619078

  20. Outcomes and Effect of Radiotherapy in Patients With Stage I or II Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ballonoff, Ari [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)], E-mail: ari.ballonoff@uchsc.edu; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Schwer, Amanda; McCammon, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Bassetti, Michael; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To assess disease-specific survival (DSS), overall survival (OS), and the effect of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Patients and Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for all patients diagnosed with Stage I, IE, II, or IIE DLBCL between 1988 and 2004. The analyzable data included gender, age, race, stage, presence of extranodal disease, and RT administration. Patients who had died or were lost to follow-up within 6 months of diagnosis were excluded. Results: A total of 13,420 patients met the search criteria. Of these, 5,547 (41%) had received RT and 7,873 (59%) had not. RT was associated with a significant DSS (hazard ratio, 0.82, p <0.0001) and OS benefit that persisted during the 15 years of follow-up. Elderly patients, defined either as those >60 or >70 years old, had significantly improved DSS and OS associated with RT. On multivariate analysis, RT was significantly associated with increased DSS and OS. The 5-year DSS outcomes were highly variable among patient subsets, defined by age, stage, and extranodal disease (range for RT-treated patients, 70% for Stage II, age >60 years to 87% for Stage I, age {<=}60 years). Conclusion: This analysis presents the largest detailed data set of Stage I-II DLBCL patients. The results of our study have demonstrated that RT is associated with a survival advantage in patients with localized DLBCL, a benefit that extends to elderly patients. Outcomes for discrete patient subsets varied greatly. The development of tailored therapy according to the relapse risk is warranted, rather than uniform treatment of all early-stage DLBCL.

  1. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel or Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine With or Without Bevacizumab as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV or Recurrent Stage I Epithelial Ovarian or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Borderline Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  2. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... uterus and colon. An inset shows cancer cells floating in the peritoneal fluid surrounding abdominal organs. Also ... broken open, or (c) cancer cells are found floating in the peritoneal fluid surrounding ab

  3. The effect of postoperative radiotherapy on the feasibility of optimal dose adjuvant CMF chemotheraphy in stage II breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkes, A.; Brufman, G.; Rizel, S.; Weshler, Z.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of a number of variables upon the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy given to 87 patients with Stage II breast carcinoma was retrospectively analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF). Drugs were given in optimal doses (85% or more of the planned dose) to 17% of the patients; in intermediate doses (66 to 84% of the planned dose) to 50% of the patients; and in low doses (65% or less of the planned dose) to 33% of the patients. Myelosuppression was the main reason for giving intermediate or low doses. At a median follow-up of three years, 84% of all patients remain alive. Radiation therapy preceding chemotherapy was given to 70% of the patients, concomitant irradation and chemotherapy to 15%, and 13 patients (15%) received chemotheapy only. Of the 14 patients who received optimal doses of CMF, 12 (86%) also received radiation therapy. Disease-free survival at three years is similar for irradiated and nonirradiated patients, but the latter have a higher incidence of local recurrence (5% vs. 15%), although the difference is not statistically significant. Delay in the intiation of chemotherapy, mostly because of the administration of postoperative irradiation, adversely affected the probability and duration of disease-free survival, particulararly in premenopausal women in whom chemotherapy was started within more than 90 days of mastectomy. The administration of optimal doses of adjuvant chemotherapy should follow the primary treatment to the breast tumor as closely as possible. If radiation therapy is indicated as well, it should be delivered concomitantly with chemotherapy, given the feasibility of administering both modalities simultaneously, as demonstrated in this study.

  4. Stratifying risk of recurrence in stage II colorectal cancer using deregulated stromal and epithelial microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Marc D.; Pickard, Karen; Mitter, Richard; Sayan, A. Emre; Primrose, John N.; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A.; Thomas, Gareth J.; Packham, Graham K.; Mirnezami, Alex H.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) enable colonic epithelial cells to acquire malignant characteristics and metastatic capabilities. Recently, cancer relevant miRNAs deregulated during disease progression have also been identified in tumor-associated stroma. By combining laser-microdissection (LMD) with high-throughput screening and high-sensitivity quantitation techniques, miRNA expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens and paired normal colonic tissue was independently characterized in stromal and epithelial tissue compartments. Notably, deregulation of the key oncogene miR-21 was identified exclusively as a stromal phenomenon and miR-106a, an epithelial phenomenon in the malignant state. MiRNAs identified in this study successfully distinguished CRC from normal tissue and metastatic from non-metastatic tumor specimens. Furthermore, in a separate cohort of 50 consecutive patients with CRC, stromal miR-21 and miR-556 and epithelial miR-106a expression predicted short disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in stage II disease: miR-21 (DFS: HR = 2.68, p = 0.015; OS: HR = 2.47, p = 0.029); miR-556 (DFS: HR = 2.60, p = 0.018); miR-106a (DFS: HR = 2.91, p = 0.008; OS: HR = 2.25, p = 0.049); combined (All High vs. All Low. DFS: HR = 5.83, p = 0.002; OS: HR = 4.13, p = 0.007). These data support the notion that stromal as well as epithelial miRNAs play important roles during disease progression, and that mapping patterns of deregulated gene expression to the appropriate tumor strata may be a valuable aid to therapeutic decision making in CRC. PMID:25788261

  5. Stratigraphy and stage boundaries in reference sections of the Upper Cretaceous Chalk in the east of the Paris Basin: the “Craie 700” Provins boreholes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francis Robaszynski; Bernard Pomerol; Edwige Masure; Jean-Pierre Bellier; Jean-François Deconinck

    2005-01-01

    The Provins boreholes (Poigny: Craie 701, and Sainte-Colombe: Craie 702) drilled in 1999 as part of the “Craie 700” project initiated by the Paris Basin Geologists' Association provide reference sections for the Upper Cretaceous of the eastern part of the Paris Basin. The lithology of the Cretaceous drilled at Poigny and Sainte-Colombe is presented in two logs displaying major litho-events

  6. Acceleration of type 2 spicules in the solar chromosphere. II. Viscous braking and upper bounds on coronal energy input

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Michael L., E-mail: mgoodman@wvhtf.org [Advanced Technologies Group, West Virginia High Technology Consortium Foundation, 1000 Galliher Drive, Fairmont, WV 26554 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    A magnetohydrodynamic model is used to determine conditions under which the Lorentz force accelerates plasma to type 2 spicule speeds in the chromosphere. The model generalizes a previous model to include a more realistic pre-spicule state, and the vertical viscous force. Two cases of acceleration under upper chromospheric conditions are considered. The magnetic field strength for these cases is ?12.5 and 25 G. Plasma is accelerated to terminal vertical speeds of 66 and 78 km s{sup –1} in 100 s, compared with 124 and 397 km s{sup –1} for the case of zero viscosity. The flows are localized within horizontal diameters ?80 and 50 km. The total thermal energy generated by viscous dissipation is ?10 times larger than that due to Joule dissipation, but the magnitude of the total cooling due to rarefaction is ? this energy. Compressive heating dominates during the early phase of acceleration. The maximum energy injected into the corona by type 2 spicules, defined as the energy flux in the upper chromosphere, may largely balance total coronal energy losses in quiet regions, possibly also in coronal holes, but not in active regions. It is proposed that magnetic flux emergence in intergranular regions drives type 2 spicules.

  7. XUV exposed, non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets II: Hydrogen coronae and ion escape

    E-print Network

    Kislyakova, K G; Holmström, M; Panchenko, M; Odert, P; Erkaev, N V; Leitzinger, M; Khodachenko, M L; Kulikov, Yu N; Güdel, M; Hanslmeier, A

    2012-01-01

    The interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star such as GJ 436 and hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of an Earth-like planet and a "super-Earth" with the radius of 2 R_Earth and a mass of 10 M_Earth, located within the habitable zone at ~0.24 AU are studied. The formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influence of such factors as the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause) and the heating efficiency on the evolution of the hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres is investigated. XUV fluxes which are 1, 10, 50 and 100 times higher compared to that of the present Sun are considered and the formation of the high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions have been modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with the planetary hydrogen atoms and photoionization leads to the production of initially cold io...

  8. Comparison of NEXRAD Stage III and MPE precipitation products with constraints from high quality and density of raingauge networks in the Upper Guadalupe River Basin, Central Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Xie; X. Wang

    2006-01-01

    NEXRAD's Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) product replaced the Stage III product started in October 2003 at the West Gulf River Forecast Center (WGRFC) where includes most of the Texas and New Mexico. The MPE is an integrated product of rain gauge, NEXRAD, and satellite (GOES) precipitation estimates. The main objective of MPE is to reduce both areal-mean bias error and

  9. Anemia and long-term outcome in adjuvant and neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy of stage II and III rectal adenocarcinoma: The Freiburg experience (1989-2002)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Weissenberger; Michael Geissler; Florian Otto; Annette Barke; Karl Henne; Georg von Plehn; Alex Rein; Christine Müller; Susanne Bartelt; Michael Henke

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term outcome of standard 5-FU based adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and to identify the predictive factors, especially anemia before and after radiotherapy as well as hemoglobin increase or decrease during radiotherapy. METHODS: Two hundred and eighty-six patients with Union International Contre Cancer (UICC) stage II and III rectal adenocarcinomas, who underwent resection by conventional surgical techniques

  10. Specific activity of cyclin-dependent kinase I is a new potential predictor of tumour recurrence in stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeestraten, E C M; Maak, M; Shibayama, M; Schuster, T; Nitsche, U; Matsushima, T; Nakayama, S; Gohda, K; Friess, H; van de Velde, C J H; Ishihara, H; Rosenberg, R; Kuppen, P J K; Janssen, K-P

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are no established biomarkers to identify tumour recurrence in stage II colon cancer. As shown previously, the enzymatic activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2 (CDK1 and CDK2) predicts outcome in breast cancer. Therefore, we investigated whether CDK activity identifies tumour recurrence in colon cancer. Methods: In all, 254 patients with completely resected (R0) UICC stage II colon cancer were analysed retrospectively from two independent cohorts from Munich (Germany) and Leiden (Netherlands). None of the patients received adjuvant treatment. Development of distant metastasis was observed in 27 patients (median follow-up: 86 months). Protein expression and activity of CDKs were measured on fresh-frozen tumour samples. Results: Specific activity (SA) of CDK1 (CDK1SA), but not CDK2, significantly predicted distant metastasis (concordance index=0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.55–0.79, P=0.036). Cutoff derivation by maximum log-rank statistics yielded a threshold of CDK1SA at 11 (SA units, P=0.029). Accordingly, 59% of patients were classified as high-risk (CDK1SA ?11). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed CDK1SA as independent prognostic variable (hazard ratio=6.2, 95% CI: 1.44–26.9, P=0.012). Moreover, CKD1SA was significantly elevated in microsatellite-stable tumours. Conclusion: Specific activity of CDK1 is a promising biomarker for metastasis risk in stage II colon cancer. PMID:22108518

  11. Motor impairments related to brain injury timing in early hemiparesis Part II: abnormal upper extremity joint torque synergies

    PubMed Central

    Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J.; Dewald, Julius P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Extensive neuromotor development occurs early in human life, and the timing of brain injury may affect the resulting motor impairment. In part I of this paper series it was demonstrated that the distribution of weakness in the upper extremity depended on the timing of brain injury in individuals with childhood-onset hemiparesis. Objective The goal of this study was to characterize how timing of brain injury impacts joint torque synergies, or losses of independent joint control. Method Twenty-four individuals with hemiparesis were divided into three groups based on the timing of their injury: before birth (PRE-natal, n=8), around the time of birth (PERI-natal, n=8) and after 6 months of age (POST-natal, n=8). Individuals with hemiparesis, as well as 8 typically developing peers participated in maximal isometric shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger torque generation tasks while their efforts were recorded by a multiple degree-of-freedom load cell. Motor output in 4 joints of the upper extremity were concurrently measured during 8 primary torque generation tasks to quantify joint torque synergies. Results There were a number of significant coupling patterns identified in individuals with hemiparesis that differed from the typically developing group. POST-natal differences were most noted in the coupling of shoulder abductors with elbow, wrist, and finger flexors, while the PRE-natal group demonstrated significant distal joint coupling with elbow flexion. Conclusion The torque synergies measured provide indirect evidence for the use of bulbospinal pathways in the POST-natal group, while those with earlier injury may utilize relatively preserved ipsilateral corticospinal motor pathways. PMID:23911972

  12. Bevacizumab, Cisplatin, Radiation Therapy, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage III, Stage IVA, or Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  13. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  14. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images. II. Flow fields in the final stages of sunspot decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Deng, N.; Liu, C.; Shimizu, T.; Wang, H.; Denker, C.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Generation and dissipation of magnetic fields is a fundamental physical process on the Sun. In comparison to flux emergence and the initial stages of sunspot formation, the demise of sunspots still lacks a comprehensive description. Aims: The evolution of sunspots is most commonly discussed in terms of their intensity and magnetic field. Here, we present additional information about the three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of sunspots towards the end of their existence. Methods: We present a subset of multi-wavelengths observations obtained with the Japanese Hinode mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain during the time period 2010 November 18-23. Horizontal proper motions were derived from G-band and Ca ii H images, whereas line-of-sight velocities were extracted from VTT echelle H? ?656.28 nm spectra and Fe i ?630.25 nm spectral data of the Hinode/Spectro-Polarimeter, which also provided three-dimensional magnetic field information. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO provided continuum images and line-of-sight magnetograms, in addition to the high-resolution observations for the entire disk passage of the active region. Results: We perform a quantitative study of photospheric and chromospheric flow fields in and around decaying sunspots. In one of the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 11126, we observe moat flow and moving magnetic features (MMFs), even after its penumbra had decayed. We also detect a superpenumbral structure around this pore. We find that MMFs follow well-defined, radial paths from the spot all the way to the border of a supergranular cell surrounding the spot. In contrast, flux emergence near the other sunspot prevents the establishment of similar well ordered flow patterns, which could be discerned around a tiny pore of merely 2 Mm diameter. After the disappearance of the sunspots/pores, a coherent patch of abnormal granulation remained at their location, which was characterized by more uniform horizontal proper motions, low divergence values, and smaller photospheric Doppler velocities. This region, thus, differs significantly from granulation and other areas covered by G-band bright points. We conclude that this peculiar flow pattern is a signature of sunspot decay and the dispersal of magnetic flux.

  15. RKIP phosphorylation and STAT3 activation is inhibited by oxaliplatin and camptothecin and are associated with poor prognosis in stage II colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A major obstacle in treating colorectal cancer (CRC) is the acquired resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. An important protein in the regulation of cancer cell death and clinical outcome is Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP). In contrast, activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a protein that promotes tumor cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis and has an important role in cancer progression in many of cancer types. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regulation of RKIP and STAT3 after treatment with clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents (camptothecin (CPT) and oxaliplatin (OXP)) and the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in HCT116 colon cancer cells as well as evaluate the association between RKIP and STAT3 with clinical outcome of Stage II colon cancer patients. Methods HCT-116 colon cancer cells were treated with CPT, OXP, and IL-6 separately or in combination in a time and dose-dependent manner and examined for phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated RKIP and STAT3 via Western blot analysis. STAT3 transcriptional activity was measured via a luciferase reporter assay in HCT116 cells treated with CPT, IL-6 or transfected with JAK 1, 2 separately or in combination. We extended these observations and determined STAT3 and RKIP/ pRKIP in tumor microarrays (TMA) in stage II colon cancer patients. Results We demonstrate IL-6-mediated activation of STAT3 occurs in conjunction with the phosphorylation of RKIP in vitro in human colon cancer cells. OXP and CPT block IL-6 mediated STAT3 activation and RKIP phosphorylation via the inhibition of the interaction of STAT3 with gp130. We determined that STAT3 and nuclear pRKIP are significantly associated with poor patient prognosis in stage II colon cancer patients. Conclusions In the analysis of tumor samples from stage II colon cancer patients and the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116, pRKIP and STAT3, 2 proteins potentially involved in the resistance to conventional treatments were detected. The phosphorylation of pRKIP and STAT3 are induced by the cytokine IL-6 and suppressed by the chemotherapeutic drugs CPT and OXP. Therefore, these results suggest that STAT3 and pRKIP may serve as prognostic biomarkers in stage II colon cancer patients and may improve chemotherapy. PMID:24098947

  16. Illuminating heterogeneous anisotropic upper mantle: testing a new anisotropic teleseismic body-wave tomography code - part II: Inversion mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munzarova, Helena; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Kissling, Edi

    2015-04-01

    Considering only isotropic wave propagation and neglecting anisotropy in teleseismic tomography studies is a simplification obviously incongruous with current understanding of the mantle-lithosphere plate dynamics. Furthermore, in solely isotropic high-resolution tomography results, potentially significant artefacts (i.e., amplitude and/or geometry distortions of 3D velocity heterogeneities) may result from such neglect. Therefore, we have undertaken to develop a code for anisotropic teleseismic tomography (AniTomo), which will allow us to invert the relative P-wave travel time residuals simultaneously for coupled isotropic-anisotropic P-wave velocity models of the upper mantle. To accomplish that, we have modified frequently-used isotropic teleseismic tomography code Telinv (e.g., Weiland et al., JGR, 1995; Lippitsch, JGR, 2003; Karousova et al., GJI, 2013). Apart from isotropic velocity heterogeneities, a weak hexagonal anisotropy is assumed as well to be responsible for the observed P-wave travel-time residuals. Moreover, no limitations to orientation of the symmetry axis are prescribed in the code. We allow a search for anisotropy oriented generally in 3D, which represents a unique approach among recent trials that otherwise incorporate only azimuthal anisotopy into the body-wave tomography. The presented code for retrieving anisotropy in 3D thus enables its direct applications to datasets from tectonically diverse regions. In this contribution, we outline the theoretical background of the AniTomo anisotropic tomography code. We parameterize the mantle lithosphere and asthenosphere with an orthogonal grid of nodes with various values of isotropic velocities, as well as of strength and orientation of anisotropy in 3D, which is defined by azimuth and inclination of either fast or slow symmetry axis of the hexagonal approximation of the media. Careful testing of the new code on synthetics, concentrating on code functionality, strength and weaknesses, is a necessary step before AniTomo is applied to real datasets. We examine various aspects coming along with anisotropic tomography such as setting a starting anisotropic model and parameters controlling the inversion, and particularly influence of a ray coverage on resolvability of individual anisotropic parameters. Synthetic testing also allows investigation of the well-known trade-off between effects of P-wave anisotropy and isotropic heterogeneities. Therefore, the target synthetic models are designed to represent schematically different heterogeneous anisotropic structures of the upper mantle. Testing inversion mode of the AniTomo code, considering an azimuthally quasi-equal distribution of rays and teleseismic P-wave incidences, shows that a separation of seismic anisotropy and isotropic velocity heterogeneities is plausible and that the correct orientation of the symmetry axes in a model can be found within three iterations for well-tuned damping factors.

  17. Differential prognostic significance of extralobar and intralobar nodal metastases in patients with surgically resected stage II non–small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haney, John C.; Hanna, Jennifer M.; Berry, Mark F.; Harpole, David H.; D’Amico, Thomas A.; Tong, Betty C.; Onaitis, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine the prognostic significance of extralobar nodal metastases versus intralobar nodal metastases in patients with lung cancer and pathologic stage N1 disease. Methods A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained lung resection database identified 230 patients with pathologic stage II, N1 non–small cell lung cancer from 1997 to 2011. The surgical pathology reports were reviewed to identify the involved N1 stations. The outcome variables included recurrence and death. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the R statistical software package. Results A total of 122 patients had extralobar nodal metastases (level 10 or 11); 108 patients were identified with intralobar nodal disease (levels 12–14). The median follow-up was 111 months. The baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. No significant differences were noted in the surgical approach, anatomic resections performed, or adjuvant therapy rates between the 2 groups. Overall, 80 patients developed recurrence during follow-up: 33 (30%) of 108 in the intralobar and 47 (38%) of 122 in the extralobar cohort. The median overall survival was 46.9 months for the intralobar cohort and 24.4 months for the extralobar cohort (P<.001). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model that included the presence of extralobar nodal disease, age, tumor size, tumor histologic type, and number of positive lymph nodes, extralobar nodal disease independently predicted both recurrence-free and overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.36–2.81; P = .001). Conclusions In patients who underwent surgical resection for stage II non–small cell lung cancer, the presence of extralobar nodal metastases at level 10 or 11 predicted significantly poorer outcomes than did nodal metastases at stations 12 to 14. This finding has prognostic importance and implications for adjuvant therapy and surveillance strategies for patients within the heterogeneous stage II (N1) category. PMID:24507984

  18. Aberrant expression of the glycolytic enzymes aldolase B and type II hexokinase in hepatocellular carcinoma are predictive markers for advanced stage, early recurrence and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shian-Yang; Lai, Po-Lin; Pan, Hung-Wei; Hsiao, Li-Pin; Hsu, Hey-Chi

    2008-04-01

    Cancer cells with a high glycolytic rate have an advantage in tumor growth. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) often exhibits an aberrant expression of glycolytic enzymes, particularly type II hexokinase (HKII) and aldolase B (ALDOB). This study examined the aberrant expression of HKII and ALDOB in 203 surgically resected HCCs. A dramatic down-regulation of ALDOB was found in 116 HCCs (57%), while 43% of HCCs maintained the expression. HKII mRNA was overexpressed in 70 (35%) primary HCCs. The ALDOB down-regulation and HKII overexpression correlated with high-grade (grade II-IV) HCC (all ps<0.0001), portal vein invasion (stage IIIB-IV) (ps<1x10(-6)), early tumor recurrence (ETR) (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively) and a lower 5-year survival (p=0.000001 and p=0.0062, respectively). Notably, in stage II HCC which had no vascular invasion, the ALDOB down-regulation was associated with ETR (p<0.05) and a lower 5-year survival (p=0.015). The down-regulation of ALDOB correlated with a high AFP (p=1x10(-8)), whereas the overexpression of HKII, which has two functional motifs for the mutant p53, correlated with the p53 mutation, p<0.01. The three factors (ALDOB down-regulation, HKII overexpression and p53 mutation) not only correlated with tumor progression, but also interacted with one another, leading to a more aggressive HCC with a portal vein invasion and various extent of intrahepatic metastasis by more than four-fold (ps<1x10(-6)) and frequent ETR by more than two-fold (ps<0.0001) compared with HCCs without the events. In conclusion, the aberrant expression of ALDOB and HKII is associated with advanced disease, ETR and poor prognosis, and ALDOB down-regulation in stage II HCC is a predictive marker of ETR and an unfavorable outcome. PMID:18357395

  19. Galectin Expression Profiling Identifies Galectin-1 and Galectin-9?5 as Prognostic Factors in Stage I/II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    van den Boogaart, Vivian; van Suylen, Robert-Jan; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Thijssen, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30–40% of the patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will present with recurrent disease within two years of resection. Here, we performed extensive galectin expression profiling in a retrospective study using frozen and paraffin embedded tumor tissues from 87 stage I/II NSCLC patients. Our data show that galectin mRNA expression in NSCLC is confined to galectin-1, -3, -4, -7, -8, and -9. Next to stage, univariable Cox regression analysis identified galectin-1, galectin-9FL and galectin-9?5 as possible prognostic markers. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates revealed that overall survival was significantly shorter in patients that express galectin-1 above median levels, i.e., 23.0 (2.9–43.1) vs. 59.9 (47.7–72.1) months (p?=?0.020) as well as in patients that express galectin-9?5 or galectin-9FL below the median, resp. 59.9 (41.9–75.9) vs. 32.8 (8.7–56.9) months (p?=?0.014) or 23.2 (?0.4–46.8) vs. 58.9 (42.9–74.9) months (p?=?0.042). All three galectins were also prognostic for disease free survival. Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that for OS, the most significant prognostic model included stage, age, gal-1 and gal-9?5 while the model for DFS included stage, age and gal-9?5. In conclusion, the current study confirms the prognostic value of galectin-1 and identifies galectin-9?5 as novel potential prognostic markers in early stage NSCLC. These findings could help to identify early stage NSCLC patients that might benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:25259711

  20. PAK6 increase chemoresistance and is a prognostic marker for stage II and III colon cancer patients undergoing 5-FU based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongwang; Cui, Feifei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Fudong; Xue, Yingming; Feng, Xiaodong; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Senlin; Yu, Yang; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2015-01-01

    p21-Activated kinase 6 (PAK6) has been implicated in radiotherapy and docetaxel resistance. We have further evaluated PAK6 as a predictor of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment response in colon cancer. Here we report that in colon cancer PAK6 promotes tumor progression and chemoresistance both in vitro and in vivo. In the clinical analysis, PAK6 was overexpressed in 104 of 147 (70.75%) stage II and III patients who received 5-FU based chemotherapy after surgery. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that PAK6 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (P < 0.001). Colon cancer cell lines showed increased PAK6 expression upon 5-FU treatment. In PAK6-knockdown cells treated with 5-FU, cell viability and phosphorylation of BAD decreased, and the number of apoptotic cells, levels of cleaved caspase 3 and PARP increased compared to control cells. The opposite was observed in PAK6 overexpressing cells. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of PAK6 blocked cells in G2-M phase. Furthermore, Animal experiments results in vivo are consistent with outcomes in vitro. This study demonstrates that PAK6 is an independent prognostic factor for adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with stage II and stage III colon cancer. PMID:25426562

  1. Factors Influencing Goal Attainment in Patients with Post-Stroke Upper Limb Spasticity Following Treatment with Botulinum Toxin A in Real-Life Clinical Practice: Sub-Analyses from the Upper Limb International Spasticity (ULIS)-II Study

    PubMed Central

    Fheodoroff, Klemens; Ashford, Stephen; Jacinto, Jorge; Maisonobe, Pascal; Balcaitiene, Jovita; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    In this post-hoc analysis of the ULIS-II study, we investigated factors influencing person-centred goal setting and achievement following botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) treatment in 456 adults with post-stroke upper limb spasticity (ULS). Patients with primary goals categorised as passive function had greater motor impairment (p < 0.001), contractures (soft tissue shortening [STS]) (p = 0.006) and spasticity (p = 0.02) than those setting other goal types. Patients with goals categorised as active function had less motor impairment (0.0001), contracture (p < 0.0001), spasticity (p < 0.001) and shorter time since stroke (p = 0.001). Patients setting goals for pain were older (p = 0.01) with more contractures (p = 0.008). The proportion of patients achieving their primary goal was not impacted by timing of first-ever BoNT-A injection (medium-term (?1 year) vs. longer-term (>1 year)) post-stroke (80.0% vs. 79.2%) or presence or absence of severe contractures (76.7% vs. 80.6%), although goal types differed. Earlier BoNT-A intervention was associated with greater achievement of active function goals. Severe contractures impacted negatively on goal achievement except in pain and passive function. Goal setting by patients with ULS is influenced by impairment severity, age and time since stroke. Our findings resonate with clinical experience and may assist patients and clinicians in selecting realistic, achievable goals for treatment. PMID:25856546

  2. CT and MR imaging diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma: part II. Extracellular agents, hepatobiliary agents, and ancillary imaging features.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Jeong-Min; Sirlin, Claude B

    2014-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging play critical roles in the diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The second article of this two-part review discusses basic concepts of diagnosis and staging, reviews the diagnostic performance of CT and MR imaging with extracellular contrast agents and of MR imaging with hepatobiliary contrast agents, and examines in depth the major and ancillary imaging features used in the diagnosis and characterization of HCC. PMID:25247563

  3. Efficient reduction of loco-regional recurrences but no effect on mortality twenty years after postmastectomy radiation in premenopausal women with stage II breast cancer – A randomized trial from the South Sweden Breast Cancer Group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fredrika Killander; Harald Anderson; Stefan Rydén; Torgil Möller; L. O. Hafström; Per Malmström

    2009-01-01

    PurposeTo study long term loco-regional and distant recurrence rate and survival after post-mastectomy radiotherapy in combination with oral cyclophosphamide in premenopausal women with stage II breast cancer.

  4. A phase II study of active specific immunotherapy and5-FU/Leucovorin as adjuvant therapy for stage III colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baars, A; Claessen, A M E; Wagstaff, J; Giaccone, G; Scheper, R J; Meijer, S; Schakel, M J A G; Gall, H E; Meijer, C J L M; Vermorken, J B; Pinedo, H M; van den Eertwegh, A J M

    2002-01-01

    Active specific immunotherapy, using vaccines with autologous tumour cells and BCG, significantly reduces the rate of tumour recurrence in stage II colon cancer patients, while no clinical benefit has yet been observed in stage III patients. Adjuvant treatment with 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin is now considered standard therapy for stage III colon carcinoma and results in an absolute survival benefit of approximately 10%. Yet, the 5-year overall survival rate of stage III colon cancer patients is only 40–50%. Combining chemotherapy and immunotherapy might improve prognosis for stage III patients, especially when considering that active specific immunotherapy and chemotherapy have shown synergistic effects in pre-clinical tumour models. We performed a phase II study with 56 patients, using the combination of active specific immunotherapy and chemotherapy as an adjuvant therapy in stage III colon cancer patients to assess the influence of 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin on anti-tumour immunity induced by autologous tumour cell vaccinations. Anti-tumour immunity was measured before and after chemotherapy by means of delayed type hypersensitivity reactions, taken 48?h after the third and the fourth vaccination. We also investigated the toxicity of this combined immuno-chemotherapy treatment. Delayed type hypersensitivity reactions before chemotherapy had a median size of 20.3?mm, while after chemotherapy delayed type hypersensitivity size was 18.4?mm (P=0.01), indicating that chemotherapy hardly affected anti-tumour immunity. The severity of ulcers at the BCG vaccination sites was comparable to previous studies. In 30% of the patients grade III or grade IV chemotherapy related toxicity was seen; this is comparable to what is normally observed after adjuvant chemotherapy alone. This study shows that the active specific immunotherapy-induced anti-tumour immune response is only minimally impaired by consecutive chemotherapy and that the combined treatment of stage III colon cancer patients with active specific immunotherapy and 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin does not cause unexpected toxicity. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1230–1234. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600254 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953877

  5. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation With Paclitaxel/Carboplatin for Selected Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Trimodality Phase II Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Hehr, Thomas, E-mail: thomashehr@vinzenz.d [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Marienhospital Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Friedel, Godehard; Steger, Volker [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Schillerhoehe Hospital, Thoracic Center of the Robert Bosch Hospital-Stuttgart, Gerlingen (Germany); Spengler, Werner [Department of Pneumology, Schillerhoehe Hospital, Thoracic Center of the Robert Bosch Hospital-Stuttgart, Gerlingen (Germany); Eschmann, Susanne M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marienhospital Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Bamberg, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Budach, Wilfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Duesseldorf, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a Phase II trial conducted August 1998 through January 2001, the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and definitive surgery in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), Stages IIIA bulky and selected Stage IIIB. Patients and Methods: Staging of LA-NSCLC included computed tomography of cranium, thorax, and abdomen, whole-body positron emission tomography, and video mediastinoscopy. Induction chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin was followed by hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy (45 Gy) with simultaneous weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin. Four to six weeks after completion of induction therapy, restaging and resection of primary tumor and lymph nodes was intended. Results: A total of 59 consecutive patients were enrolled, 25% with Stage IIIA bulky disease, 65% with Stage IIIB, and 10% with Stage IV (excluded from further analysis). Forty-one patients completed induction therapy; in 52.4% a functional (positron emission tomography) downstaging was proven. Thirty-two patients (59.3%) underwent complete tumor resection, and 5 patients had an exploratory thoracotomy only. Histopathologic downstaging was proven in 59.4% and complete response in 21.9%. Hospital mortality was 5.4%. Median duration of follow-up for living patients was 62.1 months. Overall median survival was 22.6 months, 58.2 months for completely resected patients. During induction chemotherapy, Grade 3/4 granulocytopenia occurred in 8% of patients; the most common Grade 3/4 toxicity of chemoradiation was esophagitis, in 26.4% of patients. Conclusions: Induction paclitaxel/carboplatin with hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiotherapy followed by complete tumor resection demonstrates high efficacy in LA-NSCLC and offers a promising chance of long-term survival.

  6. Post-disposal orbital evolution of satellites and upper stages used by the GPS and GLONASS navigation constellations: The long-term impact on the Medium Earth Orbit environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    2012-08-01

    The long-term evolution and environmental impact in MEO of all the abandoned spacecraft and upper stages associated with the GPS and GLONASS navigation constellations were analyzed. The orbits of the disposed objects, as of 1 May 2011, were propagated for 200 years and snapshots of their evolving distribution were obtained, together with an estimation of the changing collision probability with the spacecraft of the operational navigation systems existing or planned in MEO, i.e., GLONASS, GPS, Beidou and Galileo. The probability that the abandoned objects considered will collide with the operational spacecraft of the navigation constellations is very low, even taking into account the intrinsic eccentricity instability of the disposal orbits. Assuming the present or envisaged configuration of the constellations in MEO, the probability of collision, integrated over 200 years, would be <1/300 with a GLONASS spacecraft, <1/15,000 with a GPS or Beidou spacecraft, and <1/250,000 with a Galileo spacecraft. The worst disposal strategy consists in abandoning satellites and upper stages close to the altitude of the operational constellation (GLONASS), while a re-orbiting a few hundred km away (GPS) is able to guarantee an effective long-term dilution of the collision risk, irrespective of the eccentricity instability due to geopotential and luni-solar perturbations. The disposal strategies applied so far to the GPS satellites should be able to guarantee for at least a few centuries a sustainable MEO environment free of collisions among intact objects. Consequently, there would be no need to adopt disposal schemes targeting also the optimal value of the eccentricity vector. However, it should be pointed out that the GPS disposal strategy was devised well in advance of the Beidou constellation announcement, so most of the abandoned satellites were re-orbited fairly close to the altitude of the new Chinese system. A new re-orbiting approach will be therefore needed in the future.

  7. Involvement of Difference in Decrease of Hemoglobin Level in Poor Prognosis of Stage I and II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Implication in Outcome of Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Anhui provincial hospital, Hefei (China); Tao Yalan; Li Guo; Yi Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xia Yunfei, E-mail: xiayf@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and the difference in its decrease during treatment on outcome of radiotherapy (RT) alone for patients with Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 572 patients with Stage I-II nasopharyngeal carcinoma with RT alone between January 2001 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Patient characteristics, tumor variables, and Hb level, including pre-RT Hb, mid-RT Hb, and dynamic change of Hb between pre- and post- RT and its difference in decrease ( White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb) were subjected to univariate and multivariable analysis to identify factors that predict disease-specific survival (DSS), local regional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS). Results: The 5-year DSS was poorer in the Hb continuous decrease group than in the Hb noncontinuous decrease group (84% vs. 89%; p = 0.008). There was poorer 5-year DSS in patients with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of >11.5 g/L than in those with White-Up-Pointing-Small-Triangle Hb of {<=}11.5 g/L (82% vs. 89%; p = 0.001), and poorer LRFS (79% vs. 83%; p = 0.035). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that Hb decrease difference with greater than 11.5 g/L was an independent prognostic factor for DSS and LRFS. Conclusions: The difference in decrease of Hb level during the course of radiation treatment appeared as a poor prognostic factor in Stage I and II nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

  8. Quality of Life After Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy or Axillary Lymph Node Dissection in Stage I\\/II Breast Cancer Patients: A Prospective Longitudinal Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan Kootstra; Josette E. H. M. Hoekstra-Weebers; Hans Rietman; Jaap de Vries; Peter Baas; Jan H. B. Geertzen; Harald J. Hoekstra

    2008-01-01

    Background  Breast cancer patients’ quality of life (QoL) after surgery has been reported to improve significantly over time. Little is\\u000a known about QoL recovery after sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  175 of 195 stage I\\/II breast cancer patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30: one day before surgery (T0) and after 6 (T1), 26\\u000a (T2),

  9. Individual Surgeon, Pathologist, and Other Factors Affecting Lymph Node Harvest in Stage II Colon Carcinoma. Is a Minimum of 12 Examined Lymph Nodes Sufficient?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luca Stocchi; Victor W. Fazio; Ian Lavery; Jeff Hammel

    2011-01-01

    Background  Insufficient lymph node harvest in presumed stage II colon carcinomas can result in understaging and worsened cancer outcomes.\\u000a The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors affecting the number of lymph node examined, their corresponding impact\\u000a on cancer outcomes, and the optimal number of examined nodes with reference to the standard of 12.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods  We evaluated all patients

  10. Effects of alumina refinery wastewater and signature metal constituents at the upper thermal tolerance of: 2. The early life stages of the coral Acropora tenuis.

    PubMed

    Negri, Andrew P; Harford, Andrew J; Parry, David L; van Dam, Rick A

    2011-03-01

    The success of early life history transitions of the coral Acropora tenuis were used as endpoints to evaluate thermal stress and the effects of wastewater discharged to a tropical marine environment. The studies assessed the effects of: (i) temperature; (ii) three signature metals of the wastewater, aluminium (Al), vanadium (V) and gallium (Ga); and (iii) the wastewater (at 27°C and 32°C) on fertilisation and larval metamorphosis. The median inhibition temperatures for fertilisation and metamorphosis were 32.8°C and 33.0°C, respectively. Fertilisation IC(50)s for Al, V and Ga were 2997, 2884 and 3430 ?g L(-1), respectively. Metamorphosis IC(50)s for Al, V and Ga were 1945, 675 and 3566 ?g L(-1), respectively. The wastewater only affected fertilisation and metamorphosis at moderate concentrations (IC(50)s=63% and 67%, v/v, respectively, at 27°C), posing a low risk to this species in the field. The effects of wastewater and temperature on fertilisation and metamorphosis were additive. PMID:21349553

  11. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. Changed salt appetite and central angiotensin II-induced cellular activation in rat offspring following hypoxia during fetal stages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Mao, Caiping; Xia, Fei; Zheng, Jianli; Wang, Aiqing; Zhu, Liyan; He, Rui; Xu, Zhice

    2010-06-01

    Hypoxia in pregnancy may induce fetal growth restriction and cause functional abnormalities during development. The present study determined the long-term influence of hypoxia in fetal life on dipsogenic behavior linked to central angiotensin (Ang) network in the offspring rats. Fetal blood pO(2) and body weight were decreased by hypoxia during pregnancy, followed by a postnatal "catch-up" growth. Subcutaneous hypertonic saline or intracerebroventricular Ang II significantly increased salt intake in the offspring prenatally exposed to hypoxia, while water intake was the same between the two groups. Ang II-induced c-fos expression was detected in the paraventricular nuclei, median preoptic nuclei, supraoptic nuclei, and subfornical organ in the brain, in association with reduced forebrain AT(2) receptor protein abundance in the offspring prenatally exposed to hypoxia. Levels of central AT(1) receptor protein were not changed between the two groups. Hypoxia during pregnancy could be linked to developmental problems related to behavioral dysfunctions in body fluid regulations in later life, in association with the change in central angiotensin II-mediated neural activation and expression of the Ang II receptor in the brain. PMID:20307607

  13. DROPOUT AND RETENTION RATE METHODOLOGY USED TO ESTIMATE FIRST-STAGE ELEMENTS OF THE TRANSITION PROBABILITY MATRICES FOR DYNAMOD II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HUDMAN, JOHN T.; ZABROWSKI, EDWARD K.

    EQUATIONS FOR SYSTEM INTAKE, DROPOUT, AND RETENTION RATE CALCULATIONS ARE DERIVED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS, SECONDARY SCHOOLS, AND COLLEGES. THE PROCEDURES DESCRIBED WERE FOLLOWED IN DEVELOPING ESTIMATES OF SELECTED ELEMENTS OF THE TRANSITION PROBABILITY MATRICES USED IN DYNAMOD II. THE PROBABILITY MATRIX CELLS ESTIMATED BY THE PROCEDURES DESCRIBED…

  14. FtsH Is Involved in the Early Stages of Repair of Photosystem II in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo Silva; Elinor Thompson; Shaun Bailey; Olaf Kruse; Conrad W. Mullineaux; Colin Robinson; Nicholas H. Mann; Peter J. Nixon; Coventry CV; Biologie VIII

    2003-01-01

    When plants, algae, and cyanobacteria are exposed to excessive light, especially in combination with other environmental stress conditions such as extreme temperatures, their photosynthetic performance declines. A major cause of this photoin- hibition is the light-induced irreversible photodamage to the photosystem II (PSII) complex responsible for photosynthetic oxygen evolution. A repair cycle operates to selectively replace a damaged D1 subunit

  15. [Follow-up study, using dynamic transcutaneous oximetry in 17 patients with stage II Leriche and Fontaine occlusive arterial disease of the lower limbs].

    PubMed

    Grard, C; Perez-Cousin, M; Desmyttère, J; Alsberghe, M C; Hachulla, E; Copin, D; Roux, J P; Brouillard, M; Hatron, P Y; Warembourg, H

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the value of dynamic transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement (TcPO2) in 17 patients with stage II occlusive arterial disease of the lower limbs treated with exercise only. We studied 17 patients (15 men, two women) with an average age of 63 years (range 39-80 years). Claudication perimeter and dynamic TcPO2 were evaluated before and after 6 month walking exercise and tabac stopping. Four different sites of TcPO2 were studied: precordium (reference probe), thigh, calf and foot in the dorsal recumbent position after 30 minutes rest, during a standardised exercise stress test at 50 watts and during the recovery phase. The results were expressed as ratio of tissue oxygenation (RTO): thigh, calf or foot TcPO2/precordial TcPO2 x 100 in order to take into account the patients cardiorespiratory status and adaptation to exercise. Claudication perimeter was 255 m +/- 221 before 6 months exercise and 835 m +/- 539 after (P < 0.01). The duration of significative ischemia was significantly reduced after 6 months exercise (P = 0.02 calf, P < 0.01 foot). Dynamic transcutaneous oxymetry would therefore seem to be a useful method of assessing stage II occlusive peripheral arterial disease and the topography of tissue hypoxia. It could be valuable in orientating treatment and the first method to provide and objective evaluation of the efficacy of medical or surgical treatment. PMID:7938965

  16. Stage II invasive adenocarcinoma of the ovary: results of treatment by whole abdominal radiation plus pelvic boost versus pelvic radiation plus oral melphalan chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Piver, M.S.; Lele, S.B.; Patsner, B.; Krishnamsetty, R.; Emrich, L.J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-one patients with histologically confirmed FIGO Stage II adenocarcinoma of the ovary were prospectively treated in two sequential studies: 3000 rad of whole abdominal radiation therapy over 6 weeks by an open field technique followed by 2000 rad pelvic boost over 2 weeks (group 1, 16 patients, 1972-1974) or 5000 rad of pelvic radiation therapy over 5 weeks followed by a year of melphalan chemotherapy at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg/day for 5 days every 4 weeks (group 2, 15 patients, 1975-1982). Abdominal radiation included the entire peritoneal cavity and both diaphragms; the liver was not shielded. Only 2 patients had residual disease greater than 2 cm. No group 1 patients underwent pretherapy restaging laparoscopy prior to radiation or second look laparotomy after treatment. Eighty percent of group 2 patients underwent restaging laparoscopy (10) or staging laparotomy (2) prior to radiation. All group 2 patients underwent second look procedures if no evidence of disease. No patient developed intestinal complications secondary to radiation requiring surgery. Eighty-one percent of group 1 patients and to date 40% of group 2 patients developed recurrences. Size of residual disease prior to radiation, histologic grade, and substage (IIA, B, or C) did not correlate with recurrences. Five-year estimated survival was 40 and 50% for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Three thousand rad of wole abdominal radiation plus 2000 rad pelvic boost or 5000 rad pelvic radiation plus melphalan did not appear to improve survival over surgery alone. The role of radiation therapy in Stage II ovarian cancer remains unclear.

  17. Stage II invasive adenocarcinoma of the ovary: results of treatment by whole abdominal radiation plus pelvic boost versus pelvic radiation plus oral melphalan chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Piver, M S; Lele, S B; Patsner, B; Krishnamsetty, R; Emrich, L J

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-one patients with histologically confirmed FIGO Stage II adenocarcinoma of the ovary were prospectively treated in two sequential studies: 3000 rad of whole abdominal radiation therapy over 6 weeks by an open field technique followed by 2000 rad pelvic boost over 2 weeks (group 1, 16 patients, 1972-1974) or 5000 rad of pelvic radiation therapy over 5 weeks followed by a year of melphalan chemotherapy at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg/day for 5 days every 4 weeks (group 2, 15 patients, 1975-1982). Abdominal radiation included the entire peritoneal cavity and both diaphragms; the liver was not shielded. Only 2 patients had residual disease greater than 2 cm. No group 1 patients underwent pretherapy restaging laparoscopy prior to radiation or second look laparotomy after treatment. Eighty percent of group 2 patients underwent restaging laparoscopy (10) or staging laparotomy (2) prior to radiation. All group 2 patients underwent second look procedures if no evidence of disease. No patient developed intestinal complications secondary to radiation requiring surgery. Eighty-one percent of group 1 patients and to date 40% of group 2 patients developed recurrences. Size of residual disease prior to radiation, histologic grade, and substage (IIA, B, or C) did not correlate with recurrences. Five-year estimated survival was 40 and 50% for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Three thousand rad of wole abdominal radiation plus 2000 rad pelvic boost or 5000 rad pelvic radiation plus melphalan did not appear to improve survival over surgery alone. The role of radiation therapy in Stage II ovarian cancer remains unclear. PMID:3943758

  18. Mastectomy With Immediate Expander-Implant Reconstruction, Adjuvant Chemotherapy, and Radiation for Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Treatment Intervals and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Ben-Porat, Leah [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Van Zee, Kimberly J. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hudis, Clifford [Department of Medicine, Solid Tumor Division, Breast Cancer Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Beal, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)], E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine intervals between surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation in patients treated with mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and to evaluate locoregional and distant control and overall survival in these patients. Methods and Materials: Between May 1996 and March 2004, 104 patients with Stage II-III breast cancer were routinely treated at our institution under the following algorithm: (1) definitive mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and immediate tissue expander placement, (2) tissue expansion during chemotherapy, (3) exchange of tissue expander for permanent implant, (4) radiation. Patient, disease, and treatment characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 45 years. Twenty-six percent of patients were Stage II and 74% Stage III. All received adjuvant chemotherapy. Estrogen receptor staining was positive in 77%, and 78% received hormone therapy. Radiation was delivered to the chest wall with daily 0.5-cm bolus and to the supraclavicular fossa. Median dose was 5040 cGy. Median interval from surgery to chemotherapy was 5 weeks, from completion of chemotherapy to exchange 4 weeks, and from exchange to radiation 4 weeks. Median interval from completion of chemotherapy to start of radiation was 8 weeks. Median follow-up was 64 months from date of mastectomy. The 5-year rate for locoregional disease control was 100%, for distant metastasis-free survival 90%, and for overall survival 96%. Conclusions: Mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation results in a median interval of 8 weeks from completion of chemotherapy to initiation of radiation and seems to be associated with acceptable 5-year locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival.

  19. Biologic Determinants of Tumor Recurrence in Stage II Colon Cancer: Validation Study of the 12-Gene Recurrence Score in Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9581

    PubMed Central

    Venook, Alan P.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lopatin, Margarita; Ye, Xing; Lee, Mark; Friedman, Paula N.; Frankel, Wendy; Clark-Langone, Kim; Millward, Carl; Shak, Steven; Goldberg, Richard M.; Mahmoud, Najjia N.; Warren, Robert S.; Schilsky, Richard L.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A greater understanding of the biology of tumor recurrence should improve adjuvant treatment decision making. We conducted a validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score (RS), a quantitative assay integrating stromal response and cell cycle gene expression, in tumor specimens from patients enrolled onto Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9581. Patients and Methods CALGB 9581 randomly assigned 1,713 patients with stage II colon cancer to treatment with edrecolomab or observation and found no survival difference. The analysis reported here included all patients with available tissue and recurrence (n = 162) and a random (approximately 1:3) selection of nonrecurring patients. RS was assessed in 690 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by using prespecified genes and a previously validated algorithm. Association of RS and recurrence was analyzed by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Continuous RS was significantly associated with risk of recurrence (P = .013) as was mismatch repair (MMR) gene deficiency (P = .044). In multivariate analyses, RS was the strongest predictor of recurrence (P = .004), independent of T stage, MMR, number of nodes examined, grade, and lymphovascular invasion. In T3 MMR-intact (MMR-I) patients, prespecified low and high RS groups had average 5-year recurrence risks of 13% (95% CI, 10% to 16%) and 21% (95% CI, 16% to 26%), respectively. Conclusion The 12-gene RS predicts recurrence in stage II colon cancer in CALGB 9581. This is consistent with the importance of stromal response and cell cycle gene expression in colon tumor recurrence. RS appears to be most discerning for patients with T3 MMR-I tumors, although markers such as grade and lymphovascular invasion did not add value in this subset of patients. PMID:23530100

  20. Differential survival trends of stage II colorectal cancer patients relate to promoter methylation status of PCDH10, SPARC, and UCHL1.

    PubMed

    Heitzer, Ellen; Artl, Monika; Filipits, Martin; Resel, Margit; Graf, Ricarda; Weißenbacher, Bettina; Lax, Sigurd; Gnant, Michael; Wrba, Fritz; Greil, Richard; Dietze, Otto; Hofbauer, Friedrich; Böhm, Gerhard; Höfler, Gerald; Samonigg, Hellmut; Schaberl-Moser, Renate; Balic, Marija; Dandachi, Nadia

    2014-06-01

    Surgical excision of colorectal cancer at early clinical stages is highly effective, but 20-30% of patients relapse. Therefore, it is of clinical relevance to identify patients at high risk for recurrence, who would benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The objective of this study was to identify prognostic and/or predictive methylation markers in stage II colorectal cancer patients. Therefore, we selected six gene promoters (FZD9, PCDH10 (protocadherin 10), SFRP2, SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), UCHL1 (ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 1), and WIF1) for methylation analysis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumor samples of colorectal cancer patients (n=143) who were enrolled in a prospective randomized phase III trial of the Austrian Breast and Colorectal cancer Study Group. Patients were randomized to adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin or surveillance only. Survival analyses revealed that combined evaluation of three promoters (PCDH10, SPARC, and UCHL1) showed differential effects with regard to disease-free survival and overall survival in the two treatment groups (significance level 0.007). In the chemotherapy arm, a statistically insignificant trend for patients without methylation toward longer survival was observed (P=0.069 for disease-free survival and P=0.139 for overall survival). Contrary, patients in the surveillance arm without methylation in their gene promoters had shorter disease-free survival and overall survival (P=0.031 for disease-free survival and P=0.003 for overall survival), indicating a prognostic effect of methylation in this group (test for interaction, P=0.006 for disease-free survival and P=0.018 for overall survival). These results indicate that promoter methylation status of PCDH10, SPARC, and UCHL1 may be used both as prognostic and predictive molecular marker for colorectal cancer patients and, therefore, may facilitate treatment decisions for stage II colorectal cancer. PMID:24309322

  1. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Oh, Julia L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: joh@mdanderson.org; Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meric-Bernstam, Funda [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hahn, Karin [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.

  2. The growth factor receptors HER-2/neu and EGFR, their relationship, and their effects on the prognosis in early stage (FIGO I-II) epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Skirnisdóttir, I; Sorbe, B; Seidal, T

    2001-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and many biologic and molecular factors are important for its development and progression, including growth rate, metastatic potential, chemo- and radiosensitivity, and prognosis. Even in the early stages (FIGO I-II), many questions persist about the biologic behavior, optimal treatment, and prognosis. In a series of 106 patients with epithelial ovarian cancers in FIGO stages IA-IIC, a number of known prognostic factors (age, FIGO stage, histopathologic type, and tumor grade) were studied in relation to two important growth factor receptors for oncogenesis (HER-2/neu and EGFR). Immunohistochemical techniques were used. All patients received adjuvant radiotherapy 4-6 weeks after the primary surgery. In a univariate analysis, the expression of the HER-2/neu receptor was not associated with any of the clinicopathologic factors studied or survival status. Positive EGFR staining was associated with poor survival in a univariate analysis. Co-expression of HER-2/neu and EGFR was most frequently seen in serous tumors and positive staining for HER-2/neu alone was associated with mucinous tumors. Both endometrioid and clear cell tumors belonged to the largest subgroup with concomitant negativity for both HER-2/neu and EGFR. In a multivariate Cox analysis, the tumor grade and EGFR status of the tumors were independent and significant prognostic factors. A therapeutic strategy for epithelial ovarian cancer might be to decrease EGFR expression by gene therapy in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy. PMID:11328410

  3. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M., E-mail: Gary.Freedman@uphs.upenn.edu [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bleicher, Richard J. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Swaby, Ramona F. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldstein, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  4. A two-stage Bayesian design with sample size reestimation and subgroup analysis for phase II binary response trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Koopmeiners, Joseph S.; Carlin, Bradley P.

    2013-01-01

    Frequentist sample size determination for binary outcome data in a two-arm clinical trial requires initial guesses of the event probabilities for the two treatments. Misspecification of these event rates may lead to a poor estimate of the necessary sample size. In contrast, the Bayesian approach that considers the treatment effect to be random variable having some distribution may offer a better, more flexible approach. The Bayesian sample size proposed by Whitehead et al. (2008) for exploratory studies on efficacy justifies the acceptable minimum sample size by a “conclusiveness” condition. In this work, we introduce a new two-stage Bayesian design with sample size reestimation at the interim stage. Our design inherits the properties of good interpretation and easy implementation from Whitehead et al. (2008), generalizes their method to a two-sample setting, and uses a fully Bayesian predictive approach to reduce an overly large initial sample size when necessary. Moreover, our design can be extended to allow patient level covariates via logistic regression, now adjusting sample size within each subgroup based on interim analyses. We illustrate the benefits of our approach with a design in non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a simple binary covariate (patient gender), offering an initial step toward within-trial personalized medicine. PMID:23583925

  5. Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Weekly Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Biweekly Bevacizumab Therapy in Women With Clinical Stage II or III HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mrózek, Ewa; Layman, Rachel; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari; Lustberg, Maryam; Vecchione, Andrea; Knopp, Michael V.; Shapiro, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    This phase II trial tested the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) achieved by women with stage II–III human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer (BC) treated with neo-adjuvant nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-P), carboplatin and bevacizumab. The rate of pCR was 18%, all pCRs were observed in patients with triple negative BC. Background We hypothesized that adding bevacizumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) with nab-P and carboplatin would increase the rates of pCR in BC patients and that early changes in tumor vascularity imaged by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) would predict pCR. Methods Thirty-three women with clinical stage II or III HER2-negative BC received nab-P 100 mg/m2 and carboplatin area under the curve = 2 on days 1, 8, and 15 in combination with bevacizumab 10 mg/kg on days 1 and 15 administered every 28 days. Results Six patients (18%) achieved pCR, all pCRs occurred in triple-negative BC (TNBC) (pCR = 50% for TNBC). At the end of cycle 2, the changes in relative angiogenic volume were significantly different between responders and non-responders (P = .001). The major toxicity of this NCT was myelosuppression. Conclusion NCT with weekly nab-P, carboplatin, and biweekly bevacizumab resulted in a pCR rate that was neither superior to the historical data with anthracycline- or taxane-containing NCT nor to carboplatin and taxane combinations in patients with HER2-negative BC. In patients with TNBC, the observed pCR rate was 50%. The early changes in the relative angiogenic volume imaged by DCE-MRI could predict pCR. PMID:24703985

  6. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) to Help Characterize Vespel SP-211 Polyimide Material for Use as a 750 F Valve Seal on the Ares I Upper Stage J-2X Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Doug

    2013-01-01

    DuPont (TM) Vespel (R) SP-211 polyimide was selected as the top candidate seal material for use in the Oxidizer Turbine Bypass Valve (OTBV) on NASA's Ares I Upper Stage J-2X engine. In the OTBV, the seal material would get exposed to temperatures up to 750degF for approx 10 minutes at a time. Although the J-2X engine is not reusable, the valve material could be exposed to multiple temperature cycles up to 750 F during engine operation. The Constellation Program that included the Ares I rocket was eventually cancelled, but the J-2X engine was chosen for continued use for development of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). The SLS is a heavy-lift launch vehicle that will have capability of taking astronauts and hardware to the Moon, Mars and asteroids. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was one of several test techniques used to characterize Vespel SP-211 to help prove its worthiness for use on the OTBV of the J-2X engine.

  7. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) to Help Characterize Vespel SP-211 Polyimide Material for Use as a 750 F Valve Seal on the Ares I Upper Stage J-2X Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Doug

    2013-01-01

    DuPont(tm) Vespel(R) SP-211 polyimide was selected as the top candidate seal material for use in the Oxidizer Turbine Bypass Valve (OTBV) on NASA's Ares I Upper Stage J-2X engine. In the OTBV, the seal material would get exposed to temperatures up to 750degF for approx 10 minutes at a time. Although the J-2X engine is not reusable, the valve material could be exposed to multiple temperature cycles up to 750degF during engine operation. The Constellation Program that included the Ares I rocket was eventually cancelled, but the J-2X engine was chosen for continued use for development of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). The SLS is a heavy-lift launch vehicle that will have capability of taking astronauts and hardware to the Moon, Mars and asteroids. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was one of several test techniques used to characterize Vespel SP-211 to help prove its worthiness for use on the OTBV of the J-2X engine.

  8. SLS Dual Use Upper Stage (DUUS) Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Steve; Holladay, Jon; Jones, Davey

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Provide an overview of SLS DUUS type capability requirements to provide context for possible International Partner collaboration. Addition of a DUUS would greatly increase exploration mission capture and performance margin for cis-Lunar and Near Earth System exploration campaigns.

  9. Randomized Trial of Postoperative Adjuvant Therapy in Stage II and III Rectal Cancer to Define the Optimal Sequence of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: 10-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Won [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Hee [Department of Hematology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kang, Yoon-Koo [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoo-Hyung [Department of Hematology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Chang-Sik [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ahn, Seung-Do [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Kun [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Cheon [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Shin, E-mail: jayslee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal sequence of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 308 patients were randomized to early (n = 155) or late (n = 153) radiotherapy (RT). Treatment included eight cycles of chemotherapy, consisting of fluorouracil 375 mg/m{sup 2}/day and leucovorin 20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, at 4-week intervals, and pelvic radiotherapy of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Radiotherapy started on Day 1 of the first chemotherapy cycle in the early RT arm and on Day 1 of the third chemotherapy cycle in the late RT arm. Results: At a median follow-up of 121 months for surviving patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 10 years was not statistically significantly different between the early and late RT arms (71% vs. 63%; p = 0.162). A total of 36 patients (26.7%) in the early RT arm and 49 (35.3%) in the late RT arm experienced recurrence (p = 0.151). Overall survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment groups. However, in patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection, the DFS rate at 10 years was significantly greater in the early RT arm than in the late RT arm (63% vs. 40%; p = 0.043). Conclusions: After the long-term follow-up duration, this study failed to show a statistically significant DFS advantage for early radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy after resection of Stage II and III rectal cancer. Our results, however, suggest that if neoadjuvant chemoradiation is not given before surgery, then early postoperative chemoradiation should be considered for patients requiring an abdominoperineal resection.

  10. Taurus II Stage Test Simulations: Using Large-Scale CFD Simulations to Provide Critical Insight into Plume Induced Environments During Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struzenberg, L. L.; West, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of targeted Loci/CHEM CFD simulations to evaluate the effects of a dual-engine first-stage hot-fire test on an evolving integrated launch pad/test article design. This effort was undertaken as a part of the NESC Independent Assessment of the Taurus II Stage Test Series. The underlying conceptual model included development of a series of computational models and simulations to analyze the plume induced environments on the pad, facility structures and test article. A pathfinder simulation was first developed, capable of providing quick-turn around evaluation of plume impingement pressures on the flame deflector. Results from this simulation were available in time to provide data for an ongoing structural assessment of the deflector. The resulting recommendation was available in a timely manner and was incorporated into construction schedule for the new launch stand under construction at Wallops Flight Facility. A series of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) quasi-steady simulations representative of various key elements of the test profile was performed to identify potential concerns with the test configuration and test profile. As required, unsteady Hybrid-RANS/LES simulations were performed, to provide additional insight into critical aspects of the test sequence. Modifications to the test-specific hardware and facility structures thermal protection as well as modifications to the planned hot-fire test profile were implemented based on these simulation results.

  11. Aggressive local therapy combined with systemic chemotherapy provides long-term control in grade II stage 2 canine mast cell tumour: 21 cases (1999-2012)(*)

    PubMed

    Lejeune, A; Skorupski, K; Frazier, S; Vanhaezebrouck, I; Rebhun, R B; Reilly, C M; Rodriguez, C O

    2013-05-31

    This retrospective case series evaluates the outcome of 21 dogs with grade II stage 2 mast cell tumour (MCT) treated with adequate local therapy and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy (prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU). The median survival for all dogs was 1359?days (range, 188-2340). Median disease-free interval was 2120?days (149-2325?days). Dogs treated with surgery and chemotherapy had shorter survival (median, 1103?days; 188-2010?days) than those that underwent surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy as part of their treatment (median, 2056?days; 300-2340?days). Two patients had local recurrence in the radiation field and four patients had de novo MCT. Distant metastasis was not observed in any dogs. The results of this study suggest that, in the presence of loco-regional lymph node metastasis in grade II MCT, the use of prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU after adequate local-regional therapy can provide a median survival in excess of 40?months. PMID:23721492

  12. Treatment factors affecting breast cancer-related lymphedema after systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy in stage II/III breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, So-Youn; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Myungsoo; Chung, Seung Hyun; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Kwon, Youngmee; Lee, Keun Seok; Park, In Hae; Ro, Jungsil

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated whether the sequence or regimen of systemic chemotherapy could be a risk factor for breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE). We retrospectively analyzed 848 patients with stage II/III breast cancer who underwent curative surgery with adequate systemic therapy from 2004 to 2009. Adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) was performed in 552 patients (65.1 %) and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in 296 (34.9 %). We evaluated the incidence of LE based on clinicopathological factors and treatments. At a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 358 patients (42.2 %) had experienced LE and 243 (28.7 %) had retained (persistent LE) [120/552 (21.7 %) with ACT vs. 123/296 (41.6 %) with NAC; P < 0.001]. The incidence of LE in patients with taxane was greater than in those without taxane [233/704 (33.1 %) vs. 10/144 (6.9 %); P < 0.001]. Multivariate analysis showed that NAC [hazard ratio (HR), 1.63 in LE event; P < 0.001; HR, 1.39 in persistent LE; P = 0.02] and RT including supraclavicular area (SCRT) (HR 1.55; P = 0.02; HR 1.93; P = 0.006), number of dissected axillary lymph nodes (N-ALNs) >10 (HR, 1.37; P = 0.01; HR, 1.71; P = 0.001), advanced stage (HR, 1.31; P = 0.03; HR, 1.60; P = 0.002), and taxane (HR, 1.69; P = 0.03; HR, 2.07; P = 0.04) were independent risk factors for the LE occurrence. In addition to advanced stage, N-ALNs and SCRT, NAC, and taxane were shown to increase the risk of LE, which could help clinicians identify patients at risk for LE. PMID:25253173

  13. Genomic location of the human RNA polymerase II general machinery: evidence for a role of TFIIF and Rpb7 at both early and late stages of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Marilena; Jeronimo, Célia; Forget, Diane; Bouchard, Annie; Bergeron, Dominique; Côte, Pierre; Poirier, Guy G.; Greenblatt, Jack; Coulombe, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The functions ascribed to the mammalian GTFs (general transcription factors) during the various stages of the RNAPII (RNA polymerase II) transcription reaction are based largely on in vitro studies. To gain insight as to the functions of the GTFs in living cells, we have analysed the genomic location of several human GTF and RNAPII subunits carrying a TAP (tandem-affinity purification) tag. ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) experiments using anti-tag beads (TAP-ChIP) allowed the systematic localization of the tagged factors. Enrichment of regions located close to the TIS (transcriptional initiation site) versus further downstream TRs (transcribed regions) of nine human genes, selected for the minimal divergence of their alternative TIS, were analysed by QPCR (quantitative PCR). We show that, in contrast with reports using the yeast system, human TFIIF (transcription factor IIF) associates both with regions proximal to the TIS and with further downstream TRs, indicating an in vivo function in elongation for this GTF. Unexpectedly, we found that the Rpb7 subunit of RNAPII, known to be required only for the initiation phase of transcription, remains associated with the polymerase during early elongation. Moreover, ChIP experiments conducted under stress conditions suggest that Rpb7 is involved in the stabilization of transcribing polymerase molecules, from initiation to late elongation stages. Together, our results provide for the first time a general picture of GTF function during the RNAPII transcription reaction in live mammalian cells and show that TFIIF and Rpb7 are involved in both early and late transcriptional stages. PMID:17848138

  14. Cardiac Mortality in Patients With Stage I and II Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With and Without Radiation: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J., E-mail: thomas.pugh@ucdenver.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Ballonoff, Ari; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; McCammon, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Comprehensive Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Standard therapy for stage I and II diffuse large B-cell lymphoma consists of combined modality therapy with anthracycline-based chemotherapy, anti-CD20 antibody, and radiation therapy (RT). Curative approaches without RT typically utilize more intensive and/or protracted chemotherapy schedules. Anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimens are associated with a dose-dependent risk of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. We hypothesize that patients treated without RT, i.e., those who are treated with greater total chemotherapy cycles and hence cumulative anthracycline exposure, are at increased risk of cardiac mortality. Methods and Materials: The rate of cardiac-specific mortality (CSM) was analyzed in patients with stage I and II diffuse large B-cell lymphoma diagnosed between 1988 and 2004 by querying the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results database. Analyzable data included gender, age, race, stage, presence of extranodal disease, and RT administration. Results: A total of 15,454 patients met selection criteria; 6,021 (39%) patients received RT. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-180 months). The median age was 64 years. The actuarial incidence rates of CSM at 5, 10, and 15 years were 4.3%, 9.0%, and 13.8%, respectively, in patients treated with RT vs. 5.9%, 10.8% and 16.1%, respectively, in patients treated without RT (p < 0.0001; hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16-1.56). The increase in cardiac deaths for patients treated without RT persisted throughout the follow-up period. On multivariate analysis, treatment without RT remained independently associated with an increased risk of CSM (Cox hazard ratio, 1.32; 95% CI: 1.13-1.54; p = 0.0005). Conclusions: Increased anthracycline exposure in patients treated only with chemotherapy regimens may result in an increase in cardiac deaths, detectable only through analysis of large sample sizes. Confirmatory evaluation through meta-analysis of randomized data and design of large prospective trials is warranted.

  15. Staged cascade fluidized bed combustor

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, Joseph N. (4103 Farragut St., Hyattsville, MD 20781); De Lucia, David E. (58 Beacon St., Apt. No. 2, Boston, MA 02108); Jackson, William M. (5300 McArthur Blvd., NW., Washington, DC 20016); Porter, James H. (P.O. Box 1131, Daggett Ave., Vineyard Haven, MA 02568)

    1984-01-01

    A fluid bed combustor comprising a plurality of fluidized bed stages interconnected by downcomers providing controlled solids transfer from stage to stage. Each stage is formed from a number of heat transfer tubes carried by a multiapertured web which passes fluidizing air to upper stages. The combustor cross section is tapered inwardly from the middle towards the top and bottom ends. Sorbent materials, as well as non-volatile solid fuels, are added to the top stages of the combustor, and volatile solid fuels are added at an intermediate stage.

  16. COLLISIONS BETWEEN GRAVITY-DOMINATED BODIES. II. THE DIVERSITY OF IMPACT OUTCOMES DURING THE END STAGE OF PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Sarah T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Leinhardt, Zoee M., E-mail: sstewart@eps.harvard.edu, E-mail: zoe.leinhardt@bristol.ac.uk [School of Physics, University of Bristol, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-20

    Numerical simulations of the stochastic end stage of planet formation typically begin with a population of embryos and planetesimals that grow into planets by merging. We analyzed the impact parameters of collisions leading to the growth of terrestrial planets from recent N-body simulations that assumed perfect merging and calculated more realistic outcomes using a new analytic collision physics model. We find that collision outcomes are diverse and span all possible regimes: hit-and-run, merging, partial accretion, partial erosion, and catastrophic disruption. The primary outcomes of giant impacts between planetary embryos are approximately evenly split between partial accretion, graze-and-merge, and hit-and-run events. To explore the cumulative effects of more realistic collision outcomes, we modeled the growth of individual planets with a Monte Carlo technique using the distribution of impact parameters from N-body simulations. We find that fewer planets reached masses >0.7 M{sub Earth} using the collision physics model compared to simulations that assumed every collision results in perfect merging. For final planets with masses >0.7 M{sub Earth}, 60% are enriched in their core-to-mantle mass fraction by >10% compared to the initial embryo composition. Fragmentation during planet formation produces significant debris ({approx}15% of the final mass) and occurs primarily by erosion of the smaller body in partial accretion and hit-and-run events. In partial accretion events, the target body grows by preferentially accreting the iron core of the projectile and the escaping fragments are derived primarily from the silicate mantles of both bodies. Thus, the bulk composition of a planet can evolve via stochastic giant impacts.

  17. A model for signal transmission in an ear having hair cells with free-standing stereocilia. II. Macromechanical stage.

    PubMed

    Rosowski, J J; Peake, W T; Lynch, T J; Leong, R; Weiss, T F

    1985-01-01

    A model of the signal-processing properties of the macromechanical system of the alligator-lizard middle and inner ear is developed. The model is based on measurements (as a function of tone frequency) of ossicular and basilar-membrane motion and of acoustic input-admittance at the tympanic membrane before and after alterations of middle-ear and inner-ear structures. From the structure of the ear, we formulate an equivalent electric network consisting of six admittance blocks and two transformers. The admittance blocks represent the mechanical properties of particular structures, e.g. the tympanic membrane (TM), the ossicle, the TM-ossicular joint, the vestibule, the basilar membrane and the helicotrema. The transformers represent the conversions from acoustical to mechanical variables performed by the TM-ossicular system and by the columella footplate. The block admittances and transformer ratios are inferred from the measurements, and each admittance is approximated by a network with a few simple elements. The resulting model fits the experimental results satisfactorily, allows correlations between specific structures and response behavior, and predicts the macromechanical transfer function. This transfer function acts as the first stage of a model of the alligator-lizard auditory periphery (Weiss et al., Weiss and Leong, 1985, Hearing Res. 20, 131-138, 157-174, 175-195). In the model the frequency dependence of basilar-membrane motion (1) is determined primarily by the tympanic membrane and extracolumella in the middle frequencies and (2) is affected by the helicotrema at low frequencies and the TM-ossicular joint at high frequencies. PMID:3878838

  18. The relationship between positive peritoneal cytology and the prognosis of patients with FIGO stage I/II uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Yasuyuki; Komeda, Satomi; Tanaka, Aki; Abe, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobutaka; Takekuma, Munetaka

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess whether peritoneal cytology has prognostic significance in uterine cervical cancer. Methods Peritoneal cytology was obtained in 228 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stages IB1-IIB) between October 2002 and August 2010. All patients were negative for intraperitoneal disease at the time of their radical hysterectomy. The pathological features and clinical prognosis of cases of positive peritoneal cytology were examined retrospectively. Results Peritoneal cytology was positive in 9 patients (3.9%). Of these patients, 3/139 (2.2%) had squamous cell carcinoma and 6/89 (6.7%) had adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma. One of the 3 patients with squamous cell carcinoma who had positive cytology had a recurrence at the vaginal stump 21 months after radical hysterectomy. All of the 6 patients with adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma had disease recurrence during the follow-up period: 3 with peritoneal dissemination and 2 with lymph node metastases. There were significant differences in recurrence-free survival and overall survival between the peritoneal cytology-negative and cytology-positive groups (log-rank p<0.001). Multivariate analysis of prognosis in cervical cancer revealed that peritoneal cytology (p=0.029) and histological type (p=0.004) were independent prognostic factors. Conclusion Positive peritoneal cytology may be associated with a poor prognosis in adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Therefore, the results of peritoneal cytology must be considered in postoperative treatment planning. PMID:24761211

  19. A Phase I/II Trial of 125I Methylene Blue for One-Stage Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, Jason David; Wang, Yi-Zarn; Espenan, Gregory; Maloney, Thomas; Camp, Arthur; Lazarus, Laura; Stolier, Alan; Brooks, Randy; Torrance, Bruce; Stafford, Shawn; O'Leary, James P.; Woltering, Eugene A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Sentinel lymph node biopsy can be associated with delays in operating room schedule and with significant pain during the preoperative 99mTc colloid injection. To avoid these problems, we developed a novel radiolabeled blue dye that can be injected intraoperatively. Methods: We performed a phase I/II trial (IND#70627) of sterile pyrogen-free 125I-methylene blue to identify sentinel nodes in patients with breast cancer. Twelve women were studied. Two women each were given peritumoral or circumareolar injections of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, or 1000 ?Ci of 125I methylene blue. Results: Sentinel nodes were detected in 11 of 12 patients, with a low-dose 200 ?Ci patient being the single exception. The number of sentinel nodes detected per patient ranged from 0 to 3 (mean = 1.66 nodes/case). Radioactivity at the tumor injection site [counts per second (cps) averaged over 10 seconds] ranged from 3346 to 47,300 cps and was highly dose-dependent (r = 0.90, P = 0.0002). In contrast, the in vivo node counts ranged from 0 to 1228 cps, while ex vivo counts ranged from 0 to 1516 cps. The in vivo nodal counts were dose-dependent (r = 0.67, and P = 0.0231). Radiation was carefully monitored inside the operating room and in pathology. Even with the 1-mCi dose, the radioactive blue dye produced significantly lower personnel exposure than historically seen with 99mTc. Conclusions: This method eliminates the painful preoperative injections of 99mTc colloid, is performed by the surgeon in the operating room, is associated with lower radiation exposures for personnel, and avoids the delays caused by nonoperating room personnel. These observations warrant a more extensive trial of this method using the 1000-?Ci dose of 125I methylene blue dye for sentinel lymph node biopsies. PMID:17245184

  20. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  1. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-14

    Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with PVM (Cisplatin + Vindesine + Mitomycin C) and UFT (Uracil + Tegaful) in resected stage I-II NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer): a randomized clinical trial 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiromi Wada; Ryo Miyahara; Fumihiro Tanaka; Shigeki Hitomi

    Objective: The West Japan Study Group For Lung Cancer Surgery (WJSG) conducted a randomized controlled trial in order to assess the usefulness of adjuvant chemotherapy for NSCLC. Methods: Patients with completely resected NSCLC (stages I and II) were enrolled in the trial. These patients were randomized into two groups: a surgery alone group; and a chemotherapy group which received intravenous

  3. 12/16/09 5:20 PMReaders respond to Inside Illinois survey | Inside Illinois | News Bureau | University of Illinois Page 1 of 2file:///Volumes/STAGING/news.illinois.edu/ii/09readersurvey.html

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Jennifer

    12/16/09 5:20 PMReaders respond to Inside Illinois survey | Inside Illinois | News Bureau | University of Illinois Page 1 of 2file:///Volumes/STAGING/news.illinois.edu/ii/09readersurvey.html Readers respond to Inside Illinois survey INSIDE ILLINOIS, Dec. 17, 2009 | Doris K. Dahl, Editor, 217

  4. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies diet and physical activity changes to see how well they work compared with usual care in improving progression-free survival in patients with previously treated stage II, III, or IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. A healthy lifestyle and counseling after treatment may improve progression-free survival in patients with previously treated cancer.

  5. [Compensation for disordered functions and the problems of rehabilitative treatment of disabled veterans of World War II who suffered gunshot wounds of the upper extrememities].

    PubMed

    Degtiar', G P

    1977-02-01

    The data of dynamic observations and clincal examination of 128 invalids of the Great Patriotic War having gunshot wounds of the upper extremities after 20 years and longer evidence considerable improvement of the wounded extremity function and a reduced degree of disability in the late period due to compensatory phenomena under the influence of active labour life. PMID:324109

  6. Preliminary findings of a study of the upper reaches of the Tamar Estuary, UK, throughout a complete tidal cycle: Part II: In-situ floc spectra observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Bass; K. R. Dyer

    2007-01-01

    A series of field experiments funded by the Natural Environmental Research Council were conducted in the upper reaches of the Tamar estuary (UK), which placed the measurements within the tidal trajectory of the turbidity maximum. The aim of the study was to examine how the distribution of floc characteristics evolved with respect to changes in the turbulent shear stress, suspended

  7. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-02

    Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  8. Effect of Various Blade Modifications on Performance of a 16-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor. II - Effect on Over-All Performance Characteristics of Increasing Twelfth through Fifteenth Stage Stator-Blade Angles 3 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, James E.; Medeiros, Arthur A.

    1952-01-01

    The stator-blade angles in the twelfth through fifteenth stages of a 16-stage axial-flow compressor were increased 3O. The over-all performance of this modified compressor is compared to the performance of the compressor with original blade angles. The matching characteristics of the modified compressor and a two-stage turbine were obtained and compared to those of the compressor with original blade angles and the same turbine.

  9. Cancer Staging

    MedlinePLUS

    ... over time. They continue to change as scientists learn more about cancer. Some staging systems cover many ... cancer treatment summaries that describe the staging of adult and childhood cancers. Information about cancer staging can ...

  10. Vinorelbine is well tolerated and active in the treatment of elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A two-stage phase II study.

    PubMed

    Gridelli, C; Perrone, F; Gallo, C; De Marinis, F; Ianniello, G; Cigolari, S; Cariello, S; Di Costanzo, F; D'Aprile, M; Rossi, A; Migliorino, R; Bartolucci, R; Bianco, A R; Pergola, M; Monfardini, S

    1997-03-01

    More than 30% of lung cancers arise in patients aged 70 years or more; however, because elderly patients are not considered to tolerate chemotherapy, they are generally excluded from clinical trials and are not considered eligible for aggressive cisplatin-based chemotherapy in clinical practice. The aims of the present study were to test tolerability and activity of weekly vinorelbine in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients aged 70 years or more, and to define whether minimum conditions existed for a randomised comparison with best supportive care. The study was designed as a multicentre two-stage phase II trial according to Simon's optimal design: 8 or more responses out of 43 treated patients were expected at the end of the trial. Patients aged 70 years or more were eligible if they had a cytological or histological diagnosis of NSCLC at stage IIIb-IV and a performance status less than or equal to two according to the ECOG scale. Vinorelbine was given intravenously (i.v.) at a dose of 30 mg/m2 every week for 12 doses. As planned, 43 patients entered the study; median age was 73 years (range 70-80); 11 patients were older than 75 years. Median dose-intensity (mg/m2/week) of vinorelbine was 21.2 (range 7.5-30) and was not affected by age of patients. Toxicity was generally mild, mainly haematological and never life-threatening. ECOG performance status improved in 26% of patients; cough and pain improved in more than 40% of patients symptomatic at entry, while dyspnoea improved in 28%; approximately half the patients had a stabilisation of their symptoms. 10 patients (23-95% exact confidence interval (CI): 12-39%) obtained a partial response. Median time to progression was 11 weeks (95% CI 8-30) and median survival 36 weeks (95% CI 28-53). One-year estimated progression-free and overall survival rates are 16% and 36%, respectively. In conclusion, vinorelbine was well tolerated and active in the treatment of elderly NSCLC patients. A phase III trial (ELVIS-Elderly Lung Cancer Vinorelbine Italian Study) comparing best supportive care versus best supportive care plus vinorelbine is now ongoing. PMID:9155522

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-19

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  12. THE ARGILLIC HORIZON AND DOMINANT CARBONATE STAGE

    E-print Network

    THE ARGILLIC HORIZON AND DOMINANT CARBONATE STAGE Map Units With More Than One Stage I,III (3,794 - 2) III,IV (20,778 - 12) Argillic horizon and stage I carbonate (13,769 - 8) Argillic horizon and stage II carbonate (1,641 - 1) Argillic horizon and stage III carbonate (26,565 - 14) Argillic horizon

  13. Lernpunkt Deutsch--Stage 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theil, Elvira

    1997-01-01

    Evaluates the first stage of "Lernpunkt Deutsch," a new three-stage German course designed for upper elementary and early secondary school. Describes the publisher's package of materials and the appropriateness of the course, utility of the different package elements, format of the materials, and assesses whether the course provides pedagogically…

  14. Phase I/II Study of Postoperative Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Advanced-Stage Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck (cSCCHN)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-17

    Recurrent Skin Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity

  15. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  16. Surgical management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Vincent G.; Kanagarajah, Prashanth

    2011-01-01

    Upper tract urothelial cell carcinoma accounts for 5% of all urothelial tumors. Compared to lower urinary tract tumors, upper tract urothelial carcinoma is diagnosed more frequently at advanced stages. Open radical nephroureterectomy remains the gold standard treatment option for upper tract tumors. However, with the advancement of minimally invasive techniques and the benefits of these procedures regarding perioperative morbidity, cosmesis, and earlier convalescence, these options have shown promise in managing the patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma. Despite the perioperative advantages, concerns exist on the oncological safety after minimally invasive surgery. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of the surgical management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma. PMID:21716884

  17. Long-term prognostic and predictive factors in 107 stage II/III breast cancer patients treated with anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Brain, E.; Garrino, C.; Misset, J. L.; Carbonero, I. G.; Itzhaki, M.; Cvitkovic, E.; Goldschmidt, E.; Burki, F.; Regensberg, C.; Pappo, E.; Hagipantelli, R.; Musset, M.

    1997-01-01

    The heterogeneity of therapeutic modalities and eligibility criteria and the lack of long-term follow-up in most reports of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer preclude us from drawing conclusions about its value in clinically relevant patient subgroups. The present study aims to identify predictive and prognostic factors in 107 non-inflammatory stage II/III breast cancer patients treated between November 1980 and October 1991 with an anthracycline-based induction regimen before locoregional surgery. Preoperative chemotherapy comprised 3-6 cycles of doxorubicin (pirarubicin after 1986), vindesine, cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil. Type of subsequent surgery and adjuvant treatment were decided individually. In analysis of outcome, univariate comparisons of end points were made using the log-rank test, and significant (P < or = 0.05) pre- and post-therapeutic factors were incorporated in a Cox multivariate analysis. With a median follow-up of 81 months (range 32-164+ months), the median disease-free survival (DFS) is 90.5 months while median overall survival has not yet been reached. Cytoprognostic grade and histopathological response in both the primary and lymph nodes were independent covariates associated with locoregional relapse with or without DFS and overall survival. Eleven patients with pathological complete response remain free of disease with a 68-month median follow-up, while the 18 with residual microscopic disease on the specimen showed a 60% cumulative incidence of locoregional recurrence. Despite encouraging response rates based on clinical or radiological evaluation (87% or 70%), neither method showed any significant correlation with pathological response and failed to contribute prognostic information on patients' outcome. Pathological evaluation of antitumoral activity of primary chemotherapy remains a major source of prognostic information and might be used to select patients in need of additional adjuvant treatment. PMID:9155059

  18. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced (Stage II and worse) head-and-neck cancer: Dosimetric and clinical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Portaluri, Maurizio [Department of Radiotherapy, AUSL Br-1, 'Di Summa-Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy) and National Research Council, IFC, Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: portaluri@hotmail.com; Fucilli, Fulvio I.M. [Department of Medical Physics, AUSL Br-1, 'Di Summa-Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Castagna, Roberta [Department of Radiotherapy, AUSL Br-1, 'Di Summa-Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Bambace, Santa [Department of Radiotherapy, AUSL Br-1, 'Di Summa-Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Pili, Giorgio [Department of Medical Physics, AUSL Br-1, 'Di Summa-Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Tramacere, Francesco [Department of Radiotherapy, AUSL Br-1, 'Di Summa-Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Russo, Donatella [Department of Radiotherapy, AUSL Br-1, 'Di Summa-Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy); Francavilla, Maria Carmen [Department of Radiotherapy, AUSL Br-1, 'Di Summa-Perrino' Hospital, Brindisi (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck tumors (Stage II and above) and the effects on xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were consecutively treated with 3D-CRT using a one-point setup technique; 17 had larynx cancer, 12 oropharynx, 12 oral cavity, and 6 nasopharynx cancer; 2 had other sites of cancer. Of the 49 patients, 41 received postoperative RT and 8 definitive treatment. Also, 13 were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy before and during RT; in 6 cases, 5-fluorouracil was added. The follow-up time was 484-567 days (median, 530 days). Results: One-point setup can deliver 96% of the prescribed dose to the isocenter, to the whole planning target volume, including all node levels of the neck and without overdosages. The mean dose to the primary planning target volume was 49.54 {+-} 4.82 Gy (51.53 {+-} 5.47 Gy for larynx cases). The average dose to the contralateral parotid gland was approximately 38 Gy (30 Gy for larynx cases). The maximal dose to the spinal cord was 46 Gy. A Grade 0 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia score corresponded to a mean dose of 30 Gy to one parotid gland. A lower xerostomia score with a lower mean parotid dose and longer follow-up seemed to give rise to a sort of functional recovery phenomenon. Conclusion: Three dimensional-CRT in head-and-neck cancers permits good coverage of the planning target volume with about 10-11 segments and one isocenter. With a mean dose of approximately 30 Gy to the contralateral parotid, we observed no or mild xerostomia.

  19. Adding nebivolol to ongoing antihypertensive therapy improves blood pressure and response rates in patients with uncontrolled stage I-II hypertension.

    PubMed

    Neutel, J M; Smith, D H G; Gradman, A H

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed blood pressure (BP) reductions and response rates following addition of nebivolol to ongoing antihypertensive therapy in patients with uncontrolled stage I-II hypertension despite antihypertensive treatment. Patients with an average sitting diastolic BP (SiDBP) > or =90 and < or =109 mm Hg while taking an antihypertensive regimen were included in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. The primary efficacy end point was reduction from baseline to week 12 in mean trough SiDBP. In total, 669 patients were randomized to once-daily nebivolol 5, 10 or 20 mg or placebo. Addition of nebivolol 5, 10 and 20 mg significantly reduced BP; placebo-subtracted least squares mean reductions in trough SiDBP were -3.3, -3.5 and -4.6 mm Hg, respectively (P<0.001) and -5.7, -3.7 and -6.2 mm Hg in trough sitting systolic BP (SiSBP), respectively (P< or =0.015). Adding nebivolol 5-20 mg resulted in significantly more responders (SiDBP <90 or > or =10 mm Hg reduction; range: 53.0-65.1 vs 41.3% with placebo; P< or =0.028) and significantly better control rates (SiSBP/SiDBP <140/90 mm Hg; range: 41.3-52.7 vs 29.3% with placebo; P< or =0.029). Nebivolol was well tolerated; the incidence of adverse events with nebivolol was similar to that with placebo (40.2 vs 38.9%, respectively; P=0.763). Addition of once-daily nebivolol to ongoing antihypertensive therapy provided significant additional BP reductions and better response rates in patients with uncontrolled hypertension and was well tolerated. PMID:19404314

  20. A Comparison of Laparoscopic and Abdominal Radical Parametrectomy for Cervical or Vaginal Apex Carcinoma and Stage II Endometrial Cancer After Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Qu, Lianxi; Hua, Keqin; Xu, Huan; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: Radical parametrectomy (RP), performed either abdominally (ARP) or laparoscopically (LRP), is a viable alternative to radiotherapy in treating invasive cervical cancer, vaginal apex cancer, and endometrial cancer that is more advanced than initially suspected after hysterectomy. We carried out a comparative study on intra- and postoperative parameters between the two performed by similarly experienced surgeons. Methods: Forty consecutive patients indicative for RP were reviewed: 22 and 18 underwent ARP and LRP, respectively. Information was collected on demographics, indications for initial and this surgery, tumor characteristics, intra- and postoperative parameters, and complications. The lengths of resected parametrial and vaginal tissues were measured. Results: Compared with ARP, LRP resulted in shorter operative time (200 vs 239 min), less blood loss (627.8 vs 929.5 mL), shorter hospital stay (16.8 vs 19.9 days), and removal of more pelvic lymph nodes (27.4 ± 5.9 vs 23.1 ± 7.1). Although it was not attempted in ARP to remove lymph nodes in the deep obturator space, it was attempted in LRP and one positive node was found. In the ARP cohort there was one case of injury to the small intestine during surgery, whereas in LRP there was one instance of lower urologic fistula after surgery. Conclusion: LRP is superior to ARP in terms of shorter operative time, less blood loss, and shorter hospital stay while still maintaining the completeness of the procedure. It can be safely performed in the hands of experienced surgeons for cervical or vaginal apex carcinoma and stage II endometrial cancer after hysterectomy. PMID:23925019

  1. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy Using Carboplatin, Tegafur-Uracil and Leucovorin for Stage III and IV Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of GORTEC Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fesneau, Melanie; Pointreau, Yoann; Chapet, Sophie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Kaplan Center, Tours (France); Martin, Laurent [Department of Radiation Oncology, Guillaume le Conquerant Center, Le Havre (France); Pommier, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leon Berard Center, Lyon (France); Alfonsi, Marc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sainte Catherine Center, Avignon (France); Laguerre, Brigitte [Department of Radiation Oncology, Eugene Marquis Center, Rennes (France); Feham, Nasreddine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Louis Pas43teur Hospital, Colmar (France); Berger, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint Jean Center, Saint-Doulchard (France); Garaud, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Henry Kaplan Center, Tours (France); Calais, Gilles, E-mail: calais@med.univ-tours.f [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Kaplan Center, Tours (France)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of locally advanced, nonresectable, head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, the optimal chemotherapy regimen is still controversial. The objective of this Phase II study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant treatment using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, carboplatin, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 77 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma Stage III and IVA were enrolled between October 2003 and July 2005. Of the 77 patients, 72 were eligible. They were treated with tegafur-uracil (300 mg/m{sup 2}/d) and leucovorin (75 mg/d) from Days 1 to 19 and from Days 29 to 47 and carboplatin (70 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously for 4 consecutive days), in three cycles every 21 days. Conventional radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Results: With a mean follow-up of 22.8 months, the 3-year locoregional control, overall survival and disease-free survival actuarial rate was 33.1%, 41.9%, and 27.2%, respectively. The compliance of the treatment was correct. The main acute toxicity was mucositis, with 62% Grade 3-4. Three patients (4.2%) died of acute toxicity. The incidence and severity of late toxicity was acceptable, with 32% Grade 3 and no Grade 4 toxicity. Conclusion: The protocol of concomitant chemoradiotherapy using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, and carboplatin for locally advanced unresectable head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma is feasible. The compliance was correct. The incidence and severity of the acute and late toxicities were acceptable, but not improved. The efficacy of this regimen seems equivalent to the main protocols of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. It represents a possible alternative for patients without an intravenous catheter.

  2. Results of a comparative, phase III, 12-week, multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind assessment of the efficacy and tolerability of a fixed-dose combination of telmisartan and amlodipine versus amlodipine monotherapy in Indian adults with stage II hypertension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akhilesh Sharma; Ananda Bagchi; Satish B. Kinagi; Yogesh Kumar Sharma; Vidyagauri P. Baliga; Chandrashekhar Bollmall

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a new fixed-dose combination (FDC) of telmisartan 40 mg + amlodipine 5 mg (T+A) compared with amlodipine 5-mg monotherapy (A) in adult Indian patients with stage II hypertension.Methods: This comparative, Phase III, 12-week, multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind study was conducted in Indian patients aged 18 to

  3. Adjuvant Radio-Chemotherapy with 5Fluorouracil and Leucovorin in Stage II and III Rectal Cancer: 12 Months vs. 6 Months of Therapy. A Study of the Association for Medical Oncology of the German Cancer Society

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Queißer; G. Hartung; A. Kopp-Schneider; P. Diezler; E. Hagmüller; A. Baur; J. Weniger; C. Wojatshcek; N. Janssen; D. Hossfeld; H. Lindemann; T. Schnabel; L. Edler

    2000-01-01

    Summary Background: Postoperative radio-chemotherapy has been established as standard treatment for stage II and III rectal cancer patients. However, modulation and schedule of administration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy are still subject of discussion. In a prospectively randomized study we compared 12 vs. 6 months of 5-FU/leucovorin (LV) chemo-radiotherapy in locally advanced or node-positive rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients with

  4. Circulating HER2 mRNA-positive cells in the peripheral blood of patients with stage I and II breast cancer after the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy: evaluation of their clinical relevance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Apostolaki; M. Perraki; A. Pallis; V. Bozionelou; S. Agelaki; P. Kanellou; A. Kotsakis; E. Politaki; K. Kalbakis; A. Kalykaki; L. Vamvakas; V. Georgoulias; D. Mavroudis

    2007-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) expressing HER2 messenger RNA (mRNA) after the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in women with operable breast cancer. Patients and methods: HER2 mRNA-positive CTCs were detected by nested RT-PCR in the peripheral blood of 214 patients with stage I and II breast cancer after

  5. Docetaxel and cisplatin as induction chemotherapy in patients with pathologically-proven stage IIIA N2 non-small cell lung cancer: a phase II study of the European organization for research and treatment of cancer (EORTC 08984)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Biesma; C. Manegold; H. J. M. Smit; L. Willems; C. Legrand; A. Passioukov; J. P. van Meerbeeck; G. Giaccone

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this phase II study was to document activity and toxicity of docetaxel and cisplatin as induction chemotherapy in patients with stage IIIA N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) before definitive local treatment. Forty-six chemotherapy-na?¨ve patients (median age 60 years) were included. Treatment consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel (85 mg\\/m2 on day 1), followed by cisplatin (40

  6. Cryogenic Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, David

    2011-01-01

    The CPS is an in-space cryogenic propulsive stage based largely on state of the practice design for launch vehicle upper stages. However, unlike conventional propulsive stages, it also contains power generation and thermal control systems to limit the loss of liquid hydrogen and oxygen due to boil-off during extended in-space storage. The CPS provides the necessary (Delta)V for rapid transfer of in-space elements to their destinations or staging points (i.e., E-M L1). The CPS is designed around a block upgrade strategy to provide maximum mission/architecture flexibility. Block 1 CPS: Short duration flight times (hours), passive cryo fluid management. Block 2 CPS: Long duration flight times (days/weeks/months), active and passive cryo fluid management.

  7. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi, E-mail: junsaito@sannet.ne.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi [Division of Respiratory Disease, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shibuya, Kei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  8. XUV-Exposed, Non-Hydrostatic Hydrogen-Rich Upper Atmospheres of Terrestrial Planets. Part II: Hydrogen Coronae and Ion Escape

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, Helmut; Holmström, Mats; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V.; Leitzinger, Martin; Khodachenko, Maxim L.; Kulikov, Yuri N.; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We studied the interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star, such as GJ 436, and the hydrogen-rich upper atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and a “super-Earth” with a radius of 2 REarth and a mass of 10 MEarth, located within the habitable zone at ?0.24?AU. We investigated the formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influences of the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause), and the loss of planetary pickup ions on the evolution of hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres. Stellar XUV fluxes that are 1, 10, 50, and 100 times higher compared to that of the present-day Sun were considered, and the formation of high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to the charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions was modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with planetary hydrogen atoms, and photoionization, lead to the production of initially cold ions of planetary origin. We found that the ion production rates for the studied planets can vary over a wide range, from ?1.0×1025 s?1 to ?5.3×1030 s?1, depending on the stellar wind conditions and the assumed XUV exposure of the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that most likely the majority of these planetary ions are picked up by the stellar wind and lost from the planet. Finally, we estimated the long-time nonthermal ion pickup escape for the studied planets and compared them with the thermal escape. According to our estimates, nonthermal escape of picked-up ionized hydrogen atoms over a planet's lifetime within the habitable zone of an M dwarf varies between ?0.4 Earth ocean equivalent amounts of hydrogen (EOH) to <3 EOH and usually is several times smaller in comparison to the thermal atmospheric escape rates. Key Words: Stellar activity—Low-mass stars—Early atmospheres—Earth-like exoplanets—Energetic neutral atoms—Ion escape—Habitability. Astrobiology 13, 1030–1048. PMID:24283926

  9. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil adjuvant chemotherapy following three-field lymph node dissection for stage II/III N1, 2 esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    HASHIGUCHI, TADASUKE; NASU, MOTOMI; HASHIMOTO, TAKASHI; KUNIYASU, TETSUJI; INOUE, HIROHUMI; SAKAI, NORITAKA; OUCHI, KAZUTOMO; AMANO, TAKAYUKI; ISAYAMA, FUYUMI; TOMITA, NATSUMI; IWANUMA, YOSHIMI; TSURUMARU, MASAHIKO; KAJIYAMA, YOSHIAKI

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel + cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (DCF) in lymph node metastasis-positive esophageal cancer, we retrospectively analyzed 139 patients with stage II/III (non-T4) esophageal cancer with lymph node metastasis (1–6 nodes), who did not receive preoperative treatment and underwent three-field lymph node dissection in the Juntendo University Hospital between December, 2004 and December, 2009. The tumors were histologically diagnossed as squamous cell carcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups, a surgery alone group (S group, 88 patients) and a group that received postoperative DCF therapy (DCF group, 51 patients). The disease-free and overall survival were compared between the groups and a multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was performed. The same analysis was performed for cases classified as N1 and N2, according to the TNM classification. There were no significant differences between the S and DCF groups regarding clinicopathological factors other than intramural metastasis and main tumor location. The presence of intramural metastasis, blood vessel invasion and the number of lymph nodes were identified as prognostic factors. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival were 55.8 and 57.3%, respectively, in the S group and 52.8 and 63.0%, respectively, in the DCF group. These differences were not considered to be statistically significant (P=0.789 and 0.479 for disease-free and overall survival, respectively). Although there were no significant differences in disease-free and overall survival between the S and DCF groups in N1 cases, both disease-free and overall survival were found to be better in the DCF group (54.2 and 61.4%, respectively) compared to the S group (29.6 and 28.8%, respectively) in N2 cases (P=0.029 and 0.020 for disease-free and overall survival, respectively). Therefore, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with DCF was shown to improve disease-free and overall survival in moderate lymph node metastasis-positive cases (N2), suggesting that the DCF regimen may be effective as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with lymph node metastasis from esophageal cancer. PMID:25054036

  10. Managing type II work-related upper limb disorders in keyboard and mouse users who remain at work: a case series report.

    PubMed

    Povlsen, Bo; Rose, Robyn-Lee

    2008-01-01

    Work-related upper limb disorders (WRULDs) are difficult to diagnose due to the limited availability of recognized objective assessment methods. This case series report demonstrates the use of the "typing capacity cycle" test and standardized clinical tests as outcome measures to assess work capacity in four high-intensity keyboard and mouse users who remain at work before and after the implementation of a six-month treatment program. Pain intensity, the duration of pain before treatment, the duration of treatment, type of work, and the location of the pain were recorded for each patient. Function was assessed before and after treatment using the Functional Grading Scale. The assessment results were analyzed to determine any improvements made after rehabilitation. The outcomes indicate that all patients improved their resting pain and work capacity with the three-phase rehabilitation program. PMID:18215754

  11. Stage Separation Failure: Model Based Diagnostics and Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchinsky, Dmitry; Hafiychuk, Vasyl; Kulikov, Igor; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Hanson, John; Hill, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    Safety of the next-generation space flight vehicles requires development of an in-flight Failure Detection and Prognostic (FD&P) system. Development of such system is challenging task that involves analysis of many hard hitting engineering problems across the board. In this paper we report progress in the development of FD&P for the re-contact fault between upper stage nozzle and the inter-stage caused by the first stage and upper stage separation failure. A high-fidelity models and analytical estimations are applied to analyze the following sequence of events: (i) structural dynamics of the nozzle extension during the impact; (ii) structural stability of the deformed nozzle in the presence of the pressure and temperature loads induced by the hot gas flow during engine start up; and (iii) the fault induced thrust changes in the steady burning regime. The diagnostic is based on the measurements of the impact torque. The prognostic is based on the analysis of the correlation between the actuator signal and fault-induced changes in the nozzle structural stability and thrust.

  12. Canadian Computing Competition 2010 Stage 2

    E-print Network

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Canadian Computing Competition 2010 Stage 2 Summary Stage 2 of the Canadian Computing Competition occurred May 3-7, 2010 at the University of Waterloo. Based on results from Stage 1 and Stage 2 Mills C.I. North York, ON ZHOU ZIJIAN Beijing No. 4 High School Beijing, CHINA (II) JONATHAN ZUNG

  13. MTHFR-1298 A>C (rs1801131) is a predictor of survival in two cohorts of stage II/III colorectal cancer patients treated with adjuvant fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Cecchin, E; Perrone, G; Nobili, S; Polesel, J; De Mattia, E; Zanusso, C; Petreni, P; Lonardi, S; Pella, N; D'Andrea, M; Errante, D; Rizzolio, F; Mazzei, T; Landini, I; Mini, E; Toffoli, G

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant treatment based on fluoropyrimidines (FL) improves the prognosis of stage II/III colorectal cancer (CRC). Validated predictive/prognostic biomarkers would spare therapy-related morbidity in patients with a good prognosis. We compared the impact of a set of 22 FL-related polymorphisms with the prognosis of two cohorts of CRC patients treated with adjuvant FL with or without OXA, including a total of 262 cases. 5,10-Methylentetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) MTHFR-1298 A>C (rs1801131) polymorphism had a concordant effect: MTHFR-rs1801131-1298CC genotype carriers had a worse disease free survival (DFS) in both the cohorts. In the pooled population MTHFR-rs1801131-1298CC carriers had also a worse overall survival. We computed a clinical score related to DFS including MTHFR-rs1801131, tumor stage, sex and tumor location, where rs1801131 is the most detrimental factor (hazard ratio=5.3, 95% confidence interval=2.2-12.9; P-value=0.0006). MTHFR-rs1801131 is a prognostic factor that could be used as an additional criteria for the choice of the proper adjuvant regimen in stage II/III colorectal cancer patients. PMID:25331073

  14. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, and double strand break genes as markers for response to radiotherapy in patients with Stage I to II head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carles, Joan [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital del Mar, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jcarles@imas.imim.es; Monzo, Mariano [Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Amat, Marta [Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital del Mar, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Jansa, Sonia [Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Artells, Rosa [Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Navarro, Alfons [Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Foro, Palmira [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital del Mar, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Alameda, Francesc [Department of Pathology, Hospital del Mar, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Gayete, Angel [Department of Radiology, Hospital del Mar, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Gel, Bernat [Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Miguel, Maribel [Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Albanell, Joan [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital del Mar, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Fabregat, Xavier [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital del Mar, University Autonoma of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes can influence response to radiotherapy. We analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in nine DNA repair genes in 108 patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNSCC) who had received radiotherapy only. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 to December 2004, patients with Stage I and II histopathologically confirmed HNSCC underwent radiotherapy. DNA was obtained from paraffin-embedded tissue, and SNP analysis was performed using a real-time polymerase chain reaction allelic discrimination TaqMan assay with minor modifications. Results: Patients were 101 men (93.5%) and 7 (6.5%) women, with a median age of 64 years (range, 40 to 89 years). Of the patients, 76 (70.4%) patients were Stage I and 32 (29.6%) were Stage II. The XPF/ERCC1 SNP at codon 259 and XPG/ERCC5 at codon 46 emerged as significant predictors of progression (p 0.00005 and 0.049, respectively) and survival (p = 0.0089 and 0.0066, respectively). Similarly, when variant alleles of XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5 and XPA were examined in combination, a greater number of variant alleles was associated with shorter time to progression (p = 0.0003) and survival (p 0.0002). Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms in XPF/ERCC1, XPG/ERCC5, and XPA may significantly influence response to radiotherapy; large studies are warranted to confirm their role in HNSCC.

  15. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-24

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Sensitive survey for 13CO, CN, H2CO, and SO in the disks of T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars. II. Stars in ? Ophiuchi and upper Scorpius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboussin, L.; Guilloteau, S.; Simon, M.; Grosso, N.; Wakelam, V.; Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Piétu, V.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We attempt to determine the molecular composition of disks around young low-mass stars in the ? Oph region and to compare our results with a similar study performed in the Taurus-Auriga region. Methods: We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to perform a sensitive search for CN N = 2-1 in 29 T Tauri stars located in the ? Oph and upper Scorpius regions. 13CO J = 2-1 is observed simultaneously to provide an indication of the level of confusion with the surrounding molecular cloud. The bandpass also contains two transitions of ortho-H2CO, one of SO, and the C17O J = 2-1 line, which provides complementary information on the nature of the emission. Results: Contamination by molecular cloud in 13CO and even C17O is ubiquitous. The CN detection rate appears to be lower than for the Taurus region, with only four sources being detected (three are attributable to disks). H2CO emission is found more frequently, but appears in general to be due to the surrounding cloud. The weaker emission than in Taurus may suggest that the average disk size in the ? Oph region is smaller than in the Taurus cloud. Chemical modeling shows that the somewhat higher expected disk temperatures in ? Oph play a direct role in decreasing the CN abundance. Warmer dust temperatures contribute to convert CN into less volatile forms. Conclusions: In such a young region, CN is no longer a simple, sensitive tracer of disks, and observations with other tracers and at high enough resolution with ALMA are required to probe the gas disk population. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Cardiovascular risk and mortality in end-stage renal disease patients undergoing dialysis: sleep study, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life: a prospective, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most serious public health problems. The increasing prevalence of CKD in developed and developing countries has led to a global epidemic. The hypothesis proposed is that patients undergoing dialysis would experience a marked negative influence on physiological variables of sleep and autonomic nervous system activity, compromising quality of life. Methods/Design A prospective, consecutive, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial is proposed to address the effect of dialysis on sleep, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life in patients with CKD. The measurement protocol will include body weight (kg); height (cm); body mass index calculated as weight/height2; circumferences (cm) of the neck, waist, and hip; heart and respiratory rates; blood pressures; Mallampati index; tonsil index; heart rate variability; maximum ventilatory pressures; negative expiratory pressure test, and polysomnography (sleep study), as well as the administration of specific questionnaires addressing sleep apnea, excessive daytime sleepiness, depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life. Discussion CKD is a major public health problem worldwide, and its incidence has increased in part by the increased life expectancy and increasing number of cases of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Sleep disorders are common in patients with renal insufficiency. Our hypothesis is that the weather weight gain due to volume overload observed during interdialytic period will influence the degree of collapsibility of the upper airway due to narrowing and predispose to upper airway occlusion during sleep, and to investigate the negative influences of haemodialysis in the physiological variables of sleep, and autonomic nervous system, and respiratory mechanics and thereby compromise the quality of life of patients. Trial registration The protocol for this study is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (ReBEC RBR-7yhr4w and World Health Organization under Universal Trial Number UTN: U1111-1127-9390 [http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/RBR-7yhr4w/]). PMID:24103561

  19. Trends in the Utilization of Adjuvant Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy and/or External Beam Radiation Treatment in Stage I and II Endometrial Cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Study

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Mehul K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Cote, Michele L. [Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Ali-Fehmi, Rouba [Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Buekers, Thomas; Munkarah, Adnan R. [Department of Women's Health Services, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Elshaikh, Mohamed A., E-mail: melshai1@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The optimal adjuvant radiation treatment for endometrial carcinoma (EC) remains controversial. Adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VB) has emerged as an increasingly common treatment modality. However, the time trends for using VB, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), or combined therapy (VB+EBRT) have not been well characterized. We therefore examined the utilization trends of VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT for adjuvant RT in International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology (FIGO) stage I and II EC over time. Methods and Materials: We evaluated treatment patterns for 48,122 patients with EC diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2005, using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) public use database. Chi-squared tests were used to assess differences by radiation type (VB, EBRT, and VB+EBRT) and various demographic and clinical variables. Results: Analyses were limited to 9,815 patients (20.4%) with EC who met the inclusion criteria. Among women who received adjuvant RT, the proportion receiving VB increased yearly (12.9% in 1995 compared to 32.8% in 2005 (p < 0.0001). The increasing use of VB was proportional to the decreasing use of EBRT (56.1% in 1995 to 45.8% in 2005; p < 0.0001) and VB+EBRT (31.0% in 1995 to 21.4% in 2005; p < 0.001). Conclusions: This population-based report demonstrates an increasing trend in the use of VB in the adjuvant setting after hysterectomy for treatment of women with FIGO stage I-II EC. VB alone appears to be replacing pelvic EBRT and VB+EBRT therapy in the management of stage I-II EC.

  20. Navigated Early Survivorship Transition in Improving Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I-III Breast, Lung, Prostate, or Colorectal Cancer and Their Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    Cancer Survivor; Caregiver; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Lung Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  1. Results from the Upper Limb International Spasticity Study-II (ULIS-II): a large, international, prospective cohort study investigating practice and goal attainment following treatment with botulinum toxin A in real-life clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Fheodoroff, Klemens; Jacinto, Jorge; Maisonobe, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe real-life practice and person-centred outcomes in the treatment of poststroke upper limb spasticity with botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A). Design Observational, prospective study. Setting 84 secondary care centres in 22 countries. Participants 456 adults (?18?years) with poststroke upper limb spasticity treated with one cycle of BoNT-A. Methods/outcomes Muscle selection, BoNT-A preparation, injection technique and timing of follow-up were conducted according to routine practice for each centre. Primary outcome: achievement of the patient's primary goal for treatment using goal-attainment scaling (GAS). Measurements of spasticity, standardised outcome measures and global benefits were also recorded. Results The median number of injected muscles was 5 (range 1–15) and the most frequently injected muscles were the long finger flexors, followed by biceps and brachioradialis. The median (range) follow-up time was 14 (2.6 to 32.3) weeks. The common primary treatment goals were passive function (132 (28.9%)), active function (104 (22.8%)), pain (61 (13.4%)), impairment (105 (23%)), involuntary movement (41 (9%)) and mobility (10 (2.2%)). Overall, 363 (79.6%) (95% CI 75.6% to 83.2%) patients achieved (or overachieved) their primary goal and 355 (75.4%) (95% CI 71.2% to 79.2%) achieved their secondary goal. Mean (SD) change from baseline in GAS T-scores was 17.6 (11.0) (95% CI 16.4 to 18.8; p<0.001). GAS T-scores were strongly correlated with global benefit and other standard measures (correlations of 0.38 and 0.63, respectively; p<0.001). Conclusions BoNT-A demonstrated a clinically significant effect on goal attainment for the real-life management of upper-limb spasticity following stroke. The study confirms the feasibility of a common international data set to collect systematic prospective data, and of using GAS to capture person-centred outcomes relating to passive and active functions and to pain. Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01020500 PMID:23794582

  2. A Longitudinal Comparison of Arm Morbidity in Stage I–II Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy, Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Followed by Completion Lymph Node Dissection, or Axillary Lymph Node Dissection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jan J. Kootstra; Josette E. H. M. Hoekstra-Weebers; Johan S. Rietman; Jakob de Vries; Peter C. Baas; Jan H. B. Geertzen; Harald J. Hoekstra

    2010-01-01

    Background  Long-term shoulder and arm function following sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) may surpass that following complete axillary\\u000a lymph node dissection (CLND) or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). We objectively examined the morbidity and compared\\u000a outcomes after SLNB, SLNB + CLND, and ALND in stage I\\/II breast cancer patients.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods  Breast cancer patients who had SLNB (n = 51), SLNB + CLND (n = 55), and ALND (n = 65)

  3. Scheduling Algorithms for Shared Fiber-Delay-Line Optical Packet Switches - Part II: The Three-Stage Clos-Network Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shi; Hu, Gang; Liew, Soung Y.; Chao, H. Jonathan

    2005-04-01

    In all-optical packet switching, packets may arrive at an optical switch in an uncoordinated fashion. To prevent packet loss in the switch,fiber delay lines (FDLs) are used as optical buffers to store optical packets. However, assigning FDLs to the arrival packets to achieve high throughput,low delay, and low loss rate is not a trivial task. In the authors' companion paper, several efficient scheduling algorithms were proposed for single-stage shared-FDL optical packet switches (OPSs). To further enhance the switch's scalability, this work was extended to a multistage case. In this paper, two scheduling algorithms are proposed: 1) sequential FDL assignment and 2) multicell FDL assignment algorithms for a three-stage optical Clos-Network switch (OCNS). The paper shows by simulation that a three-stage OCNS with these FDL assignment algorithms can achieve satisfactory performance.

  4. Concurrent radiochemotherapy for patients with stage III non-small–cell lung cancer (NSCLC): long-term results of a phase II study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Branislav Jeremic; Yuta Shibamoto; Biljana Milicic; Nebojsa Nikolic; Aleksandar Dagovic; Slobodan Milisavljevic

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and activity of concurrent radiochemotherapy in patients with Stage III nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).Materials and Methods: Forty-one patients were treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HfxRT) using 1.2 Gy bid, to a total of 69.6 Gy and concurrent low-dose daily chemotherapy (CHT) consisting of 30 mg of carboplatin (CBDCA) and 30 mg of etoposide (VP-16) given

  5. Microsatellite Instability and Loss of Heterozygosity at Chromosomal Location 18q: Prospective Evaluation of Biomarkers for Stages II and III Colon Cancer—A Study of CALGB 9581 and 89803

    PubMed Central

    Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Redston, Mark; Compton, Carolyn C.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Mayer, Robert J.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Colacchio, Thomas A.; Saltz, Leonard B.; Warren, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops as a result of a series of accumulated genomic changes that produce oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene loss. These characteristics may classify CRC into subsets of distinct clinical behaviors. Patients and Methods We studied two of these genomic defects—mismatch repair deficiency (MMR-D) and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomal location 18q (18qLOH)—in patients enrolled onto two phase III cooperative group trials for treatment of potentially curable colon cancer. These trials included prospective secondary analyses to determine the relationship between these markers and treatment outcome. A total of 1,852 patients were tested for MMR status and 955 (excluding patients with MMR-D tumors) for 18qLOH. Results Compared with stage III, more stage II tumors were MMR-D (21.3% v 14.4%; P < .001) and were intact at 18q (24.2% v 15.1%; P = .001). For the combined cohort, patients with MMR-D tumors had better 5-year disease-free survival (DFS; 0.76 v 0.67; P < .001) and overall survival (OS; 0.81 v 0.78; P = .029) than those with MMR intact (MMR-I) tumors. Among patients with MMR-I tumors, the status of 18q did not affect outcome, with 5-year values for patients with 18q intact versus 18qLOH tumors of 0.74 versus 0.65 (P = .18) for DFS and 0.81 versus 0.77 (P = .18) for OS. Conclusion We conclude that MMR-D tumor status, but not the presence of 18qLOH, has prognostic value for stages II and III colon cancer. PMID:21747089

  6. Phase II neoadjuvant clinical trial of carboplatin and eribulin in women with triple negative early-stage breast cancer (NCT01372579).

    PubMed

    Kaklamani, Virginia G; Jeruss, Jacqueline S; Hughes, Elisha; Siziopikou, Kalliopi; Timms, Kirsten M; Gutin, Alexander; Abkevich, Victor; Sangale, Zaina; Solimeno, Cara; Brown, Krystal L; Jones, Joshua; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Meservey, Caitlin; Jovanovic, Borko; Helenowski, Irene; Khan, Seema A; Bethke, Kevin; Hansen, Nora; Uthe, Regina; Giordano, Sara; Rosen, Steven; Hoskins, Kent; Von Roenn, Jamie; Jain, Sarika; Parini, Vamsi; Gradishar, William

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant treatment with carboplatin and eribulin in patients with early-stage triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), and to explore biomarkers based on DNA and protein expression profiles as predictors of response. Patients with histologically confirmed early-stage TNBC received carboplatin AUC 6 iv every 21 days, and eribulin 1.4 mg/m(2) day 1 and day 8 every 21 days for four cycles. The primary endpoint of the study was pathologic complete response (pCR), with secondary endpoints including clinical response and safety of the combination. Exploratory studies assessed DNA-based biomarkers [homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) score, and HR deficiency status (HRD score + BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation status)], protein-based biomarkers (Ki67, TP53, androgen receptor, Cyclin E, CDK2, Cyclin D, CDK4, Pin1 and Smad3), and clinical pretreatment factors as predictors of pCR. 13/30 (43.3 %) patients enrolled in the study achieved pCR. 24 (80.0 %) had a clinical complete or partial response. The combination was safe with mostly grade 1 and 2 toxicities. HRD score (P = 0.0024) and HR deficiency status (P = 0.0012) significantly predicted pCR. Pretreatment cytoplasmic CDK2 was also associated with pCR (P = 0.021). Significant differences in pre- versus post-treatment expression levels of nuclear Cyclin D (P = 0.020), nuclear CDK4 (P = 0.0030), and nuclear Smad3 (P = 0.015) were detected. The combination of carboplatin and eribulin is safe and efficacious in the treatment of early-stage TNBC. HRD score, HR deficiency status, and cytoplasmic CDK2 predicted pCR in this patient population. PMID:26006067

  7. Prospective, Risk-Adapted Strategy of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bral, Samuel, E-mail: samuelbral@yahoo.co.uk [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Gevaert, Thierry; Linthout, Nadine; Versmessen, Harijati; Collen, Christine; Engels, Benedikt [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Verdries, Douwe [Department of Radiology of the University Hospital Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Everaert, Hendrik [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Christian, Nicolas; De Ridder, Mark; Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Brussels, Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Validation of a prospective, risk-adapted strategy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with a T1-3N0M0 (American Joint Committee on Cancer 6th edition) NSCLC were accrued. Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group definition, patients were treated to a total dose of 60,Gy in three fractions for peripherally located lesions and four fractions for centrally located lesions. The primary endpoint was toxicity, graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute and late morbidity scoring system, and the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0. Secondary endpoints were local control and survival. Results: A total of 40 patients were included, 17 with a centrally located lesion. The lung toxicity-free survival estimate at 2 years was 74% and was related to the location (central vs. peripheral) and the size of the target volume. No dose volumetric parameters could predict the occurrence of lung toxicity. One patient died because of treatment-related toxicity. The 1-year and 2-year local progression-free survival estimates were 97% and 84%, respectively, and were related to stage (T1 vs. T2) related (p = 0.006). Local failure was not more frequent for patients treated in four fractions. The 1-year local progression-free survival estimate dropped below 80% for lesions with a diameter of more than 4 cm. Conclusion: The proposed risk-adapted strategy for both centrally and peripherally located lesions showed an acceptable toxicity profile while maintaining excellent local control rates. The correlation between local control and tumor diameter calls for the inclusion of tumor stage as a variable in future study design.

  8. Radiotherapy Compared to Other Strategies in the Treatment of Stage I/II Follicular Lymphoma: A Study of 404 Patients with a Median Follow-Up of 15 Years

    PubMed Central

    Barzenje, Dlawer Abdulla; Kolstad, Arne; Holte, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate outcome for patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) stage I-II treated at a population-based referral institution with a median follow-up of 15 years. Overall and cause-specific survival was compared to that of a sex, age and residency matched individuals from normal population. Material and Methods 404 patients with early stage FL treated between 1980 and 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. Two of three patients had stage I disease. Based on clinical characteristics, first line treatments were radiotherapy (RT) (48% of patients), chemotherapy (CT) (16%), combined chemo-and radiotherapy (CRT) (16%) or observation (OBS) (15%). Survival was modeled with Kaplan-Meier methodology. Multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox model. Results Fifteen years overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS) and time to next treatment (TNT) were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 45–55), 42% (95% CI: 36–47) and 48% (95% CI, 42–54), respectively. For patients treated with RT 97% achieved a complete remission, and 15 year OS, PFS and TNT were 57% (95% CI, 50–64), 46% (95% CI, 39–54) and 49% (95% CI, 42–57), respectively. Relapse rate after RT and CRT was 49% and 36%, respectively. Only 2% of patients who received RT or CRT relapsed inside the radiation field and 5% had isolated near-field relapse. No statistical differences were found between treatment groups regarding death from cardiovascular disease or incidence of second cancer. Compared to a matched normal population, non-lymphoma cancer mortality was higher among patients given RT, hazard ratio 1.66 (95% CI: 1.14–2.42; P<0.01). Compared to other treatment modalities, patients selected for observation without treatment did not have inferior outcome. Conclusions A differentiated treatment strategy in early stage FL results in long term survival for the majority of patients. OBS is a valid initial choice for selected patients without lymphoma-related symptoms. PMID:26147646

  9. Intertonguing of the Lower Part of the Uinta Formation with the Upper Part of the Green River Formation in the Piceance Creek Basin During the Late Stages of Lake Uinta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnell, John R.

    2009-01-01

    During most of middle Eocene time, a 1,500-mi2 area between the Colorado and White Rivers in northwestern Colorado was occupied by the Piceance lobe of Lake Uinta. This initially freshwater lake became increasingly saline throughout its history. Sediments accumulating in the lake produced mostly clay shale, limestone, and dolomite containing varying concentrations of organic matter. At the time of the maximum extent of the lake, the organic-rich Mahogany bed of the Green River Formation was deposited throughout the area. Shortly after its deposition, stream deposits began infilling the lake from the north through a series of contractions interspersed with minor expansions. This fluctuation of the shoreline resulted in the intertonguing of the stream sediments of the lower part of the overlying Uinta Formation with the lacustrine sediments of the upper part of the Green River over a distance of about 40 mi; construction of regional stratigraphic cross sections show the pattern of intertonguing in considerable detail. The data utilized in this study, which covered parts of Rio Blanco, Garfield, and Mesa counties, was derived from (1) geologic mapping of thirty-four 7 1/2-minute quadrangles and stratigraphic studies by geologists of the U.S. Geological Survey, and (2) shale-oil assay information from numerous cores. As a result of this previous work and the additional effort involved in the compilation here presented, more than a dozen Green River Formation tongues have been named, some formally, others informally. Middle Eocene strata above the Mahogany bed in the northern part of the study area are dominantly coarse clastics of the Uinta Formation. The sedimentary sequence becomes more calcareous and organic-rich to the south where, in a 400-mi2 area, a 250 ft-thick sequence of oil shale above the Mahogany bed contains an average of 16 gallons of oil per ton of shale and is estimated to contain 73 billion barrels of oil.

  10. Applications of NIR in early stage formulation development. Part II. Content uniformity evaluation of low dose tablets by principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiyong; Bagnol, Laurent; Berman, Maxine; Chiarella, Renato A; Gerber, Michael

    2009-10-01

    A near infrared method based on principal component analysis (PCA) was developed for predicting content uniformity of low dose tablets manufactured by a direct compression process. The work was conducted in early stage formulation development. NIR spectra of one hundred and eighty tablets from three feasibility batches were used as the pseudo-calibration set. A correlation was established between PCA scores and a set of reference values obtained by HPLC analysis. The reference values were also used to define a concentration range for the active pharmaceutical ingredient to facilitate content uniformity prediction by PCA. Analyses of unknown samples were conducted by forming a prediction set that included the calibration and unknown samples, followed by PCA. Samples from two development batches were predicted using the PCA model and the results were consistent with the reference HPLC values. Remarkably, the model was able to predict CU for tablets that were prepared using different grades of lactose (anhydrous versus monohydrate). Additionally, during this study, the impact of spectrum pretreatments on PCA is demonstrated. A brief discussion is given to highlight the advantages of PCA over partial least squares (PLS) regression for analysis of samples generated in early stage formulation development. PMID:19576977

  11. Transfer orbit stage (TOS) guidance and control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James R. Stuart; Marshall H. Kaplan; Randall E. Coffey; Thomas W. White

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the strap-down, ring laser gyro-based guidance and control system of the current Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) family of orbital transfer vehicles being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation. The paper begins with a summary review of the key features and guidance and control approaches used by that employed by the TOS family of upper stages. The TOS system

  12. Patient Preferences in Making Treatment Decisions in Patients With Stage I-IVA Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-14

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Tongue Cancer

  13. Patient Preferences in Making Treatment Decisions in Patients With Stage I-IVA Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-22

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Tongue Cancer

  14. Heat-flux measurements for the rotor of a full-stage turbine. II - Description of analysis technique and typical time-resolved measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. G.; George, W. K.; Rae, W. J.; Woodward, S. H.; Moller, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical technique for obtaining the time-resolved heat flux of a turbine blade is applied to the case of a TFE 731-2 hp full-stage rotating turbine. In order to obtain the heat flux values from the thin film gage temperature histories, a finite difference procedure is used to solve the heat equation with variable thermal properties. After setting out the data acquisition and analysis procedures, their application is illustrated for three midspan locations on the blade and operation at the design flow function. Results demonstrate that the magnitude of the heat flux fluctuation due to vane-balde interaction is large by comparison to the time-averaged heat flux at all investigated locations; FFT of a portion of the heat flux record illustrates that the dominant frequencies occur at the wake-cutting frequency and its harmonics.

  15. Tolerance of Three-Stage CIGS Deposition to Variations Imposed by Roll-to-Roll Processing: Phase II Annual Report, May 2003--May 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M. E.; Repins, I. L.

    2004-07-01

    Global Solar Energy, Inc. (GSE) and lower-tier subcontractor ITN Energy Systems, Inc. (ITN) are addressing process tolerance issues in this program. The definition and resolution of process tolerance issues satisfy many of the goals of the Thin Film Photovoltaics Partnerships Program (TFPPP). First, the investigation is likely to identify acceptable ranges for critical deposition parameters. This will have the benefit of providing upper and lower control limits for in-situ process monitoring components, thus increasing average efficiency as well as yield of product. Second, the exploration may uncover insensitivities to some processing procedures, allowing manufacture of modules at increased throughput and decreased cost. The exploration allows a quantitative evaluation of the trade-offs between performance, throughput, and costs. Third, the proposed program also satisfies the TFPPP goal of establishing a wider research and development base for higher-efficiency processing. Four th, the acquisition of data defining sensitivity to processing has important implications for the required accuracy of process sensors and control. Finally, the program helps the photovoltaic community advance toward a better understanding of CIGS growth, a longer-term goal of the TFPPP.

  16. Phase II MOR00208 in Combination With Lenalidomide for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CLL, SLL or PLL or Older Patients With Untreated CLL, SLL or PLL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-18

    Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  17. Multiple angle single stage scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlie, L.

    1982-02-02

    A scrubber for cleansing flue gases is disclosed. The scrubber includes a housing which defines a channel. The channel includes a scrubber stage wherein vertically spaced rows of deflecting members of l-shaped cross-section are disposed. In a given row of deflecting members, a plurality of flow paths are defined between horizontally adjacent deflecting members. Each deflecting member has an upper arm and a lower arm. The lowermost edge of the lower arms of the deflecting members in one row are disposed between vertical projections from the uppermost edges of upper arms of deflecting members in a row below the last mentioned row.

  18. Dose-volume histogram parameters of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for Stage I-II cervical cancer (?4cm) arising from a small-sized uterus treated with a point A dose-reduced plan.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akiko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Kuwako, Keiko; Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the rectal dose-sparing effect and tumor control of a point A dose-reduced plan in patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (?4 cm) arising from a small-sized uterus. Between October 2008 and August 2011, 19 patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (?4 cm) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the pelvis and CT-guided brachytherapy. Seven patients were treated with brachytherapy with standard loading of source-dwell positions and a fraction dose of 6 Gy at point A (conventional brachy-plan). The other 12 patients with a small uterus close to the rectum or small intestine were treated with brachytherapy with a point A dose-reduction to match D2cc of the rectum and <6 Gy as the dose constraint ('point A dose-reduced plan') instead of the 6-Gy plan at point A ('tentative 6-Gy plan'). The total doses from EBRT and brachytherapy were added up and normalized to a biological equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The median doses to the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 in the conventional brachy-plan, tentative 6-Gy plan and point A dose-reduced plan were 62 GyEQD2, 80 GyEQD2 and 64 GyEQD2, respectively. The median doses of rectal D2cc in the corresponding three plans were 42 GyEQD2, 62 GyEQD2 and 51 GyEQD2, respectively. With a median follow-up period of 35 months, three patients developed Grade-1 late rectal complications and no patients developed local recurrence. Our preliminary results suggested that CT-guided brachytherapy using an individualized point A dose-reduced plan might be useful for reducing late rectal complications while maintaining primary tumor control. PMID:24566721

  19. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Linda C., E-mail: Linda.watson@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Interdisciplinary Practice, Community Oncology, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Gies, Donna [Department of Radiation Oncology Nursing, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thompson, Emmanuel [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary Faculty of Science, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thomas, Bejoy [Department of Psychosocial Resources, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Alberta Health Services-Cancer Care, Calgary, AB (Canada); Department of Psychosocial Oncology, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using antiperspirants during their treatment, and the decision to use an antiperspirant or not in this setting should be left to the discretion of the patient.

  20. Quantum Adversary (Upper) Bound

    E-print Network

    Kimmel, Shelby

    2011-01-01

    We propose a method for upper bounding the general adversary bound for certain boolean functions. Due to the the tightness of query complexity and the general adversary bound \\cite{Lee2010}, this gives an upper bound on the quantum query complexity of those functions. We give an example where this upper bound is smaller than the query complexity of any known quantum algorithm.

  1. Validity of the ages and stages questionnaires in Korean compared to Bayley Scales of infant development-II for screening preterm infants at corrected age of 18-24 months for neurodevelopmental delay.

    PubMed

    Kwun, Yoojin; Park, Hye Won; Kim, Min-Ju; Lee, Byong Sop; Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validity of the ages and stages questionnaire in Korean (ASQ 1st edition, Korean Questionnaires, Seoul Community Rehabilitation Center, 2000) for premature infants. The study population consisted of 90 premature infants born between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, who were tested using the ASQ (Korean) and Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) (II) at a corrected age of 18-24 months. The validity of the ASQ (Korean) using cut-off values set at < -2 SD was examined by comparing it to the BSID (II) components, namely, the mental developmental index (MDI) or psychomotor developmental index (PDI), which were both set at < 85. The calculation of the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values of the ASQ (Korean) components revealed that they detected infants with neurodevelopmental delay with low sensitivity and positive predictive values, however, the communication domain showed moderate correlations with MDI. The failure in more than one domain of the ASQ (Korean) was significantly correlated with the failure in MDI. The ASQ (Korean) showed low validity for screening neurodevelopmentally delayed premature infants. PMID:25829813

  2. Early radiotherapy has an essential role for improving survival in patients with stage I-II nasal-type of NK/T cell lymphoma treated with L-asparaginase-containing chemotherapy--a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Zang, Jian; Li, Chen; Luo, Shan-Quan; Wang, Jian-Hua; Xu, Man; Zhao, Li-Na; Li, Wei-Wei; Yang, Hua; Xiao, Feng; Hitchcock, Ying J; Shi, Mei

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of early radiotherapy in patients with localized-stage nasal-type natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma treated with L-asparaginase-containing chemotherapy. Sixty-four patients with stage I-II nasal-type NK/T cell lymphoma were enrolled in this study. All patients received an L-asparaginase-containing regimen. Thirty-four patients received late radiotherapy (RT), which was defined as receiving 6 cycles of prior chemotherapy (CT) followed by RT, and 30 patients received early RT, which was defined as receiving no more than 3 cycles of CT followed by early RT. With a median follow-up of 35 months (range, 12-49 months), 19 patients (29.7 %) died from lymphoma-related causes, and 22 patients (34.4 %) developed local and/or distant relapse. The 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 84.2 and 74.3 % for early RT and 57.6 and 55.9 % for late RT, respectively, and these differences were significant (OS, p?=?0.027; PFS, p?=?0.034). After 2 cycles of initial CT, 58 patients achieved treatment response (complete response and partial response). For the 58 patients, there were still significant differences for 3-year OS and PFS when early RT was compared with late RT (3-year OS 94.4 vs. 58 %, P?=?0.005; 3-year PFS 82.9 vs. 56.3 %, P?=?0.01). Early RT has an essential role in improving survival for localized-stage nasal-type NK/T cell lymphoma (TCL) patients even when used in combination with L-asparaginase-containing CT. Prospective, randomized studies should to be performed to confirm these results. PMID:25409913

  3. Comprehensive Management of Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koukourakis, Georgios; Zacharias, Georgios; Koukourakis, Michael; Pistevou-Gobaki, Kiriaki; Papaloukas, Christos; Kostakopoulos, Athanasios; Kouloulias, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract represents only 5% of all urothelial cancers. The 5-year cancer-specific survival in the United States is roughly 75% with grade and stage being the most powerful predictors of survival. Nephroureterectomy with excision of the ipsilateral ureteral orifice and bladder cuff en bloc remains the gold standard treatment of the upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, while endoscopic and laparoscopic approaches are rapidly evolving as reasonable alternatives of care depending on grade and stage of disease. Several controversies remain in their management, including a selection of endoscopic versus laparoscopic approaches, management strategies on the distal ureter, the role of lymphadenectomy, and the value of chemotherapy in upper tract disease. Aims of this paper are to critically review the management of such tumors, including endoscopic management, laparoscopic nephroureterectomy and management of the distal ureter, the role of lymphadenectomy, and the emerging role of chemotherapy in their treatment. PMID:19096525

  4. Fusion-Activated Ca2+ Entry: An “Active Zone” of Elevated Ca2+ during the Postfusion Stage of Lamellar Body Exocytosis in Rat Type II Pneumocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wittekindt, Oliver H.; Haller, Thomas; Dietl, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is essential for vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in virtually all types of regulated exocytoses. However, in contrast to the well-known effects of a high cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in the prefusion phase, the occurrence and significance of Ca2+ signals in the postfusion phase have not been described before. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied isolated rat alveolar type II cells using previously developed imaging techniques. These cells release pulmonary surfactant, a complex of lipids and proteins, from secretory vesicles (lamellar bodies) in an exceptionally slow, Ca2+- and actin-dependent process. Measurements of fusion pore formation by darkfield scattered light intensity decrease or FM 1-43 fluorescence intensity increase were combined with analysis of [Ca2+]c by ratiometric Fura-2 or Fluo-4 fluorescence measurements. We found that the majority of single lamellar body fusion events were followed by a transient (t1/2 of decay?=?3.2 s) rise of localized [Ca2+]c originating at the site of lamellar body fusion. [Ca2+]c increase followed with a delay of ?0.2–0.5 s (method-dependent) and in the majority of cases this signal propagated throughout the cell (at ?10 µm/s). Removal of Ca2+ from, or addition of Ni2+ to the extracellular solution, strongly inhibited these [Ca2+]c transients, whereas Ca2+ store depletion with thapsigargin had no effect. Actin-GFP fluorescence around fused LBs increased several seconds after the rise of [Ca2+]c. Both effects were reduced by the non-specific Ca2+ channel blocker SKF96365. Conclusions/Significance Fusion-activated Ca2+ entry (FACE) is a new mechanism that leads to [Ca2+]c transients at the site of vesicle fusion. Substantial evidence from this and previous studies indicates that fusion-activated Ca2+ entry enhances localized surfactant release from type II cells, but it may also play a role for compensatory endocytosis and other cellular functions. PMID:20544027

  5. The occurrence, acoustic characteristics, and significance of submerged reefs on the continental shelf edge and upper slope, northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xishuang; Li, Xinzhong; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Lejun; Zhou, Songwang

    2015-06-01

    Comprehensive research was performed to investigate the existence of submerged reefs on the continental shelf edge and upper slope outside the Pearl River estuary in the northern South China Sea to analyze the morphology and distribution of the coral reefs, identify their ages, and discuss their paleoenvironmental significance. The results show that the submerged reefs are distributed on the topographic high of the continental shelf and upper slope at a water depth of 140-420 m, with an outcropping area of over 700 km2. The submerged reefs are mainly topographically characterized by low mound protrusions, several to 20 m above the modern seafloor, and they exhibit three typical acoustic facies in the acoustic profile: punctate reflection, planar reflection, and mound reflection. Based on various geophysical data, we propose at least four stages (I-IV) of submerged reefs on the continental shelf edge and upper slope: The oldest stage I submerged reefs are covered by loose sedimentary strata of >100 m thickness, a minority of stage II submerged reefs outcrop on the modern seafloor, and most stage III and IV submerged reefs outcrop on the seafloor. The submerged reefs developed on the top of the sandy or muddy substrate on the continental shelf edge and upper slope and formed during a period of low sea level. Sea-level changes controlled periodic reef formation events, with stage I, II, and IV reef formation events corresponding to three low-sea-level events, i.e., at 1450, 600, and 20 ky B.P. Based on the maximum water depth (?220 m) where the last glacial submerged reefs appeared, we estimate that the sea level during the last glacial maximum fell by ?132-152 m. Further geophysical surveys and sampling need to be performed to clarify the actual distribution, type, and age of the submerged reefs in the study area.

  6. Performance of Single-Stage Turbine of Mark 25 Torpedo Power Plant with Two Special Nozzles. II; Efficiency with 20 Degrees-Inlet-Angle Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schum, Harold J.; Whitney, Warren J.

    1949-01-01

    A single-stage modification of the turbine from a Mark 25 torpedo power plant was investigated to determine the performance with two nozzle designs in combination with special rotor blades having a 20 inlet angle. The performance is presented in terms of blade, rotor, and brake efficiency as a function of blade-jet speed ratio for pressure ratios of 8, 15 (design), and 20. The blade efficiency with the nozzle having circular pas- sages (K) was equal to or higher than that with the nozzle having rectangular passages (J) for all pressure ratios and speeds investigated. The maximum blade efficiency of 0.571 was obtained with nozzle K at a pressure ratio of 8 and a blade-jet speed ratio of 0.296. The difference in blade efficiency was negligible at a pressure ratio of 8 at the low speeds; the maxim difference was 0.040 at a pressure ratio of 20 and a blade-jet speed ratio of 0.260.

  7. Is Regional Lymph Node Irradiation Necessary in Stage II to III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Pathologic Node Status After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Daveau, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Stevens, Denise [Department of Biostatistics, Centre Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Brain, Etienne [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France)

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) generally induces significant changes in the pathologic extent of disease. This potential down-staging challenges the standard indications of adjuvant radiation therapy. We assessed the utility of lymph node irradiation (LNI) in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic N0 status (pN0) after NAC and breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: Among 1,054 BC patients treated with NAC in our institution between 1990 and 2004, 248 patients with clinical N0 or N1 to N2 lymph node status at diagnosis had pN0 status after NAC and BCS. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRR-FS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: All 248 patients underwent breast irradiation, and 158 patients (63.7%) also received LNI. With a median follow-up of 88 months, the 5-year LRR-FS and OS rates were respectively 89.4% and 88.7% with LNI and 86.2% and 92% without LNI (no significant difference). Survival was poorer among patients who did not have a pathologic complete primary tumor response (hazard ratio, 3.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-7.99) and in patients with N1 to N2 clinical status at diagnosis (hazard ratio = 2.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-4.36). LNI did not significantly affect survival. Conclusions: Relative to combined breast and local lymph node irradiation, isolated breast irradiation does not appear to be associated with a higher risk of locoregional relapse or death among cN0 to cN2 breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC. These results need to be confirmed in a prospective study.

  8. Mountain Stage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mountain Stage, a famous Charleston, West Virginia, venue where folk musicians play, is broadcast on National Public Radio, and can be heard on the NPR website, simply by clicking on "Listen", next to the artist's picture and brief bio. Visitors wishing to read more about the artist's musical history can click on the name of the artist next to their picture. Included in the history is their set list for the broadcast show. Visitors can comment on each artist's show, or recommend it to other visitors, by clicking on the icons at the bottom of each brief bio on the homepage.

  9. J STAGE

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Developed by the Japan Science and Technology Corporation (JST), J-STAGE (The Japan Science and Technology Aggregator, Electronic) is a recently launched electronic journal center that publishes and disseminates Japanese electronic scientific journals. At present, the site hosts four journals (one of which is Japanese only), but expects to add over a hundred in the near future. The three available English-language journals include the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, the Journal of the Physical Society of Japan, and SHIGEN-TO-SOZAI, a journal of the Mining and Materials Processing Institute of Japan. The full-text articles are available free of charge with searchable back issues also available.

  10. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  11. Let the Volgian stage stay in the Jurassic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. Zakharov; M. A. Rogov

    2008-01-01

    In 1996 the Volgian Stage was divided into the Jurassic and Cretaceous units, removed from the Geological Time Scale, and substituted by the Tithonian Stage according to the guidelines of the Interdepartmental Stratigraphic Committee of the Russian Federation (ISC RF). Consequently, the Upper Volgian Substage including three zones (five subzones) was placed into the Berriasian Stage (the Cretaceous) proceeding from

  12. Long-term Survival Outcomes Following Internal Mammary Node Irradiation in Stage II-III Breast Cancer: Results of a Large Retrospective Study With 12-Year Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae; Lee, Ik Jae; Keum, Ki Chang; Lee, Chang Geol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Doo Ho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok, E-mail: cosuh317@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Seung Jae, E-mail: sjhuh@smc.samsung.co.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) on disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy and postoperative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 396 patients with stage II-III breast cancer were treated with postmastectomy radiation therapy with (n=197) or without (n=199) IMNI. Patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. IMNI was administered at the clinical discretion of the treating physician. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45.0-59.4 Gy) in 28 fractions, with inclusion of the supraclavicular fossa in 96% of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 99.7% of the patients and endocrine therapy to 53%. Results: The median follow-up was 149 months (range, 124-202). IMNI patients had more advanced nodal stage and non-high grade tumors than those without IMNI (P<.001). Otherwise, disease and treatment characteristics were well balanced. The 10-year DFS with and without IMNI was 65% and 57%, respectively (P=.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that IMNI was an independent, positive predictor of DFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P=.02). Benefits of IMNI in DFS were seen most apparently in N2 patients (HR, 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.74) and inner/central tumors (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.90). The 10-year OS with and without IMNI was 72% and 66%, respectively (P=.62). The 10-year DFS and OS were 61%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Internal mammary node irradiation significantly improved DFS in postmastectomy breast cancer patients. Pending long-term results from randomized trials, treatment of internal mammary nodes should be considered in postmastectomy radiation therapy.

  13. Ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of nucleic acids using exonuclease III-induced cascade two-stage isothermal amplification-mediated zinc (II)-protoporphyrin IX/G-quadruplex supramolecular fluorescent nanotags.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingwang; Lv, Yanqin; Zhang, Yuanfu; Xu, Shulin; Li, Rui; Yue, Qiaoli; Li, Haibo; Wang, Lei; Gu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuqiu; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-11-15

    A cascadic sensing system was developed for detection of DNA target at ultralow concentration by a combination of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and exonuclease III (Exo III)-induced cascade two-stage isothermal amplification in the study. An ingeniously designed capture hairpin probe (CHP) that integrates target-binding and signal transduction sequences within one multifunctional design was assembled on MNPs. Upon sensing of the analyte nucleic acid, the hairpin probe on MNPs could be opened and stepwise removed by Exo III accompanied by the releasing of target DNA for the successive hybridization and cleavage process and the generation of bare signal transduction sequences of CHP as a new trigger for next circular reaction. The new DNA triggers initiate hybridizing with hairpin DNA probe that contains a partially "caged" G-quadruplex sequence (GHP), forming a duplex structure and liberating the active G-quadruplex structure. Then, Exo III digests the resulting duplex domain, leading to the recycling of new DNA trigger and simultaneously generating numerous ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex supramolecular complexes with the help of the zinc (II)-protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), as an optical label for amplified fluorescence sensing event. Finally, numerous liberated cascade ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex supramolecular complexes give a remarkable fluorescence response. Because of two-stage autocatalytic recycling amplification and the specifically catalyzed formation of ZnPPIX/G-quadruplex supramolecular complexes, this newly designed protocol provides a high sensitivity with a detection limit of 0.75 fM, can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA, and gives low matrix effect due to using MNPs as the separation and amplification elements in the real samples. Therefore, it holds great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases. PMID:24912035

  14. Analysis of Resource Allocation in Final Stage Sugarcane Clonal Selection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Steven Brown; Barry Glaz

    2001-01-01

    in 1990 in Stage I, passed successively through Stages II and III, and were first grown in Stage IV trials in Superior genotypes of sugarcane (interspecific hybrids of Sac- 1993. The current procedure for Stage IV, initiated in charum spp.) must continue to be developed with current resources as selection criteria evolve and expand. Developing future cultivars 1994, is to

  15. Next generation: Unmanned launch vehicles and upper stages: The needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, Charles R.

    1991-01-01

    The focus is on common vehicle elements, higher mission success, and lower transportation cost with respect to the common needs of the Department of Defense, NASA, and U.S. Industry. The following are presented in viewgraph form: (1) perspectives on mission costs and failures; (2) the recurring costs of the Delta 7925, Atlas/Centar, Titan 3, and Titan 4; (3) U.S. launches from 1957-1987 of Vanguard, Jupiter, Thor/Delta, Juno, Atlas, Scout, Redstone, Saturn, Titan, and the Space Transportation System; and (4) subsystem sources of failure. The following topics are also briefly presented: (1) engine costs; (2) a summary of flight experience; (3) recommendations for next generation space transportation; (4) low cost engine demonstration; and (5) the next generation commercial expendable launch vehicle (ELV) needs estimate.

  16. Inertial Upper Stage Redundant Inertial Measurement Unit space performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, R. A.; Morrison, G. E. S.; Peters, R. C.

    Hardware and software on the redundant inertial navigation system (RINS) and redundant inertial measurement unit (RIMU) for the IUS are detailed. The system carries sufficient redundancy so that the failure of any specific component cannot jeopardize successful functioning. Malfunctions or erroneous measurements are detected by a fault detection and isolation (FDI) system which reroutes processing pathways away from the defective area. Inertial measurements sensors have quintuple redundance, and the RIMU monitors performance by means of a series of threshold checks on the magnitude of parity vectors formed by gyroscope and accelerometer data. The parity is checked 50 times/sec. Failure of a sensor to reach parity with other sensors causes removal of the sensor's signals from control pathways.

  17. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, Robin H.; Holt, James B.; Hastings, Leon J.

    1999-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy is required. a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point. the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating, boil-off losses.

  18. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, Robin H.; Holt, James B.; Hastings, Leon J.

    2001-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space, and would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray-bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray-bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube heat exchanger, and a spray-bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses.

  19. SolSTUS: Solar Source Thermal Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This paper was written by members of the Utah State University (USU) Space Systems Design class, fall quarter 1993. The class is funded by NASA and administered by the University Space Research Association (USRA). The focus of the class is to give students some experience in design of space systems and as a source of original ideas for NASA. This paper is a summary of the work done by members of the Space Systems Design class during the opening phase of the course. The class was divided into groups to work on different areas of the Solar Thermal Rocket (STR) booster in order to produce a design reference mission that would identify the key design issues. The design reference mission focused upon a small satellite mission to Mars. There are several critical components in a Solar Thermal Rocket. STR's produce a very low thrust, but have a high specific impulse, meaning that they take longer to reach the desired orbit, but use a lot less fuel in doing it. The complexity of the rocket is discussed in this paper. Some of the more critical design problems discussed are: (1) the structural and optical complexity of collecting and focusing sunlight onto a specific point, (2) long term storage of fuel (liquid hydrogen), (3) attitude control while thrusting in an elliptical orbit and orienting the mirrors to collect sunlight, and (4) power and communications for the rocket and it's internal systems. The design reference mission discussed here is a very general mission to Mars. A first order trajectory design has been done and a possible basic science payload for Mars has been suggested. This paper summarizes the design reference mission (DRM) formulated by the USU students during fall quarter and identifies major design challenges that will confront the design team during the next two quarters here at USU.

  20. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain Ravex; Robin Flachbart; Barney Holt

    1999-01-01

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid\\/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical

  1. Zero Gravity Cryogenic Vent System Concepts for Upper Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravex, Alain; Flachbart, Robin; Holt, Barney

    The capability to vent in zero gravity without resettling is a technology need that involves practically all uses of sub-critical cryogenics in space. Venting without resettling would extend cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle capabilities. However, the lack of definition regarding liquid/ullage orientation coupled with the somewhat random nature of the thermal stratification and resulting pressure rise rates, lead to significant technical challenges. Typically a zero gravity vent concept, termed a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), consists of a tank mixer to destratify the propellant, combined with a Joule-Thomson (J-T) valve to extract thermal energy from the propellant. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) was used to test both spray bar and axial jet TVS concepts. The axial jet system consists of a recirculation pump heat exchanger unit. The spray bar system consists of a recirculation pump, a parallel flow concentric tube, heat exchanger, and a spray bar positioned close to the longitudinal axis of the tank. The operation of both concepts is similar. In the mixing mode, the recirculation pump withdraws liquid from the tank and sprays it into the tank liquid, ullage, and exposed tank surfaces. When energy extraction is required, a small portion of the recirculated liquid is passed sequentially through the J-T expansion valve, the heat exchanger, and is vented overboard. The vented vapor cools the circulated bulk fluid, thereby removing thermal energy and reducing tank pressure. The pump operates alone, cycling on and off, to destratify the tank liquid and ullage until the liquid vapor pressure reaches the lower set point. At that point, the J-T valve begins to cycle on and off with the pump. Thus, for short duration missions, only the mixer may operate, thus minimizing or even eliminating boil-off losses. TVS performance testing demonstrated that the spray bar was effective in providing tank pressure control within a 6.89 kPa (1psi) band for fill levels of 90%, 50%, and 25%. Complete destratification of the liquid and ullage was achieved at these fill levels. The axial jet was effective in providing tank pressure control within the same pressure control band at the 90% fill level. However, at the 50% level, the system reached a point at which it was unable to extract enough energy to keep up with the heat leak into the tank. Due to a hardware problem, the recirculation pump operated well below the axial jet design flow rate. Therefore, it is likely that the performance of the axial jet would have improved had the pump operated at the proper flow rate. A CFD model is being used to determine if the desired axial jet performance would be achieved if a higher pump flow rate were available. Testing conducted thus far has demonstrated that both TVS concepts can be effective in destratifying a propellant tank, rejecting stored heat energy, and thus, controlling tank pressure.

  2. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. Upper Yosemite Falls

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Upper Yosemite Falls may be seen. Upper Yosemite Falls is the highest of the three sectiosn of Yosemite Falls. It is about 1,430 ft (440 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  4. Stage at Diagnosis | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    Cancers can be diagnosed at different stages in their development. Stage of cancer diagnosis may be expressed as numbers (for example, I, II, III, or IV) or by terms such as “localized,” “regional,” and “distant.” The lower the number or the more localized the cancer, the better a person’s chances of benefiting from treatment.

  5. Esophagoscopy in Evaluating Treatment in Patients With Stage I-IV Head and Neck Cancer Who Are Undergoing Radiation Therapy and/or Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-09

    Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  6. Computed Tomography Staging of Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek Abdel; Ghonim, Mohamed Rashad; Ashraf, Bassem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To establish computed tomography (CT) staging of middle ear cholesteatoma and assess its impact on the selection of the surgical procedure. Material/Methods Prospective study was conducted on 61 consecutive patients (mean age 26.8 years) with middle ear cholesteatoma. CT scan of the temporal bone and surgery were performed in all patients. CT staging classified cholesteatoma according to its location in the tympanic cavity (T); extension into the mastoid (M); and associated complications (C). Cholesteatoma was staged as stage I (T1, T2), stage II (T3, M1, M2, C1), and stage III (C2). Results The overall sensitivity of CT staging of cholesteatoma compared to surgery was 88% with excellent agreement and correlation between CT findings and intra-operative findings (K=0.863, r=0.86, P=0.001). There was excellent agreement and correlation of CT staging with surgical findings for T location (K=0.811, r=0.89, P=0.001), good for M extension (K=0.734, r=0.88, P=0.001), and excellent for associated C complications (K=1.00, r=1.0, P=0.001). Atticotympanotomy was carried out in stage I (n=14), intact canal wall surgery was performed in stage II (n=38), and canal wall down surgery was done in stage III (n=5) and stage II (n=4). Conclusions We established CT staging of middle ear cholesteatoma that helps surgeons to select an appropriate surgery.

  7. 76 FR 20910 - Proposed Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Stage I Vapor Recovery Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ...Implementation Plans; Indiana; Stage I Vapor Recovery Rule AGENCY...SIP), amendments to the stage I vapor recovery rule and administrative changes to stage II vapor recovery rule submitted...Fax: (312) 408-2279. 4. Mail: Doug Aburano,...

  8. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image. PMID:23101609

  9. Adventures in Law and History. Volume II: Coming to America, Colonial America, and the Revolutionary Era. A Law and Civic Education Curriculum for Upper Elementary Grades with Units on Equal Protection, Due Process, Authority, and Rights and Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croddy, Marshall; Degelman, Charles; Doggett, Keri; Hayes, Bill

    This is volume two of a two-volume civics curriculum on law and effective citizenship for upper-elementary students. The lessons, set in American historical eras, engage students in cooperative-learning activities, role plays, simulations, readers theater, stories, and guided discussions, which introduce and reinforce law-related and civic…

  10. The upper intertidal zone

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Katie Hale (California State University, Fullerton; Student, Biological Sciences)

    2007-01-04

    The upper intertidal zone is exposed most of the time and will become submerged only during high tide. This zone is least abundant of the intertidal zones but contains some mollusks, barnacles, and other animals adapted to avoid drying out.

  11. The upper intertidal zone

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Katie Hale (CSUF; Biological Sciences)

    2007-06-08

    The upper intertidal zone is exposed most of the time and will become submerged only during high tide. This zone is least abundant of the intertidal zones but contains some mollusks, barnacles, and other animals adapted to avoid drying out.

  12. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and vinorelbine followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin in patients with inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae Ho [Center for Lung Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Han, Ji-Youn [Center for Lung Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Center for Lung Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Center for Lung Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyae Young [Center for Lung Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Jin B.S. [Center for Lung Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Soo [Center for Lung Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jslee@ncc.re.kr

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: For locoregionally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become a standard therapy. We conducted a Phase II trial to examine the efficacy and toxicity of adding gemcitabine and vinorelbine induction chemotherapy to concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included inoperable clinical Stage III NSCLC without pleural effusion, ECOG performance status 0-1, and weight loss {<=}5%. Induction chemotherapy consisted of three cycles of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} and vinorelbine 30 mg/m{sup 2}, each given i.v. on Days 1 and 8, every 3 weeks. During once-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, total 63 Gy), two cycles of oral etoposide (100 mg on Days 1-5 and 8-12) plus cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8) were given concurrently 4 weeks apart. Results: Between April 2002 and November 2003, 42 patients were enrolled and 40 were included in response and toxicity evaluation. The median age was 59 years and 13 patients had IIIA and 27 had IIIB; 24 had squamous ca, 12 had adenocarcinoma, and 4 had others. Objective tumor responses were obtained in 29 patients (72.5%), including 18 (45.0%) after induction chemotherapy. After a median follow-up of 23.8 months, the median survival time and progression-free survival was 23.2 months and 10.9 months, respectively, with 2-year survival rate of 43.9%. For the patients with supraclavicular nodal involvement, the median survival time was 11.8 months with 2-year survival rate of 16.7%, whereas the corresponding figures were 27.8 months and 52.0%, respectively, for those without supraclavicular nodal involvement. Toxicity of induction chemotherapy was mild and well tolerated. However, concurrent chemoradiotherapy was associated with G3/4 hematologic toxicity in 75.7%, G3 esophagitis in 24.2%, and two treatment-related deaths. There were nonlife-threatening late toxicities in additional 6 patients. Conclusions: Induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and vinorelbine followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy with etoposide and cisplatin showed very promising survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC, especially in those without supraclavicular nodal involvement, which warrants further evaluation.

  13. Upper Airway Mechanics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johan A. Verbraecken; Wilfried A. De Backer

    2009-01-01

    This review discusses the pathophysiological aspects of sleep-disordered breathing, with focus on upper airway mechanics in obstructive and central sleep apnoea, Cheyne-Stokes respiration and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to substantial pathology, i.e. increased upper airway collapsibility, control of breathing instability, increased work of breathing, disturbed

  14. 49. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM -- DAM CONCRETE -- TYPICAL PIER ISOMETRIC. M-L 26(R) 40/1 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  15. 50. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. LOCK AND DAM NO. 26 (REPLACEMENT). FIRST STAGE DAM -- DAM CONCRETE -- GENERAL ARRANGEMENT -- SECTION AND ELEVATIONS. M-L 26(R) 40/3 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 26R, Alton, Madison County, IL

  16. Stage Separation Performance Analysis Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Zhang, Sijun; Liu, Jiwen; Wang, Ten-See

    2001-01-01

    Stage separation process is an important phenomenon in multi-stage launch vehicle operation. The transient flowfield coupled with the multi-body systems is a challenging problem in design analysis. The thermodynamics environment with burning propellants during the upper-stage engine start in the separation processes adds to the complexity of the-entire system. Understanding the underlying flow physics and vehicle dynamics during stage separation is required in designing a multi-stage launch vehicle with good flight performance. A computational fluid dynamics model with the capability to coupling transient multi-body dynamics systems will be a useful tool for simulating the effects of transient flowfield, plume/jet heating and vehicle dynamics. A computational model using generalize mesh system will be used as the basis of this development. The multi-body dynamics system will be solved, by integrating a system of six-degree-of-freedom equations of motion with high accuracy. Multi-body mesh system and their interactions will be modeled using parallel computing algorithms. Adaptive mesh refinement method will also be employed to enhance solution accuracy in the transient process.

  17. Motor Cortex Stimulation for the Treatment of Chronic Facial, Upper Extremity, and Throat Pain.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-17

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (Burchiel Type I); Trigeminal Neuralgia (Burchiel Type II); Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain; Trigeminal Deafferentation Pain; Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (Types I and II, Involving the Upper Extremity); Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia; Upper Extremity Pain Due to Deafferentation of the Cervical Spine; Central Pain Syndromes

  18. Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province

    E-print Network

    Draft Inventory Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Council ...........................................................................................................1 Bonneville Power Administration Funded Projects within the Upper Snake Province Needed Future Actions within the Upper Snake Subbasin.........................22 Needed Future Actions

  19. Photodynamic therapy--1994: treatment of benign and malignant upper aerodigestive tract disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1995-03-01

    From 1983 to 1994 Phase II and III clinical studies at Henry Ford Hospital demonstrated complete or partial responses in 46 of 47 patients treated with hematoporphyrin-derivative photodynamic therapy (HPD-PDT) for a variety of benign and malignant upper aerodigestive tract disease: (1) superficial `condemned mucosa' or `field cancerization' of the oral cavity; (2) stage III/IV head and neck cancer; (3) mucocutaneous AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma of the upper aerodigestive tract; (4) recurrent laryngotracheal papillomatosis; (5) severe dysplasia/adenocarcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus; (6) partial or completely obstructing terminal esophageal cancer. HPD-PDT produced complete responses in 19 patients (follow up 6 months to 8 years) with `field cancerization' (CIS, T1) of the oral cavity and larynx (6), adenocarcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus (2), mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (9), obstructing esophageal carcinoma (1), and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx (1). PDT treatment protocols, results, complications, and application as adjunct or primary oncologic therapy for head and neck disease are reviewed.

  20. RNA-seq liver transcriptome analysis reveals an activated MHC-I pathway and an inhibited MHC-II pathway at the early stage of vaccine immunization in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a prominent vertebrate model of human development and pathogenic disease and has recently been utilized to study teleost immune responses to infectious agents threatening the aquaculture industry. In this work, to clarify the host immune mechanisms underlying the protective effects of a putative vaccine and improve its immunogenicity in the future efforts, high-throughput RNA sequencing technology was used to investigate the immunization-related gene expression patterns of zebrafish immunized with Edwardsiella tarda live attenuated vaccine. Results Average reads of 18.13 million and 14.27 million were obtained from livers of zebrafish immunized with phosphate buffered saline (mock) and E. tarda vaccine (WED), respectively. The reads were annotated with the Ensembl zebrafish database before differential expressed genes sequencing (DESeq) comparative analysis, which identified 4565 significantly differentially expressed genes (2186 up-regulated and 2379 down-regulated in WED; p<0.05). Among those, functional classifications were found in the Gene Ontology database for 3891 and in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database for 3467. Several pathways involved in acute phase response, complement activation, immune/defense response, and antigen processing and presentation were remarkably affected at the early stage of WED immunization. Further qPCR analysis confirmed that the genes encoding the factors involved in major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I processing pathway were up-regulated, while those involved in MHC-II pathway were down-regulated. Conclusion These data provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying zebrafish immune response to WED immunization and might aid future studies to develop a highly immunogenic vaccine against gram-negative bacteria in teleosts. PMID:22805612

  1. A phase II open-label clinical study of comparing nab-paclitaxel with pemetrexed as second-line chemotherapy for patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhefeng; Wei, Zhimin; Hu, Yi; Gao, Feng; Hao, Lu; Fang, Ping; Sun, Shengjie; Li, Jinyu; Jiao, Shunchang

    2015-08-01

    Current choices of second-line chemotherapy regimens for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are extremely limited. We applied a new strategy of using nab-paclitaxel as single chemotherapy regimen in second-line setting for patients with unsuccessful first-line chemotherapy. The efficacy and safety were compared with patients who received standard second-line regimen pemetrexed. Patients with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC and unsuccessful first-line platinum-based chemotherapy were randomly divided into two arms. Arm I received pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) intravenously (i.v.) on day 1 of 3-week cycle. Arm II received nab-paclitaxel 150 mg/m(2) i.v. on days 1 and 8 of 3-week cycle. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). One hundred and eleven patients were randomly assigned to receive pemetrexed (n = 56) and nab-paclitaxel (n = 55). Median OSs were 9.4 months (95 % CI 7.1-12.5 months) for pemetrexed and 9.9 months (95 % CI 8.2-11.9 months) for nab-paclitaxel. Median PFS was 4.6 months (95 % CI 2.7-6.1 months) for pemetrexed and 5.1 months (95 % CI 3.9-7.4 months) for nab-paclitaxel. While no CR was reported for either treatment, PRs + SDs were seen in 32/56 (57.1 %) patients in pemetrexed arm and 36/55 (65.5 %) patients in nab-paclitaxel arm. Grade 3 and grade 4 adverse events were comparable between two treatment arms. New second-line chemotherapy single-regimen nab-paclitaxel showed equivalent efficacy and toxicity profiles as pemetrexed in treating patients with NSCLC. PMID:26168982

  2. Induction therapy with cetuximab plus docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (ETPF) in patients with resectable nonmetastatic stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. A GERCOR phase II ECHO-07 study

    PubMed Central

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Lacave, Roger; Lefevre, Marine; Soussan, Patrick; Antoine, Martine; Périé, Sophie; Belloc, Jean-Baptiste; Banal, Alain; Albert, Sébastien; Chabolle, Frédéric; Céruse, Philippe; Baril, Philippe; Gatineau, Michel; Housset, Martin; Moukoko, Rachel; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; de Gramont, Aimery; Bonnetain, Franck; Lacau St Guily, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Induction TPF regimen is a standard treatment option for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx. The efficacy and safety of adding cetuximab to induction TPF (ETPF) therapy was evaluated. Patients with nonmetastatic resectable stage III/IV SCC of the oropharynx were treated with weekly cetuximab followed the same day by docetaxel and cisplatin and by a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil on days 1-5 (every 3 weeks, 3 cycles). The primary endpoint was clinical and radiological complete response (crCR) of primary tumor at 3 months. Secondary endpoints were crCR rates, overall response, pathological CR, progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. Forty-two patients were enrolled, and 41 received ETPF. The all nine planned cetuximab doses and the full three doses of planned chemotherapy were completed in 31 (76%) and 36 (88%) patients, respectively. Twelve (29%) patients required dose reduction. The crCR of primary tumor at the completion of therapy was observed in nine (22%) patients. ETPF was associated with a tumor objective response rate (ORR) of 58%. The most frequent grade 3–4 toxicities were as follows: nonfebrile neutropenia (39%), febrile neutropenia (19%), diarrhea (10%), and stomatitis (12%). Eighteen (44%) patients experienced acne-like skin reactions of any grade. One toxic death occurred secondary to chemotherapy-induced colitis with colonic perforation. This phase II study reports an interesting response rate for ETPF in patients with moderately advanced SCC of the oropharynx. The schedule of ETPF evaluated in this study cannot be recommended at this dosage. PMID:25684313

  3. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chafe, Susan, E-mail: susan.chafe@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute-University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Moughan, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pass, Helen [Womens' Breast Center, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, Connecticut (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); White, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ?3 cm, negative margins, and ?3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  4. Phase II Study of Afatinib as Third-Line Treatment for Patients in Korea With Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Harboring Wild-Type EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Myung-Ju; Kim, Sang-We; Cho, Byoung-Chul; Ahn, Jin Seok; Lee, Dae Ho; Sun, Jong-Mu; Massey, Dan; Kim, Miyoung; Shi, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Background. This phase II single-arm trial evaluated afatinib, an irreversible inhibitor of the ErbB receptor family as third-line treatment of Korean patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and tumors with wild-type EGFR. Currently, no standard therapy exists for these patients. Methods. Eligible patients had stage IIIB/IV wild-type EGFR lung adenocarcinoma and had failed to benefit from two previous lines of chemotherapy but had not received anti-EGFR treatment. Patients received oral afatinib at 40 mg per day until disease progression or occurrence of intolerable adverse events (AEs). The primary endpoint was confirmed objective tumor response (OR) rate (confirmed complete response [CR] or partial response [PR]). Secondary endpoints included disease control rate (DCR; OR or stable disease for ?6 weeks), progression-free survival (PFS), and safety. Results. Forty-two patients received afatinib treatment, and 38 of those were included in efficacy analyses. No confirmed CRs or PRs were reported. DCR was 24% (9 of 38 patients), with a median disease control duration of 19.3 weeks. Median PFS was 4.1 weeks (95% confidence interval: 3.9–8.0). Frequently reported AEs (mainly grades 1 and 2) were rash/acne (88%), diarrhea (62%), and stomatitis (57%). Conclusion. Heavily pretreated patients with wild-type EGFR NSCLC treated with afatinib monotherapy did not experience an objective response and only 24% had disease stabilization lasting more than 6 weeks. AEs were manageable and consistent with the expected safety profile. PMID:24868099

  5. Staging TDP-43 pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Josephs, Keith A; Murray, Melissa E; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Parisi, Joseph E; Petrucelli, Leonard; Jack, Clifford R; Petersen, Ronald C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2014-03-01

    TDP-43 immunoreactivity occurs in 19-57 % of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases. Two patterns of TDP-43 deposition in AD have been described involving hippocampus (limbic) or hippocampus and neocortex (diffuse), although focal amygdala involvement has been observed. In 195 AD cases with TDP-43, we investigated regional TDP-43 immunoreactivity with the aim of developing a TDP-43 in AD staging scheme. TDP-43 immunoreactivity was assessed in amygdala, entorhinal cortex, subiculum, hippocampal dentate gyrus, occipitotemporal, inferior temporal and frontal cortices, and basal ganglia. Clinical, neuroimaging, genetic and pathological characteristics were assessed across stages. Five stages were identified: stage I showed scant-sparse TDP-43 in the amygdala only (17 %); stage II showed moderate-frequent amygdala TDP-43 with spread into entorhinal and subiculum (25 %); stage III showed further spread into dentate gyrus and occipitotemporal cortex (31 %); stage IV showed further spread into inferior temporal cortex (20 %); and stage V showed involvement of frontal cortex and basal ganglia (7 %). Cognition and medial temporal volumes differed across all stages and progression across stages correlated with worsening cognition and medial temporal volume loss. Compared to 147 AD patients without TDP-43, only the Boston Naming Test showed abnormalities in stage I. The findings demonstrate that TDP-43 deposition in AD progresses in a stereotypic manner that can be divided into five distinct topographic stages which are supported by correlations with clinical and neuroimaging features. Given these findings, we recommend sequential regional TDP-43 screening in AD beginning with the amygdala. PMID:24240737

  6. Two-stage flexor tendon reconstruction in zone II using a silicone rod and a pedicled intrasynovial graft 1 1 No benefits in any form have been received or will be received by a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandros E Beris; Nickolaos A Darlis; Anastasios V Korompilias; Marios D Vekris; Gregory I Mitsionis; Panayiotis N Soucacos

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of a modified Paneva-Holevich technique for flexor tendon reconstruction in zone II.Methods: Twenty patients (22 digits) with poor prognosis injuries (Boyes grade 2–5) were reconstructed. The technique included placing a silicone rod and creating a loop between the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) in the first stage and reflecting the

  7. Esophageal Cancer Staging

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate staging of esophageal cancer is very important to achieving optimal treatment outcomes. The AJCC (American Joint Committee on Cancer) first published TNM esophageal cancer staging recommendations in the first edition of their staging manual in 1977. Thereafter, the staging of esophageal cancer was changed many times over the years. This article reviews the current status of staging of esophageal cancer. PMID:26078921

  8. Staging of neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters and 10 case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: Metastatic Disease to the Thorax, CT Staging of Esophageal Carcinoma, CT Staging of Renal Carcinoma, CT Staging of Lymphoma, Staging of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Initital Experience with MRI Staging of Neoplasms.

  9. Transfer orbit stage (TOS) guidance and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, James R.; Kaplan, Marshall H.; Coffey, Randall E.; White, Thomas W.

    This paper describes the strap-down, ring laser gyro-based guidance and control system of the current Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) family of orbital transfer vehicles being developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation. The paper begins with a summary review of the key features and guidance and control approaches used by that employed by the TOS family of upper stages. The TOS system design overview is presented, covering the major subsystems and flight operations. The major components and functions of the TOS avionics system are described, highlighting the Laser Inertial Navigation System (LINS). The LINS components, operations, performance and reliability are discussed. The hardware and software redundancy and built-in-test failure detection techniques are examined. Finally, the paper discusses some future developments for the LINS and TOS family of upper stages.

  10. Progressive upper limb prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Lake, Chris; Dodson, Robert

    2006-02-01

    The field of upper extremity prosthetics is a constantly changing arena as researchers and prosthetists strive to bridge the gap between prosthetic reality and upper limb physiology. With the further development of implantable neurologic sensing devices and targeted muscle innervation (discussed elsewhere in this issue), the challenge of limited input to control vast outputs promises to become a historical footnote in the future annals of upper limb prosthetics. Soon multidextrous terminal devices, such as that found in the iLimb system(Touch EMAS, Inc., Edinburgh, UK), will be a clinical reality (Fig. 22). Successful prosthetic care depends on good communication and cooperation among the surgeon, the amputee, the rehabilitation team, and the scientists harnessing the power of technology to solve real-life challenges. If the progress to date is any indication, amputees of the future will find their dreams limited only by their imagination. PMID:16517345

  11. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Cate, David; Blasingame, Thomas; Major, R.P.; Brown, Lewis; Stafford, Wayne

    2001-08-07

    The principal objectives of this project was to: increase the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. Efforts for Year 1 of this project has been reservoir characterization, which has included three (3) primary tasks: geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, and microbial characterization.

  12. Upper atmosphere research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, K. H.

    From 1960 until 1977 the Weapons Research Establishment (WRE) undertook research into determining the properties of the upper atmosphere by the use of sounding rockets fired from the Woomera rocket range. This Monograph describes the experiments which were conducted. The experiments were aimed at measuring the temperature, density, constituents, ionization, and motions of the upper atmosphere between 60 and 200 km, about which at that time little was known. Many of the experiments were conducted in collaboration with Australian and overseas universities and research institutes, this work is also described.

  13. Staging of Lung Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... it important to know the stage of my lung cancer? Finding out the stage of your lung cancer ... you. How does staging differ between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)? ...

  14. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA View/Download: Small: 612x612 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; ...

  15. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IVB View/Download: Small: 594x640 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; ...

  16. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    MedlinePLUS

    Cervical Cancer Stage IA View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing shows a cross-section of the ...

  17. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IVA View/Download: Small: 756x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; ...

  18. Phase II Sequential and Concurrent Chemoradiation for Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-19

    Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  19. Upper Atmosphere Dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Friedman

    1970-01-01

    We are able to construct three-dimensional global models of the upper atmosphere (120 to 800 km) by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy. We show that variation of conditions at the lower boundary, 120 km, affects the atmosphere only to about 200-km altitude. Differing results obtained by in situ satellite or rocket measurements in the 120- to

  20. 42. VIEW OF STAGE RECORDER AT END OF UPSTREAM GUIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. VIEW OF STAGE RECORDER AT END OF UPSTREAM GUIDE WALL, LOOKING NORTHEAST. (Several hours after this view was taken, the stage recorder was hit a~d heavily damaged by a grain barge.) - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 9, Lynxville, Crawford County, WI

  1. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  2. Binghamton University Software II

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Design Graphic 412 Binghamton University Software II Course Syllabus #12;Arts412 Graphic Design between fine art and graphic design· To prepare students for a typical design/production atmosphere in ARTS305, broaden the students' aesthetic experience and complement upper level design classes. Creative

  3. Survival analysis of revised 2013 FIGO staging classification of epithelial ovarian cancer and comparison with previous FIGO staging classification

    PubMed Central

    Paik, E Sun; Lee, Yoo-Young; Lee, Eun-Jung; Choi, Chel Hun; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the prognostic role of revised version of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (2013) in epithelial ovarian cancer and compare with previous version staging classification Methods We retrospectively enrolled patients with epithelial ovarian cancer treated at Samsung Medical Center from 2002 to 2012. We reclassified the patients based on the revised FIGO staging classification. Results Eight hundred seventy-eight patients were enrolled (stage I, 22.8%; stage II, 10.4%; stage III, 56.2%; stage IV, 10.7%). Previous stage IC (98, 11.1%) was subdivided into IC1 (9, 1.0%), IC2 (57, 6.4%), and IC3 (32, 4.1%). In addition, previous stage IV (94, 1.7%) was categorized into IVA (37, 4.2%) and IVB (57, 6.5%) in new staging classification. Stage IIC (66, 7.5%) has been eliminated and integrated into IIA (36, 4.1%) and IIB (55, 6.2%) in revised classification. Revised FIGO stage IC3 had significant prognostic impact on PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 3.840; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.361 to 10.83; P=0.011) and revised FIGO stage IIIC appears to be an independent, significant poor prognostic factor for PFS (HR, 2.541; 95% CI, 1.242 to 5.200; P=0.011) but not in the case of previous version of FIGO stage IIIC (HR, 1.070; 95% CI, 0.502 to 2.281; P=0.860). However, any sub-stages of both previous and revised version in stage II and IV, there was no significant prognostic role. Conclusion Revised FIGO stage has more progressed utility for informing prognosis than previous version, especially in stage I and III. For stage II and IV, further validation should be needed in large population based study in the future. PMID:25798426

  4. Radiotherapy in the treatment of mucosal melanoma of the upper aerodigestive tract: Analysis of 74 cases. A Rare Cancer Network study

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy)]. E-mail: krengli@tera.it; Masini, Laura [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Kaanders, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Maingon, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre G. F. Leclerc, Dijon (France); Oei, Swan Bing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Instituut, Tilburg (Netherlands); Zouhair, Abderrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ozyar, Enis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara (Turkey); Roelandts, Martine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles (Belgium); Amichetti, Maurizio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ospedale Oncologico A. Businco, Cagliari (Italy); Bosset, Mathieu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Besancon, Besancon (France); Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze a series of mucosal melanoma of the upper aerodigestive tract to determine the prognostic factors and contribute to understanding the role of radiotherapy in the therapeutic strategy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients were analyzed. The most frequent locations were nasal and oral, in 31 patients (41.9%) and 12 patients (16.2%), respectively. Sixty-three patients (85.1%) were in Stage I, 5 (6.8%) in Stage II, and 6 (8.1%) in Stage III. Treatment consisted of surgery in 17 patients (23.0%), surgery and radiotherapy in 42 (56.8%), radiotherapy in 11 (14.9%), and chemo-immunotherapy in 4 (5.4%). Median follow-up was 20 months. Results: Local control at 3 years was 57% after surgery alone and 71% after surgery and radiotherapy. Overall and disease-free survival rates, respectively, were 41% and 31% at 3 years and 14% and 22% at 10 years. After univariate analysis, female gender, melanosis, tumor size {<=}3 cm, Stage I, postoperative radiotherapy, and complete remission were favorable prognostic factors. Stage I and melanosis were confirmed by multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Local control was improved by postoperative radiotherapy, despite survival being as poor as in other published series. Stage I and melanosis at diagnosis were the most favorable prognostic factors.

  5. Stage-to-Stage Comparison of Preoperative and Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy for T3 Mid or Distal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Choi, Hyo Seong; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Sohn, Dae Kyung [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a comparative analysis, the prognostic implications of postchemoradiotherapy (post-CRT) pathologic stage (ypStage) vs. postoperative pathologic stage (pStage) in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and December 2006, 487 patients with T3 mid or distal rectal cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Concurrent CRT was administered preoperatively (n = 364, 74.7%) or postoperatively (n = 123, 25.3%). The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. All patients underwent a total mesorectal excision and received adjuvant chemotherapy. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Differences in DFS, stratified by ypStage and pStage, were compared using the log-rank test. Results: For surviving patients, the median follow-up period was 68 months (range, 12-105 months). The 5-year local recurrence-free survival rate was not different, at 95.3% and 92.1% in preoperative and postoperative CRT groups, respectively (p = 0.402), but the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate was significantly different, at 81.6% (preoperative CRT) vs. 65.4% (postoperative CRT; p = 0.001). The 5-year DFS rate of 78.8% in the preoperative CRT group was significantly better than the 63.0% rate in the postoperative CRT group (p = 0.002). Post-CRT pathologic Stage 0-I occurred in 42.6% (155 of 364) of the patients with preoperative CRT. The 5-year DFS rates were 90.2% (ypStage 0-I), 83.5% (ypStage II), 77.3% (pStage II), 58.6% (ypStage III), and 54.7% (pStage III). The DFS rate of ypStage 0-I was significantly better than that of ypStage II or pStage II. Post-CRT pathologic Stage II and III had similar DFS, compared with pStage II and III, respectively. Conclusions: Disease-free survival predicted by each ypStage was similar to that predicted by the respective pStage. Improved DFS with preoperative vs. postoperative CRT was associated with the ypStage 0-I group that showed a similarly favorable outcome to pStage I rectal cancer.

  6. Evaluation of bone loss at single-stage and two-stage implant abutments of fixed partial dentures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koczorowski R; Surdacka A

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Fixed partial dentures (FPDs) can be sup- ported on implant abutments only or on single-stage and two-stage implants and teeth. Purpose: The purpose of this study was a compara- tive analysis of bone loss at the single-stage and two-stage implant abutments of fixed partial dentures used to restore missing teeth classified as Class I or Class II according to

  7. [Lymphedema of the lower limbs: CT staging].

    PubMed

    Marotel, M; Cluzan, R V; Pascot, M; Alliot, F; Lasry, J L

    2002-06-01

    Routinely performed, CT is useful and reliable for staging lower limb lymphedema. We describe methods we utilized. We found in frequency order: skin thickening, subcutaneous tissues area increase in regard the safe limb, perimuscular aponevrosis thickening, fat infiltration: lines parallel to the skin, edematous areas along perimuscular aponevrosis, lines perpendicular to the skin. The lowest fat density is increased on the pathologic side. Subfascial compartment is slightly fattened. We found huge differences between primary and secondary lymphedema for the thigh. Same images may be generated by old or young lymphedema. Rarely useful for positive diagnosis, CT is indispensable for secondary lymphedema staging (initial staging or after a recent increase). It seems us indispensable for any pretherapeutic staging (whole objectively disorders, exact upper limit, infraclinic bilaterality). PMID:12162203

  8. Soy Isoflavones in Preventing Head and Neck Cancer Recurrence in Patients With Stage I-IV Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  9. Determinants of Survival in Adult HIV Clients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Lawra and Jirapa Districts of Upper West Region, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Okyere, Gabriel Asare; Alalbil, Paul Awinbil; Ping-Naah, Henry; Tifere, Yakubu

    2015-05-01

    We describe the rate of death and identify the determinants of survival in a cohort of adults starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 2 hospitals in Upper West Region, Ghana. Kaplan-Meier model was used to estimate the survival probability after ART initiation and Cox proportional hazard model used to assess the relationship between baseline variables and mortality. A total of 91 clients who were initiated on ART in both hospitals participated in the study. Clients staged in the World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage III/IV had a higher risk of mortality than those staging I/II (hazard ratio [HR] of 3.93). Hemoglobin value at baseline with a cutoff ?12 g/dL for women (and ?13 for men) was strongly associated with mortality in participants with an HR of 3.87 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.71-21.19) for severe anemia, 2.11 (95% CI: 0.45-9.93) for moderate anemia, and 0.88 (95% CI: 0.16-4.82) for mild anemia. Anemia and WHO staging were independent predictors of mortality. PMID:24344253

  10. Upper bound multigraphs for posets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terry A. McKee

    1989-01-01

    The study of upper bound graphs of posets can be extended naturally to multigraphs. This paper characterizes such upper bound multigraphs, shows they determine the associated posets up to isomorphism, and extends results of D. Scott to characterize posets having chordal or interval upper bound multigraphs.

  11. Ares I First Stage: Powering Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    I. Ares First Stage design is on schedule. a) Avionics; b) Major Structures; c) Motor; and d) Deceleration System II. Ares I-X hardware is complete and assembly at KSC is underway. Launch scheduled for October 31. III. Recovery system testing is on schedule a) Drogue; b) Main chute; and c) Cluster. DM-1 static firing is scheduled for August 25, 2009

  12. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing shows cancer in the cervix, the vagina, and ... that connect the kidneys to the bladder). The drawing shows the ureter on the right blocked by ...

  13. Accurate Upper Bound Efficiency for Solar Thermal Power Generation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Viorel Badescu

    2000-01-01

    A class of accurate upper bounds for the efficiency of converting solar energy into work was derived in this paper by taking into account (i) the irreversibilities associated with the heat transfer inside the heat engine and (ii) details about the system considered, as the geometric (view) factor of the Sun, the dilution factors of solar and ambient radiation and

  14. The role of postoperative local or regional irradiation in the treatment of stage I ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Powlis, W D; Mauch, P; Ehrmann, R L; Rose, C M; Knapp, R C; Bloomer, W D

    1982-03-01

    Histological grade and cell type were major prognostic factors in a retrospective study of 63 patients with Stage I epithelial carcinoma of the ovary. Grading by architectural pattern seemed to predict relapse better than cytological grading. With serous, mucinous, and endometrioid cystadenocarcinomas, relapses increased with higher grades. Relapse occurred in none of 18 tumors of borderline malignancy, 2 of 27 (7%) with Grade I or II tumor, and 4 of 6 (67%) with Grade III. The upper abdomen and pelvis were both at risk. Because most recurrences were limited to the peritoneal surface in Grade III serous, mucinous, and endometrioid carcinoma, local and regional radiation therapy are justified; postoperative therapy is not recommended for borderline or Grade I tumors unless ascites or cytological evidence of peritoneal disease is present. Clear-cell carcinoma was uncommon and unfavorable; of 12 cases, 5 involved relapse, with 3 recurrences developing outside the abdomen. PMID:7063696

  15. Role of postoperative local or regional irradiation in the treatment of Stage 1 ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Powlis, W.D. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA); Mauch, P.; Ehrmann, R.L.; Rose, C.M.; Knapp, R.C.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1982-03-01

    Histological grade and cell type were major prognostic factors in a retrospective study of 63 patients with Stage I epithelial carcinoma of the ovary. Grading by architectural pattern seemed to predict relapse better than cytological grading. With serous, mucinous, and endometrioid cystadenocarcinomas, relapses increased with higher grades. Relapse occurred in none of 18 tumors of borderline malignancy, 2 of 27 (7%) with Grade I or II tumor, and 4 of 6 (67%) with Grade III. The upper abdomen and pelvis were both at risk. Because most recurrences were limited to the peritoneal surface in Grade III serous, mucinous, and endometrioid carcinoma, local and regional radiation therapy are justified; postoperative therapy is not recommended for borderline or Grade I tumors unless ascites or cytological evidence of peritoneal disease is present. Clear-cell carcinoma was uncommon and unfavorable; of 12 cases, 5 involved relapse, with 3 recurrences developing outside the abdomen.

  16. How Is Ovarian Cancer Staged?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stage grouping to determine the stage, expressed in Roman numerals from stage I (the least advanced stage) ... adding letters and sometimes additional numbers to the Roman numerals. Stage I The cancer is only within ...

  17. Essays on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois Waterway and U.S. grain market 

    E-print Network

    Yu, Tun-Hsiang

    2005-08-29

    This dissertation examines several issues regarding the congestion on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois Waterway. Chapter II identifies and measures the impact of lock congestion on grain barge rates on these waterways. Results indicate grain...

  18. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-24

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  19. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-08

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  20. Effect of coal briquetting on overall plant costs for a large low-Btu gas application. Task II final topical report. Addendum. [Two-stage gasification plant with briquetting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Baker; H. P. Cassidy

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to determine the technical and economic aspects of coal briquetting, when the coal briquettes are used as feed coal to a coal gasification facility. Gas from the coal gasification facility was used as the fuel source for an iron ore pelletizing facility. The gasifier for this plant was a two-stage, fixed-bed gasifier.

  1. Towards a standard upper ontology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Niles; Adam Pease

    2001-01-01

    The Suggested Upper Merged Ontology (SUMO) is an upper levelontology that has been proposed as a starter document for TheStandard Upper Ontology Working Group, an IEEE-sanctioned workinggroup of collaborators from the fields of engineering, philosophy,and information science. The SUMO provides definitions forgeneral-purpose terms and acts as a foundation for more specificdomain ontologies. In this paper we outline the strategy used

  2. Stage transitioning in the sensorimotor development of Down's syndrome infants.

    PubMed

    Dunst, C J

    1988-10-01

    The relative amount of time necessary to move from stage-to-stage during the sensorimotor period was examined among a group of 30 Down's syndrome and 12 non-retarded infants. Stage transitioning was examined for the four transitional points between Stages II and VI for the seven branches of sensorimotor development on the Uzgiris-Hunt scales. The findings showed that the Down's syndrome infants generally took longer to move from one stage to the next even after their slower pace of development was taken into consideration. PMID:2974084

  3. Silicon Phthalocyanine 4 and Photodynamic Therapy in Stage IA-IIA Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-16

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  4. Occurrence of Organic Compounds and Trace Elements in the Upper Passaic and Elizabeth Rivers and Their Tributaries in New Jersey, July 2003 to February 2004: Phase II of the New Jersey Toxics Reduction Workplan for New York-New Jersey Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Timothy P.; Bonin, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Samples of surface water and suspended sediment were collected from the Passaic and Elizabeth Rivers and their tributaries in New Jersey from July 2003 to February 2004 to determine the concentrations of selected chlorinated organic and inorganic constituents. This sampling and analysis was conducted as Phase II of the New York-New Jersey Harbor Estuary Workplan?Contaminant Assessment and Reduction Program (CARP), which is overseen by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Phase II of the New Jersey Workplan was conducted to define upstream tributary and point sources of contaminants in those rivers sampled during Phase I work, with special emphasis on the Passaic and Elizabeth Rivers. Samples were collected from three groups of tributaries: (1) the Second, Third, and Saddle Rivers; (2) the Pompton and upper Passaic Rivers; and (3) the West Branch and main stem of the Elizabeth River. The Second, Third, and Saddle Rivers were sampled near their confluence with the tidal Passaic River, but at locations not affected by tidal flooding. The Pompton and upper Passaic Rivers were sampled immediately upstream from their confluence at Two Bridges, N.J. The West Branch and the main stem of the Elizabeth River were sampled just upstream from their confluence at Hillside, N.J. All tributaries were sampled during low-flow discharge conditions using the protocols and analytical methods for organic constituents used in low-flow sampling in Phase I. Grab samples of streamflow also were collected at each site and were analyzed for trace elements (mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, and lead) and for suspended sediment, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic carbon. The measured concentrations and available historical suspended-sediment and stream-discharge data (where available) were used to estimate average annual loads of suspended sediment and organic compounds in these rivers. Total suspended-sediment loads for 1975?2000 were estimated using rating curves developed from historical U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) suspended-sediment and discharge data, where available. Average annual loads of suspended sediment, in millions of kilograms per year (Mkg/yr), were estimated to be 0.190 for the Second River, 0.23 for the Third River, 1.00 for the Saddle River, 1.76 for the Pompton River, and 7.40 for the upper Passaic River. On the basis of the available discharge records, the upper Passaic River was estimated to provide approximately 60 percent of the water and 80 percent of the total suspended-sediment load at the Passaic River head-of-tide, whereas the Pompton River provided roughly 20 percent of the total suspended-sediment load estimated at the head-of-tide. The combined suspended-sediment loads of the upper Passaic and Pompton Rivers (9.2 Mkg/yr), however, represent only 40 percent of the average annual suspended-sediment load estimated for the head-of-tide (23 Mkg/yr) at Little Falls, N.J. The difference between the combined suspended-sediment loads of the tributaries and the estimated load at Little Falls represents either sediment trapped upriver from the dam at Little Falls, additional inputs of suspended sediment downstream from the tributary confluence, or uncertainty in the suspended-sediment and discharge data that were used. The concentrations of total suspended sediment-bound polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the tributaries to the Passaic River were 194 ng/g (nanograms per gram) in the Second River, 575 ng/g in the Third River, 2,320 ng/g in the Saddle River, 200 ng/g in the Pompton River, and 87 ng/g in the upper Passic River. The dissolved PCB concentrations in the tributaries were 563 pg/L (picograms per liter) in the Second River, 2,510 pg/L in the Third River, 2,270 pg/L in the Saddle River, 887 pg/L in the Pompton River, and 1,000 pg/L in the upper Passaic River. Combined with the sediment loads and discharge, these concentrations resulted in annual loads of suspended sediment-bound PCBs, i

  5. Two stage catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Inventor); Bachovchin, Dennis (Inventor); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Inventor); Lippert, Thomas E. (Inventor); Bruck, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A catalytic combustor (14) includes a first catalytic stage (30), a second catalytic stage (40), and an oxidation completion stage (49). The first catalytic stage receives an oxidizer (e.g., 20) and a fuel (26) and discharges a partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture (36). The second catalytic stage receives the partially oxidized fuel/oxidizer mixture and further oxidizes the mixture. The second catalytic stage may include a passageway (47) for conducting a bypass portion (46) of the mixture past a catalyst (e.g., 41) disposed therein. The second catalytic stage may have an outlet temperature elevated sufficiently to complete oxidation of the mixture without using a separate ignition source. The oxidation completion stage is disposed downstream of the second catalytic stage and may recombine the bypass portion with a catalyst exposed portion (48) of the mixture and complete oxidation of the mixture. The second catalytic stage may also include a reticulated foam support (50), a honeycomb support, a tube support or a plate support.

  6. Prospective Multi-Institutional Study of Definitive Radiotherapy With High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy in Patients With Nonbulky (<4-cm) Stage I and II Uterine Cervical Cancer (JAROG0401/JROSG04-2)

    SciTech Connect

    Toita, Takafumi, E-mail: b983255@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Ehime (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saku Central Hospital, Saku (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokumaru, Sunao [Department of Radiology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tsukuba (Japan); Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Radiation Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a definitive radiotherapy protocol using high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) with a low cumulative dose schedule in nonbulky early-stage cervical cancer patients, we conducted a prospective multi-institutional study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had squamous cell carcinoma of the intact uterine cervix, Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages Ib1, IIa, and IIb, tumor size <40 mm in diameter (assessed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging), and no pelvic/para-aortic lymphadenopathy. The treatment protocol consisted of whole-pelvis external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 20 Gy/10 fractions, pelvic EBRT with midline block of 30 Gy/15 fractions, and HDR-ICBT of 24 Gy/4 fractions (at point A). The cumulative biologically effective dose (BED) was 62 Gy{sub 10} ({alpha}/{beta} = 10) at point A. The primary endpoint was the 2-year pelvic disease progression-free (PDPF) rate. All patients received a radiotherapy quality assurance review. Results: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 60 eligible patients were enrolled. Thirty-six patients were assessed with FIGO stage Ib1; 12 patients with stage IIa; and 12 patients with stage IIb. Median tumor diameter was 28 mm (range, 6-39 mm). Median overall treatment time was 43 days. Median follow-up was 49 months (range, 7-72 months). Seven patients developed recurrences: 3 patients had pelvic recurrences (2 central, 1 nodal), and 4 patients had distant metastases. The 2-year PDPF was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-100%). The 2-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 90% (95% CI, 82%-98%) and 95% (95% CI, 89%-100%), respectively. The 2-year late complication rates (according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer of Grade {>=}1) were 18% (95% CI, 8%-28%) for large intestine/rectum, 4% (95% CI, 0%-8%) for small intestine, and 0% for bladder. No Grade {>=}3 cases were observed for genitourinary/gastrointestinal late complications. Conclusions: These results suggest that definitive radiotherapy using HDR-ICBT with a low cumulative dose schedule (BED, 62 Gy{sub 10} at point A) can provide excellent local control without severe toxicity in nonbulky (<4-cm) early-stage cervical cancer.

  7. Upper carboniferous conodont zones of Russia and their global correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goreva, N. V.; Alekseev, A. S.

    2010-12-01

    The last decade has been marked by significant progress in the study of the stratigraphic ranges of the conodonts characteristic of the Kasimovian and Gzhelian stages in shallow-water sediments of the type sections in the Moscow Basin and the deeper facies of the South Urals. This paper discusses the history of studies of the Upper Carboniferous conodont zonation in Russia and abroad, and proposes a refined zonal conodont scale for the Kasimovian and Gzhelian stages, which may be included, as a standard, into the general Carboniferous scale of Russia. In this scale, the Kasimovian and Gzhelian stages correspond respectively to six ( subexcelsus, makhlinae, sagittalis, cancellosus, toretzianus, firmus) and five ( simulator, vitali, virgilicus, bellus, wabaunsensis) zones. The proposed scale works for the entire East European Platform and the Urals from the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago in the north to the Mugodzhary Mountains in the south. These regions of Russia are occupied by Upper Carboniferous marine facies. At several levels (especially in the Gzhelian Stage), the scale reliably correlates with zones of the Missourian and Virgilian stages in North America and also Dalaun and Mapingian stages in China.

  8. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  9. Can elective nodal irradiation be omitted in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer? analysis of recurrences in a phase II study of induction chemotherapy and involved-field radiotherapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suresh Senan; Sjaak Burgers; Michael J Samson; Rob J van Klaveren; Swie Swat Oei; John van Sörnsen de Koste; Peter W. J Voet; Frank J Lagerwaard; Jan Maarten van Haarst; Joachim G. J. V Aerts; Jan P van Meerbeeck

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the recurrence patterns when elective mediastinal irradiation was omitted, patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated with sequential chemotherapy (CHT) and involved-field radiotherapy (RT).Methods and Materials: Fifty patients were treated with either two or four cycles of induction CHT, followed by once-daily involved-field RT to 70 Gy, delivered using three-dimensional treatment planning. The contoured gross

  10. Multicenter Phase II Study Evaluating Two Cycles of Docetaxel, Cisplatin and Cetuximab as Induction Regimen Prior to Surgery in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients with NSCLC Stage IB-IIIA (INN06-Study)

    PubMed Central

    Hilbe, Wolfgang; Pall, Georg; Kocher, Florian; Pircher, Andreas; Zabernigg, August; Schmid, Thomas; Schumacher, Michael; Jamnig, Herbert; Fiegl, Michael; Gächter, Anne; Freund, Martin; Kendler, Dorota; Manzl, Claudia; Zelger, Bettina; Popper, Helmut; Wöll, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    Background Different strategies for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early stage NSCLC have already been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of a chemoimmunotherapy when limited to two cycles. Methods Between 01/2007 and 03/2010 41 patients with primarily resectable NSCLC stage IB to IIIA were included. Treatment consisted of two cycles cisplatin (40 mg/m2 d1+2) and docetaxel (75 mg/m2 d1) q3 weeks, accompanied by the administration of cetuximab (400 mg/m2 d1, then 250 mg weekly). The primary endpoint was radiological response according to RECIST. Results 40 patients were evaluable for toxicity, 39 for response. The main grade 3/4 toxicities were: neutropenia 25%, leucopenia 11%, febrile neutropenia 6%, nausea 8% and rash 8%. 20 patients achieved a partial response, 17 a stable disease, 2 were not evaluable. 37 patients (95%) underwent surgery and in three of them a complete pathological response was achieved. At a median follow-up of 44.2 months, 41% of the patients had died, median progression-free survival was 22.5 months. Conclusions Two cycles of cisplatin/ docetaxel/ cetuximab showed promising efficacy in the neoadjuvant treatment of early-stage NSCLC and rapid operation was possible in 95% of patients. Toxicities were manageable and as expected. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trials Register; Eudract-Nr: 2006-004639-31 PMID:26020783

  11. Stage hippocampe Physique 2011

    E-print Network

    Vermet, Franck

    Stage hippocampe Physique 2011 L'ENERGIE Thème: Contacts: IREM (irem@univ-brest.fr) LSOL (matthieu physique et électronique) Nous proposons d'encadrer des élèves de 1ère S lors d'un stage de physique au... Plusieurs notions de la Physique fondamentale interviennent donc dans ce thème. Durant le stage, les élèves

  12. [Pathomimia in upper limb].

    PubMed

    Maalla, Riadh; Bensalma, Hichem; Hamdi, Lamia; Assel, Salem; Bahri, Hichem; Hamdi, Abdelaziz

    2005-03-01

    Pathomimia, or factitious disorders, are characterized by producing symptoms voluntarily with the intention of playing the role of the patient. Inspite of being considerd as a psychatric disorder, pathomimuia is often encountered in the daily professional life of doctors without being recognized or diagnosed. There are various clinical aspects of pathomimia. The items that decide the orientation of the diagnosis are essentially the uncommon and odd expression of the reported symptoms, A capricious evolution as well as the multiplicity of the past medical cases. We report a group of five patients who were followed and treated between the years 2000 and 2003. This group was composed of three men and two women with an average age of 30 years. In three cases, we found the notion of skin injury. In one case, we noted a median nerve lesion in the elbow and once in the right upper member. The evolution was performed towards recidives of the initial symptomatology with more or less long periods of improvements. PMID:15929447

  13. Upper Cervical Spine Trauma.

    PubMed

    Bransford, Richard J; Alton, Timothy B; Patel, Amit R; Bellabarba, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Injuries to the upper cervical spine are potentially lethal; thus, full characterization of the injuries requires an accurate history and physical examination, and management requires an in-depth understanding of the radiographic projection of the craniocervical complex. Occipital condyle fractures may represent major ligament avulsions and may be highly unstable, requiring surgery. Craniocervical dissociation results from disruption of the primary osseoligamentous stabilizers between the occiput and C2. Dynamic fluoroscopy can differentiate the subtypes of craniocervical dissociation and help guide treatment. Management of atlas fractures is dictated by transverse alar ligament integrity. Atlantoaxial dislocations are rotated, translated, or distracted and are treated with a rigid cervical orthosis or fusion. Treatment of odontoid fractures is controversial and dictated by fracture characteristics, patient comorbidities, and radiographic findings. Hangman's fractures of the axis are rarely treated surgically, but atypical patterns and displaced fractures may cause neurologic injury and should be reduced and fused. Management of injuries to the craniocervical junction remains challenging, but good outcomes can be achieved with a comprehensive plan that consists of accurate and timely diagnosis and stabilization of the craniocervical junction. PMID:25344597

  14. Upper Hudson Dredging Debate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jeff Chiarenzelli

    In preparation for the activity a lecture is given on the properties and history of polychlorinated biphenyls and other contaminants. Each student is assigned to one of six groups with an interest in the outcome of the debate. The teams must meet and prepare a position paper on the proposed environmental dredging in the Upper Hudson River. Each team must represent the interests of its assigned constituency. Data and background information is found on the world wide web and from the instructor's collection of related articles. On the day of the debate the student's orally present their position paper (some make posters or powerpoint presentations). After each group has made their opening statement the invited guest senators on the panel (other faculty, myself, interested students, those who were absent for the preparation) ask each group a series of questions related to their stance. After this a general debate begins with detailed and sometimes heated discussions between the groups and the panel. A few moments are saved at the end of class and everyone is allowed to drop their assumed affiliation and speak their mind on what should be done. Before leaving the class is give a series of big picture topics to think about over the weekend and these are discussed during the next class.

  15. Oriental upper blepharoplasty.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chau-Jin

    2009-02-01

    Aesthetic surgery of the upper eyelids is a very common procedure performed in cosmetic practices around the world. The word blepharoplasty, however, has a different meaning in Asia than it does elsewhere. Orientals have different periorbital anatomic characteristics, their motivations for seeking eyelid treatment are different, and operative techniques have been adapted consequently. There are also many eyelid shapes among Orientals, mostly with regard to the presence and location of the supratarsal fold and/or presence of an epicanthal fold. The surgeon must therefore master a range of surgical procedures to treat these variations adequately. It is critical to know the indications for each blepharoplasty technique as well as their complications to select the right surgery and avoid unfavorable results. Epicanthoplasty performed on the right patient can greatly improve aesthetic results while retaining ethnic characteristics. This article will discuss Oriental eyelid characteristics, preoperative patient assessment, commonly used corrective techniques for the "double-eyelid" creation, and complications and how to avoid them. PMID:20567720

  16. Chemical equilibration of the Earth's core and upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.

    1984-01-01

    The oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the Earth's upper mantle appears to lie somewhat above that of the iron-wu??stite buffer, its fO2 is assumed to have been similar to the present value at the time of core formation. In the upper mantle, the Fe-rich liquid protocore that would form under such conditions of fO2 at elevated temperatures would lie predominantly in the system Fe-S-O. Distribution coefficients for Co, Cu, Ni, Ir, Au, Ir, W, Re, Mo, Ag and Ga between such liquids and basalt are known and minimum values are known for Ge. From these coefficients, upper mantle abundances for the above elements can be calculated by assuming cosmic abundances for the whole Earth and equilibrium between the Fe-S-O protocore and upper mantle. These calculated abundances are surprisingly close to presently known upper mantle abundances; agreements are within a factor of 5, except for Cu, W, and Mo. Therefore, siderophile element abundances in the upper mantle based on known distribution coefficients do not demand a late-stage meteoritic bombardment, and a protocore formed from the upper mantle containing S and O seems likely. As upper mantle abundances fit a local equilibrium model, then either the upper mantle has not been mixed with the rest of the mantle since core formation, or else partition coefficients between protocore and mantle were similar for the whole mantle regardless of P, T, and fO2. The latter possibility seems unlikely over such a P-T range. ?? 1984.

  17. Five Stages of Flow

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website includes an animation which shows the stages that molecules go through as they move from the turbulent stage of viscous flow, transition into laminar flow, and then transition again into molecular flow. You may pause this animation between stages. Objective: Identify the five stages of flow. This simulation is from Module 98 of the Vacuum Technology and Gas Control Cluster of the MATEC Module Library (MML). You can find this animation under the section "Vacuum Technology & Gas Controls." To view other clusters or for more information about the MML visit http://matec.org/ps/library3/process_I.shtmlKey

  18. Phase-I\\/II study to evaluate dose limiting toxicity, maximum tolerated dose, and tolerability of bendamustine HCl in pre-treated patients with B-chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (Binet stages B and C) requiring therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Lissitchkov; G. Arnaudov; D. Peytchev; Kh. Merkle

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Bendamustine hydrochloride, an anti-neoplastic agent with unique mechanism of action, is known to cause impressive remissions\\u000a in relapsed nonHodgkin’s lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Optimal bendamustine dosing for CLL patients had\\u000a not been finally established and a phase I\\/II study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose limiting\\u000a toxicity (DLT) of bendamustine. Methods: The

  19. Diagnosis and Staging

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer can cause many different symptoms. The doctor will order tests to determine if symptoms are caused by cancer or some other problem. If cancer is diagnosed, the doctor will run tests to determine the stage. Knowing the stage helps the doctor plan treatment and discuss prognosis.

  20. Early intervention with tiotropium in Chinese patients with GOLD stages I–II chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (Tie-COPD): study protocol for a multicentre, double-blinded, randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaochen; Zhou, Yumin; Chen, Shuyun; Zheng, Jinping; Zhong, Nanshan; Ran, Pixin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Owing to the high and increasing morbidity and mortality, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has become a major public health problem worldwide. Although the majority of patients with COPD are in the early stages, little attention has been paid to them, in particular regarding to early intervention. Tiotropium bromide can significantly relieve symptoms and reduce the incidence of acute exacerbations of COPD. Therefore, we hypothesise that therapy with tiotropium bromide will benefit patients with COPD with early-stage disease. Method/analysis A randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicentre clinical trial (Tiotropium In Early COPD study, Tie-COPD study) is being conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term intervention with tiotropium in patients with COPD with early-stage disease. A total of 839 patients with COPD who satisfied the eligibility criteria were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive a once daily inhaled capsule of either tiotropium bromide (18??g) or matching placebo for 2?years. Measurements will include forced expiratory volume in 1?s, health-related quality of life, grade degree of breathlessness related to activities, COPD exacerbations and pharmacoeconomic analysis. Ethics/dissemination This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University. Recruitment started in November 2011 and ended in October 2013, with 839 patients randomised. The treatment follow-up of participants with Tie-COPD is currently ongoing and is due to finish in November 2015. The authors will disseminate the findings in peer-reviewed publications, conferences and seminar presentations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01455129). PMID:24549160

  1. A population-based study of ethnicity and breast cancer stage at diagnosis in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, O.M.; Fischer, H.D.; Shah, B.R.; Lipscombe, L.; Fu, L.; Anderson, G.M.; Rochon, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer stage at diagnosis is an important predictor of survival. Our goal was to compare breast cancer stage at diagnosis (by American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria) in Chinese and South Asian women with stage at diagnosis in the remaining general population in Ontario. Methods We used the Ontario population-based cancer registry to identify all women diagnosed with breast cancer during 2005–2010, and we applied a validated surname algorithm to identify South Asian and Chinese women. We used logistic regression to compare, for Chinese or South Asian women and for the remaining general population, the frequency of diagnoses at stage ii compared with stage i and stages ii–iv compared with stage i. Results The registry search identified 1304 Chinese women, 705 South Asian women, and 39,287 women in the remaining general population. The Chinese and South Asian populations were younger than the remaining population (mean: 54, 57, and 61 years respectively). Adjusted for age, South Asian women were more often diagnosed with breast cancer at stage ii than at stage i [odds ratio (or): 1.28; 95% confidence interval (ci): 1.08 to 1.51] or at stages ii–iv than at stage i (or: 1.27; 95% ci: 1.08 to 1.48); Chinese women were less likely to be diagnosed at stage ii than at stage i (or: 0.82; 95% ci: 0.72 to 0.92) or at stages ii–iv than at stage i (or: 0.73; 95% ci: 0.65 to 0.82). Conclusions Breast cancers were diagnosed at a later stage in South Asian women and at an earlier stage in Chinese women than in the remaining population. A more detailed analysis of ethnocultural factors influencing breast screening uptake, retention, and care-seeking behavior might be needed to help inform and evaluate tailored health promotion activities. PMID:25908908

  2. Solvent extraction and separation of Cd(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) from chloride leach liquors of spent Ni–Cd batteries using commercial organo-phosphorus extractants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Ramachandra Reddy; D. Neela Priya; S. Venkateswara Rao; P. Radhika

    2005-01-01

    Development of a flow sheet for the solvent extraction, separation and recovery of cadmium(II), cobalt(II) and nickel(II) from chloride leach liquors of spent Ni–Cd batteries by hydrometallurgical route was investigated. Cyanex 923 showed selective separation of cadmium(II) from nickel(II) and cobalt(II). Two-stage counter-current extraction at 1:1 phase ratio and three stages of stripping with distilled water at an aqueous to

  3. Comparison of Lactic Acid Productivities at High Substrate Conversions in a Continuous Two-stage Fermenter With Cell Recycle Using Different Kinetic Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Nishiwaki; I. J. Dunn

    2005-01-01

    The steady-state performance of a two-stage recycle fermenter with two different types (I and II) of configurations for staging was investigated numerically for the continuous production of lactic acid. In Type I the bleed broth withdrawn from the first stage is supplied to the second fermenter, and in Type II both filtrate and bleed broth from the first stage are

  4. Upper Airway Obstruction in Children.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Anirban; Kabra, Sushil K; Lodha, Rakesh

    2015-08-01

    Children with upper airway obstruction are both unique and variable in their presentation and management, often posing a challenge to the pediatrician. Several anatomical and physiologic peculiarities make a child vulnerable to develop an obstruction of upper airways. The characteristic finding in upper airway obstruction is stridor-inspiratory, biphasic or expiratory. The etiologies vary widely throughout the age groups and according to the mode of presentation. The approach starts with suspicion, mandates careful clinical evaluation of the degree of obstruction and many a times emergency measures precede any investigation or even precise diagnosis. Maintaining an open and stable airway is of the utmost importance, often requiring a team approach of emergency physician, pediatrician, otorhinolaryngologist and pediatric pulmonologist. The commonest condition presenting with upper airway obstruction in pediatric population is viral croup. Croup is a clinical diagnosis in a febrile child, with barking cough and stridor preceded by upper respiratory infection. It is treated with systemic or inhaled steroids and nebulized epinephrine. Epiglottitis and bacterial tracheitis are acute bacterial infections of upper airways, presenting as true airway emergencies. Though the mainstay of therapy is IV antibiotics, the prime concern is maintenance of airway, which frequently requires endotracheal intubation. Rigid bronchoscopy is the procedure of choice for airway foreign bodies, a common cause of upper airway obstruction in children below 3 y of age. Airway malacias are the commonest cause of chronic stridor and are mostly managed conservatively. PMID:26104110

  5. 120. STAGE RECORDER WELLS & HOUSES HOUSE DETAILS (ML877/4FS) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. STAGE RECORDER WELLS & HOUSES - HOUSE DETAILS (ML-8-77/4-FS) August 1936 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 8, On Mississippi River near Houston County, MN, Genoa, Vernon County, WI

  6. [Blepharoplasty and upper eyelid malposition].

    PubMed

    Delas, J; Lagier, J

    2010-01-01

    Upper eyelid blepharoplasties are sometimes performed for functional purposes, but more often for cosmetic reasons. Upper eyelid malpositions, such as ptosis or lid retraction, are frequent and of varying causes. It is not rare for patients to present upper lid malposition, with or without functional consequences, associated with myocutaneous excess. Both functional and cosmetic outcomes are important. This article explores the etiologies of these pathologies and current surgical procedures. Furthermore we will discuss the advantages of combined procedures and different approaches to treat these concomitant pathologies. PMID:21284232

  7. Upper cylinder area lubrication system

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.A.

    1988-05-24

    An upper cylinder area lubrication system for an internal combustion engine, comprising: conduit means connected to the upper cylinder area of an internal combustion engine for introducing lubricant thereto, lubricant supply means including a reservoir for containing a lubricant suitable for introduction to the upper cylinder area of the internal combustion engine, and an electric pump connected to the reservoir and the conduit means, and timer means for automatically and alternately operating the pump on for relatively short periods of time and off for relatively long periods of time while the internal combustion engine is running.

  8. Upper mantle material in the Brazilian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbert, C. O.; Svisero, D. P.; Sial, A. N.; Meyer, H. O. A.

    1981-04-01

    Information on the nature of the upper mantle can be obtained from nodules in kimberlites and basalt and from mantle-derived magmas, mineral inclusions in diamonds, as well as from the fields of geodesy, seismology, geothermy, geomagnetism and petrological models for the upper mantle. In Brazil studies of these kinds are still in the stage of data gathering. This article intends to present some of this data related to the alpine peridotites, nodules in basalts, mineral inclusions in diamonds, and kimberlites, without any pretension of deeper-going interpretation. Alpine peridotites are found all over Brazil and are grouped in three main classes: the serpentinized dunites-peridotites of small and medium size; the gabbro-pyroxenite-peridotite association in large complexes, the latter described only in the central part of Brazil; and the pyroxenite-gabbroic gneisses of the Goianira-Trindade type. Kimberlites have been described in Minas Gerais and Piaui states, but they also exist in Mato Grosso and possibly in Rondonia, Goiás, Roraima and Bahia. Inclusions in diamonds studied from Minas Gerais, Piauí, Mato Grosso, Paraná, Sa˜o Paulo and Goiás include olivine, pyroxene, garnet, chromite, sulphides, ilmenite, zircon and rutile. Ultramafic nodules in basalts and basanites from Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Norte, Paraíba states and Fernando de Noronha Island are essentially Iherzolites, like the ones described from Paraguay.

  9. NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper State Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    By incorporating rigorous engineering practices, innovative manufacturing processes and test techniques, a unique multi-center government/contractor partnership, and a clean-sheet design developed around the primary requirements for the International Space Station (ISS) and Lunar missions, the Upper Stage Element of NASA s Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), the "Ares I," is a vital part of the Constellation Program s transportation system.

  10. Effect of coal briquetting on overall plant costs for a large low-Btu gas application. Task II final topical report. Addendum. [Two-stage gasification plant with briquetting

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.L.; Cassidy, H.P.

    1983-03-02

    This report presents the results of a study to determine the technical and economic aspects of coal briquetting, when the coal briquettes are used as feed coal to a coal gasification facility. Gas from the coal gasification facility was used as the fuel source for an iron ore pelletizing facility. The gasifier for this plant was a two-stage, fixed-bed gasifier. The product gas was 20 x 10/sup 9/ Btu per day (833.3 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hour), HHV, to be sent to an iron ore pelletizing facility. The product gas was a clean low-Btu gas produced at approximately atmospheric pressure. The evaluations were based on installing the gasifiers at the existing Erie Mining Company iron ore pelletizing plant at Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota. Thus, the designs use existing facilities where possible, and produce or purchase other needs. The briquetting/gasification design presented is technically feasible. The estimated fuel gas price is $10.00 per million Btu with a 12 percent DCF-ROR. The fuel cost is higher than the present price of natural gas at Hoyt Lakes, $3.52 per million Btu, and higher than the $7.70 per million Btu obtainable through substitution of Winkler fluidized-bed gasifiers for the two-stage fixed bed gasifiers. Not included in the study were considerations of intrinsic factors, such as the interruptible nature of natural gas supplies and future changes in the prices of natural gas and coal. 3 references, 16 figures, 16 tables.

  11. Life Stages Cards

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-09-26

    All animals develop and grow over time. The animals in this document undergo one of the most dramatic developmental processes known: metamorphosis. See if you can place the developmental stages in their proper order.

  12. Staging Airliner Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    There is a general consensus building that historically high fuel prices and greater public awareness of the emissions that result from burning fuel are going to be long-term concerns for those who design, build, and operate airliners. The possibility of saving both fuel and reducing emissions has rekindled interest in breaking very long-range airline flights into multiple stages or even adopting in-flight refueling. It is likely that staging will result in lower fuel burn, and recent published reports have suggested that the savings are substantial, particularly if the airliner is designed from the outset for this kind of operation. Given that staging runs against the design and operation historical trend, this result begs for further attention. This paper will examine the staging question, examining both analytic and numeric performance estimation methodologies to quantify the likely amount of fuel savings that can be expected and the resulting design impacts on the airliner.

  13. Stages of Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Vaginal Cancer Key Points Vaginal cancer is a disease in which malignant ( ... to the pelvis . Stages of Vaginal Cancer Key Points After vaginal cancer has been diagnosed, tests are ...

  14. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment (PDQ®) General Information About Thyroid Cancer Key Points Thyroid cancer is a disease in which malignant ( ... recurred (come back). Stages of Thyroid Cancer Key Points After thyroid cancer has been diagnosed, tests are ...

  15. Stages of Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your baby in these three stages. First trimester (week 1-week 12) First trimester See how your baby is ... is each pregnancy. Return to top Second trimester (week 13-week 28) Second trimester See how your ...

  16. Staging Bipolar Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduard Vieta; M. Reinares; A. R. Rosa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the evidence supporting a staging model for bipolar disorder. The authors conducted\\u000a an extensive Medline and Pubmed search of the published literature using a variety of search terms (staging, bipolar disorder,\\u000a early intervention) to find relevant articles, which were reviewed in detail. Only recently specific proposals have been made\\u000a to apply clinical

  17. MX stage I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilden, J. G.; Dykstra, P. R.

    1980-06-01

    The MX stage I program is addressed in summary fashion. It is noted that the MX first stage is now entering development after an extended period of System Definition. Consideration is given to the fact that the design baseline is a selection of technology that represents a balance of risks between performance, cost and schedule. Further, as the largest solid propulsion unit ever developed for ballistic missiles, the design is considered to be of general interest.

  18. Stage Two Enhancements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George Khushf

    In this essay I consider two kinds of human enhancement technologies. Stage 1 enhancements are discrete, medical enhancements;\\u000a they involve a modest augmentation of some specific function or capacity, and have quantifiable harms and benefits that are\\u000a amenable to conventional study designs. Examples of these enhancements include psychopharmaceuticals for enhanced cognitive\\u000a function, cosmetic surgery, and sports doping. Stage 2 enhancements

  19. Precision adjustable stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W. (Tracy, CA); Silva, Leonard L. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  20. A Mechanism for Upper Airway Stability during Slow Wave Sleep

    PubMed Central

    McSharry, David G.; Saboisky, Julian P.; DeYoung, Pam; Matteis, Paul; Jordan, Amy S.; Trinder, John; Smales, Erik; Hess, Lauren; Guo, Mengshuang; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: The severity of obstructive sleep apnea is diminished (sometimes markedly) during slow wave sleep (SWS). We sought to understand why SWS stabilizes the upper airway. Increased single motor unit (SMU) activity of the major upper airway dilating muscle (genioglossus) should improve upper airway stability. Therefore, we hypothesized that genioglossus SMUs would increase their activity during SWS in comparison with Stage N2 sleep. Design: The activity of genioglossus SMUs was studied on both sides of the transition between Stage N2 sleep and SWS. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Twenty-nine subjects (age 38 ± 13 yr, 17 males) were studied. Intervention: SWS. Measurement and Results: Subjects slept overnight with fine-wire electrodes in their genioglossus muscles and with full polysomnographic and end tidal carbon dioxide monitors. Fifteen inspiratory phasic (IP) and 11 inspiratory tonic (IT) units were identified from seven subjects and these units exhibited significantly increased inspiratory discharge frequencies during SWS compared with Stage N2 sleep. The peak discharge frequency of the inspiratory units (IP and IT) was 22.7 ± 4.1 Hz in SWS versus 20.3 ± 4.5 Hz in Stage N2 (P < 0.001). The IP units also fired for a longer duration (expressed as a percentage of inspiratory time) during SWS (104.6 ± 39.5 %TI) versus Stage N2 sleep (82.6 ± 39.5 %TI, P < 0.001). The IT units fired faster during expiration in SWS (14.2 ± 1.8 Hz) versus Stage N2 sleep (12.6 ± 3.1 Hz, P = 0.035). There was minimal recruitment or derecruitment of units between SWS and Stage N2 sleep. Conclusion: Increased genioglossus SMU activity likely makes the airway more stable and resistant to collapse throughout the respiratory cycle during SWS. Citation: McSharry DG; Saboisky JP; DeYoung P; Matteis P; Jordan AS; Trinder J; Smales E; Hess L; Guo M; Malhotra A. A mechanism for upper airway stability during slow wave sleep. SLEEP 2013;36(4):555-563. PMID:23565001

  1. Two stage turbine for rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The advanced turbine airfoils were designed and tested by Pratt & Whitney. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for a turbopump to be used in an advanced upper stage rocket engine. The advanced engine will use a hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion of hydrogen/oxygen propellants, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low mass flow rates and high operating pressures result in very small airfoil heights and diameters. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The shrouded axial turbine blades are 50 percent reaction with a maximum thickness to chord ratio near 1. At 6 deg from the tangential direction, the nozzle and blade exit flow angles are well below the traditional design minimum limits. The blade turning angle of 160 deg also exceeds the maximum limits used in traditional turbine designs.

  2. Two-stage coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Mitchell, T.O.; Whitehurst, D.D.

    1982-08-31

    Two-stage coal liquefaction is improved by separating a light fraction from the first (dissolving) stage effluent, hydrogenating that fraction and reblending the hydrogenated light fraction with the material passed from the first stage to the second stage reactor operating at higher temperature than the first stage.

  3. Depositional environments of Pennsylvanian Upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, W.H. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    Upper Strawn Group (Desmoinesean) represents a transition to fluvial facies from progradational deltaic facies. The lower part of the upper Strawn is composed mostly of horizontally bedded, fine-grained sandstones and shales of a distal delta-front origin. These sandstones and shales exhibit foreset bed dips of up to 15/sup 0/. In addition to the dipping foreset beds, the delta-front facies on occasion contain small listric normal faults, resulting from periodic higher rates of sedimentation. The middle parts of the upper Strawn consist predominantly of massive, fine to medium-grained, mature sandstones which represent distributary-mouth-bar deposits, as well as other proximal delta-front deposits such as distributary channels. The upper part of the upper Strawn consists of fluvial trough cross-bedded sandstones and chert-pebble conglomerates. These overlie the deltaic facies and indicate the final stages of upper Strawn deposition. The upper Strawn is overlain by the Adams Branch limestone and shales which represent marine transgression and subsequent shallow-marine deposition. The upper Strawn Group in McCulloch and San Saba Counties, Texas, represents continued filling of the Fort Worth basin during Desmoinesean time. The upper Strawn overlies the lower Strawn, an older, deeper water facies, in most parts of the study area. The upper Strawn overlies the Atokan age Marble Falls Limestone in an isolated section of the study area due to its position there on the Concho arch.

  4. A Longitudinal Study of Piaget's Developmental Stages and the Concept of Regression I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Z. Dudek; G. B. Dyer

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of 65 children, ages 5-9, followed longitudinally over a four year period with tests of operational and causal thinking offers support for Piaget's notions of constant, irreversible succession of stage progression. By Grade II (ages 7-8) the majority of children had attained the terminal stage on all but 2 of the 9 tests given. By Grade III terminal stages

  5. ARTICLES Colon Cancer Survival Rates With the New American Joint Committee on Cancer Sixth Edition Staging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica B. O'Connell; Melinda A. Maggard; Clifford Y. Ko

    Background: The recently revised American Joint Commit- tee on Cancer (AJCC) sixth edition cancer staging system increased the stratification within colon cancer stages II and III defined by the AJCC fifth edition system. Using nation- ally representative Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Re- sults (SEER) data, we compared survival rates associated with colon cancer stages defined according to both AJCC systems.

  6. Impact of Postoperative Radiation Therapy on Survival in Patients With Complete Resection and Stage I, II, or IIIA Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Chemotherapy: The Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association (ANITA) Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Douillard, Jean-Yves [Centre R. Gauducheau, Nantes (France)], E-mail: jy-douillard@nantes.fnclcc.fr; Rosell, Rafael [Catalan Institute of Oncology, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona (Spain); De Lena, Mario [IRCCS Oncologico, Bari (Italy); Riggi, Marcello; Hurteloup, Patrick [Institut de Recherche Pierre Fabre, Boulogne (France); Mahe, Marc-Andre [Centre R. Gauducheau, Nantes (France)

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) on survival in the Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association (ANITA) randomized study of adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: ANITA is a randomized trial of adjuvant cisplatin and vinorelbine chemotherapy vs. observation in completely resected non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) Stages IB to IIIA. Use of PORT was recommended for pN+ disease but was not randomized or mandatory. Each center decided whether to use PORT before initiation of the study. We describe here the survival of patients with and without PORT within each treatment group of ANITA. No statistical comparison of survival was performed because this was an unplanned subgroup analysis. Results: Overall, 232 of 840 patients received PORT (33.3% in the observation arm and 21.6% in the chemotherapy arm). In univariate analysis, PORT had a deleterious effect on the overall population survival. Patients with pN1 disease had an improved survival from PORT in the observation arm (median survival [MS] 25.9 vs. 50.2 months), whereas PORT had a detrimental effect in the chemotherapy group (MS 93.6 months and 46.6 months). In contrast, survival was improved in patients with pN2 disease who received PORT, both in the chemotherapy (MS 23.8 vs. 47.4 months) and observation arm (median 12.7 vs. 22.7 months). Conclusion: This retrospective evaluation suggests a positive effect of PORT in pN2 disease and a negative effect on pN1 disease when patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The results support further evaluation of PORT in prospectively randomized studies in completely resected pN2 NSCLC.

  7. Paclitaxel/carboplatin with or without sorafenib in the first-line treatment of patients with stage III/IV epithelial ovarian cancer: a randomized phase II study of the Sarah Cannon Research Institute

    PubMed Central

    Hainsworth, John D; Thompson, Dana S; Bismayer, John A; Gian, Victor G; Merritt, William M; Whorf, Robert C; Finney, Lindsey H; Dudley, B Stephens

    2015-01-01

    This trial compared the efficacy and toxicity of standard first-line treatment with paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/carboplatin plus sorafenib in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma. Patients with stage 3 or 4 epithelial ovarian cancer with residual measurable disease or elevated CA-125 levels after maximal surgical cytoreduction were randomized (1:1) to receive treatment with paclitaxel (175 mg/m2, 3 h infusion, day 1) and carboplatin (AUC 6.0, IV, day 1) with or without sorafenib 400 mg orally twice daily (PO BID). Patients were reevaluated for response after completing 6 weeks of treatment (two cycles); responding or stable patients received six cycles of paclitaxel/carboplatin. Patients receiving the sorafenib-containing regimen continued sorafenib (400 PO BID) for a total of 52 weeks. Eighty-five patients were randomized and received treatment.Efficacy was similar for patients receiving paclitaxel/carboplatin/sorafenib versus paclitaxel/carboplatin: overall response rates 69% versus 74%; median progression-free survival 15.4 versus 16.3 months; 2 year survival 76% versus 81%. The addition of sorafenib added substantially to the toxicity of the regimen; rash, hand–foot syndrome, mucositis, and hypertension were significantly more common in patients treated with sorafenib. The addition of sorafenib to standard paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve efficacy and substantially increased toxicity in the first-line treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Based on evidence from this study and other completed trials, sorafenib is unlikely to have a role in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25556916

  8. Paclitaxel/carboplatin with or without sorafenib in the first-line treatment of patients with stage III/IV epithelial ovarian cancer: a randomized phase II study of the Sarah Cannon Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, John D; Thompson, Dana S; Bismayer, John A; Gian, Victor G; Merritt, William M; Whorf, Robert C; Finney, Lindsey H; Dudley, B Stephens

    2015-05-01

    This trial compared the efficacy and toxicity of standard first-line treatment with paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/carboplatin plus sorafenib in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma. Patients with stage 3 or 4 epithelial ovarian cancer with residual measurable disease or elevated CA-125 levels after maximal surgical cytoreduction were randomized (1:1) to receive treatment with paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2) , 3 h infusion, day 1) and carboplatin (AUC 6.0, IV, day 1) with or without sorafenib 400 mg orally twice daily (PO BID). Patients were reevaluated for response after completing 6 weeks of treatment (two cycles); responding or stable patients received six cycles of paclitaxel/carboplatin. Patients receiving the sorafenib-containing regimen continued sorafenib (400 PO BID) for a total of 52 weeks. Eighty-five patients were randomized and received treatment.Efficacy was similar for patients receiving paclitaxel/carboplatin/sorafenib versus paclitaxel/carboplatin: overall response rates 69% versus 74%; median progression-free survival 15.4 versus 16.3 months; 2 year survival 76% versus 81%. The addition of sorafenib added substantially to the toxicity of the regimen; rash, hand-foot syndrome, mucositis, and hypertension were significantly more common in patients treated with sorafenib. The addition of sorafenib to standard paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve efficacy and substantially increased toxicity in the first-line treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Based on evidence from this study and other completed trials, sorafenib is unlikely to have a role in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25556916

  9. Stage Management & Technology 

    E-print Network

    O'Brien, Madison D

    2013-02-04

    are already in hardcopy format one can save them as printed documents or choose to scan them into the computer and save them as an electronic file. 29 If you choose to scan these images into a document then they can easily be saved as photos or PDFs... for each movement or significant action that changes the image on stage. Most stage managers develop their own shorthand or key that they use for noting this in the blocking script. It is also necessary for someone to be on book, which is following along...

  10. [Orthodontics and the upper airway].

    PubMed

    Cobo Plana, J; de Carlos Villafranca, F; Macías Escalada, E

    2004-03-01

    One of the general aims of orthodontic treatment and of the combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery is to achieve good occlusion and aesthetic improvement, especially in cases of severe dentoskeletal deformities. However, on many occasions, the parameters of the upper airways are not taken into account when the aims of conventional treatment are fulfilled. Patients with obstructive alterations during sleep represent for the orthodontist a type of patient who differs from the normal; for them, treatment should include the objective of improving oxygen saturation. Here, functional considerations should outweigh purely aesthetic ones. It is important, when making an orthodontic, surgical or combined diagnosis for a patient, to bear in mind the impact that treatment may have on the upper airways. Good aesthetics should never be achieved for some of our patients at the expense of diminishing the capacity of their upper airways. PMID:15301356

  11. Lung cancer staging now and in the future.

    PubMed

    Liam, Chong-Kin; Andarini, Sita; Lee, Pyng; Ho, James Chung-Man; Chau, Ngo Quy; Tscheikuna, Jamsak

    2015-05-01

    For a long time lung cancer was associated with a fatalistic approach by healthcare professionals. In recent years, advances in imaging, improved diagnostic techniques and more effective treatment modalities are reasons for optimism. Accurate lung cancer staging is vitally important because treatment options and prognosis differ significantly by stage. The staging algorithm should include a contrast computed tomography (CT) of the chest and the upper abdomen including adrenals, positron emission tomography/CT for staging the mediastinum and to rule out extrathoracic metastasis in patients considered for surgical resection, endosonography-guided needle sampling procedure replacing mediastinoscopy for near complete mediastinal staging, and brain imaging as clinically indicated. Applicability of evidence-based guidelines for staging of lung cancer depends on the available expertise and level of resources and is directly impacted by financial issues. Considering the diversity of healthcare infrastructure and economic performance of Asian countries, optimal and cost-effective use of staging methods appropriate to the available resources is prudent. The pulmonologist plays a central role in the multidisciplinary approach to lung cancer diagnosis, staging and management. Regional respiratory societies such as the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology should work with national respiratory societies to strive for uniform standards of care. For developing countries, a minimum set of care standards should be formulated. Cost-effective delivery of optimal care for lung cancer patients, including staging within the various healthcare systems, should be encouraged and most importantly, tobacco control implementation should receive an absolute priority status in all countries in Asia. PMID:25682805

  12. Extreme Cranial Ontogeny in the Upper Cretaceous Dinosaur Pachycephalosaurus

    PubMed Central

    Horner, John R.; Goodwin, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Extended neoteny and late stage allometric growth increase morphological disparity between growth stages in at least some dinosaurs. Coupled with relatively low dinosaur density in the Upper Cretaceous of North America, ontogenetic transformational representatives are often difficult to distinguish. For example, many hadrosaurids previously reported to represent relatively small lambeosaurine species were demonstrated to be juveniles of the larger taxa. Marginocephalians (pachycephalosaurids + ceratopsids) undergo comparable and extreme cranial morphological change during ontogeny. Methodology/Principal Findings Cranial histology, morphology and computer tomography reveal patterns of internal skull development that show the purported diagnostic characters for the pachycephalosaurids Dracorex hogwartsia and Stygimoloch spinifer are ontogenetically derived features. Coronal histological sections of the frontoparietal dome of an adult Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis reveal a dense structure composed of metaplastic bone with a variety of extremely fibrous and acellular tissue. Coronal histological sections and computer tomography of a skull and frontoparietal dome of Stygimoloch spinifer reveal an open intrafrontal suture indicative of a subadult stage of development. These dinosaurs employed metaplasia to rapidly grow and change the size and shape of their horns, cranial ornaments and frontoparietal domes, resulting in extreme cranial alterations during late stages of growth. We propose that Dracorex hogwartsia, Stygimoloch spinifer and Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis are the same taxon and represent an ontogenetic series united by shared morphology and increasing skull length. Conclusions/Significance Dracorex hogwartsia (juvenile) and Stygimoloch spinifer (subadult) are reinterpreted as younger growth stages of Pachycephalosaurus wyomingensis (adult). This synonymy reduces the number of pachycephalosaurid taxa from the Upper Cretaceous of North America and demonstrates the importance of cranial ontogeny in evaluating dinosaur diversity and taxonomy. These growth stages reflect a continuum rather than specific developmental steps defined by “known” terminal morphologies. PMID:19859556

  13. Decomposition and (importance) sampling techniques for multi-stage stochastic linear programs

    SciTech Connect

    Infanger, G.

    1993-11-01

    The difficulty of solving large-scale multi-stage stochastic linear programs arises from the sheer number of scenarios associated with numerous stochastic parameters. The number of scenarios grows exponentially with the number of stages and problems get easily out of hand even for very moderate numbers of stochastic parameters per stage. Our method combines dual (Benders) decomposition with Monte Carlo sampling techniques. We employ importance sampling to efficiently obtain accurate estimates of both expected future costs and gradients and right-hand sides of cuts. The method enables us to solve practical large-scale problems with many stages and numerous stochastic parameters per stage. We discuss the theory of sharing and adjusting cuts between different scenarios in a stage. We derive probabilistic lower and upper bounds, where we use importance path sampling for the upper bound estimation. Initial numerical results turned out to be promising.

  14. Stage cementing valve

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, H.E.; Adams, R.W.

    1989-11-14

    This patent describes a method for stage cementing a string of pipe in a well bore. The string of pipe includes a stage valve having a tubular valve collar intermediate of its length and has a tubular sleeve valve member slidably received in the stage collar for movement between first and second longitudinal positions relative to the stage collar and where the sleeve valve member has a flange in engagement with an engagement surface on the valve collar in the first longitudinal position. The sleeve valve member has a piston portion located in an annular chamber between the sleeve valve member and the valve collar and where the sleeve valve member has a sleeve valve port with access to one surface of the piston portion in the annular chamber for placing the one surface in fluid communication with the bore of the sleeve valve member. The valve collar has a valve collar port with access to the other surface of the of the piston portion in the annular chamber for placing the other surface in fluid communication with the exterior of the valve collar. The piston portion separates the sleeve valve port from the valve collar in a the first longitudinal position and permits the ports to be in fluid communication with one another in an the second longitudinal position.

  15. Staging for rhinosinusitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    VALERIE J. LUND; DAVID W. KENNEDY

    1997-01-01

    Interest in the surgical treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis has increased, primarily because rigid endoscopy and, more particularly, computed tomographic scanning have facilitated the visualization of disease. At the same time it has become both scientifically and financially imperative to audit therapeutic outcome. Consequently, a staging system for nonneoplastic sinus disease is needed. It is clear that any assessment of medical

  16. Data Staging on NFS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yunqing Chen; Jian Wu; Cong Yu

    2002-01-01

    Due to the storage limitation and imperfect predic- tion, mobile computing devices may experience large delays when accessing data on the distributed file systems. Flinn et al. (4) have proposed a novel ar- chitecture, called Data Staging, in which nearby un- trusted and unmanaged surrogates are used as the secondary file cache for the client to reduce the re- mote

  17. Definitive radiotherapy for early-stage hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kaname; Kubota, Akira; Furukawa, Madoka; Kitani, Yousuke; Nakayama, Yuko; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Shiomi, Miho

    2015-08-01

    The present study analyzed the outcomes of patients with early-stage hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HPSCC) treated with radical radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 33 patients with early-stage HPSCC who underwent RT or CCRT between January 1999 and December 2011. Of the 33 patients who were treated, 12 had Stage I and 21 had Stage II disease. Patients with Stage I were typically treated with RT, while patients with Stage II were treated with CCRT (concurrent chemotherapy: 5FU, cisplatin or TS-1). The median follow-up period was 81 months, ranging from 15 to 155 months. The 5-year overall survival rates, cause specific survival rates, locoregional control rates, and progression-free survival rates were 58, 75, 56, and 49 %, respectively. Of the 33 patients, 51 % experienced second primary malignancies. Esophageal carcinoma occurred in several cases, and was diagnosed either during screening after treatment for the second primary malignancy or simultaneously with the second primary malignancy. Advanced-stage second malignancies significantly influenced the survival of the patients and the control rate for HPSCC. Treatment emphasizing the quality of life after treatment is needed, if a poor prognosis is expected because of advanced-stage second primary malignancy. PMID:24939176

  18. Race influences stage-specific survival in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Howard, J Harrison; Hiles, Jason M; Leung, Anna M; Stern, Stacey L; Bilchik, Anton J

    2015-03-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma studies show improved survival for Asians but have not reported stage-specific overall survival (OS) or disease-specific survival (DSS) by race. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database was queried for cases of gastric adenocarcinoma between 1998 and 2008. We evaluated OS and DSS by race and stage. Number of assessed lymph nodes was compared among surgical patients. Of 49,058 patients with complete staging data, 35,300 were white, 7709 were Asian, and 6049 were black. Asians had significantly better OS for all stages (P < 0.001) and significantly better DSS for Stages I (P < 0.0001) and II (P = 0.0006). As compared with blacks, whites had significantly better DSS for Stages I (P < 0.0001), II (P = 0.0055), III (P = 0.0165), and IV (P < 0.0001). Among the 28,133 (57%) surgical patients, average number of evaluated lymph nodes was highest for Asians (P < 0.0001). Among surgical patients with 15 or more nodes evaluated, DSS was worse in blacks with Stage I disease (P < 0.05). Blacks with gastric adenocarcinoma have a worse DSS, which disappears when surgical treatment includes adequate lymphadenectomy. Race-associated survival differences for gastric adenocarcinoma might simply reflect variations in surgical staging techniques and socioeconomic factors. PMID:25760201

  19. Streamlining deep brain stimulation surgery by reversing the staging order.

    PubMed

    van Horne, Craig G; Vaughan, Scott W; Massari, Carla; Bennett, Michael; Asfahani, Wissam S Z; Quintero, Jorge E; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2015-05-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is approved for several clinical indications; however, the sequencing of DBS surgery and the timeline for implementing stimulation therapy are not standardized. In over 140 cases so far, the authors have reversed the sequencing for staged implantation of DBS systems that was conducive to minimizing patient anxiety and discomfort while providing the opportunity to shorten the time between implantation and programming for therapeutic management of symptoms. Stage I was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and consisted of implantation of the pulse generator and lead extensions and placement of the bur holes. Stage II was completed 1-7 days later, using only local anesthesia, and included stereotactic frame-based microelectrode recordings, semi-microstimulation and macrostimulation, and testing and placement of the stimulating electrodes. Stage I lasted approximately 90 minutes, whereas Stage II lasted approximately 230 minutes. All patients tolerated the procedures and received a complete implanted system. Deep brain stimulation therapy was typically initiated on the same day as lead implantation. When sequencing was reversed and bur holes were placed during the first stage while a patient was under general anesthesia, the patient was able to tolerate the second awake stage and was able to begin stimulation therapy within 48 hours of the second stage. PMID:25748305

  20. UPPER-ATMOSPHERE HELIUM IONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. B. Hanson

    1962-01-01

    An experimental measurement of the ion concentration in the upper ; ionosphere is examined in light of a suggestion that helium is an important ; constituent of the high atmosphere. An isothermal region of helium ions at l600 ; deg K is found above approximately 1200 km. Consideration of the loss mechanism ; for helium ions by ion-atom interchange with