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Sample records for ilc reference design

  1. Ilc Cryogenic Systems Reference Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, T. J.; Geynisman, M.; Klebaner, A.; Parma, V.; Tavian, L.; Theilacker, J.

    2008-03-01

    A Global Design Effort (GDE) began in 2005 to study a TeV scale electron-positron linear accelerator based on superconducting radio-frequency (RF) technology, called the International Linear Collider (ILC). In early 2007, the design effort culminated in a reference design for the ILC, closely based on the earlier TESLA design. The ILC will consist of two 250 GeV linacs, which provide positron-electron collisions for high energy physics research. The particle beams will be accelerated to their final energy in superconducting niobium RF cavities operating at 2 kelvin. At a length of about 12 km each, the main linacs will be the largest cryogenic systems in the ILC. Positron and electron sources, damping rings, and beam delivery systems will also have a large number and variety of other superconducting RF cavities and magnets, which require cooling at liquid helium temperatures. Ten large cryogenic plants with 2 kelvin refrigeration are envisioned to cool the main linacs and the electron and positron sources. Three smaller cryogenic plants will cool the damping rings and beam delivery system components predominately at 4.5 K. This paper describes the cryogenic systems concepts for the ILC.

  2. ILC cryogenic systems reference design

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.J.; Geynisman, M.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Parma, V.; Tavian, L.; /CERN

    2008-01-01

    A Global Design Effort (GDE) began in 2005 to study a TeV scale electron-positron linear accelerator based on superconducting radio-frequency (RF) technology, called the International Linear Collider (ILC). In early 2007, the design effort culminated in a reference design for the ILC, closely based on the earlier TESLA design. The ILC will consist of two 250 GeV linacs, which provide positron-electron collisions for high energy physics research. The particle beams will be accelerated to their final energy in superconducting niobium RF cavities operating at 2 kelvin. At a length of about 12 km each, the main linacs will be the largest cryogenic systems in the ILC. Positron and electron sources, damping rings, and beam delivery systems will also have a large number and variety of other superconducting RF cavities and magnets, which require cooling at liquid helium temperatures. Ten large cryogenic plants with 2 kelvin refrigeration are envisioned to cool the main linacs and the electron and positron sources. Three smaller cryogenic plants will cool the damping rings and beam delivery system components predominately at 4.5 K. This paper describes the cryogenic systems concepts for the ILC.

  3. ILC Reference Design Report: Accelerator Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, Nan; /SLAC

    2007-12-14

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a 200-500 GeV center-of-mass high-luminosity linear electron-positron collider, based on 1.3 GHz superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating cavities. The use of the SCRF technology was recommended by the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP) in August 2004 [1], and shortly thereafter endorsed by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). In an unprecedented milestone in high-energy physics, the many institutes around the world involved in linear collider R&D united in a common effort to produce a global design for the ILC. In November 2004, the 1st International Linear Collider Workshop was held at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan. The workshop was attended by some 200 accelerator physicists from around the world, and paved the way for the 2nd ILC Workshop in August 2005, held at Snowmass, Colorado, USA, where the ILC Global Design Effort (GDE) was officially formed. The GDE membership reflects the global nature of the collaboration, with accelerator experts from all three regions (Americas, Asia and Europe). The first major goal of the GDE was to define the basic parameters and layout of the machine--the Baseline Configuration. This was achieved at the first GDE meeting held at INFN, Frascati, Italy in December 2005 with the creation of the Baseline Configuration Document (BCD). During the next 14 months, the BCD was used as the basis for the detailed design work and value estimate (as described in section 1.6) culminating in the completion of the second major milestone, the publication of the draft ILC Reference Design Report (RDR). The technical design and cost estimate for the ILC is based on two decades of world-wide Linear Collider R&D, beginning with the construction and operation of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The SLC is acknowledged as a proof-of-principle machine for the linear collider concept. The ILC SCRF linac technology was pioneered by the TESLA collaboration*, culminating in

  4. The Reference Design for the ILC, Costs, and What's Next

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, Barry

    2007-03-26

    A Reference Design for the International Linear Collider was recently released. The scale of the ILC is such that it must be built by an international collaboration and the design is the culmination of a unique global effort. Through ICFA, a decision was made to base the design on superconducting RF technology and then the Global Design Effort (GDE) was created to coordinate the actual accelerator design toward a construction proposal. The reference design establishes all the features of the machine, and defines both the R&D program and engineering design that will now follow over the next few years.

  5. International Linear Collider Reference Design Report Volume 2: Physics at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, Gerald; Abe, Toshinori; Abernathy, Jason; Ablikim, Medina; Abramowicz, Halina; Adey, David; Adloff, Catherine; Adolphsen, Chris; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Agapov, Ilya; Ahn, Jung-Keun; Aihara, Hiroaki; Akemoto, Mitsuo; del Carmen Alabau, Maria; Albert, Justin; Albrecht, Hartwig; Albrecht, Michael; Alesini, David; Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Jim; Allison, Wade; /SLAC /Tokyo U. /Victoria U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Tel Aviv U. /Birmingham U. /Annecy, LAPP /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /DESY /Royal Holloway, U. of London /CERN /Pusan Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Notre Dame U. /Frascati /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Oxford U. /Hefei, CUST /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /Fermilab

    2011-11-14

    The triumph of 20th century particle physics was the development of the Standard Model and the confirmation of many of its aspects. Experiments determined the particle constituents of ordinary matter, and identified four forces that hold matter together and transform it from one form to another. Particle interactions were found to obey precise laws of relativity and quantum theory. Remarkable features of quantum physics were observed, including the real effects of 'virtual' particles on the visible world. Building on this success, particle physicists are now able to address questions that are even more fundamental, and explore some of the deepest mysteries in science. The scope of these questions is illustrated by this summary from the report Quantum Universe: (1) Are there undiscovered principles of nature; (2) How can we solve the mystery of dark energy; (3) Are there extra dimensions of space; (4) Do all the forces become one; (5) Why are there so many particles; (6) What is dark matter? How can we make it in the laboratory; (7) What are neutrinos telling us; (8) How did the universe begin; and (9) What happened to the antimatter? A worldwide program of particle physics investigations, using multiple approaches, is already underway to explore this compelling scientific landscape. As emphasized in many scientific studies, the International Linear Collider is expected to play a central role in what is likely to be an era of revolutionary advances. Discoveries from the ILC could have breakthrough impact on many of these fundamental questions. Many of the scientific opportunities for the ILC involve the Higgs particle and related new phenomena at Terascale energies. The Standard Model boldly hypothesizes a new form of Terascale energy, called the Higgs field, that permeates the entire universe. Elementary particles acquire mass by interacting with this field. The Higgs field also breaks a fundamental electroweak force into two forces, the electromagnetic and weak

  6. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  7. Silicon Tracker Design for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.; /SLAC

    2005-07-27

    The task of tracking charged particles in energy frontier collider experiments has been largely taken over by solid-state detectors. While silicon microstrip trackers offer many advantages in this environment, large silicon trackers are generally much more massive than their gaseous counterparts. Because of the properties of the machine itself, much of the material that comprises a typical silicon microstrip tracker can be eliminated from a design for the ILC. This realization is the inspiration for a tracker design using lightweight, short, mass-producible modules to tile closed, nested cylinders with silicon microstrips. This design relies upon a few key technologies to provide excellent performance with low cost and complexity. The details of this concept are discussed, along with the performance and status of the design effort.

  8. Design of the ILC RTML extraction lines

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Walz, D.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The ILC [1] Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) contains three extraction lines (EL). Each EL can be used both for an emergency abort dumping of the beam and tune-up continual train-by-train extraction. Two of the extraction lines are located downstream of the first and second stages of the RTML bunch compressor, and must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spreads of 2.5% and 0.15%, respectively. In this paper we report on an optics design that allowed minimizing the length of the extraction lines while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by the distance required for acceptable radiation levels in the service tunnel. The proposed extraction lines can accommodate beams with different energy spreads while at the same time providing the beam size acceptable for the aluminum dump window.

  9. Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, M.

    2011-04-30

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  10. Design of the ILC RTML Extraction Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Walz, D.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-10-17

    The ILC [1] Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) contains three extraction lines (EL). Each EL can be used both for an emergency abort dumping of the beam and tune-up continual train-by-train extraction. Two of the extraction lines are located downstream of the first and second stages of the RTML bunch compressor, and must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spreads of 2.5% and 0.15%, respectively. In this paper we report on an optics design that allowed minimizing the length of the extraction lines while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by the distance required for acceptable radiation levels in the service tunnel. The proposed extraction lines can accommodate beams with different energy spreads while at the same time providing the beam size acceptable for the aluminum dump window. The RTML incorporates three extraction lines, which can be used for either an emergency beam abort or for a train-by-train extraction. The first EL is located downstream of the Damping Ring extraction arc. The other two extraction lines are located downstream of each stage of the two-stage bunch compressor. The first extraction line (EL1) receives 5GeV beam with an 0.15% energy spread. The extraction line located downstream of the first stage of bunch compressor (ELBC1) receives both compressed and uncompressed beam, and therefore must accept beam with both 5 and 4.88GeV energy, and 0.15% and 2.5% energy spread, respectively. The extraction line located after the second stage of the bunch compressor (ELBC2) receives 15GeV beam with either 0.15 or 1.8% energy spread. Each of the three extraction lines is equipped with the 220kW aluminum ball dump, which corresponds to the power of the continuously dumped beam with 5GeV energy, i.e., the beam trains must be delivered to the ELBC2 dump at reduced repetition rate.

  11. ILC Polarized Electron Source Design and R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, A.; Sheppard, J.; Zhou, F.; Poelker, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-06

    The R and D program for the ILC electron focuses on three areas. These are the source drive laser system, the electron gun and photo cathodes necessary to produce a highly polarized electron beam. Currently, the laser system and photo cathode development take place at SLAC's 'ILC Injector Test facility', which is an integrated lab (laser and gun) that allows the production of the electron beam and is equipped with a set of diagnostics, necessary to characterize the source performance. Development of the ILC electron gun takes place at Jefferson Lab, where advanced concepts and technologies for HV DC electron guns for polarized beams are being developed. The goal is to combine both efforts at one facility to demonstrate an electron beam with ILC specifications, which are electron beam charge and polarization as well as the cathode's lifetime. The source parameters are summarized in Table 1. The current schematic design of the ILC central complex is depicted in Figure 1. The electron and positron sources are located and laid out approximately symmetric on either side of the damping rings.

  12. The ILC Beam Delivery System - Conceptual Design and RD Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2005-05-27

    The Beam Delivery System of the ILC has many stringent and sometimes conflicting requirements. To produce luminosity, the beams must be focused to nanometer size. To provide acceptable detector backgrounds, particles far from the beam core must be collimated. Unique beam diagnostics and instrumentation are required to monitor parameters of the colliding beams such as the energy spectrum and polarization. The detector and beamline components must be protected against errant beams. After collision, the beams must also be transported to the beam dumps safely and with acceptable losses. An international team is actively working on the design of the ILC Beam Delivery System in close collaboration. Details of the design, recent progress and remaining challenges will be summarized in this paper.

  13. Design of the Second-Generation ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, M.A.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; MacNair, D.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) has initiated a program to design and build a Marx-topology modulator to produce a relatively compact, low-cost, high availability klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Building upon the success of the P1 Marx, the SLAC P2 Marx is a second-generation modulator whose design further emphasizes the qualities of modularity and high-availability. This paper outlines highlights of this design and presents single-cell performance data obtained during the proof-of-concept phase of the project.

  14. DESIGN OF ILC EXTRACTION LINE FOR 20 MRAD CROSSING ANGLE

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y.; Moffeit, K.; Seryi, A.; Woods, M.; Arnold, R.; Oliver, W.; Parker, B.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U.

    2005-05-16

    One of the two ILC Interaction Regions will have a large horizontal crossing angle which would allow to extract the spent beams in a separate beam line. In this paper, the extraction line design for 20 mrad crossing angle is presented. This beam line transports the primary e{sup +}/e{sup -} and beamstrahlung photon beams from the IP to a common dump, and includes diagnostic section for energy and polarization measurements. The optics is designed for a large energy acceptance to minimize losses in the low energy tail of the disrupted beam. The extraction optics, diagnostic instrumentation and particle tracking simulations are described.

  15. The ILC control system.

    SciTech Connect

    Carwardine, J.; Saunders, C.; Arnold, N.; Lenkszus, F.; Rehlich, K.; Simrock, S.; Banerjee, b.; Chase, B.; Gottschalk, E.; Joireman, P.; Kasley, P.; Lackey, S.; McBride, P.; Pavlicek, V.; Patrick, J.; Votava, M.; Wolbers, S.; Furukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Larson, R.S.; Downing, R.; DESY; FNAL; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    Since the last ICALEPCS, a small multi-region team has developed a reference design model for a control system for the International Linear Collider as part of the ILC Global Design Effort. The scale and performance parameters of the ILC accelerator require new thinking in regards to control system design. Technical challenges include the large number of accelerator systems to be controlled, the large scale of the accelerator facility, the high degree of automation needed during accelerator operations, and control system equipment requiring 'Five Nines' availability. The R&D path for high availability touches the control system hardware, software, and overall architecture, and extends beyond traditional interfaces into the technical systems. Software considerations for HA include fault detection through exhaustive out-of-band monitoring and automatic state migration to redundant systems, while the telecom industry's emerging ATCA standard - conceived, specified, and designed for High Availability - is being evaluated for suitability for ILC front-end electronics.

  16. Optimization of Helium Vessel Design for ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Fratangelo, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    The ILC (International Linear Collider) is a proposed new major particle accelerator. It consists of two 20 km long linear accelerators colliding electrons and positrons at an energy exceeding 500 GeV, Achieving this collision energy while keeping reasonable accelerator dimensions requires the use of high electric field superconducting cavities as the main acceleration element. These cavities are operated at l.3 GHz inside an appropriate container (He vessel) at temperatures as low as 1.4 K using superfluid Helium as the refrigerating medium. The purpose of this thesis, in the context of the ILC R&D activities currently in progress at Fermilab (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory), is the mechanical study of an ILC superconducting cavity and Helium vessel prototype. The main goals of these studies are the determination of the limiting working conditions of the whole He vessel assembly, the simulation of the manufacturing process of the cavity end-caps and the assessment of the Helium vessel's efficiency. In addition this thesis studies the requirements to certify the compliance with the ASME Code of the whole cavity/vessel assembly. Several Finite Elements Analyses were performed by the candidate himself in order to perform the studies listed above and described in detail in Chapters 4 through 8. ln particular the candidate has developed an improved procedure to obtain more accurate results with lower computational times. These procedures will be accurately described in the following chapters. After an introduction that briefly describes the Fennilab and in particular the Technical Division (where all the activities concerning with this thesis were developed), the first part of this thesis (Chapters 2 and 3) explains some of the main aspects of modem particle accelerators. Moreover it describes the most important particle accelerators working at the moment and the basic features of the ILC project. Chapter 4 describes all the activities that were done to certify

  17. Towards a PEBB-Based Design Approach for a Marx-Topology ILC Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Macken, K

    2009-10-17

    Introduced by the U.S. Navy more than a decade ago, the concept of Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) has been successfully applied in various applications. It is well accepted within the power electronics arena that this concept offers the potential to achieve increased levels of modularity and compactness. This approach is thus ideally suited for applications where easy serviceability and high availability are key, such as the ILC. This paper presents a building block approach for designing a Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator.

  18. The ILC global control system.

    SciTech Connect

    Carwardine, J.; Arnold, N.; Lenkszus, F.; Saunders, C.; Rehlich, K.; Simrock, S.; Banerjee, B.; Chase, B.; Gottschalk, E.; Joireman, P.; Kasley, P.; Lackey, S.; McBride, P.; Pavlicek, V.; Patrick, J.; Votava, M.; Wolbers, S.; Furukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Larsen , R .S.; Downing, R.; FNAL; DESY; KEK; SLAC

    2008-01-01

    The scale and performance parameters of the ILC require new thinking in regards to control system design. This design work has begun quite early in comparison to most accelerator projects, with the goal of uniquely high overall accelerator availability. Among the design challenges are high control system availability, precision timing and rf phase reference distribution, standardizing of interfaces, operability, and maintainability. We present the current state of the design and take a prospective look at ongoing research and development projects.

  19. The RF Design of an HOM Polarized RF Gun for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Miller, R.A.; Lewellen, J.W.; /Argonne

    2006-11-15

    The ILC requires a polarized electron beam. While a highly polarized beam can be produced by a GaAs-type cathode in a DC gun of the type currently in use at SLAC, JLAB and elsewhere, the ILC injector system can be simplified and made more efficient if a GaAs-type cathode can be combined with a low emittance RF gun. Since this type of cathode is known to be extremely sensitive to vacuum contamination including back bombardment by electrons and ions, any successful polarized RF gun must have a significantly improved operating vacuum compared to existing RF guns. We present a new RF design for an L-Band normal conducting (NC) RF gun for the ILC polarized electron source. This design incorporates a higher order mode (HOM) structure, whose chief virtue in this application is an improved conductance for vacuum pumping on the cathode. Computer simulation models have been used to optimize the RF parameters with two principal goals: first to minimize the required RF power; second to reduce the peak surface field relative to the field at the cathode in order to suppress field emitted electron bombardment. The beam properties have been simulated initially using PARMELA. Vacuum and other practical issues for implementing this design are discussed.

  20. Design study of an optical cavity for a future photon collider at ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemz, G.; Mönig, K.; Will, I.

    2006-08-01

    Hard photons well above 100 GeV have to be generated in a future photon collider which essentially will be based on the infrastructure of the planned International Linear Collider (ILC). The energy of near-infrared laser photons will be boosted by Compton backscattering against a high-energy relativistic electron beam. For high effectiveness, a very powerful laser system is required that exceeds today's state-of-the-art capabilities. In this paper a design of an auxiliary passive cavity is discussed that resonantly enhances the peak-power of the laser. The properties and prospects of such a cavity are addressed on the basis of the specifications for the European TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) proposal. Those of the ILC are expected to be similar.

  1. Beam Dynamics Challenges for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Kiyoshi; Seryi, Andrei; Walker, Nicholas; Wolski, Andy; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2008-02-13

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposal for 500 GeV center-of-mass electron-positron collider, with a possible upgrade to {approx}1 TeV center-of-mass. At the heart of the ILC are the two {approx}12 km 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SCRF) linacs which will accelerate the electron and positron beams to an initial maximum energy of 250 GeV each. The Global Design Effort (GDE)--responsible for the world-wide coordination of this uniquely international project--published the ILC Reference Design Report in August of 2007 [1]. The ILC outlined in the RDR design stands on a legacy of over fifteen-years of R&D. The GDE is currently beginning the next step in this ambitious project, namely an Engineering Design phase, which will culminate with the publication of an Engineering Design Report (EDR) in mid-2010. Throughout the history of linear collider development, beam dynamics has played an essential role. In particular, the need for complex computer simulations to predict the performance of the machine has always been crucial, not least because the parameters of the ILC represent in general a large extrapolation from where current machines operate today; many of the critical beam-dynamics features planned for the ILC can ultimately only be truly tested once the ILC has been constructed. It is for this reason that beam dynamics activities will continue to be crucial during the Engineering Design phase, as the available computer power and software techniques allow ever-more complex and realistic models of the machine to be developed. Complementary to the computer simulation efforts are the need for well-designed experiments at beam-test facilities, which--while not necessarily producing a direct demonstration of the ILC-like parameters for the reasons mentioned above--can provide important input and benchmarking for the computer models.

  2. Superconducting magnet needs for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, J.C.; Kashikhin, Vl.; Parker, B.; Palmer, M.A. /; Clarke, J.A.; /Daresbury

    2007-06-01

    The ILC Reference Design Report was completed early in February 2007. The Magnet Systems Group was formed to translate magnetic field requirements into magnet designs and cost estimates for the Reference Design. As presently configured, the ILC will have more than 13,000 magnetic elements of which more than 2300 will be based on superconducting technology. This paper will describe the major superconducting magnet needs for the ILC as presently determined by the Area Systems Groups, responsible for beam line design, working with the Magnet Systems Group. The superconducting magnet components include Main Linac quadrupoles, Positron Source undulators, Damping Ring wigglers, a complex array of Final Focus superconducting elements in the Beam Delivery System, and large superconducting solenoids in the e{sup +} and e{sup -} Sources, and the Ring to Main Linac lines.

  3. Design Considerations for a PEBB-Based Marx-Topology ILC Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Macken, K.; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.A.; Nguyen, M.N.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    The concept of Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) has its origin in the U.S. Navy during the last decade of the past century. As compared to a more conventional or classical design approach, a PEBB-oriented design approach combines various potential advantages such as increased modularity, high availability and simplified serviceability. This relatively new design paradigm for power conversion has progressively matured since then and its underlying philosophy has been clearly and successfully demonstrated in a number of real-world applications. Therefore, this approach has been adopted here to design a Marx-topology modulator for an International Linear Collider (ILC) environment where easy serviceability and high availability are crucial. This paper describes various aspects relating to the design of a 32-cell Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator. The concept of nested droop correction is introduced and illustrated. Several design considerations including cosmic ray withstand, power cycling capability, fault tolerance, etc., are discussed. Details of the design of a Marx cell PEBB are included.

  4. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  5. To study the emittance dilution in Superconducting Linear Accelerator Design for International Linear Collider (ILC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Kirti; Solyak, Nikolay; Tenenbaum, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Recently the particle physics community has chosen a single technology for the new accelerator, opening the way for the world community to unite and concentrate resources on the design of an International Linear collider (ILC) using superconducting technology. One of the key operational issues in the design of the ILC will be the preservation of the small beam emittances during passage through the main linear accelerator (linac). Sources of emittance dilution include incoherent misalignments of the quadrupole magnets and rf-structure misalignments. In this work, the study of emittance dilution for the 500-GeV center of mass energy main linac of the Superconducting Linear Accelerator design, based on adaptation of the TESLA TDR design is performed using LIAR simulation program. Based on the tolerances of the present design, effect of two important Beam-Based steering algorithms, Flat Steering and Dispersion Free Steering, are compared with respect to the emittance dilution in the main linac. We also investigated the effect of various misalignments on the emittance dilution for these two steering algorithms.

  6. Conceptual design of an L-band recirculating superconducting traveling wave accelerating structure for ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Liu, Z.; Kazakov, S.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; Gai, W.; /Argonne

    2007-06-01

    With this paper, we propose the conceptual design of a traveling wave accelerating structure for a superconducting accelerator. The overall goal is to study a traveling wave (TW) superconducting (SC) accelerating structure for ILC that allows an increased accelerating gradient and, therefore reduction of the length of the collider. The conceptual studies were performed in order to optimize the acceleration structure design by minimizing the surface fields inside the cavity of the structure, to make the design compatible with existing technology, and to determine the maximum achievable gain in the accelerating gradient. The proposed solution considers RF feedback system redirecting the accelerating wave that passed through the superconducting traveling wave acceleration (STWA) section back to the input of the accelerating structure. The STWA structure has more cells per unit length than a TESLA structure but provides an accelerating gradient higher than a TESLA structure, consequently reducing the cost. In this paper, the STWA cell shape optimization, coupler cell design and feedback waveguide solution are considered. We also discuss the field flatness in the superconducting TW structure, the HOM modes and multipactor performance have been studied as well. The proposed TW structure design gives an overall 46% gain over the SW ILC structure if the 10 m long TW structure is employed.

  7. Design of a Pulsed Flux Concentrator for the ILC Positron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Abbott, R; Brown, C; Javedani, J; Piggott, W T; Clarke, J

    2010-05-17

    The Positron Source for the International Linear Collider requires an optical matching device after the target to increase the capture efficiency for positrons. Pulsed flux concentrators have been used by previous machines to improve the capture efficiency but the ILC has a 1 ms long pulse train which is too long for a standard flux concentrator. A pulsed flux concentrator with a 40 ms flat top was created for a hyperon experiment in 1965 which used liquid nitrogen cooling to reduce the resistance of the concentrating plates and extend the lifetime of the pulse. We report on a design for a 1 ms device based on this concept.

  8. Modular design of long narrow scintillating cells for ILC detector

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Maloney, J.; Rykalin, V.; Schellpfeffer, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    The experimental results for the narrow scintillating elements with effective area about 20 cm{sup 2} are reported. The elements were formed from the single piece of scintillator and were read out via wavelength shifting fibers with the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiodes on both ends of each fiber. The formation of the cells from the piece of scintillator by using grooves is discussed. The cell performance was tested using the radioactive source by measuring the PMT current and a single rate after amplifier and discrimination with threshold at about three photo electrons in each channel and quad coincidences (double coincidences between sensors on each fiber and double coincidences between two neighboring fibers). This result is of high importance for large multi-channel systems, i.e. module may be used as an active element for calorimeter or muon system for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector because cell effective area can be smoothly enlarged or reduced (to 4 cm{sup 2} definitely).

  9. FINAL DESIGN OF ILC RTML EXTRACTION LINE FOR SINGLE STAGE BUNCH COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S.; Solyak, N.

    2011-03-28

    The use of single stage bunch compressor (BC) in the International Linear Collider (ILC) Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) requires new design for the extraction line (EL). The EL located downstream of the BC will be used for both an emergency abort dumping of the beam and the tune-up continuous train-by-train extraction. It must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spread of 3.54% and 0.15% respectively. In this paper we report the final design that allowed minimizing the length of such extraction line while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by 5m distance required for acceptable radiation level in the service tunnel. Proposed extraction line can accommodate beams with different energy spreads at the same time providing the beam size suitable for the aluminum ball dump window. We described the final design of the ILC RTML extraction line located downstream of the new single-stage bunch compressor. The extraction line is only 24m long and is capable of accepting and transmitting 220kW of beam power. The EL can be used for both fast intra-train and continual extraction, and is capable of accepting both 0.15% and 3.54% energy spread beams at 5MeV and 4.37MeV respectively.

  10. Differentiation of human innate lymphoid cells (ILCs).

    PubMed

    Juelke, Kerstin; Romagnani, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    During the last years, a high complexity in innate lymphoid lineages now collectively referred to as innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) has been revealed. ILCs can be grouped according to their effector functions and transcriptional requirements into three main groups, termed group 1, 2 and 3 ILCs. The differentiation of ILC lineages from hematopoietic precursors and the molecular switches guiding their developmental fate have started to be characterized both in mice and humans. In this review, we discuss the origin, differentiation stages and plasticity of human ILC subsets as well as the signals that drive ILC lineage commitment and acquisition of their unique effector programs. PMID:26707651

  11. Design and evaluation of a low-level RF control system analog/digital receiver for the ILC main Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Mavric, Uros; Vidmar, Matjaz; Chase, Brian; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The proposed RF distribution scheme for the two 15 km long ILC LINACs, uses one klystron to feed 26 superconducting RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. For a precise control of the vector sum of the signals coming from the SC cavities, the control system needs a high performance, low cost, reliable and modular multichannel receiver. At Fermilab we developed a 96 channel, 1.3 GHz analog/digital receiver for the ILC LINAC LLRF control system. In the paper we present a balanced design approach to the specifications of each receiver section, the design choices made to fulfill the goals and a description of the prototyped system. The design is tested by measuring standard performance parameters, such as noise figure, linearity and temperature sensitivity. Measurements show that the design meets the specifications and it is comparable to other similar systems developed at other laboratories, in terms of performance.

  12. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET NEEDS FOR THE ILC.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; TOMPKINS, J.C.; KASHIKHIN, VI.; PALMER, M.A.; CLARKE, J.A.

    2007-06-25

    The ILC Reference Design Report was completed early in February 2007. The Magnet Systems Group was formed to translate magnetic field requirements into magnet designs and cost estimates for the Reference Design. As presently configured, the lLC will have more than 13,000 magnetic elements of which more than 2300 will be based on superconducting technology. This paper will describe the major superconducting magnet needs for the ILC as presently determined by the Area Systems Groups, responsible for beam line design, working with the Magnet Systems Group. The superconducting magnet components include Main Linac quadrupoles, Positron Source undulators, Damping Ring wigglers, a complex array of Final Focus superconducting elements in the Beam Delivery System, and large superconducting solenoids in the e{sup +} and e{sup -} Sources, and the Ring to Main Linac lines.

  13. THE SUPERCONDUCTION MAGNETS OF THE ILC BEAM DELIVERY SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; ANEREELA, M.; ESCALLIE, J.; HE, P.; JAIN, A.; MARONE, A.; NOSOCHKOV, Y.; SERYI, A.

    2007-06-25

    The ILC Reference Design Report was completed early in February 2007. The Magnet Systems Group was formed to translate magnetic field requirements into magnet designs and cost estimates for the Reference Design. As presently configured, the ILC will have more than 13,000 magnetic elements of which more than 2300 will be based on superconducting technology. This paper will describe the major superconducting magnet needs for the ILC as presently determined by the Area Systems Groups, responsible for beam line design, working with the Magnet Systems Group. The superconducting magnet components include Main Linac quadrupoles, Positron Source undulators, Damping Ring wigglers, a complex array of Final Focus superconducting elements in the Beam Delivery System, and large superconducting solenoids in the e{sup +} and e{sup -} Sources, and the Ring to Main Linac lines.

  14. Design of An 18 MW Beam Dump for 500 GeV Electron/Positron Beams at An ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, John; Arnold, Ray; Seryi, Andrei; Walz, Dieter; Kulkarni, Kiran; Rai, Pravin; Satyamurthy, Polepalle; Tiwari, Vikar; Vincke, Heinz; /CERN

    2012-07-05

    This article presents a report on the progress made in designing 18 MW water based Beam Dumps for electrons or positrons for an International Linear Collider (ILC). Multi-dimensional technology issues have to be addressed for the successful design of the Beam Dump. They include calculations of power deposition by the high energy electron/positron beam bunch trains, computational fluid dynamic analysis of turbulent water flow, mechanical design, process flow analysis, hydrogen/oxygen recombiners, handling of radioactive 7Be and 3H, design of auxiliary equipment, provisions for accident scenarios, remote window exchanger, radiation shielding, etc. The progress made to date is summarized, the current status, and also the issues still to be addressed.

  15. Polarimeters and Energy Spectrometers for the ILC Beam Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Boogert, S.; Hildreth, M.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Monig, K.; Moffeit, K.C.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Riemann, S.; Schreiber, H.J.; Schuler, P.; Torrence, E.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

    2009-02-24

    This article gives an overview of current plans and issues for polarimeters and energy spectrometers in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC. It is meant to serve as a useful reference for the Detector Letter of Intent documents currently being prepared. Concepts for high precision polarization and energy measurements exist. These concepts have resulted in detailed system layouts that are included in the RDR description for the Beam Delivery System. The RDR includes both upstream and downstream polarimeters and energy spectrometers for both beams. This provides needed complementarity and redundancy for achieving the precision required, with adequate control and demonstration of systematic errors. The BDS polarimeters and energy spectrometers need to be a joint effort of the ILC BDS team and the Detector collaborations, with collaboration members responsible for the performance and accuracy of the measurements. Details for this collaboration and assigning of responsibilities remain to be worked out. There is also a demonstrated need for Detector physicists to play an active role in the design and evaluation of accelerator components that impact beam polarization and beam energy capabilities, including the polarized source and spin rotator systems. A workshop was held in 2008 on ILC Polarization and Energy measurements, which resulted in a set of recommendations for the ILC design and operation. Additional input and action is needed on these from the Detector collaborations, the Research Director and the GDE. Work is continuing during the ILC engineering design phase to further optimize the polarimeter and energy spectrometer concepts and fully implement them in the ILC. This includes consideration for alternative methods, detailed design and cost estimates, and prototype and test beam activities.

  16. Design of an Interaction Region with Head-On Collisions for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, R.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jackson, F.; Alabau-Pons, M .; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Dadoun, O.; Rimbault, C.; Keller, L.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, A.; Payet, J.; Napoly, O.; Rippon, C.; Uriot, D.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-07-12

    An interaction region (IR) with head-on collisions is considered as an alternative to the baseline configuration of the International Linear Collider (ILC) which includes two IRs with finite crossing-angles (2 and 20 mrad). Although more challenging for the beam extraction, the head-on scheme is favored by the experiments because it allows a more convenient detector configuration, particularly in the forward region. The optics of the head-on extraction is revisited by separating the e+ and e- beams horizontally, first by electrostatic separators operated at their LEP nominal field and then using a defocusing quadrupole of the final focus beam line. In this way the septum magnet is protected from the beamstrahlung power. Newly optimized final focus and extraction optics are presented, including a first look at post-collision diagnostics. The influence of parasitic collisions is shown to lead to a region of stable collision parameters. Disrupted beam and beamstrahlung photon losses are calculated along the extraction elements.

  17. Availability and Reliability Issues for ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Himel, T.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Ross, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-27

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will be the largest most complicated accelerator ever built. For this reason extensive work is being done early in the design phase to ensure that it will be reliable enough. This includes gathering failure mode data from existing accelerators and simulating the failures and repair times of the ILC. This simulation has been written in a general fashion using MATLAB and could be used for other accelerators. Results from the simulation tool have been used in making some of the major ILC design decisions and an unavailability budget has been developed.

  18. TESLA & ILC Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T. J.; Weisend, II, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The TESLA collaboration developed a unique variant of SRF cryomodule designs, the chief feature being use of the large, low pressure helium vapor return pipe as the structural support backbone of the cryomodule. Additional innovative features include all cryogenic piping within the cryomodule (no parallel external cryogenic transfer line), long strings of RF cavities within a single cryomodule, and cryomodules connected in series. Several projects, including FLASH and XFEL at DESY, LCLS-II at SLAC, and the ILC technical design have adopted this general design concept. Advantages include saving space by eliminating the external transfer line, relatively tight packing of RF cavities along the beamline due to fewer warm-cold transitions, and potentially lower costs. However, a primary disadvantage is the relative lack of independence for warm-up, replacement, and cool-down of individual cryomodules.

  19. Design of the ILC Prototype FONT4 Digital Intra-Train Beam-Based Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, P.; Christian, G.B.; Hartin, A.F.; Dabiri Khah, H.; White, G.R.; Clarke, C.C.; Perry, C.; Kalinin, A.; McCormick, D.J.; Molloy, S.; Ross, M.C.; /SLAC

    2007-04-16

    We present the design of the FONT4 digital intra-train beam position feedback system prototype and preliminary results of initial beam tests at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK. The feedback system incorporates a fast analogue beam position monitor (BPM) front-end signal processor, a digital feedback board, and a kicker driver amplifier. The short bunchtrain, comprising 3 electron bunches separated by c. 150ns, in the ATF extraction line was used to test components of the prototype feedback system.

  20. Gathering Design References from Nature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debs, Luciana; Kelley, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Teaching design to middle and high school students can be challenging. One of the first procedures in teaching design is to help students gather information that will be useful in the design phase. An early stage of engineering design as described by Lewis (2005), calls for the designer to establish the state of the art of the problem. During this…

  1. Modular design for narrow scintillating cells with MRS photodiodes in strong magnetic field for ILC detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Schellpffer, J.; Zutshi, V.

    2006-08-01

    The experimental results for the narrow scintillating elements with effective area about 20 cm 2 are reported. The elements were formed from the single piece of scintillator and were read out via wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers with the Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor (MRS) photodiodes on both ends of each fiber. The count rates were obtained using radioactive source 90Sr, with threshold at about three photoelectrons in each channel and quad coincidences (double coincidences between sensors on each fiber and double coincidences between two neighboring fibers). The formation of the cells from the piece of scintillator by using grooves is discussed, and their performances were tested using the radioactive source by measuring the photomutiplier current using the same WLS fiber. Because effective cell area can be readily enlarged or reduced, this module may be used as an active element for calorimeter or muon system for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector. Experimental verification of the performance of the MRS photodiode in a strong magnetic field of 9 T, and the impact a magnet quench at 9.5 T are reported. The measurement method used is described. The results confirm the expectations that the MRS photodiode is insensitive to a strong magnetic field and therefore applicable to calorimetry in the presence of magnetic field. The overall result is of high importance for large multi-channel systems.

  2. Executive Summary of the Workshop on Polarization and Beam Energy Measurements at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, B.; Bailey, I.; Bartels, C.; Blair, G.; Brachmann, A.; Clarke, J.; Deacon, L.; Duginov, V.; Ghalumyan, A.; Hartin, A.; Hauptman, J.; Helebrant, C.; Hesselbach, S.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Lyapin, A.; Marchesini, I.; Melikian, R.; Monig, K.; Moeit, K.C.; /Bonn U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Royal Holloway, U. of London /SLAC /Daresbury /Dubna, JINR /Yerevan Phys. Inst /Oxford U., JAI /Iowa State U. /Durham U., IPPP /Michigan U. /University Coll. London /Novosibirsk, IYF /Minsk, Inst. Phys. /Oregon U.

    2008-07-25

    This note summarizes the results of the 'Workshop on Polarization and Beam Energy Measurements at the ILC', held at DESY (Zeuthen) April 9-11 2008. The topics for the workshop included (1) physics requirements, (2) polarized sources and low energy polarimetry, (3) BDS polarimeters, (4) BDS energy spectrometers, and (5) physics-based measurements of beam polarization and beam energy from collider data. Discussions focused on the current ILC baseline program as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), which includes physics runs at beam energies between 100 and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole. Electron polarization of P{sub e{sup -}} {approx}> 80% and positron polarization of P{sub e{sup +}} {approx}> 30% are part of the baseline configuration of the machine. Energy and polarization measurements for ILC options beyond the baseline, including Z-pole running and the 1 TeV energy upgrade, were also discussed.

  3. A reference Pelton turbine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solemslie, B. W.; Dahlhaug, O. G.

    2012-09-01

    The designs of hydraulic turbines are usually close kept corporation secrets. Therefore, the possibility of innovation and co-operation between different academic institutions regarding a specific turbine geometry is difficult. A Ph.D.-project at the Waterpower Laboratory, NTNU, aim to design several model Pelton turbines where all measurements, simulations, the design strategy, design software in addition to the physical model will be available to the public. In the following paper a short description of the methods and the test rig that are to be utilized in the project are described. The design will be based on empirical data and NURBS will be used as the descriptive method for the turbine geometry. In addition CFX and SPH simulations will be included in the design process. Each turbine designed and produced in connection to this project will be based on the experience and knowledge gained from the previous designs. The first design will be based on the philosophy to keep a near constant relative velocity through the bucket.

  4. Injection and Extraction Lines for the ILC Damping Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Reichel, Ina

    2007-06-20

    The current design for the injection and extraction linesintoand out of the ILC Damping Rings is presented as well as the designfor the abort line. Due to changes of the geometric boundary conditionsby other subsystems of the ILC, a modular approach has been used to beable to respond to recurring layout changes whilereusing previouslydesigned parts.

  5. ILC Beam delivery WG summary: Optics, collimation and background

    SciTech Connect

    Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jackson, F.; Mokhov, N.V.; Kuroda, S.; Seryi, A.A.; /SLAC

    2006-07-01

    The paper summarizes the work of the Beam Delivery working group (WG4) at Snowmass 2005 workshop, focusing on status of optics, layout, collimation and detector background. The strawman layout with two interaction regions was recommended at the first ILC workshop at KEK in November 2004. Two crossing-angle designs were included in this layout. The design of the ILC BDS has evolved since the first ILC workshop. The progress on the BDS design including the collimation system, and extraction line design have been reviewed and the design issues were discussed during the WG4 sessions at the Snowmass, and are described in this paper.

  6. Application of ILC superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Aseev, V.N.; Gonin, I.V.; Rusnak, B.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2007-10-01

    Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC) will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC) cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on {pi}-mode to provide maximum accelerating gradient. Significant R&D effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its RF system which resulted excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above {approx}1.2 GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC) cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for {beta}{sub G} = 0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H{sup -} from {approx}420 MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new {beta}{sub G} = 0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9{pi}-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  7. A study of the measurement precision of the Higgs boson decaying into tau pairs at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Shin-ichi; Fujii, Keisuke; Suehara, Taikan; Takahashi, Tohru; Tanabe, Tomohiko

    2015-12-01

    We evaluate the measurement precision of the production cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs boson decaying into tau lepton pairs at the International Linear Collider (ILC). We analyze various final states associated with the main production mechanisms of the Higgs boson, the Higgs-strahlung and WW-fusion processes. The statistical precision of the production cross section times the branching ratio is estimated to be 2.6 and 6.9 % for the Higgs-strahlung and WW-fusion processes, respectively, with the nominal integrated luminosities assumed in the ILC Technical Design Report; the precision improves to 1.0 and 3.4 % with the running scenario including possible luminosity upgrades. The study provides a reference performance of the ILC for future phenomenological analyses.

  8. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  9. The Polarized Electron Source for the International Collider (ILC) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachmann, A.; Clendenin, J. E.; Garwin, E. L.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C. Y.; Sheppard, J.; Turner, J.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-01

    The ILC project will be the next large high energy physics tool that will use polarized electrons (and positrons). For this machine spin physics will play an important role. The polarized electron source design is based on electron injectors built for the Stanford Linear Collider (polarized) and Tesla Test Facility (un-polarized). The ILC polarized electron source will provide a 5GeV spin polarized electron beam for injection into the ILC damping ring. Although most ILC machine parameters have been achieved by the SLC or TTF source, features of both must be integrated into one design. The bunch train structure presents unique challenges to the source laser drive system. A suitable laser system has not yet been demonstrated and is part of the ongoing R&D program for ILC at SLAC. Furthermore, ILC injector R&D incorporates photocathode development, increasing available polarization, and improving operational properties in gun vacuum systems. Another important area of research and development is advancing the design of DC and RF electron gun technology for polarized sources. This presentation presents the current status of the design and outlines aspects of the relevant R&D program carried out within the ILC community.

  10. Adaptive ILC algorithms of nonlinear continuous systems with non-parametric uncertainties for non-repetitive trajectory tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Lv, Mang-Mang; Ho, John K. L.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, two adaptive iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms are presented for nonlinear continuous systems with non-parametric uncertainties. Unlike general ILC techniques, the proposed adaptive ILC algorithms allow that both the initial error at each iteration and the reference trajectory are iteration-varying in the ILC process, and can achieve non-repetitive trajectory tracking beyond a small initial time interval. Compared to the neural network or fuzzy system-based adaptive ILC schemes and the classical ILC methods, in which the number of iterative variables is generally larger than or equal to the number of control inputs, the first adaptive ILC algorithm proposed in this paper uses just two iterative variables, while the second even uses a single iterative variable provided that some bound information on system dynamics is known. As a result, the memory space in real-time ILC implementations is greatly reduced.

  11. 20-MW Magnicon for ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2006-11-29

    The 1.3 GHz RF power to drive ILC is now planned to be supplied by 600-1200, 10-MW peak power multi-beam klystrons. In this project, a conceptual design for 1.3 GHz magnicons with 20 MW peak power was developed as an alternative to the klystrons, with the possibility of cutting in half the numbers of high-power tubes and associated components. Design of a conventional magnicon is described, using TM110 modes in all cavities, as well as design of a modified magnicon with a TE111 mode output cavity. The latter has the advantage of much lower surface fields than the TM110 mode, with no loss of output power or electronic efficiency.

  12. Crew Transportation System Design Reference Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mango, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Contains summaries of potential design reference mission goals for systems to transport humans to andfrom low Earth orbit (LEO) for the Commercial Crew Program. The purpose of this document is to describe Design Reference Missions (DRMs) representative of the end-to-end Crew Transportation System (CTS) framework envisioned to successfully execute commercial crew transportation to orbital destinations. The initial CTS architecture will likely be optimized to support NASA crew and NASA-sponsored crew rotation missions to the ISS, but consideration may be given in this design phase to allow for modifications in order to accomplish other commercial missions in the future. With the exception of NASA’s mission to the ISS, the remaining commercial DRMs are notional. Any decision to design or scar the CTS for these additional non-NASA missions is completely up to the Commercial Provider. As NASA’s mission needs evolve over time, this document will be periodically updated to reflect those needs.

  13. Automotive Stirling reference engine design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The reference Stirling engine system is described which provides the best possible fuel economy while meeting or exceeding all other program objectives. The system was designed to meet the requirements of a 1984 Pontiac Phoenix (X-body). This design utilizes all new technology that can reasonably be expected to be developed by 1984 and that is judged to provide significant improvement, relative to development risk and cost. Topics covered include: (1) external heat system; (2) hot engine system; (3) cold engine system; (4) engine drive system; (5) power control system and auxiliaries; (6) engine instalation; (7) optimization and vehicle simulation; (8) engine materials; and (9) production cost analysis.

  14. ILC Vertex Tracker R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marco; Bussat, Jean-Marie; Contarato, Devis; Denes,Peter; Glesener, Lindsay; Greiner, Leo; Hooberman, Benjamin; Shuman,Derek; Tompkins, Lauren; Vu, Chinh; Bisello, Dario; Giubilato, Piero; Pantano, Devis; Costa, Marco; La Rosa, Alessandro; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; Children, Isaac

    2007-10-01

    This document summarizes past achievements, current activities and future goals of the R&D program aimed at the design, prototyping and characterization of a full detector module, equipped with monolithic pixel sensors, matching the requirements for the Vertex Tracker at the ILC. We provide a plan of activities to obtain a demonstrator multi-layered vertex tracker equipped with sensors matching the ILC requirements and realistic lightweight ladders in FY11, under the assumption that ILC detector proto-collaborations will be choosing technologies and designs for the Vertex Tracker by that time. The R&D program discussed here started at LBNL in 2004, supported by a Laboratory Directed R&D (LDRD) grant and by funding allocated from the core budget of the LBNL Physics Division and from the Department of Physics at UC Berkeley. Subsequently additional funding has been awarded under the NSF-DOE LCRD program and also personnel have become available through collaborative research with other groups. The aim of the R&D program carried out by our collaboration is to provide a well-integrated, inclusive research effort starting from physics requirements for the ILC Vertex Tracker and addressing Si sensor design and characterization, engineered ladder design, module system issues, tracking and vertex performances and beam test validation. The broad scope of this program is made possible by important synergies with existing know-how and concurrent programs both at LBNL and at the other collaborating institutions. In particular, significant overlaps with LHC detector design, SLHC R&D as well as prototyping for the STAR upgrade have been exploited to optimize the cost per deliverable of our program. This activity is carried out as a collaborative effort together with Accelerator and Fusion Research, the Engineering and the Nuclear Science Divisions at LBNL, INFN and the Department of Physics in Padova, Italy, INFN and the Department of Physics in Torino, Italy and the Department

  15. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, O. B.; Scott, D. J.; Bailey, I. R.; Barber, D. P.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Brummitt, A.; Carr, S.; Clarke, J. A.; Cooke, P.; Dainton, J. B.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Malysheva, L. I.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Rochford, J.; Department of Physics, University of Liverpool Oxford St. Liverpool L69 7ZE; Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD

    2007-07-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of {approx}10 MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of {approx}100 nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4-6 mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100-200 m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  16. Vertical Arc for ILC Low Emittance Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The design and parameters of a vertical arc for the ILC Low Emittance Transport (LET) are reviewed. A 1 TeV CM ILC which relies upon 30 MV/m accelerating cavities with a packing fraction of 65% will require almost 48 km of main linac, which suggests that the total site length including BDS and bunch compressors will be on the order of 53 km. If built in a laser-straight tunnel with the low-energy ends near the surface, and assuming a perfectly spherical ''cue ball'' planetary surface with radius 6370 km, the collider halls will necessarily be 55 meters below grade, as shown in the top plot of Figure 1. Such depths would demand extensive use of deep tunneling, which would potentially drive up the cost and difficulty of ILC construction. An alternate solution is to use discrete vertical arcs at a few locations to allow a ''piecewise straight'' construction in which the depth of the tunnel below grade does not vary by more than a few meters. This approach is shown schematically in the bottom plot of Figure 1. In this Note we consider the issues for a design with one such vertical arc at the 250 GeV/c point (ie, midway down the linac for 1 TeV CM), and a second arc at the entrance to the BDS (ie, the entire BDS lies in one plane, with vertical arcs at each end).

  17. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-10-08

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

  18. Reference Design Description for a Geologic Repository

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2000-10-07

    One of the current major national environmental problems is the safe disposal of large quantities of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials, which are rapidly accumulating throughout the country. These radioactive byproducts are generated as the result of national defense activities and from the generation of electricity by commercial nuclear power plants. At present, spent nuclear fuel is accumulating at over 70 power plant sites distributed throughout 33 states. The safe disposal of these high-level radioactive materials at a central disposal facility is a high national priority. This Reference Design Description explains the current design for a potential geologic repository that may be located at Yucca Mountain in Nevada for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste materials. This document describes a possible design for the three fundamental parts of a repository: a surface facility, subsurface repository, and waste packaging. It also presents the current conceptual design of the key engineering systems for the final four phases of repository processes: operations, monitoring, closure, and postclosure. In accordance with current law, this design does not include an interim storage option. In addition, this Reference Design Description reviews the expected long-term performance of the potential repository. It describes the natural barrier system which, together with the engineered systems, achieves the repository objectives. This design will protect the public and the environment by allowing the safe disposal of radioactive waste received from government-owned custodial spent fuel sites, high-level radioactive waste sites, and commercial power reactor sites. All design elements meet or exceed applicable regulations governing the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The design will provide safe disposal of waste materials for at least a 10,000 year period. During this time interval, natural radioactive decay

  19. EBT-P proposed reference design report

    SciTech Connect

    Boch, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the proposed reference design for the EBT-P proof-of-principle test device. The device described is a result of broad studies by many participating organizations from industry and from Department of Energy-sponsored fusion research groups, some working together and some in competitive studies, but all with the goal of defining a device at minimum cost and with maximum probability of meeting its goals. This design work is based upon advances in experimental and theoretical understanding of EBT achieved at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The strategy adopted permits an initial test and validation of the key scaling properties of the ELMO Bumpy Torus concept, with a degree of built-in flexibility to extend the performance parameters toward the condition for containing a fusion reactor plasma. This will lead the way, then, to determination of a later power break-even demonstration and an eventual fusion reactor that can exploit the special high power-density and steady-state properties of the EBT concept.

  20. An Over-moded Fundamental Power Coupler for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Neilson

    2009-05-20

    The current design of fundamental power couplers for the ILC are expensive and require excessively long conditioning times. The goal of this develoment is design of a coupler that requires little rf processing and is significantly less expensive to build than the present ILC coupler. The goal of this program is development of a new technology for power couplers.This new technology is based on the cylindrical TE01 mode and other over-moded technologies developed for the X-band rf distribution system of the NCLTA. During the Phase I program, a TE10 to TE01 mode transducer suitable for use as a part of a power coupler in the ILC will be designed, built and tested. Following a succesful test, prototype designs of the TE01 to cavity coupler and thermal will be produced. A detailed study of the suitability of this overmoded waveguide technology for the ILC power coupler will be provided in the final report. Development of over-moded power couplers for superconducting cavities could find application im many world-wide accelerator projects, such as SNS, Jefferson Lab upgrade, RIA, TESLA in addition to the ILC.

  1. Designing Optical Mark Forms for Reference Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallman, Clark N.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a method for collecting reference desk statistics in machine-readable form using optical marks. Useful data categories are identified, and figures illustrate how data can be recorded for each category. Ten references are listed. (FM)

  2. Simulations of the Electron Cloud Builld Up and Instabilities for Various ILC Damping Ring Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, Mauro; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Wang, Lanfa; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Wolski, Andrzej; /Liverpool U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2007-03-12

    In the beam pipe of the positron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC), an electron cloud may be first produced by photoelectrons and ionization of residual gases and then increased by the secondary emission process. This paper reports the assessment of electron cloud effects in a number of configuration options for the ILC baseline configuration. Careful estimates were made of the secondary electron yield (sometimes in the literature also referred as secondary emission yield SEY or {delta}, with a peak value {delta}{sub max}) threshold for electron cloud build-up, and the related single- and coupled-bunch instabilities, as a function of beam current and surface properties for a variety of optics designs. When the configuration for the ILC damping rings was chosen at the end of 2005, the results from these studies were important considerations. On the basis of the joint theoretical and experimental work, the baseline configuration currently specifies a pair of 6 km damping rings for the positron beam, to mitigate the effects of the electron cloud that could present difficulties in a single 6 km ring. However, since mitigation techniques are now estimated to be sufficiently mature, a reduced single 6-km circumference is presently under consideration so as to reduce costs.

  3. Magnet reliability in the Fermilab Main Injector and implications for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Blowers, J.; Capista, D.; Harding, D.J.; Kiemschies, O.; Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh, S.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    The International Linear Collider reference design requires over 13000 magnets, of approximately 135 styles, which must operate with very high reliability. The Fermilab Main Injector represents a modern machine with many conventional magnet styles, each of significant quantity, that has now accumulated many hundreds of magnet-years of operation. We review here the performance of the magnets built for this machine, assess their reliability and categorize the failure modes, and discuss implications for reliability of similar magnet styles expected to be used at the ILC.

  4. Designing a Reference Station for the Information Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becket, Margaret; Smith, Henry Bradford

    1986-01-01

    Relates experiences of University of Rochester's main library during complete renovation of the central reference department including the addition of a full-service reference station. Topics covered include planning the reference station, solutions to seven design requirements, increase in staffing and reference questions after one year, and…

  5. Present Status of the ILC Project and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.; Walker, N.; Yamamoto, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-09-01

    The Technical Design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) Project will be finished in late 2012. The Technical Design Report (TDR) will include a description of the updated design, with a cost estimate and a project plan, and the results of research and development (R & D) done in support of the ILC. Results from directed ILC R & D are used to reduce the cost and risk associated with the ILC design. We present a summary of key challenges and show how the global R & D effort has addressed them. The most important activity has been in pursuit of very high gradient superconducting RF linac technology. There has been excellent progress toward the goal of practical industrial production of niobium sheet-metal cavities with gradient performance in excess of 35 MV/m. In addition, three purpose-built beam test facilities have been constructed and used to study and demonstrate high current linac performance, electron-cloud beam dynamics and precision beam control. The report also includes a summary of component design studies and conventional facilities cost optimization design studies.

  6. ILC: Thoughts, Issues and R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, R.

    The ILC is intended to perform precise measurements of new particles produced with the low cross sections characteristic of high energy e+ e- collisions. Figure 1 shows cross sections and event yields for a 500-1 f b data sample for various established and hypothetical processes. Cross sections are low, typical event yields for supersymmetric particles are a few thousand per channel. The angular distributions due to s-channel spin 1 exchange are forward peaked, putting a premium on good coverage of the forward direction. Although the range of new physics to be studied at the ILC is not yet clear, there are a few flagship measurements which can drive detector design. One example is the set of measurements of Higgs couplings to quarks and bosons. These measurements, which will span more than two orders of magnitude in mass and coupling strength, require excellent separation of b, c, and light quark vertices. A related measurement is the self-coupling of the Higgs. Here the signal reaction, e+ e- - Z 0 H 0 H 0 - qqbbbb with four b-jets must be separated from backgrounds like tt - bbcscs, ZZZ, and ZZH. This physics requires efficient B tagging and excellent b/c separation in complex events. Different constraints on the vertex detector come from measurements like heavy quark forward-backward asymmetry. Here the emphasis is on forward tracking with flavor tagging and determination of the charge of the parent b quark. Whether the ultimate focus is on Higgs, supersymmetry, or other new physics phenomena, it is likely that precise measurements of heavy quark jets and their decay vertices will play a crucial role [1] in ILC physics.

  7. ILC Marx Modulator Development Program Status

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, C.; Beukers, T.; Larsen, R.; Macken, K.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Development of a first generation prototype (P1) Marx-topology klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider is nearing completion at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is envisioned as a smaller, lower cost, and higher reliability alternative to the present, bouncer-topology, 'Baseline Conceptual Design'. The Marx presents several advantages over conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at ILC parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. The P1-Marx employs all solid state elements; IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the cells. A general overview of the modulator design and the program status are presented.

  8. Richards Barrier LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Kramer

    1999-11-17

    The Richards Barrier is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for the License Application (LA), Richards was a soil scientist who first described the diversion of moisture between two materials with different hydrologic properties. In this report, a Richards Barrier is a special type of backfill with a fine-grained material (such as sand) overlaying a coarse-grained material (such as gravel). Water that enters an emplacement drift will first encounter the fine-grained material and be transported around the coarse-grained material covering the waste package, thus protecting the waste package from contact with most of the groundwater. The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository by the inclusion of a Richards Barrier type backfill in emplacement drifts. The Richards Barrier can act as a barrier to water flow, can reduce the waste package material dissolution rate, limit mobilization of the radionuclides, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of barrier materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate diversion of groundwater intrusions into the barrier over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the Richards Barrier. (2) Review the thermal effects of the Richards Barrier on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of the Richards Barrier and the depth of the barrier required to protect waste packages under the barrier. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of multiple layers of the barrier. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of the barrier. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and

  9. Simulation of the ILC Collimation System using BDSIM, MARS15 and STRUCT

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.; Agapov, I.; Blair, G.A.; Deacon, L.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nosochkov, Y.M.; Seryi, A.A.; /SLAC

    2006-07-12

    The simulation codes BDSIM, MARS15 and STRUCT are used to simulate in detail the collimation section of the International Linear Collider (ILC). A comparative study of the collimation system performance for the 250 x 250 GeV machine is conducted, and the key radiation loads are calculated. Results for the latest ILC designs are presented together with their implications for future design iterations.

  10. ILC2s and fungal allergy

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have emerged recently as an important component of the immune system and the cell type that regulates mucosal immune responses and tissue homeostasis. Group 2 ILCs (ILC2s), a subset of ILCs, reside in various tissues and are characterized by their capacity to produce type 2 cytokines and tissue growth factors. These ILC2s play an important role in allergic immune responses by linking signals in the atmospheric environment to the immune system. Fungi are one of the major allergens associated with human asthma, and animal and in vitro models using the fungal allergens have provided significant information toward our understanding of the mechanisms of allergic disease. In mouse models of fungus-induced allergic airway inflammation, IL-33, IL-25, and TSLP are released by airway epithelial cells. Lung ILC2s that respond to these cytokines quickly produce a large quantity of type 2 cytokines, resulting in airway eosinophilia, mucus production, and airway hyperreactivity even in the absence of adaptive immune cells. Evidence also suggests that ILC2s interact with conventional immune cells, such as CD4+ T cells, and facilitate development of adaptive immune response and persistent airway inflammation. ILC2s are also present in respiratory mucosa in humans. Further investigations into the biology of ILC2s and their roles in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases will provide major conceptual advances in the field and may provide useful information toward development of new therapeutic strategies for patients. PMID:26117252

  11. ILC2s and fungal allergy.

    PubMed

    Kita, Hirohito

    2015-07-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have emerged recently as an important component of the immune system and the cell type that regulates mucosal immune responses and tissue homeostasis. Group 2 ILCs (ILC2s), a subset of ILCs, reside in various tissues and are characterized by their capacity to produce type 2 cytokines and tissue growth factors. These ILC2s play an important role in allergic immune responses by linking signals in the atmospheric environment to the immune system. Fungi are one of the major allergens associated with human asthma, and animal and in vitro models using the fungal allergens have provided significant information toward our understanding of the mechanisms of allergic disease. In mouse models of fungus-induced allergic airway inflammation, IL-33, IL-25, and TSLP are released by airway epithelial cells. Lung ILC2s that respond to these cytokines quickly produce a large quantity of type 2 cytokines, resulting in airway eosinophilia, mucus production, and airway hyperreactivity even in the absence of adaptive immune cells. Evidence also suggests that ILC2s interact with conventional immune cells, such as CD4(+) T cells, and facilitate development of adaptive immune response and persistent airway inflammation. ILC2s are also present in respiratory mucosa in humans. Further investigations into the biology of ILC2s and their roles in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases will provide major conceptual advances in the field and may provide useful information toward development of new therapeutic strategies for patients. PMID:26117252

  12. ILC Linac R&D at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2006-08-09

    Since the ITRP recommendation in August 2004 to use superconducting rf technology for a next generation linear collider, the former NLC Group at SLAC has been actively pursuing a broad range of R&D for this collider (the ILC). In this paper, the programs concerning linac technology are reviewed. Current activities include the development of a Marx-style modulator and a 10 MW sheet-beam klystron, operation of an L-band (1.3 GHz) rf source using an SNS HVCM modulator and commercial klystrons, design of a more efficient and less costly rf distribution system, construction of a coupler component test stand, fabrication of a prototype positron capture cavity, beam tests of prototype S-band linac beam position monitors and preparations for magnetic center stability measurements of a prototype SC linac quad.

  13. ILC RF System R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The Linac Group at SLAC is actively pursuing a broad range of R&D to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of the L-band (1.3 GHz) rf system proposed for the ILC linacs. Current activities include the long-term evaluation of a 120 kV Marx Modulator driving a 10 MW Multi-Beam Klystron, design of a second-generation Marx Modulator, testing of a sheet-beam gun and beam transport system for a klystron, construction of an rf distribution system with remotely-adjustable power tapoffs, and development of a system to combine the power from many klystrons in low-loss circular waveguide where it would be tapped-off periodically to power groups of cavities. This paper surveys progress during the past few years.

  14. Study for ILC Damping Ring at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, J.W.; Fukuma, H.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Koiso, H.; Masuzawa, M.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Y.; Oide, Katsunobu; Suetsugu, Y.; Tobiyama, M.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    ILC damping ring consists of very low emittance electron and positron storage rings. It is necessary for ILC damping ring to study electron cloud effects in such low emittance positron ring. We propose a low emittance operation of KEKB to study the effects.

  15. High Availability Instrumentation Packaging Standards for the ILC and Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.W.; Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2006-11-30

    ILC designers are exploring new packaging standards for Accelerator Controls and Instrumentation, particularly high-speed serial interconnect systems for intelligent instruments versus the existing parallel backplanes of VME, VXI and CAMAC. The High Availability Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) system is a new industrial open standard designed to withstand single-point hardware or software failures. The standard crate, controller, applications module and sub-modules are being investigated. All modules and sub-modules are hot-swappable. A single crate is designed for a data throughput in communications applications of 2 Tb/s and an Availability of 0.99999, which translates into a downtime of five minutes per year. The ILC is planning to develop HA architectures for controls, beam instrumentation and detector systems.

  16. The ILC Marx Modulator Development Program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Leyh, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The International Linear Collider [ILC] baseline design requires 576 L-band klystron stations, each supplying 10MW peak RF power to the accelerating structures. Each klystron requires a modulator capable of delivering 120kV, 140A 1.6ms pulses, at 5Hz. Solid-state Marx modulator topologies are rapidly becoming feasible with the advent of PC-board-level 4500V IGBTs, fast single junction HV diodes, high density capacitors, and sophisticated modeling software. Making full use of recent technology advances, the ILC Marx Modulator program at SLAC plans to pursue a 120kV solid-state Marx design, which appears to offer significantly higher efficiency, availability, and cost savings than existing modulator options.

  17. Mechanical stability study of type IV cryomodule (ILC prototype)

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Doremus, R.; Wands, C.R.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    An ANSYS modal and harmonic finite element analysis (FEA) was performed in order to investigate cryomodule design mechanical stability for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC). The current cryomodule, designated Type IV or (T4CM), closely follows the Type III TESLA Test Facility (TTF) version used at DESY, with the exception of a proposed location of the superconducting (SC) quadrupole at the center. This analysis considered the stringent stability criteria established for the ILC, where vertical motion for the SC quadrupole is limited to the micron range at a few Hz. Model validation was achieved through Type III cryomodule vibration measurement studies performed at DESY. The effect of support location, support stiffness and other important parameters were considered in a parametric sensitivity study. FEA results, fast motion investigations and stabilization techniques are discussed.

  18. Design Reference Missions for Deep-Space Optical Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breidenthal, J.; Abraham, D.

    2016-05-01

    We examined the potential, but uncertain, NASA mission portfolio out to a time horizon of 20 years, to identify mission concepts that potentially could benefit from optical communication, considering their communications needs, the environments in which they would operate, and their notional size, weight, and power constraints. A set of 12 design reference missions was selected to represent the full range of potential missions. These design reference missions span the space of potential customer requirements, and encompass the wide range of applications that an optical ground segment might eventually be called upon to serve. The design reference missions encompass a range of orbit types, terminal sizes, and positions in the solar system that reveal the chief system performance variables of an optical ground segment, and may be used to enable assessments of the ability of alternative systems to meet various types of customer needs.

  19. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

    2012-02-29

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  20. 77 FR 50907 - Airspace Designations; Incorporation by Reference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ...This action amends Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 relating to airspace designations to reflect the approval by the Director of the Federal Register of the incorporation by reference of FAA Order 7400.9W, Airspace Designations and Reporting Points. This action also explains the procedures the FAA will use to amend the listings of Class A, B, C, D, and E airspace areas;......

  1. Dark current model for ILC main linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Romanov, G.; Mokhov, N.V.; Eidelman, Y.; Tam, Wai-Ming; /Indiana U.

    2008-06-01

    In the ILC Main Linac, the dark current electrons, generated in SRF cavity can be accelerated to hundreds of MeV before being kicked out by quadrupoles and thus will originate electromagnetic cascade showers in the surrounding materials. Some of the shower secondaries can return back into vacuum and be re-accelerated again. The preliminary results of simulation of the dark current generation in ILC cavity, its dynamics in linac are discussing in this paper.

  2. Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0 (DRA 5.0), which is the latest in a series of NASA Mars reference missions. It provides a vision of one potential approach to human Mars exploration. The reference architecture provides a common framework for future planning of systems concepts, technology development, and operational testing as well as Mars robotic missions, research that is conducted on the International Space Station, and future lunar exploration missions. This summary the Mars DRA 5.0 provides an overview of the overall mission approach, surface strategy and exploration goals, as well as the key systems and challenges for the first three human missions to Mars.

  3. Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.; Hoffman, Stephen J.; Beaty, David W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the 2007 Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0 (DRA 5.0), which is the latest in a series of NASA Mars reference missions. It provides a vision of one potential approach to human Mars exploration including how Constellation systems can be used. The reference architecture provides a common framework for future planning of systems concepts, technology development, and operational testing as well as Mars robotic missions, research that is conducted on the International Space Station, and future lunar exploration missions. This summary the Mars DRA 5.0 provides an overview of the overall mission approach, surface strategy and exploration goals, as well as the key systems and challenges for the first three human missions to Mars.

  4. A future large-aperture UVOIR space observatory: reference designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Norman; Thronson, Harley; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-09-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  5. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Reference Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Rioux, Norman; Feinberg, Lee; Stahl, H. Philip; Redding, Dave; Jones, Andrew; Sturm, James; Collins, Christine; Liu, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. We describe the feasibility assessment of system thermal and dynamic stability for supporting coronagraphy. The observatory is in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit providing a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Reference designs include a 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of reference designs including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  6. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  7. P1-Marx Modulator for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.; Larsen, R.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    A first generation prototype, P1, Marx-topology klystron modulator has been developed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC) project. It is envisioned as a lower cost, smaller footprint, and higher reliability alternative to the present, bouncer-topology, baseline design. The application requires 120 kV (+/-0.5%), 140 A, 1.6 ms pulses at a rate of 5 Hz. The Marx constructs the high voltage pulse by combining, in series, a number of lower voltage cells. The Marx employs solid state elements; IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the cells. Active compensation of the output is used to achieve the voltage regulation while minimizing the stored energy. The P1-Marx has been integrated into a test stand with a 10 MW L-band klystron, where each is undergoing life testing. A review of the P1-Marx design and its operational history in the L-band test stand are presented.

  8. Development Status of the ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2008-06-16

    The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-} 0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

  9. Development Status of The ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2010-06-07

    The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-}0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

  10. Mooring Design for the Floating Oscillating Water Column Reference Model.

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L; Brefort, Dorian

    2014-09-01

    To reduce the price of the reference Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB), a study was done analyzing the effects of reducing the mooring line length, and a new mooring design was developed. It was found that the overall length of the mooring lines could be reduced by 1290 meters, allowing a significant price reduction of the system. In this paper, we will first give a description of the model and the storm environment it will be subject to. We will then give a recommendation for the new mooring system, followed by a discussion of the severe weather simulation results, and an analysis of the conservative and aggressive aspects of the design.

  11. Reference Model 2: %22Rev 0%22 Rotor Design.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew F.; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Griffith, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    The preliminary design for a three-bladed cross-flow rotor for a reference marine hydrokinetic turbine is presented. A rotor performance design code is described, along with modifications to the code to allow prediction of blade support strut drag as well as interference between two counter-rotating rotors. The rotor is designed to operate in a reference site corresponding to a riverine environment. Basic rotor performance and rigid-body loads calculations are performed to size the rotor elements and select the operating speed range. The preliminary design is verified with a simple finite element model that provides estimates of bending stresses during operation. A concept for joining the blades and support struts is developed and analyzed with a separate finite element analysis. Rotor mass, production costs, and annual energy capture are estimated in order to allow calculations of system cost-of-energy. Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd Evaluation Only. Created with Aspose.Pdf.Kit. Copyright 2002-2011 Aspose Pty Ltd

  12. ILC MARX MODULATOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM STATUS

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, Craig; Benwell, Andrew; Beukers, Tony; Kemp, Mark; Larsen, Raymond; MacNair, David; Nguyen, Minh; Olsen, Jeff; Tang, Tao; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A Marx-topology klystron modulator is under development for the International Linear Collider (ILC) project. It is envisioned as a lower cost, smaller footprint, and higher reliability alternative to the present, bouncer-topology, baseline design. The application requires 120 kV (+/-0.5%), 140 A, 1.6 ms pulses at a rate of 5 Hz. The Marx constructs the high voltage pulse by combining, in series, a number of lower voltage cells. The Marx employs solid state elements; IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and disolation of the cells. Active compensation of the output is used to achieve the voltage regulation while minimizing the stored energy. The developmental testing of a first generation prototype, P1, has been completed. This modulator has been integrated into a test stand with a 10 MW L-band klystron, where each is undergoing life testing. Development of a second generation prototype, P2, is underway. The P2 is based on the P1 topology but incorporates an alternative cell configuration to increase redundancy and improve availability. Status updates for both prototypes are presented.

  13. CD4+ Group 1 Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILC) Form a Functionally Distinct ILC Subset That Is Increased in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roan, Florence; Stoklasek, Thomas A; Whalen, Elizabeth; Molitor, Jerry A; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Buckner, Jane H; Ziegler, Steven F

    2016-03-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are a heterogeneous group of cellular subsets that produce large amounts of T cell-associated cytokines in response to innate stimulation in the absence of Ag. In this study, we define distinct patterns of surface marker and cytokine expression among the ILC subsets that may further delineate their migration and function. Most notably, we found that the subset previously defined as group 1 ILC (ILC1) contains CD4(+) CD8(-), CD4(-) CD8(+), and CD4(-) CD8(-) populations. Although all ILC1 subsets shared characteristics with Th1 cells, CD4(+) ILC1 also demonstrated significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. We also show that the frequencies of CD4(+) ILC1 and NKp44(+) group 3 ILC, but not CD4(-) ILC1 or group 2 ILC, are increased in the peripheral blood of individuals with systemic sclerosis (SSc), a disease characterized by fibrotic and vascular pathology, as well as immune dysregulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4(+) and CD4(-) ILC1 are functionally divergent based on their IL-6Rα expression and that the frequency of IL-6Rα expression on ILC is altered in SSc. The distinct phenotypic and functional features of CD4(+) and CD4(-) ILC1 suggest that they may have differing roles in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases, such as SSc. PMID:26826243

  14. The LCFIVertex package: Vertexing, flavour tagging and vertex charge reconstruction with an ILC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, D.; Devetak, E.; Grimes, M.; Harder, K.; Hillert, S.; Jackson, D.; Pinto Jayawardena, T.; Jeffery, B.; Lastovicka, T.; Lynch, C.; Martin, V.; Walsh, R.; Allport, P.; Banda, Y.; Buttar, C.; Cheplakov, A.; Cussans, D.; Damerell, C.; De Groot, N.; Fopma, J.; Foster, B.; Galagedera, S.; Gao, R.; Gillman, A.; Goldstein, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Halsall, R.; Hawes, B.; Hayrapetyan, K.; Heath, H.; John, J.; Johnson, E.; Kundu, N.; Laing, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Lau, W.; Li, Y.; Lintern, A.; Mandry, S.; Murray, P.; Nichols, A.; Nomerotski, A.; Page, R.; Parkes, C.; Perry, C.; O'Shea, V.; Sopczak, A.; Stefanov, K.; Tabassam, H.; Thomas, S.; Tikkanen, T.; Turchetta, R.; Tyndel, M.; Velthuis, J.; Villani, G.; Wijnen, T.; Woolliscroft, T.; Worm, S.; Yang, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2009-11-01

    The precision measurements envisaged at the International Linear Collider (ILC) depend on excellent instrumentation and reconstruction software. The correct identification of heavy flavour jets, placing unprecedented requirements on the quality of the vertex detector, will be central for the ILC programme. This paper describes the LCFIVertex software, which provides tools for vertex finding and for identification of the flavour and charge of the leading hadron in heavy flavour jets. These tools are essential for the ongoing optimisation of the vertex detector design for linear colliders such as the ILC. The paper describes the algorithms implemented in the LCFIVertex package as well as the scope of the code and its performance for a typical vertex detector design.

  15. Maintenance of Immune Homeostasis through ILC/T Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    von Burg, Nicole; Turchinovich, Gleb; Finke, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have emerged as a new family of immune cells with crucial functions in innate and adaptive immunity. ILC subsets mirror the cytokine and transcriptional profile of CD4+ T helper (TH) cell subsets. Hence, group 1 (ILC1), group 2 (ILC2), and group 3 (ILC3) ILCs can be distinguished by the production of TH1, TH2, and TH17-type cytokines, respectively. Cytokine release by ILCs not only shapes early innate immunity but can also orchestrate TH immune responses to microbial or allergen exposure. Recent studies have identified an unexpected effector function of ILCs as antigen presenting cells. Both ILC2s and ILC3s are able to process and present foreign antigens (Ags) via major histocompatibility complex class II, and to induce cognate CD4+ T cell responses. In addition, Ag-stimulated T cells promote ILC activation and effector functions indicating a reciprocal interaction between the adaptive and innate immune system. A fundamental puzzle in ILC function is how ILC/T cell interactions promote host protection and prevent autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, the way in which microenvironmental and inflammatory signals determine the outcome of ILC/T cell immune responses in various tissues is not yet understood. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the mechanisms that coordinate the collaboration between ILCs and T cells under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. We also discuss the potential roles of T cells and other immune cells to regulate ILC functions and to maintain homeostasis in mucosal tissues. PMID:26322047

  16. Muon ID at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a new way to reconstruct and identify muons with high efficiency and high pion rejection. Since muons at the ILC are often produced with or in jets, for many of the physics channels of interest [1], an efficient algorithm to deal with the identification and separation of particles within jets is important. The algorithm at the core of the method accounts for the effects of the magnetic field and for the loss of energy by charged particles due to ionization in the detector. We have chosen to develop the analysis within the setup of one of the Linear Collider Concept Detectors adopted by the US. Within b-pair production jets, particles cover a wide range in momenta; however {approx}80% of the particles have a momentum below 30 GeV[2]. Our study, focused on bbar-b jets, is preceded by a careful analysis of single energy particles between 2 and 50 GeV. As medium energy particles are a substantial component of the jets, many of the particles lose part of their energy in the calorimeters and the solenoid coil before reaching the muon detector where they may have energy below 2 GeV. To deal with this problem we have implemented a Runge-Kutta correction of the calculated trajectory to better handle these lower energy particles. The multiple scattering and other stochastic processes, more important at lower energy, is addressed by a Kalman-filter integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm provides a unique and powerful separation of muons from pions. The 5 Tesla magnetic field from a solenoid surrounds the hadron calorimeter and allows the reconstruction and precision.

  17. Discovering bottom squark coannihilation at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Alexander; Lastovicka, Tomas; Nomerotski, Andrei; Lastovicka-Medin, Gordana

    2010-02-01

    We study the potential of the international linear collider (ILC) at {radical}(s)=500 GeV to probe new dark matter motivated scenario where the bottom squark (sbottom) is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle. For this scenario, which is virtually impossible for the LHC to test, the ILC has a potential to cover a large fraction of the parameter space. The challenge is due to a very low energy of jets, below 20-30 GeV, which pushes the jet clustering and flavor tagging algorithms to their limits. The process of sbottom pair production was studied within the SiD detector concept. We demonstrate that ILC offers a unique opportunity to test the supersymmetry parameter space motivated by the sbottom-neutralino coannihilation scenario in cases when the sbottom production is kinematically accessible. The study was done with the full SiD simulation and reconstruction chain including all standard model and beam backgrounds.

  18. HOM/LOM Coupler Study for the ILC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, L.; Li, Z.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2007-04-16

    The FNAL 9-cell 3.9GHz deflecting mode cavity designed for the CKM experiment was chosen as the baseline design for the ILC BDS crab cavity. The full 9-cell CKM cavity including the coupler end-groups was simulated using the parallel eigensolver Omega3P and scattering parameter solver S3P. It was found that both the notch filters for the HOM/LOM couplers are very sensitive to the notch gap, which is about 1.6MHz/micron and is more than 10 times more sensitive than the TTF cavity. It was also found in the simulation that the unwanted vertical {pi}-mode (SOM) is strongly coupled to the horizontal 7{pi}/9 mode which causes x-y coupling and reduces the effectiveness of the SOM damping. To meet the ILC requirements, the HOM/LOM couplers are redesigned to address these issues. With the new designs, the damping of the HOM/LOM modes is improved. The sensitivity of the notch filter for the HOM coupler is reduced by one order of magnitude. The notch filter for the LOM coupler is eliminated in the new design which significantly simplifies the geometry. In this paper, we will present the simulation results of the original CKM cavity and the progresses on the HOM/LOM coupler re-design and optimization.

  19. The Superconducting Magnets of the ILC Beam Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; He, P.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2007-09-28

    The ILC Beam Delivery System (BDS) uses a variety of superconducting magnets to maximize luminosity and minimize background. Compact final focus quadrupoles with multifunction correction coils focus incoming beams to few nanometer spot sizes while focusing outgoing disrupted beams into a separate extraction beam line. Anti-solenoids mitigate effects from overlapping focusing and the detector solenoid field. Far from the interaction point (IP) strong octupoles help minimize IP backgrounds. A low-field but very large aperture dipole is integrated with the detector solenoid to reduce backgrounds from beamstrahlung pairs generated at the IP. Physics requirements and magnetic design solutions for the BDS superconducting magnets are reviewed in this paper.

  20. Effects of Magnet Errors in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Toprek, Dragan; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    The ILC baseline extraction line is designed for 14 mrad horizontal crossing angle between e{sup +} and e{sup -} colliding beams at Interaction Point (IP). The extraction optics in the Interaction Region (IR) includes a detector integrated dipole field (anti-DID) to reduce orbit perturbation caused by the detector solenoid and minimize detector background. This paper presents a study of random field and alignment errors in the extraction magnets, compensation of the induced orbit perturbation, and effects of errors on extraction beam power loss. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

  1. Reference Design for a Simple, Durable and Refuelable Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, B. S.; Tolley, A. M.

    This article describes a reference design for interplanetary vessels, composed mostly of water, that utilize simplified RF engines for low thrust, long duration propulsion, and hydrogen peroxide for short duration, high thrust burns. The electrothermal engines are designed to heat a wide range of liquid materials, possibly also milled solids or surface dusts. The system emphasizes simple components and processes based on older technologies, many well known since the 1960s, that are understandable, can process a variety of materials, and are easily serviced in flight. The goal is to radically simplify systems and their inter-dependencies, to a point where a reasonably skilled person can learn to operate these vessels, not unlike a sailboat, and to eliminate many design and testing bottlenecks in their construction. The use of water, or hydrogen peroxide generated in situ from that water, is multiply advantageous because it can be used for structure, consumption, irrigation, radiation and debris shielding, and thermal regulation, and thus greatly reduce dead weight by creating an almost fully consumable ship. This also enables the ship to utilize a wide range of in situ materials, and eventually obtain reaction mass from lower gravity sites. The ability to switch between low thrust, constant power and high thrust, short duration maneuvers will enable these ships to travel freely and reach many interesting destinations throughout the solar system. One can think of them as “spacecoaches”, not unlike the prairie schooners of the Old West, which were rugged, serviceable by tradesmen, and easily maintained.

  2. Radioisotope Power Systems Reference Book for Mission Designers and Planners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Young; Bairstow, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The RPS Program's Program Planning and Assessment (PPA) Office commissioned the Mission Analysis team to develop the Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Reference Book for Mission Planners and Designers to define a baseline of RPS technology capabilities with specific emphasis on performance parameters and technology readiness. The main objective of this book is to provide RPS technology information that could be utilized by future mission concept studies and concurrent engineering practices. A progress summary from the major branches of RPS technology research provides mission analysis teams with a vital tool for assessing the RPS trade space, and provides concurrent engineering centers with a consistent set of guidelines for RPS performance characteristics. This book will be iterated when substantial new information becomes available to ensure continued relevance, serving as one of the cornerstone products of the RPS PPA Office. This book updates the original 2011 internal document, using data from the relevant publicly released RPS technology references and consultations with RPS technologists. Each performance parameter and RPS product subsection has been reviewed and cleared by at least one subject matter representative. A virtual workshop was held to reach consensus on the scope and contents of the book, and the definitions and assumptions that should be used. The subject matter experts then reviewed and updated the appropriate sections of the book. The RPS Mission Analysis Team then performed further updates and crosschecked the book for consistency. Finally, a second virtual workshop was held to ensure all subject matter experts and stakeholders concurred on the contents.

  3. Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.

    2009-01-01

    This document reviews the Design Reference Architecture (DRA) for human exploration of Mars. The DRA represents the current best strategy for human missions. The DRA is not a formal plan, but provides a vision and context to tie current systems and technology developments to potential missions to Mars, and it also serves as a benchmark against which alternative architectures can be measured. The document also reviews the objectives and products of the 2007 study that was to update NASA's human Mars mission reference architecture, assess strategic linkages between lunar and Mars strategies, develop an understanding of methods for reducing cost/risk of human missions through investment in research, technology development and synergy with other exploration plans. There is also a review of the process by which the DRA will continue to be refined. The unique capacities of human exploration is reviewed. The possible goals and objectives of the first three human missions are presented, along with the recommendation that the mission involve a long stay visiting multiple sites.The deployment strategy is outlined and diagrammed including the pre-deployment of the many of the material requirements, and a six crew travel to Mars on a six month trajectory. The predeployment and the Orion crew vehicle are shown. The ground operations requirements are also explained. Also the use of resources found on the surface of Mars is postulated. The Mars surface exploration strategy is reviewed, including the planetary protection processes that are planned. Finally a listing of the key decisions and tenets is posed.

  4. Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0 Study: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0 Study seeks to update its long term goals and objective for human exploration missions; flight and surface systems for human missions and supporting infrastructure; operational concept for human and robotic exploration of Mars; key challenges including risk and cost drivers; and, its development schedule options. It additionally seeks to assess strategic linkages between lunar and Mars strategies and develop and understanding of methods for reducing the cost/risk of human Mars missions through investment in research, technology development, and synergy with other exploration plans. Recommendations are made regarding conjunction class (long-stay) missions which are seen as providing the best balance of cost, risk, and performance. Additionally, this study reviews entry, descent, and landing challenges; in-space transportation systems; launch vehicle and Orion assessments; risk and risk mitigation; key driving requirements and challenges; and, lunar linkages.

  5. ILC Instrumentation R&D at SCIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, J.; Crosby, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Partridge, R.; Schumm, B.A.; Spencer, N.; Wilder, M.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2011-11-14

    The Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP) continues to be engaged in research and development towards an ILC detector. The latest efforts at SCIPP are described, including those associated with the LSTFE front-end readout ASIC, the use of charge division to obtain a longitudinal coordinate from silicon strip detectors, and the contribution of strip resistance to readout noise.

  6. Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force

    SciTech Connect

    2008-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory convened the ILC Citizens' Task Force to provide guidance and advice to the laboratory to ensure that community concerns and ideas are included in all public aspects of planning and design for a proposed future accelerator, the International Linear Collider. In this report, the members of the Task Force describe the process they used to gather and analyze information on all aspects of the proposed accelerator and its potential location at Fermilab in northern Illinois. They present the conclusions and recommendations they reached as a result of the learning process and their subsequent discussions and deliberations. While the Task Force was charged to provide guidance on the ILC, it became clear during the process that the high cost of the proposed accelerator made a near-term start for the project at Fermilab unlikely. Nevertheless, based on a year of extensive learning and dialogue, the Task Force developed a series of recommendations for Fermilab to consider as the laboratory develops all successor projects to the Tevatron. The Task Force recognizes that bringing a next-generation particle physics project to Fermilab will require both a large international effort and the support of the local community. While the Task Force developed its recommendations in response to the parameters of a future ILC, the principles they set forth apply directly to any large project that may be conceived at Fermilab, or at other laboratories, in the future. With this report, the Task Force fulfills its task of guiding Fermilab from the perspective of the local community on how to move forward with a large-scale project while building positive relationships with surrounding communities. The report summarizes the benefits, concerns and potential impacts of bringing a large-scale scientific project to northern Illinois.

  7. Mars Aerocapture Studies for the Design Reference Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyne, James Evans; Wercinski, Paul; Walberg, Gerald; Jits, Roman

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of possible fossilized microbes in a Martian meteorite sample and the spectacular success of the Mars Pathfinder mission have substantially increased public interest and support for future robotic and manned exploration of Mars. NASA is currently refining a plan known as the Design Reference Mission (DRM) in which the first human landing would occur in 2014 after a series of cargo launches which would place surface systems and an Earth return vehicle at Mars two years prior to the crew's arrival. At each subsequent launch opportunity (which occur approximately every twenty-six months), an additional Earth return vehicle, surface facility and crew would depart for Mars, with each crew employing the systems launched during the previous opportunity. The mission design calls for a long-duration surface stay, rapid crew transits, in-situ manufacture of the Mars ascent propellant, nuclear thermal propulsion for the trans-Mars injection burn, and the use of aerocapture for both the cargo and crew vehicles at Mars.

  8. Positron Injector Accelerator and RF System for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bowden, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Li, Z.; Miller, R.; Sheppard, J.C.; /SLAC

    2007-03-28

    Due to the extremely high energy deposition from positrons, electrons, photons and neutrons behind the positron target, and because a solenoid is required to focus the large emittance positron beam, the 1.3 GHz preaccelerator has to use normal conducting structures up to energy of 400 MeV. There are many challenges in the design of the normal-conducting portion of the ILC positron injector system such as obtaining high positron yield with required emittance, achieving adequate cooling with the high RF and particle loss heating, and sustaining high accelerator gradients during millisecond-long pulses in a strong magnetic field. Considering issues of feasibility, reliability and cost savings for the ILC, the proposed design for the positron injector contains both standing-wave (SW) and traveling-wave (TW) L-band accelerator structures. A short version of the new type of the SW section is under fabrication and testing. An updated status report is given. This paper also covers acceleration vs. deceleration for pre-accelerator sections, SW vs. TW structures, as well as longitudinal matching from target to linac and linac to damping ring.

  9. Coaxial Coupling Scheme for TESLA/ILC-type Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports about our efforts to develop a flangeable coaxial coupler for both HOM and fundamental coupling for 9-cell TESLA/ILC-type cavities. The cavities were designed in early 90‘s for pulsed operation with a low duty factor, less than 1 %. The proposed design of the coupler has been done in a way, that the magnetic flux B at the flange connection is minimized and only a field of <5 mT would be present at the accelerating field Eacc of ~ 36 MV/m (B =150 mT in the cavity). Even though we achieved reasonably high Q-values at low field, the cavity/coupler combination was limited in the cw mode to only ~ 7 MV/m, where a thermally initiated degradation occurred. We have improved the cooling conditions by initially drilling radial channels every 30 degrees, then every 15 degrees into the shorting plate. The modified prototype performed well up to 9 MV/m in cw mode. This paper reports about our experiences with the further modified coaxial coupler and about test results in cw and low duty cycle pulsed mode, similar to the TESLA/ILC operation conditions.

  10. NASA'S RPS Design Reference Mission Set for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Strategic Roadmap identified a set of proposed large Flagship, medium New Frontiers and small Discovery class missions, addressing key exploration objectives. These objectives respond to the recommendations by the National Research Council (NRC), reported in the SSE Decadal Survey. The SSE Roadmap is down-selected from an over-subscribed set of missions, called the SSE Design Reference Mission (DRM) set Missions in the Flagship and New Frontiers classes can consider Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs), while small Discovery class missions are not permitted to use them, due to cost constraints. In line with the SSE DRM set and the SSE Roadmap missions, the RPS DRM set represents a set of missions, which can be enabled or enhanced by RPS technologies. At present, NASA has proposed the development of two new types of RPSs. These are the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), with static power conversion; and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG), with dynamic conversion. Advanced RPSs, under consideration for possible development, aim to increase specific power levels. In effect, this would either increase electric power generation for the same amount of fuel, or reduce fuel requirements for the same power output, compared to the proposed MMRTG or SRG. Operating environments could also influence the design, such that an RPS on the proposed Titan Explorer would use smaller fins to minimize heat rejection in the extreme cold environment; while the Venus Mobile Explorer long-lived in-situ mission would require the development of a new RPS, in order to tolerate the extreme hot environment, and to simultaneously provide active cooling to the payload and other electric components. This paper discusses NASA's SSE RPS DRM set, in line with the SSE DRM set. It gives a qualitative assessment regarding the impact of various RPS technology and configuration options on potential mission architectures, which could

  11. NASA's RPS Design Reference Mission Set for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Strategic Roadmap identified a set of proposed large Flagship, medium New Frontiers and small Discovery class missions, addressing key exploration objectives. These objectives respond to the recommendations by the National Research Council (NRC), reported in the SSE Decadal Survey. The SSE Roadmap is down-selected from an over-subscribed set of missions, called the SSE Design Reference Mission (DRM) set. Missions in the Flagship and New Frontiers classes can consider Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs), while small Discovery class missions are not permitted to use them, due to cost constraints. In line with the SSE DRM set and the SSE Roadmap missions, the RPS DRM set represents a set of missions, which can be enabled or enhanced by RPS technologies. At present, NASA has proposed the development of two new types of RPSs. These are the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), with static power conversion; and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG), with dynamic conversion. Advanced RPSs, under consideration for possible development, aim to increase specific power levels. In effect, this would either increase electric power generation for the same amount of fuel, or reduce fuel requirements for the same power output, compared to the proposed MMRTG or SRG. Operating environments could also influence the design, such that an RPS on the proposed Titan Explorer would use smaller fins to minimize heat rejection in the extreme cold environment; while the Venus Mobile Explorer long-lived in-situ mission would require the development of a new RPS, in order to tolerate the extreme hot environment, and to simultaneously provide active cooling to the payload and other electric components. This paper discusses NASA's SSE RPS DRM set, in line with the SSE DRM set. It gives a qualitative assessment regarding the impact of various RPS technology and configuration options on potential mission architectures, which could

  12. Detailed cost estimate of reference residential photovoltaic designs

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.S.; Penasa, D.A.; Thomas, M.G.

    1983-04-01

    This report presents estimated installation costs for four reference residential photovoltaic designs. Installation cost estimates ranged from $1.28 to $2.12/W/sub p/ for arrays installed by union labor (4.1 to 6.07 kW/sub p/-systems), and from $1.22 to $1.83 W/sub p/ for non-union installations. Standoff mounting was found to increase costs from $1.63/W/sub p/ to $2.12/W/sub p/ for a representative case, whereas 25 kWh of battery storage capacity increased installation costs from $1.44/W/sub p/ to $2.08/W/sub p/. Overall system costs (union-based were $6000 to $7000 for a 4.1 kW array in the northeast, to approx. $9000 for a 6.07 kW/sub p/ array in the southwest. This range of installation costs, approx. $1 to $2/W/sub p/ (in 1980 dollars), is representative of current installation costs for residential PV systems. Any future cost reductions are likely to be small and can be accomplished only by optimization of mounting techniques, module efficiencies, and module reliability in toto.

  13. Basic coaxial mass driver reference design. [electromagnetic lunar launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolm, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    The reference design for a basic coaxial mass driver is developed to illustrate the principles and optimization procedures on the basis of numerical integration by programmable pocket calculators. The four inch caliber system uses a single-coil bucket and a single-phase propulsion track with discrete coils, separately energized by capacitors. An actual driver would use multiple-coil buckets and an oscillatory multi-phase drive system. Even the basic, table-top demonstration system should in principle be able to achieve accelerations in the 1,000 m/sq sec range. Current densities of the order of 25 ka/sq cm, continuously achievable only in superconductors, are carried by an ordinary aluminum bucket coil for a short period in order to demonstrate the calculated acceleration. Ultimately the system can be lengthened and provided with a magnetically levitated, superconducting bucket to study levitation dynamics under quasi-steady-state conditions, and to approach lunar escape velocity in an evacuated tube.

  14. A Vernier Regulator for ILC Marx Droop Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Tao

    2009-10-30

    A two-part compensation scheme, Vernier Regulation, has been applied to offset the voltage droop (40% without correction) in a Marx-topology klystron modulator developed for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Coarse regulation, {+-}5%, is achieved by turning on additional Main Marx cells (Delayed Cells) sequentially as the droop reaches the cell voltage (11 kV). Further regulation to {+-}0.5% is achieved by adding a small Marx in series with the Main Marx. This Vernier Marx is composed of sixteen, 1.2 kV cells that are assembled as a seventeenth cell in the Main Marx. These Vernier Cells are turned on sequentially to generate a series of discrete corrections to the droop in the Main Marx cells with a step size {le}1% of the output voltage. As the required correction reaches 11 kV, all Vernier Cells are turned off synchronously with the turn on of a Delayed Cell. There are up to five Delayed Cells and six Vernier Marx cycles during each ILC Marx output pulse. The Vernier Marx has a local control system that will detect and respond to over-voltage and over-current errors. In this paper, a detailed description of the design, implementation and testing of the Vernier Marx is presented.

  15. ILC1s in Tissue Inflammation and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are innate immune cells that provide an early source of cytokines to initiate and tailor the immune response to the type of the encountered pathogen or insult. The group 1 ILCs are comprised of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells and subsets of “unconventional NK cells,” termed ILC1s. Although cNK cells and ILC1s share many features, such as certain phenotypic markers and the ability to produce IFN-γ upon activation, it is now becoming apparent that these two subsets develop from different progenitors and show unique tissue distribution and functional characteristics. Recent studies have aimed at elucidating the individual contributions of cNK cells and ILC1s during protective host responses as well as during chronic inflammation. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the developmental origins as well as of the phenotypic and functional characteristics of ILC1s. PMID:27047491

  16. Particle Flow Calorimetry at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M. A.

    2007-03-19

    One of the most important requirements for a detector at the ILC is good jet energy resolution. It is widely believed that the particle flow approach to calorimetry is the key to achieving the goal of 0.3/{radical}(E(GeV)). In contrast to the traditional approach to calorimetry, potentially the performance of particle flow calorimetry is sensitive to the detailed structure of hadronic showers. This paper describes the current performance of the PANDORAPFA particle flow algorithm. For 45 GeV jets in the Tesla TDR detector concept, the ILC jet energy resolution goal is reached. First detector optimisation studies are presented and the aspects of hadronic showers which are most likely to impact particle flow performance are discussed.

  17. Staffing by Design: A Methodology for Staffing Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, David; Phetteplace, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The growth in number and kind of online reference services has resulted in both new users consulting library research services as well as new patterns of service use. Staffing in-person and virtual reference services desks adequately requires a systematic analysis of patterns of use across service points in order to successfully meet fluctuating…

  18. Mechanisms to Suppress ILC2-induced Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kabata, Hiroki; Moro, Kazuyo; Koyasu, Shigeo; Fukunaga, Koichi; Asano, Koichiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2016-03-01

    Epithelial cell-derived cytokines such as IL-33 and IL-25 activate group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), which are known to be important sources of type 2 cytokines such as IL-5 and IL-13 in a variety of asthma mouse models. Recently, human studies have also reported the involvement of ILC2s in asthma, as ILC2s are increased in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with asthma. Compared with positive regulators such as IL-25 and IL-33, the mechanisms to suppress the ILC2s-induced inflammation remain unclear. Because ILC2s express various cytokine receptors, the function of ILC2s would likely be influenced by cytokines present around ILC2s in the lungs. We reported that IL-2, IL-7, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and promoted the proliferation of ILC2s and type 2 cytokine production when combined with IL-33. TSLP enhanced the expression of Bcl-xL, an antiapoptotic molecule, and caused corticosteroid-resistant airway inflammation via ILC2s in mice. Furthermore, pimozide, a STAT5 inhibitor, counteracted the TSLP-induced corticosteroid resistance and suppressed airway inflammation. As a negative regulator, we have found that IFN-γ and IL-27 suppressed the proliferation and type 2 cytokine production of ILC2s in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, ILC2s-induced eosinophilic inflammation was more severe in IFN-γ receptor-deficient mice than in control mice. These findings suggest the importance of environmental cytokines for the regulation of ILC2s, and this would lead to a new approach to control airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27027961

  19. Wake potentials of the ILC Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The vacuum chamber of the ILC Interaction Region (IR) is optimized for best detector performance. It has special shaping to minimize additional backgrounds due to the metal part of the chamber. Also, for the same reason this thin vacuum chamber does not have water cooling. Therefore, small amounts of power, which may be deposited in the chamber, can be enough to raise the chamber to a high temperature. One of the sources of 'heating' power is the electromagnetic field of the beam. This field diffracts by non-regularities of the beam pipe and excites free-propagating fields, which are then absorbed by the pipe wall. In addition we have a heating power of the image currents due to finite conductivity of the metallic wall. We will discuss these effects as updating the previous results. The conclusions of this report are: (1) The amount of the beam energy loss in IR is almost equal to the energy loss in one ILC (TESLA) accelerating cryo-module; (2) Addition energy spread at IR is very small; (3) Spectrum of the wake fields is limited 300 GHz; (4) Average power of the wake fields excited in IR is 30 W for nominal ILC parameters; and (5) Pulse power in this case is 6 kilowatts.

  20. Engineering challenges for detectors at the ILC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oriunno, Marco

    2016-05-31

    Over the last years two proposals for experiments at the ILC have been developed, ILD and SID. Extensive R&D has been carried out around the world to develop the needed technologies. Furthermore a first round of engineering studies was made as part of the ILC TDR to understand the integration of these different sub-systems into coherent and integrated detector concepts. Among the key challenges for the sub detectors are the extreme low mass/low power requirements or the extreme channel densities needed in particle flow based detectors. Throughout these studies special care was taken to ensure that the engineering models andmore » the simulation models, used in studies of the physics capabilities of the detectors, stay synchronized. In the near future, the models will need to be evolved to take the special requirements of the potential ILC site in Japan into account. Furthermore, the state of the integration of the detectors, and the future directions, will be discussed.« less

  1. Measuring the Magnetic Center Behavior of an ILC Superconducting Quadrupole Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Cherrill M.; Adolphsen, Chris; Berndt, Martin; Jensen, David R.; Rogers, Ron; Sheppard, John C.; Lorant, Steve St; Weber, Thomas B.; Weisend, John, II; Brueck, Heinrich; Toral, Fernando; /Madrid, CIEMAT

    2011-02-07

    The main linacs of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) consist of superconducting cavities operated at 2K. The accelerating cavities are contained in a contiguous series of cryogenic modules that also house the main linac quadrupoles, thus the quadrupoles also need to be superconducting. In an early ILC design, these magnets are about 0.6 m long, have cos (2{theta}) coils, and operate at constant field gradients up to 60 T/m. In order to preserve the small beam emittances in the ILC linacs, the e+ and e- beams need to traverse the quadrupoles near their magnetic centers. A quadrupole shunting technique is used to measure the quadrupole alignment with the beams; this process requires the magnetic centers move by no more than about 5 micrometers when their strength is changed. To determine if such tight stability is achievable in a superconducting quadrupole, we at SLAC measured the magnetic center motions in a prototype ILC quadrupole built at CIEMAT in Spain. A rotating coil technique was used with a better than 0.1 micrometer precision in the relative field center position, and less than a 2 micrometer systematic error over 30 minutes. This paper describes the warm-bore cryomodule that houses the quadrupole in its Helium vessel, the magnetic center measurement system, the measured center data and strength and harmonics magnetic data.

  2. Non-simplified SUSY: widetilde{τ }-coannihilation at LHC and ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, M.; Cakir, A.; Krücker, D.; List, J.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Samani, B. Safarzadeh; Seitz, C.; Wayand, S.

    2016-04-01

    If new phenomena beyond the Standard Model will be discovered at the LHC, the properties of the new particles could be determined with data from the High-Luminosity LHC and from a future linear collider like the ILC. We discuss the possible interplay between measurements at the two accelerators in a concrete example, namely a full SUSY model which features a small widetilde{τ }_1-LSP mass difference. Various channels have been studied using the Snowmass 2013 combined LHC detector implementation in the Delphes simulation package, as well as simulations of the ILD detector concept from the Technical Design Report. We investigate both the LHC and the ILC capabilities for discovery, separation and identification of various parts of the spectrum. While some parts would be discovered at the LHC, there is substantial room for further discoveries at the ILC. We finally highlight examples where the precise knowledge about the lower part of the mass spectrum which could be acquired at the ILC would enable a more in-depth analysis of the LHC data with respect to the heavier states.

  3. ILC Extraction Line for 14 mrad Crossing Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y.; Markiewicz, T.; Maruyama, T.; Seryi, A.; Parker, B.; /Brookhaven

    2005-12-08

    The earlier studies of the ILC extraction line for 20 mrad and 2 mrad crossing angle options [1]-[5] showed that the 20 mrad design has an advantage of a simpler beamline and lower extraction beam loss because of the independent incoming and extraction optics. However, the large 20 mrad crossing angle requires the use of a crab cavity correction, increases synchrotron radiation emittance growth in the solenoid, and increases photon backscattering from the forward calorimeter of the detector. To reduce these effects, an attempt has been made to minimize the crossing angle while keeping the extraction and incoming lines separate. A new quadrupole scheme near the interaction point has been proposed which allows a reduction of the crossing angle to 14 mrad [6]. The optics design and results of tracking and background simulations for the 14 mrad extraction line are presented.

  4. Content Analysis of Virtual Reference Data: Reshaping Library Website Design.

    PubMed

    Fan, Suhua Caroline; Welch, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    An academic health sciences library wanted to redesign its website to provide better access to health information in the community. Virtual reference data were used to provide information about user searching behavior. This study analyzed three years (2012-2014) of virtual reference data, including e-mail questions, text messaging, and live chat transcripts, to evaluate the library website for redesigning, especially in areas such as the home page, patrons' terminology, and issues prompting patrons to ask for help. A coding system based on information links in the current library website was created to analyze the data. PMID:27391180

  5. An Earth-Moon System Trajectory Design Reference Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Bosanac, Natasha; Guzzetti, Davide; Howell, Kathleen C.

    2014-01-01

    As demonstrated by ongoing concept designs and the recent ARTEMIS mission, there is, currently, significant interest in exploiting three-body dynamics in the design of trajectories for both robotic and human missions within the Earth-Moon system. The concept of an interactive and 'dynamic' catalog of potential solutions in the Earth-Moon system is explored within this paper and analyzed as a framework to guide trajectory design. Characterizing and compiling periodic and quasi-periodic solutions that exist in the circular restricted three-body problem may offer faster and more efficient strategies for orbit design, while also delivering innovative mission design parameters for further examination.

  6. An Earth-Moon system trajectory design reference catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folta, David C.; Bosanac, Natasha; Guzzetti, Davide; Howell, Kathleen C.

    2015-05-01

    As demonstrated by ongoing concept designs and the recent ARTEMIS mission, there is, currently, significant interest in exploiting three-body dynamics in the design of trajectories for both robotic and human missions within the Earth-Moon system. The concept of an interactive and 'dynamic' catalog of potential solutions in the Earth-Moon system is explored within this paper and analyzed as a framework to guide trajectory design. Characterizing and compiling periodic and quasi-periodic solutions that exist in the circular restricted three-body problem may offer faster and more efficient strategies for orbit design, while also delivering innovative mission design parameters for further examination.

  7. Technical Challenges for the Head-on Collisions and Extraction at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Napoly, O.; Delferriere, O.; Durante, M.; Payet, J.; Rippon, C.; Uriot, D.; Balhan, B.; Borburgh, J.; Goddard, B.; Kuroda, S.; Iwashita, Y.; del Carmen Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Dadoun, O.; Rimbault, C.; Sabbi, G.; Keller, L.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jackson, F.; Tzenov, S.; /Daresbury /Manchester U.

    2007-08-14

    An interaction region with head-on collisions is considered as an alternative to the baseline ILC configuration. Progress in the final focus optics design includes engineered large bore superconducting final doublet magnets and their 3D magnetic integration in the detector solenoids. Progress on the beam separation optics is based on technical designs of electrostatic separator and special extraction quadrupoles. The spent beam extraction is realized by a staged collimation scheme relying on realistic collimators.

  8. Crew Exploration Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support Design Reference Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Anderson, Molly K.; Ewert, Mike S.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.

    2007-01-01

    In preparation for the contract award of the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) produced two design reference missions for the vehicle. The design references used teams of engineers across the agency to come up with two configurations. This process helped NASA understand the conflicts and limitations in the CEV design, and investigate options to solve them.

  9. A Study of Emittance Measurement at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, G.A.; Agapov, I.V.; Carter, J.; Deacon, L.; Angal-Kalinin, D.A.K.; Jenner, L.J.; Ross, M.C.; Seryi, A.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2007-04-16

    The measurement of the International Linear Collider (ILC) emittance in the ILC beam delivery system (BDS) is simulated. Estimates of statistical and machine-related errors are discussed and the implications for related diagnostics R&D are inferred. A simulation of the extraction of the laser-wire Compton signal is also presented.

  10. Innate B Cells Tell ILC How It's Done.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang T T; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2016-07-19

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are known as first responders to infections and as instructors of subsequent CD4(+) T cell cytokine profiles. In this issue of Immunity, Fan and colleagues now demonstrate that even earlier responding innate-like B cells (NKB) induce these protective ILC responses. PMID:27438761

  11. ILC3s and the Willow Tree of Voices.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Milena

    2016-08-16

    Type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) and enteric glia, an essential structural component of gut innervation, are well-known regulators of intestinal homeostasis. Ibiza et al. (2016) uncover a new link between commensal bacteria, enteric glial cells, and ILC3s that is required for intestinal homeostasis and defense. PMID:27533011

  12. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  13. The forward region of the future ILC detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosca, A.; FCAL Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    In the very forward region of the future detector at the International Linear Collider (ILC) the following subsystems will be considered: a luminosity detector (LumiCal) for precise measurement of the Bhabha event rate; a beam calorimeter (BeamCal) and a beamstrahlung photon monitor (GamCal) for providing a fast feed-back in tuning the luminosity. BeamCal and GamCal will support also the determination of beam parameters. Both LumiCal and BeamCal will extend the angular coverage of the electromagnetic calorimeter at small polar angles. Detailed simulations are currently done to optimize the design of these detectors. Both LumiCal and BeamCal are planned as compact and highly segmented sandwich calorimeters. Tungsten disks of one X0 thickness are interspersed with sensor planes. For LumiCal, silicon pad sensors will be used. BeamCal will work in an extreme radiation environment, hence radiation hard sensors will be used. The sensors have to withstand a dose of up to several MGy per year. Several options for possible sensor materials have been investigated: polycrystalline and single crystal CVD diamond, as well as GaAs. Since the occupancy of LumiCal is relatively large and BeamCal must be readout after each bunch crossing, a fast readout electronics is necessary. The uncertainty of the luminosity measurement must be smaller than 10 for the running at high energy and about 10 in the GigaZ program focused to precision measurements of the Z boson. Systematic effects originating from hardware design as the accuracy of the sensor position, the calorimeter position and the dynamic range of the readout electronics, but also from physics processes have been studied. This work presents the current status of the research carried out to instrument this difficult region of the future ILC detector.

  14. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R.E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, J.W.; Zhou, F.; /SLAC

    2006-12-01

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of {ge}200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while {ge}500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  15. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R. H.; Wang, J. W.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of {>=}200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while {>=}500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  16. 7 CFR 801.12 - Design requirements incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 801.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.12 Design requirements...

  17. 7 CFR 801.12 - Design requirements incorporated by reference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 801.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRAIN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT § 801.12 Design requirements...

  18. COS Design Reference Mission andGround System Volume Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles D.; Kutina, Ray; Morse, Jon A.

    1999-04-01

    We describe a scenario for the expected usage of COS that incorporates predicted instrumental capabilities, the COS IDT DRM as currently envisioned, community input, astudy of planned and actual usage of the previous HST spectrographs (FOS, GHRS, andSTIS), and estimates of the time to be allocated to COS by future TACs. From this input we derive, for times of normal and stressed usage, estimates of the expected frequency of COS science- and calibration-related exposures (~12/day), average downlink volume(~600 Mbits/day), archive volume (TBD), and calibration reference file OPUS on-linestorage volume (~1 Gbyte). We also provide summaries of COS instrumental capabilitiesand predicted sensitivities in comparison with those of the other HST spectrographs.

  19. Optimization of the Low Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.S.; Kneisel, P.; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Saito, K.; Ge, L.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC main linacs. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and TJNAF (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping factors for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reducing the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced multipacting barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, multipacting activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss designs for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting.

  20. Design of Low Complexity Model Reference Adaptive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Schaefer, Jacob; Johnson, Marcus; Nguyen, Nhan

    2012-01-01

    Flight research experiments have demonstrated that adaptive flight controls can be an effective technology for improving aircraft safety in the event of failures or damage. However, the nonlinear, timevarying nature of adaptive algorithms continues to challenge traditional methods for the verification and validation testing of safety-critical flight control systems. Increasingly complex adaptive control theories and designs are emerging, but only make testing challenges more difficult. A potential first step toward the acceptance of adaptive flight controllers by aircraft manufacturers, operators, and certification authorities is a very simple design that operates as an augmentation to a non-adaptive baseline controller. Three such controllers were developed as part of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration flight research experiment to determine the appropriate level of complexity required to restore acceptable handling qualities to an aircraft that has suffered failures or damage. The controllers consist of the same basic design, but incorporate incrementally-increasing levels of complexity. Derivations of the controllers and their adaptive parameter update laws are presented along with details of the controllers implementations.

  1. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W.N.; Burke, D.L.; Claver, C.F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K.H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jacoby, S.H.; Jones, R.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kantor, J.P.; Krabbendam, V.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T.L.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, Michael A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LSST Corp. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NOAO, Tucson /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Santa Cruz /Harvard U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2011-10-14

    In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg{sup 2} field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg{sup 2} with {delta} < +34.5{sup o}, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320-1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the

  2. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers To Reference Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W. N.; Burke, D. L.; Claver, C. F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K. H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D. K.; Jacoby, S. H.; Jones, R. L.; Kahn, S. M.; Kantor, J. P.; Krabbendam, V. V.; Lupton, R. H.; Monet, D. G.; Pinto, P. A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T. L.; Schneider, D. P.; Strauss, M. A.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sweeney, D.; Szalay, A.; Thaler, J. J.; Tyson, J. A.; LSST Collaboration

    2008-06-01

    In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachón in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg2 field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg2 with δ<+34.5°, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320--1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg2 region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the LSST science drivers led to

  3. An RF Waveguide Distribution System for the ILC Test Accelerator at Fermilab's NML

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Bowden, Gordon; Swent, Richard; McKee, Bobby; /SLAC

    2007-06-27

    An ILC R&D facility is being constructed in the NML building at Fermilab which, in addition to an injector and beam dump with spectrometer, will contain up to three cryomodules of ILC-type superconducting 9-cell cavities. This linac will be powered by a single klystron. As part of SLAC's contribution to this project, we will provide a distribution network in WR650 waveguide to the various cavity couplers. In addition to commercial waveguide components and circulators and loads, this system will include adjustable tap-offs, and customized hybrids. In one configuration, the circulators will be removed to test pair-wise cancellation of cavity reflections through hybrids. The system will be pressurized with nitrogen to 3 bar absolute to avoid the need for SF{sub 6}. The full distribution system for the first cryomodule will be delivered and installed later this year. We describe the design of the system and completed RF testing.

  4. HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS REFERENCE DESIGN AND COST ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.; Boltrunis, C.; Lahoda, E.; Allen, D.; Greyvenstein, R.

    2009-05-12

    This report documents a detailed study to determine the expected efficiency and product costs for producing hydrogen via water-splitting using energy from an advanced nuclear reactor. It was determined that the overall efficiency from nuclear heat to hydrogen is high, and the cost of hydrogen is competitive under a high energy cost scenario. It would require over 40% more nuclear energy to generate an equivalent amount of hydrogen using conventional water-cooled nuclear reactors combined with water electrolysis compared to the proposed plant design described herein. There is a great deal of interest worldwide in reducing dependence on fossil fuels, while also minimizing the impact of the energy sector on global climate change. One potential opportunity to contribute to this effort is to replace the use of fossil fuels for hydrogen production by the use of water-splitting powered by nuclear energy. Hydrogen production is required for fertilizer (e.g. ammonia) production, oil refining, synfuels production, and other important industrial applications. It is typically produced by reacting natural gas, naphtha or coal with steam, which consumes significant amounts of energy and produces carbon dioxide as a byproduct. In the future, hydrogen could also be used as a transportation fuel, replacing petroleum. New processes are being developed that would permit hydrogen to be produced from water using only heat or a combination of heat and electricity produced by advanced, high temperature nuclear reactors. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing these processes under a program known as the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Republic of South Africa (RSA) also is interested in developing advanced high temperature nuclear reactors and related chemical processes that could produce hydrogen fuel via water-splitting. This report focuses on the analysis of a nuclear hydrogen production system that combines the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), under development by

  5. Architectural design proposal for a Martian base to continue NASA Mars Design Reference Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Janek

    The issue of extraterrestrial bases has recently been a very vivid one. There are orbital stations currently existing and humans will travel to Mars around 2030. They will need stations established there, which will provide them the proper living conditions. Firstly, it might be a small module brought from Earth (e.g. NASA Mars Design Reference Mission module (DRM)), in later stages equivalents of Earth houses may be built from local resources. The goal of this paper is to propose an architectural design for an intermediate stage — for a larger habitable unit transported from Earth. It is inspired by terrestrial portable architecture ideas. A pneumatic structure requires small volume during transportation. However, it provides large habitable space after deployment. It is designed for transport by DRM transportation module and its deployment is considerable easy and brief. An architectural solution analogous to a terrestrial house with a studio and a workshop was assumed. Its form was a result of technical and environmental limitations, and the need for an ergonomic interior. The spatial placement of following zones was carefully considered: residential, agricultural and science, as well as a garage with a workshop, transportation routes, and a control and communication center. The issues of Life Support System, energy, food, water and waste recycling were also discussed. This Martian base was designed to be crewed by a team of eight people to stay on Mars for at least 1.5 year. An Open Plan architectural solution was assumed in pneumatic modules, with a high level of modularity. Walls of standardized sizes with zip-fasteners allow free rearrangement of the interior to adapt to a new situation (e.g. damage of one of the pneumatic modules or a psychological ,,need of a change"). The architectural design focuses on ergonomic and psychological aspects of longer stay in hostile Martian environment. This solution provides Martian crew with a comfortable habitable

  6. Simulation of Wakefield Effect in ILC IR Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, S; Seryi, A.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; /SLAC

    2008-06-26

    To achieve super high luminosity, high current beams with very short bunch length are needed, which carry high intensity EM fields. For ILC, two bunch trains with bunch length of 300 {micro}m and bunch charge of 3.2nC are needed to collide at the IR to achieve the ILC luminosity goals. When the 300 {micro}m bunches pass through the IR chamber, wakefields will be excited, which will cause HOM power flowing through the IR chamber beam pipe to the final doublets due to the high frequency characteristic of the induced wakefields. Since superconducting technology is adopted for the final doublets of ILC BDS, whose operation stability might be affected by the HOM power produced at the IR chamber, quench might happen. In this paper, we did some analytical estimation and numerical simulation on the wakefield effects in ILC IR chamber.

  7. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  8. Energy Efficient Drivepower : Literature Reference List, Volume 2, Design Engineer`s Supplement.

    SciTech Connect

    Ula, Sadrul.; Birnbaum, Larry E.; Jordan, Don

    1992-01-01

    A large number of information sources in the area of the efficient use of drivepower are listed. The main list is for the general user of drivepower systems. The other list is a supplemental reference list for the design engineer.

  9. Energy Efficient Drivepower : Literature Reference List, Volume 2 Design Engineer's Supplement.

    SciTech Connect

    Ula, Sadrul; Jordan, Don L.; Birnbaum, Larry E.

    1993-01-01

    A large number of information sources in the area of the efficient use of drivepower are listed. The main list is for the general user of drivepower systems. The other list is a supplemental reference list for the design engineer.

  10. Klystron Cluster Scheme for ILC High Power RF Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present a concept for powering the main linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) by delivering high power RF from the surface via overmoded, low-loss waveguides at widely spaced intervals. The baseline design employs a two-tunnel layout, with klystrons and modulators evenly distributed along a service tunnel running parallel to the accelerator tunnel. This new idea eliminates the need for the service tunnel. It also brings most of the warm heat load to the surface, dramatically reducing the tunnel water cooling and HVAC requirements. In the envisioned configuration, groups of 70 klystrons and modulators are clustered in surface buildings every 2.5 km. Their outputs are combined into two half-meter diameter circular TE{sub 01} mode evacuated waveguides. These are directed via special bends through a deep shaft and along the tunnel, one upstream and one downstream. Each feeds approximately 1.25 km of linac with power tapped off in 10 MW portions at 38 m intervals. The power is extracted through a novel coaxial tap-off (CTO), after which the local distribution is as it would be from a klystron. The tap-off design is also employed in reverse for the initial combining.

  11. Higher Order Mode Heating Analysis for the ILC Superconducting Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Nantista, C.; Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2010-10-27

    The superconducting cavities and interconnects in the 11 km long linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) are designed to operate at 2K, where cooling costs are very expensive. It is thus important to minimize cryogenic heat loads. In addition to an unavoidable static load and the dynamic load of the fundamental 1.3 GHz accelerating rf, a further heat source is presented by the higher order mode (HOM) power deposited by the beam. Such modes will be damped by specially designed HOM couplers attached to the cavities (for trapped modes), and by ceramic dampers at 70K that are located between the eight or nine cavity cryomodules (for propagating modes). Brute force calculation of the higher frequency modes excited in a string of cryomodules is limited by computing capacity (see, e.g. [1]). M. Liepe has calculated {approx} 400 longitudinal TM modes in 3 superconducting cavities plus absorbers, up to 8 GHz [2]. Joestingmeier, et al., have used a ray tracing calculation to find the effect at higher frequencies, specifically in the range of tens of GHz and above [3]. In this report we present a scattering matrix approach, which we apply to an rf unit comprising 26 cavities and 3 absorbers. We perform calculations at sample frequencies (up to 20 GHz) to predict the effectiveness of the ceramic dampers in limiting HOM heat deposition at 2K.

  12. Aluminum reference plate, heat sink, and actuator design for an adaptive secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Vecchio, Ciro

    1998-09-01

    The design of an adaptive secondary mirror has to satisfy many requirements coming from different fields. The thin mirror must be actuated very precisely with a large bandwidth. The reference plate has to provide a high stability reference for the optical surfaces. The local seeing is not to be degraded by any significant thermal perturbation. In this article, the performances of a configuration with a single aluminum reference plate, that also provides the heat sink, are computed starting from the input power coming from the magnetic actuators, whose magnetic design has been revised.

  13. Updated reference design of a liquid metal cooled tandem mirror fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Garner, J.K.; Gromada, R.J.; McCarville, T.J.; Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Bandini, B.R.; Fulton, F.J.; Wong, C.P.C.; Maya, I.; Hoot, C.G.; Schultz, K.R.; Miller, L.G.; Beeston, J.M.; Harris, B.L.; Westman, R.A.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Orient, G.; Wolfer, M.; DeVan, J.H.; Torterelli, P.

    1985-09-01

    Detailed studies of key techinical issues for liquid metal cooled fusion breeder (fusion-fission hybrid blankets) have been performed during the period 1983-4. Based upon the results of these studies, the 1982 reference liquid metal cooled tandem mirror fusion breeder blanket design was updated and is described. The updated reference blankets provides increased breeding and lower technological risk in comparison with the original reference blanket. In addition to the blanket design revisions, a plant concept, cost, and fuel cycle economics assessment is provided. The fusion breeder continues to promise an economical source of fissile fuel for the indefinite future.

  14. Scaffolding Students' Development of Creative Design Skills: A Curriculum Reference Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chien-Sing; Kolodner, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for promoting creative design capabilities in the context of achieving community goals pertaining to sustainable development among high school students. The framework can be used as a reference model to design formal or out-of-school curriculum units in any geographical region. This theme is chosen due to its…

  15. 77 FR 55832 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... made under the provisions of 40 CFR part 53, as ] amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). The... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of a New Equivalent Method AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of a new equivalent method...

  16. 77 FR 60985 - Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... 53, as amended on August 31, 2011 (76 FR 54326-54341). The new equivalent methods are automated... AGENCY Ambient Air Monitoring Reference and Equivalent Methods: Designation of Three New Equivalent Methods AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of the designation of three new...

  17. Cryogenic Infrastructure for Fermilab's Ilc Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  18. CRYOGENIC INFRASTRUCTURE FOR FERMILAB'S ILC VERTICAL CAVITY TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.

    2008-03-16

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R and D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  19. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  20. Development of Integrated Programs for Aerospace-vehicle design (IPAD): Reference design process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    The airplane design process and its interfaces with manufacturing and customer operations are documented to be used as criteria for the development of integrated programs for the analysis, design, and testing of aerospace vehicles. Topics cover: design process management, general purpose support requirements, design networks, and technical program elements. Design activity sequences are given for both supersonic and subsonic commercial transports, naval hydrofoils, and military aircraft.

  1. Design and operation of a Loran-C time reference station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1974-01-01

    Some of the practical questions that arise when one decides to use Loran-C in a time reference system are explored. An extensive effort is made to provide basic, practical information on establishing and operating a reference station. Four areas were covered: (1) the design, configuration and operational concepts which should be considered prior to establishing and operating a reference station using Loran-C, (2) the options and tradeoffs available regarding capabilities, cost, size, versatility, ease of operation, etc., that are available to the designer, (3) what measurements are made, how they are made and what they mean, and (4) the experience the U.S. Naval Observatory Time Service Division has had in the design and operation of such stations.

  2. Monitoring of physics performance of ILC Software based on Higgs Recoil Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, E.; Voutsinas, G.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a part of ILC software development, that allow us to make automated testing of ILC results. The testing code consists of automated everyday Higgs recoil mass analysis and compares Higgs recoil mass with one of the previous day result. This code uses the result of generation, Mokka simulation and Marlin reconstruction of ILC events.

  3. CXCR6 Expression Is Important for Retention and Circulation of ILC Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Chea, Sylvestre; Possot, Cécilie; Perchet, Thibaut; Petit, Maxime; Cumano, Ana; Golub, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells are present at mucosal sites and represent the first immune barrier against infections, but what contributes to their circulation and homing is still unclear. Using Rag2−/−Cxcr6Gfp/+ reporter mice, we assessed the expression and role of CXCR6 in the circulation of ILC precursors and their progeny. We identify CXCR6 expressing ILC precursors in the bone marrow and characterize their significant increase in CXCR6-deficient mice at steady state, indicating their partial retention in the bone marrow after CXCR6 ablation. Circulation was also impaired during embryonic life as fetal liver from CXCR6-deficient embryos displayed decreased numbers of ILC3 precursors. When injected, fetal CXCR6-deficient ILC3 precursors also fail to home and reconstitute ILC compartments in vivo. We show that adult intestinal ILC subsets have heterogeneous expression pattern of CXCR6, integrin α4β7, CD62L, CD69, and CD44, with ILC1 and ILC3 being more likely tissue resident lymphocytes. Intestinal ILC subsets were unchanged in percentages and numbers in both mice. We demonstrate that the ILC frequency is maintained due to a significant increase of ILC peripheral proliferation, as well as an increased proliferation of the in situ ILC precursors to compensate their retention in the bone marrow. PMID:26494947

  4. The LHC Inverse Problem, Supersymmetry and the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.F.; Gainer, J.S.; Hewett, J.L.; Lillie, B.; Rizzo, T.G.

    2007-11-12

    We address the question whether the ILC can resolve the LHC Inverse Problem within the framework of the MSSM. We examine 242 points in the MSSM parameter space which were generated at random and were found to give indistinguishable signatures at the LHC. After a realistic simulation including full Standard Model backgrounds and a fast detector simulation, we find that roughly only one third of these scenarios lead to visible signatures of some kind with a significance {ge} 5 at the ILC with {radical}s = 500 GeV. Furthermore, we examine these points in parameter space pairwise and find that only one third of the pairs are distinguishable at the ILC at 5{sigma}.

  5. Probing the Universal Randall-Sundrum Model at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, H.; Lillie, B.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    The Randall-Sundrum model with all Standard Model (SM) fields in the bulk, including the Higgs, can be probed by precision measurements at the ILC. In particular, the couplings of the Higgs to the gauge bosons of the SM can be determined with high accuracy at the ILC. Here we examine the deviations in these couplings from their SM values within the framework of the Universal Randall-Sundrum Model (URSM) as well as the corresponding couplings of the first Higgs Kaluza-Klein excitation.

  6. Beam Polarization at the ILC: Physics Case and Realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauth, Annika; List, Jenny

    2016-02-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed e+e‑ collider, focused on precision measurement of the Standard Model and new physics beyond. Polarized beams are a key element of the ILC physics program. The physics studies are accompanied by an extensive R&D program for the creation of the polarized beams and the measurement of their polarization. This contribution will review the advantages of using beam polarization and its technical aspects and realization, such as the creation of polarized beams and the measurement of the polarization.

  7. RF and data acquisition systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF cavity vertical test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Nehring, Roger; Grenoble, Christiana; Powers, Thomas J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of its ILC program. The RF system for this facility is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Comprehensive data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment.

  8. Application of positive-real functions in hyperstable discrete model-reference adaptive system design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karmarkar, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Proposal of an algorithmic procedure, based on mathematical programming methods, to design compensators for hyperstable discrete model-reference adaptive systems (MRAS). The objective of the compensator is to render the MRAS insensitive to initial parameter estimates within a maximized hypercube in the model parameter space.

  9. PERFORMANCE TEST RESULTS AND COMPARATIVE DATA FOR DESIGNATED REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS FOR OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under Part 53 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 53), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designates specific ambient monitoring methods and analyzers as reference or equivalent methods acceptable for use in National Air Monitoring Stations (NAMS), S...

  10. The Role of Virtual Reference in Library Web Site Design: A Qualitative Source for Usage Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Amanda Clay; Shedd, Julie; Hill, Clay

    2011-01-01

    Gathering qualitative information about usage behavior of library Web sites is a time-consuming process requiring the active participation of patron communities. Libraries that collect virtual reference transcripts, however, hold valuable data regarding how the library Web site is used that could benefit Web designers. An analysis of virtual…

  11. Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall

  12. Proposed CTV design reference missions in support of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saucillo, Rudy J.; Cirillo, William M.

    1991-01-01

    Use of design reference missions (DRM's) for the cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) in support of Space Station Freedom (SSF) can provide a common baseline for the design and assessment of CTV systems and mission operations. These DRM's may also provide baseline operations scenarios for integrated CTV, Shuttle, and SSF operations. Proposed DRM's for CTV, SSF, and Shuttle operations envisioned during the early post-PMC time frame and continuing through mature, SSF evolutionary operations are described. These proposed DRM's are outlines for detailed mission definition; by treating these DRM's as top-level input for mission design studies, a range of parametric studies for systems/operations may be performed. Shuttle flight design experience, particularly rendezvous flight design, provides an excellent basis for DRM operations studies. To begin analysis of the DRM's, shuttle trajectory design tools were used in single case analysis to define CTV performance requirements. A summary of these results is presented.

  13. Proposed CTV design reference missions in support of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucillo, Rudy J.; Cirillo, William M.

    Use of design reference missions (DRM's) for the cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) in support of Space Station Freedom (SSF) can provide a common baseline for the design and assessment of CTV systems and mission operations. These DRM's may also provide baseline operations scenarios for integrated CTV, Shuttle, and SSF operations. Proposed DRM's for CTV, SSF, and Shuttle operations envisioned during the early post-PMC time frame and continuing through mature, SSF evolutionary operations are described. These proposed DRM's are outlines for detailed mission definition; by treating these DRM's as top-level input for mission design studies, a range of parametric studies for systems/operations may be performed. Shuttle flight design experience, particularly rendezvous flight design, provides an excellent basis for DRM operations studies. To begin analysis of the DRM's, shuttle trajectory design tools were used in single case analysis to define CTV performance requirements. A summary of these results is presented.

  14. Innate lymphoid cell development requires TOX-dependent generation of a common ILC progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Seehus, Corey R.; Aliahmad, Parinaz; de la Torre, Brian; Iliev, Iliyan D.; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent A.; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Diverse innate lymphoid cell (ILC) subtypes have been defined, based on effector function and transcription factor expression. ILCs derive from common lymphoid progenitors, although the transcriptional pathways leading to ILC lineage specification remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that transcriptional regulator TOX is required for the in vivo differentiation of common lymphoid progenitors to ILC lineage-restricted cells. In vitro modeling demonstrates that TOX deficiency results in early defects in progenitor cell survival or expansion as well as later stage ILC differentiation. In addition, comparative transcriptome analysis of bone marrow progenitors reveals that TOX-deficient cells fail to upregulate many aspects of the ILC gene program, including Notch gene targets, implicating TOX as a key determinant of early ILC lineage specification. PMID:25915732

  15. HEAO attitude reference design. [for satellite attitude control and determination subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. P.; Mcelroy, T. T.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with the precision onboard attitude reference implemented as part of the attitude control and determination subsystem for the three High Energy Astronomy Observatories (HEAO-A, HEAO-B, and HEAO-C) in the HEAO scientific spacecraft program. The first observatory (HEAO-A, designated HEAO-1 when in orbit) was launched successfully into near-earth orbit on August 12, 1977. The HEAO attitude reference, analysis techniques for performance prediction, and flight results from the HEAO-1 observatory during its first months of operation. The HEAO-B design is specifically described and analyzed in terms of gyro processing, kinematic integration, ground update algorithm, and star tracker update algorithm. Attitude reference performance estimates are also discussed. It is shown that the orbital performance of the attitude reference correlates very well with the developmental predictions, thereby validating the analytical techniques used during the development. This validation provides a firm basis from which to extrapolate to other applications and related design concepts.

  16. An Engineering Design Reference Mission for a Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie A.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    From the 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the NASA Thirty-Year Roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions, to the recent AURA report, From Cosmic Birth to Living Earths, multiple community assessments have recommended development of a large-aperture UVOIR space observatory capable of achieving a broad range of compelling scientific goals. Of these priority science goals, the most technically challenging is the search for spectroscopic biomarkers in the atmospheres of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood. Here we present an engineering design reference mission (EDRM) for the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), which was conceived from the start as capable of breakthrough science paired with an emphasis on cost control and cost effectiveness. An EDRM allows the engineering design trade space to be explored in depth to determine what are the most demanding requirements and where there are opportunities for margin against requirements. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. The ATLAST observatory is designed to operate at a Sun-Earth L2 orbit, which provides a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Our reference designs have emphasized a serviceable 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five-meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. As part of our cost-management effort, this particular reference mission builds upon the engineering design for JWST. Moreover, it is scalable to a variety of launch vehicle fairings. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of additional reference designs, including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  17. Comparison of Beam-Based Alignment Algorithms for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Gibbons, L.; Patterson, J.R.; Rubin, D.L.; Sagan, D.; Tenenbaum, P.; /SLAC

    2006-03-15

    The main linac of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires more sophisticated alignment techniques than those provided by survey alone. Various Beam-Based Alignment (BBA) algorithms have been proposed to achieve the desired low emittance preservation. Dispersion Free Steering, Ballistic Alignment and the Kubo method are compared. Alignment algorithms are also tested in the presence of an Earth-like stray field.

  18. Post-LHC8 supersymmetry benchmark points for ILC physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; List, Jenny

    2013-09-01

    We reevaluate prospects for supersymmetry (SUSY) at the proposed International Linear e+e- Collider (ILC) in light of the first two years of serious data taking at LHC: LHC7 with ˜5fb-1 of pp collisions at s=7TeV and LHC8 with ˜20fb-1 at s=8TeV. Strong new limits from LHC8 SUSY searches, along with the discovery of a Higgs boson with mh≃125GeV, suggest a paradigm shift from previously popular models to ones with new and compelling signatures. After a review of the current status of supersymmetry, we present a variety of new ILC benchmark models, including natural SUSY, radiatively driven natural SUSY, NUHM2 with low mA, a focus point case from mSUGRA/CMSSM, nonuniversal gaugino mass model, τ˜ coannihilation, Kallosh-Linde/spread SUSY model, mixed gauge-gravity mediation, normal scalar mass hierarchy, and one example with the recently discovered Higgs boson being the heavy CP-even state H. While all these models at present elude the latest LHC8 limits, they do offer intriguing case study possibilities for ILC operating at s≃0.25-1TeV. The benchmark points also present a view of the widely diverse SUSY phenomena which might still be expected in the post-LHC8 era at both LHC and ILC.

  19. Radiation requirements and testing of cryogenic thermometers for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, T.; Filippov, Yu.P.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nakao, N.; Klebaner, A.L.; Korenev, S.A.; Theilacker, J.C. /; Trenikhina, J.; Vaziri, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Large quantity of cryogenic temperature sensors will be used for operation of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Most of them will be subject to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. Understanding of particle energy spectra, accumulated radiation dose in thermometers and its impact on performance are vital in establishing technical specification of cryogenic thermometry for the ILC. Realistic MARS15 computer simulations were performed to understand the ILC radiation environment. Simulation results were used to establish radiation dose requirements for commercially available cryogenic thermometers. Two types of thermometers, Cernox{reg_sign} and TVO, were calibrated prior to irradiation using different technique. The sensors were subjected then to up to 200 kGy electron beam irradiation with kinetic energy of 5 MeV, a representative of the situation at the ILC operation. A post-irradiation behavior of the sensors was studied. The paper describes the MARS15 model, simulation results, cryogenic test set-up, irradiation tests, and cryogenic test results.

  20. A reference model for model-based design of critical infrastructure protection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Young Don; Park, Cheol Young; Lee, Jae-Chon

    2015-05-01

    Today's war field environment is getting versatile as the activities of unconventional wars such as terrorist attacks and cyber-attacks have noticeably increased lately. The damage caused by such unconventional wars has also turned out to be serious particularly if targets are critical infrastructures that are constructed in support of banking and finance, transportation, power, information and communication, government, and so on. The critical infrastructures are usually interconnected to each other and thus are very vulnerable to attack. As such, to ensure the security of critical infrastructures is very important and thus the concept of critical infrastructure protection (CIP) has come. The program to realize the CIP at national level becomes the form of statute in each country. On the other hand, it is also needed to protect each individual critical infrastructure. The objective of this paper is to study on an effort to do so, which can be called the CIP system (CIPS). There could be a variety of ways to design CIPS's. Instead of considering the design of each individual CIPS, a reference model-based approach is taken in this paper. The reference model represents the design of all the CIPS's that have many design elements in common. In addition, the development of the reference model is also carried out using a variety of model diagrams. The modeling language used therein is the systems modeling language (SysML), which was developed and is managed by Object Management Group (OMG) and a de facto standard. Using SysML, the structure and operational concept of the reference model are designed to fulfil the goal of CIPS's, resulting in the block definition and activity diagrams. As a case study, the operational scenario of the nuclear power plant while being attacked by terrorists is studied using the reference model. The effectiveness of the results is also analyzed using multiple analysis models. It is thus expected that the approach taken here has some merits

  1. A Hierarchical Control Architecture for a PEBB-Based ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Macken, K.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Nguyen, M.N.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2011-12-15

    The idea of building power conversion systems around Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) was initiated by the U.S. Office of Naval Research in the mid 1990s. A PEBB-based design approach is advantageous in terms of power density, modularity, reliability, and serviceability. It is obvious that this approach has much appeal for pulsed power conversion including the International Linear Collider (ILC) klystron modulator application. A hierarchical control architecture has the inherent capability to support the integration of PEBBs. This has already been successfully demonstrated in a number of industrial applications in the recent past. This paper outlines the underlying concepts of a hierarchical control architecture for a PEBB-based Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator. The control in PEBB-based power conversion systems can be functionally partitioned into (three) hierarchical layers; system layer, application layer, and PEBB layer. This has been adopted here. Based on such a hierarchical partition, the interfaces are clearly identified and defined and, consequently, are easily characterised. A conceptual design of the hardware manager, executing low-level hardware oriented tasks, is detailed. In addition, the idea of prognostics is briefly discussed.

  2. Thermal design and test results for SUNLITE ultra-stable reference cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    1991-01-01

    SUNLITE (Stanford University-NASA Laser In-Space Technology Experiment) is a space-based experiment which uses a reference cavity to provide a stable frequency reference for a terahertz laser oscillator. Thermal stability of the cavity is a key factor in attaining a stable narrow-linewidth laser beam. The mount which is used to support and align the cavity will provide thermal isolation from the environment. The baseline requirement for thermal stability of the cavity is 0.025 C/min, but the design is directed toward achieving stability well beyond this requirement to improve the science data gained. A prototype of the cavity mount was fabricated and tested to characterize the thermal performance. The thermal vacuum test involved stable high-resolution temperature measurements and stable baseplate temperature control over long durations. Based on test data, the cavity mount design satisfies the severe requirement for the cavity thermal stability.

  3. Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2010-06-01

    The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents

  4. Multi-point Adjoint-Based Design of Tilt-Rotors in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Acree, Cecil W.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of tilt-rotor systems requires the consideration of performance at multiple design points. In the current study, an adjoint-based optimization of a tilt-rotor blade is considered. The optimization seeks to simultaneously maximize the rotorcraft figure of merit in hover and the propulsive efficiency in airplane-mode for a tilt-rotor system. The design is subject to minimum thrust constraints imposed at each design point. The rotor flowfields at each design point are cast as steady-state problems in a noninertial reference frame. Geometric design variables used in the study to control blade shape include: thickness, camber, twist, and taper represented by as many as 123 separate design variables. Performance weighting of each operational mode is considered in the formulation of the composite objective function, and a build up of increasing geometric degrees of freedom is used to isolate the impact of selected design variables. In all cases considered, the resulting designs successfully increase both the hover figure of merit and the airplane-mode propulsive efficiency for a rotor designed with classical techniques.

  5. Control system design for the large space systems technology reference platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunds, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Structural models and classical frequency domain control system designs were developed for the large space systems technology (LSST) reference platform which consists of a central bus structure, solar panels, and platform arms on which a variety of experiments may be mounted. It is shown that operation of multiple independently articulated payloads on a single platform presents major problems when subarc second pointing stability is required. Experiment compatibility will be an important operational consideration for systems of this type.

  6. Integrated Design and Production Reference Integration with ArchGenXML V1.00

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, R H

    2004-07-20

    ArchGenXML is a tool that allows easy creation of Zope products through the use of Archetypes. The Integrated Design and Production Reference (IDPR) should be highly configurable in order to meet the needs of a diverse engineering community. Ease of configuration is key to the success of IDPR. The purpose of this paper is to describe a method of using a UML diagram editor to configure IDPR through ArchGenXML and Archetypes.

  7. Detailed conceptual designs and economic analyses of a reference Photovoltaic Central Power Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. J.; Heller, B. W.; Stephenson, J. E.

    Detailed conceptual designs and economic analyses of a reference 100MWe Photovoltaic Central Power Station (PV CPS) have been completed. Both flat plate dendritic WEB and point focus fresnel concentrator (100X concentration) arrays were used to develop two individual central station reference designs. Design requirements, detailed drawings and system, subsystem and component specifications form the basis for a plant construction cost estimate. The flat plate array PV CPS costs range from $179M to $483M (1982 U.S. Dollars) for array costs ranging from $1/Wp to $3.50/Wp and power conditioning unit (PCU) costs from $.05/Wp to $.50/Wp. Similar costs for the concentrator PV CPS range from $201M to $505M, respectively. Using representative utility financial parameters, in-house economic models, and a plant performance estimate, levelized busbar energy costs (BBEC) are derived for both flat plate and concentrator designs. BBEC range from $.15/kWh to $.41/kWh for the flat plate PV CPS from $.15/kWh to $.37/kWh for the concentrator PV CPS.

  8. Recommendation for Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Instability in the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Demma, T.; Guiducci, S.; Suetsugu, Y.; Shibata, K.; Ohmi, K.; Dugan, G.; Palmer, M.; Crittenden, J. A.; Harkay, K.; Boon, L.; Furman, M. A.; Yin Vallgren, A. C.

    2011-09-04

    Electron cloud has been identified as one of the highest priority issues for the international Linear Collider (ILC) Damping Rings (DR). An electron cloud Working Group (WG) has evaluated the electron cloud effect and instability, and mitigation solutions for the electron cloud formation. Working group deliverables include recommendations for the baseline and alternate solutions to the electron cloud formation in various regions of the ILC Positron DR, which is presently assumed to be the 3.2 km design. Detailed studies of a range of mitigation options including coatings, clearing electrodes, grooves and novel concepts, were carried out over the previous several years by nearly 50 researchers, and the results of the studies form the basis for the recommendation. The recommendations are the result of the working group discussions held at numerous meetings and during a dedicated workshop. In addition, a number of items requiring further investigation were identified during the discussions at the Cornell meeting and studies will be carried out at CesrTA, a test accelerator dedicated to electron cloud studies, and other institutions.

  9. The MOS-type DEPFET pixel sensor for the ILC environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andricek, L.; Fischer, P.; Heinzinger, K.; Herrmann, S.; Herz, D.; Karagounis, M.; Kohrs, R.; Krüger, H.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Moser, H.-G.; Peric, I.; Reuen, L.; Richter, R. H.; Sandow, C.; Schnecke, M.; Schopper, F.; Strüder, L.; Törne, E. V.; Treis, J.; Trimpl, M.; Velthuis, J.; Wermes, N.; Wölfel, S.

    2006-09-01

    A new generation of MOS-type DEPFET active pixel sensors in double metal/double poly technology with ˜25 μm pixel size has been developed to meet the requirements of the vertex detector at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The paper presents the design and technology of the new linear MOS-type DEPFET sensors including a module concept and results of a feasibility study on how to build ultra-thin fully depleted sensors. One of the major challenges at the ILC is the dominant e +e - pair background from beam-beam interactions. The resulting high occupancy in the first layer of the vertex detector can be reduced by an extremely fast read out of the pixel arrays but the pair-produced electrons will also damage the sensor by ionization. Like all MOS devices, the DEPFET is inherently susceptible to ionizing radiation. The predominant effect of this kind of irradiation is the shift of the threshold voltage to more negative values due to the build up of positive oxide charges. The paper presents the first results of the irradiation of such devices with hard X-rays and gamma rays from a 60Co source up to 1 Mrad(Si) under various biasing conditions.

  10. Cryogenic performance of a conduction-cooling splittable quadrupole magnet for ILC cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Andreev, N.; Kashikhin, V. S.; Tartaglia, M. A.; Kerby, J.; Takahashi, M.; Tosaka, T.

    2014-01-29

    A conduction-cooled splittable superconducting quadrupole magnet was designed and fabricated at Fermilab for use in cryomodules of the International Linear Collider (ILC) type, in which the magnet was to be assembled around the beam tube to avoid contaminating the ultraclean superconducting radio frequency cavity volume. This quadrupole was first tested in a liquid helium bath environment at Fermilab, where its quench and magnetic properties were characterized. Because the device is to be cooled by conduction when installed in cryomodules, a separate test with a conduction-cooled configuration was planned at KEK and Fermilab. The magnet was converted to a conduction-cooled configuration by adding conduction-cooling passages made of high-purity aluminum. Efforts to convert and refabricate the magnet into a cryostat equipped with a double-stage pulse-tube-type cryocooler began in 2011, and a thermal performance test, including a magnet excitation test of up to 30 A, was conducted at KEK. In this test, the magnet with the conduction-cooled configuration was successfully cooled to 4 K within 190 h, with an acceptable heat load of less than 1 W at 4 K. It was also confirmed that the conduction-cooled splittable superconducting quadrupole magnet was practical for use in ILC-type cryomodules.

  11. Recommendation for Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Instability in the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.; Demma, T.; Guiducci, S.; Suetsugu, Y.; Shibata, K.; Ohmi, K.; Dugan, G.; Palmer, M.; Crittenden, J.A.; Harkay, K.; Boon, L.; Furman, M.A.; Vallgren, C.Yin; /CERN

    2011-12-13

    Electron cloud has been identified as one of the highest priority issues for the international Linear Collider (ILC) Damping Rings (DR). An electron cloud Working Group (WG) has evaluated the electron cloud effect and instability, and mitigation solutions for the electron cloud formation. Working group deliverables include recommendations for the baseline and alternate solutions to the electron cloud formation in various regions of the ILC Positron DR, which is presently assumed to be the 3.2 km design. Detailed studies of a range of mitigation options including coatings, clearing electrodes, grooves and novel concepts, were carried out over the previous several years by nearly 50 researchers, and the results of the studies form the basis for the recommendation. The recommendations are the result of the working group discussions held at numerous meetings and during a dedicated workshop. In addition, a number of items requiring further investigation were identified during the discussions at the Cornell meeting and studies will be carried out at CesrTA, a test accelerator dedicated to electron cloud studies, and other institutions.

  12. Reference-based benefit design changes consumers' choices and employers' payments for ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C; Brown, Timothy; Whaley, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Some employers are using reference-based benefit (RBB) designs, also known as "reference-based pricing," to encourage patients to select lower-price ambulatory surgery centers instead of expensive hospital outpatient departments. This article analyzes the impact of such benefit designs for cataract removal surgery from the period 2009-13, using data on 2,347 surgical patients covered by the California Public Employees Retirement System (CalPERS), in comparison to 14,867 patients enrolled in non-CalPERS Anthem Blue Cross plans, which are not covered by RBB. After adjusting for changes in patient case-mix and other factors, the shift to RBB was associated with an increase in ambulatory surgery center use by 8.6 percentage points compared to trends among Anthem enrollees. Total employer and employee payments per procedure, after adjusting for changes in case-mix severity and market factors, declined by 19.7 percent compared with Anthem enrollees not subject to RBB. Consumer cost-sharing requirements increased for CalPERS patients who continued to use hospital outpatient departments but who were not exempted from RBB because of geographic or clinical factors. Reference-based benefits for cataract surgery saved CalPERS $1.3 million in the two years after implementation. PMID:25732491

  13. Longitudinal Single-Bunch Instability in the ILC Damping Rings: Estimate of Current Threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco; Venturini, Marco

    2008-06-25

    Characterization of single-bunch instabilities in the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping rings (DRs) has been indicated as a high-priority activity toward completion of an engineering design. In this paper we report on a first estimate ofthe current thresholds for the instability using numerical and analytical models of the wake potentials associated with the various machine components. The numerical models were derived (upon appropriate scaling) from designs of the correspondingcomponents installed in existing machines. The current thresholds for instabilities were determined by numerical solution of the Vlasov equation for the longitudinal dynamics. For the DR baseline lattice as of Feb. 2007 we find the critical current forinstability to be safely above the design specifications leaving room for further optimization of the choice of the momentum compaction.

  14. Planetary benchmarks. [structural design criteria for radar reference devices on planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uphoff, C.; Staehle, R.; Kobrick, M.; Jurgens, R.; Price, H.; Slade, M.; Sonnabend, D.

    1978-01-01

    Design criteria and technology requirements for a system of radar reference devices to be fixed to the surfaces of the inner planets are discussed. Offshoot applications include the use of radar corner reflectors as landing beacons on the planetary surfaces and some deep space applications that may yield a greatly enhanced knowledge of the gravitational and electromagnetic structure of the solar system. Passive retroreflectors with dimensions of about 4 meters and weighing about 10 kg are feasible for use with orbiting radar at Venus and Mars. Earth-based observation of passive reflectors, however, would require very large and complex structures to be delivered to the surfaces. For Earth-based measurements, surface transponders offer a distinct advantage in accuracy over passive reflectors. A conceptual design for a high temperature transponder is presented. The design appears feasible for the Venus surface using existing electronics and power components.

  15. Electroweak radiative corrections to triple photon production at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Wei-Hua; Duan, Peng-Fei; Song, Mao; Li, Gang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the precision predictions for three photon production in the standard model (SM) at the ILC including the full next-to-leading (NLO) electroweak (EW) corrections, high order initial state radiation (h.o.ISR) contributions and beamstrahlung effects. We present the LO and the NLO EW + h.o.ISR + beamstrahlung corrected total cross sections for various colliding energy when √{ s} ≥ 200 GeV and the kinematic distributions of final photons with √{ s} = 500 GeV at ILC, and find that the NLO EW corrections, the h.o.ISR contributions and the beamstrahlung effects are important in exploring the process e+e- → γγγ.

  16. A standard reference for chamber testing of material VOC emissions: Design principle and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yinping; Xiong, Jianyin; Li, Mu

    2012-02-01

    Environmental chambers are widely used to test formaldehyde and other volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from indoor materials and furniture. However, there is a lack of a proven method to assess the precision of the test results of the chamber system. In this paper, we describe a new standard reference, LIFE (liquid-inner tube diffusion-film-emission), to address this problem. This reference has the following salient features: (1) Constant emission rate, with less than 3.0% change with an ambient airflow speed (>0.014 m/s) at furniture emission range (0.1-1.0 mg/m 3 in a 30 m 3 chamber with air change rate of 1/h) under standard chamber test conditions as specified by ISO 16000-9 (23 °C, 50% RH); (2) Long duration of emissions, on the order of 1000 h; (3) Easy to store, apply and maintain. The design principle and criteria of the LIFE reference are presented. An analytical model and dimensionless analysis were applied to optimize the factors influencing the emission rate, and experiments were conducted to validate the analytical results. In addition, the equivalent emission parameters of the reference, i.e., the initial emittable concentration, the diffusion coefficient and the partition coefficient, were determined through a three-parameter optimizing regression. This can then be used to check the reliability of a chamber method for testing these three parameters. The developed standard reference should prove useful for calibrating chamber systems for indoor material/furniture VOC emissions tests.

  17. Requirements and design reference mission for the WFIRST/AFTA coronagraph instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Richard T.; Dekens, Frank; Calvet, Rob; Chang, Zensheu; Effinger, Robert; Ek, Eric; Hovland, Larry; Jones, Laura; Loc, Anthony; Nemati, Bijan; Noecker, Charley; Neville, Timothy; Pham, Hung; Rud, Mike; Tang, Hong; Villalvazo, Juan

    2015-09-01

    The WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph instrument takes advantage of AFTAs 2.4-meter aperture to provide novel exoplanet imaging science at approximately the same instrument cost as an Explorer mission. The AFTA coronagraph also matures direct imaging technologies to high TRL for an Exo-Earth Imager in the next decade. The coronagraph Design Reference Mission (DRM) optical design is based on the highly successful High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT), with modifications to accommodate the AFTA telescope design, service-ability, volume constraints, and the addition of an Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS). In order to optimally satisfy the three science objectives of planet imaging, planet spectral characterization and dust debris imaging, the coronagraph is designed to operate in two different modes: Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph or Shaped Pupil Coronagraph. Active mechanisms change pupil masks, focal plane masks, Lyot masks, and bandpass filters to shift between modes. A single optical beam train can thus operate alternatively as two different coronagraph architectures. Structural Thermal Optical Performance (STOP) analysis predicts the instrument contrast with the Low Order Wave Front Control loop closed. The STOP analysis was also used to verify that the optical/structural/thermal design provides the extreme stability required for planet characterization in the presence of thermal disturbances expected in a typical observing scenario. This paper describes the instrument design and the flow down from science requirements to high level engineering requirements.

  18. A Study of Thermocurrent Induced Magnetic Fields in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Anthony C.; Cooley, Victoria

    2014-03-31

    The case of axisymmetric ILC type cavities with titanium helium vessels is investigated. A first order estimate for magnetic field within the SRF current layer is presented. The induced magnetic field is found to be not more than 1.4x10-8 Tesla = 0.14 milligauss for the case of axial symmetry. Magnetic fields due to symmetry breaking effects are discussed.

  19. Wakefield Effects in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Seryi, A.; /SLAC

    2007-06-27

    The main linac of the International Linear Collider (ILC) accelerates short, high peak current bunches into the Beam Delivery System (BDS) on the way to the interaction point. In the BDS wakefields, excited by the resistance of the beam pipe walls and by beam pipe transitions, will tend to degrade the emittance of the beam bunches. In this report we calculate the effect on single bunch emittance of incoming jitter or drift, and of misalignments of the beam pipes with respect to the beam axis, both analytically and through multi-particle tracking. As we want to keep emittance growth due to this effect small, we consider also mitigation measures of changing the metallic surface material and/or the beam pipe aperture. The wake effects are studied in that part of the BDS which includes the collimation and final focus systems. Typical ILC beam parameters are given in Table 1. Initially a stainless steel (SS) beam pipe is considered. Note that the ILC collimator wakes, though very important, are not included in this study; their effects have been studied elsewhere [1]. Note also that similar methods are presented in recent reports Refs. [2],[3].

  20. Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0, Addendum #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G. (Editor); Watts Kevin D. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    This report serves as the second Addendum to NASA-SP-2009-566, "Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0." The data and descriptions contained within this Addendum capture some of the key assessments and studies produced since publication of the original document, predominately covering those conducted from 2009 through 2012. The assessments and studies described herein are for the most part independent stand-alone contributions. Effort has not been made to assimilate the findings to provide an updated integrated strategy. That is a recognized future effort. This report should not be viewed as constituting a formal plan for the human exploration of Mars.

  1. Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (CPS) Configuration in Support of NASA's Multiple Design Reference Missions (DRMs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Stephen G.; Jones, David L.; Creech, Stephen D.; Lawrence, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), the Space Launch System (SLS) is being designed for safe, affordable, and sustainable human and scientific exploration missions beyond Earth's or-bit (BEO). The SLS Team is tasked with developing a system capable of safely and repeatedly lofting a new fleet of spaceflight vehicles beyond Earth orbit. The Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (CPS) is a key enabler for evolving the SLS capability for BEO missions. This paper reports on the methodology and initial recommendations relative to the CPS, giving a brief retrospective of early studies on this promising propulsion hardware. This paper provides an overview of the requirements development and CPS configuration in support of NASA's multiple Design Reference Missions (DRMs).

  2. Design verification of large time constant thermal shields for optical reference cavities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wu, W; Shi, X H; Zeng, X Y; Deng, K; Lu, Z H

    2016-02-01

    In order to achieve high frequency stability in ultra-stable lasers, the Fabry-Pérot reference cavities shall be put inside vacuum chambers with large thermal time constants to reduce the sensitivity to external temperature fluctuations. Currently, the determination of thermal time constants of vacuum chambers is based either on theoretical calculation or time-consuming experiments. The first method can only apply to simple system, while the second method will take a lot of time to try out different designs. To overcome these limitations, we present thermal time constant simulation using finite element analysis (FEA) based on complete vacuum chamber models and verify the results with measured time constants. We measure the thermal time constants using ultrastable laser systems and a frequency comb. The thermal expansion coefficients of optical reference cavities are precisely measured to reduce the measurement error of time constants. The simulation results and the experimental results agree very well. With this knowledge, we simulate several simplified design models using FEA to obtain larger vacuum thermal time constants at room temperature, taking into account vacuum pressure, shielding layers, and support structure. We adopt the Taguchi method for shielding layer optimization and demonstrate that layer material and layer number dominate the contributions to the thermal time constant, compared with layer thickness and layer spacing. PMID:26931831

  3. A reference frame formulation for the analysis and design of steady manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagangadhar, Dinesh

    A reference frame formulation for large deformation steady state processes is proposed. The displacement and material state variables appear as the primary response fields in this mixed formulation. Unlike displacement based Lagrangian formulations, our formulation does not require a transient analysis to simulate a quasi-steady process and yields results that are free of numerical oscillations and which require considerably less computational effort. And unlike velocity based Eulerian methods, our formulation does not require free surface corrections or streamline integration algorithms. An iterative design environment for quasi-steady forming processes is developed from the computationally efficient reference frame formulation. The direct differentiation method is used to efficiently evaluate the response sensitivities. Select forming response measures and their sensitivities are combined with nonlinear programming methods to optimize the process. Three example problems are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed formulations: a laser surface treatment process is analyzed, a drawing process is analyzed and optimized and a multi-pass rolling process is analyzed and designed.

  4. Interchangeability among reference insulin analogues and their biosimilars: regulatory framework, study design and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Dowlat, H A; Kuhlmann, M K; Khatami, H; Ampudia-Blasco, F J

    2016-08-01

    Biosimilars are regulated differently from small-molecule generic, chemically derived medicines. The complexity of biological products means that small changes in manufacturing or formulation may result in changes in efficacy and safety of the final product. In the face of this complexity, the regulatory landscape for biosimilars continues to evolve, and global harmonization regarding requirements is currently lacking. It is essential that clinicians and patients are reassured that biosimilars are equally safe and effective as their reference product, and this is particularly important when interchangeability, defined as 'changing one medicine for another one which is expected to achieve the same clinical effect in a given clinical setting in any one patient', is considered. Although the automatic substitution (i.e. substitution without input from the prescribing healthcare provider) of biosimilars for reference products is currently not permitted by the majority of countries, this may change in the future. In order to demonstrate interchangeability between reference products and a biosimilar, more stringent and specific studies of the safety and efficacy of biosimilars are likely to be needed; however, guidance on the design of and the need for any such studies is currently limited. The present article provides an overview of the current regulatory framework around the demonstration of interchangeability with biosimilars, with a specific focus on biosimilar insulin analogues, and details experiences with other biosimilar products. In addition, designs for studies to evaluate interchangeability with a biosimilar insulin analogue product are proposed and a discussion about the implications of interchangeability in clinical practice is included. PMID:27097592

  5. Technical Reference Suite Addressing Challenges of Providing Assurance for Fault Management Architectural Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitz, Rhonda; Whitman, Gerek

    2016-01-01

    Research into complexities of software systems Fault Management (FM) and how architectural design decisions affect safety, preservation of assets, and maintenance of desired system functionality has coalesced into a technical reference (TR) suite that advances the provision of safety and mission assurance. The NASA Independent Verification and Validation (IVV) Program, with Software Assurance Research Program support, extracted FM architectures across the IVV portfolio to evaluate robustness, assess visibility for validation and test, and define software assurance methods applied to the architectures and designs. This investigation spanned IVV projects with seven different primary developers, a wide range of sizes and complexities, and encompassed Deep Space Robotic, Human Spaceflight, and Earth Orbiter mission FM architectures. The initiative continues with an expansion of the TR suite to include Launch Vehicles, adding the benefit of investigating differences intrinsic to model-based FM architectures and insight into complexities of FM within an Agile software development environment, in order to improve awareness of how nontraditional processes affect FM architectural design and system health management.

  6. Characterization of bandgap reference circuits designed for high energy physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversi, G.; De Canio, F.; Gaioni, L.; Manghisoni, M.; Mattiazzo, S.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Riceputi, E.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to design a high performance bandgap voltage reference circuit in a standard commercial 65 nm CMOS technology capable of operating in harsh radiation environments. A prototype circuit based on three different devices (diode, bipolar transistor and MOSFET) was fabricated and tested. Measurement results show a temperature variation as low as ±3.4 mV over a temperature range of 170 ° C (-30 °C to 140 °C) and a line regulation at room temperature of 5.2%/V. Measured VREF is 690 mV±15 mV (3σ) for 26 samples on the same wafer. Circuits correctly operate with supply voltages in the range from 1.32 V down to 0.78 V. A reference voltage shift of only 7.6 mV (around 1.1%) was measured after irradiation with 10 keV X-rays up to an integrated dose of 225 Mrad (SiO2).

  7. Development of a 10 MW Sheet Beam Klystron for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Jongewaard, E.; Haase, A.; Jensen, A.; Martin, D.; Burke, A.; /SAIC, Sunnyvale

    2009-05-07

    SLAC is developing a 10 MW, 5 Hz, 1.6 ms, L-band (1.3 GHz) Sheet-Beam Klystron as a less expensive and more compact alternative to the ILC baseline Multiple-Beam Klystron. The Klystron is intended as a plug-compatible device of the same beam current and operating voltage as existing Multiple-Beam Klystrons. At this time, a beam tester has been constructed and currently is in test. The beam tester includes an intercepting cup for making beam quality measurements of the 130 A, 40-to-1 aspect ratio beam. Measurements will be made of the electrostatic beam and of the beam after transporting through a drift tube and magnetic focusing system. General theory of operation, design trade-offs, and manufacturing considerations of both the beam tester and klystron will be discussed.

  8. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM and SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Bellantoni, L.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-06-23

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  9. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM And SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Bellantoni, L.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  10. Multi-Bunch Simulations of the ILC for Luminosity Performance Studies

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.; Walker, N.; Schulte, D.; /CERN

    2005-07-11

    To study the luminosity performance of the International Linear Collider (ILC) with different design parameters, a simulation was constructed that tracks a multi-bunch representation of the beam from the Damping Ring extraction through to the Interaction Point. The simulation code PLACET is used to simulate the LINAC, MatMerlin is used to track through the Beam Delivery System and GUINEA-PIG for the beam-beam interaction. Included in the simulation are ground motion and wakefield effects, intra-train fast feedback and luminosity-based feedback systems. To efficiently study multiple parameters/multiple seeds, the simulation is deployed on the Queen Mary High-Throughput computing cluster at Queen Mary, University of London, where 100 simultaneous simulation seeds can be run.

  11. The WFIRST Interim Design Reference Mission: Capabilities, Constraints, and Open Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    The Project Office and Science Definition Team for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) are in the midst of a pre-Phase A study to establish a Design Reference Mission (DRM). An Interim report was released in June 2011, with a final report due later in 2012. The predicted performance of the Interim DRM Observatory will be described, including optical quality, observing efficiency, and sensitivity for representative observing scenarios. Observing constraints and other limitations on performance will also be presented, with an emphasis on potential Guest Observer programs. Finally, a brief status update will be provided on open trade studies of interest to the scientific community. The final DRM may differ from the Interim DRM presented here. However, the underlying requirements of the scientific programs are not expected to change, hence the capabilities of the IDRM are likely to be maintained even if the implementation changes in significant ways.

  12. Performance of three 4. 5 m dipoles for SSC reference design D

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, P.; Cottingham, J.; Fernow, R.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.; Goodzeit, C.; Greene, A.; Herrera, J.; Kahn, S.; Kelly, E.

    1985-01-01

    Three 4.5 m long dipoles for Reference Design D of the proposed Superconducting Super Collider have been successfully tested. The magnets are cold-iron (and cold bore) 1-in-1 dipoles, wound with current density-graded high homogeneity NbTi cable in a two-layer cos theta coil of 40 mm inner diameter. The coil is prestressed by 15 mm wide stainless steel collars, and mounted in a circular, split iron yoke of 267 mm outer diameter, supported in a cylindrical yoke containment vessel. At 4.5 K the magnets reached a field of about 6.6T with little training, or the short sample limit of the conductor, and in subcooled (2.6 to 2.4 K) liquid, 8T was achieved. The allowed harmonics were close to the predicted values, and the unallowed harmonics small. The sextupole trim coil operated at eight times the required current without training.

  13. Human Health and Performance Aspects of the Mars Design Reference Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper will describe the current planning for exploration-class missions, emphasizing the medical, and human factors aspects of such expeditions. The details of mission architecture are still under study, but a typical Mars design reference mission comprises a six-month transit from Earth to Mar, eighteen months in residence on Mars, and a six-month transit back to Earth. Physiological stressors will include environmental factors such as prolonged exposure to radiation, weightlessness in transit, and hypogravity and a toxic atmosphere while on Mars. Psychological stressors will include remoteness from Earth, confinement, and potential interpersonal conflicts, all complicated by circadian alterations. Medical risks including trauma must also be considered. Results of planning for assuring human health and performance will be presented.

  14. Rocky Flats Plant fluidized-bed incinerator. Engineering design and reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Meile, L.J.

    1982-11-05

    The information in this manual is being presented to complete the documentation of the fluidized-bed incineration (FBI) process development at the Rocky Flats Plant. The information pertains to the 82-kg/hour demonstration unit at the Rocky Flats Plant. This document continues the presentation of design reference material in the aeas of equipment drawings, space requirements, and unit costs. In addition, appendices contain an operating procedure and an operational safety analysis of the process. The cost figures presented are based on 1978 dollars and have not been converted to a current dollar value. Also, the cost of modifications are not included, since they would be insignificant if they were incorporated into a new installation.

  15. Use of the 4D-Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) for space shuttle descent design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    The method of using the Global Reference Atmosphere Model (GRAM) mean and dispersed atmospheres to study skipout/overshoot requirements, to characterize mean and worst case vehicle temperatures, study control requirements, and verify design was discussed. Landing sites in these analyses range from 65 N to 30 S, while orbit inclinations vary from 20 deg to 98 deg. The primary concern was that they cannot use as small vertical steps in the reentry calculation as desired because the model predicts anomalously large density shear rates for very small vertical step sizes. The winds predicted by the model are not satisfactory. This is probably because they are geostrophic winds and because the model has an error in the computation of winds in the equatorial regions.

  16. ILC You Later: Early and Irreparable Loss of Innate Lymphocytes in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Joseph C; Brenchley, Jason M

    2016-02-16

    Loss of IL-17-producing cells in the gut during HIV infection is linked to GI barrier damage. Kløverpris et al. (2016) find that circulating ILCs are lost early and irreversibly during HIV infection. Early ART administration protects against the ILC loss, and this might be clinically beneficial to HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26885853

  17. ILC3 GM-CSF production and mobilisation orchestrate acute intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Claire; Thornton, Emily E; McKenzie, Brent; Schaupp, Anna-Lena; Huskens, Nicky; Griseri, Thibault; West, Nathaniel; Tung, Sim; Seddon, Benedict P; Uhlig, Holm H; Powrie, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) contribute to host defence and tissue repair but can induce immunopathology. Recent work has revealed tissue-specific roles for ILCs; however, the question of how a small population has large effects on immune homeostasis remains unclear. We identify two mechanisms that ILC3s utilise to exert their effects within intestinal tissue. ILC-driven colitis depends on production of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which recruits and maintains intestinal inflammatory monocytes. ILCs present in the intestine also enter and exit cryptopatches in a highly dynamic process. During colitis, ILC3s mobilize from cryptopatches, a process that can be inhibited by blocking GM-CSF, and mobilization precedes inflammatory foci elsewhere in the tissue. Together these data identify the IL-23R/GM-CSF axis within ILC3 as a key control point in the accumulation of innate effector cells in the intestine and in the spatio-temporal dynamics of ILCs in the intestinal inflammatory response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10066.001 PMID:26780670

  18. Technical Reference Suite Addressing Challenges of Providing Assurance for Fault Management Architectural Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitz, Rhonda; Whitman, Gerek

    2016-01-01

    Research into complexities of software systems Fault Management (FM) and how architectural design decisions affect safety, preservation of assets, and maintenance of desired system functionality has coalesced into a technical reference (TR) suite that advances the provision of safety and mission assurance. The NASA Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) Program, with Software Assurance Research Program support, extracted FM architectures across the IV&V portfolio to evaluate robustness, assess visibility for validation and test, and define software assurance methods applied to the architectures and designs. This investigation spanned IV&V projects with seven different primary developers, a wide range of sizes and complexities, and encompassed Deep Space Robotic, Human Spaceflight, and Earth Orbiter mission FM architectures. The initiative continues with an expansion of the TR suite to include Launch Vehicles, adding the benefit of investigating differences intrinsic to model-based FM architectures and insight into complexities of FM within an Agile software development environment, in order to improve awareness of how nontraditional processes affect FM architectural design and system health management. The identification of particular FM architectures, visibility, and associated IV&V techniques provides a TR suite that enables greater assurance that critical software systems will adequately protect against faults and respond to adverse conditions. Additionally, the role FM has with regard to strengthened security requirements, with potential to advance overall asset protection of flight software systems, is being addressed with the development of an adverse conditions database encompassing flight software vulnerabilities. Capitalizing on the established framework, this TR suite provides assurance capability for a variety of FM architectures and varied development approaches. Research results are being disseminated across NASA, other agencies, and the

  19. Benchmarking / Crosschecking DFS in the ILC Main Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey C.; Eliasson, Peder; Latina, Andrea; Schulte, Daniel; Poirier, Freddy; Walker, Nicholas; Lebrun, Paul; Ranjan, Kirti; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Tenenbaum, Peter; /SLAC

    2007-01-08

    In an effort to compare beam dynamics and create a ''benchmark'' for Dispersion Free Steering (DFS) a comparison was made between different ILC simulation programs while performing DFS. This study consisted of three parts. First, a simple betatron oscillation was tracked through each code. Secondly, a set of component misalignments and corrector settings generated from one program was read into the others to confirm similar emittance dilution. Thirdly, given the same set of component misalignments DFS was performed independently in each program and the resulting emittance dilution was compared. Performance was found to agree exceptionally well in all three studies.

  20. Mechanical design of the University of Florida Torsion Pendulum for testing the LISA Gravitational Reference Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Ryan; Chilton, Andrew; Olatunde, Tawio; Ciani, Giacomo; Mueller, Guido; Conklin, John

    2014-03-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) requires free falling test masses, whose acceleration must be below 3 fm/s2/rtHz in the lower part of LISA's frequency band ranging from 0.1 to 100 mHz. Gravitational reference sensors (GRS) house the test masses, shield them from external disturbances, control their orientation, and sense their position at the nm/rtHz level. The GRS torsion pendulum is a laboratory test bed for GRS technology. By decoupling the system of test masses from the gravity of the Earth, it is possible to identify and quantify many sources of noise in the sensor. The mechanical design of the pendulum is critical to the study of the noise sources and the development of new technologies that can improve performance and reduce cost. The suspended test mass is a hollow, gold-coated, aluminum cube which rests inside a gold-coated, aluminum housing with electrodes for sensing and actuating all six degrees of freedom. This poster describes the design, analysis, and assembly of the mechanical subsystems of the UF Torsion Pendulum.

  1. Design Of A SCRAMJET Nozzle With Streamline Tracing Technique And Reference Temerature Methode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehmer, J.; Gulhan, A.

    2011-05-01

    This study presents a method to find an optimal shape of a three-dimensional supersonic nozzle for a rectangular scramjet combustion chamber with rounded edges by taking into account the skin friction effects. The geometric and flow constraints are defined within the German DFG GRK 1095/2 project and the designed nozzle will be part of a scramjet demonstrator configuration [1]. The nozzle inlet conditions are mean values of the combustion chamber exit conditions with the assumption of a constant specific heat ratio. To generate the shape of the nozzle a streamline tracing technique is applied to an axis-symmetric flow field calculated by the Method of Characteristics (MOC). Skin friction in relatively high pressure supersonic flow from the combustion chamber is very dominant and cannot be neglected in the design process. Therefore the skin friction is calculated using the Reference Temperature Method (RTM) and used for the determination of the thrust and moment vectors. This allows considering viscous effects without boundary layer calculations. With this approach an optimal truncated ideal nozzle contour which yields the geometric constraints can be derived. For the validation of this method comparative calculations have been carried out with the DLR code TAU on an exemplary axis-symmetric supersonic nozzle for different flow conditions. Results showed a good agreement. Finally for the three-dimensional nozzle the analytical solution for the inviscous and viscous case provided comparable data like TAU simulations. Further simplifications of the approach for an efficient three-dimensional nozzle design will be addressed in the paper.

  2. First results with prototype ISIS devices for ILC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damerell, C.; Zhang, Z.; Gao, R.; John John, Jaya; Li, Y.; Nomerotski, A.; Holland, A.; Seabroke, G.; Havranek, M.; Stefanov, K.; Kar-Roy, A.; Bell, R.; Burt, D.; Pool, P.

    2010-12-01

    The vertex detectors at the International Linear Collider (ILC) (there will be two of them, one for each of two general purpose detectors) will certainly be built with silicon pixel detectors, either monolithic or perhaps vertically integrated. However, beyond this general statement, there is a wide range of options supported by active R&D programmes all over the world. Pixel-based vertex detectors build on the experience at the SLAC large detector (SLD) operating at the SLAC linear collider (SLC), where a 307 Mpixel detector permitted the highest physics performance at LEP or SLC. For ILC, machine conditions demand much faster readout than at SLC, something like 20 time slices during the 1 ms bunch train. The approach of the image sensor with in-situ storage (ISIS) is unique in offering this capability while avoiding the undesirable requirement of 'pulsed power'. First results from a prototype device that approaches the pixel size of 20 μm square, needed for physics, are reported. The dimensional challenge is met by using a 0.18 μm imaging CMOS process, instead of a conventional CCD process.

  3. REFERENCE MANUAL FOR RASSMIT VERSION 2.1: SUB-SLAB DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEM DESIGN PERFORMANCE SIMULATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a reference manual for RASSMlT Version 2.1, a computer program that was developed to simulate and aid in the design of sub-slab depressurization systems used for indoor radon mitigation. The program was designed to run on DOS-compatible personal computers to ensure ...

  4. The X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS): A Reference Cryogenic Instrument Design for Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehouse, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    Constellation-X, a mission now belonging to the Beyond Einstein initiative, is being planned to inherit the x-ray sky from Chandra, XMM-Newton and Astro-E. The first two of four observatories in the constellation will be launched together in 2013 and followed a year later by the launch of the remaining two. The four will independently orbit the Sun-Earth Lagrange point L2. An instrument compliment resides in the Focal Plane Module (FPM) of each observatory 10 m from the Optics Module and consists of three Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) detectors, a Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) focal plane CCD camera and an X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS). Instrument awards are scheduled for early 2006. The reference detector for XMS is a 32 x 32 array of microcalorimetric superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TES). Each pixel casts a variable resistance in a SQUID based multiplexed readout circuit which is coupled to series SQUID arrays for amplification and finally read out by external electronics. A multi-stage continuous ADR will provide the stable 50 mK desired for the TES array and a stable 1 K for the series SQUID arrays while also lifting thermal parasitic and inefficiency loads to a 6 K cryocooler interface. The 6 K cryocooler is expected to emerge from the joint-project Advanced Cryocooler Technology Development Program (ACTDP) in which Constellation-X is an active participant. Project Pre-Formulation activities are marked by extensive technology development necessitating early, but realistic, thermal and cooling load requirements for ADR and ACTDP-cryocooler design points. Such requirements are driven by the encompassing XMS cryostat and ultimately by the thermal environment imposed by the FPM. It is further desired that the XMS instrument be able to operate on its side in the laboratory, with a warm vacuum shell, during an extensive calibration regime. It is that reference system design of the XMS instrument (microcalorimeter, ADR, cryocooler and

  5. Vehicle occupancy detection camera position optimization using design of experiments and standard image references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Peter; Hoover, Martin; Rabbani, Mojgan

    2013-03-01

    Camera positioning and orientation is important to applications in domains such as transportation since the objects to be imaged vary greatly in shape and size. In a typical transportation application that requires capturing still images, inductive loops buried in the ground or laser trigger sensors are used when a vehicle reaches the image capture zone to trigger the image capture system. The camera in such a system is in a fixed position pointed at the roadway and at a fixed orientation. Thus the problem is to determine the optimal location and orientation of the camera when capturing images from a wide variety of vehicles. Methods from Design for Six Sigma, including identifying important parameters and noise sources and performing systematically designed experiments (DOE) can be used to determine an effective set of parameter settings for the camera position and orientation under these conditions. In the transportation application of high occupancy vehicle lane enforcement, the number of passengers in the vehicle is to be counted. Past work has described front seat vehicle occupant counting using a camera mounted on an overhead gantry looking through the front windshield in order to capture images of vehicle occupants. However, viewing rear seat passengers is more problematic due to obstructions including the vehicle body frame structures and seats. One approach is to view the rear seats through the side window. In this situation the problem of optimally positioning and orienting the camera to adequately capture the rear seats through the side window can be addressed through a designed experiment. In any automated traffic enforcement system it is necessary for humans to be able to review any automatically captured digital imagery in order to verify detected infractions. Thus for defining an output to be optimized for the designed experiment, a human defined standard image reference (SIR) was used to quantify the quality of the line-of-sight to the rear seats of

  6. Diffusive Barrier and Getter Under Waste Packages VA Reference Design Feature Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    MacNeil, K.

    1999-05-24

    This technical document evaluates those aspects of the diffusive barrier and getter features which have the potential for enhancing the performance of the Viability Assessment Reference Design and are also directly related to the key attributes for the repository safety strategy of that design. The effects of advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, and diffusion on the radionuclide migration rates through the diffusive barrier were determined through the application of the one-dimensional, advection/dispersion/diffusion equation. The results showed that because advective flow described by the advection-dispersion equation dominates, the diffusive barrier feature alone would not be effective in retarding migration of radiocuclides. However, if the diffusive barrier were combined with one or more features that reduced the potential for advection, then transport of radionuclides would be dominated by diffusion and their migration from the EBS would be impeded. Apatite was chosen as the getter material used for this report. Two getter configurations were developed, Case 1 and Case 2. As in the evaluation of the diffusive barrier, the effects of advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, and diffusion on the migration of radionuclides through the getter are evaluated. However, in addition to these mechanisms, the one-dimensional advection/dispersion/diffusion model is modified to include the effect of sorption on radionuclide migration rates through the sorptive medium (getter). As a result of sorption, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, and the average linear velocity are effectively reduced by the retardation factor. The retardation factor is a function of the getter material's dry bulk density, sorption coefficient and moisture content. The results of the evaluation showed that a significant delay in breakthrough through the getter can be achieved if the thickness of the getter barrier is increased.

  7. Design of a Model Reference Adaptive Controller for an Unmanned Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Matsutani, Megumi; Annaswamy, Anuradha M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the "Adaptive Control Technology for Safe Flight (ACTS)" architecture, which consists of a non-adaptive controller that provides satisfactory performance under nominal flying conditions, and an adaptive controller that provides robustness under off nominal ones. The design and implementation procedures of both controllers are presented. The aim of these procedures, which encompass both theoretical and practical considerations, is to develop a controller suitable for flight. The ACTS architecture is applied to the Generic Transport Model developed by NASA-Langley Research Center. The GTM is a dynamically scaled test model of a transport aircraft for which a flight-test article and a high-fidelity simulation are available. The nominal controller at the core of the ACTS architecture has a multivariable LQR-PI structure while the adaptive one has a direct, model reference structure. The main control surfaces as well as the throttles are used as control inputs. The inclusion of the latter alleviates the pilot s workload by eliminating the need for cancelling the pitch coupling generated by changes in thrust. Furthermore, the independent usage of the throttles by the adaptive controller enables their use for attitude control. Advantages and potential drawbacks of adaptation are demonstrated by performing high fidelity simulations of a flight-validated controller and of its adaptive augmentation.

  8. A Design Method of Code Correlation Reference Waveform in GNSS Based on Least-Squares Fitting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengtao; Liu, Zhe; Tang, Xiaomei; Wang, Feixue

    2016-01-01

    The multipath effect is one of the main error sources in the Global Satellite Navigation Systems (GNSSs). The code correlation reference waveform (CCRW) technique is an effective multipath mitigation algorithm for the binary phase shift keying (BPSK) signal. However, it encounters the false lock problem in code tracking, when applied to the binary offset carrier (BOC) signals. A least-squares approximation method of the CCRW design scheme is proposed, utilizing the truncated singular value decomposition method. This algorithm was performed for the BPSK signal, BOC(1,1) signal, BOC(2,1) signal, BOC(6,1) and BOC(7,1) signal. The approximation results of CCRWs were presented. Furthermore, the performances of the approximation results are analyzed in terms of the multipath error envelope and the tracking jitter. The results show that the proposed method can realize coherent and non-coherent CCRW discriminators without false lock points. Generally, there is performance degradation in the tracking jitter, if compared to the CCRW discriminator. However, the performance promotions in the multipath error envelope for the BOC(1,1) and BPSK signals makes the discriminator attractive, and it can be applied to high-order BOC signals. PMID:27483275

  9. Optimization of the Low-Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Li; L. Ge; K. Ko; L. Lee; C.-K. Ng; G. L. Schussman; L. Xiao; T. Higo; Y. Morozumi; K. Saito; P. Kneisel; J. S. Sekutowicz

    2007-08-01

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and JLab (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting (MP) still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reduces the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced MP barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, MP activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss shape for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting. Comparisons of simulation results with measurements will also be presented.

  10. Hepatitis B virus genotype A: design of reference sequences for sub-genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qun; Zhu, Huilan; Zhang, Yafei; Li, Xu; Zhang, Zhenhua

    2016-06-01

    Genotype A of hepatitis B virus (HBV/A) is widespread and is currently divided into six sub-genotypes. Suitable reference sequences for different sub-genotypes can facilitate research on HBV/A. However, the current reference sequences for this virus are insufficient. In the present work, we retrieved 442 full-length HBV/A genomic sequences from the GenBank database and classified them into sub-genotypes by phylogenetic analysis. By the maximum likelihood method using the MEGA6.0 software, we established the reference sequences for different HBV/A sub-genotypes. Our analyses demonstrated that these reference sequences clustered phylogenetically with known strains, indicating that the reference sequences we established indeed belonged to the right sub-genotypes. HBV/A subtype sequences were selected by geographic origins and grouped as sub-genotypes including A1-South Africa, A2-Europe, A3-Cameroon, and A5-Haiti. Reference sequences of sub-genotypes A1, A2, A3, and A5 were constructed and deposited into GenBank (KP234050-KP234053). By applying phylogenetic analyses, we further determined the time to most recent common ancestor of HBV/A lineages. In conclusion, these newly established reference sequences can provide suitable reference standards for studies on the molecular biology and virology of HBV genotype A. PMID:27002608

  11. Bunching for shorter damping rings for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    A variant rearrangement of the bunch trains for the ILC that enables much shorter damping rings is presented. In a particular example the {approx}2820 bunches are regrouped into {approx}550 subtrains of five adjacent bunches. These subtrains are extracted from the damping rings at {approx}1.8 {micro}s intervals, obtaining the 1ms macrobunch length of the baseline TESLA collider scenario. If the baseline damping rf frequency is 325 MHz and the kicker rise and fall times are {approx}20 ns, a ring circumference of {approx}5.8km is required. Variations of the scheme could easily reduce the circumference to {approx}4km, and faster kickers could reduce it even further.

  12. Bunching for shorter damping rings for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A variant rearrangement of the bunch trains for the ILC that enables much shorter damping rings is presented. In a particular example the {approx}2280 bunches are regrouped into {approx}450 subtrains of five adjacent bunches. These subtrains are extracted from the damping rings at {approx}2.2 {micro}s intervals, obtaining the 1ms macrobunch length of the baseline TESLA collider scenario. If the baseline damping rf frequency is 325 MHz and the kicker rise and fall times are {approx}20 ns, a ring circumference of {approx}4.5km is required. Variations of the scheme could easily reduce the circumference to {approx}3km, and faster kickers could reduce it even further.

  13. Configuration Studies and Recommendations for the ILC DampingRings

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej; Gao, Jie; Guiducci, Susanna

    2006-02-04

    We describe the results of studies comparing differentoptions for the baseline configuration of the ILC damping rings. Theprincipal configuration decisions apply to the circumference, beamenergy, lattice type, and technology options for key components,including the injection/extraction kickers and the damping wigglers. Toarrive at our recommended configuration, we performed detailed studies ofa range of lattices representing a variety of different configurationoptions; these lattices are described in Chapter 2. The results of thevarious studies are reported in chapters covering issues of beamdynamics, technical subsystems, costs, and commissioning, reliability andupgradeability. Our detailed recommendations for the baselineconfiguration are given in Chapter 7, where we also outline furtherresearch and development that is needed before a machine using ourrecommended configuration can be built and operated successfully. In thesame chapter, we suggest possible alternatives to the baselineconfiguration.

  14. Configuration Studies and Recommendations for the ILC DampingRings

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, Andrzej; Gao, Jie; Guiducci, Susanna

    2006-02-04

    We describe the results of studies comparing different options for the baseline configuration of the ILC damping rings. The principal configuration decisions apply to the circumference, beam energy, lattice type, and technology options for key components, including the injection/extraction kickers and the damping wigglers. To arrive at our recommended configuration, we performed detailed studies of a range of lattices representing a variety of different configuration options; these lattices are described in Chapter 2. The results of the various studies are reported in chapters covering issues of beam dynamics, technical subsystems, costs, and commissioning, reliability and upgrade ability. Our detailed recommendations for the baseline configuration are given in Chapter 7, where we also outline further research and development that is needed before a machine using our recommended configuration can be built and operated successfully. In the same chapter, we suggest possible alternatives to the baseline configuration.

  15. Cavity BPM System Tests for the ILC Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, M.

    2007-12-21

    The main physics program of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a measurement of the beam energy at the interaction point with an accuracy of 10{sup -4} or better. To achieve this goal a magnetic spectrometer using high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs) has been proposed. This paper reports on the cavity BPM system that was deployed to test this proposal. We demonstrate sub-micron resolution and micron level stability over 20 hours for a 1 m long BPM triplet. We find micron-level stability over 1 hour for 3 BPM stations distributed over a 30 m long baseline. The understanding of the behavior and response of the BPMs gained from this work has allowed full spectrometer tests to be carried out.

  16. FPGA-based Klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Miura, T.; Qiu, F.; Chase, B.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-01-23

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successfulmore » implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. Furthermore, the functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation.« less

  17. FPGA-based Klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-01-23

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. Furthermore, the functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation.

  18. Reconstruction of IP Beam Parameters at the ILC From Beamstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.; /SLAC /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2005-07-11

    The luminosity performance of the ILC will be very sensitive to the parameters of the colliding bunches. Only some of these parameters can be measured using planned instrumentation. This analysis aims to access some of the colliding beam parameters not available by other means and to improve on the resolution of those that are. GUINEA-PIG is used to simulate the beam-beam interactions and produce beamstrahlung radiation (e+/e- pairs and photons). These are tracked to a simulation of the low-angle Beam Calorimeter and a photon detector and event shapes are produced. A Taylor map is produced to transform from the event shapes to the simulated beam parameters. This paper reports on the progress of this analysis, examining the usefulness of the proposed fitting technique.

  19. T cells are necessary for ILC2 activation in house dust mite-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Bobby W S; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; Tindemans, Irma; Lukkes, Melanie; KleinJan, Alex; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2016-06-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways mediated by an adaptive type 2 immune response. Upon allergen exposure, group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) can be rapidly activated and represent an early innate source of IL-5 and IL-13. Here, we used a house dust mite (HDM)-driven asthma mouse model to study the induction of ILC2s in allergic airway inflammation. In BALF, lungs, and lymph nodes, ILC2 activation is critically dependent on prior sensitization with HDM. Importantly, T cells are required for ILC2 induction, whereby T-cell activation precedes ILC2 induction. During HDM-driven allergic airway inflammation the accumulation of ILC2s in BALF is IL-33 independent, although infiltrating ILC2s produce less cytokines in Il33(-/-) mice. Transfer of in vitro polarized OVA-specific OT-II Th2 cells alone or in combination with Th17 cells followed by OVA and HDM challenge is not sufficient to induce ILC2, despite significant eosinophilic inflammation and T-cell activation. In this asthma model, ILC2s are therefore not an early source of Th2 cytokines, but rather contribute to type 2 inflammation in which Th2 cells play a key role. Taken together, ILC2 induction in HDM-mediated allergic airway inflammation in mice critically depends on activation of T cells. PMID:27062360

  20. Design reference missions for the exoplanet starshade (Exo-S) probe-class study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabert, Rachel; Shaklan, Stuart; Lisman, P. Douglas; Roberge, Aki; Turnbull, Margaret; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Stark, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Exo-S is a direct imaging space-based mission to discover and characterize exoplanets. The mission is comprised of two formation-flying spacecraft - a starlight suppressing starshade and a telescope separated by ~30,000 km. To align the starshade between the target star and telescope, one of the two spacecraft must perform a retargeting slew. This drives the need for a sophisticated program to help optimize this path to maximize target yield within mission constraints such as solar and earth avoidance angles, thrust and fuel limitations, and target scheduling for previously-discovered known giant planets. The Design Reference Mission (DRM) describes the sequence of observations to be performed and estimates the number of planets that will be detected and characterized. It is executed with a Matlab-based tool developed for the Exo-S Study. Here we analyze four case studies: • Case 1: Starshade with a 1.1m dedicated telescope prioritizing the search for earths in the Habitable Zone (HZ). • Case 2: Starshade with a 1.1m dedicated telescope focused on maximizing planet harvest return and characterization. • Case 3: Starshade that rendezvous with a 2.4 m shared telescope prioritizing the search for earths in the HZ. • Case 4: A Rendezvous Earth Finder mission based on a 40-m diameter starshade with a 2.4 m telescope, operating for 4 years, and focused exclusively on detecting Earths in the HZ Previous starshade DRM tools have been reported in the literature, all of them focused on detection and/or characterization of Earth-twins in the habitable zone. This study has taken then next step and focused on total planet harvest including known Gas Giants, Earths in the Habitable Zone and elsewhere, super-earths, sub-Neptunes, and Jupiters. The DRM employs a hierarchical approach: an observation schedule of known radial velocity gas giants, whose availabilities for observation are known form their orbital parameters, forms a "framework" of observation that have a high

  1. A Study of Laser System Requirements for Application in Beam Diagnostics And Polarimetry at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S.; Delerue, N.; Foster, B.; Howell, D.F.; Peach, K.; Quelch, G.; Qureshi, M.; Reichold, A.; Hirst, G.; Ross, I.; Urakawa, J.; Soskov, V.; Variola, A.; Zomer, F.; Blair, G.A.; Boogert, S.T.; Boorman, G.; Bosco, A.; Driouichi, C.; Karataev, P.; Brachmann, A.; /SLAC

    2007-02-12

    Advanced laser systems will be essential for a range of diagnostics devices and polarimetry at the ILC. High average power, high beam quality, excellent stability and reliability will be crucial in order to deliver the information required to attain the necessary ILC luminosity as well as for efficient polarimetry. The key parameters are listed together with the R & D required to achieve the necessary laser system performance.

  2. Resistive-Wall Instability in the Damping Rings of the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Bane, K.L.F.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; /SLAC

    2006-07-05

    In the damping rings of the International Linear Collider (ILC), the resistive-wall instability is one of the dominant transverse instabilities. This instability directly influences the choice of material and aperture of the vacuum pipe, and the parameters of the transverse feedback system. This paper investigates the resistive-wall instabilities in an ILC damping ring under various conditions of beam pipe material, aperture, and fill pattern.

  3. MAPMT H7546B anode current response study for ILC SiD muon system prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Blazey, G.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Zutshi, V.; Fisk, H.; Milstene, C.; Abrams, R.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-01

    The proposed Silicon Detector (SiD) concept for the ILC has barrel and end cap muon systems. An SiD scintillator based muon system prototype has 256 strips and was constructed from extruded strips, WLS fibers, clear fibers, and multianode photo multiplier tubes (MAPMT) Hamamatsu H7546B. Six MAPMTs were used. As a first step to understand strip output, the response of every anode to a given brightness of light and applied voltage must be measured. For the test, a custom made light source was used. Each MAPMT output was measured independently. The anode currents were measured at constant (green) input light brightness and the same photocathode to anode voltage (800V). The anode currents have a wide spread; for all tubes the maximum value is 5.23 times larger than the minimum value. The MAPMT cross talk was measured for one of the central inputs. The maximum cross talk value is about 4.9%. The average cross talk for the nearest four neighboring channels is 3.9%, for the farthest four is 1%. To assure the reproducibility and repeatability of the measurements, the double reference method was used.

  4. Critical role of fatty acid metabolism in ILC2-mediated barrier protection during malnutrition and helminth infection.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Christoph; Harrison, Oliver J; Schmitt, Vanessa; Pelletier, Martin; Spencer, Sean P; Urban, Joseph F; Ploch, Michelle; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Siegel, Richard M; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2016-07-25

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) play an important role in many immune processes, including control of infections, inflammation, and tissue repair. To date, little is known about the metabolism of ILC and whether these cells can metabolically adapt in response to environmental signals. Here we show that type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), important mediators of barrier immunity, predominantly depend on fatty acid (FA) metabolism during helminth infection. Further, in situations where an essential nutrient, such as vitamin A, is limited, ILC2 sustain their function and selectively maintain interleukin 13 (IL-13) production via increased acquisition and utilization of FA. Together, these results reveal that ILC2 preferentially use FAs to maintain their function in the context of helminth infection or malnutrition and propose that enhanced FA usage and FA-dependent IL-13 production by ILC2 could represent a host adaptation to maintain barrier immunity under dietary restriction. PMID:27432938

  5. 40 CFR 53.8 - Designation of reference and equivalent methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... satisfy the applicable requirements of this part shall be designated as a FRM or FEM (as applicable) by... notice indicating that the method has been designated as a FRM or FEM shall be sent to the applicant. (c) The Administrator will maintain a current list of methods designated as FRM or FEM in accordance...

  6. 40 CFR 53.8 - Designation of reference and equivalent methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... satisfy the applicable requirements of this part shall be designated as a FRM or FEM (as applicable) by... notice indicating that the method has been designated as a FRM or FEM shall be sent to the applicant. (c) The Administrator will maintain a current list of methods designated as FRM or FEM in accordance...

  7. Design implementation and control of MRAS error dynamics. [Model-Reference Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, B. K.; Boland, J. S., III

    1974-01-01

    Use is made of linearized error characteristic equation for model-reference adaptive systems to determine a parameter adjustment rule for obtaining time-invariant error dynamics. Theoretical justification of error stability is given and an illustrative example included to demonstrate the utility of the proposed technique.

  8. Compact, Intelligent, Digitally Controlled IGBT Gate Drivers for a PEBB-Based ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.; Olsen, J.J.; Macken, K.; /SLAC

    2010-06-07

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has built and is currently operating a first generation prototype Marx klystron modulator to meet ILC specifications. Under development is a second generation prototype, aimed at improving overall performance, serviceability, and manufacturability as compared to its predecessor. It is designed around 32 cells, each operating at 3.75 kV and correcting for its own capacitor droop. Due to the uniqueness of this application, high voltage gate drivers needed to be developed for the main 6.5 kV and droop correction 1.7 kV IGBTs. The gate driver provides vital functions such as protection of the IGBT from over-voltage and over-current, detection of gate-emitter open and short circuit conditions, and monitoring of IGBT degradation (based on collector-emitter saturation voltage). Gate drive control, diagnostic processing capabilities, and communication are digitally implemented using an FPGA. This paper details the design of the gate driver circuitry, component selection, and construction layout. In addition, experimental results are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the protection circuit.

  9. The Reference Ability Neural Network Study: motivation, design, and initial feasibility analyses.

    PubMed

    Stern, Yaakov; Habeck, Christian; Steffener, Jason; Barulli, Daniel; Gazes, Yunglin; Razlighi, Qolamreza; Shaked, Danielle; Salthouse, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    We introduce and describe the Reference Ability Neural Network Study and provide initial feasibility data. Based on analyses of large test batteries administered to individuals ranging from young to old, four latent variables, or reference abilities (RAs) that capture the majority of the variance in age-related cognitive change have been identified: episodic memory, fluid reasoning, perceptual speed, and vocabulary. We aim to determine whether spatial fMRI networks can be derived that are uniquely associated with the performance of each reference ability. We plan to image 375 healthy adults (50 per decade from age 20 to 50; 75 per decade from age 50 to 80) while performing a set of 12 cognitive tasks. Data on 174 participants are reported here. Three tasks were grouped a priori into each of the four reference ability domains. We first assessed to what extent both cognitive task scores and activation patterns readily show convergent and discriminant validity, i.e. increased similarity between tasks within the same domain and decreased similarity between tasks between domains, respectively. Block-based time-series analysis of each individual task was conducted for each participant via general linear modeling. We partialled activation common to all tasks out of the imaging data. For both test scores and activation topographies, we then calculated correlations for each of 66 possible pairings of tasks, and compared the magnitude of correlation of tasks within reference ability domains to that of tasks between domains. For the behavioral data, globally there were significantly stronger inter-task correlations within than between domains. When examining individual abilities, 3 of the domains also met these criteria but memory reached only borderline significance. Overall there was greater topographic similarity within reference abilities than between them (p<0.0001), but when examined individually, statistical significance was reached only for episodic memory and

  10. Proposed Reference Spectral Irradiance Standards to Improve Photovoltaic Concentrating System Design and Performance Evaluation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.; Emery, K. E.; Gueymard, C.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), and the International Standards Organization (ISO) standard solar terrestrial spectra (ASTM G-159, IEC-904-3, ISO 9845-1) provide standard spectra for photovoltaic performance applications. Modern terrestrial spectral radiation models and knowledge of atmospheric physics are applied to develop suggested revisions to update the reference spectra. We use a moderately complex radiative transfer model (SMARTS2) to produce the revised spectra. SMARTS2 has been validated against the complex MODTRAN radiative transfer code and spectral measurements. The model is proposed as an adjunct standard to reproduce the reference spectra. The proposed spectra represent typical clear sky spectral conditions associated with sites representing reasonable photovoltaic energy production and weathering and durability climates. The proposed spectra are under consideration by ASTM.