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Sample records for ileal mucosal glutathione

  1. Artemisia supplementation differentially affects the mucosal and luminal ileal microbiota of diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Shawna, Wicks; M., Taylor Christopher; Meng, Luo; Eugene, Blanchard IV; David, Ribnicky; T., Cefalu William; L., Mynatt Randall; A., Welsh David

    2014-01-01

    Objective The gut microbiome has been implicated in obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, most studies have focused on fecal or colonic samples. Several species of Artemisia have been reported to ameliorate insulin signaling both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to characterize the mucosal and luminal bacterial populations in the terminal ileum with or without supplementation with Artemisia extracts. Materials/Methods Following 4 weeks of supplementation with different Artemisia extracts (PMI 5011, Santa or Scopa), diet-induced obese mice were sacrificed and luminal and mucosal samples of terminal ileum were used to evaluate microbial community composition by pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA hypervariable regions. Results Significant differences in community structure and membership were observed between luminal and mucosal samples, irrespective of diet group. All Artemisia extracts increased the Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio in mucosal samples. This effect was not observed in the luminal compartment. There was high inter-individual variability in the phylogenetic assessments of the ileal microbiota, limiting the statistical power of this pilot investigation. Conclusions Marked differences in bacterial communities exist dependent upon the biogeographic compartment in the terminal ileum. Future studies testing the effects of Artemisia or other botanical supplements require larger sample sizes for adequate statistical power. PMID:24985102

  2. Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Noctor, Graham; Queval, Guillaume; Mhamdi, Amna; Chaouch, Sejir; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is a simple sulfur compound composed of three amino acids and the major non-protein thiol in many organisms, including plants. The functions of glutathione are manifold but notably include redox-homeostatic buffering. Glutathione status is modulated by oxidants as well as by nutritional and other factors, and can influence protein structure and activity through changes in thiol-disulfide balance. For these reasons, glutathione is a transducer that integrates environmental information into the cellular network. While the mechanistic details of this function remain to be fully elucidated, accumulating evidence points to important roles for glutathione and glutathione-dependent proteins in phytohormone signaling and in defense against biotic stress. Work in Arabidopsis is beginning to identify the processes that govern glutathione status and that link it to signaling pathways. As well as providing an overview of the components that regulate glutathione homeostasis (synthesis, degradation, transport, and redox turnover), the present discussion considers the roles of this metabolite in physiological processes such as light signaling, cell death, and defense against microbial pathogen and herbivores. PMID:22303267

  3. Total proctocolectomy and ileal - anal pouch

    MedlinePLUS

    Restorative proctocolectomy; Ileal-anal resection; Ileal-anal pouch; J-pouch; S-pouch; Pelvic pouch; Ileal-anal pouch; Ileal ... RD, Mahmoud N, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau J. Colon and rectum. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, ...

  4. Bile Acids Induce Ileal Damage During Experimental Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Melissa D.; Holubec, Hana; Saunders, Tara A.; Dvorak, Katerina; Clark, Jessica A.; Doelle, Sarah M.; Ballatori, Nazzareno; Dvorak, Bohuslav

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency of premature infants. While the effect of bile acids (BAs) on intestinal mucosal injury is known, we investigated the contribution of BAs during the development of NEC in neonatal rats. Methods Premature rats were fed with cow’s milk–based formula and subjected to asphyxia and cold stress to develop NEC. Jejunal and ileal luminal BAs, portal blood BAs, and messenger RNA and protein for the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, the ileal bile acid binding protein, and the heteromeric organic solute transporter (Ost?/Ost?)were evaluated. Results Ileal luminal BAs levels were increased significantly during disease development and the removal of ileal BAs significantly decreased the incidence and severity of disease. Furthermore, when NEC was reduced via treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF), BA levels were reduced significantly. Jejunal luminal BA levels were similar between animals with NEC and controls, but portal/ileal luminal BA ratios were decreased significantly in animals with NEC. The apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter was up-regulated at the site of injury in animals with NEC and decreased after EGF treatment; however, the ileal bile acid binding protein was up-regulated only in the NEC and EGF group. Ost?/Ost? expression was low in all groups, and only slightly increased in the NEC group. Conclusions These data strongly suggest that BAs play a role in the development of ileal damage in experimental NEC and that alterations in BA transport in the neonatal ileum may contribute to disease development. PMID:16472592

  5. Mucosal immunology

    PubMed Central

    Bienenstock, J.; Befus, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, we shall highlight some recent advances in mucosal immunology and also those concepts which seem to us to merit more attention than they normally receive. Since we cannot hope to be all inclusive, we recommend the following articles and books to the reader (Tomasi & Bienenstock, 1968; Tomasi & Grey, 1972; Bienenstock, 1974; Heremans, 1974; Mestecky & Lawton, 1974; Lamm, 1976; Tomasi, 1976; Waksman & Ozer, 1976; Porter & Knight, 1977; McGhee, Mestecky & Babb, 1978; Ogra & Dayton, 1979; Befus & Bienenstock, 1980). PMID:7002769

  6. Enhanced production of IL-8 in chronic but not in early ileal lesions of Crohn's disease (CD)

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, E; Colombel, J-F; Ectors, N; Gambiez, L; Emilie, D; Geboes, K; Capron, M; Desreumaux, P

    2000-01-01

    Distinct Th1/Th2 patterns have been observed during the evolution of CD. The aim of this study was to compare neutrophil involvement and IL-8 mRNA and protein expression during early recurrent lesions and chronic phases of CD. Twenty-nine patients with CD having ileocolonic resection with anastomosis were studied. Biopsies were obtained during surgery from the non-inflamed ileal mucosa and from chronic ileal lesions. Endoscopic ileal biopsies were also taken from early recurrent ileal lesions occurring 3 months after surgery. Neutrophil counts were performed and mucosal IL-8 levels were evaluated by competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Early recurrent ileal lesions were characterized by low neutrophil counts and IL-8 production at the mRNA and protein levels compared with the ileal chronic lesions. The main cellular sources of IL-8 in the early recurrent lesions were neutrophils, while in chronic lesions the majority of IL-8-stained cells were CD3+ T cells and macrophages. These results confirmed that the nature of the inflammatory infiltrate and the expression of cytokine profiles may differ between the acute and chronic phases of CD. PMID:11091272

  7. Lisofylline ameliorates intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction caused by ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Wattanasirichaigoon, S; Menconi, M J; Delude, R L; Fink, M P

    1999-04-01

    In an effort to determine whether treatment with lisofylline (LSF) ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in rats subjected to mesenteric ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), regional mesenteric vessels were occluded for 60 min and then unclamped for 60 min more. In Protocol 1, intravenous LSF (15 mg/kg bolus then 10 mg/kg/h) was administered 5 min before ischemia. In Protocol 2, LSF (same dose) was given 1 min before reperfusion. Controls received an equivalent volume of Ringer's lactate solution. Permeability was assessed by determining the mucosal-to-serosal clearance of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated dextran (4 kDa) in everted ileal gut sacs incubated ex vivo. In Protocol 1, LSF treatment during ischemia ameliorated mucosal barrier dysfunction; mean +/- SEM clearances for the LSF and Ringer's lactate solution groups after 60 min of ischemia were 34.4+/-6.1 and 64+/-7.1 nL/min/cm2, respectively; p = .007. Clearances after reperfusion were the same in the two groups. In Protocol 2, LSF treatment just before reperfusion ameliorated barrier dysfunction measured 60 min after the restoration of blood flow; clearances for the LSF and Ringer's lactate solution groups were 23.1+/-3.8 and 40.2+/-4.5 nL/min/cm2, respectively; p = .012. Treatment with LSF did not affect intestinal levels of reduced glutathione or adenosine triphosphate or the extent of histological damage to the mucosa after I/R. Nevertheless, villus height was greater in animals treated with LSF than RLS prior to ischemia in Protocol 1 (250+/-37 and 160+/-15 microm, respectively; p = .04) and during reperfusion in Protocol 2 (170+/-21 and 82+/-7 microm, respectively; p = .002). We conclude that LSF is effective in reducing both ischemia- and I/R-induced gut barrier dysfunction, possibly due to a mechanism related to preservation of villus height. PMID:10220304

  8. Segregation of B lymphocytes into stationary apoptotic and migratory proliferating subpopulations in agglomerate cultures with ileal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Alitheen, N; McClure, S; McCullagh, P

    2001-09-01

    The B lymphocyte-epithelial cell interactions that define the microenvironment of the ileal Peyer's patch, the primary B lymphocyte organ of the fetal lamb, have been replicated in tissue culture. Mixed suspensions of ileal epithelial cells, lymphocytes and fibroblasts from fetuses of 63-103 days of gestation organized into macroscopically visible agglomerates within 72 h. These agglomerates contained translucent spherical cavities and were enclosed within a marginal cell layer and surrounded by an expanding corona of emigrating cells. The lining of the cavities and the marginal layer consisted of well-differentiated, polarized columnar ileal epithelial cells. One population of B lymphocytes in the initial mixed suspension differentiated into two discrete populations reproducing the characteristics of intact fetal ileal Peyer's patches. B cells apposed to follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) within agglomerates underwent apoptosis. The other population of emigrant B cells proliferated and expressed the BAQ44A differentiation marker. Differentiation of ileal epithelial cells into FAE, typical of Peyer's patches, was markedly accelerated. The mutually inductive influences of intestinal epithelial cells and B lymphocytes in these agglomerates replicate normal mid-gestational fetal development of the mucosal immune system and afford new opportunities for its further investigation. PMID:11536153

  9. Gastroprotective effect of desmosdumotin C isolated from Mitrella kentii against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhage in rats: possible involvement of glutathione, heat-shock protein-70, sulfhydryl compounds, nitric oxide, and anti-Helicobacter pylori activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitrella kentii (M. kentii) (Bl.) Miq, is a tree-climbing liana that belongs to the family Annonaceae. The plant is rich with isoquinoline alkaloids, terpenylated dihydrochalcones and benzoic acids and has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study is to assess the gastroprotective effects of desmosdumotin C (DES), a new isolated bioactive compound from M. kentii, on gastric ulcer models in rats. Methods DES was isolated from the bark of M. kentii. Experimental rats were orally pretreated with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of the isolated compound and were subsequently subjected to absolute ethanol-induced acute gastric ulcer. Gross evaluation, mucus content, gastric acidity and histological gastric lesions were assessed in vivo. The effects of DES on the anti-oxidant system, non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) content, nitric oxide (NO)level, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme activity, bcl-2-associated X (Bax) protein expression and Helicabacter pylori (H pylori) were also investigated. Results DES pre-treatment at the administered doses significantly attenuated ethanol-induced gastric ulcer; this was observed by decreased gastric ulcer area, reduced or absence of edema and leucocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control group. It was found that DES maintained glutathione (GSH) level, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, increased NP-SH content and NO level and inhibited COX-2 activity. The compound up regulated heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and down regulated Bax protein expression in the ulcerated tissue. DES showed interesting anti-H pylori effects. The efficacy of DES was accomplished safely without any signs of toxicity. Conclusions The current study reveals that DES demonstrated gastroprotective effects which could be attributed to its antioxidant effect, activation of HSP-70 protein, intervention with COX-2 inflammatory pathway and potent anti H pylori effect. PMID:23866830

  10. Host Responses to Persistent Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Infection in Surgically Isolated Bovine Ileal Segments

    PubMed Central

    Charavaryamath, Chandrashekhar; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Fries, Patrick; Gomis, Susantha; Doig, Kimberley; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Napper, Scott

    2013-01-01

    A lack of appropriate disease models has limited our understanding of the pathogenesis of persistent enteric infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A model was developed for the controlled delivery of a defined dose of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis to surgically isolated ileal segments in newborn calves. The stable intestinal segments enabled the characterization of host responses to persistent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections after a 9-month period, including an analysis of local mucosal immune responses relative to an adjacent uninfected intestinal compartment. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained localized at the initial site of intestinal infection and was not detected by PCR in the mesenteric lymph node. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T cell proliferative responses included both CD4 and ?? T cell receptor (??TcR) T cell responses in the draining mesenteric lymph node. The levels of CD8+ and ??TcR+ T cells increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the lamina propria, and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) and gamma interferon secretion by lamina propria leukocytes was also significantly (P < 0.05) increased. There was a significant (P < 0.05) accumulation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in the lamina propria, but the expression of mucosal toll-like receptors 1 through 10 was not significantly changed by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. In conclusion, surgically isolated ileal segments provided a model system for the establishment of a persistent and localized enteric M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle and facilitated the analysis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific changes in mucosal leukocyte phenotype and function. The accumulation of DC subpopulations in the lamina propria suggests that further investigation of mucosal DCs may provide insight into host responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and improve vaccine strategies to prevent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID:23221000

  11. GLUTATHIONE SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shelly C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione (GSH) is present in all mammalian tissues as the most abundant non-protein thiol that defends against oxidative stress. GSH is also a key determinant of redox signaling, vital in detoxification of xenobiotics, regulates cell proliferation, apoptosis, immune function, and fibrogenesis. Biosynthesis of GSH occurs in the cytosol in a tightly regulated manner. Key determinants of GSH synthesis are the availability of the sulfur amino acid precursor, cysteine, and the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which is composed of a catalytic (GCLC) and a modifier (GCLM) subunit. The second enzyme of GSH synthesis is GSH synthetase (GS). SCOPE OF REVIEW This review summarizes key functions of GSH and focuses on factors that regulate the biosynthesis of GSH, including pathological conditions where GSH synthesis is dysregulated. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS GCL subunits and GS are regulated at multiple levels and often in a coordinated manner. Key transcription factors that regulate the expression of these genes include NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) via the antioxidant response element (ARE), AP-1, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF?B). There is increasing evidence that dysregulation of GSH synthesis contributes to the pathogenesis of many pathological conditions. These include diabetes mellitus, pulmonary and liver fibrosis, alcoholic liver disease, cholestatic liver injury, endotoxemia and drug-resistant tumor cells. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE GSH is a key antioxidant that also modulates diverse cellular processes. A better understanding of how its synthesis is regulated and dysregulated in disease states may lead to improvement in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:22995213

  12. Ileal J-Pouch Perforation: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dogan, U; Dogan, B; Habibi, M; Erol, M K; Mayir, B; Aslaner, A; Bulbuller, N

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old male patient who had undergone total colectomy and J-pouch ileanal anastomosis subsequent to diagnosisof familial adenomatous polyposis five years previously was admitted to the emergency room with complaints of severe abdominal pain of a four-day duration. Physical examination revealed widespread tenderness throughout the abdomen, especially in the lower quadrant. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed fluid between intestinal loops and computed tomography revealed free air and fluid in the abdomen. During laparotomy to expand the ileal J-pouch to approximately 12 cmin diameter, a 2-mm perforation was detected in the blind end of the ileal J-pouch. The perforation was repaired primarily andprotective ileostomy was performed. During postoperative endoscopy, neither obstruction nor stasis was observed, but pouchitis was observed in the ileal J-pouch. The patient was postoperatively discharged on the 20th day and followed endoscopically. The endoscopic findings were normal in the sixth month postsurgery. PMID:26158741

  13. Association of a Functional Variant in the Wnt Co-Receptor LRP6 with Early Onset Ileal Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koslowski, Maureen J.; Teltschik, Zora; Beisner, Julia; Schaeffeler, Elke; Wang, Guoxing; Kübler, Irmgard; Gersemann, Michael; Cooney, Rachel; Jewell, Derek; Reinisch, Walter; Vermeire, Séverine; Rutgeerts, Paul; Schwab, Matthias; Stange, Eduard F.; Wehkamp, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Ileal Crohn's Disease (CD), a chronic small intestinal inflammatory disorder, is characterized by reduced levels of the antimicrobial peptides DEFA5 (HD-5) and DEFA6 (HD-6). Both of these ?-defensins are exclusively produced in Paneth cells (PCs) at small intestinal crypt bases. Different ileal CD–associated genes including NOD2, ATG16L1, and recently the ?-catenin–dependant Wnt transcription factor TCF7L2 have been linked to impaired PC antimicrobial function. The Wnt pathway influences gut mucosal homeostasis and PC maturation, besides directly controlling HD-5/6 gene expression. The herein reported candidate gene study focuses on another crucial Wnt factor, the co-receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6). We analysed exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large cohort (Oxford: n?=?1,893) and prospectively tested 2 additional European sample sets (Leuven: n?=?688, Vienna: n?=?1,628). We revealed an association of a non-synonymous SNP (rs2302685; Ile1062Val) with early onset ileal CD (OR 1.8; p?=?0.00034; for homozygous carriers: OR 4.1; p?=?0.00004) and additionally with penetrating ileal CD behaviour (OR 1.3; p?=?0.00917). In contrast, it was not linked to adult onset ileal CD, colonic CD, or ulcerative colitis. Since the rare variant is known to impair LRP6 activity, we investigated its role in patient mucosa. Overall, LRP6 mRNA was diminished in patients independently from the genotype. Analysing the mRNA levels of PC product in biopsies from genotyped individuals (15 controls, 32 ileal, and 12 exclusively colonic CD), we found particularly low defensin levels in ileal CD patients who were carrying the variant. In addition, we confirmed a direct relationship between LRP6 activity and the transcriptional expression of HD-5 using transient transfection. Taken together, we identified LRP6 as a new candidate gene in ileal CD. Impairments in Wnt signalling and Paneth cell biology seem to represent pathophysiological hallmarks in small intestinal inflammation and should therefore be considered as interesting targets for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:22393312

  14. IN VITRO INHIBITION OF GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE BY ARSENOTRI-GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenotriglutathione, a product of the reduction of arsenate and the complexation of arsenite by glutathione, is a mixed type inhibitor of the reduction of glutathione disulfide by purified yeast glutathione reductase or the glutathione reductase activity in rabbit erythrocyte ly...

  15. Why mucosal health?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  16. RpoS Controls the Vibrio cholerae Mucosal Escape Response

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Glen; Miller, Michael C; Wu, Cheng Yen; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2006-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes a severe diarrhoeal disease by secreting a toxin during colonization of the epithelium in the small intestine. Whereas the initial steps of the infectious process have been intensively studied, the last phases have received little attention. Confocal microscopy of V. cholerae O1-infected rabbit ileal loops captured a distinctive stage in the infectious process: 12 h post-inoculation, bacteria detach from the epithelial surface and move into the fluid-filled lumen. Designated the “mucosal escape response,” this phenomenon requires RpoS, the stationary phase alternative sigma factor. Quantitative in vivo localization assays corroborated the rpoS phenotype and showed that it also requires HapR. Expression profiling of bacteria isolated from ileal loop fluid and mucus demonstrated a significant RpoS-dependent upregulation of many chemotaxis and motility genes coincident with the emigration of bacteria from the epithelial surface. In stationary phase cultures, RpoS was also required for upregulation of chemotaxis and motility genes, for production of flagella, and for movement of bacteria across low nutrient swarm plates. The hapR mutant produced near-normal numbers of flagellated cells, but was significantly less motile than the wild-type parent. During in vitro growth under virulence-inducing conditions, the rpoS mutant produced 10- to 100-fold more cholera toxin than the wild-type parent. Although the rpoS mutant caused only a small over-expression of the genes encoding cholera toxin in the ileal loop, it resulted in a 30% increase in fluid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Together, these results show that the mucosal escape response is orchestrated by an RpoS-dependent genetic program that activates chemotaxis and motility functions. This may furthermore coincide with reduced virulence gene expression, thus preparing the organism for the next stage in its life cycle. PMID:17054394

  17. The Analysis of Factors Associated with Progression of Isolated Terminal Ileal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fangbin, Zhang; Weiwei, Hao; Wugan, Zhao; Cong, Zheng; Yanjun, Chu; Feng, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the factors associated with the progression of isolated terminal ileal lesions (ITILs) at colonoscopy in Chinese patients. Methods Patients diagnosed with ITILs were enrolled. The ileoscopy was performed by two experienced gastroenterologists every 52 weeks. A logistic regression analysis was used to elucidate the factors associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and mucosal healing. A log rank test was used to assess the differences of the cumulative proportion of CD and mucosal healing in different groups at different times. Results (1) A total of 34 patients were included and no patient had taken nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the last 6 months; eight (23.5%) patients had a clinical diagnosis of CD, 14 (41.2%) patients achieved mucosal healing, and 12 (35.3%) patients showed no significant changes in the lesions at last follow-up. (2) The logistic regression analysis showed that only abdominal pain was a factor in the ITIL disease outcomes. (3) The cumulative proportion of CD in the abdominal pain group after 3 years was statistically higher than that in the non-abdominal pain group (42.7% vs. 6.2%, ?2?=?10.129, P?=?0.001). However, the cumulative proportion of mucosal healing in the non-abdominal pain group was statistically higher than that in the abdominal pain group (73.3% vs. 5.6%, ?2?=?5.225, P?=?0.022). (4) The numbers of lesions observed on the initial colonoscopy exams and the initial histologic findings were not related to the ITIL disease outcomes. Conclusions Clinical symptoms may be related to ITIL disease outcomes. Patients with abdominal pain had a high likelihood of CD, whereas those without abdominal pain had a high likelihood of mucosal healing. PMID:24625578

  18. Ileoileal intussusception secondary to an ileal fibroma.

    PubMed

    Chelimilla, Haritha; Ihimoyan, Ariyo; Carvajal, Simeon; Bhavna, Balar

    2012-09-01

    Intussusception is defined as the telescoping of a segment of the gastrointestinal tract (intussusceptum) into an immediately adjacent distal bowel (intussuscipiens). Intussusception is a relatively rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults. Unlike in children, a lead point is present in 90% of adult cases. The most common causes of small bowel intussusception are benign, usually hamartomas, lipomas, inflammatory polyps, adenomas and leiomyomas, in contrast to the large intestine where malignant tumors, usually adenocarcinomas, are more common. The clinical presentation of adult intussusception is non-specific with variable manifestations, predominantly those of intestinal obstruction, often making the diagnosis a challenge. The onset of symptoms may be acute, intermittent or chronic. We present a rare case of an ileal fibroma presenting with intussusception. A 43-year-old woman presented to our outpatient clinic with a history of recurrent abdominal pain. The clinical presentation and CT scan findings led to the diagnosis of ileoileal intussusception. Subsequently she underwent laparotomy which revealed an ileal fibroma as the lead point of the intussusception. Surgical exploration remains essential for diagnosis and treatment since in the majority of cases a pathologic lead point is identified. Ileal fibroma is an uncommon benign neoplasm of the small bowel and must be considered in the differential diagnosis for small bowel intussusception. PMID:23275765

  19. Mucosal Health in Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract The mucosal surfaces (skin, gill, and intestine) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient absorption, osmoregulation, and waste excretion. Aquaculture specie...

  20. Detection of ileal symbiont intracellularis in porcine faecal samples by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    McCormick, B M; Hasse, D; Monckton, R P

    1995-12-01

    Ileal Symbiont Intracellularis (ISI), the organism causing proliferative enteritis (PE) in pigs was detected in faeces by the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The assay based on a 319 base pair DNA fragment was used on faecal and mucosal samples derived from pigs either affected or unaffected with PE. As few as 10(3) ISI could be detected in pig faeces spiked with ISI. No amplification product was detected in the faeces of unaffected pigs but faeces of confirmed clinical cases were positive. This method offers an accurate, sensitive, easy to perform alternative to monoclonal antibody tests or histological examination post-mortem for the presence of ISI in pig herds. PMID:8748553

  1. Effect of the route of administration on the mucosal and systemic immune responses to Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, M G; Collins, A M; Dunlop, R H; Emery, D

    2015-04-01

    In an on-farm study, 40 weaned piglets aged 3 weeks were vaccinated with Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine orally, IM or IP while a fourth group remained unvaccinated. All vaccinated animals showed increased serum levels of L. intracellularis-specific IgG antibodies, but significantly elevated concentrations of specific IgG, IgA and cytokines were generated in ileal mucosal secretions from the orally and IP vaccinated pigs when examined at 17 days after vaccination. PMID:25817978

  2. New frontiers in mucositis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Douglas E; Keefe, Dorothy M; Sonis, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    Mucositis is among the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeted anticancer therapy. Research continues to escalate regarding key issues such as etiopathology, incidence and severity across different mucosae, relationships between mucosal and nonmucosal toxicities, and risk factors. This approach is being translated into enhanced management strategies. Recent technology advances provide an important foundation for this continuum. For example, evolution of applied genomics is fostering development of new algorithms to rapidly screen genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for patient-associated risk prediction. This modeling will permit individual tailoring of the most effective, least toxic treatment in the future. The evolution of novel cancer therapeutics is changing the mucositis toxicity profile. These agents can be associated with unique mechanisms of mucosal damage. Additional research is needed to optimally manage toxicity caused by agents such as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, without reducing antitumor effect. There has similarly been heightened attention across the health professions regarding clinical practice guidelines for mucositis management in the years following the first published guidelines in 2004. New opportunities exist to more effectively interface this collective guideline portfolio by capitalizing upon novel technologies such as an Internet-based Wiki platform. Substantive progress thus continues across many domains associated with mucosal injury in oncology patients. In addition to enhancing oncology patient care, these advances are being integrated into high-impact educational and scientific venues including the National Cancer Institute Physician Data Query (PDQ) portfolio as well as a new Gordon Research Conference on mucosal health and disease scheduled for June 2013. PMID:24451793

  3. Flow cytometric analysis of gut mucosal lymphocytes supports an impaired Th1 cytokine profile in spondyloarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, N; De Vos, M; Baeten, D; Demetter, P; Mielants, H; Verbruggen, G; Cuvelier, C; Veys, E; De Keyser, F

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To quantify the fraction of gut mucosal lymphocytes expressing the T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines, interferon ? (IFN?) and interleukin (IL)2, and the Th2 cytokines, IL4 and IL10, at the single cell level in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA) in comparison with healthy controls.?METHODS—An improved extraction protocol was used for the enrichment of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) from colonic and ileal biopsy specimens obtained from patients with SpA (n=20) and healthy controls (n=13). After stimulation with phorbol ester/ionomycin, expression of the intracellular cytokines IFN?, IL2, IL4, and IL10 was determined in CD3+, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD8? T cells by flow cytometry.?RESULTS—In colonic LPLs, a significant decrease in IFN?-producing CD3+ cells was observed (p=0.02) in patients with SpA. In the CD3+CD8? subset, the proportion of cells producing IFN? and IL2 was decreased in patients with SpA (p=0.021 and p=0.027 respectively). In ileal LPLs, the percentage of IL10-producing CD3+CD8? cells was significantly increased (p=0.046).?CONCLUSION—An impaired Th1 cytokine profile is observed in gut mucosal lymphocytes from patients with SpA. This adds to the existing evidence that the gut mucosal immune apparatus is involved in the pathogenesis of SpA.?? PMID:11302872

  4. Delayed complication of pelvic lymphocele: Ileal conduit obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Sanket S.; Bakshi, Ganesh K.; Prakash, Gagan; Sable, Nilesh P.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Lymphocele is a common sequalae of pelvic lymphadenectomy. We report an unusual presentation of pelvic lymphocele developing after radical cystectomy reconstructed with an ileal conduit where the patient developed obstruction of the ileal conduit loop due to external pressure of the lymphocele. Catheter drainage of the conduit relieved the symptoms and a computerized tomography scan showed a large lymphocele causing acute angulation and resultant obstruction of the ileal conduit. The patient was treated with percutaneous drainage of the lymphocele and remains symptom-free on follow-up at 1 year. PMID:26166973

  5. Delayed complication of pelvic lymphocele: Ileal conduit obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Sanket S; Bakshi, Ganesh K; Prakash, Gagan; Sable, Nilesh P

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Lymphocele is a common sequalae of pelvic lymphadenectomy. We report an unusual presentation of pelvic lymphocele developing after radical cystectomy reconstructed with an ileal conduit where the patient developed obstruction of the ileal conduit loop due to external pressure of the lymphocele. Catheter drainage of the conduit relieved the symptoms and a computerized tomography scan showed a large lymphocele causing acute angulation and resultant obstruction of the ileal conduit. The patient was treated with percutaneous drainage of the lymphocele and remains symptom-free on follow-up at 1 year. PMID:26166973

  6. Glutamine transport in isolated rabbit ileal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Déchelotte, P; Darmaun, D; Rongier, M; Desjeux, J F

    1989-10-01

    Oral rehydration therapy of diarrhea is based upon the promoting effect of glucose on sodium absorption. This ionic transport could be further enhanced by the addition of glutamine, an amino acid which is also the major energy source for the enterocyte. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess glutamine intestinal transport and to evaluate ionic movements associated with this transport. Strips of ileal epithelium from rabbits at weaning were mounted in Ussing chambers. Both sides of the epithelium were bathed with Ringer solution supplemented, after a basal period, with 2, 5, 10 or 25 mM glutamine. Unidirectional transepithelial fluxes of glutamine were measured with 3H and 14C tracers. Short circuit current, reflecting ionic transport, and potential difference were continuously monitored. Glucose 9 mM was later added to both sides. An apparent bidirectionnal transepithelial transport of glutamine was observed. The net result was a dose-dependent absorption (1.8 +/- 0.3 mumoles/h. cm2 at 25 mM). Glutamine induced a significant (p less than 0.01) dose-dependent saturable increase of short-circuit current and potential difference; the epithelial conductance was not modified. The addition of glucose did not significantly modify glutamine transport but caused and additional increase of short-circuit current. These results suggest that glutamine is actively transported by the ileal epithelium and stimulates ionic transport, suggesting Na+ absorption. The mechanism of this stimulation may differ from that of glucose, as the effects were additive. The present data provide support to the clinical evaluation of glutamine-supplemented rehydration solutions in the treatment of diarrhea. PMID:2591691

  7. [Mucosal protective drugs].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-07-01

    New therapeutic strategy has been established for the management of acid-related diseases, GERD and peptic ulcer. The use of proton pump inhibitor is a first-line treatment for GERD. The therapeutic strategy for peptic ulcer is determined by the major causes, H. pylori infection and NSAIDs use. However, the use of alginate-raft formulations is a well-established treatment for heartburn and other symptoms related to GERD. Regarding H. pylori related gastric ulcer, some mucosal protective drugs have accelerated ulcer healing after H. pylori eradication treatment, which were demonstrated by two randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind trials conducted in Japan. Misoprostol and other mucosal protective drugs have a preventive effect against NSAIDs-induced gastric ulcer and are promising in NSAIDs user with low risks for gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26165071

  8. Gastroduodenal Mucosal Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kemmerly, Thomas; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review recent developments in the field of gastroduodenal mucosal defense. Recent findings Research in the field of gastroduodenal mucosal defense has focused on continued elucidation of molecular mechanisms that protect the mucosa and influence healing at the cellular level. Review of literature over the past year reveals that familiar proteins and mediators such as nitric oxide, Toll-like receptors, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins, ?-defensins, macrophages, dendritic cells, mucins, autophagy, and the influence of aging and diet are still subjects of study, but also brings into light new processes and mediators such as dual oxidases, defense against radiation injuries, and novel proteins such as ZBP-89. Summary These new published findings contribute to our overall understanding of gastroduodenal defense and suggest innovative avenues of future research and possible novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25229259

  9. [Biliary endoprosthesis causing ileal perforation--a case report].

    PubMed

    Kosi?ski, Robert; Ol?dzki, Szymon; Modrzejewski, Andrzej

    2015-10-01

    We experienced ileal perforation caused by dislocated biliary endoprosthesis in 59 years old female patient. The endoprosthesis was implanted due to biliary fistula after laparoscopic cholecystectomy 2 years before the perforation. It seems that endoprosthesis dislocation and the perforation were the result of too long stay of endoprosthesis. After the surgical management and the removal of the prosthesis patient was cured. Although ileal perforation caused by dislocated biliary endoprosthesis is rare, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of its occurrence. PMID:26608492

  10. INTERACTION OF HALOACETONITRILES WITH GLUTATHIONE AND GLUTATHIONE-S-TRANSFERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions of reduced glutathione (GSH) with haloacetonitriles (HAH) were carried out under various conditions and the depletion of GSH was determined. Haloacetonitriles reacted directly with glutathione in the absence of tissue extracts. he reactivities of haloacetonitrile...

  11. Nasal mucosal endorgan hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Svensson, C; Andersson, M; Greiff, L; Persson, C G

    1998-01-01

    Nonspecific hyperresponsiveness of the upper and lower airways is a well-known characteristic of different inflammatory airway diseases but the underlying mechanisms have not yet been satisfactorily explained. In attempts to elucidate the relation of hyperresponsiveness to disease pathophysiology we have particularly examined the possibility that different airway endorgans may alter their function in allergic airway disease. The nose, in contrast to the bronchi, is an accessible part of the airways where in vivo studies of airway mucosal processes can be carried out in humans under controlled conditions. Different endorgans can be defined in the airway mucosa: subepithelial microvessels, epithelium, glands, and sensory nerves. Techniques may be applied further in the nose to determine selectively the responses/function of these endorgans. Topical challenge with methacholine will induce a glandular secretory response, and topical capsaicin activates sensory c-fibers and induces nasal smart. Topical histamine induces extravasation of plasma from the subepithelial microvessels. The plasma exudate first floods the lamina propria and then moves up between epithelial cells into the airway lumen. This occurs without any changes in the ultrastructure or barrier function of the epithelium. We have therefore forwarded the view of mucosal exudation of bulk plasma as a physiological airway tissue response with primarily a defense function. Since the exudation is specific to inflammation, we have also suggested mucosal exudation as a major inflammatory response among airway endorgan functions. Using a "nasal pool" device for concomitant provocation with histamine and lavage of the nasal mucosa we have assessed exudative responses by analyzing the levels of plasma proteins (e.g., albumin alpha 2-macroglobulin) in the returned lavage fluids. A secretory hyperresponsiveness occurs in both experimental and seasonal allergic rhinitis. This type of nasal hyperreactivity may develop already 30 minutes after allergen challenge. It is attenuated by topical steroids and oral antihistamines. We have demonstrated that exudative hyperresponsiveness develops in both seasonal allergic rhinitis and common cold, indicating significant changes of this important microvascular response in these diseases. An attractive hypothesis to explain airway hyperresponsiveness has been increased mucosal absorption permeability due to epithelial damage, possibly secondary to the release of eosinophil products. However, neither nonspecific nor specific endorgan hyperresponsiveness in allergic airways may be explained by epithelial fragility or damage since nasal absorption permeability (measured with 51CR-EDTA and dDAVP) was decreased or unchanged in our studies of allergic and virus-induced rhinitis, respectively. Thus, the absorption barrier of the airway mucosa may become functionally tighter in chronic eosinophilic inflammation. PMID:9513658

  12. TAK1 is a key modulator of the profibrogenic phenotype of human ileal myofibroblasts in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Alessia Rosaria; Scarpa, Melania; D'Incà, Renata; Brun, Paola; Scarpa, Marco; Porzionato, Andrea; De Caro, Raffaele; Martines, Diego; Buda, Andrea; Angriman, Imerio; Palù, Giorgio; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; Castagliuolo, Ignazio

    2015-09-15

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-?-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signaling can mediate inflammatory responses as well as tissue remodeling. Intestinal mucosal myofibroblast (IMF) activation drives gut fibrosis in Crohn's disease (CD); however, the molecular pathways involved are largely unknown. Thus we investigated the yet-unknown expression and function of TAK1 in human CD-associated fibrosis. Ileal surgical specimens, ileal biopsies, and IMF isolated from controls and CD patients were analyzed for TAK1 and its active phosphorylated form (pTAK1) by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and real-time quantitative PCR. TAK1 pharmacological inhibition and silencing were used to assess its role in collagen and inflammatory cytokine synthesis in IMF. TAK1 and pTAK1 levels increased in ileum specimens from CD patients compared with controls and correlated to tissue fibrosis. Similarly, TAK1 mRNA in ileal biopsies of CD patients correlated with fibrogenic marker expression but not inflammatory cytokines. CD-derived IMF showed higher TAK1 and pTAK1 expression associated with increased collagen1(?)1 mRNA levels compared with control IMF. TGF-?1 promoted pTAK1 nuclear translocation and collagen synthesis. TAK1 inhibition or silencing significantly reduced TGF-?1-stimulated collagen production and normalized the profibrogenic phenotype of CD-derived IMF. Taken together, these data suggest that TAK1 activation and nuclear translocation induce and maintain a fibrogenic phenotype in the IMF. Thus the TAK1 signaling pathway may represent a suitable target to design new, antifibrotic therapies. PMID:26185333

  13. Contrast Enhanced Abdominal Ultrasound in the Assessment of Ileal Inflammation in Crohn’s Disease: A Comparison with MR Enterography

    PubMed Central

    Horjus Talabur Horje, C. S.; Roovers, L.; Groenen, M. J. M.; Wahab, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims To prospectively examine the feasibility and accuracy of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) in the assessment of Crohn’s disease (CD) activity in the terminal ileum in comparison to Magnetic Resonance Enterography (MRE), using endoscopy as a reference standard. Methods 105 consecutive patients with alleged clinically active CD were assessed by MRE and CEUS. CEUS of the terminal ileum was performed using an intravenous microbubble contrast enhancer. Accuracy values of CEUS and MRE for the presence of active terminal ileitis were evaluated using the Receiver Operating Characteristic method, using endoscopic findings as a reference standard. Sensitivity and specificity values of MRE and CEUS were compared by the McNemar test. Results CEUS was feasible in 98% of patients, MRE in all. Optimal diagnostic accuracy in CEUS was obtained at a peak intensity value of 10%, showing 100% sensitivity, 92% specificity and an accuracy of 99% in demonstrating ileal mucosal inflammation. For MRE, overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, 87%, 100%, and 88%, respectively. CEUS and MRE were highly correlated in assessing length and wall thickness of the terminal ileum. CEUS identified 11 of 16 MRE-detected strictures, but no fistulae. Conclusion The accuracy of CEUS is comparable to that of MRE in the assessment of active, uncomplicated terminal ileal CD and therefore a valuable bedside alternative to MRE in the follow-up of these patients. PMID:26322970

  14. Experience with registered mucosal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Guido; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Lang, Alois B; Viret, Jean-François

    2003-01-30

    Most pathogens gain access to their host through mucosal surfaces. It is therefore desirable to develop vaccination strategies that lead to mucosal immune responses. Ideally, a vaccine should be administered mucosally in order to elicit mucosal protection. Several attenuated live viral and bacterial pathogens are registered as oral vaccines for human use, including the oral polio vaccine (Sabin) as well as attenuated strains of Salmonella typhi and Vibrio cholerae. These attenuated bacterial live vaccines-S. typhi Ty21a as well as V. cholerae CVD 103-HgR-are employed as vaccines against typhoid and cholera, respectively. In this manuscript, we review the immune responses that are induced by these vaccines, with a focus on mucosal immunity. PMID:12531339

  15. Dehydroalanine analog of glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Islam R.; Elliott, Meenal; Peer, Cody J.; Cooper, Arthur J.L.; Pinto, John T.; Konat, Gregory W.; Kraszpulski, Michal; Petros, William P.; Callery, Patrick S.

    2008-01-01

    Elimination of hydrogen sulfide from glutathione (GSH) converts a well-known cellular nucleophile to an electrophilic species, ?-glutamyldehydroalanylglycine (EdAG). We have found that a sulfonium metabolite formed from GSH and busulfan undergoes a facile ?-elimination reaction to give EdAG, which is an ??-unsaturated dehydroalanyl analog of GSH. EdAG was identified as a metabolite of busulfan in a human liver cytosol fraction. EdAG condenses with GSH in a Michael addition reaction to produce a lanthionine thioether (GSG), which is a non-reducible analog of glutathione disulfide (GSSG). EdAG was less cytotoxic than busulfan to C6 rat glioma cells. GSH and EdAG were equally effective in displacing a glutathione S-transferase isozyme (human GSTA1-1) from a GSH-Agarose column. The finding of an electrophilic metabolite of GSH suggests that alteration of cellular GSH concentrations, irreversible non-reducible glutathionylation of proteins, and interference with GST function may contribute to the toxicity of busulfan. PMID:18791061

  16. Histopathological study of colo-ileal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    MATSUKUMA, SUSUMU; OKADA, KENJI; TAKEO, HIROAKI; SATO, KIMIYA

    2011-01-01

    Cases of colo-ileal carcinoma (CIC), defined as intestinal carcinoma involving the right-sided colon and the ileum, are rarely encountered. The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinicopathological characteristics, which have been poorly understood, in such cases. A total of 16 CICs were examined histologically and immunohistochemically. Microsatellite instability-related histology was also evaluated according to previously published models, such as MsPath and PREDICT. CICs included 14 adenocarcinomas and 2 mucinous adenocarcinomas. The CICs showed focal or diffuse cytokeratin 20 expression and 7 CICs showed focal cytokeratin 7 co-expression. MsPath and PREDICT scores ranged from 1.6 to 6.6 (mean, 3.14) and from 1.6 to 7.8 (mean, 3.86), respectively. Three CICs showed loss of MLH1 immunoreactivity. Prominent neutrophilia and cancerous lymphangiosis in Peyer’s patches (CLPP) were found in 8 cases (50%) and in 3 cases (18.8%), respectively. Neither variable was associated with parameters such as gender, tumor size or poor prognosis. However, the PREDICT score in prominently neutrophilic CICs was significantly higher than that in CICs with non-prominent neutrophilia (P=0.004). Patients with CLPP-positive CICs were significantly younger than those with CLPP-negative CICs (P=0.031). This study showed that almost all CICs originate from the right-sided colon with possible high levels of microsatellite instability. Prominent neutrophilia may be an additional histological indicator for microsatellite instability. Prognosis-independent CLPP occasionally occurs in younger patients with CICs. PMID:22740977

  17. Effect of type of grinding of barley and dehydrated alfalfa on performance, digestion, and crude mucin ileal concentration in growing rabbits.

    PubMed

    Romero, C; Nicodemus, N; Rodríguez, J D; García, A I; de Blas, C

    2011-08-01

    The effects of type of grinding of barley and dehydrated alfalfa (DA) were tested in rabbits weaned at 35 d of age with an average BW of 846 ± 93 g. Four nonmedicated diets were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial structure, with type of grinding (coarse grinding with a 4.5-mm screen or fine grinding with a 1.5-mm screen) of barley (TGB) and DA (TGDA) as the main factors. A total of 1,056 mixed-sex rabbits (264 per diet) were fattened until d 63. Most of these rabbits (216 per diet) were housed in pairs and were used only to record mortality rate. Mortality was also recorded for the remaining 192 rabbits, which were housed individually and used to determine growth performance. From this group, 100 rabbits were used to determine digestive traits. Apart from those rabbits, a different group of 88 rabbits (44 housed individually and the remaining 44 housed in pairs) was used in the digestibility trial. All rabbits in this group were used to determine ileal digestibility (13 pools of ileal digesta per diet) and ileal mucin concentration (6 pools of ileal digesta per diet), whereas only the 44 individually housed rabbits were used to assess the fecal digestibility coefficients (11 rabbits per diet). Last, a jejunal sample was excised from 32 of the 44 individually housed rabbits to determine mucosal histology. Treatments did not affect ADG, ADFI, or G:F in the entire fattening period, but in the 49- to 63-d period, the diet containing both finely ground barley and DA reduced ADFI (P=0.08) compared with the other treatments (130 vs. 137 g). Moreover, this diet increased total digestive tract (4.76%, P=0.08) and cecal content (11.3%, P=0.08) weights compared with the other 3 treatments. Pylorus (P=0.09) and mixed digesta (P=0.06) pH, respectively, were reduced from 1.53 and 1.59 to 1.37 and 1.44 when both barley and DA were finely instead of coarsely ground. Grinding both barley and DA coarsely reduced the ileal digestibility of starch (0.899 vs. 0.936, P=0.06), increased (P < 0.01) its ileal flow and content in the feces to 1.66 g/d and 7.42 g/kg of DM, respectively, and led to decreased fecal digestibility (0.932 vs. 0.951, P < 0.01) compared with fine grinding. Coarse DA shortened villi (612 vs. 704 ?m, P=0.02), increased crypt depth (121 vs. 92.1 ?m, P=0.01), and reduced the villus:crypt ratio (5.08 vs. 7.66, P < 0.01) compared with finely ground DA. Furthermore, the greatest ileal crude mucin (148 vs. 107 g/kg of DMI, P=0.02) and sialic acid (71.7 vs. 61.7 mg/kg of DMI, P=0.04) concentrations were reported in rabbits receiving the diet with both coarsely ground barley and DA. Finally, mortality rate was not influenced by treatments, with an average of 9.64%. In conclusion, the diet containing finely ground barley and coarsely ground DA did not increase the weight of cecal contents, resulting in increased feed intake and leading to increased ileal digestibility and reduced ileal flow of starch. PMID:21478455

  18. Intracorporeal ileal ureter replacement using laparoscopy and robotics

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Allen; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Mischinger, Johannes; Halalsheh, Omar; Boettge, Johannes; Rausch, Steffen; Bier, Simone; Aufderklamm, Stefan; Stenzl, Arnulf; Gakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ileal ureter is a suitable treatment option for patients with long ureteric strictures. Minimally invasive techniques have been shown to be as safe as open techniques but superior in terms of post–operative recovery. We report our experience using minimally invasive techniques for total intracorporeal ureteral replacement. Material and methods A chart review revealed five patients who underwent intracorporeal ileal ureter using minimally invasive techniques in the preceding 5 years. 4 patients underwent conventional laparoscopic surgery and 1 patient underwent robotic–assisted surgery. Patient's characteristics, perioperative data and functional outcomes as well as a detailed description of surgical technique are reported. In all 5 of these patients, the ileal ureter was performed completely intracorporeally. Results The median age of our patients is 61 (range 42–73). The median operative time was 250 minutes (range 150–320) and median blood loss was 100 ml (range 50–200). The median hospital stay was 8 days (range 6–10) and there were no major perioperative complications reported. At median follow up of 22 months (range 4–38), there were no recurrences of strictures or any other complications. Conclusions We have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of minimally invasive intracorporeal ileal ureter. Numbers are still small but its application is likely to grow further. PMID:25667767

  19. Alteration of the Redox State with Reactive Oxygen Species for 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis. PMID:24376587

  20. Glutamine attenuates the inhibitory effect of methotrexate on TLR signaling during intestinal chemotherapy-induced mucositis in a rat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) is crucial in maintaining intestinal epithelial homeostasis, participates in a vigorous signaling process and heightens inflammatory cytokine output. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of glutamine (GLN) on TLR-4 signaling in intestinal mucosa during methotrexate (MTX)-induced mucositis in a rat. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of four experimental groups of 8 rats each: 1) control rats; 2) CONTR-GLN animals were treated with oral glutamine given in drinking water (2%) 48 hours before and 72 hours following vehicle injection; 3) MTX-rats were treated with a single IP injection of MTX (20 mg/kg); and 4) MTX-GLN rats were pre-treated with oral glutamine similar to group B, 48 hours before and 72 hours after MTX injection. Intestinal mucosal damage, mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 72 hours following MTX injection. The expression of TLR-4, MyD88 and TRAF6 in the intestinal mucosa was determined using real time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. MTX-GLN rats demonstrated a greater jejunal and ileal mucosal weight and mucosal DNA, greater villus height in ileum and crypt depth and index of proliferation in jejunum and ileum, compared to MTX animals. The expression of TLR-4 and MyD88 mRNA and protein in the mucosa was significantly lower in MTX rats versus controls animals. The administration of GLN increased significantly the expression of TLR-4 and MyD88 (vs the MTX group). In conclusion, treatment with glutamine was associated with up-regulation of TLR-4 and MyD88 expression and a concomitant decrease in intestinal mucosal injury caused by MTX-induced mucositis in a rat. PMID:24742067

  1. Glutathione specifically labeled with isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K.; Abbott, W.A.; Bridges, R.J.; Meister, A.

    1985-10-01

    A procedure for synthesis of glutathione selectivity labeled with isotopes is described. A strain of Escherichia coli enriched in its content of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione synthetase by recombinant DNA techniques is immobilized in a carrageenan matrix and treated with toluene to render the cells more permeable to the substrates. The immobilized cell matrix is incubated with a mixture containing the appropriately labeled amino acid, the other amino acid constituents of glutathione, ATP, and acetylphosphate. The radiolabeled product is isolated by column chromatography.

  2. Ileal microbiota composition of broilers fed various commercial diet compositions.

    PubMed

    van der Hoeven-Hangoor, E; van der Vossen, J M B M; Schuren, F H J; Verstegen, M W A; de Oliveira, J E; Montijn, R C; Hendriks, W H

    2013-10-01

    Microbiota plays a role in the release and absorption of nutrients from feed components, thereby affecting digesta composition and moisture content of the excreta. The objective of the current study was to determine the effects of 5 different diets varying in ingredients (medium-chain fatty acids, nonstarch polysaccharides, and starch) on the microbiota composition of ileal digesta of broiler chickens and excreta DM content. Each treatment was repeated 6 times in cages each containing 18 Ross 308 broilers, with growth performance measured from 0 to 34 d of age and excreta DM and ileal microbiota composition analyzed at 34 d of age. Microbiota composition was evaluated using a novel ribosomal RNA microarray technology containing 370 different probes covering various genera, groups of microbial species, and individual species of the chicken gut microbiota, of which 321 had a signal above the background threshold. Replacing part of the animal fat and soybean oil in the wheat-based diet with medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA; 0.3% C10 and 2.7% C12) improved feed efficiency compared with the other dietary treatments. This coincided with a suppression of gram-positive bacteria belonging to the phylum of the Firmicutes, including Lactobacillus species, and species belonging to the family of the Enterococcaceae and Micrococcaceae, whereas the gram-negative bacteria belonging to the family of the Enterobacteriaceae were promoted. None of the other diets used in the present study notably changed the ileal digesta bacteria composition. Excreta DM content was not affected by dietary treatment. The variation between individual birds per dietary treatment was more pronounced than variation caused by feed composition, with the exception of the digesta microbiota of the birds fed the MCFA diet. It is concluded that a diet with MCFA significantly changes the ileal microbiota composition, whereas the effect of the other diets on the composition of the microbiota and excreta DM content is small in broiler chickens. PMID:24046419

  3. Atraumatic splenic rupture and ileal volvulus following cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Smith, J Patrick; Samra, Navdeep S

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 38-year-old male with an atraumatic splenic rupture, hemoperitoneum, and ileal volvulus following acute cocaine intoxication. Computed tomography showed a "whirl sign", a subcapsular splenic hematoma with suspected peripheral laceration, and diffuse hemoperitoneum. At laparotomy, the spleen was confirmed to be the source of bleeding and was removed. A nonreducible volvulus was found at the distal ileum, and this segment of small bowel was removed. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:26324218

  4. Glutathione and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C.

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in cells whose functions are dependent on the redox-active thiol of its cysteine moiety that serves as a cofactor for a number of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. While synthesized exclusively in the cytosol from its constituent amino acids, GSH is distributed in different compartments, including mitochondria where its concentration in the matrix equals that of the cytosol. This feature and its negative charge at physiological pH imply the existence of specific carriers to import GSH from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix, where it plays a key role in defense against respiration-induced reactive oxygen species and in the detoxification of lipid hydroperoxides and electrophiles. Moreover, as mitochondria play a central strategic role in the activation and mode of cell death, mitochondrial GSH has been shown to critically regulate the level of sensitization to secondary hits that induce mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and release of proteins confined in the intermembrane space that once in the cytosol engage the molecular machinery of cell death. In this review, we summarize recent data on the regulation of mitochondrial GSH and its role in cell death and prevalent human diseases, such as cancer, fatty liver disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25024695

  5. [The development of mucosal vaccines].

    PubMed

    Bakke, Hilde; Haneberg, Bjørn

    2006-11-01

    The live oral polio vaccine was the first mucosal vaccine accepted for general use. Since then, similar vaccines have been developed against typhoid fever, cholera and rotavirus infection, and a nasal vaccine against influenza has recently been registered in the USA. The only non-living mucosal vaccine on the market today is an oral cholera vaccine consisting of inactivated Vibrio cholerae and the B subunit of cholera toxin. Several groups of scientists are at present working on the development of other mucosal vaccines based on inactivated microbes or parts of them. Results from animal trials at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, suggest that non-living nasal vaccines can provide protective immunity and may be combined with the same types of vaccines for injection. Clinical trials with nasal vaccines consisting of beta-propiolactone inactivated influenza particles, showed that it was possible to achieve serum concentrations of antibodies at levels providing protection against influenza. IgA antibodies, which were formed in nasal secretions, were specifically aimed at influenza and ought to hinder the spread of the disease. By optimizing the immunization regimes so that the immunological memory is better exploited, and by adding adjuvants to the formulations, it is probable that non-living mucosal vaccines can be realistic alternatives to several of the vaccines now given by injection. PMID:17086224

  6. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  7. Rebamipide attenuates 5-Fluorouracil-induced small intestinal mucositis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jin Hyun; Moon, Won; Park, Jongha; Park, Seun Ja; Song, Geun Am; Han, Seung Hee; Lee, Jong Hun

    2015-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis is one of the most common morbidities in chemotherapy and involves the reactive oxygen species (ROS) system, apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokines. Rebamipide exerts a mucosal-protective effect, mediated through several mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of rebamipide in 5-FU-induced mouse small-intestinal mucositis. BALB/c mice were assigned randomly to four groups; (1) control group (n=10; receiving saline orally for 6 d), (2) rebamipide group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally), (3) 5-FU group (n=10; 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and (4) rebamipide +5-FU group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally and 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, i.p.). Body weights and diarrhea scales were assessed. At day 5, the mice were sacrificed. Small intestinal tissue was used for: (1) hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining for determination of small intestinal villi height, (2) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, (3) immunohistochemistry for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), F4/80, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-?1, (4) measurement of serum and tissue GSH levels, and (5) measurement of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? levels. Rebamipide attenuated the severity of mucosal injury reflected by body weight changes, degrees of diarrhea, and heights of villi. Rebamipide reduced the expression of iNOS and TGF-?1, apoptosis, macrophage accumulation, serum TNF-? levels, and prevented reductions in serum and tissue glutathione (GSH) levels by 5-FU administration. These results suggest that rebamipide promotes several mechanisms of mucosal protection and attenuated the 5-FU-induced mucosal injury. In conclusion, administration of rebamipide may have significant protective effects against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. PMID:25747976

  8. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  9. Ileal impaction and jejunal enterotomy in a 4-month-old Arabian filly.

    PubMed

    Davis, Heather A; Munsterman, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old Arabian filly was treated by surgical correction of an ileal impaction. The impaction was resolved through a distal jejunal enterotomy. One-year follow-up showed no post-operative complications secondary to the enterotomy. Jejunal enterotomy may be a surgical option for resolution of an ileal impaction. PMID:22753967

  10. Ileal neuroendocrine tumors and heart: not only valvular consequences.

    PubMed

    Calissendorff, Jan; Maret, Eva; Sundin, Anders; Falhammar, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Ileal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) often progress slowly, but because of their generally nonspecific symptoms, they have often metastasized to local lymph nodes and to the liver by the time the patient presents. Biochemically, most of these patients have increased levels of whole blood serotonin, urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and chromogranin A. Imaging work-up generally comprises computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, or in recent years positron emission tomography with 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs, allowing for detection of even sub-cm lesions. Carcinoid heart disease with affected leaflets, mainly to the right side of the heart, is a well-known complication and patients routinely undergo echocardiography to diagnose and monitor this. Multitasking surgery is currently recognized as first-line treatment for ileal NETs with metastases and carcinoid heart disease. Open heart surgery and valve replacement are advocated in patients with valvular disease and progressive heart failure. When valvulopathy in the tricuspid valve results in right-sided heart failure, a sequential approach, performing valve replacement first before intra-abdominal tumor-reductive procedures are conducted, reduces the risk of bleeding. Metastases to the myocardium from ileal NETs are seen in <1-4.3% of patients, depending partly on the imaging technique used, and are generally discovered in those affected with widespread disease. Systemic treatment with somatostatin analogs, and sometimes alpha interferon, is first-line medical therapy in metastatic disease to relieve hormonal symptoms and stabilize the tumor. This treatment is also indicated when heart metastases are detected, with the addition of diuretics and fluid restriction in cases of heart failure. Myocardial metastases are rarely treated by surgical resection. PMID:25319177

  11. Spontaneous rupture of ileal neobladder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tu-Hao; Li, Ching-Chia; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Chou, Yii-Her; Liu, Chia-Chu; Huang, Chun-Hsiung

    2005-04-01

    A 63-year-old male patient suffered from diabetes, hypertension, and a bladder tumor. He had undergone radical cystectomy and ileal neobladder construction 1 year prior to this admission. He came to our emergency room complaining of abdominal pain after recent alcohol consumption. Muscle guarding and abdominal rebounding pain developed after conservative treatment for 1 day. The next day, emergency laparotomy for acute peritonitis revealed two small perforations in the neobladder and calculus formation within it. In addition, severe intraperitoneal adhesion was noted. After removing the neobladder stone and repairing the neobladder, a Foley catheter was inserted for urine drainage. The patient's postoperative recovery was excellent. PMID:15909676

  12. Vaccination Strategies to Promote Mucosal Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    There are great interest and demand for the development of vaccines to prevent and treat diverse microbial infections. Mucosal vaccines elicit immune protection by stimulating the production of antibodies at mucosal surfaces and systemic districts. Being positioned in close proximity to a large community of commensal microbes, the mucosal immune system deploys a heterogeneous population of cells and a complex regulatory network to maintain the balance between surveillance and tolerance. A successful mucosal vaccine relies on leveraging the functions of these immune cells and regulatory components. This article reviews the important cellular interactions and molecular pathways underlying the induction and regulation of mucosal antibody responses and discusses their implications on mucosal vaccination. PMID:21029959

  13. Hepatic portal venous gas and portal venous thrombosis following colonoscopy in a patient with terminal ileal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Adler Shing Chak; Ewing, Iain; Murray, Charles Daniel; Hamilton, Mark Ian

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year-old man developed extensive hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) shortly after staging colonoscopy for active, ulcerating, terminal ileal Crohn's disease. Non-operative management was instigated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and thromboprophylaxis. Radiology at 72?h demonstrated resolution of HPVG but revealed fresh non-occlusive left portal vein thrombus. Anticoagulation with warfarin was continued for 1?year, during which the thrombus initially progressed and then organised with recanalisation of the portal vein. There were no long-term clinical consequences. HPVG has previously been documented as a rare complication of inflammatory bowel disease and endoscopic intervention. We hypothesise that the barotrauma sustained during endoscopy, in association with active ulceration and mucosal friability, predisposes to the influx of gas and bacteria into the portal system. We describe successful non-operative management of HPVG in this setting and draw attention to an additional complication of portal venous thrombosis, highlighting the importance of thromboprophylaxis and serial radiological examination. PMID:25939971

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Glutathione synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to cells by neutralizing harmful molecules generated during energy production. Glutathione also plays a role in processing medications and cancer-causing compounds (carcinogens), and building DNA, proteins, and other important cellular components. Glutathione ...

  15. Localized ileal giant pseudopolyposis in Crohn's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Limaiem, F; Ben Slama, S; Jedidi, S; Aloui, S; Lahmar, A; Bouraoui, S; Mzabi, S

    2012-08-01

    Localized giant pseudopolyposis is a rare complication in inflammatory bowel disease defined as a pseudopolyp (isolated or clustered) larger than 1.5 cm in size. Giant pseudopolyps are more commonly found in ulcerative colitis compared to Crohn's disease and mainly involve the left colon. A 26-year-old male patient with a two-year history of Crohn's disease was admitted with increasing abdominal pain, vomiting, anorexia, weight loss and fever. On physical examination, the abdomen was diffusely tender. Computed tomography showed diffuse irregular thickening of the ileal wall and stenosis of the terminal ileum. The patient underwent ileo-cecal resection with re-anastomosis. The ileal portion of the resected specimen harboured multiple finger-like pedunculated polyps, with the smallest measuring 0.5 cm and the largest measuring 1.8 cm. Histologically, the polyps were consistent with granulation tissue. No evidence of dysplasia or malignancy was found. The post-operative course was uneventful considering one month follow-up. This report illustrates an unusual case of giant pseudopolyposis involving the ileum in a patient with Crohn's disease. The natural history of these lesions, as well as their optimal management, remain uncertain. PMID:23316625

  16. Imaging findings post colorectal endoscopic mucosal resection

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, James A; Crookdake, Jonathan; Jepson, Steven; Wurm, Peter; Elabassy, Mosheir

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection is commonly the treatment regime of choice for large sessile colonic polyps. We describe the computed tomography findings of a 51 year old female who presented with transient severe abdominal pain without systemic upset post endoscopic mucosal polyp resection, which resolved with conservative management. This is the second case in the literature that demonstrates ‘normal’ appearances post endoscopic mucosal resection. The clinical team and radiologist need to be aware of these findings when making management decisions in patients who present with acute pain post endoscopic mucosal resection. PMID:24421955

  17. Oxygen metabolite-induced cytotoxicity to cultured rat gastric mucosal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraishi, H.; Terano, A.; Ota, S.; Ivey, K.J.; Sugimoto, T.

    1987-07-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites have been reported to be responsible for the pathogenesis of ischemia-induced gastric mucosal lesion. The authors have investigated the possible protective effect of specific enzymes and oxygen radical scavenging agents on oxygen metabolite-induced injury to cultured gastric mucosal cells. Oxygen-reactive metabolites were generated by 1 mM xanthine and 10-100 mU/ml xanthine oxidase. Cytotoxicity was quantified by measuring /sup 51/Cr release from prelabeled cells. Xanthine oxidase caused a dose-dependent increase of /sup 51/Cr release in the presence of 1 mM xanthine. Catalase diminished xanthine-xanthine oxidase-induced /sup 51/Cr release in a dose-dependent manner. Superoxide dismutase failed to affect the amounts of /sup 51/Cr release induced by xanthine plus xanthine oxidase. Pretreatment with diethyl maleate potentiated oxygen radical-mediated /sup 51/Cr release dose dependently. The presence of ferrous ion or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-chelated iron did not alter xanthine-xanthine oxidase-induced cellular injury. They conclude that in vitro (1) oxygen metabolites, extracellularly generated, have a direct toxic effect on gastric mucosal cells; (2) hydrogen peroxide is a major mediator of oxygen metabolite-induced gastric cell injury; (3) the oxygen-derived superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are less toxic to gastric mucosal cells than hydrogen peroxide; and (4) intracellular glutathione, which detoxifies hydrogen peroxide, may be involved in antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  18. Diagnostic value of terminal ileum biopsies in patients with abnormal terminal ileum mucosal appearance

    PubMed Central

    Velidedeo?lu, Mehmet; Enes Ar?kan, A.; Ka?an Zengin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the necessity of obtaining routine ileal biopsy during colonoscopy in the patients with abnormal terminal ileum mucosal appearance if the inflammatory bowel disease is not considered. Material and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for 57 patients who were referred to a private hospital for colonoscopy between January 2008 and February 2009, in whom terminal ileum intubation was achieved and an abnormal appearance was observed. Results: There were 33 men and 24 women; the mean age was 44.12±11.42 years. In 22 patients, the abnormality was ulcers and/or erosions. In 10 patients, there were mucosal nodularity and in 24, the finding was erythema. The time to reach to ileum from cecum was 28.78±24.30 s. The mean length of the examined ileum was 12.93±6.05 cm. There was no difference between groups according to distance covered in the ileum for diagnostic yield, but going further than 2 cm was important. Conclusion: There should be no need to obtain routine biopsy in patients with abnormal terminal ileum mucosa appearance, when inflammatory bowel disease is not considered. In these patients, histopathology also reveals non-specific ileitis. Furthermore, in these patients, the macroscopic pathological diagnosis overlaps the histopathology, and it has a low diagnostic yield and lower clinical significance. PMID:26504419

  19. Voice Disorders in Mucosal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vieira, Jéssica Rafael; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena; Terceiro, Benivaldo Ramos Ferreira; de Sousa Torraca, Tania Salgado; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases - Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age) and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. Results 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81%) were male and five (19%) female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years). The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%), followed by dysphonia (38.5%), odynophagia (30.8%) and dysphagia (26.9%). 23 patients (84.6%) presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. Conclusion We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some resonance structures (larynx, pharynx and nasal and oral cavities) or even to compensation mechanisms caused by the presence of lesions in the upper airways and digestive tract. PMID:25055046

  20. Biology and Mucosal Immunity to Myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed. PMID:23994774

  1. Prolapse of inverted ileal loops through a patent vitellointestinal duct.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Agarwal, Nitin; Singh, Poonam; Dhaneria, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a prolapsed patent vitellointestinal duct (PVID) in a 2-month-old girl child who presented with sudden increase in size of a polypoidal lesion into a large, 'Y'-shaped reddish, prolapsing lesion, discharging gaseous and faecal matter at her umbilicus. The lesion was diagnosed as a prolapse of inverted ileal loops through the PVID. The child had no associated congenital anomalies. A transumbilical exploration was performed, followed by wedge resection and anastomosis. The child tolerated the procedure well and the postoperative course was uneventful. If the omphalomesenteric duct fails to obliterate a range of congenital defects related to the umbilicus, it can become clinically apparent. Meckel's diverticulum is the commonest of these defects but is most often asymptomatic. PVID is the most common symptomatic anomaly of the patent omphalomesenteric duct and requires prompt surgical correction to avoid complications. PMID:26494719

  2. Neonatal Bartter syndrome associated with ileal atresia and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Akuma, A. O.; Mittal, S. K.; Sambo, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of neonatal Bartter syndrome presenting with severe hyperkalemia is reported in a preterm child born to consanguineous parents. This child also had ileal atresia, and meconium plugs were found at laparotomy. The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was subsequently made on genetic testing. Despite full intensive care management and surgical interventions, he died of respiratory failure after 70 days. This is the first reported case of such conglomeration of pathologies in a newborn child. Second, in highlighting this case we want clinicians to be aware that a subtype of neonatal Bartter syndrome can present with initial hyperkalemia so that an erroneous diagnosis of pseudohypoaldosteronism is not made when this is seen in combination with hyperkalemia and hyperrenin hyperaldosteronism. PMID:23580805

  3. Effect of Dietary Exogenous Enzyme Supplementation on Enteric Mucosal Morphological Development and Adherent Mucin Thickness in Turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ayoola, Ayuub A.; Malheiros, Ramon D.; Grimes, Jesse L.; Ferket, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-nutritional factors (ANFs) in feed ingredients can challenge gut health and reduce nutrient utilization. Birds typically activate their innate immune system as a protective response against the adverse effects of ANF, which often involves the secretion of mucin. Although dietary supplementation of exogenous enzymes are commonly used to alleviate the adverse effects of ANF on apparent nutrient digestibility, little is known about how they affect gut health, particularly in relation to the morphological development and mucin secretion of enteric mucosa. We carried out two trials to examine the effect of dietary supplementation of different types of exogenous enzymes on gut health of by accessing the effect of jejunum morphological development and ileal enteric adherent mucin thickness layer in turkeys. Dietary ?-mannanase supplementation reduced ileal adherent mucin thickness layer (804 vs 823??g/g; p?ileal adherent mucin layer thickness (589 vs 740??g/g; p?mucosal irritation that stimulates enteric mucin secretion. PMID:26664972

  4. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23197881

  5. Palliation of radiation-related mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, B.R.; Spektor, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oral mucositis associated with head and neck radiotherapy can substantially hinder completion of cancer therapy. Alleviation of this often severe stomatitis can provide enhanced patient comfort and facilitate appropriate care. A double-blind format was used in a pilot project to measure, against a control rinse, the effectiveness of an oral rinse consisting of hydrocortisone, nystatin, tetracycline, and diphenhydramine in controlling radiation-related mucositis. A combination of clinical evaluation and patient responses to a questionnaire was used to judge the results of the topical medications. Patients using the experimental medication developed less mucositis than did patients in the control group.

  6. Salivary changes in oral mucosal diseases.

    PubMed

    Hassona, Yazan; Scully, Crispian

    2016-02-01

    Saliva is a unique biological fluid that can be easily collected and analyzed with low cost and low morbidity. Therefore, there is a growing attention for using salivary biomarkers in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease progress and response to treatment. Salivary changes have been described in relation to oral mucosal diseases. This article discusses the causes and consequences of salivary hypofunction and presents a review of the literature related to changes in salivary parameters in various oral mucosal diseases and in systemic diseases with possible oral mucosal involvement. PMID:26662486

  7. Oxidation induced by the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) 

    E-print Network

    Petzold H.; Sadler P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Remarkably efficient oxygen atom transfer from an intermediate of glutathione (GSH) autoxidation to an organometallic ruthenium arene thiolato complex is observed under physiologically-relevant conditions.

  8. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20?years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  9. Measurement of true ileal phosphorus digestibility in meat and bone meal for broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Mutucumarana, R K; Ravindran, V; Ravindran, G; Cowieson, A J

    2015-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to estimate true ileal phosphorus (P:) digestibility of 3 meat and bone meal samples (MBM-1, MBM-2: , and MBM-3:) for broiler chickens. Four semipurified diets were formulated from each sample to contain graded concentrations of P. The experiment was conducted as a completely randomized design with 6 replicates (6 birds per replicate) per dietary treatment. A total of 432 Ross 308 broilers were assigned at 21 d of age to the 12 test diets. The apparent ileal digestibility coefficient of P was determined by the indicator method, and the linear regression method was used to determine the true P digestibility coefficient. The apparent ileal digestibility coefficient of P in birds fed diets containing MBM-1 and MBM-2 was unaffected by increasing dietary concentrations of P (P > 0.05). The apparent ileal digestibility coefficient of P in birds fed the MBM-3 diets decreased with increasing P concentrations (linear, P < 0.001; quadratic, P < 0. 01). In birds fed the MBM-1 and MBM-2 diets, ileal endogenous P losses were estimated to be 0.049 and 0.142 g/kg DM intake (DMI:), respectively. In birds fed the MBM-3 diets, endogenous P loss was estimated to be negative (-0.370 g/kg DMI). True ileal P digestibility of MBM-1, MBM-2, and MBM-3 was determined to be 0.693, 0.608, and 0.420, respectively. True ileal P digestibility coefficients determined for MBM-1 and MBM-2 were similar (P < 0.05), but were higher (P < 0.05) than that for MBM-3. Total P and true digestible P contents of MBM-1, MBM-2, and MBM-3 were determined to be 37.5 and 26.0; 60.2 and 36.6; and 59.8 and 25.1 g/kg, respectively, on an as-fed basis. PMID:26015585

  10. Ileal lesions in patients with ulcerative colitis after ileo-rectal anastomosis: Relationship with colonic metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Livia; Calabrese, Emma; Palmieri, Giampiero; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Onali, Sara; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo; Cossignani, Marta; Condino, Giovanna; Das, Kiron Moy; Pallone, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis (IRA), ileal lesions may develop in the neo-terminal-ileum and their possible relation with phenotypic changes towards colonic epithelium. METHODS: A total of 19 patients with IRA under regular follow up were enrolled, including 11 UC and 8 controls (6 Crohn’s disease, CD; 1 familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP; 1 colon cancer, colon K). Ileal lesions were identified by ileoscopy with biopsies taken from the ileum (involved and uninvolved) and from the rectal stump. Staining included HE and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against colonic epithelial protein CEP (Das-1) and human tropomyosin isoform 5, hTM5 (CG3). Possible relation between development of colonic metaplasia and ileal lesions was investigated. RESULTS: Stenosing adenocarcinoma of the rectal stump was detected in 1 UC patient. The neo-terminal ileum was therefore investigated in 10/11 UC patients. Ileal ulcers were detected in 7/10 UC, associated with colonic metaplasia in 4/7 (57.1%) and Das-1 and CG3 reactivity in 3/4 UC. In controls, recurrence occurred in 4/6 CD, associated with colonic metaplasia in 3/4 and reactivity with Das-1 and CG3 in 2/3. CONCLUSION: Present findings suggest that in UC, ileal lesions associated with changes towards colonic epithelium may develop also after IRA. Changes of the ileal content after colectomy may contribute to the development of colonic metaplasia, leading to ileal lesions both in the pouch and in the neo-terminal ileum after IRA. PMID:18785281

  11. Primary bile acid diarrhoea without an ileal carrier defect: quantification of active bile acid transport across the ileal brush border membrane.

    PubMed Central

    van Tilburg, A J; de Rooij, F W; van den Berg, J W; van Blankenstein, M

    1991-01-01

    Unexplained bile acid malabsorption associated with diarrhoea that responds to cholestyramine was first described in 1973 but convincing evidence of the proposed mechanism--a defective active ileal bile acid transport--has never been substantiated. Active bile acid transport was quantified in vitro using brush border membrane vesicles prepared from terminal ileal biopsy specimens from 10 patients who fulfilled the criteria of idiopathic bile acid diarrhoea. They were recruited from 181 patients with bile acid malabsorption of various causes. Transport was quantified as in vitro Na+ dependent bile acid transport (INBAT), expressed as pmol taurocholate/mg brush border membrane protein/15 seconds, and in vitro Na+ dependent bile acid local transport capacity (INBALTC), expressed as pmol taurocholate/g ileal biopsy tissue/15 seconds. The lowest INBAT and INBALTC values in the 10 patients with idiopathic bile acid diarrhoea were well above the 10th centile values of a control group of 132 patients. Both INBAT (mean (range) 88 (30-136)) and INBALTC (158 (85-268)) values were significantly higher in the 10 patients than in the control group (INBAT: mean (range) 63 (1-244), INBALTC: mean (range) 98 (1-408)). Quantification of active ileal bile acid transport in these 10 patients with idiopathic bile acid malabsorption suggests that a genetic (carrier) defect is rare in adults. PMID:2040472

  12. The Effects of Emulsions on the Upregulation of Satiety Hormones in Cell Culture and the Activation of the Ileal Brake in Human Subjects 

    E-print Network

    Gearing, Merrick Hume

    2015-05-26

    To treat obesity, one approach is developing food products formulated to trigger the ileal brake, a gastric feedback mechanism that induces satiety, the prolonged feeling of fullness. PYY and GLP-1, biomarkers of the ileal brake, are secreted from...

  13. Effect of diallyl disulfide on acute gastric mucosal damage induced by alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-C; Baek, H-S; Kim, S-H; Moon, C; Park, S-H; Kim, S-H; Shin, I-S; Park, S-C; Kim, J-C

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the gastroprotective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a secondary organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.) on experimental model of ethanol (EtOH)-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The antiulcerogenic activity of DADS was evaluated by gross/histopathological inspection, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lipid peroxidation with antioxidant enzyme activities in the stomach. DADS (100 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 2 h prior to EtOH treatment (5 ml/kg). The animals were killed 1 h after receiving EtOH treatment. Pretreatment with DADS attenuated EtOH-induced gastric mucosal injury, as evidenced by decreased severity of hemorrhagic lesions and gastric ulcer index upon visual inspection. DADS also prevented histopathological alterations and gastric apoptotic changes caused by EtOH. An increase in tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and inducible nitric oxide synthase was observed in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats that coincided with increased serum TNF-? and interleukin 6 levels. In contrast, DADS effectively suppressed production of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by EtOH. Furthermore, DADS prevented the formation of gastric malondialdehyde and the depletion of reduced glutathione content and restored antioxidant enzyme activities, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats. These results indicate that DADS prevents gastric mucosal damage induced by acute EtOH administration in rats and that the protective effects of DADS may be due to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:24972622

  14. Glutathione synthesis in the exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Neuschwander-Tetri, B A; Presti, M E; Wells, L D

    1997-05-01

    Glutathione is essential for cellular cytoprotection, and in the exocrine pancreas, it is required for digestive enzyme synthesis. The purpose of these studies was to measure the capacity of the exocrine pancreas to synthesize glutathione, determine whether the pancreatic transsulfuration pathway has a role in providing cysteine needed for glutathione synthesis, and determine whether the glutathione synthetic capacity of the pancreas responds to pathologically relevant stresses. The activity of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, the key regulatory enzyme for glutathione synthesis, was 3.56 +/- 0.29 mU/mg protein in the pancreas of fed rats, compared to 31 +/- 4 in the liver and 116 +/- 5 in the kidney. Studies using dispersed rat pancreatic acinar cells showed that the exocrine pancreas synthesizes glutathione from precursor amino acids and that the transsulfuration pathway is functionally intact in the pancreas and may serve as an important source of pancreatic cysteine. In mice, pancreatic gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity was induced 37% by corn oil, 77% by ethanol, and 88% by both treatments. Thus, the glutathione synthetic capacity of the pancreas is quantitatively less than that of the kidney or liver, but its key regulatory enzyme responds dynamically to pathologically relevant metabolic stresses, suggesting that glutathione is a key pancreatic cytoprotectant. PMID:9163779

  15. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    PubMed

    Schrier, B P; Lichtendonk, W J; Witjes, J A

    2002-05-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a refrigerator. After precipitation, the urine was decanted. The residue was stirred to a homogeneous suspension. To samples of 4.5 ml mucus, 0.5 ml NAC 10% was added. To the control sample, 0.5 ml water was added. The samples were incubated in a water bath at 37 degrees C for 5, 30 and 60 min. Viscosity was measured in the Bohlin VOR Rheometer. The viscosity of the ileal neobladder mucus decreased quickly after incubating with NAC 10%. Viscosity increased slightly after I h of incubation. The viscosity in the control sample was higher than in the other incubated samples. NAC was found to decrease the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus, supporting the in vivo experience that NAC can be useful in patients with an ileal neobladder to facilitate the evacuation of mucus by decreasing viscosity. PMID:12088194

  16. Large Intraluminal Ileal Hematoma Presenting as Small Bowel Obstruction in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun Jung; Nam, So Hyun; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Intraluminal small bowel hematoma has been rarely reported in children, as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. We present a case of an intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child. Computed Tomography (CT) indicated a large intraluminal hyperdense lesion in the distal ileum as the cause of small bowel obstruction. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic mass-like lesion with multiple septa in the distal ileum. Small bowel obstruction due to a complicated cystic mass was provisionally diagnosed. Histopathologic examination of the resected mass suggested a submucosal ileal hematoma. Although intraluminal small bowel hematoma is rare in children, it can present as an intraluminal cystic mass and should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The US and CT findings of submucosal ileal hematoma could be useful for the diagnosis of such cases in the future. PMID:25901264

  17. Inhibition of the effect of serotonin on rat ileal transport by cisapride: evidence in favour of the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, K J; Higgs, N B; Woodford, M; Warhurst, G; Turnberg, L A

    1987-01-01

    Cisapride is a synthetic drug which binds, in vitro, to type 2 serotonin receptors. We examined the influence of serotonin and cisapride on ion transport across intestinal mucosa in vitro and studied the effect of cisapride on the response to serotonin. Segments of ileum of male Sprague-Dawley rats were stripped of muscle layers and mounted in flux chambers. The addition of serotonin (10(-8) to 10(-4) M) to the serosal aspect of the mucosa caused a rapid, dose-dependent rise in short circuit current and transmural potential difference. Cisapride alone (5 X 10(-5) M), when added to the mucosal and serosal surfaces, had no effect on the short circuit current, transmural potential difference, resistance, or sodium and chloride fluxes across the mucosa. It did, however, inhibit the response of the mucosa to serotonin (10(-5) M) in a dose dependent manner and blocked it completely at a concentration of 5 X 10(-5) M. Serotonin (5 X 10(-5) M) increased serosal to mucosal flux of chloride from 12.6 +/- 0.8 to 15.2 +/- 0.6 mumol/cm2/h (p less than 0.025), thus reducing net chloride absorption from 4.65 +/- 0.81 to 1.49 +/- 1.04 mumol/cm2/h (p less than 0.05). This effect was completely blocked by cisapride (5 X 10(-5) M). In summary, cisapride inhibits the effect of serotonin on rat ileal ion transport, probably by blocking type 2 serotonin receptors. PMID:3653752

  18. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  19. A mathematical model of glutathione metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Michael C; Thomas, Rachel L; Pavisic, Jovana; James, S Jill; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Nijhout, H Frederik

    2008-01-01

    Background Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in anti-oxidant defense and detoxification reactions. It is primarily synthesized in the liver by the transsulfuration pathway and exported to provide precursors for in situ GSH synthesis by other tissues. Deficits in glutathione have been implicated in aging and a host of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, Down syndrome and autism. Approach We explore the properties of glutathione metabolism in the liver by experimenting with a mathematical model of one-carbon metabolism, the transsulfuration pathway, and glutathione synthesis, transport, and breakdown. The model is based on known properties of the enzymes and the regulation of those enzymes by oxidative stress. We explore the half-life of glutathione, the regulation of glutathione synthesis, and its sensitivity to fluctuations in amino acid input. We use the model to simulate the metabolic profiles previously observed in Down syndrome and autism and compare the model results to clinical data. Conclusion We show that the glutathione pools in hepatic cells and in the blood are quite insensitive to fluctuations in amino acid input and offer an explanation based on model predictions. In contrast, we show that hepatic glutathione pools are highly sensitive to the level of oxidative stress. The model shows that overexpression of genes on chromosome 21 and an increase in oxidative stress can explain the metabolic profile of Down syndrome. The model also correctly simulates the metabolic profile of autism when oxidative stress is substantially increased and the adenosine concentration is raised. Finally, we discuss how individual variation arises and its consequences for one-carbon and glutathione metabolism. PMID:18442411

  20. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek Kumar; Bains, Rhythm

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO), is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials. PMID:26604952

  1. JAK-STAT and intestinal mucosal immunology

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, Aaron F; Pierre, Joseph F; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal mucosal immune system is challenged with bacteria, viruses, and parasites, in addition to food and environmental antigens, that require dynamic immune responsiveness for homeostasis. One central signaling pathway is JAK-STAT, which regulates the adaptive and innate immune arms of mucosal immunity as well as epithelial repair and regeneration. Adaptive immunity includes lymphocyte mediated secretion of specific antibodies, while innate immune respones include secretion of non-antigen specific compounds. This review examines effects of specialized nutrition support on JAK-STAT in innate immune function and in lymphocyte modulation and epithelial antibody transport in gut-associated lymphoid tissue. PMID:24416649

  2. Combined treatment with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor sitagliptin and elemental diets reduced indomethacin-induced intestinal injury in rats via the increase of mucosal glucagon-like peptide-2 concentration

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kaori; Inoue, Takuya; Yorifuji, Naoki; Iguchi, Munetaka; Sakanaka, Taisuke; Narabayashi, Ken; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Ishida, Kumi; Abe, Yosuke; Masuda, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Fukunishi, Shinya; Umegaki, Eiji; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    The gut incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and the intestinotropic hormone GLP-2 are released from enteroendocrine L cells in response to ingested nutrients. Treatment with an exogenous GLP-2 analogue increases intestinal villous mass and prevents intestinal injury. Since GLP-2 is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), DPP4 inhibition may be an effective treatment for intestinal ulcers. We measured mRNA expression and DPP enzymatic activity in intestinal segments. Mucosal DPP activity and GLP concentrations were measured after administration of the DPP4 inhibitor sitagliptin (STG). Small intestinal ulcers were induced by indomethacin (IM) injection. STG was given before IM treatment, or orally administered after IM treatment with or without an elemental diet (ED). DPP4 mRNA expression and enzymatic activity were high in the jejunum and ileum. STG dose-dependently suppressed ileal mucosal enzyme activity. Treatment with STG prior to IM reduced small intestinal ulcer scores. Combined treatment with STG and ED accelerated intestinal ulcer healing, accompanied by increased mucosal GLP-2 concentrations. The reduction of ulcers by ED and STG was reversed by co-administration of the GLP-2 receptor antagonist. DPP4 inhibition combined with luminal nutrients, which up-regulate mucosal concentrations of GLP-2, may be an effective therapy for the treatment of small intestinal ulcers. PMID:25759522

  3. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  4. Rupture of ileal neobladder due to urethral obstruction by mucous plug.

    PubMed

    Haupt, G; Pannek, J; Knopf, H J; Schulze, H; Senge, T

    1990-09-01

    We report a case of ileal neobladder rupture after radical cystectomy due to mucus obstruction of the bladder neck. Since mucus production in bowel neobladders cannot be sufficiently influenced pharmacologically, patients with a continent urinary diversion connected to the urethra should learn self-catheterization. PMID:2388342

  5. Transforming a Biliopancreatic Derivation in an Ileal Interposition with a Single Anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Sergio; de Aquino, Caio G Gaspar

    2015-08-01

    The biliopancreatic derivation (BPD) is the most powerful bariatric procedure. However, it never became a very popular procedure, except for Italy, because of the high rate of nutritional problems, intense flatulence, and diarrhea. Here, we describe an extremely simple way (just one anastomosis) to revise the BPD, transforming it into an ileal interposition with duodenal exclusion, solving these described problems. PMID:26084252

  6. A Comparative Study between the Outcome of Primary Repair versus Loop Ileostomy in Ileal Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Sushil; Singh, Harnam; Munghate, Anand; Singh, Gurpreet; Garg, Anjna; Sharma, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Ileal perforation peritonitis is a common surgical emergency in the Indian subcontinent and in tropical countries. It is reported to constitute the fifth common cause of abdominal emergencies due to high incidence of enteric fever and tuberculosis in these regions. Methods. Sixty proven cases of ileal perforation patients admitted to Surgical Emergency were taken up for emergency surgery. Randomisation was done by senior surgeons by picking up card from both the groups. The surgical management was done as primary repair (group A) and loop ileostomy (group B). Results. An increased rate of postoperative complications was seen in group A when compared with group B with 6 (20%) patients landed up in peritonitis secondary to leakage from primary repair requiring reoperation as compared to 2 (6.67%) in ileostomy closure. A ratio of 1?:?1.51 days was observed between hospital stay of group A to group B. Conclusion. In cases of ileal perforation temporary defunctioning loop ileostomy plays an important role. We recommend that defunctioning ileostomy should be preferred over other surgical options in cases of ileal perforations. It should be recommended that ileostomy in these cases is only temporary and the extra cost and cost of management are not more than the price of life. PMID:25374961

  7. Legume grains enhance ileal losses of specific endogenous serine-protease proteins in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Paulo; Montagne, Lucile; Freire, João P B; Ferreira, Ricardo B; Teixeira, Artur; Bento, Ofélia; Abreu, Manuel C; Toullec, René; Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2002-07-01

    Feeding legume grains to pigs usually increases losses of endogenous proteins at the terminal ileum. However, the identity of such proteins is largely unknown. This study was undertaken to determine the ileal flow and identity of soluble proteins present in large concentrations in ileal digesta of young pigs fed soybean meal (SBM), peas (P), faba beans (FB), or blue lupin (L) in expt. 1, and white (WPC) or black (BPC) chickpeas in expt. 2. Protein in the control diet (C) was provided by casein. Ileal digesta proteins were analyzed using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Coomassie blue staining, densitometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Three protein bands at molecular masses of 25, 27, and 30 kDa had a higher ileal flow (P < 0.05) in the pigs fed the legume-based diets compared to those fed the control diet in expt. 2. This was true for the 25- and 30-kDa proteins (P < 0.05) and the 27-kDa protein (P < 0.10) in pigs fed the legume-containing diets in expt. 1. These proteins shared N-terminal amino acid sequences with enzymes of the serine protease family including pig trypsin (25 kDa) and blood coagulation factor IX or chymotrypsin (27 and 30 kDa). PMID:12097670

  8. Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Partial Colpectomy and Intracorporeal Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion (Bricker) for Cervical Adenocarcinoma Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Uzan, Jennifer; Cornou, Caroline; Bensaid, Chérazade; Audenet, François; Ngô, Charlotte; Bats, Anne-Sophie; Lecuru, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Ileal conduit urinary diversion (Bricker) is a standard surgical open procedure. The Da Vinci robot allowed precision for this surgical procedure, especially for intracorporeal suturing. Meanwhile, few reports of robot-assisted laparoscopic ileal conduit diversion (Bricker) are described in the literature. We report the case of a 69-year-old patient with a vaginal recurrence of cervical adenocarcinoma associated with vesicovaginal fistula treated by robot-assisted laparoscopic partial colpectomy and ileal conduit urinary diversion (Bricker). The robot-assisted laparoscopic procedure followed all surgical steps of the open procedure. Postoperative period was free of complications. PMID:26634161

  9. Management of Mucositis During Chemotherapy: From Pathophysiology to Pragmatic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Stansborough, Romany; Wardill, Hannah R; Bateman, Emma; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a common condition caused by the breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Symptoms can include pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, which can often necessitate chemotherapy treatment breaks or dose reductions, thus compromising survival outcomes. Despite the significant impact of mucositis, there are currently limited clinically effective pharmacological therapies for the pathology. New emerging areas of research have been proposed to play key roles in the development of mucositis, providing rationale for potential new therapeutics for the prevention, treatment or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review aims to address these new areas of research and to comment on the therapeutics arising from them. PMID:26384312

  10. The microbiome and regulation of mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Andrew J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a mucosal surface constantly exposed to foreign antigens and microbes, and is protected by a vast array of immunologically active structures and cells. Epithelial cells directly participate in immunological surveillance and direction of host responses in the gut and can express numerous pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR9, and nucleotide oligomerization domain 2, as well as produce chemotactic factors for both myeloid and lymphoid cells following inflammatory stimulation. Within the epithelium and in the underlying lamina propria resides a population of innate lymphoid cells that, following stimulation, can become activated and produce effector cytokines and exert both protective and pathogenic roles during inflammation. Lamina propria dendritic cells play a large role in determining whether the response to a particular antigen will be inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. It is becoming clear that the composition and metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiome, as a whole community, exerts a profound influence on mucosal immune regulation. The microbiome produces short-chain fatty acids, polysaccharide A, ?-galactosylceramide and tryptophan metabolites, which can induce interleukin-22, Reg3?, IgA and interleukin-17 responses. However, much of what is known about microbiome–host immune interactions has come from the study of single bacterial members of the gastrointestinal microbiome and their impact on intestinal mucosal immunity. Additionally, evidence continues to accumulate that alterations of the intestinal microbiome can impact not only gastrointestinal immunity but also immune regulation at distal mucosal sites. PMID:24329495

  11. Challenges in mucosal vaccines for the control of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    The mucosal surface is the largest route through which pathogens enter the human body. To control the outbreak of mucosal infectious diseases, we must use our knowledge of the mucosal immune system to create vaccines that elicit protective mucosal and systemic immunity. Mucosal vaccines have advantages over traditional injectable vaccines in that they not only induce effective mucosal immune responses, but they also do not cause physical or psychological discomfort. Mucosal vaccines currently licensed for human use include oral vaccines against Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella typhi, poliovirus and rotavirus, and nasal vaccines against influenza virus. To further improve the existing vaccines, it will be necessary to develop novel vaccine production, storage and delivery systems through innovative strategies derived from interdisciplinary scientific research. Our accumulated knowledge of the innate and acquired arms of the mucosal immune system and the recent scientific and technical advancements in the fields of molecular biology, plant biology, bio-engineering and chemical engineering, genome biology and systems biology have created a unique research and development platform for the development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines. This review summarizes the current perspectives and future directions of mucosal vaccine development with emphasis on oral and nasal vaccines for the control of infectious diseases. PMID:24914172

  12. Chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants: Sunrise on the ocean.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yufei; Fan, Qingze; Hao, Dongxia; Wu, Jie; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-11-01

    Mucosal vaccination, which is shown to elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses, serves as a non-invasive and convenient alternative to parenteral administration, with stronger capability in combatting diseases at the site of entry. The exploration of potent mucosal adjuvants is emerging as a significant area, based on the continued necessity to amplify the immune responses to a wide array of antigens that are poorly immunogenic at the mucosal sites. As one of the inspirations from the ocean, chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants have been developed with unique advantages, such as, ability of mucosal adhesion, distinct trait of opening the junctions to allow the paracellular transport of antigen, good tolerability and biocompatibility, which guaranteed the great potential in capitalizing on their application in human clinical trials. In this review, the state of art of chitosan and its derivatives as mucosal adjuvants, including thermo-sensitive chitosan system as mucosal adjuvant that were newly developed by author's group, was described, as well as the clinical application perspective. After a brief introduction of mucosal adjuvants, chitosan and its derivatives as robust immune potentiator were discussed in detail and depth, in regard to the metabolism, safety profile, mode of actions and preclinical and clinical applications, which may shed light on the massive clinical application of chitosan as mucosal adjuvant. PMID:26271831

  13. Mucosal changes associated with adenomatous colonic polyps.

    PubMed Central

    Urbanski, S. J.; Haber, G.; Hartwick, W.; Kortan, P.; Marcon, N.; Miceli, P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to assess the presence of morphologically recognizable colonic nonneoplastic mucosal alterations that may be associated with adenomatous transformation the authors undertook a retrospective analysis of 984 colonic polyps removed between 1979 and 1983. There were 708 adenomatous and 276 nonadenomatous polyps, all colonoscopically removed. In addition to adenomatous mucosa, three different mucosal patterns were recognized and labeled as transitional, eosinophilic, and, hyperplastic. Each polyp, but not the polyp's shoulder, was scored by two pathologists for the presence of these changes. Analysis of the data (Pearson's chi-square test) demonstrated a strong association between eosinophilic and transitional mucosa as well as between eosinophilic mucosa and adenomas. There was also a strong negative association between both eosinophilic and transitional mucosa and hyperplastic mucosa. On the basis of these data, it is postulated that transitional mucosa, representing a nonspecific reactive mucosal phenomenon, may precede eosinophilic mucosa, which subsequently may represent fertile soil for adenomatous transformation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3728646

  14. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  15. Glutathione Metabolism and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smeyne, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition when the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone, or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism and functional interactions of glutathione, and discuss how this relates to protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23665395

  16. Protective Effects of the Traditional Herbal Formula Oryeongsan Water Extract on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Lim, Hye-Sun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effect and safety of Oryeongsan water extract (OSWE) on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury and an acute toxicity study in rats. Acute gastric lesions were induced via intragastric oral administration of absolute ethanol at a dose of 5?mL/kg. OSWE (100 and 200?mg/kg) was administered to rats 2?h prior to the oral administration of absolute ethanol. The stomach of animal models was opened and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Gastric mucosal injuries were evaluated by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In the acute toxicity study, no adverse effects of OSWE were observed at doses up to 2000?mg/kg/day. Administration of OSWE reduced the damage by conditioning the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury, which included hemorrhage, hyperemia, and loss of epithelial cells. The level of MDA was reduced in OSWE-treated groups compared with the ethanol-induced group. Moreover, the level of GSH and the activity of antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the OSWE-treated groups. Our findings suggest that OSWE has a protective effect on the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury via the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23118790

  17. Efflux of glutathione and glutathione complexes from human erythrocytes in response to vanadate.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Yeliz; Yildiz, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate if vanadate is extruded from the cells in a glutathione dependent manner resulting in the appearance of extracellular glutathione and complexes of glutathione with vanadium. Vanadate significantly depleted intracellular non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The intracellular NPSH level was decreased to 0.0 ± 0.0 ?mol/ml erythrocyte when exposed to 10 mM of vanadate for 4h. Extracellular NPSH level was increased concomitantly with the intracellular decrease and reached to 0.1410 ± 0.005 ?mol/ml erythrocyte in 4h. Intracellular decrease and extracellular increase in NPSH levels were significantly inhibited in the presence of DIDS, a chloride-bicarbonate exchanger which also mediates phosphate and arsenate transport in erythrocytes. In parallel with the increase in extracellular NPSH levels, significant increases in extracellular glutathione levels were detected following exposure to vanadate. Extracellular glutathione levels reached to 0.0150 ± 0.0.001, 0.0330 ± 0.001, and 0.0576 ± 0.002 ?mol/ml erythrocyte with 1, 5, and 10 mM of vanadate respectively. Dimercaptosuccinic acid treatment of supernatants significantly increased the glutathione levels measured in the extracellular media. Utilization of MK571 an MRP inhibitor decreased the rate of glutathione efflux from erythrocytes suggesting a role for this membrane transporter in the process. A known methylation inhibitor periodate oxidized adenosine decreased the rate of glutathione efflux from erythrocytes. This observed decrease in extracellular GSH levels suggests that GSH release partly requires a proper cellular methylation process and that part of GSH detected in the extracellular media may arise from GSH-vandium complexes. The results of the present study indicate that human erythrocyte efflux glutathione in reduced free form and in conjugated form/s that can be recovered with dimercaptosuccinic acid when exposed to vanadate. PMID:22824382

  18. A clinical trial of glutathione supplementation in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Janet K.; Geier, David A.; Adams, James B.; Garver, Carolyn R.; Audhya, Tapan; Geier, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Recent evidence shows that subjects diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have significantly lower levels of glutathione than typically developing children. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of two commonly used glutathione supplements in subjects diagnosed with an ASD to determine their efficacy in increasing blood glutathione levels in subjects diagnosed with an ASD. Material/Methods The study was an eight-week, open-label trial using oral lipoceutical glutathione (n=13) or transdermal glutathione (n=13) in children, 3–13 years of age, with a diagnosis of an ASD. Subjects underwent pre- and post-treatment lab testing to evaluate plasma reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione, cysteine, taurine, free and total sulfate, and whole-blood glutathione levels. Results The oral treatment group showed significant increases in plasma reduced glutathione, but not whole-blood glutathione levels following supplementation. Both the oral and transdermal treatment groups showed significant increases in plasma sulfate, cysteine, and taurine following supplementation. Conclusions The results suggest that oral and transdermal glutathione supplementation may have some benefit in improving some of the transsulfuration metabolites. Future studies among subjects diagnosed with an ASD should further explore the pharmacokinetics of glutathione supplementation and evaluate the potential effects of glutathione supplementation upon clinical symptoms. PMID:22129897

  19. Glutathione-Binding Site of a Bombyx mori Theta-Class Glutathione Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. D. Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily plays key roles in the detoxification of various xenobiotics. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a silkworm protein belonging to a previously reported theta-class GST family. The enzyme (bmGSTT) catalyzes the reaction of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)-propane, and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide. Mutagenesis of highly conserved residues in the catalytic site revealed that Glu66 and Ser67 are important for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTT and into the metabolism of exogenous chemical agents. PMID:24848539

  20. Inhibition of ileal bile acid transporter: An emerging therapeutic strategy for chronic idiopathic constipation

    PubMed Central

    Mosi?ska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic constipation is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that encompasses a wide profile of symptoms. Current treatment options for chronic idiopathic constipation are of limited value; therefore, a novel strategy is necessary with an increased effectiveness and safety. Recently, the inhibition of the ileal bile acid transporter has become a promising target for constipation-associated diseases. Enhanced delivery of bile acids into the colon achieves an accelerated colonic transit, increased stool frequency, and relief of constipation-related symptoms. This article provides insight into the mechanism of action of ileal bile acid transporter inhibitors and discusses their potential clinical use for pharmacotherapy of constipation in chronic idiopathic constipation. PMID:26139989

  1. [Malignant carcinoid of the last ileal ansa. Report on 2 consecutive clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Buccianelli, E; Aloise, F; Veltroni, A

    2002-04-01

    Carcinoid tumors are very rare neoplasms, arising from enterochromaffin cells, classified in Apud system, exhibiting an intermediate malignancy, because of their long lasting clinical silence and low evolution to advanced stage. At the same time, these features unfortunately cause a high incidence of lymphatic and liver metastases, visible at first diagnostic approach, which are also determined by aspecific symptoms and signs, especially involving jejunal and ileal carcinoids, as the two cases described, and by very frequent absence, in current clinical practice, of pathognomonic carcinoid syndrome. Two carcinoids located into the distal ileal ansa, strictly adjacent to the ileocecal valve, are reported; the first tumor, accompanied by lymphonodal positivity, the second by a solitary hepatic metastasis, requiring segmentectomy of the liver, in addition to right hemicolectomy. PMID:11941295

  2. Bowel obstruction in a pregnant patient with ileal pouch–anal anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mark; Sylvain, Jacques; Stern, Hartley

    1997-01-01

    Bowel obstruction is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy for both the mother and the developing fetus. This report describes the case of 17-year-old girl with ileal pouch–anal anastomosis (IPAA). She presented at 36 weeks’ gestation with a complete small-bowel obstruction. Because conservative management was unsuccessful, labour was induced to relieve the obstruction or simplify surgery. Soon after spontaneous vaginal delivery she began to pass copious amounts of flatus and stool. The bowel obstruction resolved within hours. This report illustrates how IPAA alters the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract, placing the ileal pouch at risk from compressive obstruction by the gravid uterus. Induction of labour in a near-term fetus is a reasonable initial method of management in such women. PMID:9416260

  3. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...used to determine the activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase in serum, plasma, or erythrocytes by such techniques as fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease, glutathione reductase...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...used to determine the activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase in serum, plasma, or erythrocytes by such techniques as fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease, glutathione reductase...

  5. Glutathione transferases: probing for isoform specificity using dynamic combinatorial chemistry 

    E-print Network

    Caniard, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a large family of enzymes that play an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics. They catalyse the conjugation of the glutathione tripeptide (GSH) to a wide range of ...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...determine the activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase in serum, plasma, or erythrocytes by such techniques as fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease, glutathione reductase deficiency, or...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...determine the activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase in serum, plasma, or erythrocytes by such techniques as fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease, glutathione reductase deficiency, or...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...determine the activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase in serum, plasma, or erythrocytes by such techniques as fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease, glutathione reductase deficiency, or...

  9. Ileo-ileal knotting as an uncommon cause of acute intestinal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Engida; Asmare, Biruhtesfa; Addise, Abebe

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is one of the most common acute surgical conditions that require urgent evaluation and treatment. Several common causes are known in the general surgical practice, and the causes are different in the developing and developed world. In this article, we present a case of an acute SBO secondary to ileo-ileal knotting in a 50 years old Ethiopian female patient. The diagnostic difficulty and the need for urgent treatment of the condition are discussed. PMID:26251466

  10. Glutathione S-transferases in earthworms (Lumbricidae).

    PubMed Central

    Stenersen, J; Guthenberg, C; Mannervik, B

    1979-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity (EC 2.5.1.18) was demonstrated in six species of earthworms of the family Lumbricidae: Eisenia foetida, Lumbricus terrestris, Lumbricus rebellus, Allolobophora longa, Allolobophora caliginosa and Allolobophora chlorotica. Considerable activity was obtained with 1-chlorl-2,4-dinitrobenzene and low activity with 3,4-dichloro-1-nitrobenzene, but no enzymic reaction was detectable with sulphobromophthalein 1,2-epoxy-3-(p-nitrophenoxy)propane of trans-4-phenylbut-3-en-2-one as substrates. Enzyme prepartations from L. rubellus and A. longa were the most active, whereas A. chlorotica gave the lowest activity. The ratio of the activities obtained with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 3,4-cichloro-1-nitrobenzene was very different in the various species, but no phylogenetic pattern was evident. Isoelectric focusing gave rise to various activity peaks as measured with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate, and the activity profiles of the species examined appeared to follow a taxonomic pattern. The activity of Allolobophora had the highest peak in the alkaline region, whereas that of Lumbricus had the highest peak in the acid region. Eisenia showed a very complex activity profile, with the highest peak ne pH 7. As determined by an enzymic assay, all the species contained glutathione, on an average about 0.5 mumol/g wet wt. Conjugation with glutathione catalysed by glutathione S-transferases may consequently be an important detoxification mechanism in earthworms. PMID:486159

  11. Role of glutathione in intracellular copper transport 

    E-print Network

    Ha, Chenxiang

    1994-01-01

    , is thought to play a crucial role in the regulation of this reactive ion. Using reversed phase HPLC, we have identified a glutathione-Cu complex in the acid-soluble fraction of cell extracts from human BeWo cells following treatment with 67CUC12. 67Cu...

  12. Linked thioredoxin-glutathione systems in platyhelminths

    E-print Network

    Linked thioredoxin-glutathione systems in platyhelminths Gustavo Salinas1 , Murray E. Selkirk2 have recently been characterized in platyhelminth parasites, and the emerging biochemical scenario in platyhelminths [4­6]. Selenocysteine (Sec, see Box 1)-containing TGR appears to be the major oxido

  13. Five Decades with Glutathione and the GSTome

    PubMed Central

    Mannervik, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Uncle Folke inspired me to become a biochemist by demonstrating electrophoresis experiments on butterfly hemolymph in his kitchen. Glutathione became the subject for my undergraduate project in 1964 and has remained a focal point in my research owing to its multifarious roles in the cell. Since the 1960s, the multiple forms of glutathione transferase (GST), the GSTome, were isolated and characterized, some of which were discovered in our laboratory. Products of oxidative processes were found to be natural GST substrates. Examples of toxic compounds against which particular GSTs provide protection include 4-hydroxynonenal and ortho-quinones, with possible links to the etiology of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and other degenerative conditions. The role of thioltransferase and glutathione reductase in the cellular reduction of disulfides and other oxidized forms of thiols was clarified. Glyoxalase I catalyzes still another glutathione-dependent detoxication reaction. The unusual steady-state kinetics of this zinc-containing enzyme initiated model discrimination by regression analysis. Functional properties of the enzymes have been altered by stochastic mutations based on DNA shuffling and rationally tailored by structure-based redesign. We found it useful to represent promiscuous enzymes by vectors or points in multidimensional substrate-activity space and visualize them by multivariate analysis. Adopting the concept “molecular quasi-species,” we describe clusters of functionally related enzyme variants that may emerge in natural as well as directed evolution. PMID:22247548

  14. Vaccination of goats with a glutathione peroxidase DNA vaccine induced partial protection against Haemonchus contortus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Song, Xiaokai; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2011-12-15

    Due to their critical functions in worm physiology, glutathione peroxidases in Haemonchus contortus are potential candidates for vaccine to control haemonchosis. However, information on the protection potential of these molecules is lacking. In this study, recombinant HC29 antigen was tested for protection against experimental H. contortus infections in goats. Fifteen animals were allocated into three trial groups. The animals of HC29 group was vaccinated with a recombinant HC29 DNA vaccine twice at day 0 and day 14, and then challenged with 5000 infective H. contortus L3 (third larval stage) on the 28th day. An unvaccinated positive control group was challenged with L3 at the same time. An unvaccinated negative control group was not challenged with L3. The results indicated HC29 DNA vaccine was transcribed at local injection sites and expressed in vivo post immunizations, respectively. Following L3 challenge, the mean eggs per gram feces and worm burdens of HC29 group were reduced by 36.1% and 35.6% respectively compared to the positive control group. After immunization with the DNA vaccine, significantly high levels of serum IgG, serum IgA, mucosal IgA and CD4(+) T lymphocytes were detected. These results suggest that recombinant H. contortus HC29 glutathione peroxidase DNA vaccine induced a partial immune response and has protective potentials against caprine haemonchosis. PMID:21680097

  15. Mitomycin-C suppresses mucus secretion in an ileal neobladder rat model

    PubMed Central

    FAN, WEIWEI; YU, YANG; SHU, JUNJIE; MING, HAO; LI, WEIPING; FAN, ZHILU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mucus secretion status of mature goblet cells following the application of mitomycin-C (MMC) in ileal neobladder rat models. Bladder substitution models were established in Sprague Dawley rats, which had been divided into five groups, namely the control (sham), normal saline (NS), high-dose MMC (HMMC), low-dose MMC (LMMC) and dehydrated alcohol (DA) groups. To evaluate the total protein concentration and level of sialic acid following the therapy, urine from the rats in each group was collected on days 8, 11 and 14. In addition, to observe the variances between mucus secretion and the ileum goblet cells, immunohistochemistry and hematoxylin and eosin staining were conducted in the different groups on day 17. The results indicated that the ileal neobladder mucosas in the MMC groups were clearly undamaged, as compared with the DA group. Furthermore, the MMC and DA groups were shown to inhibit the proliferation of goblet cells. The concentration of protein and sialic acid in the LMMC group was found to be lower compared with the NS group, while the concentration in the HMMC group was considerably lower. In conclusion, HMMC was demonstrated to evidently reduce the mucin and sialic acid concentration in the urine, without visible damage to the ileal neobladder mucus membrane. Therefore, MMC may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of certain bladder conditions.

  16. Surgical Audit of Patients with Ileal Perforations Requiring Ileostomy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Hemkant; Pandey, Siddharth; Sheoran, Kapil Dev; Marwah, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Ileal perforation peritonitis is a frequently encountered surgical emergency in the developing countries. The choice of a procedure for source control depends on the patient condition as well as the surgeon preference. Material and Methods. This was a prospective observational study including 41 patients presenting with perforation peritonitis due to ileal perforation and managed with ileostomy. Demographic profile and operative findings in terms of number of perforations, site, and size of perforation along with histopathological findings of all the cases were recorded. Results. The majority of patients were male. Pain abdomen and fever were the most common presenting complaints. Body mass index of the patients was in the range of 15.4–25.3 while comorbidities were present in 43% cases. Mean duration of preoperative resuscitation was 14.73 + 13.77 hours. Operative findings showed that 78% patients had a single perforation; most perforations were 0.6–1?cm in size and within 15?cm proximal to ileocecal junction. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in 29.2% patients. On histopathological examination, nonspecific perforations followed by typhoid and tubercular perforations respectively were the most common. Conclusion. Patients with ileal perforations are routinely seen in surgical emergencies and their demography, clinical profile, and intraoperative findings may guide the choice of procedure to be performed. PMID:26247059

  17. Ileal and total tract digestibility of wet and dried wheat distillers grain products in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Lyberg, K; Borling, J; Lindberg, J E

    2012-12-01

    The apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of nutrients were evaluated in 2 commercially available products: wheat (Triticum aestivum) wet distillers grain with solubles (WDGS) and wheat dried distillers grain with solubles (DDGS). Two diets included (DM basis) 50% basal diet with either 50% WDGS (W) or 50% DDGS (D). The basal diet included corn (Zea mays) starch, sugar, vitamins, and minerals. Seven castrated male pigs with post valve T-cecum cannulas were fed the diets according to a changeover design during two 14-d periods. In a pre- and postperiod, casein was given as the only protein source with the basal diet to estimate endogenous losses of N and AA for calculation of standardized ileal digestibility (SID). The AID of OM did not differ between diets, but ATTD of OM was higher (P < 0.05) for diet W. The AID (76.2 vs. 68.9%), SID, and ATTD of CP was higher (P < 0.05) in diet W than diet D. The SID for Lys (75.7 vs. 51.8%) and Met (75.8 vs. 70.1%) was higher (P < 0.01) in WDGS than DDGS. In conclusion, drying of wheat distillers grain products can markedly lower ileal digestibility of Lys and Met whereas negative effects on energy value are small. PMID:23365306

  18. Use of a long-term metal stent in complex uretero-ileal anastomotic stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Mohammed N.; Bach, Christian; Kachrilas, Stefanos; Zaman, Faruquz; Junaid, Islam; Buchholz, Noor; Masood, Junaid

    2011-01-01

    Uretero-ileal anastomotic stricture is a potentially serious late complication after ileal conduit formation, with a reported incidence of 3–9%. The standard management technique is open surgical revision of the anastomosis with reimplantation of the affected ureter. This is technically challenging and has potential significant morbidity for the patient. Advances in endourological techniques now offer a variety of less-invasive treatment options, like balloon dilatation or laser ureterotomy followed by stent insertion. What happens when such open and minimally invasive techniques fail? Recently, using a combined antegrade and retrograde approach, we inserted a novel, semi-permanent, dual-expansion thermo-expandable metallic alloy stent across a recurrent ileal-ureteric stricture. We describe the technique and potential advantages of this minimally invasive method. This minimally invasive treatment option is of interest, as in contrast to other stents, it does not require routine change, and is resistant to corrosion and urothelial ingrowth, hence ensuring ease of exchange or removal if required.

  19. Nephrotoxicity of 4-aminophenol glutathione conjugate.

    PubMed

    Fowler, L M; Moore, R B; Foster, J R; Lock, E A

    1991-11-01

    4-Aminophenol (p-aminophenol, PAP) causes selective necrosis to the pars recta of the proximal tubule in Fischer 344 rats. The basis for this selective toxicity is not known, but PAP can undergo oxidation in a variety of systems to form the 4-aminophenoxy free radical. Oxidation or disproportionation of this radical will form 1,4-benzoquinoneimine which can covalently bind to tissue macromolecules. Recent studies have shown that certain benzoquinol-glutathione conjugates can cause renal necrosis in rats. We have synthesized a putative glutathione conjugate of PAP. The effect on the kidney of this conjugate and the sulphate and N-acetyl conjugates, known metabolites of PAP, have been examined in Fischer 344 rats. 4-Amino-3-S-glutathionylphenol produced a dose-dependent (92-920 mumol kg-1) necrosis of the proximal tubular epithelium and altered renal excretory function. The lesion at the low dose was restricted to the pars recta of the proximal tubule in the medullary rays, while at the higher doses it affected the pars recta region of all nephrons. In contrast, PAP-O-sulphate and N-acetyl-4-aminophenol (paracetamol) caused no histological or functional alteration to the kidney at 920 mumol kg-1. The renal necrosis produced by 4-amino-3-S-glutathionylphenol was very similar to that produced by PAP (367-920 mumol kg-1), both functionally and histologically, except that smaller doses of the glutathione conjugate were required. These studies indicate that glutathione conjugation of PAP generates a metabolite that is more toxic to the kidney than the parent compound. A possible mechanism of toxicity (analogous to that reported for glutathione conjugates of certain quinones) involving oxidation to form a 1,4-benzoquinoneimine thioether that could redox cycle is discussed. PMID:1687859

  20. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  1. Efflux of glutathione and glutathione complexes from human erythrocytes in response to inorganic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Deniz; Cakir, Yeliz

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if arsenic exposure results in glutathione efflux from human erythrocytes. Arsenite significantly depleted intracellular nonprotein thiol level in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The intracellular nonprotein thiol level was decreased to 0.767?±?0.0017 ?mol/ml erythrocyte following exposure to 10 mM of arsenite for 4 h. Extracellular nonprotein thiol level was increased concomitantly with the intracellular decrease and reached to 0.481?±?0.0005 ?mol/ml erythrocyte in 4 h. In parallel with the change in extracellular nonprotein thiol levels, significant increases in extracellular glutathione levels were detected. Extracellular glutathione levels reached to 0.122?±?0.0013, 0.226?±?0.003, and 0.274?±?0.004 ?mol/ml erythrocyte with 1, 5, and 10 mM of arsenite, respectively. Dimercaptosuccinic acid treatment of supernatants significantly increased the glutathione levels measured in the extracellular media. Utilization of MK571 and verapamil, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and Pgp inhibitors, decreased the rate of glutathione efflux from erythrocytes suggesting a role for these membrane transporters in the process. The results of the present study indicate that human erythrocytes efflux glutathione in reduced free form and in conjugated form or forms that can be recovered with dimercaptosuccinic acid when exposed to arsenite. PMID:22890881

  2. REG3?-deficient mice have altered mucus distribution and increased mucosal inflammatory responses to the microbiota and enteric pathogens in the ileum.

    PubMed

    Loonen, L M P; Stolte, E H; Jaklofsky, M T J; Meijerink, M; Dekker, J; van Baarlen, P; Wells, J M

    2014-07-01

    REG3? is considered to have a protective role against infection with Gram-positive bacteria due to its bactericidal activity, but evidence from in vivo studies is lacking. We generated a REG3?(-/-) mouse, and investigated the effect of lack of REG3? on intestinal mucus distribution, spatial compartmentalization of bacteria, and expression of innate immunity genes. Infection studies were also performed with Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens to investigate the antimicrobial role of REG3?. REG3?(-/-) mice display altered mucus distribution, increased bacterial contact with the epithelium, and elevated inflammatory markers in the ileum without histological evidence of pathology. Infection response pathway genes were differentially expressed in both Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis infected REG3?(-/-) and wild-type (wt) mice. Higher amounts of myeloperoxidase and interleukin-22 transcripts were present in the ileal mucosa of REG3?(-/-) than wt mice, but translocation to the organs was unaffected. We concluded that REG3? has a protective role against mucosal infection with pathogenic Listeria and Salmonella in vivo. REG3? is equally distributed throughout the mucus and its absence results in increased epithelial contact with the microbiota resulting in low-grade inflammation. REG3? can bind to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and influence mucus distribution in the ileum, properties which may contribute to mucosal protection. PMID:24345802

  3. Dual binding capacity of mucosal immunoblasts to mucosal and synovial endothelium in humans: dissection of the molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Lymphocytes continuously migrate throughout the body in search of antigens. Virgin lymphocytes recirculate freely between the blood and different lymphatic organs, whereas immunoblasts extravasate preferentially into sites similar to those where they initially responded to antigen. Tissue-specific extravasation of lymphocytes is largely controlled by distinct lymphocyte surface receptors that mediate lymphocyte binding to high endothelial venules (HEV). In the present study, the molecular mechanisms determining the specificity of human mucosal (lamina propria) lymphocyte binding to different endothelial recognition systems were analyzed. Mucosal immunoblasts adhered five times better than small mucosal lymphocytes to mucosal HEV. Importantly, mucosal immunoblasts also bound to synovial HEV almost as efficiently as to mucosal HEV, but they did not adhere to peripheral lymph node HEV. To study the impact of different homing- associated molecules in this dual endothelial binding, we used a gut- derived T cell line and freshly isolated mucosal immunoblasts. Both cell types expressed integrins alpha 4, beta 1, beta 7, and lymphocyte function associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), and were CD44 positive, but practically L-selectin negative. Binding of mucosal immunoblasts to mucosal HEV was almost completely abolished by pretreatment with anti- beta 7 monoclonal antibodies, but it was independent of alpha 4/beta 1 function. In contrast, alpha 4/beta 1 partially mediated immunoblast adherence to synovial HEV, whereas alpha 4/beta 7 had only a minor role in adherence of blasts at this site. CD44 and LFA-1 contributed to HEV- binding both in mucosa and synovium. Taken together, this is the first report that demonstrates a critical role for alpha 4/beta 7 in the binding of gut lymphocytes to mucosal venules in humans. Moreover, a hitherto unknown interaction between mucosal effector cells and synovial endothelial cells was shown to be only partially mediated by the currently known homing receptors. The dual endothelial binding capacity of mucosal blasts may help to explain the pathogenesis of reactive arthritis not uncommonly associated with inflammatory and infectious bowel disease. PMID:7528765

  4. High-protein diet differently modifies intestinal goblet cell characteristics and mucosal cytokine expression in ileum and colon.

    PubMed

    Lan, Annaïg; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Blouin, Jean-Marc; Liu, Xinxin; Descatoire, Véronique; Desclée de Maredsous, Caroline; Davila, Anne-Marie; Walker, Francine; Tomé, Daniel; Blachier, François

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that high-protein (HP) diet ingestion causes marked changes in the luminal environment of the colonic epithelium. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of such modifications on small intestinal and colonic mucosa, two segments with different transit time and physiological functions. Rats were fed with either normal protein (NP; 14% protein) or HP (53% protein) isocaloric diet for 2 weeks, and parameters related to intestinal mucous-secreting cells and to several innate/adaptive immune characteristics (myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine and epithelial TLR expression, proportion of immune cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues) were measured in the ileum and colon. In ileum from HP animals, we observed hyperplasia of mucus-producing cells concomitant with an increased expression of Muc2 at both gene and protein levels, reduction of mucosal myeloperoxidase activity, down-regulation of Tlr4 gene expression in enterocytes and down-regulation of mucosal Th cytokines associated with CD4+ lymphocyte reduction in mesenteric lymph nodes. These changes coincided with an increased amount of acetate in the ileal luminal content. In colon, HP diet ingestion resulted in a lower number of goblet cells at the epithelial surface but increased goblet cell number in colonic crypts together with an increased Muc3 and a slight reduction of Il-6 gene expression. Our data suggest that HP diet modifies the goblet cell distribution in colon and, in ileum, increases goblet cell activity and decreases parameters related to basal gut inflammatory status. The impact of HP diet on intestinal mucosa in terms of beneficial or deleterious effects is discussed. PMID:25459886

  5. Innate mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are activated in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Serriari, N-E; Eoche, M; Lamotte, L; Lion, J; Fumery, M; Marcelo, P; Chatelain, D; Barre, A; Nguyen-Khac, E; Lantz, O; Dupas, J-L; Treiner, E

    2014-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by a deregulated immune response targeting the gut bacterial flora. Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ib-restricted innate-like lymphocytes with anti-bacterial functions. They display an effector/memory phenotype and are found in large numbers in the blood, mucosae and liver. They have also been implicated in inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Therefore, we aimed to analyse the possible involvement of MAIT cells in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). To this end, a phenotypical and functional analysis of MAIT cells isolated from the blood of healthy subjects, CD and UC patients was undertaken. MAIT cells were also quantified in ileal biopsies of CD patients. The frequency of blood MAIT cells was specifically reduced in IBD patients compared with healthy donors, whereas it was dramatically greater in the inflamed versus healthy tissue. MAIT cells were activated as they expressed significantly more the Ki67 antigen, and this was accompanied by phenotypical changes such as increased expression of natural killer (NK)G2D and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA). Finally, in-vitro-activated MAIT cells from CD and UC patients secreted significantly more interleukin (IL)-17, together with a decreased interferon (IFN)-? in CD but an increased IL-22 in UC. These data show that MAIT cells are activated in IBD, which results in an increased recruitment towards the inflamed tissues, an altered phenotype and a switch in the pattern of cytokine secretion. This is the first demonstration that MAIT cells are immune players in IBD, whose precise functions in this context need to be addressed. PMID:24450998

  6. Ipilimumab for Patients With Advanced Mucosal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Postow, Michael A.; Luke, Jason J.; Bluth, Mark J.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Panageas, Katherine S.; Lawrence, Donald P.; Ibrahim, Nageatte; Flaherty, Keith T.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Ott, Patrick A.; Callahan, Margaret K.; Harding, James J.; D'Angelo, Sandra P.; Dickson, Mark A.; Schwartz, Gary K.; Chapman, Paul B.; Gnjatic, Sacha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Hodi, F. Stephen

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of patients with mucosal melanoma treated with ipilimumab is not defined. To assess the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in this melanoma subset, we performed a multicenter, retrospective analysis of 33 patients with unresectable or metastatic mucosal melanoma treated with ipilimumab. The clinical characteristics, treatments, toxicities, radiographic assessment of disease burden by central radiology review at each site, and mutational profiles of the patients' tumors were recorded. Available peripheral blood samples were used to assess humoral immunity against a panel of cancer-testis antigens and other antigens. By the immune-related response criteria of the 30 patients who underwent radiographic assessment after ipilimumab at approximately week 12, there were 1 immune-related complete response, 1 immune-related partial response, 6 immune-related stable disease, and 22 immune-related progressive disease. By the modified World Health Organization criteria, there were 1 immune-related complete response, 1 immune-related partial response, 5 immune-related stable disease, and 23 immune-related progressive disease. Immune-related adverse events (as graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0) consisted of six patients with rash (four grade 1, two grade 2), three patients with diarrhea (one grade 1, two grade 3), one patient with grade 1 thyroiditis, one patient with grade 3 hepatitis, and 1 patient with grade 2 hypophysitis. The median overall survival from the time of the first dose of ipilimumab was 6.4 months (range: 1.8–26.7 months). Several patients demonstrated serologic responses to cancer-testis antigens and other antigens. Durable responses to ipilimumab were observed, but the overall response rate was low. Additional investigation is necessary to clarify the role of ipilimumab in patients with mucosal melanoma. PMID:23716015

  7. Kinetics of the Attachment of Intrinsic Factor-Bound Cobamides to Ileal Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mathan, V. I.; Babior, Bernard M.; Donaldson, Robert M.

    1974-01-01

    To determine whether the molecular configuration of vitamin B12 influences the attachment of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex to ileal microvillous membrane receptor sites, we have examined the kinetics of uptake of intrinsic factor-bound cyanocobalamin by brush borders and microvillous membranes isolated from guinea pig ileum, and have compared this uptake with that of intrinsic factor alone and with that of intrinsic factor complexed with various analogs of cyanocobalamin. We first studied the kinetics of binding of cyanocobalamin and other cobamides to human gastric intrinsic factor. The binding of cyanocobalamin showed saturation kinetics and, at relatively high concentrations of cyanocobalamin, a Scatchard plot of binding was linear. The dissociation constant for the intrinsic factor-cyanocobalamin complex was 0.066 nM. When the binding of various vitamin B12 analogs to intrinsic factor was determined by competition experiments, the analogs could be separated into two categories: those with affinities similar to that of cyanocobalamin and those with affinities much lower than that of cyanocobalamin. The affinity of cyanocobalamin for intrinsic factor was not altered by various substitutions at the -CN position, while removal of a single amido group on the corrin ring of substitution of the dimethylbenzimidazole base greatly reduced affinity. Removal of the base totally abolished binding. These findings, confirming those reported by others, are consistent with the concept that the cyanocobalamin molecule fits into a “pocket” in the intrinsic factor molecule, with the nucleotide base facing inward and the -CN side of the planar corrin ring facing outward. We then investigated the attachment of intrinsic factor-bound cyanocobalamin to ileal receptor. Attachment to microvillous membranes showed saturation kinetics with a dissociation constant of 0.25 nM. Attachment was rapid and was 70% complete within 5 min; the second-order rate constant for attachment was 1.3 × 106 M-1 s-1. The half-time for dissociation of intrinsic factor-bound cyanocobalamin from the ileal receptor was approximately 35 min. Free intrinsic factor inhibited the attachment of intrinsic factor-bound cyanocobalamin, but the rate of attachment of free intrinsic factor was slower than that of intrinsic factor bound to cyanocobalamin. When intrinsic factor was complexed with various analogs of cyanocobalamin, the affinities of these complexes for ileal microvillous membranes were similar to that of intrinsic factor-bound cyanocobalamin. These findings suggest that the molecular configuration of vitamin B12 is not a major determinant in the interaction between intrinsic factor-bound vitamin B12 and its ileal receptor site. PMID:4852622

  8. Gastric Mucosal Protection by Aegle Marmelos Against Gastric Mucosal Damage: Role of Enterochromaffin Cell and Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purnima; Dutta, Shubha R.; Guha, Debjani

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) released from enterochromaffin (EC) cells in gastric mucosa inhibits gastric acidity by increasing the gastric mucus secretion. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos (AM) ripe fruit pulp (250 mg/kg body weight) on mean ulcer index (MUI), EC cells, 5-HT content, and adherent mucosal thickness of ulcerated gastric tissue in adult albino rats. Material and Methods: Ulceration was induced by using aspirin (500 mg/kg, p.o.), cerebellar nodular lesion and applying cold-restraint stress. Results: In all cases increased MUI in gastric tissue along with decreased EC cell count was observed with concomitant decrease of 5-HT content and adherent mucosal thickness (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with AM for 14 days decreased MUI, increased EC cell count, and 5-HT content as well as adherent mucosal thickness in all ulcerated group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AM produces gastric mucosal protection mediated by increased EC cell count and 5-HT levels. PMID:25672237

  9. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  10. Crystal structure of non-fused glutathione S-transferase from Schistosoma japonicum in complex with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Kursula, I; Heape, A M; Kursula, P

    2005-10-01

    Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase (SjGST) is a common fusion tag in recombinant protein production, and its 3-dimensional structure has been studied in the context of drug design. We have determined the crystal structure of non-fused SjGST complexed with glutathione, and compare it to complexes between glutathione and SjGST fusion proteins. PMID:16522189

  11. Generation of Effector Memory T Cell-Based Mucosal and Systemic Immunity with Pulmonary Nanoparticle Vaccination

    E-print Network

    Li, Adrienne Victoria

    Many pathogens infiltrate the body and initiate infection via mucosal surfaces. Hence, eliciting cellular immune responses at mucosal portals of entry is of great interest for vaccine development against mucosal pathogens. ...

  12. Distribution of macrophages and granulocytes expressing L1 protein (calprotectin) in human Peyer's patches compared with normal ileal lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjerke, K; Halstensen, T S; Jahnsen, F; Pulford, K; Brandtzaeg, P

    1993-01-01

    Antibodies to the cytosolic leucocyte L1 protein (or calprotectin) were examined for reactivity with macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils identified by paired immunofluorescence staining in sections of normal human ileal mucosa, including Peyer's patches. Macrophages were recognised by expression of the myelomonocytic antigen CD68 (monoclonal antibody KP1). Neutrophilic granulocytes were identified by their content of neutrophil elastase, and eosinophilic granulocytes by monoclonal antibody EG2. Virtually all CD68+ macrophages in normal lamina propria and Peyer's patches were L1- and the same was true for most extravasated macrophages in normal peripheral lymph nodes. Some mesenteric lymph nodes, however, and all peripheral lymph nodes with overt pathological processes (malignant lymphoma) contained many CD68+L1+ macrophages. Numerous L1+ cells were also localised to the crypt region and to some extent beneath the villous epithelium in normal lamina propria, but they were mainly identified as EG2+ eosinophils. Such cells were remarkably scarce or absent beneath the follicle associated epithelium in the dome region of Peyer's patches, where CD68+L1- macrophages were abundant. Also subepithelial and interfollicular CD68- interdigitating dendritic cells in Peyer's patches (recognised by antibody to S-100 protein) were usually unreactive with L1 antibody. The L1 protein shows a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities in vitro, and its putative antiproliferative properties are interesting in relation to the immunosuppression postulated to take place in lamina propria. The virtual absence of L1 producing cells beneath the follicle associated epithelium in Peyer's patches may support the immunostimulatory function of these macrophage rich structures, which are held to be crucial for induction of specific mucosal immunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8244101

  13. Down-regulation of mechanisms involved in cell transport and maintenance of mucosal integrity in pigs infected with Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium, responsible for the disease complex known as proliferative enteropathy (PE). L. intracellularis is associated with intestinal crypt epithelial cell proliferation but the mechanisms responsible are yet to be defined. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in experimentally infected pigs to identify pathways that may be involved. Ileal samples originating from twenty-eight weaner pigs experimentally challenged with a pure culture of L. intracellularis (strain LR189/5/83) were subjected to microarray analysis. Microarray transcriptional signatures were validated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR of selected genes at various time points post challenge. At peak of infection (14 days post challenge) 86% of altered transcripts were down regulated, particularly those involved in maintenance of mucosal integrity and regulation of cell transport. Among the up-regulated transcripts, CD163 and CDK1 were novel findings and considered to be important, due to their respective roles in innate immunity and cellular proliferation. Overall, targeted cellular mechanisms included those that are important in epithelial restitution, migration and protection; maintenance of stable inter-epithelial cell relationships; cell transport of nutrients and electrolytes; innate immunity; and cell cycle. PMID:24885874

  14. Down-regulation of mechanisms involved in cell transport and maintenance of mucosal integrity in pigs infected with Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sionagh H; Wilson, Alison D; Van Ettinger, Imke; MacIntyre, Neil; Archibald, Alan L; Ait-Ali, Tahar

    2014-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium, responsible for the disease complex known as proliferative enteropathy (PE). L. intracellularis is associated with intestinal crypt epithelial cell proliferation but the mechanisms responsible are yet to be defined. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in experimentally infected pigs to identify pathways that may be involved. Ileal samples originating from twenty-eight weaner pigs experimentally challenged with a pure culture of L. intracellularis (strain LR189/5/83) were subjected to microarray analysis. Microarray transcriptional signatures were validated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR of selected genes at various time points post challenge. At peak of infection (14 days post challenge) 86% of altered transcripts were down regulated, particularly those involved in maintenance of mucosal integrity and regulation of cell transport. Among the up-regulated transcripts, CD163 and CDK1 were novel findings and considered to be important, due to their respective roles in innate immunity and cellular proliferation. Overall, targeted cellular mechanisms included those that are important in epithelial restitution, migration and protection; maintenance of stable inter-epithelial cell relationships; cell transport of nutrients and electrolytes; innate immunity; and cell cycle. PMID:24885874

  15. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Different Implication for Colonic and Ileal Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bogaert, Sara; De Vos, Martine; Olievier, Kim; Peeters, Harald; Elewaut, Dirk; Lambrecht, Bart; Pouliot, Philippe; Laukens, Debby

    2011-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been suggested to play a role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The three branches (ATF6, IRE1 and PERK) of the unfolded protein response (UPR) have different roles and are not necessarily activated simultaneously. Methodology/Principal Findings Expression of UPR-related genes was investigated in colonic and ileal biopsies of 23 controls, 15 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 54 Crohn's disease (CD) patients. This expression was confirmed at protein level in colonic and ileal samples of five controls, UC and CD patients. HSPA5, PDIA4 and XBP1s were significantly increased in colonic IBD at mRNA and/or protein levels, indicating activation of the ATF6 and IRE1 branch. Colonic IBD was associated with increased phosphorylation of EIF2A suggesting the activation of the PERK branch, but subsequent induction of GADD34 was not observed. In ileal CD, no differential expression of the UPR-related genes was observed, but our data suggested a higher basal activation of the UPR in the ileal mucosa of controls. This was confirmed by the increased expression of 16 UPR-related genes as 12 of them were significantly more expressed in ileal controls compared to colonic controls. Tunicamycin stimulation of colonic and ileal samples of healthy individuals revealed that although the ileal mucosa is exhibiting this higher basal UPR activation, it is still responsive to ER stress, even more than colonic mucosa. Conclusions/Significance Activation of the three UPR-related arms is seen in colonic IBD-associated inflammation. However, despite EIF2A activation, inflamed colonic tissue did not increase GADD34 expression, which is usually involved in re-establishment of ER homeostasis. This study also implies the presence of a constitutive UPR activation in healthy ileal mucosa, with no further activation during inflammation. Therefore, engagement of the UPR differs between colon and ileum and this could be a factor in the development of ileal or colonic disease. PMID:22028783

  16. Th17 cells and Mucosal Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Shean J.; Dubin, Patricia J.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2008-01-01

    Th17 cells are a new lineage of T-cells that are controlled by the transcription factor ROR?t and develop independent of GATA-3, T-bet, Stat 4 and Stat 6. Novel effector molecules produced by these cells include IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and IL-26. IL-17RA binds IL-17A and IL-17F and is critical for host defense against extracellular planktonic bacteria by regulating chemokine gradients for neutrophil emigration into infected tissue sites as well as host granulopoiesis. Moreover IL-17 and IL-22 regulate the production of antimicrobial proteins in mucosal epithelium. Although TGF-?1 and IL-6 have been shown to be critical for development of Th17 cells from naïve precursors, IL-23 is also important in regulating IL-17 release in mucosal tissues in response to infectious stimuli. Compared to Th1 cells, IL-23 and IL-17 show limited roles in controlling host defense against primary infections with intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggesting a predominate role of the Th17 lineage in host defense against extracellular pathogens. However in the setting of chronic biofilm infections, as that occurs with Cystic Fibrosis or bronchetctasis, Th17 cells may be key contributors of tissue injury. PMID:18054248

  17. Mucosal immunity against parasitic gastrointestinal nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Onah, Denis Nnabuike

    2000-01-01

    The last two decades witnessed significant advances in the efforts of immunoparasitologists to elucidate the nature and role of the host mucosal defence mechanisms against intestinal nematode parasites. Aided by recent advances in basic immunology and biotechnology with the concomitant development of well defined laboratory models of infection, immunoparasitologists have more precisely analyzed and defined the different immune effector mechanisms during the infection; resulting in great improvement in our current knowledge and understanding of protective immunity against gastrointestinal (GI) nematode parasites. Much of this current understanding comes from experimental studies in laboratory rodents, which have been used as models of livestock and human GI nematode infections. These rodent studies, which have concentrated on Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Strongyloides ratti/S. venezuelensis, Trichinella spiralis and Trichuris muris infections in mice and rats, have helped in defining the types of T cell responses that regulate effector mechanisms and the effector mechanisms responsible for worm expulsion. In addition, these studies bear indications that traditionally accepted mechanisms of resistance such as eosinophilia and IgE responses may not play as important roles in protection as were previously conceived. In this review, we shall, from these rodent studies, attempt an overview of the mucosal and other effector responses against intestinal nematode parasites beginning with the indices of immune protection as a model of the protective immune responses that may occur in animals and man. PMID:11138315

  18. Mucosal Melanoma: Epidemiology, Biology and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Kristen R; Mehnert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal melanoma is an exceedingly rare variant of cutaneous melanoma that, due to its rarity, is poorly described and infrequently studied. Primary sites of origin include the head and neck, anorectum and vulvovaginal regions. It is uniquely different from cutaneous melanoma with respect to epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis and prognosis. The etiology and pathogenesis remain unclear. Unlike cutaneous melanoma, exposure to UV light is not an apparent risk factor. Furthermore, distinct molecular features including a lower incidence of BRAF oncogene mutations but a higher incidence of KIT oncogene mutations suggest divergent genetic etiologies. Mucosal melanomas generally present at a later stage, are more aggressive and carry a worse prognosis regardless of the stage at diagnosis. Establishing standardized treatment guidelines has been challenging due to the rarity of the disease. Early detection provides the best chance at survival but is often difficult due to anatomic location. Surgery remains the primary therapeutic intervention if complete resection is technically feasible given the anatomic location. Radiotherapy may be used to achieve local control when resection is not feasible, or adjuvantly to enhance locoregional control, but most studies have failed to demonstrate an improvement in overall survival. There are no consensus guidelines on the optimal systemic therapy, and regimens are often extrapolated from data based on therapies used to treat advanced cutaneous melanoma. Clinical trials, particularly utilizing newer targeted therapies and immunotherapies, are investigating novel treatment approaches. PMID:26601869

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE SUMMARY A mucosal vaccine against Chlamydia

    E-print Network

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE SUMMARY VACCINES A mucosal vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis generates two* INTRODUCTION: Administering vaccines through nonmucosal routes often leads to poor protection against mucosal pathogens, presum- ably because such vaccines do not generate memory lymphocytes that migrate to mu- cosal

  20. Minimally invasive treatment of oral ranula with a mucosal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Jia, T; Xing, L; Zhu, F; Jin, X; Liu, L; Tao, J; Chen, Y; Gao, Z; Zhang, H

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new method for minimally-invasive treatment of uncomplicated oral ranulas using a mucosal tunnel, and we report the clinical outcome. We constructed a mucosal tunnel for each of 35 patients who presented with an oral ranula, by making 2 parallel incisions across the top of the protruding ranula 2-3mm apart, and dissected the soft tissue along the incisions to its wall. The fluid was removed and the cavity irrigated with normal saline. The wall of the ranula was not treated. The first mucosal tunnel was made by suturing the base of the mucosal strip to the deepest part of the wall of the ranula. The mucosal base of the tunnel and the deepest part of the base of the ranula were fixed with absorbable sutures. The two external edges of the incisions were sutured together to form the second mucosal tunnel, and apposing sutures were inserted between the two parallel incisions to form two natural mucosal tunnels. The duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 5 years. One patient was lost to follow-up and 34 patients were cured. Outcomes were satisfactory without relapse during the follow-up period and the patients were satisfied with the outcome. The mucosal tunnel is a safe, effective, simple, and minimally-invasive treatment for oral ranula. PMID:25468316

  1. Cloning and molecular characterization of the ontogeny of a rat ileal sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Shneider, B L; Dawson, P A; Christie, D M; Hardikar, W; Wong, M H; Suchy, F J

    1995-02-01

    Sodium-dependent bile acid transport in the rat ileum is abruptly expressed at weaning. Degenerate oligonucleotides, based on amino acid sequence identities between the rat liver and hamster ileal transporters, were used to amplify a rat ileal probe. A 1.2-kb cDNA clone, which contains the full coding region (348 amino acids, 38 kD), was isolated by hybridization screening. In vitro translation yielded a 38-kD protein which glycosylated to 48 kD. Sodium-dependent uptake of taurocholate was observed in oocytes injected with cRNA. Northern blot analysis revealed a 5.0-kb mRNA in ileum, kidney, and cecum. A 48-kD protein was detected in ileal brush border membranes and localized to the apical border of villus ileal enterocytes. mRNA and protein expression, which were negligible before weaning, increased dramatically at weaning. Nuclear transcription rates for the transporter increased 15-fold between postnatal days 7 and 28. The apparent molecular weight of the transporter also increased between days 19 and 28. In summary, the developmental regulation of the rat ileal sodium-dependent bile acid cotransporter is characterized by transcriptionally regulated increases in mRNA and protein levels at the time of weaning with changes in apparent molecular weight of the protein after weaning. PMID:7860756

  2. Selenium-independent glutathione peroxidase activity associated with glutathione S-transferase from the housefly, Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Simmons, T W; Jamall, I S; Lockshin, R A

    1989-01-01

    1. A glutathione S-transferase having Se-independent glutathione peroxidase activity was isolated from 100,000 g supernatant from housefly homogenate. 2. The specific activity of the partially purified Se-independent glutathione peroxidase was 1776 nmol NADPH oxidized/min/mg protein, representing an 87-fold purification. 3. The Mr of this enzyme was estimated to be 37,000 and 26,000 by gel filtration chromatography and gel electrophoresis, respectively. 4. Selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity could not be detected in this same supernatant. 5. Se-independent glutathione peroxidase activity should be considered in future studies of the insect antioxidant defense system. PMID:2591193

  3. Autologous Transplantation of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cell Sheets Cultured on an Amniotic Membrane Substrate for Intraoral Mucosal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kanamura, Narisato

    2015-01-01

    The human amniotic membrane (AM) is a thin intrauterine placental membrane that is highly biocompatible and possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-scarring properties. Using AM, we developed a novel method for cultivating oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets. We investigated the autologous transplantation of oral mucosal epithelial cells cultured on AM in patients undergoing oral surgeries. We obtained specimens of AM from women undergoing cesarean sections. This study included five patients without any history of a medical disorder who underwent autologous cultured oral epithelial transplantation following oral surgical procedures. Using oral mucosal biopsy specimens obtained from these patients, we cultured oral epithelial cells on an AM carrier. We transplanted the resultant cell sheets onto the oral mucosal defects. Patients were followed-up for at least 12 months after transplantation. After 2–3 weeks of being cultured on AM, epithelial cells were well differentiated and had stratified into five to seven layers. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the cultured cells expressed highly specific mucosal epithelial cell markers and basement membrane proteins. After the surgical procedures, no infection, bleeding, rejection, or sheet detachment occurred at the reconstructed sites, at which new oral mucous membranes were evident. No recurrence was observed in the long-term follow-up, and the postoperative course was excellent. Our results suggest that AM-cultured oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets represent a useful biomaterial and feasible method for oral mucosal reconstruction. However, our primary clinical study only evaluated their effects on a limited number of small oral mucosal defects. PMID:25915046

  4. Effects of hulls of faba beans (Vicia faba L.) with a low or high content of condensed tannins on the apparent ileal and fecal digestibility of nutrients and the excretion of endogenous protein in ileal digesta and feces of pigs.

    PubMed

    Jansman, A J; Verstegen, M W; Huisman, J; van den Berg, J W

    1995-01-01

    In three experiments (Exp. 1, 2, and 3) with young pigs (BW 10 to 26 kg), the effects of dietary inclusion of hulls of faba beans (Vicia faba L.) (200 g/kg) with a low (< .1% catechin equivalents; LT) or high tannin content (3.3% catechin equivalents; HT) on the apparent ileal (Exp. 1 and 2) and fecal (Exp. 3) digestibility of nutrients were determined. In addition, the true digestibility of protein of the diets and the excretion of endogenous protein (N x 6.25) in ileal digesta and feces of pigs were measured, using the 15N isotope dilution technique (Exp. 3). Diets contained either casein and faba bean cotyledons as highly soluble (HS) protein sources (Exp. 1 to 3) or potato protein, soy concentrate, sunflower meal, meat meal, and fish meal as protein sources with a low solubility (LS) (Exp. 1). Control diets contained cellulose as a fiber source (64 to 73 g/kg). Inclusion of either type of hulls decreased the apparent ileal digestibility for DM, organic matter (OM), and nonprotein organic matter (NPOM) (P < .05). Inclusion of LT hulls instead of cellulose only reduced the apparent ileal digestibility of crude protein (N x 6.25; CP) in Exp. 3 (P < .05). Inclusion of HT instead of LT hulls reduced the apparent ileal digestibility of CP (by 7 to 10 units) and amino acids (by 4 to 29 units) (P < .05). The LT hulls decreased apparent and true ileal digestibility of CP from 88 to 83 and from 97 to 94, respectively (P < .05). Inclusion of HT instead of LT hulls decreased apparent and true ileal CP digestibility from 83 to 74 and 94 to 90 (P < .05) and increased the excretion of endogenous CP from 22 to 32 and from 13 to 23 g/kg of DM intake at the ileal and fecal level, respectively (P < .05). It is concluded that condensed tannins in faba beans interact with both dietary and endogenous proteins in the digestive tract of pigs. This reduces the true digestibility of dietary protein and increases the excretion of endogenously secreted proteins. Tannins from faba beans show some preference to interact with proteins with a high content of proline and histidine. PMID:7601724

  5. Delayed ileal-ileocystoplasty fistula formation: an unusual complication of augmentation enterocystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Lin, Siying; Hagger, Robert W; Renani, Seyed M Ameli; Chung, Eric A L

    2012-02-01

    Augmentation enterocystoplasty is a successful treatment for patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Delayed spontaneous bladder rupture is a serious recognised complication of the procedure; however, to our knowledge, delayed fistula formation between the neobladder and the gastrointestinal tract has not been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 21-year-old male who presented with chronic diarrhoea resulting from an ileal-ileocystoplasty fistula 10 years following a successful augmentation enterocystoplasty. Fistula formation is a possible complication of this procedure, and a high index of suspicion is required for patients presenting with diarrhoea who have previously undergone bladder augmentation surgery. PMID:21855415

  6. Lower abdominal phlegmon due to spontaneous rupture of an ileal neobladder.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, A; Yamada, Y; Tanaka, K; Minami, R; Yamanaka, N

    2001-02-01

    A case is presented of spontaneous rupture of an ileal orthotopic neobladder due to a large residual urine volume. The present case is the 13th such case reported; however, this case is the first to show lower abdominal phlegmon and in which the perforation site was detected using computed tomography scanning. The indications for neobladder should be considered with great care. If spontaneous rupture is suspected, an early diagnosis of the perforation site and a measure of the extravasation volume using computed tomography are necessary. Appropriate treatment should include laparotomy. PMID:11240829

  7. [Plasty of extrahepatic biliary ducts with the use of ileal autotransplantate].

    PubMed

    Markov, P V; Onopriev, V I; Fomenko, I V; Grigorov, S P

    2010-01-01

    A method of extrahepatic biliary duct plasty with the use of tubular ileal autotransplantate of 1 sm in diameter was presented in 19 patients with benign strictures. The transplantate on the vascular pedicle was created by resection of the antimesenterial side of the intestinal loop. Distally the anastomosis was performed with the common bile duct, including, thus, papilla Vateri into the bile passage (4 patients). By the impossibility of the latter, the anastomosis was performed with the vertical part of duodenum (16 patients). Postoperative follow-up variated from 1 to 15 years. 18 patients demonstrated good long-term result, 1 patients had a stricture recurrence. PMID:21169941

  8. Radical Cystectomy with Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion in a Patient with a Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Pariser, Joseph J.; Weiner, Adam B.; Steinberg, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is an option for the surgical management of severe heart failure, and radical cystectomy remains the standard of care for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Given a complicated population in terms of comorbidities and management for patients with an LVAD, there is little experience with major urologic procedures, which require balancing the benefits of surgery with considerable perioperative risks. We report our experience performing the first radical cystectomy with ileal conduit in a patient with an LVAD and muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:26290767

  9. Oral mucosal status and major salivary gland function

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, A.; Fox, P.C.; Ship, J.A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Baum, B.J. )

    1990-07-01

    Normal salivary function is considered to be critical for the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. However, few studies have examined mucosal changes in patients with objectively documented salivary gland performance. In the present report, the mucosal status of 298 subjects being evaluated in a dry mouth clinic was assessed. A complete oral examination was performed and unstimulated and stimulated salivary samples were collected separately from the parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands. Data were analyzed according to diagnosis and salivary output after the assignment of an oral mucosal rating to each subject. In general, the mucosal surfaces were well preserved and infections were not seen. Patients evaluated for Sjoegren's syndrome and radiation-induced xerostomia had the lowest salivary gland performance but displayed a mucosal status similar to denture-wearing healthy subjects or patients with normal salivary flow who had idiopathic xerostomia. However, those patients with a total lack of salivary flow rarely had normal-appearing oral mucosa. These results confirm a role for saliva in oral mucosal preservation and also suggest that other factors may act to maintain oral mucosal integrity.

  10. Mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Neurath, Markus F; Travis, Simon P L

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies have identified mucosal healing on endoscopy as a key prognostic parameter in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), thus highlighting the role of endoscopy for monitoring of disease activity in IBD. In fact, mucosal healing has emerged as a key treatment goal in IBD that predicts sustained clinical remission and resection-free survival of patients. The structural basis of mucosal healing is an intact barrier function of the gut epithelium that prevents translocation of commensal bacteria into the mucosa and submucosa with subsequent immune cell activation. Thus, mucosal healing should be considered as an initial event in the suppression of inflammation of deeper layers of the bowel wall, rather than as a sign of complete healing of gut inflammation. In this systematic review, the clinical studies on mucosal healing are summarised and the effects of anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs such as 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, azathioprine, ciclosporin and anti-TNF antibodies (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, infliximab) on mucosal healing are discussed. Finally, the implications of mucosal healing for subsequent clinical management in patients with IBD are highlighted. PMID:22842618

  11. Oral Mucosal Lesions in Indians From Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Patricia Ramos; Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; e Ribeiro, Livia Silva Figueiredo; de Aquino Xavier, Flavia Caló; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and their risk indicators in adult Kiriri Indians from Northeast Brazil. Clinical oral examination was performed on a representative sample of 223 Indians (age ?19 years). A systematic evaluation of lips, labial mucosa and sulcus, commissures, buccal mucosa and sulcus, gingiva and alveolar ridge, tongue, floor of the mouth, and soft and hard palate was performed. Bivariate analysis was conducted to assess associations between mucosal conditions and age, gender, income, educational level, diabetic status, and smoking status. Mucosal lesions were found in 50 participants (22.4%). The most prevalent lesions were fistulae (6.2%) and traumatic ulcers (4.48%). Oral mucosal was associated with higher age (?35 years; odds ratio [OR]?=?1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–3.76, P?=?0.03) and lower education level (<9 years; OR?=?2.13, 95% CI: 0.96–4.71, P?=?0.06). Mucosal conditions are prevalent in Kiriri Indians and the presence of mucosal lesions is associated with advanced age and lower education. A public health program aimed at preventing and treating mucosal lesions and targeted toward the high-risk group is vital to improve the oral health status of this population. PMID:25501053

  12. Effects of concentrated drinking water injection on glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in liver of Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed

    Elia, Antonia Concetta; Fanetti, Alessia; Dörr, Ambrosius Josef Martin; Taticchi, Maria I

    2008-06-01

    Two drinking water production plants located in North Italy, collecting water from the River Po (Plants 1 and 2) were chosen for this study. Water samples were collected before and after the disinfection process and at two points along the piping system. Water samples were concentrated by the solid-phase extraction system and injected intraperitoneally into specimens of Cyprinus carpio. The concentration of water samples was 3 l/equiv. In order to assess the effects of the water samples on carp liver, total glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glyoxalase I, were measured following this treatment for 6 days at two experimental times (3 and 6 days). Both water plant-treated carp showed a general increase of the enzymatic activities of glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase which might be employed as potential biomarkers of oxidative stress induced by disinfected river water. Plant 1-treated carp showed higher glyoxalase I and glutathione levels and lower glutathione peroxidase activity. A depleted level of total glutathione and of glyoxalase I for specimens of water plant 2 (for both experimental times), without correlation with the distances in the pipeline, suggests that river plant water can also lead to potentially adverse effects on selected biochemical parameters in C. carpio. PMID:18457861

  13. Engineering immunity in the mucosal niche against sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Renuka; Woodrow, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of the genital tract are the site of entry to over 30 different bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogens that are the cause of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. Women and adolescent girls are more severely impacted by STIs than men due in part to a greater biological susceptibility for acquiring infections and differences in disease sequelae. While it is widely accepted that preventative vaccines against the most commonly transmitted STIs would have a major impact on decreasing the global health burden of STIs for women worldwide, several challenges preclude their development. The female genital tract is a complex niche of microflora, hormonal influences, and immune tissues and cells that result in a mucosal immune system that is distinct from other mucosal sites and from our systemic immune system. An appreciation of these differences and their effect on shaping mucosal immunity to sexually transmitted pathogens is an important determinant for the design of effective STI vaccines. Here we describe the anatomy and mucosal immune system of the female reproductive tract, and discuss bioengineering strategies to design mucosal vaccines that overcome delivery challenges and coordinate the presentation kinetics and compartmentalization of antigens and adjuvants to relevant mucosal immune cell subsets. In particular, we describe recent progress in understanding the role of specific mucosal dendritic cell subsets in facilitating immune responses to pathogenic microbes in the genital mucosa. We also discuss the development of pathogen-mimicking materials that may be useful for engineering protective immunity in this mucosal niche. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2015, 8:107-122. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1359 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26153141

  14. Deficient Glutathione in the Pathophysiology of Mycotoxin-Related Illness

    PubMed Central

    Guilford, Frederick T.; Hope, Janette

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of mycotoxin-related illness is increasing. The glutathione antioxidant and detoxification systems play a major role in the antioxidant function of cells. Exposure to mycotoxins in humans requires the production of glutathione on an “as needed” basis. Research suggests that mycotoxins can decrease the formation of glutathione due to decreased gene expression of the enzymes needed to form glutathione. Mycotoxin-related compromise of glutathione production can result in an excess of oxidative stress that leads to tissue damage and systemic illness. The review discusses the mechanisms by which mycotoxin-related deficiency of glutathione may lead to both acute and chronic illnesses. PMID:24517907

  15. Prescribing for mucosal disease in primary dental care.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Michael N

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucosal disease has a variety of causes, some of which are due to dysfunction of the immune system. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus are the mucosal diseases of unknown cause seen most frequently in dental practice, and the most likely mucosal diseases for which a dentist will prescribe. This paper briefly reviews the clinical features of these conditions, their causation and pertinent information for managing them in a primary care setting. The prescribing of appropriate medications to treat the conditions in a general dental practice is described and discussed. PMID:25668376

  16. Glutathione Resins I. List of Components

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    /Loading Buffer (1.4 mM NaCl; 100 mM Na2 HPO4 ; 18 mM KH2 PO4 , pH 7.5): To prepare the extraction/loading buffer: · Extraction buffer (loading): 140 mM NaCl; 10 mM Na2 HPO4 ; 1.8 mM KH2 PO4 (pH 7.5). · Elution buffer: 10 m HPO4 ; 1.8 mM KH2 PO4 (pH 7.5). · Alumina (Sigma, #A-2039) GlutathioneResinProtocol BD Biosciences

  17. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1365 Glutathione test system. (a) Identification....

  18. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1365 Glutathione test system. (a) Identification....

  19. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1365 Glutathione test system. (a) Identification....

  20. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1365 Glutathione test system. (a) Identification....

  1. Relationships between electromyographic ileal and colonic motility patterns in cats during fasting and feeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cherbut, C; Achard, F; Denavit, M; Roche, M

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between ileal and colonic electromyographic motility patterns were investigated in six awake cats chronically fitted with subserosal electrodes implanted in the smooth muscles of the ileum and colon. Smooth muscle electrical activity (electromyogram) was recorded in both fed and fasted conditions under a 12-12 hours dark-light schedule. It consisted of electrical long spike bursts having two different patterns for each condition. Short sequences of three to five long spike bursts were propagated either aborally or orally from any part of the colon; they were most frequent during the interdigestive or fasting period and no relationship was observed between these long spike bursts and the electrical activity of the ileum. During the digestive or feeding period, the colonic activity was organized in long sequences of 10-15 long spike bursts, termed migrating spike bursts, which started near the caecal junction and propagated aborally to the distal colon. These migrating spike bursts were correlated with the ileal motility. This relationship demonstrated between ileum and colon after feeding is dependent upon the amount of food intake. PMID:3742348

  2. Ileal intussusception due to intestinal metastases from primary malignant melanoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Testini, Mario; Trabucco, Senia; Di Venere, Beatrice; Piscitelli, Domenico

    2002-04-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the lung (PMML) is an uncommon tumor with very few cases reported in the literature that satisfy the required criteria to establish a primary bronchial origin. We report a case of a 44-year-old man with acute abdominal distress and a right pulmonary roentgenographic opacity. A cranial-thoracic-abdominal CT scan confirmed the presence of a pulmonary nodule with bilateral cerebral metastases and marked dilatation of intestinal loops. At laparotomy an ileal intussusception was noted and an ileal resection was done. The resected intestinal segment contained three endoluminal polypoidal formations. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses showed the presence of multiple sites of melanoma. These lesions as well as the brain lesions clearly appeared metastatic. The patient underwent further evaluation to identify a primary site of melanoma; bronchoscopy was performed with biopsy of the pulmonary nodule. Pathology revealed a neoplastic process of fusiform cells, with focal presence of melanic inter- and extracellular pigment. The immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the diagnosis of PMML. We discuss the criteria for diagnosis and histogenesis of PMML along with this unusual presentation. PMID:11952250

  3. Gastroprotection Studies of Schiff Base Zinc (II) Derivative Complex against Acute Superficial Hemorrhagic Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Golbabapour, Shahram; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Hadi, A. Hamid A; Majid, Nazia Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Background The study was carried out to assess the gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex against ethanol-induced acute hemorrhagic lesions in rats. Methodology/Principal Finding The animals received their respective pre-treatments dissolved in tween 20 (5% v/v), orally. Ethanol (95% v/v) was orally administrated to induce superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. Omeprazole (5.790×10?5 M/kg) was used as a reference medicine. The pre-treatment with the zinc (II) complex (2.181×10?5 and 4.362×10?5 M/kg) protected the gastric mucosa similar to the reference control. They significantly increased the activity levels of nitric oxide, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and prostaglandin E2, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde. The histology assessments confirmed the protection through remarkable reduction of mucosal lesions and increased the production of gastric mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis indicated that the complex might induced Hsp70 up-regulation and Bax down-regulation. The complex moderately increased the gastroprotectiveness in fine fettle. The acute toxicity approved the non-toxic characteristic of the complex (<87.241×10?5 M/kg). Conclusion/Significance The gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II) complex was mainly through its antioxidant activity, enzymatic stimulation of prostaglandins E2, and up-regulation of Hsp70. The gastric wall mucus was also a remarkable protective mechanism. PMID:24058648

  4. Cell Proliferation, Reactive Oxygen and Cellular Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Day, Regina M.; Suzuki, Yuichiro J.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of cellular activities, including metabolism, growth, and death, are regulated and modulated by the redox status of the environment. A biphasic effect has been demonstrated on cellular proliferation with reactive oxygen species (ROS)—especially hydrogen peroxide and superoxide—in which low levels (usually submicromolar concentrations) induce growth but higher concentrations (usually >10–30 micromolar) induce apoptosis or necrosis. This phenomenon has been demonstrated for primary, immortalized and transformed cell types. However, the mechanism of the proliferative response to low levels of ROS is not well understood. Much of the work examining the signal transduction by ROS, including H2O2, has been performed using doses in the lethal range. Although use of higher ROS doses have allowed the identification of important signal transduction pathways, these pathways may be activated by cells only in association with ROS-induced apoptosis and necrosis, and may not utilize the same pathways activated by lower doses of ROS associated with increased cell growth. Recent data has shown that low levels of exogenous H2O2 up-regulate intracellular glutathione and activate the DNA binding activity toward antioxidant response element. The modulation of the cellular redox environment, through the regulation of cellular glutathione levels, may be a part of the hormetic effect shown by ROS on cell growth. PMID:18648617

  5. Physiology and immunology of mucosal barriers in catfish (Ictalurus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mucosal barriers of catfish (Ictalurus spp.) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient adsorption, osmoregulation, waste excretion, and environmental sensing. Catf...

  6. Pathogenesis of human papillomavirus-associated mucosal disease

    E-print Network

    Groves, Ian J.; Coleman, Nicholas

    2014-12-08

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a necessary cause of carcinoma of the cervix and other mucosal epithelia. Key events in high-risk HPV (HRHPV)-associated neoplastic progression include persistent infection, deregulated expression of virus early...

  7. Humoral and mucosal defense molecules rhythmically oscillate during a light-dark cycle in permit, Trachinotus falcatus.

    PubMed

    Lazado, Carlo C; Lund, Ivar; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg; Nguyen, Huy Quang

    2015-12-01

    Circadian rhythm provides organisms with an internal system to maintain temporal order in a dynamic environment. This is typified by a 24-h cycle for a number of physiological processes, including immunity. The present study characterized the humoral and mucosal defense molecules and their dynamics during a light-dark (LD) cycle in juvenile permit, Trachinotus falcatus. All studied defense molecules were constitutively identified in serum and skin mucus. Serum generally exhibited higher levels of these defenses than skin mucus, with the exception of anti-protease (ANTIPRO). The difference in ANTIPRO, lysozyme (LYZ), esterase (ESA) and catalase (CAT) levels between serum and skin mucus was not affected by the phase of the daily cycle. However, a clear phase-dependent difference was observed in protease (PRO), globulin (GLOB), myeloperoxidase (MPO), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) levels. Activities of ALP and GPX displayed significant daily rhythmicity in both serum and skin mucus. Circadian profile of ALP was identical in both biofluids, but an antiphasic feature was exhibited by GPX. GLOB and MPO levels also exhibited significant daily oscillation but only in serum with acrophases registered at ZT 14.5 and 6.15, respectively. Mucus PRO and serum ANTIPRO demonstrated significant temporal variations during a daily cycle albeit not rhythmic. Cluster analysis of the defense molecules in serum and skin mucus revealed two different daily profiles suggesting a possibility of distinct circadian control between humoral and mucosal immunity. These observations indicate that LD cycle had a remarkable impact in the defense molecules characterizing the humoral and mucosal immunity in permit. Daily rhythmic patterns of these defense molecules contribute to our understanding of the barely explored interplay of immunity and circadian rhythm in teleost fish. Lastly, the results could be useful in developing aquaculture practices aiming at modifying the immune functions of permit for improved health. PMID:26518503

  8. BILE ACIDS REGULATE THE ONTOGENIC EXPRESSION OF ILEAL BILE ACID BINDING PROTEIN IN THE RAT VIA THE FARNESOID X RECEPTOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the rat, an increase in ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) expression occurs during the third postnatal week. In vitro studies suggest that bile acids (BAs) increase IBABP transcription by activating the BA receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Thus, we investigated the role of BAs on the on...

  9. Standardized ileal digestible tryptophan to lysine ratios in growing pigs fed corn-based and non-corn-based diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two 21-d experiments were conducted to determine the optimum standard ileal digestible (SID) Trp:Lys ratio in growing pigs fed corn-based diets compared to non-corn-based diets. The primary response variables in both experiments were ADG and plasma urea N (PUN) concentrations with the optimum SID Tr...

  10. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  11. Effect of plantain banana on gastric ulceration in NIDDM rats: role of gastric mucosal glycoproteins, cell proliferation, antioxidants and free radicals.

    PubMed

    Mohan Kumar, M; Joshi, M C; Prabha, T; Dorababu, M; Goel, R K

    2006-04-01

    Methanolic extract of Musa sapientum var. Paradisiaca (MSE, 100 mg/kg) was studied for its antiulcer and mucosal defensive factors in normal and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) rats. NIDDM was induced by administering streptozotocin (STZ, 70 mg/kg, ip) to 5 days old rat pups. The animals showing blood glucose level >140mg/dL after 12 weeks of STZ administration were considered as NIDDM positive. Effects of MSE were compared with known ulcer protective drug, sucralfate (SFT, 500 mg/kg) and anti-diabetic drug glibenclamide (GLC, 0.6 mg/kg) when administered orally, once daily for 6 days against gastric ulcers (GU) induced by cold-restraint stress (CRS) and ethanol and subsequent changes in gastric mucosal glycoproteins, cell proliferation, free radicals (lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide) and anti-oxidants enzymes (super oxide dismutase and catalase) and glutathione (GSH) levels. MSE showed better ulcer protective effect in NIDDM rats compared with SFT and GLC in CRS-induced GU. NIDDM caused a significant decrease in gastric mucosal glycoprotein level without having any effect on cell proliferation. However, all the test drugs reversed the decrease in glycoprotein level in NIDDM rats, but cell proliferation was enhanced in case of MSE alone. Both CRS or NIDDM as such enhanced gastric mucosal LPO, NO and SOD, but decreased CAT levels while CRS plus NIDDM rats caused further increase in LPO and NO level without causing any further changes in SOD and CAT level. MSE pretreatment showed reversal in the levels of all the above parameters better than GLC. Ethanol caused a decrease in glutathione level which was further reduced in NIDDM-ethanol rats. MSE reversed the above changes significantly in both normal as well as in NIDDM rats, while GLC reversed it only in NIDDM rats. However, SFT was ineffective in reversing the changes induced by CRS or ethanol or when given in NIDDM-CRS or NIDDM-ethanol rats. The results indicated that the ulcer protective effect of MSE could be due to its predominant effect on mucosal glycoprotein, cell proliferation, free radicals and antioxidant systems. PMID:16629371

  12. Gastric mucosal mast cells in atopic subjects.

    PubMed

    Bagnato, G F; Di Cesare, E; Caruso, R A; Gulli, S; Cugliari, A; Morabito Lo Prete, A; Previti, M; Muscarà, M; Bottari, M

    1995-04-01

    Intragastral allergen provocation under endoscopic control (IPEC) allows direct observation of gastric mucosa reactions after contact with inhalant allergens that reach the stomach. We selected patients with proved atopy to Parietaria but without clinical and endoscopic signs of gastric disease, and we tested them with the specific inhalant allergen during IPEC, recording gastric macroscopic reaction and mucosal mast-cell changes in biopsy specimens. All atopic patients showed visible changes in gastric mucosa quantified as IPEC score. Mast-cell numbers detected in atopic patients (135.4 +/- 102.6/mm2 of stromal area) were significantly higher than in nonatopic subjects (59.8 +/- 25.4/mm2; P < 0.03) and were positively correlated to atopic IPEC score (P < 0.01). In addition, 6/12 atopics who had both higher mast-cell counts and IPEC score showed an intraepithelial distribution of gastric mast cells which displayed ultrastructural features of partial degranulation. It is likely that changes observed in our patients with allergy to Parietaria reflect a subclinical activation of mast cells in the gastric mucosa. PMID:7573815

  13. Molecular weight distribution of soluble fiber fractions and short chain fatty acids in ileal digesta of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, E; Andersson, R; Lindberg, J E

    2012-12-01

    The effect of dietary fiber source on molecular weight (MW) distribution of soluble fiber fractions and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) in ileal digesta of 7 post valve T-cecum (PVTC) cannulated growing pigs was studied. Pigs were fed semisynthetic diets with sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) pulp (SBP) or chicory (Cichorium intybus) forage (CFO) as fiber sources of which the soluble nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP) fraction originated mainly from pectin. Three MW intervals were selected-large MW (MWL): 10,000,000 to 1,000,000 g/mol, medium MW (MWM): 1,000,000 to 200,000 g/mol, and small MW (MWS): 200,000 to 10,000 g/mol-and the relative distribution (% of total) of molecules in each interval was calculated. The MWM fraction was higher (P < 0.05) in ileal digesta of pigs fed diet SBP and the MWS fraction was higher (P < 0.05) in ileal digesta of pigs fed diet CFO. The mole/100 mole of propionic acid (HPr) was higher (P < 0.010) in pigs fed diet SBP whereas pigs fed diet CFO had higher (P < 0.010) mole/100 mole of acetic acid (HAc). The proportion of the MWL and MWM fractions in ileal digesta were negatively correlated to HAc (r = -0.52, P = 0.05, and r = -0.62, P = 0.02, respectively). The proportion of MWM in ileal digesta was positively correlated to HPr (r = 0.83; P = 0.001) whereas MWS and HPr were negatively correlated (r = -0.76; P = 0.002). In conclusion, the bacterial degradation of the soluble NSP fraction is selective and MW distribution may explain differences in SCFA production. PMID:23365284

  14. The Level of Protein in Milk Formula Modifies Ileal Sensitivity to LPS Later in Life in a Piglet Model

    PubMed Central

    Gras-Le Guen, Christèle; Lallès, Jean-Paul; Le Huërou-Luron, Isabelle; Boudry, Gaëlle

    2011-01-01

    Background Milk formulas have higher protein contents than human milk. This high protein level could modify the development of intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier and immune functions and have long-term consequences. Methodology/Principal findings We investigated the effect of a high protein formula on ileal microbiota and physiology during the neonatal period and later in life. Piglets were fed from 2 to 28 days of age either a normoprotein (NP, equivalent to sow milk) or a high protein formula (HP, +40% protein). Then, they received the same solid diet until 160 days. During the formula feeding period ileal microbiota implantation was accelerated in HP piglets with greater concentrations of ileal bacteria at d7 in HP than NP piglets. Epithelial barrier function was altered with a higher permeability to small and large probes in Ussing chambers in HP compared to NP piglets without difference in bacterial translocation. Infiltration of T cells was increased in HP piglets at d28. IL-1? and NF-?B sub-units mRNA levels were reduced in HP piglets at d7 and d28 respectively; plasma haptoglobin also tended to be reduced at d7. Later in life, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion in response to high doses of LPS in explants culture was reduced in HP compared to NP piglets. Levels of mRNA coding the NF-?B pathway sub-units were increased by the challenge with LPS in NP piglets, but not HP ones. Conclusions/Significance A high protein level in formula affects the postnatal development of ileal microbiota, epithelial barrier and immune function in piglets and alters ileal response to inflammatory mediators later in life. PMID:21573022

  15. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864... reductase assay. (a) Identification. A glutathione reductase assay is a device used to determine the... fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease,...

  16. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione. PMID:26105794

  17. Proanthocyanidin from Grape Seed Extracts Protects Indomethacin-Induced Small Intestinal Mucosal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Soo-Heon; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2014-01-01

    Proanthocyanidin (grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts, GSPEs) is an antioxidant and scavenges free radicals. Excessive oxidative stress and free radical production are major components in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced small intestinal injury. We investigated the effect of GSPEs on indomethacin-induced intestinal mucosal injury in the rat. Rats were allocated into four groups: the null control group, the indomethacin control group, the low-dose GSPEs group, and the high-dose GSPEs group. GSPEs were administered for 4 days. Then indomethacin and GSPEs were coadministered for the following 2 days by oral route. The dose of indomethacin was 200?mg/Kg. The doses of GSPEs were 100?mg/Kg for low-dose group and 300?mg/Kg for high-dose group. Luminal bleeding was solely observed in one of 5 rats from indomethacin control group. The number of ulcer count was reduced to 0.1 ± 0.3 per rat in GSPEs treated group compared to 1.4 ± 0.5 per rat in indomethacin control group. Submucosal inflammatory cell infiltration was also reduced to 50% in GSPEs treated group. The tissue level of prostaglandin E2 was not affected by GSPEs treatment. GSPEs attenuated the indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury irrespective of the tissue PGE2 depletion and glutathione consumption. PMID:24868202

  18. Glutathione-Dependent Detoxification Processes in Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Dringen, Ralf; Brandmann, Maria; Hohnholt, Michaela C; Blumrich, Eva-Maria

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes have a pivotal role in brain as partners of neurons in homeostatic and metabolic processes. Astrocytes also protect other types of brain cells against the toxicity of reactive oxygen species and are considered as first line of defence against the toxic potential of xenobiotics. A key component in many of the astrocytic detoxification processes is the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) which serves as electron donor in the GSH peroxidase-catalyzed reduction of peroxides. In addition, GSH is substrate in the detoxification of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds by GSH-S-transferases which generate GSH conjugates that are efficiently exported from the cells by multidrug resistance proteins. Moreover, GSH reacts with the reactive endogenous carbonyls methylglyoxal and formaldehyde to intermediates which are substrates of detoxifying enzymes. In this article we will review the current knowledge on the GSH metabolism of astrocytes with a special emphasis on GSH-dependent detoxification processes. PMID:25428182

  19. ABIOTIC STRESS ALTERS TRANSCRIPT PROFILES AND ACTIVITY OF GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE, GLUTHIONE PEROXIDASE, AND GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE IN EUPHORBIA ESULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula L.) is an invasive perennial weed in North American plains and prairies which exhibits remarkable tolerance towards abiotic and biotic stress. Glutathione plays an important role in plant defense mechanisms and varying degrees of glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutat...

  20. Quantitation of protein S-glutathionylation by liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometry: Correction for contaminating glutathione and glutathione disulfide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a posttranslational modification that links oxidative stimuli to reversible changes in cellular function. Protein-glutathione mixed disulfides (PSSG) are commonly quantified by the reduction of the disulfide and detection of the resultant glutathione species. This met...

  1. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  2. Mucosal immunization using recombinant plant-based oral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Streatfield, Stephen J

    2006-02-01

    The induction of mucosal immunity is very important in conferring protection against pathogens that typically invade via mucosal surfaces. Delivery of a vaccine to a mucosal surface optimizes the induction of mucosal immunity. The apparent linked nature of the mucosal immune system allows delivery to any mucosal surface to potentially induce immunity at others. Oral administration is a very straightforward and inexpensive approach to deliver a vaccine to the mucosal lining of the gut. However, vaccines administered by this route are subject to proteolysis in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, dose levels for protein subunit vaccines are likely to be very high and the antigen may need to be protected from proteolysis for oral delivery to be efficacious. Expression of candidate vaccine antigens in edible recombinant plant material offers an inexpensive means to deliver large doses of vaccines in encapsulated forms. Certain plant tissues can also stably store antigens for extensive periods of time at ambient temperatures, obviating the need for a cold-chain during vaccine storage and distribution, and so further limiting costs. Antigens can be expressed from transgenes stably incorporated into a host plant's nuclear or plastid genome, or from engineered plant viruses infected into plant tissues. Molecular approaches can serve to boost expression levels and target the expressed protein for appropriate post-translational modification. There is a wide range of options for processing plant tissues to allow for oral delivery of a palatable product. Alternatively, the expressed antigen can be enriched or purified prior to formulation in a tablet or capsule for oral delivery. Fusions to carrier molecules can stabilize the expressed antigen, aid in antigen enrichment or purification strategies, and facilitate delivery to effector sites in the gastrointestinal tract. Many antigens have been expressed in plants. In a few cases, vaccine candidates have entered into early phase clinical trials, and in the case of farmed animal vaccines into relevant animal trials. PMID:16431131

  3. A rare case of jejuno-ileal intussusception secondary to a gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Annabel; Santharam, Lakshmi; Mirza, Nazzia

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare tumours, making up 0.2–1% of gastrointestinal malignancies [Zakaria and Daradkeh (Jejunojejunal intussusception induced by a gastrointestinal stromal tumour. Case Rep Surg 2012;2022:173680)]. Their relative rarity combined with non-specific presentation results in tumours often remaining undiagnosed until surgery or histological examination [Martis et al. (A rare case of jejunojejunal intussusception in an adult. Indian J Surg 2013;75(Suppl 1):18–20)]. Presentation as a lead point for intussusception is particularly rare. We present the first case of GIST leading to intussusception at the jejuno-ileal junction in an otherwise well patient prior to presentation. Provisional diagnosis was made during emergency laparotomy, and confirmed through histological analysis. A typical immunohistochemical profile was identified, after which the patient was commenced on adjuvant imatinib therapy. We discuss classical presentation of intussusception and GIST. Further considerations of the investigation and treatment options of GISTs are also presented. PMID:25576166

  4. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy ileal pouch anal anastomosis: How I do it?

    PubMed Central

    Madnani, Manish A; Mistry, Jitendra H; Soni, Harshad N; Shah, Atul J; Patel, Kantilal S; Haribhakti, Sanjiv P

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for ulcerative colitis is a major and complex colorectal surgery. Laparoscopy benefits these patients with better outcomes in context of cosmesis, pain and early recovery, especially in young patients. For surgeons, it is a better tool for improving vision and magnification in deep cavities. This is not the simple extension of the laparoscopy training. Starting from preoperative preparation to post operative care there are wide variations as compared to open surgery. There are also many variations in steps of laparoscopic surgery. It involves left colon, right colon and rectal mobilisation, low division of rectum, pouch creation and anastomosis of pouch to rectum. Over many years after standardisation of this technique, it takes same operative time as open surgery at our centre. So we present our standardized technique of laparoscopic assisted restorative proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA). PMID:26195886

  5. Biliary excretion of glutathione and glutathione disulfide in the rat. Regulation and response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Lauterburg, B H; Smith, C V; Hughes, H; Mitchell, J R

    1984-01-01

    Regulation of the biliary excretion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and responses to selected model toxins were examined in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In control and phenobarbital-pretreated rats in which the intrahepatic concentration of GSH was modulated by the administration of diethyl maleate or acetaminophen, the biliary concentration of GSH was consistently lower than, but directly proportional to, the intrahepatic concentration of GSH. Furthermore, increments in bile flow produced by the infusion of sulfobromophthalein (BSP)-glutathione were associated with proportional increases in the biliary excretion of GSH, suggesting that GSH passes into bile passively along a concentration gradient. In contrast, GSSG appears to be secreted into bile against a steep concentration gradient. An increased hepatic production and biliary excretion of GSSG resulted from the administration of t-butyl hydroperoxide. Measurement of biliary GSSG and BSP during a constant infusion of the GSH adduct of BSP indicated that GSSG shares a common excretory mechanism with GSH adducts. Diquat, nitrofurantoin, and paraquat also markedly stimulated the biliary excretion of GSSG. On a molar basis, these compounds generated much more GSSG than a direct substrate for glutathione peroxidase such as t-butyl hydroperoxide, indicating that the compounds undergo redox-cycling with concomitant production of hydrogen peroxide. Aminopyrine (0.8 mmol/kg) also significantly increased biliary GSSG. This increase, however, was associated with a proportional increase in bile flow and in the biliary excretion of GSH such that the GSSG/GSH ratio in bile did not change. Acetaminophen and chloroform, two compounds generating electrophilic metabolites that deplete intrahepatic GSH, led to a progressive decrease in the biliary excretion of GSH and GSSG. Furosemide and dimethylnitrosamine, the electrophilic metabolites of which do not deplete hepatic GSH, minimally altered biliary GSH and GSSG. Similarly, carbon tetrachloride and iproniazid, which yield organic radical metabolites that can peroxidize membrane lipids, did not increase the biliary excretion of GSSG. This finding indicates that membrane-bound lipid hydroperoxides may not be good substrates for glutathione peroxidases. The measurement of the biliary excretion of GSSG and of the GSSG/GSH ratio in bile is a sensitive index of oxidative stress in vivo and thus complements other in vivo parameters for the study of reactive intermediates of xenobiotics such as the determination of covalent binding, the formation of lipid hydroxy acids, and the depletion of intracellular GSH. PMID:6690473

  6. Mucosal Immune Development in Early Life: Setting the Stage.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Sylvia; Perdijk, Olaf; van Neerven, R J Joost; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2015-08-01

    Our environment poses a constant threat to our health. To survive, all organisms must be able to discriminate between good (food ingredients and microbes that help digest our food) and bad (pathogenic microbes, viruses and toxins). In vertebrates, discrimination between beneficial and harmful antigens mainly occurs at the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory, digestive, urinary and genital tract. Here, an extensive network of cells and organs form the basis of what we have come to know as the mucosal immune system. The mucosal immune system is composed of a single epithelial cell layer protected by a mucus layer. Different immune cells monitor the baso-lateral side of the epithelial cells and dispersed secondary lymphoid organs, such as Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles are equipped with immune cells able to mount appropriate and specific responses. This review will focus on the current knowledge on host, dietary and bacterial-derived factors that shape the mucosal immune system before and after birth. We will discuss current knowledge on fetal immunity (both responsiveness and lymphoid organ development) as well as the impact of diet and microbial colonization on neonatal immunity and disease susceptibility. Lastly, inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed as an example of how the composition of the microbiota might predispose to disease later in life. A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms involved in mucosal immune development and tolerance will aid nutritional intervention strategies to improve health in neonatal and adult life. PMID:25666708

  7. Fluorescein-labeled glutathione to study protein S-glutathionylation.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Brown, Carolyn M; Edson, Carolyn A; Gilbert, Laura J; Grega-Larson, Nathan; Wirth, Anna Jean; Lane, Kelly C

    2010-07-01

    Numerous studies of S-glutathionylation of cysteine thiols indicate that this protein modification plays a key role in redox regulation of proteins. To facilitate the study of protein S-glutathionylation, we developed a synthesis and purification to produce milligram quantities of fluorescein-labeled glutathione. The amino terminus of the glutathione tripeptide reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate readily in ammonium bicarbonate. Purification by solid phase extraction on C8 and C18 columns separated excess reactants from desired products. Both oxidized and reduced fluorescein-labeled glutathione reacted with a variety of thiol-containing proteins to yield fluorescent proteins. PMID:20156418

  8. Quantitation of protein S-glutathionylation by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: correction for contaminating glutathione and glutathione disulfide.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Michael R; Bucklin, Christopher; Picklo, Matthew J

    2015-01-15

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a posttranslational modification that links oxidative stimuli to reversible changes in cellular function. Protein-glutathione mixed disulfide (PSSG) is commonly quantified by reduction of the disulfide and detection of the resultant glutathione species. This methodology is susceptible to contamination by free unreacted cellular glutathione (GSH) species, which are present in 1000-fold greater concentration. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method was developed for quantification of glutathione and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which was used for the determination of PSSG in biological samples. Analysis of rat liver samples demonstrated that GSH and GSSG coprecipitated with proteins similar to the range for PSSG in the sample. The use of [(13)C2,(5)N]GSH and [(13)C4,(5)N2]GSSG validated these results and demonstrated that the release of GSH from PSSG did not occur during sample preparation and analysis. These data demonstrate that GSH and GSSG contamination must be accounted for when determining PSSG content in cellular/tissue preparations. A protocol for rinsing samples to remove the adventitious glutathione species is demonstrated. The fragmentation patterns for glutathione were determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry, and candidate ions for detection of PSSG on protein and protein fragments were identified. PMID:25448621

  9. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Eric A; Camacho, Zenaido T; Hillestad, Matthew L; Crosby, Catherine M; Turner, Mallory A; Guenzel, Adam J; Fadel, Hind J; Mercier, George T; Barry, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber ?-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. PMID:25827529

  10. Evaluation of mucosal adjuvants and immunization routes for the induction of systemic and mucosal humoral immune responses in macaques.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Siddiqui, Asna; Klein, Katja; Buffa, Viviana; Fischetti, Lucia; Doyle-Meyers, Lara; King, Deborah F; Tregoning, John S; Shattock, Robin J

    2015-12-01

    Delivering vaccine antigens to mucosal surfaces is potentially very attractive, especially as protection from mucosal infections may be mediated by local immune responses. However, to date mucosal immunization has had limited successes, with issues of both safety and poor immunogenicity. One approach to improve immunogenicity is to develop adjuvants that are effective and safe at mucosal surfaces. Differences in immune responses between mice and men have overstated the value of some experimental adjuvants which have subsequently performed poorly in the clinic. Due to their closer similarity, non-human primates can provide a more accurate picture of adjuvant performance. In this study we immunised rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) using a unique matrix experimental design that maximised the number of adjuvants screened while reducing the animal usage. Macaques were immunised by the intranasal, sublingual and intrarectal routes with the model protein antigens keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), ?-galactosidase (?-Gal) and ovalbumin (OVA) in combination with the experimental adjuvants Poly(I:C), Pam3CSK4, chitosan, Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP), MPLA and R848 (Resiquimod). Of the routes used, only intranasal immunization with KLH and R848 induced a detectable antibody response. When compared to intramuscular immunization, intranasal administration gave slightly lower levels of antigen specific antibody in the plasma, but enhanced local responses. Following intranasal delivery of R848, we observed a mildly inflammatory response, but no difference to the control. From this we conclude that R848 is able to boost antibody responses to mucosally delivered antigen, without causing excess local inflammation. PMID:26697975

  11. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  12. The content of glutathione and glutathione S-transferases and the glutathione peroxidase activity in rat liver nuclei determined by a non-aqueous technique of cell fractionation.

    PubMed Central

    Soboll, S; Gründel, S; Harris, J; Kolb-Bachofen, V; Ketterer, B; Sies, H

    1995-01-01

    Hepatocellular nuclei require glutathione, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx) for intranuclear protection against damage from electrophiles or products of active oxygen. Data so far available from the literature on nuclei isolated in aqueous systems range from glutathione, GSTs and GPx either being absent altogether to being present in quantities in excess of those in the cytoplasm. This paper describes a small-scale preparation of a nuclear fraction from rat liver by a non-aqueous technique, designed to retain nuclear water-soluble molecules in situ, since low-molecular-mass compounds can diffuse freely into other compartments during aqueous separation. This non-aqueous procedure shows the nucleus to contain glutathione at 8.4 mM and soluble GSTs at 38 micrograms/mg of protein, the enrichment over the homogenate being 1.2-1.4-fold. Se-dependent GPx activity was also present in the nucleus (56 m-units/mg), although with slightly lower activity than in the homogenate (0.7-fold). Images Figure 1 PMID:7487946

  13. Glutathione and modulation of cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Aw, Tak Yee

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly organized form of cell death that is important for tissue homeostasis, organ development and senescence. To date, the extrinsic (death receptor mediated) and intrinsic (mitochondria derived) apoptotic pathways have been characterized in mammalian cells. Reduced glutathione, GSH, is the most prevalent cellular thiol that plays an essential role in preserving a reduced intracellular environment. GSH protection of cellular macromolecules like DNA, proteins and lipids against oxidizing, environmental and cytotoxic agents, underscores its central anti-apoptotic function. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) can oxidize cellular GSH or induce its extracellular export leading to the loss of intracellular redox homeostasis and activation of the apoptotic signaling cascade. Recent evidence uncovered a novel role for GSH involvement in apoptotic signaling pathways wherein post-translational S-glutathiolation of protein redox active cysteines is implicated in the potentiation of apoptosis. In the present review we focus on the key aspects of GSH redox mechanisms associated with apoptotic signaling that includes: (a) changes in cellular GSH redox homeostasis through GSH oxidation or GSH transport in relation to the initiation or propagation of the apoptotic cascade, and (b) evidence for S-glutathiolation in protein modulation and apoptotic initiation. PMID:22732297

  14. Radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy with ileal conduit urinary diversion and abdominal wall reconstruction: an interesting case of multidisciplinary management

    PubMed Central

    Sofos, Stratos S; Walsh, Ciaran J; Parr, Nigel J; Hancock, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The ileal conduit for urinary diversion after radical cystectomy is a well-described procedure. Furthermore, parastomal hernias, prolapse, stenosis, and retraction of the stoma have been reported as some of the more common complications of this procedure. The subsequent repair of parastomal hernias with a biological mesh and the potential of the conduit to “tunnel” through it has also been described. In this case report, we present a combined repair of a large incisional hernia with a cystectomy and a pelvic lymphadenectomy for invasive bladder cancer, with the use of a biological mesh for posterior component abdominal wall primary repair as well as for support to the ileal conduit used for urinary diversion. PMID:25653561

  15. Radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy with ileal conduit urinary diversion and abdominal wall reconstruction: an interesting case of multidisciplinary management.

    PubMed

    Sofos, Stratos S; Walsh, Ciaran J; Parr, Nigel J; Hancock, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The ileal conduit for urinary diversion after radical cystectomy is a well-described procedure. Furthermore, parastomal hernias, prolapse, stenosis, and retraction of the stoma have been reported as some of the more common complications of this procedure. The subsequent repair of parastomal hernias with a biological mesh and the potential of the conduit to "tunnel" through it has also been described. In this case report, we present a combined repair of a large incisional hernia with a cystectomy and a pelvic lymphadenectomy for invasive bladder cancer, with the use of a biological mesh for posterior component abdominal wall primary repair as well as for support to the ileal conduit used for urinary diversion. PMID:25653561

  16. Mucosal wrinkling in animal antra induced by volumetric growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Cao, Yan-Ping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yu, Shou-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Surface wrinkling of animal mucosas is crucial for the biological functions of some tissues, and the change in their surface patterns is a phenotypic characteristic of certain diseases. Here we develop a biomechanical model to study the relationship between morphogenesis and volumetric growth, either physiological or pathological, of mucosas. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are performed to unravel the critical characteristics of mucosal wrinkling in a spherical antrum. It is shown that the thicknesses and elastic moduli of mucosal and submucosal layers dictate the surface buckling morphology. The results hold clinical relevance for such diseases as inflammation and gastritis.

  17. Ileal digestibility and endogenous flow of minerals and amino acids: responses to dietary phytic acid in piglets.

    PubMed

    Woyengo, Tofuko A; Cowieson, Aaron J; Adeola, Olayiwola; Nyachoti, Charles M

    2009-08-01

    Effects of phytic acid (PA) on ileal mineral and amino acid (AA) digestibilities and ileal endogenous AA flow in piglets were investigated. Seven ileal-cannulated weanling pigs were fed a casein-maize starch-based diet with PA (as sodium phytate) at 0, 5, 10 or 20 g/kg in 4 x 4 Latin square design with three added columns to give seven observations per treatment. The basal diet was formulated to meet National Research Council energy and AA requirements for piglets. The respective digestibility and endogenous lysine loss were determined by indicator and homoarginine methods. The apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of Na, K and P was linearly and quadratically reduced (P < 0.05) by increased dietary PA concentration, whereas that of Ca and Mg was only linearly reduced (P < 0.05) by the dietary PA. The AID values for Mg and Na were negative ( - 0.03 and - 0.18, respectively) when PA was supplemented at 20 g/kg. The AID of isoleucine, leucine and valine responded quadratically to dietary PA concentration, though the differences between the AID values of the AA due to change in dietary PA concentration were marginal (at most by 1.8 percentage units). Furthermore, dietary PA did not affect (P>0.05) endogenous AA losses. The results suggest that PA has limited effect on the digestibility and endogenous losses of AA in piglets, but can reduce AID of Mg and Na partly by increasing endogenous losses of these minerals as evidenced by their negative AID values. PMID:19144214

  18. The pleiotropic role of vitamin A in regulating mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Sirisinha, Stitaya

    2015-06-01

    The effect of vitamin A on mucosal immunity has never been subjected to extensive studies until recently. We started to work in this area in the early 1970s when we observed that children with protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM) often had defective mucosal immunity, judging from the incidence of respiratory tract infections and diarrhea. We reported that these children had depressed secretory IgA (sIgA) levels in their nasal wash fluids. The IgA level in specimens collected from those superimposed with some degrees of vitamin A deficiency state appeared to be more severely affected. In order to better understand the underlying mechanism associated with this condition, we started to study more detail the deficiency state using experimental vitamin A-deficient rats. From a series of experiments using this animal model, we proposed that vitamin A was needed for transport and/or secretion of sIgA across the mucosa. This conclusion was based on the observation that the secretory component of sIgA synthesized by the epithelial cells of these vitamin A deficient animals was adversely affected as compared to the control animals. From that time onward, much progress has been made by several other groups showing that other mechanisms could also influence the integrity and immune function of the mucosa. For instance, recent studies demonstrated that retinoic acid which is a biologically active form of vitamin A has an essential role in mucosal homeostasis, controlling tolerance and immunity in these non-lymphoid tissues. Such a conclusion was made possible by the availability of sophisticated new molecular biology and genetic engineering techniques together with advances in the field of immunoregulation, e.g., the discovery of dendritic cells (DCs) and T helper cell subsets in 1980s, and the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) together with other innate immune regulators in controlling adaptive immune response in the early 1990s. These advances provided considerable new insights into the pleiotropic roles of vitamin A including educating mucosal DCs, differentiation of lymphocyte lineages and imprinting them with mucosal-homing properties as well as in regulating tolerance and immunity. The identification of a novel lymphocyte subpopulation, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), at the beginning of this century has provided us with an additional insight into a new role of vitamin A in regulating homeostasis at the mucosal surface through influencing ILCs. Another new player that regulates intestinal homeostasis and mucosal immune response is microbiota whose composition is known to vary with vitamin A status. So it appears now that the role of vitamin A on mucosal immunity is far beyond regulating the adaptive Th1-Th2 cell response, but is highly pleiotropic and more complicating, e.g., polarizing the phenotype of mucosal DCs and macrophages, directing gut-homing migration of T and B cells, inducing differentiation of effector T cells and Treg subpopulation, balancing mucosal ILCs subpopulation and influencing the composition of microbiota. In this review, I will attempt to bring together these important advances to provide a comprehensive and contemporary perspective on the role of vitamin A in regulating mucosal immunity. PMID:26141028

  19. Lactacidosis modulates glutathione metabolism and oxidative glutamate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lewerenz, Jan; Dargusch, Richard; Maher, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    Lactate and acidosis increase infarct size in humans and in animal models of cerebral ischemia but the mechanisms by which they exert their neurotoxic effects are poorly understood. Oxidative glutamate toxicity is a form of nerve cell death, wherein glutamate inhibits cystine uptake via the cystine/glutamate antiporter system leading to glutathione depletion, accumulation of reactive oxygen species and, ultimately, programmed cell death. Using the hippocampal cell line, HT22, we show that lactate and acidosis exacerbate oxidative glutamate toxicity and further decrease glutathione levels. Acidosis but not lactate inhibits system , whereas both acidosis and lactate inhibit the enzymatic steps of glutathione synthesis downstream of cystine uptake. In contrast, when glutathione synthesis is completely inhibited by cystine-free medium, acidosis partially protects against glutathione depletion and cell death. Both effects of acidosis are also present in primary neuronal and astrocyte cultures. Furthermore, we show that some neuroprotective compounds are much less effective in the presence of lactacidosis. Our findings indicate that lactacidosis modulates glutathione metabolism and neuronal cell death. Furthermore, lactacidosis may interfere with the action of some neuroprotective drugs rendering these less likely to be therapeutically effective in cerebral ischemia. PMID:20132475

  20. Allyl isothiocyanate depletes glutathione and upregulates expression of glutathione S-transferases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Øverby, Anders; Stokland, Ragni A.; Åsberg, Signe E.; Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Bones, Atle M.

    2015-01-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) is a phytochemical associated with plant defense in plants from the Brassicaceae family. AITC has long been recognized as a countermeasure against external threats, but recent reports suggest that AITC is also involved in the onset of defense-related mechanisms such as the regulation of stomatal aperture. However, the underlying cellular modes of action in plants remain scarcely investigated. Here we report evidence of an AITC-induced depletion of glutathione (GSH) and the effect on gene expression of the detoxification enzyme family glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Treatment of A. thaliana wild-type with AITC resulted in a time- and dose-dependent depletion of cellular GSH. AITC-exposure of mutant lines vtc1 and pad2-1 with elevated and reduced GSH-levels, displayed enhanced and decreased AITC-tolerance, respectively. AITC-exposure also led to increased ROS-levels in the roots and loss of chlorophyll which are symptoms of oxidative stress. Following exposure to AITC, we found that GSH rapidly recovered to the same level as in the control plant, suggesting an effective route for replenishment of GSH or a rapid detoxification of AITC. Transcriptional analysis of genes encoding GSTs showed an upregulation in response to AITC. These findings demonstrate cellular effects by AITC involving a reversible depletion of the GSH-pool, induced oxidative stress, and elevated expression of GST-encoding genes. PMID:25954298

  1. Phytase Modulates Ileal Microbiota and Enhances Growth Performance of the Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ptak, Anna; Bedford, Michael R.; ?wi?tkiewicz, Sylwester; ?y?a, Krzysztof; Józefiak, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Phytase is well studied and explored, however, little is known about its effects on the microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract. In total, 400 one-day-old female Ross 308 chicks were randomly distributed to four experimental groups. The dietary treatments were arranged as a 2 × 2 complete factorial design, with the factors being adequate (PC) or insufficient calcium (Ca) and digestible phosphor (dP)(NC) and with or without 5000 phytase units (FTU)/kg of Escherichia coli 6-phytase. The gastrointestinal tract pH values, ileal microbial communities and short-chain fatty acid concentrations in the digesta were determined. The reduction in Ca and dP concentration significantly affected pH in the crop and caeca, and addition of phytase to the NC resulted in a pH increase in the ileum. The reduction in Ca and dP concentration significantly lowered, while phytase supplementation increased ileal total bacterial counts. Additionally, the deficient diet reduced butyrate- but increased lactate-producing bacteria. The addition of phytase increased Lactobacillus sp./Enterococcus sp. whereas in case of Clostridium leptum subgroup, Clostridium coccoides - Eubacterium rectale cluster, Bifidobacterium sp. and Streptococcus/Lactococcus counts, a significant Ca and dP level x phytase interaction was found. However, the recorded interactions indicated that the effects of phytase and Ca and dP levels were not consistent. Furthermore, the reduction of Ca and dP level lowered Clostridium perfringens and Enterobacteriaceae counts. The analysis of fermentation products showed that reducing the Ca and dP content in the diet reduced total SCFA, DL-lactate, and acetic acid in the ileum whereas phytase increased concentrations of these acids in the NC group. This suggests that P is a factor which limits fermentation in the ileum. It may be concluded that phytase plays a role in modulating the gut microbiota of chicken, however, this is clearly linked with the levels of P and Ca in a diet. PMID:25781608

  2. EFFECT OF EXOGENOUS GLUTATHIONE, GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, AND CHLORITE ON OSMOTIC FRAGILITY OF RAT BLOOD IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2), chlorite (ClO2(-1)), and chlorate (ClO3(-1)) in drinking water decreased blood glutathione and RBC osmotic fragility in vivo. The osmotic fragility and glutathione content were also studied in rat blood treated with ClO2, ClO2(-1), ClO3(-1) in vitro. RBC ...

  3. Herbal Substance, Acteoside, Alleviates Intestinal Mucositis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Daniel; Kritas, Stamatiki; Polychronopoulos, Panagiotis; Skaltsounis, Alexios L.; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Tran, Cuong D.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of acteoside in the amelioration of mucositis. C57BL/6 mice were gavaged daily with acteoside 600??g for 5?d prior to induction of mucositis and throughout the experimental period. Mucositis was induced by methotrexate (MTX; 12.5?mg/kg; s.c.). Mice were culled on d 5 and d 11 after MTX. The duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, metallothionein (MT) levels, and histology. Acteoside reduced histological severity scores by 75, 78, and 88% in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, respectively, compared to MTX-controls on d 5. Acteoside reduced crypt depth by 49, 51, and 33% and increased villus height by 19, 38, and 10% in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, respectively, compared to MTX-controls on d 5. Acteoside decreased MT by 50% compared to MTX-control mice on d 5. Acteoside decreased MPO by 60% and 30% in the duodenum and jejunum, respectively, compared to MTX-controls on d 5. Acteoside alleviated MTX-induced small intestinal mucositis possibly by preventing inflammation. PMID:25628651

  4. Targeting mucosal sites by polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-directed peptides.

    PubMed

    White, Kendra D; Capra, J Donald

    2002-08-19

    Polymeric immunoglobulins provide first line humoral defense at mucosal surfaces to which they are specifically transported by the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) on mucosal and glandular epithelial cells. Previous studies from our laboratory suggested that amino acids 402-410 of the Calpha3 domain of dimeric IgA (dIgA) represented a potential binding site for the pIgR. Here by binding human secretory component to overlapping decapeptides of Calpha3, we confirm these residues and also uncover an additional site. Furthermore, we show that the Calpha3 motif appears to be sufficient to direct transport of green fluorescent protein through the pIgR-specific cellular transcytosis system. An alternative approach identified phage peptides, selected from a library by the in vitro Madin Darby Canine Kidney transcytosis assay, for pIgR-mediated transport through epithelial cells. Some transcytosis-selected peptides map to the same 402-410 pIgR-binding Calpha3 site. Further in vivo studies document that at least one of these peptides is transported in a rat model measuring hepatic bile transport. In addition to identifying small peptides that are both bound and transported by the pIgR, this study provides evidence that the pIgR-mediated mucosal secretion system may represent a means of targeting small molecule therapeutics and genes to mucosal epithelial cells. PMID:12186846

  5. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  6. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) mucosal infection in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Aamelfot, Maria; McBeath, Alastair; Christiansen, Debes H; Matejusova, Iveta; Falk, Knut

    2015-01-01

    All viruses infecting fish must cross the surface mucosal barrier to successfully enter a host. Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), the causative agent of the economically important infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., has been shown to use the gills as its entry point. However, other entry ports have not been investigated despite the expression of virus receptors on the surface of epithelial cells in the skin, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the conjunctiva. Here we investigate the ISAV mucosal infection in Atlantic salmon after experimental immersion (bath) challenge and in farmed fish collected from a confirmed outbreak of ISA in Norway. We show for the first time evidence of early replication in several mucosal surfaces in addition to the gills, including the pectoral fin, skin and GI tract suggesting several potential entry points for the virus. Initially, the infection is localized and primarily infecting epithelial cells, however at later stages it becomes systemic, infecting the endothelial cells lining the circulatory system. Viruses of low and high virulence used in the challenge revealed possible variation in virus progression during infection at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:26490835

  7. Growth of Surface Waves with Application to the Mucosal Wave

    E-print Network

    Growth of Surface Waves with Application to the Mucosal Wave of the Vocal Folds R. S. Mc structure consisting of flowing air, epithelium, Reinke's space, and muscle. Only after the problem, epithelium, Reinke's space, and the deep layer of ligament and muscle. The variations normal to the coronal

  8. Individual mammalian mucosal glucosidase subunits digest various starch structures differently

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch digestion in the human body requires two luminal enzymes,salivary and pancreatic alpha-amylase (AMY), and four small intestinal mucosal enzyme activities related to the maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) complexes. Starch consists of two polysaccharides, amylose (AM) and ...

  9. Induction of chloride secretory currents across mouse ileal tissues by rotavirus enterotoxic peptide in different age mice 

    E-print Network

    Cox, Virginia Waters

    2002-01-01

    ) is enterotoxic and induces a chloride efflux across neonatal mouse intestinal mucosa. Chloride ion efflux across mucosal tissue is measured as an electrical current in Ussing chambers and is the predominant electrolyte driving fluid secretion. Until recently a...

  10. Fermentable non-starch polysaccharides increases the abundance of Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas in ileal microbial community of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, E; Roos, S; Liu, H Y; Lindberg, J E

    2014-11-01

    Most plant-origin fiber sources used in pig production contains a mixture of soluble and insoluble non-starch polysaccharides (NSP). The knowledge about effects of these sources of NSP on the gut microbiota and its fermentation products is still scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of feeding diets with native sources of NSP on the ileal and fecal microbial composition and the dietary impact on the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactic acid. The experiment comprised four diets and four periods in a change-over design with seven post valve t-cecum cannulated growing pigs. The four diets were balanced to be similar in NSP content and included one of four fiber sources, two diets were rich in pectins, through inclusion of chicory forage (CFO) and sugar beet pulp, and two were rich in arabinoxylan, through inclusion of wheat bran (WB) and grass meal. The gut microbial composition was assessed with terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length polymorphism and the abundance of Lactobacillus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas and the ?-xylosidase gene, xynB, were assessed with quantitative PCR. The gut microbiota did not cluster based on NSP structure (arabinoxylan or pectin) rather, the effect was to a high degree ingredient specific. In pigs fed diet CFO, three TRFs related to Prevotellaceae together consisted of more than 25% of the fecal microbiota, which is about 3 to 23 times higher (P<0.05) than in pigs fed the other diets. Whereas pigs fed diet WB had about 2 to 22 times higher abundance (P<0.05) of Megasphaera elsdenii in feces and about six times higher abundance (P<0.05) of Lactobacillus reuteri in ileal digesta than pigs fed the other diets. The total amount of digested NSP (r=0.57; P=0.002), xylose (r=0.53; P=0.004) and dietary fiber (r=0.60; P=0.001) in ileal digesta were positively correlated with an increased abundance of Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas. The effect on SCFA was correlated to specific neutral sugars where xylose increased the ileal butyric acid proportion, whereas arabinose increased the fecal butyric acid proportion. Moreover, chicory pectin increased the acetic acid proportion in both ileal digesta and feces. PMID:25046106

  11. Mucosal healing and deep remission: what does it mean?

    PubMed

    Rogler, Gerhard; Vavricka, Stephan; Schoepfer, Alain; Lakatos, Peter L

    2013-11-21

    The use of specific terms under different meanings and varying definitions has always been a source of confusion in science. When we point our efforts towards an evidence based medicine for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) the same is true: Terms such as "mucosal healing" or "deep remission" as endpoints in clinical trials or treatment goals in daily patient care may contribute to misconceptions if meanings change over time or definitions are altered. It appears to be useful to first have a look at the development of terms and their definitions, to assess their intrinsic and context-independent problems and then to analyze the different relevance in present-day clinical studies and trials. The purpose of such an attempt would be to gain clearer insights into the true impact of the clinical findings behind the terms. It may also lead to a better defined use of those terms for future studies. The terms "mucosal healing" and "deep remission" have been introduced in recent years as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of IBD patients. Several clinical trials, cohort studies or inception cohorts provided data that the long term disease course is better, when mucosal healing is achieved. However, it is still unclear whether continued or increased therapeutic measures will aid or improve mucosal healing for patients in clinical remission. Clinical trials are under way to answer this question. Attention should be paid to clearly address what levels of IBD activity are looked at. In the present review article authors aim to summarize the current evidence available on mucosal healing and deep remission and try to highlight their value and position in the everyday decision making for gastroenterologists. PMID:24282345

  12. Altered glutathione homeostasis in animals prenatally exposed to lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuangui; Carvey, Paul M.; Ling, Zaodung

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported that injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into gravid female rats at embryonic day 10.5 resulted in a birth of offspring with fewer than normal dopamine (DA) neurons along with innate immunity dysfunction and many characteristics seen in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. The LPS-exposed animals were also more susceptible to secondary toxin exposure as indicated by an accelerated DA neuron loss. Glutathione (GSH) is an important antioxidant in the brain. A disturbance in glutathione homeostasis has been proposed for the pathogenesis of PD. In this study, animals prenatally exposed to LPS were studied along with an acute intranigral LPS injection model for the status of glutathione homeostasis, lipid peroxidation, and related enzyme activities. Both prenatal LPS exposure and acute LPS injection produced a significant GSH reduction and increase in oxidized GSH (GSSG) and lipid peroxide (LPO) production. Activity of ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS), the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo GSH synthesis, was up-regulated in acute supranigral LPS model but was reduced in the prenatal LPS model. The GCS light subunit protein expression was also down-regulated in prenatal LPS model. GSH redox recycling enzyme activities (glutathione peroxidase, GPx and glutathione reducdase, GR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), ?-glutamyl transpeptidase (?-GT) activities were all increased in prenatal LPS model. Prenatal LPS exposure and aging synergized in GSH level and GSH related enzyme activities except for those (GR, GST, and ?-GT) with significant regional variations. Additionally, prenatal LPS exposure produced a reduction of DA neuron count in the substantia nigra (SN). These results suggest that prenatal LPS exposure may cause glutathione homeostasis disturbance in offspring brain and render DA neurons susceptible to the secondary neurotoxin insult. PMID:17291629

  13. Mucosal immunity and protection against HIV/SIV infection: strategies and challenges for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Demberg, Thorsten; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    To date, most HIV vaccine strategies have focused on parenteral immunization and systemic immunity. These approaches have not yielded the efficacious HIV vaccine urgently needed to control the AIDS pandemic. As HIV is primarily mucosally transmitted, efforts are being re-focused on mucosal vaccine strategies, in spite of complexities of immune response induction and evaluation. Here, we outline issues in mucosal vaccine design and illustrate strategies with examples from the recent literature. Development of a successful HIV vaccine will require in-depth understanding of the mucosal immune system, knowledge that ultimately will benefit vaccine design for all mucosally transmitted infectious agents. PMID:19241252

  14. K? absorption by locust gut and inhibition of ileal K? and water transport by FGLamide allatostatins.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lisa; Donini, Andrew; Lange, Angela B

    2014-09-15

    The scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) was utilized for the first time in Locusta migratoria to characterize K(+) transport along the digestive tract and to determine the effect of two locust FGLamide allatostatins (FGLa/ASTs) on K(+) transport: a previously sequenced FGLa/AST from Schistocerca gregaria (Scg-AST-6; ARPYSFGL-NH2) and a newly sequenced FGLa/AST from L. migratoria (Locmi-FGLa/AST-2; LPVYNFGL-NH2). Regional differences in K(+) fluxes along the gut were evident, where K(+) efflux in vitro (or absorption into the hemolymph in vivo) was greatest at the anterior ileum, and lowest at the colon. Ileal K(+) efflux was inhibited by both Scg-AST-6 and Locmi-FGLa/AST-2, with maximal inhibition at 10(-10) and 10(-11) mol l(-1), respectively. Both FGLa/ASTs also inhibited cAMP-stimulated K(+) efflux from the ileum. Locmi-FGLa/AST-2 also inhibited efflux of water across the ileum. Locusts are terrestrial insects living in dry climates, risking desiccation and making water conservation a necessity. The results suggest that FGLa/ASTs may be acting as diuretics by increasing K(+) excretion and therefore increasing water excretion. Thus it is likely that FGLa/ASTs are involved in the control of hemolymph water and ion levels during feeding and digestion, to help the locust deal with the excess K(+) load (and subsequently fluid) when the meal is processed. PMID:25013112

  15. Temporal Differential Proteomes of Clostridium difficile in the Pig Ileal-Ligated Loop Model

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Ching-Hao; McDonough, Sean P.; Gleed, Robin D.; Fubini, Susan L.; Zhang, Sheng; Akey, Bruce; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2012-01-01

    The impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) on healthcare is becoming increasingly recognized as it represents a major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. A rising number of CDI cases and outbreaks have been reported worldwide. Here, we developed the pig ileal-ligated loop model for semi-quantitative analysis comparing temporal differential proteomes in C. difficile following in vivo incubation with in vitro growth using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Proteins retrieved from the in vitro cultures and the loop contents after 4, 8, and 12 h in vivo incubation were subjected to in-solution digestion, iTRAQ labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and statistical analyses. From a total of 1152 distinct proteins identified in this study, 705 proteins were available for quantitative measures at all time points in both biological and technical replicates; 109 proteins were found to be differentially expressed. With analysis of clusters of orthologous group and protein-protein network interactions, we identified the proteins that might play roles in adaptive responses to the host environment, hence enhancing pathogenicity during CDI. This report represents the quantitative proteomic analysis of C. difficile that demonstrates time-dependent protein expression changes under conditions that mimic in vivo infection and identifies potential candidates for diagnostic or therapeutic measures. PMID:23029131

  16. Ileal Intussusception Due to Metastasis from Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Resected 12 Years Previously.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Chino, Osamu; Tajima, Takayuki; Tanaka, Yoichi; Yokoyama, Daiki; Hanashi, Tomoko; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    An 88-year-old woman, with a history of resection of stage IIA lung cancer in 1998, was referred to our hospital in August 2010 complaining of upper abdominal pain, vomiting, and dark brown stools. After endoscopic examination, she was admitted with a diagnosis of Mallory-Weiss syndrome. Vomiting ecurred when food intake was resumed after fasting. Intestinal obstruction was suspected on abdominal radiography, and complete small bowel obstruction was confirmed by contrast-enhanced imaging after placement of an ileus tube. A small intestinal tumor with intussusception was detected by computed tomography. At laparotomy, there was no ascites. Intussusception was found due to an ileal tumor located approximately 50 cm from the ileocecal valve, and we performed partial small bowel resection. The resected small intestine contained a submucosal tumor approximately 40 mm in diameter that had penetrated the bowel wall to reach the serosa. Pathological examination revealed a submucosal tumor that showed poor continuity with the surrounding mucosa, while the histology was squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor was CK7 positive, CK20 negative, TTF-1 negative, and CK10 positive. Based on these findings, we made a diagnosis of small intestinal metastasis at 12 years after radical resection of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. PMID:26662663

  17. The efficacy of sucralfate suspension in the prevention of oral mucositis due to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; Wong, F.L.W. )

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of sucralfate suspension in prevention of oral mucositis and for reduction of oral pain in patients who develop mucositis during radiation therapy. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized prospective trial of a sucralfate suspension in the prevention and management of oral mucositis during radiation therapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using a quantitative scale and symptoms were assessed using visual analogue scales. The statistical model was developed to detect a 40% reduction in mucositis. No statistically significant reduction in mucositis was seen. Early during radiation therapy less oral pain was reported in the sucralfate group, but as treatment progressed all patients experienced pain. Patients in the sucralfate group were prescribed topical and systemic analgesics later in the course of radiation therapy. Prophylactic oral rinsing with sucralfate did not prevent oral ulcerative mucositis. Sucralfate may reduce the experience of pain during radiation therapy. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Evidence That Glutathione and the Glutathione System Efficiently Recycle 1-Cys Sulfiredoxin In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Boukhenouna, Samia; Mazon, Hortense; Branlant, Guy; Jacob, Christophe; Toledano, Michel B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs) are Cys peroxidases that undergo inactivation by hyperoxidation of the catalytic Cys, a modification reversed by ATP-dependent reduction by sulfiredoxin (Srx). Such an attribute is thought to provide regulation of 2-Cys Prxs functions. The initial steps of the Srx catalytic mechanism lead to a Prx/Srx thiolsulfinate intermediate that must be reduced to regenerate Srx. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae Srx, the thiolsulfinate is resolved by an extra Cys (Cys48) that is absent in mammalian, plant, and cyanobacteria Srxs (1-Cys Srxs). We have addressed the mechanism of reduction of 1-Cys Srxs using S. cerevisiae Srx mutants lacking Cys48 as a model. Results: We have tested the recycling of Srx by glutathione (GSH) by a combination of in vitro steady-state and single-turnover kinetic analyses, using enzymatic coupled assays, Prx fluorescence, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and reverse-phase chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that GSH reacts directly with the thiolsulfinate intermediate, by following saturation kinetics with an apparent dissociation constant of 34??M, while producing S-glutathionylated Srx as a catalytic intermediate which is efficiently reduced by the glutaredoxin/glutathione reductase system. Total cellular depletion of GSH impacted the recycling of Srx, confirming in vivo that GSH is the physiologic reducer of 1-Cys Srx. Innovation: Our study suggests that GSH binds to the thiolsulfinate complex, thus allowing non-rate limiting reduction. Such a structural recognition of GSH enables an efficient catalytic reduction, even at very low GSH cellular levels. Conclusion: This study provides both in vitro and in vivo evidence of the role of GSH as the primary reducer of 1-Cys Srxs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 731–743. PMID:25387359

  19. Glutathione is required for efficient production of infectious picornavirus virions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Allen D. . E-mail: smitha@ba.ars.usda.gov; Dawson, Harry . E-mail: dawsonh@ba.ars.usda.gov

    2006-09-30

    Glutathione is an intracellular reducing agent that helps maintain the redox potential of the cell and is important for immune function. The drug L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) selectively inhibits glutathione synthesis. Glutathione has been reported to block replication of HIV, HSV-1, and influenza virus, whereas cells treated with BSO exhibit increased replication of Sendai virus. Pre-treatment of HeLa cell monolayers with BSO inhibited replication of CVB3, CVB4, and HRV14 with viral titers reduced by approximately 6, 5, and 3 log{sub 1}, respectively. The addition of glutathione ethyl ester, but not dithiothreitol or 2-mercaptoethanol, to the culture medium reversed the inhibitory effect of BSO. Viral RNA and protein synthesis were not inhibited by BSO treatment. Fractionation of lysates from CVB3-infected BSO-treated cells on cesium chloride and sucrose gradients revealed that empty capsids but not mature virions were being produced. The levels of the 5S and 14S assembly intermediates, however, were not affected by BSO treatment. These results demonstrate that glutathione is important for production of mature infectious picornavirus virions.

  20. Melatonin is more effective than ascorbic acid and ?-carotene in improvement of gastric mucosal damage induced by intensive stress

    PubMed Central

    Akinci, Aysin; Cetin, Asli; Ates, Burhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress has been considered to play a primary role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced gastric damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin, ascorbic acid and ?-carotene on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage. Material and methods Fifty-six male Wistar albino rats were divided into control, stress, stress + standard diet, stress + saline, stress + melatonin, stress + ascorbic acid and stress + ?-carotene groups. The rats from stress groups were exposed to starvation, immobilization and cold by immobilizing for 8 h at +4°C following 72-hour food restriction. Following stress application, melatonin, ascorbic acid and ?-carotene were administered for 7 days. Specimens of gastric tissue were prepared for microscopic and biochemical examinations. Results Mean histopathological damage scores and mean tissue malondialdehyde levels were significantly decreased but mean tissue glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were increased in treatment groups vs. stress groups in general. Mean histopathological damage scores of the stress + Mel group was lower than those of stress + D, stress + S, stress + ?-car (p < 0.05) and stress + Asc groups (p < 0.005). Additionally, mean tissue catalase activity of the stress + Mel group was higher than that of stress + S (p < 0.005), stress + D (p < 0.05) and stress + ?-car groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions Melatonin is more effective than ascorbic acid and ?-carotene in improvement of gastric damage induced by intensive stress. We suggest that as well as the direct antioxidant and free radical scavenging potency of melatonin, its indirect effect via the brain-gut axis might account for its greater beneficial action against stress-induced gastric damage. PMID:26528359

  1. Characterization of recombinant glutathione reductase from the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mikyoung; Barnwell, Callie V; Grunden, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Glutathione reductases catalyze the reduction of oxidized glutathione (glutathione disulfide, GSSG) using NADPH as the substrate to produce reduced glutathione (GSH), which is an important antioxidant molecule that helps maintain the proper reducing environment of the cell. A recombinant form of glutathione reductase from Colwellia psychrerythraea, a marine psychrophilic bacterium, has been biochemically characterized to determine its molecular and enzymatic properties. C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was shown to be a homodimer with a molecular weight of 48.7 kDa using SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and gel filtration. The C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase sequence shows significant homology to that of Escherichia coli glutathione reductase (66 % identity), and it possesses the FAD and NADPH binding motifs, as well as absorption spectrum features which are characteristic of flavoenzymes such as glutathione reductase. The psychrophilic C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase exhibits higher k cat and k cat/K m at lower temperatures (4 °C) compared to mesophilic Baker's yeast glutathione reductase. However, C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was able to complement an E. coli glutathione reductase deletion strain in oxidative stress growth assays, demonstrating the functionality of C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase over a broad temperature range, which suggests its potential utility as an antioxidant enzyme in heterologous systems. PMID:26101017

  2. Glutathione Homeostasis and Functions: Potential Targets for Medical Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I.

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide, which has many biological roles including protection against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The primary goal of this paper is to characterize the principal mechanisms of the protective role of GSH against reactive species and electrophiles. The ancillary goals are to provide up-to-date knowledge of GSH biosynthesis, hydrolysis, and utilization; intracellular compartmentalization and interorgan transfer; elimination of endogenously produced toxicants; involvement in metal homeostasis; glutathione-related enzymes and their regulation; glutathionylation of sulfhydryls. Individual sections are devoted to the relationships between GSH homeostasis and pathologies as well as to developed research tools and pharmacological approaches to manipulating GSH levels. Special attention is paid to compounds mainly of a natural origin (phytochemicals) which affect GSH-related processes. The paper provides starting points for development of novel tools and provides a hypothesis for investigation of the physiology and biochemistry of glutathione with a focus on human and animal health. PMID:22500213

  3. Thioltransferase activity of bovine lens glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, M; Cecconi, I; Buono, F; Vilardo, P G; Del Corso, A; Mura, U

    1998-01-01

    A Mu-class glutathione S-transferase purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens displayed thioltransferase activity, catalysing the transthiolation reaction between GSH and hydroxyethyldisulphide. The thiol-transfer reaction is composed of two steps, the formation of GSSG occurring through the generation of an intermediate mixed disulphide between GSH and the target disulphide. Unlike glutaredoxin, which is only able to catalyse the second step of the transthiolation process, glutathioneS-transferase catalyses both steps of the reaction. Data are presented showing that bovine lens glutathione S-transferase and rat liver glutaredoxin, which was used as a thioltransferase enzyme model, can operate in synergy to catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of hydroxyethyldisulphide. PMID:9693102

  4. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  5. Langerhans Cells and Their Role in Oral Mucosal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Juhi; Upadhyay, Ram B; Agrawal, Pankaj; Jaitley, Shweta; Shekhar, Rhitu

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are arguably the most potent antigen-presenting cells and may be the only cells capable of initiating the adaptive immune response. The epithelial residents of dendritic cells are Langerhans cells, which serve as the “sentinels” of the mucosa, altering the immune system not only to pathogen entry but also of tolerance to self antigen and commensal microbes. Oral mucosal Langerhans cells are capable of engaging and internalizing a wide variety of pathogens and have been found responsive to nickel in patients with nickel allergies, oral Candida species, oral lichen planus, lichenoid drug eruptions, graft versus host diseases, periodontal diseases median rhomboid glossitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, hairy leukoplakia of the tongue, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Review focuses on the role of antigen-presenting cells in particular Langerhans cells to better understand the mechanisms underlying immune responses. In this review, comprehensive detail about mucosal diseases has been compiled using the PubMed database and through textbooks. PMID:24251267

  6. The gut mucosal immune response to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S B; Denkers, E Y

    2015-03-01

    As an orally acquired pathogen, the immune response to Toxoplasma gondii unfolds in the small intestinal mucosa. There, an array of regulatory and effector immune cells are elicited to combat the parasite through secretion of inflammatory mediators, normally resulting in host protection and pathogen control. Recent studies largely in mice have found that a productive immune response requires the combined recognition of parasite- and commensal-derived antigens by mucosal leucocytes. However, despite the fine-tuned regulatory mechanisms in place to prevent immunopathology, dysregulated responses can occur in genetically susceptible subjects, leading to lethal pro-inflammatory-mediated intestinal damage. Here, we describe the current understanding of the inflammatory players involved in orchestrating immunity or immunopathology in the intestine during the mucosal response to Toxoplasma infection. PMID:25418610

  7. Prevalence of Oral Mucosal Lesions in Male Smokers and Nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Falsafi, Parisa; Hayati, Zahra; Rezaei, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is one of the most important risk factors for the development of oral mucosal lesions such as leukoplakia and hairy tongue. Controversy exists in the literature, however, about the prevalence of oral lesions in smokers. The aim of this study was to evaluate oral lesions in male smokers compared with nonsmokers in Hamadan. A total of 516 male participants were assessed, 258 of whom were smokers and 258 of whom were healthy nonsmokers. The prevalence of lesions was evaluated by clinical observation and biopsy. We found that the most prevalent lesions among smokers were gingival problems and coated tongue; smokers had significantly more lesions than did nonsmokers. Malignant and premalignant lesions were found in a higher age range. Among all participants in our study, we found a large number of oral mucosal lesions in smokers that had a strong correlation with smoking. Dental services need to implement care and health education for smokers to promote health. PMID:24010068

  8. Mucosal Immunity in the Female Genital Tract, HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Reis Machado, Juliana; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Rosa Miranda Corrêa, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal immunity consists of innate and adaptive immune responses which can be influenced by systemic immunity. Despite having been the subject of intensive studies, it is not fully elucidated what exactly occurs after HIV contact with the female genital tract mucosa. The sexual route is the main route of HIV transmission, with an increased risk of infection in women compared to men. Several characteristics of the female genital tract make it suitable for inoculation, establishment of infection, and systemic spread of the virus, which causes local changes that may favor the development of infections by other pathogens, often called sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The relationship of these STDs with HIV infection has been widely studied. Here we review the characteristics of mucosal immunity of the female genital tract, its alterations due to HIV/AIDS, and the characteristics of coinfections between HIV/AIDS and the most prevalent STDs. PMID:25313360

  9. Small intestine contrast ultrasonography vs computed tomography enteroclysis for assessing ileal Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Onali, Sara; Calabrese, Emma; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Zorzi, Francesca; Sica, Giuseppe; Fiori, Roberto; Ascolani, Marta; Lolli, Elisabetta; Condino, Giovanna; Palmieri, Giampiero; Simonetti, Giovanni; Pallone, Francesco; Biancone, Livia

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare computed tomography enteroclysis (CTE) vs small intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) for assessing small bowel lesions in Crohn's disease (CD), when using surgical pathology as gold standard. METHODS: From January 2007 to July 2008, 15 eligible patients undergoing elective resection of the distal ileum and coecum (or right colon) were prospectively enrolled. All patients were under follow-up. The study population included 6 males and 9 females, with a median age of 44 years (range: 18-80 years). Inclusion criteria: (1) certain diagnosis of small bowel requiring elective ileo-colonic resection; (2) age between 18-80 years; (3) elective surgery in our Surgical Unit; and (4) written informed consent. SICUS and CTE were performed ? 3 mo before surgery, followed by surgical pathology. The following small bowel lesions were blindly reported by one sonologist, radiologist, surgeon and histolopathologist: disease site, extent, strictures, abscesses, fistulae, small bowel dilation. Comparison between findings at SICUS, CTE, surgical specimens and histological examination was made by assessing the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of each technique, when using surgical findings as gold standard. RESULTS: Among the 15 patients enrolled, CTE was not feasible in 2 patients, due to urgent surgery in one patients and to low compliance in the second patient, refusing to perform CTE due to the discomfort related to the naso-jejunal tube. The analysis for comparing CTE vs SICUS findings was therefore performed in 13 out of the 15 CD patients enrolled. Differently from CTE, SICUS was feasible in all the 15 patients enrolled. No complications were observed when using SICUS or CTE. Surgical pathology findings in the tested population included: small bowel stricture in 13 patients, small bowel dilation above ileal stricture in 10 patients, abdominal abscesses in 2 patients, enteric fistulae in 5 patients, lymphnodes enlargement (> 1 cm) in 7 patients and mesenteric enlargement in 9 patients. In order to compare findings by using SICUS, CTE, histology and surgery, characteristics of the small bowel lesions observed in CD each patient were blindly reported in the same form by one gastroenterologist-sonologist, radiologist, surgeon and anatomopathologist. At surgery, lesions related to CD were detected in the distal ileum in all 13 patients, also visualized by both SICUS and CTE in all 13 patients. Ileal lesions > 10 cm length were detected at surgery in all the 13 CD patients, confirmed by SICUS and CTE in the same 12 out of the 13 patients. When using surgical findings as a gold standard, SICUS and CTE showed the exactly same sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting the presence of small bowel fistulae (accuracy 77% for both) and abscesses (accuracy 85% for both). In the tested CD population, SICUS and CTE were also quite comparable in terms of accuracy for detecting the presence of small bowel strictures (92% vs 100%), small bowel fistulae (77% for both) and small bowel dilation (85% vs 82%). CONCLUSION: In our study population, CTE and the non-invasive and radiation-free SICUS showed a comparable high accuracy for assessing small bowel lesions in CD. PMID:23155337

  10. Digestibility of fibre sources and molecular weight distribution of fibre fractions in ileal digesta of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Emma; Andersson, Roger; Lindberg, Jan Erik

    2012-12-01

    Seven post-valve T-caecum cannulated growing pigs were used in a change-over experiment with four diets and four 14-day periods to evaluate the total tract apparent digestibility (TTAD) and the ileal apparent digestibility (IAD) of diets with inclusion of chicory forage (CFO), sugar beet pulp (SBP), wheat bran (WB) and grass meal (GM), as well as the TTAD of the mentioned fibre sources. Moreover, this experiment evaluated the molecular weight distribution of soluble non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) fractions in diet and ileal digesta from pigs fed the CFO and SBP diets. The experimental diets were balanced to have similar NSP content and compromised of one part of the basal diet and one part of the four fibre sources (CFO, SBP, WB and GM). In addition, all pigs were fed the basal diet during a 14-day period before and after the experimental periods. Diet affected the TTAD of all dietary components except glucose. The TTAD of organic matter (OM) was higher for Diet SBP than for Diets WB and CFO, showing both were higher than Diet GM. The TTAD of NSP was higher for Diet SBP than Diets WB and GM. The IAD of OM was higher in Diet SBP than in the other diets. The IAD of NSP was lower in Diet WB than in the other diets. The TTAD of OM and energy of CFO was 0.43 ± 0.04 (standard error), which is similar to that reported for commonly used forage crops. The molecular weight distribution in ileal digesta showed different distributions between Diets CFO and SBP as well as between digesta from pigs fed these diets. PMID:23130965

  11. Electrophysiological and Mechanical Characteristics in Human Ileal Motility: Recordings of Slow Waves Conductions and Contractions, In vitro.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Moon, Sang Hui; Choe, Eun Kyung; Yu, Sung A; Park, Sung-Hye; Park, Kyu Joo

    2015-11-01

    Little human tissue data are available for slow waves and migrating motor complexes, which are the main components of small bowel motility. We investigated the electrophysiological and mechanical characteristics of human ileal motility, in vitro. Ileum was obtained from patients undergoing bowel resection. Electrophysiological microelectrode recordings for membrane potential changes and mechanical tension recordings for contraction from smooth muscle strips and ileal segments were performed. Drugs affecting the enteric nervous system were applied to measure the changes in activity. Slow waves were detected with a frequency of 9~10/min. There were no cross-sectional differences in resting membrane potential (RMP), amplitude or frequency between outer and inner circular muscle (CM), suggesting that electrical activities could be effectively transmitted from outer to inner CM. The presence of the interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC) at the linia septa was verified by immunohistochemistry. Contractions of strips and segments occurred at a frequency of 3~4/min and 1~2/min, respectively. The frequency, amplitude and area under the curve were similar between CM and LM. In segments, contractions of CM were associated with LM, but propagation varied with antegrade and retrograde directions. Atropine, N(W)-oxide-L-arginine, and sodium nitroprusside exhibited different effects on RMP and contractions. There were no cross-sectional differences with regard to the characteristics of slow waves in CM. The frequency of contractions in smooth muscle strips and ileal segments was lower than slow waves. The directions of propagation were diverse, indicating both mixing and transport functions of the ileum. PMID:26557020

  12. Electrophysiological and Mechanical Characteristics in Human Ileal Motility: Recordings of Slow Waves Conductions and Contractions, In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Moon, Sang Hui; Choe, Eun Kyung; Yu, Sung A; Park, Sung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Little human tissue data are available for slow waves and migrating motor complexes, which are the main components of small bowel motility. We investigated the electrophysiological and mechanical characteristics of human ileal motility, in vitro. Ileum was obtained from patients undergoing bowel resection. Electrophysiological microelectrode recordings for membrane potential changes and mechanical tension recordings for contraction from smooth muscle strips and ileal segments were performed. Drugs affecting the enteric nervous system were applied to measure the changes in activity. Slow waves were detected with a frequency of 9~10/min. There were no cross-sectional differences in resting membrane potential (RMP), amplitude or frequency between outer and inner circular muscle (CM), suggesting that electrical activities could be effectively transmitted from outer to inner CM. The presence of the interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC) at the linia septa was verified by immunohistochemistry. Contractions of strips and segments occurred at a frequency of 3~4/min and 1~2/min, respectively. The frequency, amplitude and area under the curve were similar between CM and LM. In segments, contractions of CM were associated with LM, but propagation varied with antegrade and retrograde directions. Atropine, NW-oxide-L-arginine, and sodium nitroprusside exhibited different effects on RMP and contractions. There were no cross-sectional differences with regard to the characteristics of slow waves in CM. The frequency of contractions in smooth muscle strips and ileal segments was lower than slow waves. The directions of propagation were diverse, indicating both mixing and transport functions of the ileum. PMID:26557020

  13. Psittacid herpesviruses associated with mucosal papillomas in neotropical parrots.

    PubMed

    Styles, Darrel K; Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K; Jaeger, Laurie A; Phalen, David N

    2004-07-20

    Mucosal papillomas are relatively common lesions in several species of captive neotropical parrots. They cause considerable morbidity and in some cases, result in mortality. Previous efforts to identify papillomavirus DNA and proteins in these lesions have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, increasing evidence suggests that mucosal papillomas may contain psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs). In this study, 41 papillomas from 30 neotropical parrots were examined by PCR with PsHV-specific primers. All 41 papillomas were found to contain PsHV DNA. This 100% prevalence of PsHV infection in the papilloma population was found to be significantly higher than PsHV infection prevalence observed in other surveys of captive parrots. PsHV genotypes 1, 2, and 3, but not 4 were found in these lesions. Psittacus erithacus papillomavirus DNA and finch papillomavirus DNA were not found in the papillomas. A papilloma from a hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) was found to contain cells that had immunoreactivity to antiserum made to the common antigenic region of human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 major capsid protein. However, four other mucosal papillomas were negative for this immunoreactivity, and negative control tissues from a parrot embryo showed a similar staining pattern to that seen in the cloaca papilloma of the hyacinth macaw, strongly suggesting that the staining seen in hyacinth macaw papilloma was nonspecific. Based on these findings, it was concluded that specific genotypes of PsHV play a direct role in the development of mucosal papillomas of neotropical parrots and there is no evidence to suggest the concurrent presence of a papillomavirus in these lesions. PMID:15231383

  14. Adjuvant radiotherapy for primary mucosal malignant melanoma of the larynx.

    PubMed

    Asare-Owusu, L; Shotton, J C; Schofield, J B

    1999-10-01

    Primary mucosal malignant melanoma (PMML) of the larynx continues to be a rare entity. To date, there are few cases reported in the world literature consisting of mainly isolated case reports and literature reviews. Traditionally believed to be radioresistant, we present a case of PMML of the right vocal fold managed with right cordectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. The patient is well without any evidence of local recurrence or metastasis three years and four months from presentation. PMID:10664714

  15. An Overview of Challenges Limiting the Design of Protective Mucosal Vaccines for Finfish

    PubMed Central

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Research in mucosal vaccination in finfish has gained prominence in the last decade in pursuit of mucosal vaccines that would lengthen the duration of protective immunity in vaccinated fish. However, injectable vaccines have continued to dominate in the vaccination of finfish because they are perceived to be more protective than mucosal vaccines. Therefore, it has become important to identify the factors that limit developing protective mucosal vaccines in finfish as an overture to identifying key areas that require optimization in mucosal vaccine design. Some of the factors that limit the success for designing protective mucosal vaccines for finfish identified in this review include the lack optimized protective antigen doses for mucosal vaccines, absence of immunostimulants able to enhance the performance of non-replicative mucosal vaccines, reduction of systemic antibodies due to prolonged exposure to oral vaccination and the lack of predefined correlates of protective immunity for use in the optimization of newly developed mucosal vaccines. This review also points out the need to develop prime-boost vaccination regimes able to induce long-term protective immunity in vaccinated fish. By overcoming some of the obstacles identified herein, it is anticipated that future mucosal vaccines shall be designed to induce long-term protective immunity in finfish. PMID:26557121

  16. Current indications and results of orthotopic ileal neobladder for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Andrea; Serni, Sergio; Vittori, Gianni; Masieri, Lorenzo; Siena, Giampaolo; Lanciotti, Michele; Lapini, Alberto; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco

    2014-04-01

    During the past three decades, the reconstructive aspects of urologic surgery emerged and became a major component of our surgical specialty, and the most relevant developments have been observed in the field of urinary diversions. Health-related quality of life and self esteem have been improved following orthotopic bladder substitutions, which are actually the preferred method for continent urinary diversion. Patients with neobladders have enhanced cosmesis and the potential for normal voiding function with no abdominal stoma. Patient's selection for orthotopic neobladder formation is mandatory as most of the surgical complications or consequences associated with a neobladder are correlated not only with surgical technique or management after surgery, but also with wrong patient's selection. The principles of intestinal detubularization and reconfiguration to obtain spherical reservoir are the basis of continent urinary diversions and ileum seems to be preferable over any other segment. Nowadays, ileal neobladder is a widely adopted solution after cystectomy with a neobladder rate of 9-19% for population-based data with an increase to 39.1-74% for high-volume centers. However, controversies still exist in this urological field about the best candidates for neobladder construction, the best type of neobladder to offer, whether or not an antireflux uretero intestinal anastomosis should be used, the future of minimally invasive approaches, that is, robotic assisted cystectomy plus extracorporeal or intracorporeal neobladder, and last but very important, the functional results and the level of symptoms-induced distress and quality of life in the long term in patients with bladder cancer receiving an orthotopic bladder substitution. All these issues are discussed on the basis of the most recent published data. PMID:24483953

  17. Investigation of Gastroduodenal Mucosal Injury in Japanese Asymptomatic Antiplatelet Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Sogabe, Masahiro; Okahisa, Toshiya; Nakasono, Masahiko; Fujino, Yasuteru; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Takaoka, Yoshihumi; Kimura, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Koichi; Muguruma, Naoki; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Antiplatelet drugs are widely used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cerebral vascular disorders. Although there have been several studies on gastroduodenal mucosal injury with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as GI bleeding, in antiplatelet drug users (including low-dose aspirin (LDA)), there have been few reports on the association between antiplatelet drug use and gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users. This study was a cross-sectional study elucidating the association between antiplatelet drug use and gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users. Subjects were 186 asymptomatic Japanese antiplatelet drug users who underwent a regular health checkup. Subjects were divided into those with and without gastroduodenal mucosal injury endoscopically, and the association between gastroduodenal mucosal injury and other data in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users was investigated. The prevalence of males and drinkers were significantly higher in subjects with gastroduodenal mucosal injury than in those without. In addition, the prevalence of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) users was significantly lower in subjects with gastroduodenal mucosal injury than in subjects without gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Logistic regression analysis showed PPI (odds ratios: 0.116; 95% confidence intervals: 0.021–0.638; P?mucosal injury and closed-type (C-type) atrophy (3.172; 1.322–7.609; P?mucosal injury in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users. Gender and lifestyle, such as drinking, may have an impact on risk of gastroduodenal mucosal injury in asymptomatic subjects taking antiplatelet drugs. Although PPI is a significant predictor of a decreased prevalence of gastroduodenal mucosal injury, including in asymptomatic antiplatelet drug users, status of gastric atrophy should also be considered against severe gastroduodenal mucosal injury. PMID:26131815

  18. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Management of mucositis during therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaskowski, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the purposes of an oral care protocol, the major components of an oral care regimen, and oral care protocols and studies done to date. Many questions remain in the area of optimal oral care for the patient experiencing mucositis as a sequela of cancer treatment. Research is needed on types and use of mouth rinses, effective, harmless, and pleasant lip lubricants, appropriate analgesic and anti-inflammatory combinations, and the effectiveness of a variety of devices for oral cleansing, to name a few areas. As outpatient oncology services grow, oral care protocols must be developed to meet the needs of ambulatory patient populations. Oral care regimens must be safe, easy to use, and economical as well as effective to ensure patient and staff compliance. Research on the management of mucositis must be conducted in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Finally, in order to obtain sufficient sample sizes and optimize data collection, these studies will need to be conducted by multidisciplinary teams (including dentists, oncologists, radiation therapists, and nurses) across multiple sites. Not until large-scale clinical trials are done on the treatment of mucositis will we be able to optimize the therapeutic regimen for the patient. 43 references.

  19. Volatile Sulfur Compounds as a Predictor for Esophagogastroduodenal Mucosal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Hee; Jung, Hyeon Sik; Sohn, Wee Sik; Kim, Bong Hwan; Ku, Bon Ho; Kim, Young Saeng; Park, Sang Woon

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims Halitosis is a symptom that bothers patients more socially than medically and its pathogenic mechanisms are unclear and treatment armamenterium is limited. Clinicians generally ignored active interventions. Since halitosis is closely associated with volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), we used a Halimeter and gas chromatography to measure VSCs in patients with Helicobacter-pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric diseases. Methods We categorized 72 patients with H. pylori infection into two groups based on their endoscopic findings: a non-erosive mucosal group (NE, n=24) and an erosive mucosal group (E, n=48). Halitosis was objectively assessed by applying either a Halimeter to breath air or gas chromatography to gastric juice. Simultaneously, the expression of VSC-generating enzyme was measured with reverse-transcriptase PCR using mRNA isolated from biopsy tissues. Results The levels of VSCs in exhaled breaths or aspirated gastric juices differed significantly between the NE and E groups (p<0.00001), suggesting that VSCs might reflect eroded epithelial damage induced by H. pylori infection. The expressions of cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine ?-lyase (CSE) were broadly consistent with the degree of mucosal injury. Conclusions Erosive changes in esophagogastroduodenal mucosa were strongly correlated with increased VSC levels, suggesting that halitosis might result from H. pylori-associated erosive lesions. PMID:20485620

  20. Treatment-induced mucositis: an old problem with new remedies.

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    Mucositis may be a painful, debilitating, dose-limiting side-effect of both chemotherapy and radiotherapy for which there is no widely accepted prophylaxis or effective treatment. The basis of management is pain relief, prevention of dehydration and adequate nutrition. When tested vigorously, most antiseptic mouthwashes and anti-ulcer agents are ineffective. Simple mechanical cleansing by saline is the most effective traditional measure. A variety of new agents are effective. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) act outwith the haemopoeitic system and can reduce mucositis, but the best schedule, dosage and method of administration is not known or which is the best growth factor to prevent this side-effect. A placebo-controlled randomized trial of antibiotic pastilles has shown a significant reduction in mucositis and weight loss during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Another method to reduce radiation effects in normal tissue is to stimulate cells to divide before radiotherapy by silver nitrate or interleukin 1. These methods may be particularly effective when given along with hyperfractionated radiation treatment such as CHART. PMID:9635851

  1. Novel vaccination strategies for the control of mucosal infection.

    PubMed

    Husband, A J

    1993-01-01

    Enteric disease remains one of the greatest causes of mortality and morbidity in both human and veterinary species. There has been a remarkable lack of success in vaccination to control mucosal disease and it is therefore apparent that novel strategies are required to achieve effective mucosal immunity. Basic studies described in this paper have addressed problems associated with antigen handling and the induction of an immune response in the intestine, and the subsequent dissemination of effector cells and molecules to intestinal and extra-intestinal submucosal regions. Effective induction of IgA responses is dependent on T-cell help and requires cognate interactions between T cells and B cells within organized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). The delivery of an IgA antibody response to mucosal sites is also a T cell dependent but antigen driven process. The normal route by which antigen is taken up by GALT is via the epithelial surface but antigen presented in this way via villus epithelial cells generates predominantly a suppressor response. Strategies designed to overcome this effect include the use of powerful adjuvants (such as cholera toxin, muramyldipeptide and phorbol esters), the use of immunogenic carriers, or delivery via liposomes, microspheres or genetically engineered viral or bacterial vectors. Alternatively, the feasibility of accessing GALT via the serosal surface by administration of intraperitoneal antigen in oil emulsion has been explored and a vaccine formulation (Auspharm (patent pending)) has been developed which is suitable for IP delivery in commercial applications. PMID:8438609

  2. Effect of GABA and baclofen on gastric mucosal protective factors.

    PubMed

    Abbas, W R; Maiti, R N; Goel, R K; Bhattacharya, S K

    1998-02-01

    GABA and baclofen (BAC), a GABA-mimetic agent, were investigated for antiulcerogenic activity. Orally administered GABA (100 mg/kg) and BAC (10 mg/kg) showed significant ulcer protection when given either alone for one day or for 4 days, or when given together with aspirin (ASP; 200 mg/kg x 3 days) in their 4 days treatment time in pylorus-ligated rats. Both the drugs showed a tendency to increase acid and decrease peptic output, and increased gastric mucus secretion in terms of total carbohydrate to protein ratio (TC:P) in both the above treatment groups. ASP tended to decrease acid and increase peptic output and significantly decreased TC:P ratio. Both GABA and BAC tended to reverse aspirin-induced effects, though they had little per se effect on TC:P ratio of gastric mucosal glycoproteins except an increase in sialic acid content both after one day or four days treatment. No, per se, effect on cell shedding (DNA and protein content of gastric juice) or cell proliferation (DNA/mg protein) was noted with GABA or BAC but the enhanced cell shedding induced by ASP was attenuated by them. ASP was found to enhance cell proliferation. However, neither of drug showed any effect on cell proliferation when given either alone or in combination with ASP. The antiulcerogenic effect of GABA and BAC may be due to their predominant effects on mucosal defensive factors like enhanced mucin secretion and decreased cell shedding or mucosal damage. PMID:9754049

  3. Importance of innate mucosal immunity and the promises it holds

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedy, Abhisek; Aich, Palok

    2011-01-01

    The body defense mechanism has evolved to protect animals from invading pathogenic microorganisms and cancer. It is able to generate a diverse variety of cells and molecules capable of specifically recognizing and eliminating a limitless variety of foreign invaders. These cells and molecules act together in a dynamic network and are known as the immune system. Innate mucosal immunity consists of various recognition receptor molecules, including toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, and RIG-I-like receptors. These recognition receptor molecules recognize various invading pathogens effectively, and generate an immune response to stop their entry and neutralize their adverse consequences, such as tissue damage. Furthermore, they regulate the adaptive response in cases of severe infection and also help generate a memory response. Most infections occur through the mucosa. It is important to understand the initial host defense response or innate immunity at the mucosal surface to control these infections and protect the system. The aim of this review is to discuss the effects and functions of various innate mucosal agents and their importance in understanding the physiological immune response, as well as their roles in developing new interventions. PMID:21556316

  4. Fecal bile acid excretion and messenger RNA expression levels of ileal transporters in high risk gallstone patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cholesterol gallstone disease (GS) is highly prevalent among Hispanics and American Indians. In GS, the pool of bile acids (BA) is decreased, suggesting that BA absorption is impaired. In Caucasian GS patients, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporters are decreased. We aimed to determine fecal BA excretion rates, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporter genes and of regulatory genes of BA synthesis in Hispanic GS patients. Results Excretion of fecal BA was measured in seven GS females and in ten GS-free individuals, all with a body mass index < 29. Participants ingested the stool marker Cr2O3 (300 mg/day) for 10 days, and fecal specimens were collected on the last 3 days. Chromium was measured by a colorimetric method, and BA was quantitated by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Intake of calories, nutrients, fiber and cholesterol were similar in the GS and GS-free subjects. Mean BA excretion levels were 520 ± 80 mg/day for the GS-free group, and 461 ± 105 mg/day for the GS group. Messenger RNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR on biopsy samples obtained from ileum during diagnostic colonoscopy (14 GS-free controls and 16 GS patients) and from liver during surgery performed at 8 and 10 AM (12 GS and 10 GS-free patients operated on for gastrointestinal malignancies), all with a body mass index < 29. Messenger RNA level of the BA transporter genes for ileal lipid binding protein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 3, organic solute transporter alpha, and organic solute transporter beta were similar in GS and GS-free subjects. Messenger RNA level of Cyp27A1, encoding the enzyme 27?-hydroxylase, the short heterodimer partner and farnesoid X receptor remained unchanged, whereas the mRNA level of Cyp7A1, the rate limiting step of BA synthesis, was increased more than 400% (p < 0.01) in the liver of GS compared to GS-free subjects. Conclusion Hispanics with GS have fecal BA excretion rates and mRNA levels of genes for ileal BA transporters that are similar to GS-free subjects. However, mRNA expression levels of Cyp7A1 are increased in GS, indicating that regulation of BA synthesis is abnormal in Hispanics with GS. PMID:19995447

  5. The mouse ileal lipid-binding protein gene: a model for studying axial patterning during gut morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Normal, chimeric-transgenic, and transgenic mice have been used to study the axial patterns of ileal lipid-binding protein gene (Ilbp) expression during and after completion of gut morphogenesis. Ilbp is initially activated in enterocytes in bidirectional wave that expands proximally in the ileum and distally to the colon during late gestation and the first postnatal week. This activation occurs at the same time that a wave of cytodifferentiation of the gut endoderm is completing its unidirectional journey from duodenum to colon. The subsequent contraction of Ilbp's expression domain, followed by its reexpansion from the distal to proximal ileum, coincides with a critical period in gut morphogenesis (postnatal days 7-28) when its proliferative units (crypts) form, establish their final stem cell hierarchy, and then multiply through fission. The wave of reactivation is characterized by changing patterns of Ilbp expression: (a) at the proximal most boundary of the wave, villi contain a mixed population of scattered ileal lipid- binding protein (ILBP)-positive and ILBP-negative enterocytes derived from the same monoclonal crypt; (b) somewhat more distally, villi contain vertical coherent stripes of wholly ILBP-positive enterocytes derived from monoclonal crypts and adjacent, wholly ILBP-negative stripes of enterocytes emanating from other monoclonal crypts; and (c) more distally, all the enterocytes on a villus support Ilbp expression. Functional mapping studies of Ilbp's promoter in transgenic mice indicate that nucleotides -145 to +48 contain cis-acting elements sufficient to produce an appropriately directed distal-to-proximal wave of Ilbp activation in the ileum, to maintain an appropriate axial distribution of monophenotypic wholly reporter-positive villi in the distal portion of the ileum, as well as striped and speckled villi in the proximal portion of its expression domain, and to correctly support reporter production in villus-associated ileal enterocytes. Nucleotides -417 to -146 of Ilbp contain a "temporal" suppressor that delays initial ileal activation of the gene until the second postnatal week. Nucleotides -913 to -418 contain a temporal suppressor that further delays initial activation of the gene until the third to fourth postnatal week, a spatial suppressor that prohibits gene expression in the proximal quarter of the ileum and in the proximal colon, and a cell lineage suppressor that prohibits expression in goblet cells during the first two postnatal weeks. PMID:8089185

  6. Mechanism-based biomarker gene sets for glutathione depletion-related hepatotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Weihua; Mizukawa, Yumiko; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Minowa, Yosuke; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yasuo; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2010-09-15

    Chemical-induced glutathione depletion is thought to be caused by two types of toxicological mechanisms: PHO-type glutathione depletion [glutathione conjugated with chemicals such as phorone (PHO) or diethyl maleate (DEM)], and BSO-type glutathione depletion [i.e., glutathione synthesis inhibited by chemicals such as L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO)]. In order to identify mechanism-based biomarker gene sets for glutathione depletion in rat liver, male SD rats were treated with various chemicals including PHO (40, 120 and 400 mg/kg), DEM (80, 240 and 800 mg/kg), BSO (150, 450 and 1500 mg/kg), and bromobenzene (BBZ, 10, 100 and 300 mg/kg). Liver samples were taken 3, 6, 9 and 24 h after administration and examined for hepatic glutathione content, physiological and pathological changes, and gene expression changes using Affymetrix GeneChip Arrays. To identify differentially expressed probe sets in response to glutathione depletion, we focused on the following two courses of events for the two types of mechanisms of glutathione depletion: a) gene expression changes occurring simultaneously in response to glutathione depletion, and b) gene expression changes after glutathione was depleted. The gene expression profiles of the identified probe sets for the two types of glutathione depletion differed markedly at times during and after glutathione depletion, whereas Srxn1 was markedly increased for both types as glutathione was depleted, suggesting that Srxn1 is a key molecule in oxidative stress related to glutathione. The extracted probe sets were refined and verified using various compounds including 13 additional positive or negative compounds, and they established two useful marker sets. One contained three probe sets (Akr7a3, Trib3 and Gstp1) that could detect conjugation-type glutathione depletors any time within 24 h after dosing, and the other contained 14 probe sets that could detect glutathione depletors by any mechanism. These two sets, with appropriate scoring systems, could be promising biomarkers for preclinical examination of hepatotoxicity.

  7. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient ? -ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Timothy O.; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M2 seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion, are necessary to induce the transcription of sulfate assimilation genes during early cadmium stress. PMID:22283708

  8. Multifunctional liposomes constituting microneedles induced robust systemic and mucosal immunoresponses against the loaded antigens via oral mucosal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ning; Gao, Zibin; Ma, Xiaoyu; Wei, Biao; Deng, Yihui; Wang, Ting

    2015-08-20

    To develop effective, convenient and stable mucosal vaccines, mannose-PEG-cholesterol (MPC)/lipid A-liposomes (MLLs) entrapping model antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA) were prepared by the procedure of emulsification-lyophilization and used to constitute microneedles, forming the proMLL-filled microneedle arrays (proMMAs). The proMMAs were rather stable and hard enough to pierce porcine skin and, upon rehydration, dissolved rapidly recovering the MLLs without size and entrapment change. The proMMAs given to mice via oral mucosal (o.m.) route, rather than routine intradermal administration, elicited robust systemic and mucosal immunoresponses against the loaded antigens as evidenced by high levels of BSA-specific IgG in the sera and IgA in the salivary, intestinal and vaginal secretions of mice. Enhanced levels of IgG2a and IFN-? in treated mice revealed that proMMAs induced a mixed Th1/Th2 immunoresponse. Moreover, a significant increase in CD8(+) T cells confirmed that strong cellular immunity had also been established by the immunization of the proMMAs. Thus, the proMMAs can be immunized via o.m. route to set up an effective multiple defense against pathogen invasion and may be an effective vaccine adjuvant-delivery system (VADS) applicable in the controlled temperature chain. PMID:25858854

  9. Targeting Glutathione-S Transferase Enzymes in Musculoskeletal Sarcomas: A Promising Therapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Pasello, Michela; Manara, Maria Cristina; Michelacci, Francesca; Fanelli, Marilù; Hattinger, Claudia Maria; Nicoletti, Giordano; Landuzzi, Lorena; Lollini, Pier Luigi; Caccuri, Annamaria; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia; Serra, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that targeting glutathione-S-transferase (GST) isoenzymes may be a promising novel strategy to improve the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy in the three most common musculoskeletal tumours: osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. By using a panel of 15 drug-sensitive and drug-resistant human osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, the efficay of the GST-targeting agent 6-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-ylthio)hexanol (NBDHEX) has been assessed and related to GST isoenzymes expression (namely GSTP1, GSTA1, GSTM1, and MGST). NBDHEX showed a relevant in vitro activity on all cell lines, including the drug-resistant ones and those with higher GSTs levels. The in vitro activity of NBDHEX was mostly related to cytostatic effects, with a less evident apoptotic induction. NBDHEX positively interacted with doxorubicin, vincristine, cisplatin but showed antagonistic effects with methotrexate. In vivo studies confirmed the cytostatic efficay of NBDHEX and its positive interaction with vincristine in Ewing's sarcoma cells, and also indicated a positive effect against the metastatisation of osteosarcoma cells. The whole body of evidence found in this study indicated that targeting GSTs in osteosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma may be an interesting new therapeutic option, which can be considered for patients who are scarcely responsive to conventional regimens. PMID:21673434

  10. Involvement of glutathione and glutathione metabolizing enzymes in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Areum Daseul; Zhang, Rui; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Maeng, Young Hee; Chang, Weon Young; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-09-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is an abundant tripeptide present in the majority of cell types. GSH is highly reactive and is often conjugated to other molecules, via its sulfhydryl moiety. GSH is synthesized from glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine via two sequential ATP?consuming steps, which are catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) and GSH synthetase (GSS). However, the role of GSH in cancer remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to determine the levels of GSH and GSH synthetic enzymes in human colorectal cancer. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GSH, the catalytic subunit of GCL (GCLC) and GSS were significantly higher in the following five colon cancer cell lines: Caco?2, SNU?407, SNU?1033, HCT?116, and HT?29, as compared with the normal colon cell line, FHC. Similarly, in 9 out of 15 patients with colon cancer, GSH expression levels were higher in tumor tissue, as compared with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the protein expression levels of GCLC and GSS were higher in the tumor tissue of 8 out of 15, and 10 out of 15 patients with colon cancer respectively, as compared with adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that GCLC and GSS were expressed at higher levels in colon cancer tissue, as compared with normal mucosa. Since GSH and GSH metabolizing enzymes are present at elevated levels in colonic tumors, they may serve as clinically useful biomarkers of colon cancer, and/or targets for anti-colon cancer drugs. PMID:26059756

  11. Functional Divergence in the Glutathione Transferase Superfamily in Plants

    E-print Network

    Davis, Ben G.

    Functional Divergence in the Glutathione Transferase Superfamily in Plants IDENTIFICATION OF TWO in Arabidopsis thaliana which differed from all other plant GSTs by containing a cysteine in place of a serine sites (1). In plants, all the GSTs described to date are dimers composed of 25-kDa subunits

  12. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GLUTATHIONE s-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE. M K Ross1 and R A Pegram2. 1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL/ORD, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  13. A novel method for screening the glutathione transferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijun; Jin, Li; W?grzyn, Grzegorz; W?grzyn, Alicja

    2009-01-01

    Background Glutathione transferases (GSTs) belong to the family of Phase II detoxification enzymes. GSTs catalyze the conjugation of glutathione to different endogenous and exogenous electrophilic compounds. Over-expression of GSTs was demonstrated in a number of different human cancer cells. It has been found that the resistance to many anticancer chemotherapeutics is directly correlated with the over-expression of GSTs. Therefore, it appears to be important to find new GST inhibitors to prevent the resistance of cells to anticancer drugs. In order to search for glutathione transferase (GST) inhibitors, a novel method was designed. Results Our results showed that two fragments of GST, named F1 peptide (GYWKIKGLV) and F2 peptide (KWRNKKFELGLEFPNL), can significantly inhibit the GST activity. When these two fragments were compared with several known potent GST inhibitors, the order of inhibition efficiency (measured in reactions with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione as substrates) was determined as follows: tannic acid > cibacron blue > F2 peptide > hematin > F1 peptide > ethacrynic acid. Moreover, the F1 peptide appeared to be a noncompetitive inhibitor of the GST-catalyzed reaction, while the F2 peptide was determined as a competitive inhibitor of this reaction. Conclusion It appears that the F2 peptide can be used as a new potent specific GST inhibitor. It is proposed that the novel method, described in this report, might be useful for screening the inhibitors of not only GST but also other enzymes. PMID:19291299

  14. Extracellular superoxide provokes glutathione efflux from Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Galina V; Muzyka, Nadezda G; Ushakov, Vadim Y; Tyulenev, Aleksey V; Oktyabrsky, Oleg N

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate a possible relationship between transmembrane cycling of glutathione and changes in levels of external superoxide. Exposure of growing Escherichia coli to exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by xanthine and xanthine oxidase (XO) stimulates reversible glutathione (GSH) efflux from the cells that is considerably lowered under phosphate starvation. This GSH efflux is prevented by exogenous SOD, partially inhibited by catalase, and is not dependent on the GSH exporter CydDC. The ?-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) deficiency completely prevents a return of GSH to the cytoplasm. In contrast to wild-type E. coli, mutants devoid of GGT and glutathione reductase (GOR) show enhanced accumulation of oxidized glutathione in the medium after exposure to xanthine and XO. Under these conditions, sodC, ggt and especially gshA mutants reveal more intensive and prolonged inhibition of growth than wild-type cells. Treatment with XO does not influence E. coli viability, but somewhat increases the number of cells with lost membrane potential. In summary, data obtained here indicate that transmembrane cycling of GSH may be involved in E. coli protection against extracellular ROS and may promote rapid growth recovery. PMID:26257303

  15. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione test system. 862.1365 Section 862.1365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  19. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P<0.02). After 4 weeks of balneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG <150 mg/dl), the level increased ( P<0.01) and in poorly controlled patients (FPG >150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and the levels of FPG ( r=-0.430, P<0.05). After balneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  20. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  1. REACTION OF BENZENE OXIDE WITH THIOLS INCLUDING GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study accounts for the observations that the metabolism of benzene is dominated by the formation of phenol. As demonstrated here, the pathway leading to S-phenylmercapturic acid is necessarily minor on account of the low efficiency of benzene oxide capture by glutathione at ...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione test system. 862.1365 Section 862.1365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione test system. 862.1365 Section 862.1365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  4. Serum Glutathione in Patients with Schizophrenia in Dynamics of Antipsychotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, S A; Smirnova, L P; Shchigoreva, Yu G; Semke, A V; Bokhan, N A

    2015-12-01

    Serum concentrations of oxidized and reduced glutathione were measured in 73 patients with schizophrenia at admission and in dynamics of therapy with traditional and atypical antipsychotic drugs. The level of reduced glutathione in patients with schizophrenia with manifest clinical symptoms was lower than in normal subjects. Atypical neuroleptics produced virtually no effects on the glutathione system, while therapy with typical antipsychotics led to further decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, thus aggravating the imbalance of metabolic processes typical of schizophrenia. PMID:26621271

  5. Standardized ileal digestibility of proteins and amino acids in sesame expeller and soya bean meal in weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, A; Reis de Souza, T C; Mariscal-Landín, G; Escobar, K; Montaño, S; Bernal, M G

    2015-08-01

    Apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of diets containing sesame expeller (SE) and soya bean meal (SBM) was determined using 15 piglets (Genetiporc(®)), weaned at 17 ± 0.4 days with average body weight of 6.4 ± 0.7 kg (Fertilis 20 × G Performance, Genetiporc(®), PIC México, Querétaro, México). Piglets were randomly assigned to three treatments: (i) a reference diet with casein as the sole protein source; (ii) a mixed diet of casein-SE; and (iii) a mixed diet of casein-SBM. The chemical composition of SE and SBM was determined, and AID and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of crude protein (CP) and amino acids (AAs) were determined for each protein source. SE contained greater quantities of ether extract, neutral detergent fibre, phytic acid, methionine and arginine than SBM. Lysine and proline contents and trypsin inhibitor activity were higher in SBM than in SE. The AID and SID of CP and AA (except for lysine and proline) were similar in SE and SBM. The AID of lysine and proline was higher in SBM than in SE (p < 0.05), and the SID of proline was higher in SE than in SBM (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that SE is an appropriate alternative protein source for early weaned pigs. PMID:25521700

  6. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour of Small Intestine Presenting as Ileo-Ileal Intussusception - A Rare Tumour with Unusual Complication.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Diwakar; Verma, Ankur; Akhtar, Azaz; Arsia, Ashish; Singh, Nain

    2015-05-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumours (MPNST) arises from a peripheral nerve or exhibit nerve sheath differentiation on histology. Proximal portions of the upper and lower extremities and the trunk are the most common sites of occurrence. Around 50% are associated with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) with incidence of two to five per cent in patients with NF1. The estimated incidence in general population without NF1 is 0.0001% of which gastrointestinal MPNST are extremely rare. A 45-year-old lady without pathological antecedent for NF1 was admitted with pain in right lower abdomen and multiple episodes of vomiting for 3 months. Preoperatively intussusception was diagnosed in the small bowel with USG and CECT abdomen showing characteristic target sign. On laparotomy Ileo-ileal intussusception (proximal ileum telescoping into distal ileum) was found 2 feet proximal to ileo-caecal junction with surrounding inflammed mesentery and presence of intraluminal tumour as lead point. Resection of involved segment of ileum along with its mesentery was done followed by ileo-ileal anastomosis. Histopathology was suggestive of high grade MPNST. Postoperative course and follow up for last 10 month is uneventful. This case is unique in terms of a rare tumour presenting with unusual complication and only one case had been reported so far in western literature. PMID:26155547

  7. Twin studies reveal specific imbalances in the mucosa-associated microbiota of patients with ileal Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, B.; Halfvarson, J.; Dicksved, J.; Rosenquist, M.; Jarnerot, G.; Engstrand, L.; Tysk, C.; Jansson, J. K

    2008-08-15

    Large inter-individual variation in the composition of the intestinal microbiota between unrelated individuals has made it challenging to identify specific aspects of dysbiosis that lead to Crohn's disease. To reduce variations in exposure during establishment of the gut flora and influence of genotype, we studied the mucosaassociated microbiota of monozygotic twin pairs that were discordant (n=6) or concordant (n=4) for Crohn's disease. DNA was extracted from biopsies collected from 5 locations between the ileum and rectum. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified and community composition assessed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, cloning and sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR. The microbial compositions at all biopsy locations for each individual were similar, regardless of disease state, but there were differences between individuals. In particular, individuals with predominantly ileal Crohn's had a dramatically lower abundance (P<0.001) of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and increased abundance (P<0.03) of Escherichia coli compared to healthy co-twins and those with Crohn's localized in the colon. This dysbiosis was significantly correlated to the disease phenotype rather than genotype. The reduced abundance of F. prausnitzii and increased abundance of E. coli are indicative of an ileal Crohn's disease phenotype, distinct from colonic Crohn's disease and the relative abundances of these specific bacterial populations are promising biomarker candidates for differential diagnosis of Crohn's and eventually customized treatment.

  8. Bricker versus Wallace anastomosis: A meta-analysis of ureteroenteric stricture rates after ileal conduit urinary diversion

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Niall F.; Burke, John P.; McDermott, TED; Flynn, Robert; Manecksha, Rustom P.; Thornhill, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Data comparing the incidence of ureteroenteric strictures for Bricker and Wallace anastomoses are limited. This study compares both anastomotic techniques in terms of ureteroenteric stricture rates after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit urinary diversion. Methods: Electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane database) were searched for studies comparing Bricker and Wallace ureteroeneteric anastomoses for ileal conduit urinary diversion after radical cystectomy. Meta-analyses were performed using the random effects method. The primary outcome measure was to determine differences in postoperative ureteroenteric stricture rates for both surgical techniques. Four studies describing 658 patients met the inclusion criteria. The total number of ureters used for ureteroeneteric anastomoses was 1217 (545 in the Bricker group and 672 in the Wallace group). Results: There were no significant differences in age (p = 0.472), gender (p = 0.897), duration of follow-up (p = 0.168), and duration to stricture development between groups (p = 0.439). The overall stricture rate was 29 of 1217 (2.4%); 16 of 545 ureters (2.9%) in the Bricker group and 13 of 672 ureters (1.9%) in the Wallace group. The Bricker anastomosis was not associated with a significantly higher overall stricture rate compared to the Wallace ureteroenteric anastomosis (odds ratio: 1.393, 95% confidence interval: 0.441–4.394, p = 0.572). Conclusion: Accepting limitations in the available data, we found no significant difference in the incidence of ureteroenteric stricture for Bricker and Wallace anastomoses. PMID:26029296

  9. Comparison of proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis to colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Koskenvuo, L; Mustonen, H; Renkonen-Sinisalo, L; Järvinen, H J; Lepistö, A

    2015-06-01

    Prophylactic surgical options for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are either colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) or proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). The aim of this study was to analyse the short-term and long-term outcomes of these two operative techniques. All patients with FAP in Finland have been prospectively recorded in a database since 1963 were retrospectively reviewed in this analysis. Altogether 140 (61%) colectomies with IRA and 88 (39%) proctocolectomies with IPAA have been performed. Complications occurred in 28 (21%) patients after IRA and in 26 (30%) patients after IPAA. There were 15 (11%) severe complications for IRA and 5 (6%) for IPAA. Twenty-one (15%) patients of the IRA group ended up in conventional ileostomy whereas 3 (3.4%) patients of the IPAA group had their ileal reservoir converted to an ileostomy (p = 0.01). Cumulative survival for IRA was lower than for the IPAA (p = 0.03), but if accounting only for operations made after the IPAA era had commenced, there was no significant difference. IPAA was associated with improved long-term survival without an increase in postoperative complications. The risk of death after colectomy and IRA seemed to be predominantly related to the remaining risk of rectal cancer. Therefore, we favour proctocolectomy with IPAA as the prophylactic surgical procedure for FAP with intermediate or severe polyposis. PMID:25504366

  10. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour of Small Intestine Presenting as Ileo-Ileal Intussusception - A Rare Tumour with Unusual Complication

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Diwakar; Akhtar, Azaz; Arsia, Ashish; Singh, Nain

    2015-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumours (MPNST) arises from a peripheral nerve or exhibit nerve sheath differentiation on histology. Proximal portions of the upper and lower extremities and the trunk are the most common sites of occurrence. Around 50% are associated with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) with incidence of two to five per cent in patients with NF1. The estimated incidence in general population without NF1 is 0.0001% of which gastrointestinal MPNST are extremely rare. A 45-year-old lady without pathological antecedent for NF1 was admitted with pain in right lower abdomen and multiple episodes of vomiting for 3 months. Preoperatively intussusception was diagnosed in the small bowel with USG and CECT abdomen showing characteristic target sign. On laparotomy Ileo-ileal intussusception (proximal ileum telescoping into distal ileum) was found 2 feet proximal to ileo-caecal junction with surrounding inflammed mesentery and presence of intraluminal tumour as lead point. Resection of involved segment of ileum along with its mesentery was done followed by ileo-ileal anastomosis. Histopathology was suggestive of high grade MPNST. Postoperative course and follow up for last 10 month is uneventful. This case is unique in terms of a rare tumour presenting with unusual complication and only one case had been reported so far in western literature. PMID:26155547

  11. An exploration of the microrheological environment around the distal ileal villi and proximal colonic mucosa of the possum (Trichosurus vulpecula).

    PubMed

    Lim, Y F; Williams, M A K; Lentle, R G; Janssen, P W M; Mansel, B W; Keen, S A J; Chambers, P

    2013-04-01

    Multiple particle-tracking techniques were used to quantify the thermally driven motion of ensembles of naked polystyrene (0.5 µm diameter) microbeads in order to determine the microrheological characteristics around the gut mucosa. The microbeads were introduced into living ex vivo preparations of the wall of the terminal ileum and proximal colon of the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). The fluid environment surrounding both the ileal villi and colonic mucosa was heterogeneous; probably comprising discrete viscoelastic regions suspended in a continuous Newtonian fluid of viscosity close to water. Neither the viscosity of the continuous phase, the elastic modulus (G') nor the sizes of viscoelastic regions varied significantly between areas within 20 µm and areas more than 20 µm from the villous mucosa nor from the tip to the sides of the villous mucosa. The viscosity of the continuous phase at distances further than 20 µm from the colonic mucosa was greater than that at the same distance from the ileal villous mucosa. Furthermore, the estimated sizes of viscoelastic regions were significantly greater in the colon than in the ileum. These findings validate the sensitivity of the method and call into question previous hypotheses that a contiguous layer of mucus envelops all intestinal mucosa and restricts diffusive mass transfer. Our findings suggest that, in the terminal ileum and colon at least, mixing and mass transfer are governed by more complex dynamics than were previously assumed, perhaps with gel filtration by viscoelastic regions that are suspended in a Newtonian fluid. PMID:23389898

  12. An exploration of the microrheological environment around the distal ileal villi and proximal colonic mucosa of the possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Y. F.; Williams, M. A. K.; Lentle, R. G.; Janssen, P. W. M.; Mansel, B. W.; Keen, S. A. J.; Chambers, P.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple particle-tracking techniques were used to quantify the thermally driven motion of ensembles of naked polystyrene (0.5 µm diameter) microbeads in order to determine the microrheological characteristics around the gut mucosa. The microbeads were introduced into living ex vivo preparations of the wall of the terminal ileum and proximal colon of the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). The fluid environment surrounding both the ileal villi and colonic mucosa was heterogeneous; probably comprising discrete viscoelastic regions suspended in a continuous Newtonian fluid of viscosity close to water. Neither the viscosity of the continuous phase, the elastic modulus (G’) nor the sizes of viscoelastic regions varied significantly between areas within 20 µm and areas more than 20 µm from the villous mucosa nor from the tip to the sides of the villous mucosa. The viscosity of the continuous phase at distances further than 20 µm from the colonic mucosa was greater than that at the same distance from the ileal villous mucosa. Furthermore, the estimated sizes of viscoelastic regions were significantly greater in the colon than in the ileum. These findings validate the sensitivity of the method and call into question previous hypotheses that a contiguous layer of mucus envelops all intestinal mucosa and restricts diffusive mass transfer. Our findings suggest that, in the terminal ileum and colon at least, mixing and mass transfer are governed by more complex dynamics than were previously assumed, perhaps with gel filtration by viscoelastic regions that are suspended in a Newtonian fluid. PMID:23389898

  13. GLUTATHIONE IS REQUIRED FOR ACID RESISTANCE IN E. COLI O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Escherichia coli, the reduced cytoplasmic environment is maintained by the glutathione- and thioredoxin-dependent reduction systems. Glutathione is important for the detoxification of an array of toxic substances. To determine if a reduced intracellular environment provided by glutathione is im...

  14. Effects of Chronic Dietary Cadmium on Hepatic Glutathione Levels and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    E-print Network

    Pilastro, Andrea

    % in comparison to controls. Total GSH-Px activity in the liver was inhibited in the group fed with 50 ppm, due to inhibition of the selenium-dependent fraction of the enzyme, while the selenium- independent fraction did dismutase, catalase, vitamin E and glutathione (GSH) are protective against Cd- induced oxidative damage

  15. Mucosal HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through oral compared to vaginal and rectal routes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingke; Vajdy, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field There are currently over thirty million people infected with HIV and there are no vaccines available to prevent HIV infections or disease. The genitourinary, rectal and oral mucosa are the mucosal HIV transmission routes. An effective vaccine that can induce both systemic and local mucosal immunity is generally accepted as a major means of protection against mucosal HIV transmission and AIDS. What the reader will gain Structure and cells that comprise the oral, vaginal and rectal mucosa pertaining to HIV transmission and vaccination strategies through each mucosal route to prevent mucosal and systemic infection will be discussed. Areas covered in this review Covering publications from 1980’s through 2010, mucosal transmission of HIV and current and previous approaches to vaccinations are discussed. Take home message Although oral transmission of HIV is far less common than vaginal and rectal transmissions, infections through this route do occur through oral sex as well as vertically from mother to child. Mucosal vaccination strategies against oral and other mucosal HIV transmissions are under intense research but the lack of consensus on immune correlates of protection and lack of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants and delivery systems hamper progress towards a licensed vaccine. PMID:20624114

  16. Evaluation of topical external medicine for 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Hiromi; Suemaru, Katsuya; Li, Bingjin; Cui, Ranji; Araki, Hiroaki

    2006-12-01

    Oral ulcerative mucositis is a common and painful toxicity associated with chemotherapy for cancer. Current treatment for chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis is largely palliative, and no adequate treatment with conclusive evidence exists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential effectiveness of the topical external medicines used in clinical settings, and the authors investigated the effects of 1% azulene ointment, 0.12% dexamethasone ointment, and polaprezinc-sodium alginate suspension on an animal model for oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy. Oral mucositis was induced in hamsters through a combination treatment of 5-fluorouracil and mild abrasion of the cheek pouch. Each drug was administered topically to the oral mucosa of hamsters, and the process of healing of damaged oral mucositis was examined by measuring the size of the mucositis. Azulene ointment did not reduce the size of the mucositis compared with the vaseline-treated control group. Polaprezinc-sodium alginate suspension significantly improved the recovery from 5-fluorouracil-induced damage. In contrast, local treatment with dexamethasone exacerbated the mucositis markedly. These results suggested the healing effect of polaprezinc-sodium alginate suspension and the risk of steroids to severe oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy. PMID:17046745

  17. Current Trends in the Management of Oral Mucositis Related to Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Biswa Mohan

    2008-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the most common toxicities observed during radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment for cancers. Mucositis results in sore mouth, altered taste sensation, pain and dysphagia leading to malnutrition. Left untreated, oral mucositis leads to ulceration, orodental infection, bleeding and discontinuation of effective radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Frequent hospitalization, enteral or parenteral nutrition, increased demand for analgesics ultimately account for increased cost of healthcare. Quantification of oral mucositis using standardized grading system is important for appropriate evaluation, reporting and management. In the recent past there is a paradigm shift in the pathobiology of cancer therapy related mucositis. Clear understanding of its pathogenesis is essential for the formulation of effective mucositis care. Numerous drug therapies, radiation techniques and oral care protocols have been tried in the past to reduce oral mucositis, None have proven to be consistently effective. Current trends for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis is multi-targeted treatment supplemented by aggressive oral hygiene, reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitors, growth factors and use of specific topical agents to improve treatment of oral mucositis in future. PMID:22570584

  18. Differential expression of cholangiocyte and ileal bile acid transporters following bile acid supplementation and depletion

    PubMed Central

    Kip, N. Sertac; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Masyuk, Anatoliy I.; Splinter, Patrick L.; Huebert, Robert C.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: We have previously demonstrated that cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining intrahepatic bile ducts, encode two functional bile acid transporters via alternative splicing of a single gene to facilitate bile acid vectorial transport. Cholangiocytes possess ASBT, an apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter to take up bile acids, and t-ASBT, a basolateral alternatively spliced and truncated form of ASBT to efflux bile acids. Though hepatocyte and ileal bile acid transporters are in part regulated by the flux of bile acids, the effect of alterations in bile acid flux on the expression of t-ASBT in terminal ileocytes remains unclear. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that expression of ASBT and t-ASBT in cholangiocytes and ileocytes was regulated by bile acid flux. METHODS: Expression of ASBT and t-ASBT message and protein in cholangiocytes and ileocytes isolated from pair-fed rats given control (C) and 1% taurocholate (TCA) or 5% cholestyramine (CY) enriched diets, were assessed by both quantitative RNase protection assays and quantitative immunoblotting. The data obtained from each of the control groups were pooled to reflect the changes observed following TCA and CY treatments with respect to the control diets. Cholangiocyte taurocholate uptake was determined using a novel microperfusion technique on intrahepatic bile duct units (IBDUs) derived from C, TCA and CY fed rats. RESULTS: In cholangiocytes, both ASBT and t-ASBT message RNA and protein were significantly decreased in response to TCA feeding compared to C diet. In contrast, message and protein of both bile acid transporters significantly increased following CY feeding compared to C diet. In the ileum, TCA feeding significantly up-regulated both ASBT and t-ASBT message and protein compared to C diet, while CY feeding significantly down-regulated message and protein of both bile acid transporters compared to C diet. As anticipated from alterations in cholangiocyte ASBT expression, the uptake of taurocholate in microperfused IBDUs derived from rats on TCA diet decreased 2.7-fold, whereas it increased 1.7-fold in those on CY diet compared to C diet fed groups. CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that expression of ASBT and t-ASBT in cholangiocytes is regulated by a negative feedback loop while the expression of these transporters in terminal ileum is modified via positive feedback. Thus, while transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in response to alterations in bile acid pool size are operative in both cholangiocytes and ileocytes, each cell type responds differently to bile acid supplementation and depletion. PMID:15133850

  19. Requirement of standardized ileal digestible valine to lysine ratio for 8- to 14-kg pigs.

    PubMed

    Soumeh, E A; van Milgen, J; Sloth, N M; Corrent, E; Poulsen, H D; Nørgaard, J V

    2015-08-01

    The objective was to define the Val requirement for weaned piglets in the context of reducing the dietary protein content. A dose-response experiment was conducted to estimate the standardized ileal digestible (SID) Val to Lys ratio required to support the optimum growth of post-weaned piglets. In this study, 96 pigs weighing 8 kg were allotted to one of six dietary treatments (16 pigs for each dietary treatment) and were housed individually. Diets were formulated to provide 0.58, 0.62, 0.66, 0.70, 0.74 and 0.78 SID Val : Lys by adding graded levels of crystalline l-Val to the 0.58 SID Val : Lys diet. Lysine was sub-limiting and supplied 90% of the recommendation (10.95 g SID Lys/kg equal to 11.8 g/kg total Lys). Average daily feed intake (ADFI), average daily gain (ADG) and gain to feed ratio (G : F) were determined during a 14-day period of ad libitum feeding. Blood and urine samples were taken at the end of each week (day 7 and 14 of the experiment) 3 h after feeding the experimental diets. The maximum ADFI and ADG were obtained in pigs fed the 0.78 SID Val : Lys diet; it was not different from the results of pigs fed 0.70 SID Val : Lys diet. The highest G : F was obtained in pigs fed 0.70 SID Val : Lys. The plasma concentration of Val increased linearly (P<0.001) as the dietary SID Val : Lys increased. The increasing dietary Val : Lys also resulted in a linear increase in Cys (P<0.001) and a quadratic increase in Arg (P=0.003), Lys (P=0.05) and Phe (P=0.009). The plasma Gly showed a quadratic decrease (P=0.05) as the dietary Val : Lys increased. Neither plasma nor urinary urea to creatinine ratio was affected by treatment. The minimum SID Val : Lys required to maximize ADFI, ADG and G : F was estimated at 0.67 SID Val : Lys by a broken-line model, and at 0.71 SID Val : Lys by a curvilinear plateau model. The Val deficiency caused a reduction in ADFI, and Val supplementation above the requirement did not impair animal performance. In conclusion, 0.70 SID Val : Lys is suggested as the Val requirement for 8 to 14 kg individually housed pigs. PMID:25951981

  20. Apd1(+), a Gene Required for Red Pigment Formation in Ade6 Mutants of Schizosaccharomyces Pombe, Encodes an Enzyme Required for Glutathione Biosynthesis: A Role for Glutathione and a Glutathione-Conjugate Pump

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, B.; Ingavale, S.; Bachhawat, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    Mutants in the adenine biosynthetic pathway of yeasts (ade1 and ade2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ade6 and ade7 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe) accumulate an intense red pigment in their vacuoles when grown under adenine-limiting conditions. The precise events that determine the formation of the pigment are however, still unknown. We have begun a genetic investigation into the nature and cause of pigmentation of ade6 mutants of S. pombe and have discovered that one of these pigmentation defective mutants, apd1 (adenine pigmentation defective), is a strict glutathione auxotroph. The gene apd1(+) was found to encode the first enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, ?-glutamylcysteine synthetase, gcs1(+). This gene when expressed in the mutant could confer both glutathione prototrophy and the characteristic red pigmentation, and disruption of the gene led to a loss in both phenotypes. Supplementation of glutathione in the medium, however, could only restore growth but not the pigmentation because the cells were unable to achieve sufficient intracellular levels of glutathione. Disruption of the second enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, glutathione synthetase, gsh2(+), also led to glutathione auxotrophy, but only a partial defect in pigment formation. A reevaluation of the major amino acids previously reported to be present in the pigment indicated that the pigment is probably a glutathione conjugate. The ability of vanadate to inhibit pigment formation indicated that the conjugate was transported into the vacuole through a glutathione-conjugate pump. This was further confirmed using strains of S. cerevisiae bearing disruptions in the recently identified glutathione-conjugate pump, YCF1, where a significant reduction in pigment formation was observed. The pump of S. pombe is distinct from the previously identified vacuolar pump, hmt1p, for transporting cadystin peptides into vacuoles of S. pombe. PMID:9017391

  1. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria enhance mucosal B cell responses and differentially modulate systemic antibody responses to an oral human rotavirus vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig disease model

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in generation of protective immunity against rotavirus infection, a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Current RV vaccines are less effective in developing countries compared to developed countries. Commensals/probiotics influence mucosal immunity, but the role of early gut colonizing bacteria in modulating intestinal B cell responses to RV vaccines is largely unknown. We co-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea, with 2 dominant bacterial species present in the gut of breastfed infants, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium animalis lactis Bb12 to evaluate their impact on B cell responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine. Following HRV challenge, probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated piglets had significantly lower fecal scores and reduced HRV shedding titers compared to uncolonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs. The reduction in HRV diarrhea was significantly correlated with higher intestinal IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal HRV-specific IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs. The significantly higher small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses coincided with higher IL-6, IL-10 and APRIL responses of ileal mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics genomic DNA on TGF-? and IL-10 responses. However, serum RV IgG antibody titers and total IgG titers were significantly lower in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs, both pre- and post-challenge. In summary, LGG and Bb12 beneficially modulated intestinal B cell responses to HRV vaccine. PMID:25483333

  2. A family of beta 7 integrins on human mucosal lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, C M; Cepek, K L; Russell, G J; Shaw, S K; Posnett, D N; Schwarting, R; Brenner, M B

    1992-01-01

    The heterodimeric protein complex recognized by the human mucosal lymphocyte 1 (HML-1) monoclonal antibody is expressed on 95% of intraepithelial lymphocytes but on only 1-2% of peripheral blood lymphocytes [Cerf-Bensusson, N., Jarry, A., Brousse, N., Lisowska-Grospierre, B., Guy-Grand, D. & Griscelli, C. (1987) Eur. J. Immunol. 17, 1279-1285]. We purified the smaller HML-1 subunit (105 kDa under nonreducing conditions) from hairy-cell leukemia cells and determined the N-terminal amino acid sequence of this chain. The 17 residues determined were identical to the deduced amino acid sequence encoded by an integrin beta 7 cDNA clone [Yuan, Q., Jiang, W.-M., Krissansen, G.W. & Watson, J.D. (1990) Int. Immunol. 2, 1097-1108]. Biochemical analysis of the larger HML-1 subunit (175 kDa under nonreducing conditions) suggested that it was a distinct member of the cleaved group of integrin alpha chains, which we designated alpha E. The beta 7 chain also was associated with the integrin alpha 4 subunit, suggesting that the HML-1 antigen (alpha E beta 7) and alpha 4 beta 7 constitute a beta 7 integrin family on mucosal lymphocytes. Interestingly, regulation of the expression of the HML-1 antigen was reciprocal to that of lymphocyte function-associated molecule 1 in the presence of transforming growth factor beta 1. We suggest that these beta 7 integrins may play a specific role in mucosal localization or adhesion and that the expression of the HML-1 antigen might be regulated by transforming growth factor beta 1 produced at or near epithelial tissues. Images PMID:1542691

  3. Effects of corn gluten feed inclusion at graded levels in a corn-soybean diet on the ileal and fecal digestibility of growing pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the effect of the inclusion of corn gluten feed (CGF) on the apparent and standardized ileal digestibility of protein and amino acids and the apparent ileal and total tract digestibility of energy in growing pigs. The study was performed using 16 barrows (weight, 45.3?±?4.5 kg) that were fitted with a T cannula at the terminal ileum. There were four treatments: a corn-soybean diet without CGF and three corn-soybean diets containing increasing levels of CGF (65, 130, and 195 g/kg). Data were analyzed according to a randomized complete block design, four blocks with four pigs each (one pig per treatment). The trend of the response (linear or quadratic) was determined using orthogonal contrasts, and when a linear effect was determined, a linear equation was obtained. Results The results showed that the inclusion up to 195 g/kg of CGF in the corn-soybean diet did not diminish the ileal digestibility (apparent and standardized) of protein and amino acids (P?>?0.05), except that of phenylalanine, cystine, and proline. A linear decrease (P?ileal digestibility of phenylalanine (0.011 and 0.015 percentage units, respectively), cystine (0.048 and 0.043 percentage units, respectively), and proline (0.045 and 0.047 percentage units, respectively) was noted. Similarly, ileal digestibility of dry matter and energy were adversely affected (reduced by 0.028 and 0.025 percentage units, respectively, per gram of CGF increment in the diet). A significant (P?ileal digestibility of protein and most amino acids but reduced the ileal and total tract digestibility of energy. PMID:25279142

  4. Oral mucosal precancer and cancer: A helpful discriminating clinical tool

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Crispian; Bagan, Jose V.

    2015-01-01

    The authors have collaborated with many colleagues in several countries in formulating a useful and practical clinical tool for evaluating oral mucosal findings on routine examination. Consideration of several factors including history, evolution of positive findings and clinical information allows placement of examination results into one of three categories which are graded by a color scheme along a spectrum of concerns (green to red, or no concern to serious concern). Afforded to the clinician is a straightforward grading system as a starting point for office end clinic use for all patients. Key words:Oral, precancer, cancer, clinical tool. PMID:26241449

  5. Oral mucosal precancer and cancer: A helpful discriminating clinical tool.

    PubMed

    Scully, Crispian; Sciubba, James J; Bagan, Jose V

    2015-09-01

    The authors have collaborated with many colleagues in several countries in formulating a useful and practical clinical tool for evaluating oral mucosal findings on routine examination. Consideration of several factors including history, evolution of positive findings and clinical information allows placement of examination results into one of three categories which are graded by a color scheme along a spectrum of concerns (green to red, or no concern to serious concern). Afforded to the clinician is a straightforward grading system as a starting point for office end clinic use for all patients. PMID:26241449

  6. Hepatic glutathione content in patients with alcoholic and non alcoholic liver diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Altomare, E.; Vendemiale, G.; Albano, O.

    1988-01-01

    Reduced and oxidized hepatic glutathione was evaluated during alcoholic and non alcoholic liver injury. We studied 35 chronic alcoholics, 20 patients with non alcoholic liver diseases, 15 control subjects. Hepatic glutathione was measured in liver biopsies and correlated with histology and laboratory tests. Alcoholic and non alcoholic patients exhibited a significant decrease of hepatic glutathione compared to control subjects. Oxidized glutathione was significantly higher in the two groups of patients compared to controls. The decreased hepatic glutathione level in patients with alcoholic and non alcoholic liver diseases may represent a contributing factor of liver injury and may enhance the risk of toxicity in these patients.

  7. The Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Development and Severity of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Michel J.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, thereby promoting bacterial translocation. According to this five-phase model, the intestinal microbiota plays no role in the pathophysiology of mucositis. However, research has implicated a prominent role for the commensal intestinal microbiota in the development of several inflammatory diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, pouchitis, and radiotherapy-induced diarrhea. Furthermore, chemotherapeutics have a detrimental effect on the intestinal microbial composition (strongly decreasing the numbers of anaerobic bacteria), coinciding in time with the development of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. We hypothesize that the commensal intestinal microbiota might play a pivotal role in chemotherapy-induced mucositis. In this review, we propose and discuss five pathways in the development of mucositis that are potentially influenced by the commensal intestinal microbiota: 1) the inflammatory process and oxidative stress, 2) intestinal permeability, 3) the composition of the mucus layer, 4) the resistance to harmful stimuli and epithelial repair mechanisms, and 5) the activation and release of immune effector molecules. Via these pathways, the commensal intestinal microbiota might influence all phases in the Sonis model of the pathogenesis of mucositis. Further research is needed to show the clinical relevance of restoring dysbiosis, thereby possibly decreasing the degree of intestinal mucositis. PMID:20523891

  8. Glutathione reductase, selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase, glutathione levels, and lipid peroxidation in freshwater bivalves, Unio tumidus, as biomarkers of aquatic contamination in field studies.

    PubMed

    Cossu, C; Doyotte, A; Jacquin, M C; Babut, M; Exinger, A; Vasseur, P

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of antioxidant parameters in the freshwater bivalve, Unio tumidus, as biomarkers of exposure to pollutants and to study their potential interest in predicting toxicity. Selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx), non-selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (non-Se-GPx), glutathione reductase (GRd), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities; reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione levels; and lipid peroxidation were measured in the gills and digestive glands of Unio. Control mussels were encaged and transplanted for 15 and 30 days to sites where the contamination of sediments was analyzed, along a river receiving domestic and industrial sources of pollution. After 15 days of exposure, all antioxidant parameters of the bivalves transferred to the most polluted sites had strongly decreased compared with control values. This was particularly true for Se-GPx and GRd activities, which were inhibited by 60 and 80% in the two tissues, and for GSH levels (80% reduction in the gills and 60% in digestive glands). These decreases were associated in the gills with lipid peroxidation (measured by malondialdehyde content) and with a high level of contamination of sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls. In the mussels exposed at the least polluted sites, the same parameters decreased in the gills, but to a lesser extent: 50% for Se-GPx and 32% for GRd activities, and 45% for GSH levels. The gills appeared more sensitive than the digestive glands. After 30 days of exposure, while Se-GPx, GRd, and GSH remained reduced, a significant induction of non-Se-GPx and catalase activities was recorded in the gills, which reflected an adaptation of the transplanted species to their unsafe environment. All the results indicated that antioxidant defense components, namely, Se-GPx, GRd, and GSH, are sensitive parameters that could be useful biomarkers for the evaluation of contaminated aquatic ecosystems. The relationship between the degree of deficiency of antioxidant defenses and lipid peroxidation suggests that these parameters could also be biomarkers for toxicity. PMID:9417853

  9. Apparent or Standardized Ileal Digestibility of Amino Acids of Diets Containing Different Protein Feedstuffs Fed at Two Crude Protein Levels for Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Adebiyi, A. O.; Ragland, D.; Adeola, O.; Olukosi, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    The current study determined the apparent or standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids (AID or SID of AA) in growing pigs fed diets containing three protein feedstuffs with different fiber characteristics at two dietary crude protein (CP) levels. Twenty boars (Yorkshire×Landrace) with average initial body weight of 35 (±2.6) kg were fitted with a simple T-cannula at the distal ileum. These pigs were offered six diets containing soybean meal (SBM), canola meal (CM) or corn distillers dried grains with solubles (corn-DDGS) that were either adequate (19%) or marginal (15%) in CP using a triplicated 6×2 Youden Square Design. Except for Met, Trp, Cys, and Pro, AID of AA was greater (p<0.05) in the SBM diet compared with the CM diet. Apparent ileal digestibility for Gly and Asp was greater (p<0.05) in the SBM diet compared with the corn-DDGS diet. The AID of Ile, Leu, Phe, Val, Ala, Tyr, and Asp was greater (p<0.05) in the corn-DDGS diet compared with the CM diet. Standardized ileal digestibility of AA was greater (p<0.05) in the SBM diet compared with the CM diet for all AA except Trp and Pro. The SID of Ile, Leu, Val, Ala, Tyr, and Asp was greater (p<0.05) in the corn-DDGS diet compared with the CM diet. It was concluded that protein feedstuff affects ileal AA digestibility and is closely related to dietary fiber characteristics, and a 4-percentage unit reduction in dietary CP had no effect on ileal AA digestibility in growing pigs. PMID:26194226

  10. Effect of feeding level on ileal and total tract digestibility of nutrients and energy from soybean meal-based diets for piglets.

    PubMed

    Goerke, M; Mosenthin, R; Jezierny, D; Sauer, N; Piepho, H-P; Messerschmidt, U; Eklund, M

    2014-12-01

    A total of 36 piglets with an initial body weight (BW) of 5.6 ± 0.7 kg, fitted with simple T-cannulas at the distal ileum, were used to evaluate the effect of three graded feeding levels (50, 75 or 100 g/kg BW(0.75) day) on apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and total tract digestibility (ATTD) of dry matter (DM), nitrogen (N) and energy, and on ATTD of organic matter (OM), ether extracts (EE), neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre (ADF) and digestible (DE), metabolisable (ME) and net energy (NE) content in soybean meal (SBM)-casein-cornstarch-based diets. The AID of DM, N and energy and ATTD of NDF, ADF and EE in the diets were not affected (p > 0.05) by the feed intake (FI) level. There was a small decrease in ATTD of DM, N (CP), OM, ash and energy, and in DE, ME and NE content in the diets (p < 0.05) with increasing FI level. The net disappearance in the large intestine (in % of ileal recovery) decreased for DM, N and energy (p < 0.05) with increasing FI level. The design of the study allowed for estimating ileal endogenous loss of N and total tract endogenous loss of ash, N and EE, for estimating corresponding true ileal and total tract digestibility values, and for estimating urinary endogenous N loss. High variability in estimates of ileal endogenous N loss and total tract endogenous losses of N, EE and ash reflects great variation in individual endogenous losses between animals. Estimation of true total tract digestibility of N, EE and ash by regression analysis was affected by their decrease in ATTD with increasing FI level, as estimates for true digestibility were lower compared to their apparent values. The present results suggest that FI level can affect both apparent and true total tract nutrient digestibility in piglets. PMID:24589011

  11. Application of superparamagnetic microspheres for affinity adsorption and purification of glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Guan, Yueping; Yang, Mingzhu

    2012-10-01

    The superparamagnetic poly-(MA-DVB) microspheres with micron size were synthesized by the modified suspension polymerization method. Adsorption of glutathione by magnetic poly-(MA-DVB) microspheres with IDA-copper was investigated. The effect of solution pH value, affinity adsorption and desorption of glutathione was studied. The results showed that the optimum pH value for glutathione adsorption was found at pH=3.5, the maximum capacity for glutathione of magnetic poly-(MA-DVB) microspheres was estimated at 42.4 mg/g by fitting the experimental data to the Langmuir equation. The adsorption equilibrium of glutathione was obtained in about 10 min and the adsorbed glutathione was desorbed from the magnetic microspheres in about 30 min using NaCl buffer solution. The magnetic microspheres could be repeatedly utilized for the affinity adsorption of glutathione.

  12. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Role of Glutathione in Cancer Progression and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Traverso, Nicola; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Nitti, Mariapaola; Marengo, Barbara; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and disturbances in GSH homeostasis are involved in the etiology and progression of many human diseases including cancer. While GSH deficiency, or a decrease in the GSH/glutathione disulphide (GSSG) ratio, leads to an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress implicated in the progression of cancer, elevated GSH levels increase the antioxidant capacity and the resistance to oxidative stress as observed in many cancer cells. The present review highlights the role of GSH and related cytoprotective effects in the susceptibility to carcinogenesis and in the sensitivity of tumors to the cytotoxic effects of anticancer agents. PMID:23766865

  14. Invasive Ability of an Escherichia coli Strain Isolated from the Ileal Mucosa of a Patient with Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boudeau, Jerome; Glasser, Anne-Lise; Masseret, Estelle; Joly, Bernard; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    1999-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease in which Escherichia coli strains have been suspected of being involved. We demonstrated previously that ileal lesions of CD are colonized by E. coli strains able to adhere to intestinal Caco-2 cells but devoid of the virulence genes so far described in the pathogenic E. coli strains involved in gastrointestinal infections. In the present study we compared the invasive ability of one of these strains isolated from an ileal biopsy of a patient with CD, strain LF82, with that of reference enteroinvasive (EIEC), enteropathogenic (EPEC), enterotoxigenic (ETEC), enteraggregative (EAggEC), enterohemorrhagic (EHEC), and diffusely adhering (DAEC) E. coli strains. Gentamicin protection assays showed that E. coli LF82 was able to efficiently invade HEp-2 cells. Its invasive level was not significantly different from that of EIEC and EPEC strains (P > 0.5) but significantly higher than that of ETEC (P < 0.03), EHEC (P < 0.005), EAggEC (P < 0.004) and DAEC (P < 0.02) strains. Strain LF82 also demonstrated efficient ability to invade intestinal epithelial cultured Caco-2, Intestine-407, and HCT-8 cells. Electron microscopy examination of infected HEp-2 cells revealed the presence of numerous intracellular bacteria located in vacuoles or free in the host cell cytoplasm. In addition, the interaction of strain LF82 with epithelial cells was associated with the elongation of microvillar extensions that extruded from the host cell membranes and engulfed the bacteria. This internalization mechanism strongly resembles Salmonella- or Shigella-induced macropinocytosis. The use of cytochalasin D and colchicine showed that the uptake of strain LF82 by HEp-2 cells was mediated by both an actin microfilament-dependent mechanism and microtubule involvement. In addition, strain LF82 survived for at least 24 h in HEp-2 and Intestine-407 cells and efficiently replicated intracellularly in HEp-2 cells. PCR and hybridization experiments did not reveal the presence of any of the genetic determinants encoding EIEC, EPEC, or ETEC proteins involved in bacterial invasion. Thus, these findings show that LF82, which colonized the ileal mucosa of a patient with CD, is a true invasive E. coli strain and suggest the existence of a new potentially pathogenic group of E. coli, which we propose be designated adherent-invasive E. coli. PMID:10456892

  15. RESEARCH PAPER Induction of glutathione S-transferase genes of

    E-print Network

    Hsiang, Tom

    RESEARCH PAPER Induction of glutathione S-transferase genes of Nicotiana benthamiana following-transferase (GST) genes, NbGSTU1, NbGSTU2, NbGSTU3, and NbGSTF1, were amplified from cDNA of Nicotiana benthamiana in the infection, whereas NbGSTU2 and NbGSTF1 expression remained relatively constant. Each of the four genes

  16. Mucosal Adjuvant Activity of Flagellin in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bates, John T.; Honko, Anna N.; Graff, Aaron A.; Kock, Nancy D.; Mizel, Steven B.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of flagellin, a highly effective mucosal adjuvant in mice and non-human primates, to promote mucosal innate and adaptive immunity in aged mice. We found that intratracheal instillation of flagellin induced a stronger respiratory innate response in aged mice than in young mice, and that intranasal instillation of flagellin was equally effective at triggering recruitment of T and B lymphocytes to the draining lymph nodes of young and aged mice. Intranasal immunization of aged mice with flagellin and the Yersinia pestis protein F1 promoted specific IgG and IgA production, but at lower levels and lower avidities than in young mice. Although intranasal instillation of flagellin and F1 antigen increased germinal center formation and size in young mice, it did not do so in aged mice. Our findings are consistent with the conclusion that flagellin can promote adaptive immune responses in aged mice, but at a less robust level than in young mice. PMID:18367233

  17. Current status of cholera and rise of novel mucosal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T

    2000-10-01

    Three serious cholera epidemics have threatened the world during the last 10 years. As a countermeasure against such cholera epidemics, three vaccines, CVD 103-HgR, WC/rBS, and Vietnamese WC, showed good performance. CVD 103-HgR is a recombinant attenuated live vaccine for travelers, and its highly safety and protective efficacy have been demonstrated in volunteers in advanced countries. WC/rBS, which consists of heat- and formalin-killed bacteria and cholera toxin B subunit, protects the vaccinees (>5 years old) from cholera for 6 months. Vietnamese WC, a heat- and formalin-killed vaccine, is inexpensive and effective even for 1 to 5-year-old children. Additionally, irradiated WC vaccines and new serotype (O139) vaccines are being developed. Regarding intestinal immunity, secretory IgA has been mainly examined. In addition, mucosal IgG, as induced by the irradiated WC vaccine, should also be investigated. Development of mucosal adjuvant, such as holotoxin-type mutants of cholera toxin and related Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, has been actively undertaken. Diverse custom-made vaccines may be one countermeasure for the changing situations in endemic countries or areas and for "barriers" against live vaccines in such areas. PMID:11135702

  18. Polysaccharide Based Formulations for Mucosal Drug Delivery: A Review.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua; Okeke, Obinna; Khan, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    There has been increased interest in novel drug delivery systems to be administered via mucosal routes as an alternative to the currently used traditional routes such as parenteral (injections) and oral routes of administration. This is due to the several advantages they offer including avoiding first pass metabolism in the liver for oral administration and local activity which avoids the need for high systemic doses. To achieve the foregoing objectives, bioadhesive vehicles are required that ensure prolonged residence time to achieve systemic bioavailability via substantial drug absorption or significant drug concentration for local action. The drug delivery system is also required to be non-deleterious to the site of application and be well tolerated by vulnerable groups such as paediatric and geriatric patients. These essential characteristics are mainly satisfied by naturally occurring polymers, including polysaccharide based polymers which have the advantage of biocompatibility, biodegradability and therefore safety. This review discusses various bioadhesive polymers of polysaccharide origin formulated into a variety of dosage forms for drug delivery via the body's mucosal (moist) surfaces including ocular, oral (buccal and sublingual), nasal, gastrointestinal and vaginal mucosa, as well as moist wound sites. The anatomy and / or physiology of each site, coupled with the unique challenges each poses, the strategies employed for ensuring therapeutic efficacy, as well as the current state of the art will also be covered. PMID:26290211

  19. The effects of polyamines on human colonic mucosal function.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Ailín C; McDermott, Frank D; Mohan, Helen M; O'Connell, P Ronan; Winter, Desmond C; Baird, Alan W

    2015-10-01

    Electrogenic ion transport in human colon is a surrogate marker for colonic mucosal function, and may be manipulated by a variety of hormonal, neural, immune and paracrine mediators. Polyamines are present in vast quantities in the colonic lumen and appear to be integral to cellular function. This study explores some of the mechanisms of polyamine action on colonic tissue through study of their effects on differential secretory pathways, as well as examining their actions on intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+) accumulation. Human colonic mucosa was mounted in Ussing chambers and treated with polyamines (spermine, spermidine and putrescine) with changes in ion transport recorded. In separate experiments colonic crypts were treated with polyamines and intracellular cAMP levels determined by ELISA and intracellular calcium concentrations were quantified by fluorescent imaging. Polyamines at physiological concentrations (1mM) exert no effects on basal mucosal chloride secretion or transepithelial electrical resistance. Polyamines inhibit electrogenic ion secretion as stimulated by forskolin (cAMP-mediated), but not carbachol (Ach-mediated). All the polyamines used in this study inhibited intracellular cAMP accumulation, according to potency (spermine>spermidine>putrescine). Spermine increased intracellular Ca(2+) in a PKC-dependent manner, likely due to its effects on the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). Polyamines act to prevent cAMP-mediated Cl(-) hypersecretion in the colon, acting through CaSR to inhibit PKC-mediated [Ca(2+)]i release from intracellular stores. PMID:26144376

  20. Effects of spaceflight on the proliferation of jejunal mucosal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, Heywood R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  1. Cyclic GMP-AMP Displays Mucosal Adjuvant Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Škrnjug, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity – a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines. PMID:25295996

  2. Loss of NHE8 expression impairs intestinal mucosal integrity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiping; Li, Jing; Zhao, Yang; Johansson, Malin E V; Xu, Hua; Ghishan, Fayez K

    2015-12-01

    The newest member of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) family, NHE8, is abundantly expressed at the apical membrane of the intestinal epithelia. We previously reported that mucin 2 expression was significantly decreased in the colon in NHE8(-/-) mice, suggesting that NHE8 is involved in intestinal mucosal protection. In this study, we further evaluated the role of NHE8 in intestinal epithelial protection after dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) challenge. Compared with wild-type mice, NHE8(-/-) mice have increased bacterial adhesion and inflammation, especially in the distal colon. NHE8(-/-) mice are also susceptible to DSS treatment. Real-time PCR detected a remarkable increase in the expression of IL-1?, IL-6, TNF-?, and IL-4 in DSS-treated NHE8(-/-) mice compared with DSS-treated wild-type littermates. Immunohistochemistry showed a disorganized epithelial layer in the colon of NHE8(-/-) mice. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed a reduction in the number of mature goblet cells and the area of the goblet cell theca in NHE8(-/-) mice. Phyloxine/tartrazine staining revealed a decrease in functional Paneth cell population in the NHE8(-/-) small intestinal crypt. The expression of enteric defensins was also decreased in NHE8(-/-) mice. The reduced mucin production in goblet cells and antimicrobial peptides production in Paneth cells lead to disruption of the intestinal mucosa protection. Therefore, NHE8 may be involved in the establishment of intestinal mucosal integrity by regulating the functions of goblet and Paneth cells. PMID:26505975

  3. Benzene oxide is a substrate for glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Zarth, Adam T; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-12-01

    Benzene is a known human carcinogen which must be activated to benzene oxide (BO) to exert its carcinogenic potential. BO can be detoxified in vivo by reaction with glutathione and excretion in the urine as S-phenylmercapturic acid. This process may be catalyzed by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), but kinetic data for this reaction have not been published. Therefore, we incubated GSTA1, GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 with glutathione and BO and quantified the formation of S-phenylglutathione. Kinetic parameters were determined for GSTT1 and GSTP1. At 37 °C, the putative Km and Vmax values for GSTT1 were 420 ?M and 450 fmol/s, respectively, while those for GSTP1 were 3600 ?M and 3100 fmol/s. GSTA1 and GSTM1 did not exhibit sufficient activity for determination of kinetic parameters. We conclude that GSTT1 is a critical enzyme in the detoxification of BO and that GSTP1 may also play an important role, while GSTA1 and GSTM1 seem to be less important. PMID:26554337

  4. Glutamine: a precursor of glutathione and its effect on liver

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Chun; Jiang, Zhu-Ming; Li, De-Min

    1999-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between alanyl-glutamine (ALA-GLN) and glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis in hepatic protection. METHODS Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: one receiving standard parenteral nutrition (STD) and the other supplemented with or without ALA-GLN for 7 days. The blood and liver tissue samples were examined after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was injected peritoneally. RESULTS The concentration measurements were significantly highe r in ALA-GLN group than in STD group in serum GLN (687 ?mol/ L ± 50 ?mol/L vs 505 ?mol/L ± 39 ?mol/L,P < 0.05), serum GSH (14 ?mol/L ± 5 ?mol/L vs 7 ?mol/L ± 3 ?mol/L, P < 0.01) and in liver GSH content (6.9 ?mol/g ± 2.5 ?mol/g vs 4.4 ?mol/ g ± 1.6 ?mol/g liver tissue, P < 0.05). Rats in ALA-GLN group had lesser elevations in hepatic enzymes after 5-FU administration. CONCLUSION The supplemented nutrition ALA-GLN can protect the liver function through increasing the glutathione biosynthesis and pre-serving the glutathione stores in hepatic tissue. PMID:11819414

  5. The mucosal immune system of fish: the evolution of tolerating commensals while fighting pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Daniela; Sunyer, J Oriol; Salinas, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The field of mucosal immunology research has grown fast over the past few years, and our understanding on how mucosal surfaces respond to complex antigenic cocktails is expanding tremendously. With the advent of new molecular sequencing techniques, it is easier to understand how the immune system of vertebrates is, to a great extent, orchestrated by the complex microbial communities that live in symbiosis with their hosts. The commensal microbiota is now seen as the “extended self” by many scientists. Similarly, fish immunologist are devoting important research efforts to the field of mucosal immunity and commensals. Recent breakthroughs on our understanding of mucosal immune responses in teleost fish open up the potential of teleosts as animal research models for the study of human mucosal diseases. Additionally, this new knowledge places immunologists in a better position to specifically target the fish mucosal immune system while rationally designing mucosal vaccines and other immunotherapies. In this review, an updated view on how teleost skin, gills and gut immune cells and molecules, function in response to pathogens and commensals is provided. Finally, some of the future avenues that the field of fish mucosal immunity may follow in the next years are highlighted. PMID:24099804

  6. Antigen targeting to M cells for enhancing the efficacy of mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae-Hae; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most successful applications of immunology and for a long time has depended on parenteral administration protocols. However, recent studies have pointed to the promise of mucosal vaccination because of its ease, economy and efficiency in inducing an immune response not only systemically, but also in the mucosal compartment where many pathogenic infections are initiated. However, successful mucosal vaccination requires the help of an adjuvant for the efficient delivery of vaccine material into the mucosa and the breaking of the tolerogenic environment, especially in oral mucosal immunization. Given that M cells are the main gateway to take up luminal antigens and initiate antigen-specific immune responses, understanding the role and characteristics of M cells is crucial for the development of successful mucosal vaccines. Especially, particular interest has been focused on the regulation of the tolerogenic mucosal microenvironment and the introduction of the luminal antigen into the lymphoid organ by exploiting the molecules of M cells. Here, we review the characteristics of M cells and the immune regulatory factors in mucosa that can be exploited for mucosal vaccine delivery and mucosal immune regulation. PMID:24626171

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Pedobacter sp. Strain Hv1, an Isolate from Medicinal Leech Mucosal Castings

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Brittany M.; Beka, Lidia; Graf, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    The Pedobacter sp. Hv1 strain was isolated from the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, mucosal castings. These mucosal sheds have been demonstrated to play a role in horizontal symbiont transmission. Here, we report the draft 4.9 Mbp genome sequence of Pedobacter sp. strain Hv1. PMID:26679583

  8. Mucosal immune response in broilers following vaccination with inactivated influenza and recombinant Bacillus subtilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucosal and systemic immunity were observed in broilers vaccinated with mannosylated chitosan adjuvated (MCA) inactivated A/Turkey/Virginia/158512/2002 (H7N2) and administered with and without recombinant Bacillus subtilis to elicit heterologous influenza strain protection. Previously, mucosal immu...

  9. Branch pattern of starch internal structure influences the glucogenesis by mucosal Nt-maltase-glucoamylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To produce sufficient amounts of glucose from food starch, both alpha-amylase and mucosal alpha-glucosidases are required. We found previously that the digestion rate of starch is influenced by its susceptibility to mucosal alpha-glucosidases. In the present study, six starches and one glycogen were...

  10. Prevention and Management of Mucositis in Patients with Cancer: a Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Owlia, Fatemeh; Kazemeini, Seid kazem; Gholami, Neda

    2012-01-01

    After chemo/radiation therapy, mucositis is one of the most common side effects, so timely nursing care and instructed home care, significantly could decrease cost of medical care, and then increase quality of life. This review summarizes preventive and therapeutic intervention of mucositis (localized or systemic), between some of patients with cancer. PMID:25352973

  11. Use of inactivated E.Coli enterotoxins to enhance respiratory mucosal adjuvanticity during vaccination in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to augment responses to respiratory vaccines in swine, various adjuvants were intranasally co-administered with an antigen to pigs. Detoxified E. coli enterotoxins LTK63 and LTR72 enhanced mucosal and systemic immunity to the model peptide, exhibiting their efficacy as mucosal adjuvants for...

  12. Standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids in eight genotypes of soft winter wheat fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Rosenfelder, P; Mosenthin, R; Spindler, H K; Jørgensen, H; Bach Knudsen, K E; Sauer, N; Htoo, J K; Eklund, M

    2015-03-01

    A study with growing pigs was conducted to determine the chemical composition and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of CP and AA of 8 wheat genotypes that have recently been added to the German Descriptive Variety List. These genotypes included Tabasco, KWS Erasmus, Tobak, Skalmeje, Mulan, Event, Tommi, and Adler. The 8 genotypes were grown under identical environmental conditions on the same site, and they were harvested and processed under the same conditions. Nine barrows with an initial BW of 32 ± 2 kg were surgically fitted with simple ileal T-cannulas and allotted to a row-column design with 9 pigs and 8 periods of 6 d each. Wheat was the sole dietary source of CP and AA. Among the 8 wheat genotypes, contents of CP ranged from 10.9 to 13.3% (as-fed basis), whereas contents of total nonstarch polysaccharides ranged from 8.0 to 9.4% (as-fed basis). The SID of CP in the 8 genotypes ranged from 83 to 87%, with greatest ( = 0.01) values for Event and lowest ( = 0.01) for all other wheat genotypes. Intermediate SID of CP values were obtained for Adler and KWS Erasmus. For Lys, greater ( < 0.05) SID was observed in Adler (73%) and KWS Erasmus (74%) in comparison to Tommi, Tobak, and Mulan (69%). Adler had greater SID of Met (88%; = 0.01) when compared to Tabasco (86%); Tobak, Skalmeje, and Mulan (85%); and Tommi (84%). Among the 8 wheat genotypes, standardized ileal digestible content (cSID) of CP followed total CP content and ranged from 9.1 to 11.3% (as-fed basis). Standardized ileal digestible content of both CP and AA were greater ( < 0.001) in Adler compared to all other genotypes. For most AA, Tabasco had the lowest ( < 0.001; except for His, Trp, Asp, and Cys) cSID values of all wheat genotypes. The cSID of CP decreased ( < 0.001) as the starch content in the 8 wheat genotypes increased, but cSID of CP increased ( < 0.001) as the CP content in the 8 genotypes increased. Because SID and cSID of CP and most AA increased ( < 0.05) with lower test weight and falling number, these variables may aid to predict SID and cSID in wheat batches, whereas other nutrients such as fiber fractions are not suitable due to low variation among the 8 genotypes. The present study provides a comprehensive database on nutritional composition and SID of CP and AA of 8 wheat genotypes grown under identical conditions. Because the SID values in these genotypes are lower when compared to literature data, digestibility values in actual feed tables for wheat may overestimate their protein values and need to be updated. PMID:26020890

  13. Digestibility marker and ileal amino acid digestibility in phytase-supplemented soybean or canola meals for growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Favero, A; Ragland, D; Vieira, S L; Owusu-Asiedu, A; Adeola, O

    2014-12-01

    Two experiments using soybean meal (SBM) or canola meal (CM) were conducted to investigate whether the choice of digestibility marker influenced the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) or standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of N and AA in diets supplemented with phytase. In each experiment, 18 barrows fitted with T-cannulas at the ileocecal junction were assigned to 3 diets consisting of a N-free diet to determine endogenous losses of N and AA, a semipurified diet (SBM in Exp. 1 or CM in Exp. 2), and the semipurified diet supplemented with phytase at 1,000 phytase units/kg. Three digestibility markers including acid-insoluble ash (AIA), chromic oxide (Cr2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) were added to each diet at 3 g/kg. Each diet was fed for 7 d, consisting of a 5-d adjustment and a 2-d collection of ileal digesta. In both studies, basal ileal endogenous losses determined with Cr2O3 as a digestibility marker were lower (P<0.01) than with those determined with AIA or TiO2 digestibility markers. Using SBM as the protein source in Exp. 1, there was no interaction between phytase and digestibility marker on AID or SID of AA. The AID of N and AA in SBM using AIA as a digestibility marker tended to be lower (P<0.1) compared with Cr2O3 or TiO2 digestibility markers. Phytase supplementation increased (P<0.001) the AID of Ca and P. The use of AIA or Cr2O3 digestibility marker tended to be associated with lower (P<0.1) SID values compared with TiO2. Phytase did not affect the SID of N or any AA in SBM except for Met, for which there was an increase (P<0.05) with phytase supplementation. Using CM as the protein source in Exp. 2, there were significant interactions between digestibility marker and phytase. Phytase supplementation had effects (P<0.01) on AID or SID when Cr2O3 or TiO2 was used as the digestibility marker. With Cr2O3 or TiO2 as the digestibility marker in the CM diets, phytase supplementation increased (P<0.05) the SID of N and all AA (except Trp). There was no SID of N or AA response to phytase supplementation of CM when AIA was used as a digestibility marker. In contrast, there were no clear improvements in AA digestibility from phytase supplementation for SBM. Phytase effects on AID or SID of AA were dependent on the digestibility marker used in diets when CM was used as the protein source but not when SBM was used as the protein source. Therefore, AA digestibility response to phytase supplementation may depend on the protein being evaluated as well as the choice of digestibility marker. PMID:25403199

  14. Hydrophobicity of mucosal surface and its relationship to gut barrier function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa; Caputo, Francis J; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2008-03-01

    Loss of the gut barrier has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and, thus, understanding the intestinal barrier is of potential clinical importance. An important, but relatively neglected, component of the gut barrier is the unstirred mucus layer, which through its hydrophobic and other properties serves as an important barrier to bacterial and other factors within the gut lumen. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a reproducible method of measuring mucosal hydrophobicity and test the hypothesis that conditions that decrease mucosal hydrophobicity are associated with increased gut permeability. Hydrophobicity was measured in various segments of normal gut by measuring the contact angle of an aqueous droplet placed on the mucosal surface using a commercial goniometer. Second, the effect of the mucolytic agent N-acetyl cysteine on mucosal hydrophobicity and gut permeability was measured, as was the effects of increasing periods of in vivo gut ischemia on these parameters. Gut ischemia was induced by superior mesenteric artery occlusion, and gut permeability was measured by the mucosal-to-serosal passage of fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (4.3 kDa) (FD4) across the everted sacs of ileum. Intestinal mucosal hydrophobicity showed a gradual increase from the duodenum to the end of the ileum and remained at high level in the cecum, colon, and rectum. Both N-acetyl cysteine treatment and ischemia caused a dose-dependent decrease in mucosal hydrophobicity, which significantly correlated increased gut permeability. Mucosal hydrophobicity of the intestine can be reproducibly measured, and decreases in mucosal hydrophobicity closely correlate with increased gut permeability. These results suggest that mucosal hydrophobicity can be a reliable method of measuring the barrier function of the unstirred mucus layer and a useful parameter in evaluating the pathogenesis of gut barrier dysfunction. PMID:17693944

  15. The Formation of S-[1-(N2-deoxyguanosinyl)methyl]glutathione between Glutathione and DNA Induced by Formaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Ye, Wenjie; Gold, Avram; Ball, Louise M; Swenberg, James A

    2012-01-01

    Formaldehyde is an essential metabolic intermediate in human cells and can also enter into the body through environmental exposures. It is classified as a human and animal carcinogen according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Previous research has demonstrated that formaldehyde is genotoxic, causing mutations in multiple genes. However, no exogenous formaldehyde-induced DNA adducts have been detected in animals after inhalation exposure, although formaldehyde can result in N6-deoxyadenosine, N2-deoxyguanosine and N4-deoxycytidine adducts in vitro. This can be partially attributed to the rapid metabolism of formaldehyde by glutathione (GSH)-dependent enzyme systems. Among the intermediates in the pathway of formaldehyde detoxication, S-hydroxymethylglutathione is a reactive species and has the potential to further conjugate with DNA bases. Here, we have demonstrated the formation of S-[1-(N2-deoxyguanosinyl)methyl]glutathione between glutathione and DNA in the presence of formaldehyde. This adduct is unique because of the involvement of S-hydroxymethylglutathione which is a key player during the detoxication of formaldehyde. PMID:19239220

  16. Development of a Bovine Ileal Cannulation Model To Study the Immune Response and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis of Paratuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew J.; Park, Kun Taek; Barrington, George M.; Lahmers, Kevin K.; Hamilton, Mary Jo; Davis, William C.

    2009-01-01

    An ileal cannulation model was developed in conjunction with a flow cytometric assay to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of immunopathogenesis of Johne's disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Initial studies with calves showed that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA is detectable by PCR in ileal biopsies during the first months following experimental infection. Inflammatory lesions were not detected on endoscopic evaluation up to 8 months postexperimental infection. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA was detected in multiple tissues at necropsy 8 months postinfection. Examination of the activation status of epithelial lymphocytes from the jejunum and ileum from infected and control animals at necropsy revealed that none of the major subsets of lymphocytes (NK, CD2+, and CD2? ?? T lymphocytes, or CD4 and CD8 ?? T lymphocytes) expressed activation molecules CD25, CD26, CD71, ACT1, or ACT16. Subsets of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes from control and infected animals expressed CD26. The majority of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes expressed CD45R0, the memory T-lymphocyte marker. An immune response to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected by 3 months postinfection, dominated by a strong proliferative response of CD4 memory T lymphocytes. The findings indicate an immune response develops following initial exposure to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis that controls but does not eliminate the pathogen. This persistence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis possibly leads to erosion and dysregulation of protective immunity at later time points postinfection. Continuous access to the ileum offers an opportunity to elucidate the cellular and molecular events leading to immune dysregulation and development of chronic inflammatory ileitis. PMID:19225077

  17. Binding sites for /sup 3/H-LTC4 in membranes from guinea pig ileal longitudinal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nicosia, S.; Crowley, H.J.; Oliva, D.; Welton, A.F.

    1984-03-01

    Leutriene (LTC4) is one of the components of Slow Reacting Substance of Anaphylaxis (SRS-A) and is a potent constrictor of guinea pig ilea. The contraction is likely to be a receptor-mediated process. Here the authors report the existence of specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-LTC4 in a crude membrane preparation from guinea pig ileal longitudinal muscle. At 4 degrees C in the presence of 20 mM Serine-borate, binding increases linearly with protein concentration, reaches equilibrium in 10 minutes, and is reversible upon addition of 3 x 10(-5) M unlabelled LTC4. The dissociation curve is consistent with the existence of more than one class of binding site. Ca++ and Mg++ greatly enhance the binding of /sup 3/H-LTC4 at equilibrium. In the presence of 5 mM CaCl/sub 2/ and MgCl/sub 2/ not only LTC4 (IC50 10(-7)M), but also LTD4 and the SRS-A antagonist FPL 55712 can compete with /sup 3/H-LTC4 for its binding sites. FPL 55712 only displaces 60-70% of the total amount bound, while LTC4 displaces 90-95%. These studies indicate that multiple classes of binding sites exist for /sup 3/H-LTC4 in guinea pig ileal longitudinal muscle, and that at least part of these binding sites might be related to the ability of LTC4 to contract guinea pig ilea.

  18. Exposure to cadmium changes the content of glutathione in maize seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Rauser, W.E.

    1987-04-01

    Glutathione may be involved in the biosynthesis of Cd-binding peptides known as phytochelatins. Five-day old maize seedlings in hydroponic culture were exposed to 3 ..mu..M CdSO/sub 4/ for 2, 6 and 12 hours and 1, 2 and 3 days. Total glutathione (glutathione + glutathione disulfide) in roots and shoots was measured enzymatically. Exposure to Cd for 12 hours or longer reduced root elongation growth. Shoots contained more glutathione than did roots. Within 2 hours of exposure to Cd the glutathione content declined by 47% of control and stayed low for a day. Shoot glutathione decreased gradually and less markedly (by 34% in 24 hours). Following the decline in the first day the glutathione per seedling increased with time in the presence of Cd. Cadmium-binding peptide in roots increased during the recovery phase. If glutathione is a substrate for Cd-binding peptide synthesis, such a use accounts for only part of the decline in root glutathione observed during the first day.

  19. Hypercapnia counteracts captopril-induced depression of gastric mucosal oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Christian; Schwartges, Ingo; Behmke, Robert; Bauer, Inge; Picker, Olaf

    2013-09-01

    Hypercapnia (HC) increases systemic oxygen delivery (DO2) and gastric mucosal oxygenation. However, it activates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which conversely reduces mesenteric perfusion. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of RAAS inhibition during normocapnia and HC on oral and gastric mucosal oxygenation (?HbO2) and to assess the effect of blood pressure under these circumstances. Five dogs were repeatedly anesthetized to study the effects of ACE inhibition (ACE-I; 5?mg/kg captopril, followed by 0.25?mg/kg per h) on ?HbO2 (reflectance spectrophotometry) and hemodynamic variables during normocapnia (end-tidal CO2=35?mmHg) and HC (end-expiratory carbon dioxide (etCO2)=70?mmHg). In the control group, the dogs were subjected to HC alone. To exclude the effects of reduced blood pressure, in one group, blood pressure was maintained at baseline values via titrated phenylephrine (PHE) infusion during HC and additional captopril infusion. ACE-I strongly reduced gastric ?HbO2 from 72±2 to 65±2% and mean arterial pressure (MAP) from 64±2 to 48±4?mmHg, while DO2 remained unchanged. This effect was counteracted in the presence of HC, which increased gastric ?HbO2 from 73±3 to 79±6% and DO2 from 15±2 to 22±4?ml/kg per min during ACE-I without differences during HC alone. However, MAP decreased similar to that observed during ACE-I alone from 66±3 to 47±5?mmHg, while left ventricular contractility (dPmax) increased from 492±63 to 758±119?mmHg/s. Titrated infusion of PHE had no additional effects on ?HbO2. In summary, our data suggest that RAAS inhibition reduces gastric mucosal oxygenation in healthy dogs. HC not only abolishes this effect, but also increases ?HbO2, DO2, and dPmax. The increase in ?HbO2 during ACE-I under HC is in accordance with our results independent of blood pressure. PMID:23757508

  20. Standardized Ileal Amino Acid Digestibility of Corn, Corn Distillers' Dried Grains with Solubles, Wheat Middlings, and Bakery By-Products in Broilers and Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Adedokun, S A; Jaynes, P; Payne, R L; Applegate, T J

    2015-10-01

    Standardized ileal amino acid digestibility (SIAAD) of 5 samples of corn distillers dried grain with solubles (DDGS), 5 samples of bakery by-products (BBP), 3 samples of corn, and 1 sample of wheat middlings (WM) were evaluated in broilers and laying hens. Diets containing each of the 14 feed ingredients were evaluated in 21 day-old broiler chickens. The DDGS and BBP containing diets were fed to 30-week-old laying hens, while corn and wheat middling were evaluated in 50-week-old laying hens. All the diets were semi-purified with each feed ingredient being the only source of amino acid (AA). To obtain SIAAD values, apparent ileal AA digestibility was corrected for basal ileal endogenous AA losses using values generated from broilers and laying hens fed a nitrogen-free diet. Ileal crude protein digestibility for the 5 DDGS samples was higher (P < 0.05) in broilers than in laying hens. Broilers had higher SIAAD for DDGS 2, 3, 4, and 5 while there was no difference for DDGS 1 except for 4 AA where broilers had higher (P < 0.05) SIAAD values. Standardized ileal AA digestibility values for broilers were higher (P < 0.05) for BBP 1 and 4. Ileal CP digestibility for corn 1 was higher (P < 0.05) for broilers compared to laying hens, and SIAAD values for the 16 AA (9 indispensable and 7 dispensable) evaluated in this study were higher (P < 0.05) in broilers. Broilers had higher (P < 0.05) SIAAD values for 4 (histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, and valine) and 6 (histidine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, and valine) indispensable and 3 (cysteine, glutamic acid, and proline) and 4 (cysteine, glutamic acid, proline, and serine) dispensable AA for corn 2 and corn 3, respectively. No difference in SIAAD between broilers and laying hens was observed for WM. Results from this study confirm that high variability in digestibility exists between different samples of DDGS. Differences in SIAAD between broilers and laying hens were observed in some samples of DDGS and BBP. PMID:26316342

  1. Effects of Mycotoxins on Mucosal Microbial Infection and Related Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites detected in many agricultural commodities and water-damaged indoor environments. Susceptibility to mucosal infectious diseases is closely associated with immune dysfunction caused by mycotoxin exposure in humans and other animals. Many mycotoxins suppress immune function by decreasing the proliferation of activated lymphocytes, impairing phagocytic function of macrophages, and suppressing cytokine production, but some induce hypersensitive responses in different dose regimes. The present review describes various mycotoxin responses to infectious pathogens that trigger mucosa-associated diseases in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts of humans and other animals. In particular, it focuses on the effects of mycotoxin exposure on invasion, pathogen clearance, the production of cytokines and immunoglobulins, and the prognostic implications of interactions between infectious pathogens and mycotoxin exposure. PMID:26529017

  2. Gut mucosal microbiome across stages of colorectal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Geicho; Li, Xiangchun; Zhou, Haokui; Sheng, Jianqiu; Wong, Sunny Hei; Wu, William Ka Kai; Ng, Siew Chien; Tsoi, Ho; Dong, Yujuan; Zhang, Ning; He, Yuqi; Kang, Qian; Cao, Lei; Wang, Kunning; Zhang, Jingwan; Liang, Qiaoyi; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial dysbiosis contributes to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we catalogue the microbial communities in human gut mucosae at different stages of colorectal tumorigenesis. We analyse the gut mucosal microbiome of 47 paired samples of adenoma and adenoma-adjacent mucosae, 52 paired samples of carcinoma and carcinoma-adjacent mucosae and 61 healthy controls. Probabilistic partitioning of relative abundance profiles reveals that a metacommunity predominated by members of the oral microbiome is primarily associated with CRC. Analysis of paired samples shows differences in community configurations between lesions and the adjacent mucosae. Correlations of bacterial taxa indicate early signs of dysbiosis in adenoma, and co-exclusive relationships are subsequently more common in cancer. We validate these alterations in CRC-associated microbiome by comparison with two previously published data sets. Our results suggest that a taxonomically defined microbial consortium is implicated in the development of CRC. PMID:26515465

  3. Effects of Mycotoxins on Mucosal Microbial Infection and Related Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites detected in many agricultural commodities and water-damaged indoor environments. Susceptibility to mucosal infectious diseases is closely associated with immune dysfunction caused by mycotoxin exposure in humans and other animals. Many mycotoxins suppress immune function by decreasing the proliferation of activated lymphocytes, impairing phagocytic function of macrophages, and suppressing cytokine production, but some induce hypersensitive responses in different dose regimes. The present review describes various mycotoxin responses to infectious pathogens that trigger mucosa-associated diseases in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts of humans and other animals. In particular, it focuses on the effects of mycotoxin exposure on invasion, pathogen clearance, the production of cytokines and immunoglobulins, and the prognostic implications of interactions between infectious pathogens and mycotoxin exposure. PMID:26529017

  4. Gut mucosal microbiome across stages of colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Geicho; Li, Xiangchun; Zhou, Haokui; Sheng, Jianqiu; Wong, Sunny Hei; Wu, William Ka Kai; Ng, Siew Chien; Tsoi, Ho; Dong, Yujuan; Zhang, Ning; He, Yuqi; Kang, Qian; Cao, Lei; Wang, Kunning; Zhang, Jingwan; Liang, Qiaoyi; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbial dysbiosis contributes to the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we catalogue the microbial communities in human gut mucosae at different stages of colorectal tumorigenesis. We analyse the gut mucosal microbiome of 47 paired samples of adenoma and adenoma-adjacent mucosae, 52 paired samples of carcinoma and carcinoma-adjacent mucosae and 61 healthy controls. Probabilistic partitioning of relative abundance profiles reveals that a metacommunity predominated by members of the oral microbiome is primarily associated with CRC. Analysis of paired samples shows differences in community configurations between lesions and the adjacent mucosae. Correlations of bacterial taxa indicate early signs of dysbiosis in adenoma, and co-exclusive relationships are subsequently more common in cancer. We validate these alterations in CRC-associated microbiome by comparison with two previously published data sets. Our results suggest that a taxonomically defined microbial consortium is implicated in the development of CRC. PMID:26515465

  5. Omeprazole promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, J; Bukhave, K; Rask-Madsen, J

    1996-01-01

    The proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, surprisingly resulted in higher rates of proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion than previously reported using an H2 receptor antagonist for gastric acid inhibition. Gastroduodenal perfusions were performed in healthy volunteers to evaluate whether this incidental finding is explained by more potent gastric acid inhibition by omeprazole or might be caused by the different mode of drug action. Basal and stimulated gastric and duodenal bicarbonate secretion rates were measured in the same subjects in control experiments (n = 17) and after pretreatment with high dose omeprazole (n = 17) and ranitidine (n = 9), respectively, by use of a technique permitting simultaneous measurements. Concentrations of bicarbonate were measured in the respective effluents by the method of back titration. Both omeprazole and ranitidine completely inhibited gastric acid secretion (pH 6.9 v 6.8; p > 0.05). Omeprazole caused higher rates of basal (mean (SEM)) (597 (48) v 351 (39) mumol/h; p < 0.02) and vagally stimulated (834 (72) v 474 (66) mumol/h; p < 0.02), but not acid stimulated (3351 (678) v 2550 (456) mumol/h; p > 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion compared with control experiments. Also the combination of omeprazole and ranitidine increased (p = 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion, while ranitidine alone caused no change in either basal or stimulated secretion. In the stomach basal as well as vagally stimulated bicarbonate secretion was independent of the means of acid inhibition. These results show that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion apparently independent of its gastric acid inhibitory effect. The mechanism of action remains speculative. PMID:8566861

  6. Effects of cold atmospheric plasma on mucosal tissue culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welz, Christian; Becker, Sven; Li, Yang-Fang; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Jeon, Jin; Schwenk-Zieger, Sabina; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Isbary, Georg; Morfill, Gregor E.; Harréus, Ulrich; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal plasmas have been commonly used in medical applications such as plasma ablation and blood coagulation. Newer developments show that plasmas can be generated with ion temperatures close to room temperature: these non-thermal or so-called cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) therefore open up a wide range of further biomedical applications. Based on the understanding of the bactericidal, virucidal and fungicidal properties of CAPs, information about the effects of CAP on mucosal cells and tissue is still lacking. Therefore this study focuses on the interaction of CAP with healthy head and neck mucosal cells on a molecular level. To analyse this interaction in detail, fresh tissue samples from healthy nasal and pharyngeal mucosa were harvested during surgery, assembled to a three-dimensional tissue culture model (mini organ cultures) and treated with CAP for different treatment times. Effects on the viability, necrosis induction and mutagenic activity were evaluated with the trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining and alkaline microgel electrophoresis (comet assay). Trypan blue exclusion test revealed that the CAP treatment significantly decreases the cell viability for all tested treatment times (5, 10, 30, 60 and 120 s p < 0.05), but only a treatment time of 120 s showed a cytotoxic effect as the viability dropped below 90%. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed a significant increase in necrosis in CAP treated pharyngeal tissue cultures for treatment times of 60 and 120 s (p < 0.05). For nasal tissue this effect was already detected for a 30 s treatment (p < 0.05). Comet assay analysis showed no mutagenic effects after exposure to CAP.

  7. [Efficacy of Rebamipide Gargle against Chemotherapy-induced Oral Mucositis].

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Masato; Onikubo, Toshihide; Nakamura, Kumi

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (CIOM) is a severe adverse event resulting from cancer chemotherapy. Toxic free radicals and pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by anticancer drugs have been reported to be associated with CIOM. Rebamipide has been shown to increase gastric endogenous prostaglandin E2 and I2, to promote gastric epithelial mucin, and to behave as an oxygen free-radical scavenger in addition to other anti-inflammatory actions. We developed a gargle solution of rebamipide, adding ultrahydrogel for mucosal protection and to maintain rebamipide on the oral mucosa. A 300 mL rebamipide gargle solution combines 600 mg rebamipide, 3 g high molecular-weight polyethylene oxide, 1.2 g carrageenan, pineapple flavoring, and water. The efficacy of the rebamipide gargle was evaluated in 175 patients with CIOM from November 2009 to December 2012, each instructed to use the rebamipide gargle 5-6 times daily. The severity of CIOM was assessed according to the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 4.0). Their CTCAE scores (3/2/1/0) changed from n=13/64/98/0 to 0/10/103/62, respectively, after initiation of the rebamipide gargle (p<0.01; paired t-test). The median duration to best response was 14 days (range: 1-49). CTCAE scores decreased in 132 patients (75.4%), including 62 (35.4%) who achieved grade 0. There were no unexpected safety events. Rebamipide gargle was well tolerated and demonstrated to have significant therapeutic efficacy against CIOM. PMID:26234350

  8. Classification of pulmonary airway disease based on mucosal color analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Riker, David; Ferguson, John Scott; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Airway mucosal color changes occur in response to the development of bronchial diseases including lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. These associated changes are often visualized using standard macro-optical bronchoscopy techniques. A limitation to this form of assessment is that the subtle changes that indicate early stages in disease development may often be missed as a result of this highly subjective assessment, especially in inexperienced bronchoscopists. Tri-chromatic CCD chip bronchoscopes allow for digital color analysis of the pulmonary airway mucosa. This form of analysis may facilitate a greater understanding of airway disease response. A 2-step image classification approach is employed: the first step is to distinguish between healthy and diseased bronchoscope images and the second is to classify the detected abnormal images into 1 of 4 possible disease categories. A database of airway mucosal color constructed from healthy human volunteers is used as a standard against which statistical comparisons are made from mucosa with known apparent airway abnormalities. This approach demonstrates great promise as an effective detection and diagnosis tool to highlight potentially abnormal airway mucosa identifying a region possibly suited to further analysis via airway forceps biopsy, or newly developed micro-optical biopsy strategies. Following the identification of abnormal airway images a neural network is used to distinguish between the different disease classes. We have shown that classification of potentially diseased airway mucosa is possible through comparative color analysis of digital bronchoscope images. The combination of the two strategies appears to increase the classification accuracy in addition to greatly decreasing the computational time.

  9. Endothelin-1-dependent leptin induction in gastric mucosal inflammatory responses to Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, Bronislaw L; Slomiany, Amalia

    2005-11-01

    Leptin, a multifunctional hormone that regulates food intake and energy expenditure, has emerged recently as an important modulator of gastric mucosal responses to Helicobacter pylori infection. We applied the animal model of H. pylori LPS-induced gastritis to investigate the role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the mucosal leptin production. We show that the histologic pattern of inflammation reached a maximum on the fourth day following the LPS and was reflected in a marked increase in the mucosal level of ET-1 and leptin. Therapeutic administration of phosphoramidon, an inhibitor of ECE-1 activity, led to a 61.2% decline in the mucosal ET-1 level and a 64.1% reduction in leptin, while the severity of mucosal inflammatory involvement increased by 28.6%. A drop in the level of leptin and the increase in severity of the inflammatory involvement elicited by the LPS was also attained in the presence of ET(A) receptor antagonist BQ610, but not the ET(B) receptor antagonist BQ788. Moreover, administration of ERK inhibitor, PD98059, in the presence of ET(B) receptor antagonist, but not the ET(A) receptor antagonist, caused reduction in the mucosal leptin level. Our findings are the first to implicate ET-1 as a key factor in up-regulation of gastric mucosal leptin-associated H. pylori infection. We also show that the effect of ET-1 on leptin production is a consequence of ET(A) receptor activation. PMID:16165095

  10. Protective Effects of Aqueous Extract of Solanum nigrum Linn. Leaves in Rat Models of Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the most debilitating side effects in patient undergoing chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Leaves of the plant Solanum nigrum are used in folklore medicine to treat oral ulcers in India. However, no pharmacological investigation has been carried out till date. Aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum leaves (AESN) was prepared and subjected to various phytochemical screening. HPLC analysis of the ethyl acetate fraction was carried out. The aqueous extract (100 and 200?mg/kg) was further evaluated for its protective effect on two rat models: (a) busulfan plus infrared radiation (chemoradiotherapy) induced oral mucositis and (b) methotrexate (chemotherapy) induced oral mucositis. Various parameters including body weight change, food intake, and mortality were measured. AESN showed protective effect in both models of oral mucositis; however, the higher dose was more effective in chemotherapy induced oral mucositis. A reduction in oral mucositis score (P < 0.05) was observed in the treatment groups. Significant (P < 0.05) improvement in food intake was also observed in AESN treated groups. Aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum leaves has protective effect on chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy induced oral mucositis in rats. PMID:25506066

  11. Mucosal Vaccination Overcomes the Barrier to Recombinant Vaccinia Immunization Caused by Preexisting Poxvirus Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, Igor M.; Moss, Bernard; Strober, Warren; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    1999-04-01

    Overcoming preexisting immunity to vaccinia virus in the adult population is a key requirement for development of otherwise potent recombinant vaccinia vaccines. Based on our observation that s.c. immunization with vaccinia induces cellular and antibody immunity to vaccinia only in systemic lymphoid tissue and not in mucosal sites, we hypothesized that the mucosal immune system remains naive to vaccinia and therefore amenable to immunization with recombinant vaccinia vectors despite earlier vaccinia exposure. We show that mucosal immunization of vaccinia-immune BALB/c mice with recombinant vaccinia expressing HIV gp160 induced specific serum antibody and strong HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. These responses occurred not only in mucosal but also in systemic lymphoid tissue, whereas systemic immunization was ineffective under these circumstances. In this context, intrarectal immunization was more effective than intranasal immunization. Boosting with a second dose of recombinant vaccinia was also more effective via the mucosal route. The systemic HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response was enhanced by coadministration of IL-12 at the mucosal site. These results also demonstrate the independent compartmentalization of the mucosal versus systemic immune systems and the asymmetric trafficking of lymphocytes between them. This approach to circumvent previous vaccinia immunity may be useful for induction of protective immunity against infectious diseases and cancer in the sizable populations with preexisting immunity to vaccinia from smallpox vaccination.

  12. Identification and mucosal expression analysis of cathepsin B in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) following bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Song, Lin; Tan, Fenghua; Su, Baofeng; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhao, Honggang; Peatman, Eric

    2015-12-01

    The mucosal surfaces of fish (skin, gill and intestine) constitute the primary line of defense against pathogen invasion. Although the importance of fish mucosal surfaces as the first barriers against pathogens cannot be overstated, the knowledge of teleost mucosal immunity are still limited. Cathepsin B, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is involved in multiple levels of physiological and biological processes, and playing crucial roles for host immune defense against pathogen infection. In this regard, we identified the cathepsin B (ctsba) of channel catfish and investigated the expression patterns of the ctsba in mucosal tissues following Edwardsiella ictaluri and Flavobacterium columnare challenge. Here, catfish ctsba gene was widely expressed in all examined tissues with the lowest expression level in muscle, and the highest expression level in trunk kidney, followed by spleen, gill, head kidney, intestine, liver and skin. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis showed the catfish ctsba had the strongest relationship to zebrafish. Moreover, the ctsba showed a general trend of up-regulated in mucosal tissues following both Gram-negative bacterial challenge. Taken together, the increased expression of ctsba in mucosal surfaces indicated the protective function of ctsba against bacterial infection, and the requirement for effective clearance of invading bacteria. Further studies are needed, indeed, to expand functional characterization and examine whether ctsba may play additional physiological and biological roles in catfish mucosal tissues. PMID:26497091

  13. A Review of the Immunological Mechanisms Following Mucosal Vaccination of Finfish

    PubMed Central

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal organs are principle portals of entry for microbial invasion and as such developing protective vaccines against these pathogens can serve as a first line of defense against infections. In general, all mucosal organs in finfish are covered by a layer of mucus whose main function is not only to prevent pathogen attachment by being continuously secreted and sloughing-off but it serves as a vehicle for antimicrobial compounds, complement, and immunoglobulins that degrade, opsonize, and neutralize invading pathogens on mucosal surfaces. In addition, all mucosal organs in finfish possess antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that activate cells of the adaptive immune system to generate long-lasting protective immune responses. The functional activities of APCs are orchestrated by a vast array of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines found in all mucosal organs. The adaptive immune system in mucosal organs is made of humoral immune responses that are able to neutralize invading pathogens as well as cellular-mediated immune responses whose kinetics are comparable to those induced by parenteral vaccines. In general, finfish mucosal immune system has the capacity to serve as the first-line defense mechanism against microbial invasion as well as being responsive to vaccination. PMID:26379665

  14. Glutathione redox potential in response to differentiation and enzyme inducers.

    PubMed

    Kirlin, W G; Cai, J; Thompson, S A; Diaz, D; Kavanagh, T J; Jones, D P

    1999-12-01

    The reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) redox state is thought to function in signaling of detoxification gene expression, but also appears to be tightly regulated in cells under normal conditions. Thus it is not clear that the magnitude of change in response to physiologic stimuli is sufficient for a role in redox signaling under nontoxicologic conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the change in 2GSH/GSSG redox during signaling of differentiation and increased detoxification enzyme activity in HT29 cells. We measured GSH, GSSG, cell volume, and cell pH, and we used the Nernst equation to determine the changes in redox potential Eh of the 2GSH/GSSG pool in response to the differentiating agent, sodium butyrate, and the detoxification enzyme inducer, benzyl isothiocyanate. Sodium butyrate caused a 60-mV oxidation (from -260 to -200 mV), an oxidation sufficient for a 100-fold change in protein dithiols:disulfide ratio. Benzyl isothiocyanate caused a 16-mV oxidation in control cells but a 40-mV oxidation (to -160 mV) in differentiated cells. Changes in GSH and mRNA for glutamate:cysteine ligase did not correlate with Eh; however, correlations were seen between Eh and glutathione S-transferase (GST) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH):quinone reductase activities (N:QR). These results show that 2GSH/GSSG redox changes in response to physiologic stimuli such as differentiation and enzyme inducers are of a sufficient magnitude to control the activity of redox-sensitive proteins. This suggests that physiologic modulation of the 2GSH/GSSG redox poise could provide a fundamental parameter for the control of cell phenotype. PMID:10641713

  15. The glutathione system: a new drug target in neuroimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gerwyn; Anderson, George; Dean, Olivia; Berk, Michael; Galecki, Piotr; Martin-Subero, Marta; Maes, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) has a crucial role in cellular signaling and antioxidant defenses either by reacting directly with reactive oxygen or nitrogen species or by acting as an essential cofactor for GSH S-transferases and glutathione peroxidases. GSH acting in concert with its dependent enzymes, known as the glutathione system, is responsible for the detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and electrophiles produced by xenobiotics. Adequate levels of GSH are essential for the optimal functioning of the immune system in general and T cell activation and differentiation in particular. GSH is a ubiquitous regulator of the cell cycle per se. GSH also has crucial functions in the brain as an antioxidant, neuromodulator, neurotransmitter, and enabler of neuron survival. Depletion of GSH leads to exacerbation of damage by oxidative and nitrosative stress; hypernitrosylation; increased levels of proinflammatory mediators and inflammatory potential; dysfunctions of intracellular signaling networks, e.g., p53, nuclear factor-?B, and Janus kinases; decreased cell proliferation and DNA synthesis; inactivation of complex I of the electron transport chain; activation of cytochrome c and the apoptotic machinery; blockade of the methionine cycle; and compromised epigenetic regulation of gene expression. As such, GSH depletion has marked consequences for the homeostatic control of the immune system, oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) pathways, regulation of energy production, and mitochondrial survival as well. GSH depletion and concomitant increase in O&NS and mitochondrial dysfunctions play a role in the pathophysiology of diverse neuroimmune disorders, including depression, myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and Parkinson's disease, suggesting that depleted GSH is an integral part of these diseases. Therapeutical interventions that aim to increase GSH concentrations in vivo include N-acetyl cysteine; Nrf-2 activation via hyperbaric oxygen therapy; dimethyl fumarate; phytochemicals, including curcumin, resveratrol, and cinnamon; and folate supplementation. PMID:24752591

  16. Mucosal Immunity and B Cells in Teleosts: Effect of Vaccination and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Parra, David; Reyes-Lopez, Felipe E.; Tort, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Fish are subjected to several insults from the environment, which may endanger animal survival. Mucosal surfaces are the first line of defense against these threats, acting as a physical barrier to protect the animal but also functioning as an active immune tissue. Thus, four mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues (MALTs), which lead the immune responses in gut, skin, gills, and nose, have been described in fish. Humoral and cellular immunity, as well as their regulation and the factors that influence the response in these mucosal lymphoid tissues, are still not well known in most fish species. Mucosal B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulins (Igs) are key players in the immune response that takes place in those MALTs. The existence of IgT as a mucosal specialized Ig gives us the opportunity of measuring specific responses after infection or vaccination, a fact that was not possible until recently in most fish species. The vaccination process is influenced by several factors, being stress one of the main stimuli determining the success of the vaccine. Thus, one of the major goals in a vaccination process is to avoid possible situations of stress, which might interfere with fish immune performance. However, interaction between immune and neuroendocrine systems at mucosal tissues is still unknown. In this review, we will summarize the latest findings about B-lymphocytes and Igs in mucosal immunity and the effect of stress and vaccination on B-cell response at mucosal sites. It is important to point out that a limited number of studies have been published regarding stress in mucosa and very few about the influence of stress over mucosal B-lymphocytes. PMID:26236311

  17. Polaprezinc reduces the severity of radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    DOI, HIROSHI; FUJIWARA, MASAYUKI; SUZUKI, HITOMI; NIWA, YASUE; NAKAYAMA, MASAHIRO; SHIKATA, TOSHIYUKI; ODAWARA, SOICHI; TAKADA, YASUHIRO; KIMURA, TAKESHI; KAMIKONYA, NORIHIKO; HIROTA, SHOZO

    2015-01-01

    Polaprezinc (PZ), an antiulcer drug, has been reported to have antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of administering PZ for radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. PZ was prepared as an oral rinse. The PZ oral rinse was used four times per day during the course of radiotherapy. Sequential changes in radiation mucositis were assessed during and after radiotherapy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Furthermore, a retrospective comparison analysis was performed to assess the efficacy of PZ for radiation-induced mucositis. A total of 32 patients were enrolled in the prospective study of the PZ oral rinse. Radiotherapy was performed up to a total dose of 60–66 Gy using a conventional schedule combined with chemotherapy. Of the 32 patients, 30 (93.8%) reported no complaints due to the PZ oral rinse. In addition, PZ was not associated with severe adverse effects. Among the patients who received PZ, grade 3 mucositis was observed in 29.0% based on the mucosal findings and in 39.3% based on the symptoms. In the patients who did not receive PZ, the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 40.0% based on the mucosal findings and 60.7% based on the symptoms. Moreover, PZ promoted the recovery from mucositis caused by chemoradiotherapy and was not associated with reduced tumor response to radiotherapy. Therefore, the PZ oral rinse was well tolerated and proved to be efficient for the treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis. PMID:25798271

  18. Effect of caffeine on ibuprofen-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Koyama, R; Kataoka, H; Tanaka, Y; Nakatsugi, S; Furukawa, M

    1999-07-01

    During investigations on the effect of caffeine on ibuprofen-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats, we have found that caffeine (p.o.) inhibits the development of ibuprofen-induced gastric lesions in a dose-dependent manner (ED50 18.4 mg kg(-1)). To investigate this protective effect of caffeine, we have studied the effect of caffeine on HCl-ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions with or without indomethacin pretreatment. Caffeine inhibited the development of HCl-ethanol-induced gastric lesions with and without indomethacin pretreatment. These results indicate that caffeine did not act as a mild irritant but, on the contrary, had protective effects. We measured the gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations and gastric mucosal blood flow, as representative protective factors for gastric mucosa. Caffeine did not affect the gastric mucosal PGE2 concentrations 4h after administration of ibuprofen. However, topical administration of caffeine resulted in an increase in gastric mucosal blood flow, as measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. We investigated the gastric acid secretion and gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase activity as representative aggressive factors for gastric mucosa. When caffeine was administered intraduodenally in pylorus-ligated rats, gastric acid secretion decreased in a dose-dependent manner, with an ED50 of 44.9 mg kg(-1). Caffeine decreased ibuprofen-induced gastric myeloperoxidase activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an ED50 of 9.1 mg kg(-1). These findings indicate that caffeine, at least in rats, may inhibit the development of acute gastric mucosal injury. The mechanisms underlying the protective actions of caffeine are unclear, but may be related in part to an increase in gastric mucosal blood flow and suppression of neutrophil activation. PMID:10467957

  19. The comprehensive acid-base characterization of glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Somlyay, Máté; Noszál, Béla

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione in its thiol (GSH) and disulfide (GSSG) forms, and 4 related compounds were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations and a case-tailored evaluation method. The resulting acid-base properties are quantified in terms of 128 microscopic protonation constants; the first complete set of such parameters for this vitally important pair of compounds. The concomitant 12 interactivity parameters were also determined. Since biological redox systems are regularly compared to the GSH-GSSG pair, the eight microscopic thiolate basicities determined this way are exclusive means for assessing subtle redox parameters in a wide pH range.

  20. Viral load is associated with abnormal serum levels of micronutrients and glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in genotype 3 HCV patients

    PubMed Central

    Razzaq, Zarish; Malik, Arif

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress in hepatitis C patients has been linked to hepatitis C virus. We verified this assumption in HCV genotype 3 patients by detecting the relationship between viral load and certain specific oxidative stress markers like Cu, Mn, Fe, Se, Zn and glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes. Method Subjects (n = 200, average age 24 years) with quantitative HCV RNA polymerase chain reaction-proven genotype 3 hepatitis C were simultaneously evaluated. Cu, Mn, Fe, Se and Zn serum levels were by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Internationally accepted methods were used for viral load quantification of glutathione, GR and Gpx serum levels. Result There was a significant correlation between HCV viral load and studied parameters. With the increase of viral load from mild group (200,000–1,000,000 copies/ml) to severe group (5,000,000–25,000,000 copies/ml) the serum levels of Cu, Mn, Zn, and Fe and glutathione reductase were found to be abnormally high. However, in severe viral load group serum concentration of Se and glutathione was less than the healthy controls. Conclusion As a significant correlation was detected between the study parameters in genotype 3 HCV patients, it is concluded that the studied micronutrients and glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes are the biomolecular targets of HCV to induce oxidative stress. General significance Constant monitoring and regulation of the recommended biomolecular targets of HCV can improve the plight of more than 170 million patients suffering from hepatitis C virus around the globe. PMID:26674880

  1. [Therapeutic effect of rebamipide for oral mucositis associated with FEC therapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Enami, Akiko; Masuda, Norikazu; Yamamura, Jun; Mizutani, Makiko; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Shikata, Ayako; Masaoka, Miyuki; Takada, Seiko; Bamba, Nao; Yamamoto, Mie; Abe, Megumi; Makihara, Katsuya

    2014-11-01

    No guidelines for supportive drug therapy have been established for oral mucositis occurring during cancer chemotherapy. We retrospectively examined the progression of oral mucositis in 91 patients with breast cancer who received the 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC)-100 regimen between September 2007 and August 2008. Daily rebamipide was administered to patients with oral mucositis as per hospital protocol to evaluate the hypothesized preventive and mucosal protective effects of rebamipide(Mucosta®). Oral mucositis was observed in 43 patients (47%)during 4 courses of FEC. The median age of the patients was 55 years(range, 32-76 years). Of the 91 patients, 49 patients who did not receive rebamipide during the 4 FEC courses were classified as group A, 14 patients who received rebamipide before the start of FEC were classified as group B, and 28 patients who received rebamipide after developing oral mucositis were classified as group C. The incidence of oral mucositis at the start of FEC with or without rebamipide administration was observed in 5 patients in group B (36%) and 38 patients in groups A and C (49%) (p=0.3472). The mucositis grade was G1 in 4 patients and G2 in 1 patient in group B, and G1 in 20 patients and G2 plus G3 in 18 patients in groups A and C (p=0.2467). In group C, the grade decreased in 25 patients (89%) and did not occur (G0) in 17 patients (61%) during the next course, and 15 patients (54%) continued to the final course without any occurrence of mucositis. These results suggest that rebamipide is effective for the treatment of oral mucositis. Although significant differences were not observed in the groups, rebamipide has the potential to prevent development of oral mucositis and alleviate its symptoms, and seems promising as a new supportive drug therapy. We hope to verify the preventive and protective effects of rebamipide by conducting a prospective, randomized trial while treating oral mucositis with basic oral care and appropriate interventions provided by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:25434444

  2. Interaction of glutathione and ascorbic acid in guinea pig lungs exposed to nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, H.-W.; Morrow, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of two important water-soluble antioxidants, glutathione and ascorbic acid, was studied. The perfused guinea pig lung was found to contain about twice as much reduced glutathione as ascorbic acid. Nitrogen dioxide exposure decreased the levels of the two antioxidants both in vitro and in vivo. Ascorbic acid concentration was lowered to a greater extent than glutathione. The pulmonary ascorbic acid level was identical in both control and glutathione-deficient guinea pigs exposed to nitrogen dioxide, suggesting that there was little interaction between the two antioxidants in the lungs during oxidant stress.

  3. Selenium modulates peroxidation in the absence of glutathione peroxidase in Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Simmons, T W; Jamall, I S; Lockshin, R A

    1989-11-30

    Adult houseflies fed a low-selenium diet showed a 73% decrease in total Se compared to those given 1.0 ppm Se in their drinking water. This decrease was associated with a 84.4% increase in thiobarbituric acid reactants and a 16.3% increase in conjugated dienes. These increases were unrelated to activities of glutathione S-transferases, superoxide dismutases and catalase and to levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione, all of which were unaltered by Se deficiency. Since houseflies lack glutathione peroxidase, Se apparently modulates peroxidation in these animals independent of the antioxidant enzymes and glutathione. PMID:2590218

  4. Glutathione depletion due to copper-induced phytochelatin synthesis causes oxidative stress in Silene cucubalus

    SciTech Connect

    Ric De Vos, C.H.; Vonk, M.J.; Vooijs, R.; Schat, H. )

    1992-03-01

    The relation between loss of glutathione due to metal-induced phytochelatin synthesis and oxidative stress was studied in the roots of copper-sensitive and tolerant Silene cucubalus (L.) Wib., resistant to 1 and 40 micromolar Cu, respectively. The amount of nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds other then glutathione was taken as a measure of phytochelatins. At a supply of 20 micromolar Cu, which is toxic for sensitive plants only, phytochelatin synthesis and loss of total glutathione were observed only in sensitive plants within 6 h of exposure. When the plants were exposed to a range of copper concentrations for 3 d, a marked production of phytochelatins in sensitive plants was already observed at 0.5 micromolar Cu, whereas the production in tolerant plants was negligible at 40 micromolar or lower. The highest production in tolerant plants was only 40% of that in sensitive plants. In both varieties, the synthesis of phytochelatins was coupled to a loss of glutathione. Copper at toxic concentrations caused oxidative stress, as was evidenced by both the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and a shift in the glutathione redox couple to a more oxidized state. Depletion of glutathione by pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine significantly increased the oxidative damage by copper. At a comparably low glutathione level, cadmium had no effect on either lipid peroxidation or the glutathione redox couple in buthionine sulfoximine-treated plants. These results indicate that copper may specifically cause oxidative stress by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione due to phytochelatin synthesis.

  5. Induction of nitric oxide synthesis in J774 cells lowers intracellular glutathione: effect of modulated glutathione redox status on nitric oxide synthase induction.

    PubMed Central

    Hothersall, J S; Cunha, F Q; Neild, G H; Norohna-Dutra, A A

    1997-01-01

    Under pathological conditions, the induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in macrophages is responsible for NO production to a cytotoxic concentration. We have investigated changes to, and the role of, intracellular glutathione in NO production by the activated murine macrophage cell line J774. Total glutathione concentrations (reduced, GSH, plus the disulphide, GSSG) were decreased to 45% of the control 48 h after cells were activated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide plus interferon gamma. This was accompanied by a decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio from 12:1 to 2:1. The intracellular decrease was not accounted for by either GSH or GSSG efflux; on the contrary, rapid export of glutathione in control cells was abrogated during activation. The loss of intra- and extracellular glutathione indicates either a decrease in synthesis de novo, or an increase in utilization, rather than competition for available NADPH. All changes in activated cells were prevented by pretreatment with the NOS inhibitor L-N-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine. Basal glutathione levels in J774 cells were manipulated by pretreatment with (1) buthionine sulphoximine (glutathione synthase inhibitor), (2) acivicin (gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase inhibitor), (3) bromo-octane (glutathione S-transferase substrate) and (4) diamide/zinc (thiol oxidant and glutathione reductase inhibitor). All treatments significantly decreased the output of NO following activation. The degree of inhibition was dependent on (i) duration of treatment prior to activation, (ii) rate of depletion or subsequent recovery and (iii) thiol end product. The level of GSH did not significantly affect the production of NO, after induction of NOS. Thus, glutathione redox status appears to plays an important role in NOS induction during macrophage activation. PMID:9065766

  6. Growth performance and ileal and total tract amino acid digestibility in broiler chickens fed diets containing bacterial protein produced on natural gas.

    PubMed

    Schøyen, H F; Hetland, H; Rouvinen-Watt, K; Skrede, A

    2007-01-01

    A total of 180 broiler chickens were fed 1 of 3 diets from day-old to slaughter at 35 d: a control diet with 35% soybean meal (SOY) or diets in which either 6% basic bacterial protein meal (BBP) or 6% autolysed bacterial protein meal (AUT) partially replaced soybean meal protein. Ileal and total tract apparent amino acid digestibility were examined in 5 chickens per diet using TiO(2) as an inert marker. Chickens fed the diets with bacterial protein had higher weight gain and feed consumption than control chicks during the first 3 wk, but there were no differences in growth or feed intake during the last 2 wk or during the total experimental period. The birds fed the BBP diet showed more efficient feed conversion compared with chickens fed the SOY and AUT diets. Litter quality at 5 wk was poorer in pens where the chickens were fed the AUT diet compared with the other 2 treatments. There were no differences among diets in the dressing percentage. Ileal amino acid digestibility at 5 wk of age revealed only minor differences between diets. There was a tendency toward lower ileal digestibility (0.12 > P > 0.07) of Arg, Lys, Met, and Phe in the AUT diet compared with the SOY diet, whereas there were no differences between the SOY and BBP diets. Total tract amino acid digestibilities at 5 wk were similar or slightly lower than the ileal digestibilities within diets. Total tract amino acid digestibility at 2 wk was similar to the total tract amino acid digestibility at 5 wk. The diets containing bacterial protein showed lower total tract digestibility of most amino acids compared with the SOY diet. It was concluded that 6% of either basic or autolysed bacterial protein can replace soybean meal in diets for broiler chickens without impairing growth performance, and the basic bacterial protein seemed to be a slightly better substitute than the autolysed bacterial protein. PMID:17179420

  7. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  8. High-sensitivity detection of short-chain fatty acids in porcine ileal, cecal, portal and abdominal blood by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Matsukawa, Noriko; Tomonaga, Shozo; Inoue, Ryo; Ushida, Kazunari; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2014-04-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as acetate, propionate and n-butyrate, are the main end-products of fermentation in the large intestine. SCFA are rapidly absorbed from the large intestinal mucosa to provide energy to the host. In this study, high-sensitivity detection of SCFA was demonstrated in blood using the gas chromatometry with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Few studies have measured SCFA in porcine blood. Therefore, SCFA concentrations in the ileal (IV), cecal (CV), portal (PV) and abdominal (AV) vein blood, urine (Ur) and saliva (Sa) were measured by GC-MS. All body fluids were collected from four 5-month-old pigs. Cecal (CD) and ileal (ID) digesta, and cecal (CM) and ileal (IM) mucosa were also collected and their corresponding SCFA concentrations were measured using ion-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography. GC-MS analyses were successful to determine the SCFA concentrations in the porcine body fluids. n-Butyrate concentration was surprisingly high in CV and its proportion remained higher in CV than that in CD and CM. Acetate showed a constantly high proportion in all porcine body fluids. Propionate was detected at a relatively high proportion in CV, IV and PV, but was low in AV. PMID:24612389

  9. High-fiber rye diet increases ileal excretion of energy and macronutrients compared with low-fiber wheat diet independent of meal frequency in ileostomy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Isaksson, Hanna; Landberg, Rikard; Sundberg, Birgitta; Lundin, Eva; Hallmans, Göran; Zhang, Jie-Xian; Tidehag, Per; Erik Bach Knudsen, Knud; Moazzami, Ali A.; Åman, Per

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole-grain foods and cereal dietary fiber intake is associated with lower body weight. This may partly result from lower energy utilization of high-fiber diets. Objective In the present study, the impact on ileal excretion of energy and macronutrients in response to a rye bread high-fiber diet compared to a refined wheat low-fiber diet was investigated. Furthermore, the effect of meal frequency on apparent absorption of nutrients was studied for the first time. Design Ten participants that had undergone ileostomy consumed standardized iso-caloric diets, including low-fiber wheat bread (20 g dietary fiber per day) for 2 weeks followed by high-fiber rye bread (52 g dietary fiber per day) for 2 weeks. The diets were consumed in an ordinary (three meals per day) and a nibbling (seven meals per day) meal frequency in a cross-over design. Ileal effluents were collected during 24 h at the third day of each of the four dietary periods and analyzed for gross energy and nutrient contents. Results The results showed that intake of rye bread high-fiber diet compared to the refined wheat low-fiber diet caused an increase in ileal excretion of energy and macronutrients. The effect was independent of meal frequency. This suggests that a high intake of rye may result in lower availability of macronutrients for small intestinal digestion and absorption. A regular intake of rye may therefore have implications for weight management. PMID:24358035

  10. Evaluation of fat sources (lecithin, mono-glyceride and mono-diglyceride) in weaned pigs: Apparent total tract and ileal nutrient digestibilities

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Ho; Chen, Ying Jie; Yoo, Jong Sang; Kim, Wan Tae; Chung, Il Byung

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of lecithin, mono-glyceride and mono-diglyceride on apparent total tract and ileal nutrient digestibilities in nursery pigs. Twenty [(Landrace × Yorkshire) × Duroc] barrows were surgically fitted with simple T-cannulas. Dietary treatments included 1) CON (basal diet: soy oil), 2) LO (lecithin 0.5%), 3) MO (mono-glyceride 0.5%), 4) MG (mono-glyceride 1.0%) and 5) MDG (mono-diglyceride 1.0%). In apparent total tract nutrient digestibility, dry matter (DM) and gross energy (GE) digestibilities of MDG treatments were higher than LO and MG treatments (p<0.05). In nitrogen (N) digestibility, LO treatment showed the lowest compared to others (p<0.05). The digestibility of crude fat was higher in MDG treatment than CON and LO treatments (p<0.05). In apparent ileal nutrient digestibility, DM digestibility was higher in MDG treatment than LO and MG treatments (p<0.05). GE digestibility was higher in MDG treatment than LO, MO and MG treatments (p<0.05). N digestibility of MDG treatment was greater than LO treatment (p<0.05). Also, the digestibility of crude fat was higher in MDG treatment than CON and LO treatments (p<0.05). In conclusion, mono-diglyceride can increase apparent total tract nutrient and apparent ileal nutrient digestibilities of DM, GE, N and crude fat. PMID:20126377

  11. GATA4 represses an ileal program of gene expression in the proximal small intestine by inhibiting the acetylation of histone H3, lysine 27

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, B. E.; Aronson, S. Rabello; Berkhout, R. P.; Chavoushi, S. F.; He, A.; Pu, W. T.; Verzi, M. P.; Krasinski, S. D.

    2015-01-01

    GATA4 is expressed in the proximal 85% of small intestine where it promotes a proximal intestinal (‘jejunal’) identity while repressing a distal intestinal (‘ileal’) identity, but its molecular mechanisms are unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that GATA4 promotes a jejunal vs. ileal identity in mouse intestine by directly activating and repressing specific subsets of absorptive enterocyte genes by modulating the acetylation of histone H3, lysine 27 (H3K27), a mark of active chromatin, at sites of GATA4 occupancy. Global analysis of mouse jejunal epithelium showed a statistically significant association of GATA4 occupancy with GATA4-regulated genes. Occupancy was equally distributed between down- and up-regulated targets, and occupancy sites showed a dichotomy of unique motif over-representation at down- vs. up-regulated genes. H3K27ac enrichment at GATA4-binding loci that mapped to down-regulated genes (activation targets) was elevated, changed little upon conditional Gata4 deletion, and was similar to control ileum, whereas H3K27ac enrichment at GATA4-binding loci that mapped to up-regulated genes (repression targets) was depleted, increased upon conditional Gata4 deletion, and approached H3K27ac enrichment in wildtype control ileum. These data support the hypothesis that GATA4 both activates and represses intestinal genes, and show that GATA4 represses an ileal program of gene expression in the proximal small intestine by inhibiting the acetylation of H3K27. PMID:24878542

  12. Quantification of human hepatic glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed Central

    van Ommen, B; Bogaards, J J; Peters, W H; Blaauboer, B; van Bladeren, P J

    1990-01-01

    Human hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) subunits were characterized and quantified with the aid of a recently developed h.p.l.c. method. In 20 hepatic tissue specimens the absolute amounts of the basic Class Alpha subunits B1 and B2, the near-neutral Class Mu subunits mu and psi and the acidic subunit pi were determined. The average total amount of GST was 37 micrograms/mg of cytosolic protein, with the Class Alpha GST being the predominant class (84% of total GSTs), and pi as the sole representative of the Class Pi GSTs present in the lowest concentration (4% of total GSTs). Large interindividual differences were observed for all subunits, with variations up to 27-fold, depending on the subunit. For the Class Alpha GST-subunits B1 and B2, a biphasic ratio was observed. The genetic polymorphism of the subunits mu and psi was confirmed by h.p.l.c. analysis, and correlated with the enzymic glutathione conjugation of trans-stilbene oxide and with Western blotting of cytosols, using a monoclonal anti-(Class Mu GST) antibody. Of the 20 livers examined, ten contained only mu, whereas the occurrence of psi alone, and the combination of mu and psi, were found in only one liver each. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2390054

  13. Bioavailability Study of an Innovative Orobuccal Formulation of Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, Daniela; Grosini, Matteo; Giardina, Silvana; Michelotti, Angela; Carrabetta, Mariaelena; Seneci, Antonio; Verri, Manuela; Dossena, Maurizia; Marzatico, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of the ubiquitous thiol tripeptide glutathione (GSH) is involved in oxidative stress, which plays a role in ageing; consequently, GSH is closely related to this process characterized by progressive decline in the efficiency of physiological function and increased susceptibility to disease. When circulating GSH decreases, oral administration might be considered a therapeutic benefit. Unfortunately, due to the hydrolysis of the tripeptide by intestinal ?-glutamyltransferase, dietary glutathione is not a major determinant for its increase. Aim of this work was to evaluate improvement of GSH systemic availability testing, in vitro and in vivo, an optimized orobuccal fast-slow release formulation tablet containing pure stabilized GSH. In vitro evaluation of the penetration capability of the innovative GSH-release formulation showed that GSH was well absorbed by the reconstructed oral epithelium and its absorption has features of time-dependence. In addition, in vivo results, obtained from 15 healthy volunteers, were in favor of GSH level improvement in blood showing fast (after 30 and 60 minutes) absorption through oral mucosa. In conclusion, the intake of GSH formulated through optimized orobuccal fast-slow release tablets gave positive results in raising GSH blood concentration. PMID:26649136

  14. Interaction between glutathione and Apoptosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dilip; Sah, Sangita; Nath, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by imbalance redox state and increased apoptosis. The activation, proliferation and cell death of lymphocytes are dependent on intracellular levels of glutathione and controlled production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Changes in the intracellular redox environment of cells, through oxygen-derived free radical production known as oxidative stress, have been reported to be critical for cellular immune dysfunction, activation of apoptotic enzymes and apoptosis. The shift in the cellular GSH-to-GSSG redox balance in favor of the oxidized species, GSSG, constitutes an important signal that can decide the fate of the abnormal apoptosis in the disease. The current review will focus on four main areas: (1) general description of oxidative stress markers in SLE, (2) alteration of redox state and complication of disease (3) role of redox mechanisms in the initiation and execution phases of apoptosis, and (4) intracellular glutathione and its checkpoints with lymphocyte apoptosis represent novel targets for pharmacological intervention in SLE. PMID:23279845

  15. Fluorescence endoscopic imaging for evaluation of gastric mucosal blood flow: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquillon, Nicolas; Mordon, Serge R.; Mathieu, D.; Maunoury, Vincent; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Neviere, Remi; Wattel, Francis; Chopin, Claude

    1999-02-01

    Microcirculatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract appear to be a major compound of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome secondary to sepsis or septic shock. A better analysis of mucosal hypoperfusion in critically ill patients with sepsis may be helpful for the comprehension of this high mortality-associated syndrome. Fluorescence endoscopy has been recognized as a non-invasive method for both spatial and temporal evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion. We performed this imaging technique during routine gastric endoscopy in patients with sepsis criteria. The study included gastric observation and appearance time of gastric fluorescence after an intravenous 10% sodium - fluorescein bolus. Qualitative analysis of high fluorescence areas was compared with mucosal blood flow measurements by laser - Doppler flowmetry. We concluded that the fluorescence endoscopic imaging in critically ill patients with sepsis may reveal spacial and temporal differences in the mucosal microcirculation distribution.

  16. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for drug and gene delivery to mucosal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Samuel K.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Hanes, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Mucus is a viscoelastic and adhesive gel that protects the lung airways, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, vagina, eye and other mucosal surfaces. Most foreign particulates, including conventional particle-based drug delivery systems, are efficiently trapped in human mucus layers by steric obstruction and/or adhesion. Trapped particles are typically removed from the mucosal tissue within seconds to a few hours depending on anatomical location, thereby strongly limiting the duration of sustained drug delivery locally. A number of debilitating diseases could be treated more effectively and with fewer side effects if drugs and genes could be more efficiently delivered to the underlying mucosal tissues in a controlled manner. This review first describes the tenacious mucus barrier properties that have precluded the efficient penetration of therapeutic particles. It then reviews the design and development of new mucus-penetrating particles that may avoid rapid mucus clearance mechanisms, and thereby provide targeted or sustained drug delivery for localized therapies in mucosal tissues. PMID:19133304

  17. COMPARISON OF SYSTEMIC AND MUCOSAL ROUTES OF SENSITIZATION TO OVALBUMIN ANTIGEN IN THREE MOUSE STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have shown strain differences in allergic lung responses following ovalbumin (OVA) antigen sensitization and challenge. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these differences were maintained between systemic and mucosal sensitization routes, and to ...

  18. Immunization with synthetic nanoparticles to generate mucosal CD8 T Cell responses

    E-print Network

    Li, Adrienne Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have benefited global health by controlling or eradicating life threatening diseases. With better understanding of infectious diseases and immunity, more interest has been placed on stimulating mucosal immune ...

  19. The effect of royal jelly on oral mucositis in patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Ozden; Güngörmü?, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of royal jelly on oral mucositis in patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The study population consisted of 103 patients undergoing radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Oral mucositis was graded according to the World Health Organization criteria, and patients were divided into 2 groups. All patients received mouthwash therapy with benzydamine hydrochloride and nystatin rinses. In addition, patients in the experimental group received royal jelly. The mean resolution time of oral mucositis in the royal jelly group was significantly shorter than that of the control group. As a result, the study results demonstrate that royal jelly administrated by a certain procedure improved the signs and symptoms of oral mucositis and markedly shortened its healing time. PMID:24919094

  20. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    E-print Network

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    vaccines that stimulate the ocular mucosal immune system,”immune correlates can segregate by vaccine type in a murine herpes model system,”immune system [64]. Immunization of pregnant women with many other viral vaccines

  1. The mucosal immune system in the oral cavity-an orchestra of T cell diversity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui-Qing; Zhang, Dun-Fang; Tu, Eric; Chen, Qian-Ming; Chen, WanJun

    2014-09-01

    The mucosal immune system defends against a vast array of pathogens, yet it exhibits limited responses to commensal microorganisms under healthy conditions. The oral-pharyngeal cavity, the gateway for both the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, is composed of complex anatomical structures and is constantly challenged by antigens from air and food. The mucosal immune system of the oral-pharyngeal cavity must prevent pathogen entry while maintaining immune homeostasis, which is achieved via a range of mechanisms that are similar or different to those utilized by the gastrointestinal immune system. In this review, we summarize the features of the mucosal immune system, focusing on T cell subsets and their functions. We also discuss our current understanding of the oral-pharyngeal mucosal immune system. PMID:25105816

  2. [The effects of Rebamipide and Polaprezinc mouthwash and uptake on mucositis induced by chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Kenichiro; Terakura, Masanobu; Katsuragi, Kunihiro; Kodama, Sachiko; Morisya, Yumiyo; Hayaishi, Yuko; Nakanishi, Chie

    2011-12-01

    Mucositis is one of the most frequent side effects induced by chemotherapy that damages the patients' QOL and response rate. The efficacy of Rebamipide and Polaprezinc mouthwash and uptake was evaluated. Nine patients who underwent chemotherapy and had some complaints related with mucositis were included as subjects. Rebamipide (300 mg) and Polaprezinc (150 mg) mouthwashing and uptake were performed by the subjects 4 times per day. Macroscopic examination and symptom research were performed until three months after beginning this medication. Macroscopic mucositis was shown in 5 patients previously and 4 patients improved. Seven patients had symptomatic improvement(p=0. 018). Rebamipide and Polaprezinc mouthwash and uptake is effective for patients who have mucositis induced by chemotherapy. PMID:22189226

  3. Analysis of Mucosal Stress Response in Acid-Induced Esophagitis in Opossum

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Analysis of Mucosal Stress Response in Acid-Induced Esophagitis in Opossum ROBERT J. WHITE, Ph, and proximal samples were excised from anesthetized opossums 24 hr after three consecutive days of 45-min

  4. Impact of inactivated poliovirus vaccine on mucosal immunity: implications for the polio eradication endgame

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Edward PK; Molodecky, Natalie A; Pons-Salort, Margarita; O’Reilly, Kathleen M; Grassly, Nicholas C

    2015-01-01

    The polio eradication endgame aims to bring transmission of all polioviruses to a halt. To achieve this aim, it is essential to block viral replication in individuals via induction of a robust mucosal immune response. Although it has long been recognized that inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is incapable of inducing a strong mucosal response on its own, it has recently become clear that IPV may boost immunity in the intestinal mucosa among individuals previously immunized with oral poliovirus vaccine. Indeed, mucosal protection appears to be stronger following a booster dose of IPV than oral poliovirus vaccine, especially in older children. Here, we review the available evidence regarding the impact of IPV on mucosal immunity, and consider the implications of this evidence for the polio eradication endgame. We conclude that the implementation of IPV in both routine and supplementary immunization activities has the potential to play a key role in halting poliovirus transmission, and thereby hasten the eradication of polio. PMID:26159938

  5. Enzymatic product-mediated stabilization of CdS quantum dots produced in situ: application for detection of reduced glutathione, NADPH, and glutathione reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Garai-Ibabe, Gaizka; Saa, Laura; Pavlov, Valeri

    2013-06-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant nonprotein molecule in the cell and plays an important role in many biological processes, including the maintenance of intracellular redox states, detoxification, and metabolism. Furthermore, glutathione levels have been linked to several human diseases, such as AIDS, Alzheimer disease, alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. A novel concept in bioanalysis is introduced and applied to the highly sensitive and inexpensive detection of reduced glutathione (GSH), over its oxidized form (GSSG), and glutathione reductase (GR) in human serum. This new fluorogenic bioanalytical system is based on the GSH-mediated stabilization of growing CdS nanoparticles. The sensitivity of this new assay is 5 pM of GR, which is 3 orders of magnitude better than other fluorogenic methods previously reported. PMID:23656502

  6. [35S]-LABELING OF THE SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM GLUTATHIONE POOL TO ASSESS GLUTATHIONE-MEDIATED DNA BINDING BY 1,2-DIBROMOETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of drugs and environmental chemicals to reactive intermediates is often studied with the use of radiolabeled compounds that are synthesized by expensive and technically difficult procedures. In general, glutathione (GSH) conjugation serves as a detoxification m...

  7. Role of endothelin-1-dependent up-regulation of leptin in oral mucosal repair.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2005-12-01

    Leptin, a multifunctional hormone that regulates food intake and energy expenditure, has emerged recently as an important modulator of inflammatory cascades associated with wound healing. In this study, we applied the animal model of buccal mucosal ulcer to investigate the role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and leptin in soft oral tissue repair. Using groups of rats with experimentally induced buccal mucosal ulcers we show that ulcer onset was characterized by a marked increase in the mucosal level of ET-1 and leptin. However, while the ET-1 level gradually declined with healing, the mucosal level of leptin increased reaching maximum expression on the 4th day of healing. Therapeutic administration of phosphoramidon, an inhibitor of ECE-1 activity, not only led to a 53.2% drop in the ET-1, but also produced a dose-dependent reduction (up to 50.9%) in the mucosal level of leptin and up to 42.3% decline in the rate of ulcer healing. A marked drop (54.2%) in the mucosal level of leptin and the reduction (46.8%) in the rate of ulcer healing was also attained in the presence of ETA receptor antagonist BQ610 administration, but not the ETB receptor antagonist BQ788. Moreover, administration of ERK inhibitor, PD98059 in the presence of ETB receptor antagonist, but not the ETA receptor antagonist, caused the reduction the mucosal leptin level as well as a decline in the rate of ulcer healing. Our findings are the first to implicate the requirement for both ET-1 and leptin in orderly progression of the events of soft oral tissue repair. We also show that ET-1 is a key factor in up-regulation of leptin production associated with oral mucosal ulcer healing , and that the effect of ET-1 on leptin production is a consequence of ETA receptor activation and subsequent signaling through MAPK/ERK. PMID:16391412

  8. Surface display of a bifunctional glutathione synthetase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for converting chicken feather hydrolysate into glutathione.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiqi; Tan, Hongming; Zhou, Shining; Cao, Lixiang

    2014-08-01

    The low economic profits of feather recycling lead that the large amount of feathers is currently discarded in China. To convert feather hydrolysates into GSH with high values, surface display of the bifunctional glutathione synthetase encoded by gcsgs from Streptococcus thermophilus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the potential in glutathione (GSH) production from feather hydrolysates were studied. The surface-displayed GCSGS could be used to convert feather hydrolysates into GSH. Results showed that 10 g/l of feather was converted into 321.8 mg/l GSH by the Trichoderma atroviride F6 and surface-displayed GCSGS in the study. Compared with production of intracellular GSH by S. cerevisiae from amino acids or feather hydrolysate, the concentration of GSH in the study was higher, and purification of GSH was more feasible. Due to the glycolytic pathway, the S. cerevisiae was used to generate ATP and cheap feather hydrolysate as precursors, the process for GSH production based on surface-displayed GCSGS is cheap and feasible. The process showed the potential to convert feather hydrolysates into GSH on an industrial scale. PMID:24706360

  9. In vitro modeling of rat mucosal mast cell function in Trichinella spiralis infection

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, Seana M.; Scalfone, Lisa K.; Holowka, David; Appleton, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Intestinal infection with the parasitic nematode, Trichinella spiralis, provides a robust context for the study of mucosal mast cell function. In rats, mucosal mast cells are exposed to parasites during the earliest stage of infection, affording an opportunity for mast cells to contribute to an innate response to infection. During secondary infection, degranulation of rat mucosal mast cells coincides with expulsion of challenge larvae from the intestine. The goal of this study was to evaluate rat bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) and the rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) as models for mucosal mast cells, using parasite glycoproteins and antibody reagents that have been tested extensively in rats in vivo. We found that BMMC displayed a more robust mucosal phenotype. Although T. spiralis glycoproteins bound to mast cell surfaces in the absence of antibodies, they did not stimulate degranulation, nor did they inhibit degranulation triggered by immune complexes. Parasite glycoproteins complexed with specific monoclonal IgGs provoked release of RMCPII and ?-hexosaminidase from both cell types in a manner that replicated results observed previously in passively immunized rats. Our results document that RBL-2H3 cells and BMMC model rat mucosal mast cells in the contexts of innate and adaptive responses to T. spiralis. PMID:23094823

  10. Ascorbate preserves gastric mucosal metabolism and microcirculation after hemorrhagic shock and retransfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Ekman, T; Bagge, U; Risberg, B; Soussi, B

    1995-01-01

    The gastric mucosal microcirculation and purine nucleotide metabolism were studied in rats after hemorrhagic shock and retransfusion. The mucosal surface density of perfused vessels (SDPV) and the mucosal levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP, hypoxanthine and uric acid were measured following 15 min of hemorrhagic shock and 10 and 30 min after retransfusion, and the effects of pretreatment with allopurinol or ascorbate were studied. During shock there was a dephosphorylation of nucleotides and a decline in the SDPV. Retransfusion led to an additional reduction in the SDPV, but a complete restoration of preshock nucleotide levels 30 min after retransfusion. Allopurinol accelerated early rephosphorylation of nucleotides without effects upon SDPV while ascorbate completely preserved the mucosal level of energy-rich nucleotides 15 min after hemorrhagic shock and increased SDPV during early reperfusion. The results showed that there was a renewal of energy stores in gastric mucosa after hemorrhagic shock and retransfusion although parts of the vascular bed were not reperfused. The mucosal energy depletion after 15 min of hemorrhagic shock and part of the mucosal vessel injury after retransfusion were prevented by pretreatment with ascorbate. PMID:7890004

  11. [Importance of prevention of acute mucosal lesions in patients in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Popovi?, N

    2007-01-01

    At least three-quarters of critically ill patients develop mucosal lesion as a direct consequence of stress within the first 24 hours following the admission to intensive care unit. These mucosal lesions occur as superficial or deep mucosal lesions which can lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding and it can put at risk the life of critically ill patient. There are multiple risk factors for the occurence of mucosal lesion such as: respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, sepsis, hypotension, bums, severe trauma, neurotrauma, ileus, coagulopathy, renal and hepatic failure, myocardial infarction etc. The incidence of silent (ocult) bleeding in critically ill patients is almost 100%, but only about 5% of patients have clinically apparent (overt) hemorrhage and 1-2% have clinically significant bleeding which requires blood transfusions. In patients who are at the greatest risk of developing mucosal lesion, prophylactic treatment ought to be started immediately in order to achieve pH4 with adequate perfusion and coagulation. Today several groups of medications are used for the prevention of mucosal gastrointestinal lesion and they include: antacids, sucralfate, hisamine-2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors. PMID:17633862

  12. Polaprezinc prevents oral mucositis associated with radiochemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomoko; Ishihara, Masashi; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Mizuta, Keisuke; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2010-10-15

    Oral mucositis is frequent but serious adverse event associated with radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy in head and neck cancer severely impairs health-related quality of life, leading to poor prognosis due to discontinuation of the therapy. Although a number of compounds have been tested for prophylaxis of oral mucositis, few of them are satisfactory. We investigated the effect of polaprezinc (zinc L-carnosine), a gastric mucosal protective drug, on radiochemotherapy-induced oral mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance in patients with head and neck cancer. Patients were randomly assigned to receive polaprezinc (n = 16) or azulene oral rinse as the control (n = 15). The incidence rates of mucositis, pain, xerostomia and taste disturbance were all markedly lower in polaprezinc group than in control. Moreover, the use of analgesics was significantly (p = 0.003) less frequent and the amount of food intake was significantly (p = 0.002) higher in polaprezinc group than in control. On the other hand, tumor response rate in patients with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy was not significantly affected by polaprezinc, in which the response rate (complete plus partial response) was 88% for polaprezinc and 92% for control (p = 1.000). Therefore, it is highly assumable that polaprezinc is potentially useful for prevention of oral mucositis and improvement of quality of life without reducing the tumor response. PMID:20104529

  13. Compartment-specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Zechmann, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The tripeptide thiol glutathione (?-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine) is the most important sulfur containing antioxidant in plants and essential for plant defense against abiotic and biotic stress conditions. It is involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), redox signaling, the modulation of defense gene expression, and the regulation of enzymatic activities. Even though changes in glutathione contents are well documented in plants and its roles in plant defense are well established, still too little is known about its compartment-specific importance during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Due to technical advances in the visualization of glutathione and the redox state through microscopical methods some progress was made in the last few years in studying the importance of subcellular glutathione contents during stress conditions in plants. This review summarizes the data available on compartment-specific importance of glutathione in the protection against abiotic and biotic stress conditions such as high light stress, exposure to cadmium, drought, and pathogen attack (Pseudomonas, Botrytis, tobacco mosaic virus). The data will be discussed in connection with the subcellular accumulation of ROS during these conditions and glutathione synthesis which are both highly compartment specific (e.g., glutathione synthesis takes place in chloroplasts and the cytosol). Thus this review will reveal the compartment-specific importance of glutathione during abiotic and biotic stress conditions. PMID:25368627

  14. Regression of Aflatoxin B1-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinomas by Reduced Glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novi, Anna M.

    1981-05-01

    Reduced glutathione administered to rats bearing aflatoxin B1-induced liver tumors caused regression of tumor growth and resulted in survival of the animals. Since glutathione is a harmless natural product, it merits further investigation as a potential antitumor drug for humans.

  15. METABOLISM OF 1,1- AND 1,3- DICHLOROPROPENE: A MECHANISM OF BIOACTIVATION BY GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glutathione transferases (GST) catalyze the reaction of glutathione (GSH) with haloalkenes via a nucleophilic vinylic substitution mechanism (SNV reaction). The source water contaminants 1,1-dichloropropene and 1,3-dichloropropene, which are under scrutiny by the U.S.EPA, were...

  16. Differential toxicity of antimonial compounds and their effects on glutathione homeostasis in a human leukaemia

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    " Differential toxicity of antimonial compounds and their effects on glutathione homeostasis the effects of SbIII and pentavalent antimonial drugs (SbV ) on glutathione homeostasis, oxidative stressIII . Collectively, these findings suggest that SbIII seriously compromises thiol homeostasis in THP-1 macrophages

  17. Author's personal copy Sulfate and glutathione enhanced arsenic accumulation by arsenic

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    Author's personal copy Sulfate and glutathione enhanced arsenic accumulation by arsenic, Gainesville, FL 32611-0690, USA Sulfate and glutathione increased arsenic uptake and translocation in Pteris December 2009 Accepted 12 December 2009 Keywords: Sulfur Arsenic Hyperaccumulator GSH a b s t r a c

  18. Studies on the Glutathione-Dependent Formaldehyde-Activating Enzyme from Paracoccus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Richard J.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Smart, Tristan J.; Rose, Nathan R.; Henry, Luc; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a toxin and carcinogen that is both an environmental pollutant and an endogenous metabolite. Formaldehyde metabolism, which is probably essential for all aerobic cells, likely proceeds via multiple mechanisms, including via a glutathione-dependent pathway that is widely conserved in bacteria, plants and animals. However, it is unclear whether the first step in the glutathione-dependent pathway (i.e. formation of S-hydroxymethylglutathione (HMG)) is enzyme-catalysed. We report studies on glutathione-dependent formaldehyde-activating enzyme (GFA) from Paracoccus denitrificans, which has been proposed to catalyse HMG formation from glutathione and formaldehyde on the basis of studies using NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). Although we were able to replicate the EXSY results, time course experiments unexpectedly imply that GFA does not catalyse HMG formation under standard conditions. However, GFA was observed to bind glutathione using NMR and mass spectrometry. Overall, the results reveal that GFA binds glutathione but does not directly catalyse HMG formation under standard conditions. Thus, it is possible that GFA acts as a glutathione carrier that acts to co-localise glutathione and formaldehyde in a cellular context. PMID:26675168

  19. A Conserved Mitochondrial ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Exports Glutathione Polysulfide for Cytosolic Metal Cofactor Assembly*?

    PubMed Central

    Schaedler, Theresia A.; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Kruse, Inga; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J.; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Balk, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter located in the inner mitochondrial membrane is involved in iron-sulfur cluster and molybdenum cofactor assembly in the cytosol, but the transported substrate is unknown. ATM3 (ABCB25) from Arabidopsis thaliana and its functional orthologue Atm1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were expressed in Lactococcus lactis and studied in inside-out membrane vesicles and in purified form. Both proteins selectively transported glutathione disulfide (GSSG) but not reduced glutathione in agreement with a 3-fold stimulation of ATPase activity by GSSG. By contrast, Fe2+ alone or in combination with glutathione did not stimulate ATPase activity. Arabidopsis atm3 mutants were hypersensitive to an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis and accumulated GSSG in the mitochondria. The growth phenotype of atm3-1 was strongly enhanced by depletion of the mitochondrion-localized, GSH-dependent persulfide oxygenase ETHE1, suggesting that the physiological substrate of ATM3 contains persulfide in addition to glutathione. Consistent with this idea, a transportomics approach using mass spectrometry showed that glutathione trisulfide (GS-S-SG) was transported by Atm1. We propose that mitochondria export glutathione polysulfide, containing glutathione and persulfide, for iron-sulfur cluster assembly in the cytosol. PMID:25006243

  20. Hepatic lipid peroxidation: caused by acute drug intoxication, prevented by liposomal glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wendel, A

    1983-01-01

    Acute intoxication of mice with high doses of paracetamol (acetaminophen, 4-hydroxyacetanilide) led to a dose-dependent lipid peroxidation (LPO) measured in vivo by ethane exhalation and in vitro by malondialdehyde formation and glutathione depletion. Induction of microsomal enzymes enhanced LPO, inhibition of the monooxygenase systems totally suppressed it. Other drugs activated in phase I, i.e., furosemide, ethylmorphine or aminopyrine acted similarly if the phase II conjugation to glutathione was paralysed by glutathione depletion with diethylmaleate. The concept of lipid peroxidation being an early causal event in hepatocellular destruction was further examined experimentally: 1) Animals with alimentary selenium deficiency lacking liver selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity were much more susceptible to paracetamol-induced liver necrosis and LPO. 2) Normally fed animals were totally resistant when pretreated by intravenous liposomally entrapped glutathione. Administration of free glutathione led to a similar increase in hepatic glutathione content but the animals were much less protected. 3) Isolated perfused mouse liver released quantitatively similar amounts of ethane upon perfusion of paracetamol. The hydrocarbon evolution was reversible and preceded cell disintegration monitored by release of lactate dehydrogenase. 4) The few human data available indicate that man has a much lower activity of hydroperoxide metabolizing enzymes and much less glutathione. The results suggest an involvement of lipid peroxidation in acute chemical primary lesions. A general pathogenic mechanism for liver injury cannot be derived at present from the data available. PMID:6678834

  1. Polymeric micelles in mucosal drug delivery: Challenges towards clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Sosnik, Alejandro; Menaker Raskin, Maya

    2015-11-01

    Polymeric micelles are nanostructures formed by the self-aggregation of copolymeric amphiphiles above the critical micellar concentration. Due to the flexibility to tailor different molecular features, they have been exploited to encapsulate motley poorly-water soluble therapeutic agents. Moreover, the possibility to combine different amphiphiles in one single aggregate and produce mixed micelles that capitalize on the features of the different components substantially expands the therapeutic potential of these nanocarriers. Despite their proven versatility, polymeric micelles remain elusive to the market and only a few products are currently undergoing advanced clinical trials or reached clinical application, all of them for the therapy of different types of cancer and administration by the intravenous route. At the same time, they emerge as a nanotechnology platform with great potential for non-parenteral mucosal administration. However, for this, the interaction of polymeric micelles with mucus needs to be strengthened. The present review describes the different attempts to develop mucoadhesive polymeric micelles and discusses the challenges faced in the near future for a successful bench-to-bedside translation. PMID:25597531

  2. Human cytomegalovirus tropism for mucosal myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Laura

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human CMV infections are a serious source of morbidity and mortality for immunocompromised patients and for the developing fetus. Because of this, the development of new strategies to prevent CMV acquisition and transmission is a top priority. Myeloid dendritic cells (DC) residing in the oral and nasal mucosae are among the first immune cells to encounter CMV during entry, and greatly contribute to virus dissemination, reactivation from latency, and horizontal spread. Albeit affected by the immunoevasive tactics of CMV, mucosal DC remain potent inducers of cellular and humoral immune responses against this virus. Their natural functions could thus be exploited to generate long-lasting protective immunity against CMV by vaccination via the oro-nasal mucosae. Although related, epithelial Langerhans-type DC (LC) and dermal monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) interact with CMV in dramatically different ways. While immature MDDC are fully permissive to infection, for instance, immature LC are completely resistant. Understanding these differences is essential to design innovative vaccines and new antiviral compounds to protect these cells from CMV infection in vivo. PMID:24888709

  3. B cells modulate mucosal associated invariant T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Rezwan, Tasmia; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2014-01-01

    A common finding when measuring?T cell immunity to enteric bacterial vaccines in humans is the presence of background responses among individuals before immunization. Yet the nature of these background responses remains largely unknown. Recent findings show the presence in uninfected individuals of mucosal associated invariant?T (MAIT) cells that mount broad spectrum immune responses against a variety of microorganisms including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Therefore, we investigated whether MAIT immune responses to intestinal bacteria might account for the background responses observed before immunization. Here we measured MAIT immune responses to commensal and enteric pathogenic bacteria in healthy individuals with no history of oral immunization with enteric bacteria. We found that MAIT cells were activated by B cells infected with various bacteria strains (commensals and pathogens from the Enterobacteriaceae family), but not by uninfected cells. These responses were restricted by the non-classical MHC-related molecule 1 (MR1) and involved the endocytic pathway. The quality of these responses (i.e., cytokine profile) was dependent on bacterial load but not on the level expression of MR1 or bacterial antigen on B cell surface, suggesting that a threshold level of MR1 expression is required to trigger MAIT activation. These results provide important insights into the role of B cells as a source of antigen-presenting cells to MAIT cells and the gut immune surveillance of commensal microbiota. PMID:24432025

  4. Cisplatin fails to induce puma mediated apoptosis in mucosal melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, Marie Kristin; Metzler, Veronika; Becker, Karen; Plettenberg, Christian; Heiser, Clemens; Hofauer, Benedikt; Knopf, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Mucosal melanomas (MM) are aggressive subtypes of common melanomas. It remains unclear whether limitations in their resectability or their distinctive molecular mechanisms are responsible for the aggressive phenotype. Methods In total, 112 patients with cutaneous melanomas (CM) and 27 patients with MM were included. Clinical parameters were analysed using Chi square, Fisher exact and student's t-test. Survival rates were calculated by Kaplan–Meier. Analysis of p53, p21, Mdm2, Hipk2, Gadd45, Puma, Bax, Casp9 and Cdk1 via quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed. TP53 induction after cisplatin treatment was analysed in 10 cell lines (melanocytes, four MM and five CM) using western blot (WB) and qPCR. Results The overall/recurrence-free survival differed significantly between MM (40 months and 30 months) and CM (90 months and 107 months; p < 0.001). IHC and WB confirmed high p53 expression in all melanomas. Hipk2 and Gadd45 showed significantly higher expressions in CM (p < 0.005; p = 0.004). QPCR and WB of wild-type cell lines demonstrated no differences for p53, p21, Mdm2, Bax and Casp9. WB failed to detect Puma in MM, while Cdk1 regulation occurred exclusively in MM. Conclusions The aggressive phenotype of MM did not appear to be due to differential expressions of p53, p21, Mdm2, Bax or Casp9. A non-functional apoptosis in MM may have further clinical implications. PMID:25831048

  5. Th17 cell based vaccines in mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Chen, Kong; Kolls, Jay K

    2013-06-01

    Vaccination is proven to be effective in controlling many infections including small pox, influenza and hepatitis, but strain-specific factors may limit vaccine efficacy. All of these vaccines work through the generation of neutralizing antibodies but for some pathogens there may be roles for serotype-independent immunity. Recently several groups using murine vaccine models have shown that induced T helper cell responses including Th17 responses have shown the potential for CD4+ T-cell dependent vaccine responses. Th17 mediated protective responses involve the recruitment of neutrophils, release of anti-microbial peptides and IL-17-driven Th1 immunity. These effector mechanisms provide immunity against a range of pathogens including the recently described antibiotic-resistant metallo-beta-lactamase 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae. Continued elucidation of the mechanism of Th17 responses and identification of effective adjuvants for inducing robust non pathogenic Th17 responses may lead to successful Th17 based vaccines. Here we summarize the recent advances in understanding the role of Th17 in vaccine induced immunity. We also discuss the current status and future challenges in Th17-based mucosal vaccine development. PMID:23669353

  6. Clinical analysis of 29 cases of nasal mucosal malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    YU, HUANXIN; LIU, GANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the clinical features of nasal mucosa malignant melanoma, including the histopathological features and factors affecting prognosis. A retrospective analysis of the clinical data obtained from the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital (Tianjin, China) between October 1999 and June 2013 was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. In total, 29 cases of nasal mucosal malignant melanoma were analyzed. The overall 3- and 5-year survival rates were 48.3 and 27.6%, respectively. The study group consisted of 18 males and 11 females, with a median age of 61.5 years. Overall, 19 patients underwent surgery, 28 received radiotherapy and 17 received chemotherapy. The American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (AJCC) was used to retrospectively stage the tumors. In total, 8 were tumor stage (T)1, 10 were T2, 6 were T3 and 5 were T4. The results revealed that the T stage, surgical treatment, location of the tumor and the presence of black pigmentation affected the 5-year survival rate of the patients. By contrast, radiotherapy and chemotherapy had no effect on the overall survival rate. Overall, endoscopic or endoscopic-assisted surgery were the preferred methods of treatment, and histological features, including the presence of tumor melanin pigmentation, affected the prognosis of the patients. This study indicated that the AJCC staging system is able to effectively predict the prognosis of patients with nasal mucosa malignant melanoma.

  7. Impact of long term Fe³? toxicity on expression of glutathione system in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Budak, Harun; Gonul, Nurdan; Ceylan, Hamid; Kocpinar, Enver Fehim

    2014-01-01

    The free radicals within the body, produced by metabolic activities or derived from environmental sources are relatively related to hepatoxicity. Since heavy metals including iron have the ability to produce free radicals, the liver glutathione system neutralizes them to protect cells against any damage. The objective of this study is to indicate the toxic effects of iron on the glutathione system at the enzymatic and molecular level. Thus, any possible correlation between enzymatic and molecular levels can be determined. According to our results, while mRNA expression of glutathione reductase (Gsr) and glutathione S-transferases (Gsta5) genes were not affected by long-term exposure to various concentrations of iron (Fe(3+)), transcription level of glutathione peroxidase (Gpx2) was influenced in the presence of toxic iron. Whereas the enzyme activites of GSR (GR), GPX and GST were significantly affected in rat liver. PMID:24388910

  8. [The breeding of high glutathione-producing strain and optimization of culture condition].

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; He, Xiuping; Wang, Yaqin; Liu, Chunxiu; Kong, Yingjun; Zhang, Borun

    2003-02-01

    High glutathione-producing strain ZJF-71 was constructed by primary screening,isolation of haploid, mutagenesis and protoplasts fusion. The yield of glutathione of the fusant ZJF-71 is 1.59 and 1.42 times that of the parental strains Y64 and Y247, respectively. The factors that affected the biomass and glutathione content of the fusant ZJF-71 were also tested. The highest level of glutathione was obtained in 32 h at 30 degrees C and 200 r/min, when 30 mL of culture in 250- mL shake flasks was incubated in fermentation medium which contained (w/v): 6% cane sugar, 1% peptone, 1% yeast extract, and 2mmol/L cysteine. Glutathione yield under the optimal fermentation condition showed a 2.8-fold improvement over that of the initial condition. The fusant ZJF-71 is stable in genetic by analysis of genetic stability. PMID:16276878

  9. Glutathione suppresses the enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning in grape juice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengjun

    2014-10-01

    Browning tends to occur in grape juice during processing and storage and decreases the commercial value of it. Thus, browning inhibition is an important objective for manufacturers. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of glutathione as a browning inhibitor for use on grape juice. Grape juice browning treated with glutathione was monitored during processing and accelerated browning. 0.04% of glutathione inhibited 99.4% of the polyphenoloxidase activity in the grape juice. Consequently, during processing at room temperature and accelerated browning at 80 °C, the browning in the grape juice treated with glutathione was significantly lower than that in the control (p<0.05). The results indicate that glutathione is a promising browning inhibitor used in grape juice. PMID:24799201

  10. Enhanced detection of intracellular organism of swine proliferative enteritis, ileal symbiont intracellularis, in feces by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G F; Ward, G E; Murtaugh, M P; Lin, G; Gebhart, C J

    1993-01-01

    A sensitive assay based on amplification of a 319-bp DNA fragment of the intracellular bacterium of swine proliferative enteritis was developed for the detection of the organism in the feces of swine. A vernacular name, ileal symbiont intracellularis (IS-intracellularis), has recently been published for the intracellular bacterium, which was formerly known as a Campylobacter-like organism (C.J. Gebhart, S.M. Barnes, S. McOrist, G.F. Lin, and G.H.K. Larson, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 43:533-538, 1993). As few as 10(1) IS-intracellularis organisms purified from intestinal mucosa, or 10(3) IS-intracellularis per g of feces, were detected. No amplification product was produced from a polymerase chain reaction performed on DNA extracted from the feces of healthy pigs. A 319-bp DNA fragment specific for IS-intracellularis was produced on amplification of DNA from the feces of pigs with experimental and naturally occurring proliferative enteritis. Images PMID:8253956

  11. Robot-Assisted Excision of a Pararectal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Patient with Previous Ileal Neobladder

    PubMed Central

    Ploumidis, A.; Mottrie, A.; Spinoit, A. F.; Gan, M.; Ficarra, V.; Andrianne, R.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract with surgical resection remaining the cornerstone of therapy. Pararectal lesions are considered to be technically difficult and pose in some cases a challenge. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first robotic-assisted pararectal GIST excision. A 43-year-old man was referred to our center with pararectal GIST recurrence, despite treatment with targeted therapy. Eleven years ago, he underwent extensive abdominal surgery including cystoprostatectomy with ileal neobladder diversion due to GIST resection in the rectoprostatic space. Robot-assisted surgical resection was successfully performed without the need for temporary colostomy. The postoperative course of the patient was uneventful, and the pathology report confirmed a GIST recurrence with negative surgical margins and pelvic lymph nodes free of any tumor. Robotic-assisted pelvic surgery can be extended to incorporate excision of pararectal GISTs, as a safe, less invasive surgical alternative with promising oncological results and minimal injury to adjacent structures. PMID:25254137

  12. Unusual binding of ursodeoxycholic acid to ileal bile acid binding protein: role in activation of FXR?[S

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Changming; Filipp, Fabian V.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, ursodiol) is used to prevent damage to the liver in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The drug also prevents the progression of colorectal cancer and the recurrence of high-grade colonic dysplasia. However, the molecular mechanism by which UDCA elicits its beneficial effects is not entirely understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) has a role in mediating the effects of UDCA. We find that UDCA binds to a single site on IBABP and increases the affinity for major human bile acids at a second binding site. As UDCA occupies one of the bile acid binding sites on IBABP, it reduces the cooperative binding that is often observed for the major human bile acids. Furthermore, IBABP is necessary for the full activation of farnesoid X receptor ? (FXR?) by bile acids, including UDCA. These observations suggest that IBABP may have a role in mediating some of the intestinal effects of UDCA. PMID:22223860

  13. Resolution of intussusception after spontaneous expulsion of an ileal lipoma per rectum: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a case of spontaneous rectal expulsion of an ileal lipoma in a 65-year-old female patient who presented with recurrent attacks of subacute intestinal obstruction. During each episode, the patient developed severe abdominal pain and expelled a fleshy mass from her rectum. The fleshy mass was histopathologically diagnosed as a lipoma comprising fat cells, fibers, and blood vessels. Upon expulsion, the pain disappeared and the intussusception was immediately resolved. Colonoscopic examination revealed a 2.5-cm diameter ulcerated lesion near the ileocecal valve, which was confirmed to be inflammation by pathological examination. A subsequent barium series revealed a normal colonic tract, and the patient remained completely symptom-free for 4 months after the incident. According to the relevant literature and our clinical experience, the treatment method for a lipoma depends on the patient’s clinical manifestations and the size of the tumor. However, the various diagnostic and therapeutic modalities currently available continue to be debated; whether an asymptomatic lipoma requires treatment is controversial. When histopathological examination results allow for the exclusion of malignant lesions such as sarcoma, a lipoma can be resected surgically. PMID:24884620

  14. Ileal Interposition in Rats with Experimental Type 2 Like Diabetes Improves Glycemic Control Independently of Glucose Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Jurowich, Christian Ferdinand; Otto, Christoph; Rikkala, Prashanth Reddy; Wagner, Nicole; Vrhovac, Ivana; Saboli?, Ivan; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Koepsell, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric operations in obese patients with type 2 diabetes often improve diabetes before weight loss is observed. In patients mainly Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass with partial stomach resection is performed. Duodenojejunal bypass (DJB) and ileal interposition (IIP) are employed in animal experiments. Due to increased glucose exposition of L-cells located in distal ileum, all bariatric surgery procedures lead to higher secretion of antidiabetic glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) after glucose gavage. After DJB also downregulation of Na+-d-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 was observed. This suggested a direct contribution of decreased glucose absorption to the antidiabetic effect of bariatric surgery. To investigate whether glucose absorption is also decreased after IIP, we induced diabetes with decreased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in male rats and investigated effects of IIP on diabetes and SGLT1. After IIP, we observed weight-independent improvement of glucose tolerance, increased insulin sensitivity, and increased plasma GLP-1 after glucose gavage. The interposed ileum was increased in diameter and showed increased length of villi, hyperplasia of the epithelial layer, and increased number of L-cells. The amount of SGLT1-mediated glucose uptake in interposed ileum was increased 2-fold reaching the same level as in jejunum. Thus, improvement of glycemic control by bariatric surgery does not require decreased glucose absorption. PMID:26185767

  15. Intracellular delivery of glutathione S-transferase into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Shigeyuki; Tomida, Taichiro; Tanabe, Mao; Iino, Masamitsu; Hirose, Kenzo

    2003-06-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) derived from human immunodeficiency virus Tat protein and herpes simplex virus VP22 protein are useful for the delivery of non-membrane-permeating polar or large molecules into living cells. In the course of our study aiming at evaluating PTD, we unexpectedly found that the fluorescent-dye-labeled glutathione S-transferase (GST) from Schistosoma japonicum without known PTDs was delivered into COS7 cells. The intracellular transduction of GST was also observed in HeLa, NIH3T3, and PC12 cells, as well as in hippocampal primary neurons, indicating that a wide range of cell types is permissive for GST transduction. Furthermore, we showed that the immunosuppressive peptide VIVIT fused with GST successfully inhibits NFAT activation. These results suggest that GST is a novel PTD which may be useful in the intracellular delivery of biologically active molecules, such as small-molecule drugs, bioactive peptides, or proteins. PMID:12763035

  16. 4-Hydroxybenzyl-substituted glutathione derivatives from Gastrodia elata.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing-Lan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Cheng-Gen; Chen, Ming-Hua; Jiang, Zhi-Bo; Chen, Nai-Hong; Song, Xiu-Yun; Zhang, Mei-Jin; Shi, Jian-Gong

    2015-05-01

    Seven new 4-hydroxybenzyl-substituted glutathione derivatives (2-8), together with a known analogue (1), were isolated from the aqueous extract of Gastrodia elata Blume rhizomes. Their structures were determined by using spectroscopic and chemical methods. The absolute configurations of 1-8 were assigned by using Marfey's method, combined with comparing the NMR and CD spectroscopic data of sulfoxide moieties in 3-6 with those of S-(4-hydroxybenzyl)cysteine sulfoxide stereoisomers (9-12) synthesized as authentic samples. The configurations of 9-12 were confirmed by electronic CD calculations based on the quantum-mechanical time-dependent density functional theory. Furthermore, the structures of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 8 were verified by synthesis. Compound 3 was active against serum deprivation-induced PC12 cell damage and synthetic 9-14 exhibited activity against Fe(2+)-cysteine induced rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation. PMID:26013819

  17. Thermal denaturation of glutathione reductase from cyanobacterium Spirulina maxima.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Domínguez, A; Hernández-Arana, A; Mendoza-Hernández, G; Rendón, J L

    1997-07-01

    The thermal unfolding of glutathione reductase (NAD[P]H:GSSG oxidoreductase EC 1.6.4.2.) from cyanobacterium Spirulina maxima was monitored by differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism at neutral pH. Covalent cross-linking of enzyme at different temperatures revealed dimer as the species undergoing the thermal transition. A single endotherm was observed, but its thermodynamic parameters showed dependence on the scan rate. In the transition zone, aggregation of the dimeric species was observed. Analysis of the enzyme heated at 80 degrees C revealed that the resultant species retained a high content of secondary structure. The addition of low concentrations of guanidinium hydrochloride resulted in a full cooperative thermal transition. A model in which the dimeric protein undergoes a partial unfolding in a kinetically controlled fashion is proposed, such that the experimental value of delta H(cal) results from the simultaneous occurrence of endothermic and exothermic events. PMID:9247721

  18. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors.

    PubMed

    Canli, Özge; Alanku?, Yasemin B; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W; Greten, Florian R

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress-induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor ? activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  19. Dual pathways mediate ?-amyloid stimulated glutathione release from astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bing; Shen, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Yuan-Gui; Ransom, Bruce R; Chen, Xiao-Chun; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative conditions. Glutathione (GSH), the major antioxidant in the central nervous system, is primarily synthesized and released by astrocytes. We determined if ?-amyloid (A?42), crucially involved in Alzheimer's disease, affected GSH release. Monomeric A? (mA?) stimulated GSH release from cultured cortical astrocytes more effectively than oligomeric A? (oA?) or fibrillary A? (fA?). Monomeric A? increased the expression of the transporter ABCC1 (also referred to as MRP1) that is the main pathway for GSH release. GSH release from astrocytes, with or without mA? stimulation, was reduced by pharmacological inhibition of ABCC1. Astrocytes robustly express connexin proteins, especially connexin43 (Cx43), and mA? also stimulated Cx43 hemichannel-mediated glutamate and GSH release. A?-stimulation facilitated hemichannel opening in the presence of normal extracellular calcium by reducing astrocyte cholesterol level. A? treatment did not alter the intracellular concentration of reduced or oxidized glutathione. Using a mouse model of AD with early onset A? deposition (5xFAD), we found that cortical ABCC1 was significantly increased in temporal register with the surge of A? levels in these mice. ABCC1 levels remained elevated from 1.5 to 3.5 months of age in 5xFAD mice, before plunging to subcontrol levels when amyloid plaques appeared. Similarly, in cultured astrocytes, prolonged incubation with aggregated A?, but not mA?, reduced induction of ABCC1 expression. These results support the hypothesis that in the early stage of AD pathogenesis, less aggregated A? increases GSH release from astrocytes (via ABCC1 transporters and Cx43 hemichannels) providing temporary protection from oxidative stress which promotes AD development. GLIA 2015;63:2208-2219. PMID:26200696

  20. Glutathione dysregulation and the etiology and progression of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ballatori, Nazzareno; Krance, Suzanne M.; Notenboom, Sylvia; Shi, Shujie; Tieu, Kim; Hammond, Christine L.

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and as a result, disturbances in GSH homeostasis are implicated in the etiology and/or progression of a number of human diseases, including cancer, diseases of aging, cystic fibrosis, and cardiovascular, inflammatory, immune, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases. Because of GSH’s pleiotropic effects on cell functions, it has been quite difficult to define the role of GSH in the onset and/or the expression of human diseases, although significant progress is being made. GSH levels, turnover rates and/or oxidation state can be compromised by inherited or aquired defects in the enzymes, transporters, signaling molecules, or transcription factors that are involved in its homeostasis, or from exposure to reactive chemicals or metabolic intermediates. GSH deficiency or a decrease in the GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio manifests itself largely through an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, and the resulting damage is thought to be involved in diseases such as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, imbalances in GSH levels affect immune system function, and are thought to play a role in the aging process. Just as low intracellular GSH levels decrease cellular antioxidant capacity, elevated GSH levels generally increase antioxidant capacity and resistance to oxidative stress, and this is observed in many cancer cells. The higher GSH levels in some tumor cells are also typically associated with higher levels of GSH-related enzymes and transporters. Although neither the mechanism nor the implications of these changes are well defined, the high GSH content makes cancer cells chemoresistant, which is a major factor that limits drug treatment. The present report highlights and integrates the growing connections between imbalances in GSH homeostasis and a multitude of human diseases. PMID:19166318

  1. Purification and Biochemical Characterization of Glutathione S-Transferase from Down Syndrome and Normal Children Erythrocytes: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Ragaa R.; Maharem, Tahany M.; Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Sabry, Gilane M.; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Guneidy, Rasha A.

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the phenotypic manifestation of trisomy 21. Our study was concerned with the characterization and purification of glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST) from normal and Down syndrome (DS) erythrocytes to illustrate the difference in the role of this enzyme in the cell. Glutathione S-transferase and glutathione (GSH) was…

  2. Oral bacterial community dynamics in paediatric patients with malignancies in relation to chemotherapy-related oral mucositis: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Y; Carlsson, G; Agholme, M Barr; Wilson, J A L; Roos, A; Henriques-Normark, B; Engstrand, L; Modéer, T; Pütsep, K; Raoult, D

    2013-01-01

    The role of oral bacteria in the development of chemotherapy-related oral mucositis has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate oral bacterial community diversity and dynamics in paediatric patients with malignancies in relation to the occurrence of oral mucositis. Patients with malignancies (n = 37) and reference individuals without known systemic disorders (n = 38) were recruited. For patients, oral bacterial samples were taken from mucosal surfaces both at the time of malignancy diagnosis and during chemotherapy. If oral mucositis occurred, samples were taken from the surface of the mucositis lesions. Oral mucosal bacterial samples were also taken from reference individuals. All samples were assessed using a 16S ribosomal RNA gene 454 pyrosequencing method. A lower microbial diversity (p < 0.01) and a higher intersubject variability (p < 0.001) were found in patients as compared with reference individuals. At the time of malignancy diagnosis (i.e. before chemotherapy) patients that later developed mucositis showed a higher microbial diversity (p < 0.05) and a higher intersubject variability (p < 0.001) compared with those without mucositis. The change of bacterial composition during chemotherapy was more pronounced in patients who later developed mucositis than those without mucositis (p < 0.01). In conclusion, we found a higher microbial diversity at the time of malignancy diagnosis in patients who later develop oral mucositis and that these patients had a more significant modification of the bacterial community by chemotherapy before the occurrence of mucositis. These findings may possibly be of clinical importance in developing better strategies for personalized preventive management. PMID:23829394

  3. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines as Mucosal Vaccine Adjuvants for Induction of Protective Immunity against Influenza Virus?

    PubMed Central

    Kayamuro, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Arita, Shuhei; Katayama, Kazufumi; Nomura, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Mori, Yasuko; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Itoh, Norio; Nagano, Kazuya; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    A safe and potent adjuvant is needed for development of mucosal vaccines against etiological agents, such as influenza virus, that enter the host at mucosal surfaces. Cytokines are potential adjuvants for mucosal vaccines because they can enhance primary and memory immune responses enough to protect against some infectious agents. For this study, we tested 26 interleukin (IL) cytokines as mucosal vaccine adjuvants and compared their abilities to induce antigen (Ag)-specific immune responses against influenza virus. In mice intranasally immunized with recombinant influenza virus hemagglutinin (rHA) plus one of the IL cytokines, IL-1 family cytokines (i.e., IL-1?, IL-1?, IL-18, and IL-33) were found to increase Ag-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in plasma and IgA in mucosal secretions compared to those after immunization with rHA alone. In addition, high levels of both Th1- and Th2-type cytokines were observed in mice immunized with rHA plus an IL-1 family cytokine. Furthermore, mice intranasally immunized with rHA plus an IL-1 family cytokine had significant protection against a lethal influenza virus infection. Interestingly, the adjuvant effects of IL-18 and IL-33 were significantly decreased in mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice, indicating that mast cells have an important role in induction of Ag-specific mucosal immune responses induced by IL-1 family cytokines. In summary, our results demonstrate that IL-1 family cytokines are potential mucosal vaccine adjuvants and can induce Ag-specific immune responses for protection against pathogens like influenza virus. PMID:20881038

  4. Acceptability and Feasibility of Repeated Mucosal Specimen Collection in Clinical Trial Participants in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Park, Harriet; Mutua, Gaudensia; Farah, Bashir; Bergin, Philip J.; Laufer, Dagna; Lehrman, Jennifer; Chinyenze, Kundai; Barin, Burc; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Anzala, Omu

    2014-01-01

    Background Mucosal specimens are essential to evaluate compartmentalized immune responses to HIV vaccine candidates and other mucosally targeted investigational products. We studied the acceptability and feasibility of repeated mucosal sampling in East African clinical trial participants at low risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Methods and Findings The Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative (KAVI) enrolled participants into three Phase 1 trials of preventive HIV candidate vaccines in 2011–2012 at two clinical research centers in Nairobi. After informed consent to a mucosal sub-study, participants were asked to undergo collection of mucosal secretions (saliva, oral fluids, semen, cervico-vaginal and rectal), but could opt out of any collection at any visit. Specimens were collected at baseline and two additional time points. A tolerability questionnaire was administered at the final sub-study visit. Of 105 trial participants, 27 of 34 women (79%) and 62 of 71 men (87%) enrolled in the mucosal sub-study. Nearly all sub-study participants gave saliva and oral fluids at all visits. Semen was collected from about half the participating men (47–48%) at all visits. Cervico-vaginal secretions were collected by Softcup from about two thirds of women (63%) at baseline, increasing to 78% at the following visits, with similar numbers for cervical secretion collection by Merocel sponge; about half of women (52%) gave cervico-vaginal samples at all visits. Rectal secretions were collected with Merocel sponge from about a quarter of both men and women (24%) at all 3 visits, with 16% of men and 19% of women giving rectal samples at all visits. Conclusions Repeated mucosal sampling in clinical trial participants in Kenya is feasible, with a good proportion of participants consenting to most sampling methods with the exception of rectal samples. Experienced staff members of both sexes and trained counselors with standardized messaging may improve acceptance of rectal sampling. PMID:25360819

  5. S-Nitrosoglutathione Accelerates Recovery from 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Skeff, Maria Adriana; Brito, Gerly A. C.; de Oliveira, Marcelo G.; Braga, Cintia M.; Cavalcante, Matheus M.; Baldim, Victor; Holanda-Afonso, Rosenilde C.; Silva-Boghossian, Carina M.; Colombo, Ana Paula; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A.; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Leitão, Renata F. C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mucositis induced by anti-neoplastic drugs is an important, dose-limiting and costly side-effect of cancer therapy. Aim To evaluate the effect of the topical application of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), a nitric oxide donor, on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis in hamsters. Materials and Methods Oral mucositis was induced in male hamsters by two intraperitoneal administrations of 5-FU on the first and second days of the experiment (60 and 40 mg/kg, respectively) followed by mechanical trauma on the fourth day. Animals received saline, HPMC or HPMC/GSNO (0.1, 0.5 or 2.0 mM) 1 h prior to the 5-FU injection and twice a day for 10 or 14 days. Samples of cheek pouches were harvested for: histopathological analysis, TNF-? and IL-1? levels, immunohistochemical staining for iNOS, TNF-?, IL-1?, Ki67 and TGF-? RII and a TUNEL assay. The presence and levels of 39 bacterial taxa were analyzed using the Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method. The profiles of NO released from the HPMC/GSNO formulations were characterized using chemiluminescence. Results The HPMC/GSNO formulations were found to provide sustained release of NO for more than 4 h at concentration-dependent rates of 14 to 80 nmol/mL/h. Treatment with HPMC/GSNO (0.5 mM) significantly reduced mucosal damage, inflammatory alterations and cell death associated with 5-FU-induced oral mucositis on day 14 but not on day 10. HPMC/GSNO administration also reversed the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on cell proliferation on day 14. In addition, we observed that the chemotherapy significantly increased the levels and/or prevalence of several bacterial species. Conclusion Topical HPMC/GSNO accelerates mucosal recovery, reduces inflammatory parameters, speeds up re-epithelization and decreases levels of periodontopathic species in mucosal ulcers. PMID:25478918

  6. Choice and Design of Adjuvants for Parenteral and Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Savelkoul, Huub F. J.; Ferro, Valerie A.; Strioga, Marius M.; Schijns, Virgil E. J. C.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of pathogens that escape recognition by specific vaccines, the need to improve existing vaccines and the increased availability of therapeutic (non-infectious disease) vaccines necessitate the rational development of novel vaccine concepts based on the induction of protective cell-mediated immune responses. For naive T-cell activation, several signals resulting from innate and adaptive interactions need to be integrated, and adjuvants may interfere with some or all of these signals. Adjuvants, for example, are used to promote the immunogenicity of antigens in vaccines, by inducing a pro-inflammatory environment that enables the recruitment and promotion of the infiltration of phagocytic cells, particularly antigen-presenting cells (APC), to the injection site. Adjuvants can enhance antigen presentation, induce cytokine expression, activate APC and modulate more downstream adaptive immune reactions (vaccine delivery systems, facilitating immune Signal 1). In addition, adjuvants can act as immunopotentiators (facilitating Signals 2 and 3) exhibiting immune stimulatory effects during antigen presentation by inducing the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on APC. Together, these signals determine the strength of activation of specific T-cells, thereby also influencing the quality of the downstream T helper cytokine profiles and the differentiation of antigen-specific T helper populations (Signal 3). New adjuvants should also target specific (innate) immune cells in order to facilitate proper activation of downstream adaptive immune responses and homing (Signal 4). It is desirable that these adjuvants should be able to exert such responses in the context of mucosal administered vaccines. This review focuses on the understanding of the potential working mechanisms of the most well-known classes of adjuvants to be used effectively in vaccines. PMID:26344951

  7. Gene Gun-Mediated DNA Immunization Primes Development of Mucosal Immunity against Bovine Herpesvirus 1 in Cattle†

    PubMed Central

    Loehr, B. I.; Willson, P.; Babiuk, L. A.; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S.

    2000-01-01

    Vaccination by a mucosal route is an excellent approach to the control of mucosally acquired infections. Several reports on rodents suggest that DNA vaccines can be used to achieve mucosal immunity when applied to mucosal tissues. However, with the exception of one study with pigs and another with horses, there is no information on mucosal DNA immunization of the natural host. In this study, the potential of inducing mucosal immunity in cattle by immunization with a DNA vaccine was demonstrated. Cattle were immunized with a plasmid encoding bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) glycoprotein B, which was delivered with a gene gun either intradermally or intravulvomucosally. Intravulvomucosal DNA immunization induced strong cellular immune responses and primed humoral immune responses. This was evident after BHV-1 challenge when high levels of both immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA were detected. Intradermal delivery resulted in lower levels of immunity than mucosal immunization. To determine whether the differences between the immune responses induced by intravulvomucosal and intradermal immunizations might be due to the efficacy of antigen presentation, the distributions of antigen and Langerhans cells in the skin and mucosa were compared. After intravulvomucosal delivery, antigen was expressed early and throughout the mucosa, but after intradermal administration, antigen expression occurred later and superficially in the skin. Furthermore, Langerhans cells were widely distributed in the mucosal epithelium but found primarily in the basal layers of the epidermis of the skin. Collectively, these observations may account for the stronger immune response induced by mucosal administration. PMID:10846091

  8. Palifermin in Preventing Oral Mucositis Caused by Chemotherapy and/or Radiation Therapy in Young Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-30

    Breast Cancer; Graft Versus Host Disease; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Mucositis; Multiple Myeloma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  9. Endurance Training and Glutathione-Dependent Antioxidant Defense Mechanism in Heart of the Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Mustafa; Atalay, Mustafa; Hänninen, Osmo

    2003-01-01

    Regular physical exercise beneficially influences cardiac antioxidant defenses in normal rats. The aim of this study was to test whether endurance training can strengthen glutathione-dependent antioxidant defense mechanism and decrease lipid peroxidation in heart of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Redox status of glutathione in blood of diabetic rats in response to training and acute exercise was also examined. Eight weeks of treadmill training increased the endurance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. It did not affect glutathione level in heart tissue at rest and also after exercise. On the other hand, endurance training decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in heart, while glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase activities were not affected either by acute exhaustive exercise or endurance training. Reduced and oxidized glutathione levels in blood were not affected by either training or acute exercise. Conjugated dienes levels in heart tissue were increased by acute exhaustive exercise and also 8 weeks treadmill training. Longer duration of exhaustion in trained group may have contributed to the increased conjugated dienes levels in heart after acute exercise. Our results suggest that endurance type exercise may make heart more susceptible to oxidative stress. Therefore it may be wise to combine aerobic exercise with insulin treatment to prevent its adverse effects on antioxidant defense in heart in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:24616611

  10. Cysteinyl-glycine in the control of glutathione homeostasis in bovine lenses

    PubMed Central

    Moschini, Roberta; Cappiello, Mario; Del Corso, Antonella; Mura, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To define a possible metabolic and/or signaling role for Cys-Gly in glutathione homeostasis in bovine eye lenses. Methods Bovine lenses were cultured up to 24 h in a medium containing 0.5 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) under different conditions. The intracellular and the extracellular contents of thiol compounds were evaluated using a free zone capillary electrophoresis method. Results Culture of lenses in the presence of GSH and the gamma-glutamyl transferase inhibitor serine-borate demonstrated a 1.5 fold increase in the level of extra-lenticular glutathione with respect to the initial value. Cys-Gly exogenously added impaired the extra-lenticular accumulation of glutathione. Both cysteine and gamma-Glu-Cys were ineffective in reducing extra-lenticular glutathione accumulation. In all conditions no differences in reduced and total intra-lenticular glutathione levels were observed. Conclusions The impairment of Cys-Gly generation correlated with inhibition of gamma-glutamyl transferase by serine/borate, resulting in high extra-lenticular concentration of glutathione effluxed from the bovine lens. The possibility that Cys-Gly may intervene either in the replenishment processes for cysteine in the GSH biosynthetic step or in the function of the efflux GSH-transporters is considered. PMID:20577593

  11. Antisense-mediated depletion of tomato chloroplast glutathione reductase enhances susceptibility to chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Shu, De-Feng; Wang, Li-Yan; Duan, Ming; Deng, Yong-Sheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2011-10-01

    A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) chloroplast glutathione reductase gene (LeGR) was isolated and antisense transgenic tomato lines were obtained. Under chilling stress, transgenic plants accumulated more H(2)O(2), leaked more electrolyte and showed lower net photosynthetic rate (Pn), maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and oxidizable P700 compared with wild-type (WT) plants. Transgenic seedlings were more suppressed in fresh-weight growth and lost more cotyledon chlorophyll. The decrease in the activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) was implied to be potentially relevant to the greater accumulation of H(2)O(2) in transgenic plants. Chilling treatment induced more decrease in the level of reducted glutathione (GSH) and redox ratio of glutathione in transgenic plants than in WT plants, but aroused more increase in GSSG in transgenic plants than in WT plants. Total glutathione displayed no change. Besides, chilling stress resulted in greater decreases in the level of reducted ascorbate (AsA), total ascorbate and redox ratio of ascorbate in transgenic plants than in WT plants, but led to equivalent degree of dehydroascorbate (DHA) increase in WT and transgenic plants. These assessments of glutathione-ascorbate cycle revealed that the decrease of glutathione reductase activity in transgenic plants affected glutathione regeneration, and consequently affected ascorbate regeneration and total ascorbate content. This resulted in a greater accumulation of H(2)O(2) and an enhanced sensitivity to chilling stress in transgenic plants. Moreover, a putative concept model of ecophysiological reaction was discussed. PMID:21530286

  12. Purification and characterization of a trypanothione-glutathione thioltransferase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Moutiez, M; Aumercier, M; Schöneck, R; Meziane-Cherif, D; Lucas, V; Aumercier, P; Ouaissi, A; Sergheraert, C; Tartar, A

    1995-01-01

    Although trypanothione [T(S)2] is the major thiol component in trypanosomatidae, significant amounts of glutathione are present in Trypanosoma cruzi. This could be explained by the existence of enzymes using glutathione or both glutathione and T(S)2 as cofactors. To assess these hypotheses, a cytosolic fraction of T. cruzi epimastigotes was subjected to affinity chromatography columns using as ligands either S-hexylglutathione or a non-reducible analogue of trypanothione disulphide. A similar protein of 52 kDa was eluted in both cases. Its partial amino acid sequence indicated that it was identical with the protein encoded by the TcAc2 cDNA previously described [Schoneck, Plumas-Marty, Taibi et al. (1994) Biol. Cell 80, 1-10]. This protein showed no significant glutathione transferase activity but surprisingly catalysed the thiol-disulphide exchange between dihydrotrypanothione and glutathione disulphide. The kinetic parameters were in the same range as those determined for trypanothione reductase toward its natural substrate. This trypanothione-glutathione thioltransferase provides a new target for a specific chemotherapy against Chagas' disease and may constitute a link between the glutathione-based metabolism of the host and the trypanothione-based metabolism of the parasite. Images Figure 1 PMID:7654179

  13. Glutathione Preservation during Storage of Rat Lenses in Optisol-GS and Castor Oil

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Thomas; Brøgger-Jensen, Martin Rocho; Johnson, Leif; Kessel, Line

    2013-01-01

    Background Glutathione concentration in the lens decreases in aging and cataractous lenses, providing a marker for tissue condition. Experimental procedures requiring unfrozen lenses from donor banks rely on transportation in storage medium, affecting lens homeostasis and alterations in glutathione levels. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of Optisol-GS and castor oil on lens condition, determined from their ability to maintain glutathione concentrations. Methodology/Principal Findings Rat lenses were stored in the two types of storage media at varying time intervals up to 3 days. Glutathione concentration was afterwards determined in an enzymatic detection assay, specific for both reduced and oxidized forms. Lenses removed immediately after death exhibited a glutathione concentration of 4.70±0.29 mM. In vitro stored lenses in Optisol-GS lost glutathione quickly, ending with a concentration of 0.60±0.34 mM after 3 days while castor oil stored lenses exhibited a slower decline and ended at 3 times the concentration. A group of lenses were additionally stored under post mortem conditions within the host for 6 hours before its removal. Total glutathione after 6 hours was similar to that of lenses removed immediately after death, but with altered GSH and GSSG concentrations. Subsequent storage of these lenses in media showed changes similar to those in the first series of experiments, albeit to a lesser degree. Conclusions/Significance It was determined that storage in Optisol-GS resulted in a higher loss of glutathione than lenses stored in castor oil. Storage for more than 12 hours reduced glutathione to half its original concentration, and was considered unusable after 24 hours. PMID:24260265

  14. 1-3-A Resolution Structure of Human Glutathione S-Transferase With S-Hexyl Glutathione Bound Reveals Possible Extended Ligandin Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Trong, I.Le; Stenkamp, R.E.; Ibarra, C.; Atkins, W.M.; Adman, E.T.

    2005-08-22

    Cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a critical role in xenobiotic binding and metabolism, as well as in modulation of oxidative stress. Here, the high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of homodimeric human GSTA1-1 in the apo form and in complex with S-hexyl glutathione (two data sets) are reported at 1.8, 1.5, and 1.3A respectively. At this level of resolution, distinct conformations of the alkyl chain of S-hexyl glutathione are observed, reflecting the nonspecific nature of the hydrophobic substrate binding site (H-site). Also, an extensive network of ordered water, including 75 discrete solvent molecules, traverses the open subunit-subunit interface and connects the glutathione binding sites in each subunit. In the highest-resolution structure, three glycerol moieties lie within this network and directly connect the amino termini of the glutathione molecules. A search for ligand binding sites with the docking program Molecular Operating Environment identified the ordered water network binding site, lined mainly with hydrophobic residues, suggesting an extended ligand binding surface for nonsubstrate ligands, the so-called ligandin site. Finally, detailed comparison of the structures reported here with previously published X-ray structures reveal a possible reaction coordinate for ligand-dependent conformational changes in the active site and the C-terminus.

  15. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among Pre-University students of Kodava population in Coorg District

    PubMed Central

    Sandeepa, N C; Jaishankar, H P; Sharath, Chandra B; Abhinetra, M S; Darshan, D D; Deepika, Nappalli

    2013-01-01

    Background: To know the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among Pre-University students of Kodava population in Coorg District. This survey also aims to find out tobacco or other habits among students and related changes in the oral environment. Materials & Methods: 900 PU students of Kodava population were included. 300 students from each taluk were randomly selected, after the consent. Questions were asked to reveal the systemic diseases, abnormal oral habits, use of tobacco &alcohol. Each student was examined for oral mucosal lesions and recording was based on WHO oral health assessment form. Results: Oral mucosal lesions were similar to studies done in other population but with a slightly higher frequency of few lesions. Incidence of substance use was noted, but with no signs of significant changes in the oral mucosa. Conclusion: Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions varies among each population indicating the need for study in each population to format health policy. Substance use was noted among 16-17 yr age group indicates the need for early preventive measures among adolescents to avoid future serious health problems. How to cite this article: Sandeepa N C, Jaishankar H P, Sharath C B, Abhinetra M S, Darshan D D, Nappalli D. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among Pre-University students of Kodava population in Coorg District. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):35-41. PMID:24155600

  16. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa. PMID:26140382

  17. Synergistic effect of laminin and mesenchymal stem cells on tracheal mucosal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh Young; Lee, Jin Ho; Ahn, Hee-Jin; Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Hee-Bok; Park, Seok-Won; Kwon, Seong Keun

    2015-03-01

    Although several studies have been successfully undertaken of tracheal reconstruction in terms of the maintaining the framework of the graft, most cases of reconstruction failure have resulted from delayed mucosal regeneration. The purposes of this study were to evaluate whether laminin-coated asymmetrically porous membrane (APM) scaffold enhances mucosal regeneration, to compare the mucosalization capability with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeded APM, and to determine whether laminin coating and MSC seeding has a synergistic effect on mucosal regeneration. We reconstructed the full-thickness anterior tracheal defect of 36 New Zealand White rabbits with the APM scaffold. MSCs were isolated from the rabbit's inguinal fat. The animals were divided into 4 groups by the presence of laminin coating on APM and application of MSC [Group I, -/- (laminin/MSC); Group II, -/+; Group III, +/-; Group IV, +/+]. Endoscopy and histologic evaluation were performed and the results were compared among the groups. The results showed that ciliated columnar epithelium was regenerated earlier in groups II and III than in group I. Furthermore, the application of laminin and MSC had synergistic effects on tracheal epithelial regeneration. These results demonstrate that tracheal reconstruction by laminin-coated APM seeded with MSCs is most effective in enhancing tracheal mucosalization, and appears to be promising strategy in the regenerative treatment of tracheal defects. PMID:25617133

  18. Chemo-radiotherapy induced oral mucositis during IMRT for head and neck cancer - An assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background This study is conducted mainly to evaluate the changes in quality and quantity of oral epithelial cells during the course of IMRT. Material and Methods 30 Patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy were followed through course of treatment. They were compared with a group of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. The procedure involved WHO clinical scoring, collection of oral washings and preparation of buccal smears from both study group and control group. The changes occurred were recorded as a way of assessing the severity of oral mucositis. Results Revealed a significant occurrence of oral mucositis in almost all patients during weekly follow up. There was a significant increase in percentage of viable buccal epithelial cells in study group when compared to normal controls (P<0.005) during and at the end of chemo-radiotherapy. Conclusions Quantification of oral mucositis can be done at cellular level by determining the oral mucosal cell viability and their maturation during IMRT. Key words:Oral mucositis, in vitro assay, quantification, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, viable cells. PMID:25662542

  19. Bifidobacterium infantis has a beneficial effect on 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, K-T; Yu, H-L; Feng, W-D; Chong, P; Yang, T; Xue, C-L; Yu, M; Shi, H-P

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a common toxic side effect in cancer patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the beneficial effects of Bifidobacterium infantis in a rat model of intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control, 5-FU, and 5-FU + B. infantis. A single intraperitoneal injection of 5-FU (150 mg/kg) was used to induce intestinal mucositis. B. infantis (1×109 cfu) was administered for 11 days, starting from 7 days before 5-FU injection. Intestinal mucositis was evaluated based on body weight, villus height, immunohistological expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-?B), levels of the pro-inflammatory factors interleukin 1 beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration. The results showed that the 5-FU + B. infantis group demonstrated a higher body weight and villus height, increased expression of PCNA, reduced expression of NF-?B and pro-inflammatory factors, and lower MPO concentration compared to the 5-FU group. These data suggest that probiotic B. infantis is effective in reducing chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. PMID:25380796

  20. Tetanus toxin fragment C fused to flagellin makes a potent mucosal vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recombinant subunit vaccines provide safe and targeted protection against microbial infections. However, the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit vaccines tends to be less potent than the whole cell vaccines, especially when they are administered through mucosal routes. We have reported that a bacterial flagellin has strong mucosal adjuvant activity to induce protective immune responses. In this study, we tested whether FlaB could be used as a fusion partner of subunit vaccine for tetanus. Materials and Methods We constructed fusion proteins consisted with tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFC), the nontoxic C-terminal portion of tetanus toxin, and a Toll-like receptor 5 agonist from Vibrio vulnificus (FlaB). Mice were intranasally administered with fusion protein and protective immune responses of the vaccinated mice were analyzed. Results FlaB-TTFC recombinant protein induced strong tetanus-specific antibody responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments and prolonged the survival of mice after challenge with a supra-lethal dose of tetanus toxin. Conclusion This study establishes FlaB as a successful fusion partner for recombinant subunit tetanus vaccine applicable through mucosal route, and it further endorses our previous observations that FlaB could be a stable adjuvant partner for mucosal vaccines. PMID:25649002

  1. Role of Oral Mucosal Fluid and Electrolyte Absorption and Secretion in Dry Mouth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo H; Castro, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Dry mouth is induced by dehydration of the oral mucosa, resulting from an imbalance of fluid supply and clearance within the oral cavity. Saliva is the major source of oral mucosal fluid, whereas oral fluid clearance includes evaporation and swallowing. Oral mucosal fluid absorption has been suggested to play a critical role in oral fluid clearance; over-absorption of water and ions across the oral mucosa under certain conditions may be a major component for oral fluid imbalance, leading to mucosal dehydration. While numerous studies have confirmed that the oral mucosa absorbs fluid and electrolytes, the pathways and mechanisms mediating the absorption remain undefined. The transcellular pathway regulating oral mucosal epithelial absorption includes aquaporins, epithelial Na+ channel and/or Na+/H+ exchanger, whereas the paracellular transport is likely to be mediated by tight junctions. The regulatory mechanisms of these pathways require further elucidation. It remains unclear whether the oral mucosa also secretes fluid and ions into the oral cavity. Although intercellular lipids secreted by epithelial cells form the major barrier to paracellular water and ion transport, the role and regulation of these lipids in oral mucosal hydration in physiological and pathological conditions need further investigation. Delineation of these mechanisms will be conducive to the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions for dry mouth. PMID:26485506

  2. Induction of Intestinal Immunity by Mucosal Vaccines As a Means of Controlling HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Poles, Jordan; Alvarez, Yelina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract CD4+ T cells in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are preferentially targeted and depleted by HIV. As such, the induction of an effective anti-HIV immune response in the mucosa of the GI tract—through vaccination—could protect this vulnerable population of cells. Mucosal vaccination provides a promising means of inducing robust humoral and cellular responses in the GI tract. Here we review data from the literature about the effectiveness of various mucosal vaccination routes—oral (intraintestinal/tonsilar/sublingual), intranasal, and intrarectal—with regard to the induction of immune responses mediated by cytotoxic T cells and antibodies in the GI mucosa, as well as protective efficacy in challenge models. We present data from the literature indicating that mucosal routes have the potential to effectively elicit GI mucosal immunity and protect against challenge. Given their capacity for the induction of anti-HIV immune responses in the GI mucosa, we propose that mucosal routes, including the nonconventional sublingual, tonsilar, and intrarectal routes, be considered for the delivery of the next generation HIV vaccines. However, further studies are necessary to determine the ideal vectors and vaccination regimens for these routes of immunization and to validate their efficacy in controlling HIV infection. PMID:25354023

  3. Molecular identification and characterization of ileal and cecal fungus communities in broilers given probiotics, specific essential oil blends, and under mixed Eimeria infection.

    PubMed

    Hume, Michael E; Hernandez, Charles A; Barbosa, Nei A; Sakomura, Nilva K; Dowd, Scott E; Oviedo-Rondón, Edgar O

    2012-09-01

    Broiler digestive tract fungal communities have gained far less scrutiny than that given corresponding bacterial communities. Attention given poultry-associated fungi have focused primarily on feed-associated toxin-producers, yeast, and yeast products. The current project focused on the use of pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to identify and monitor broiler digestive fungal communities. Eight different treatments were included. Four controls were an Uninfected-Unmedicated Control, an Unmedicated-Infected Control, the antibiotic bacitracin methylene disalicylate plus the ionophore monensin as Positive Control, and the ionophore monensin alone as a Negative Control. Four treatments were two probiotics (BC-30 and Calsporin) and two specific essential oil blends (Crina Poultry Plus and Crina Poultry AF). All chickens except the Unmedicated-Uninfected Control were given, at 15 days of age, a standard oral Eimeria inoculum of sporulated oocysts. Ileal and cecal digesta were collected at pre-Eimeria infection at 14 days of age and at 7 days post-Eimeria infection at 22 days of age. Extracted cecal DNA was analyzed by pyrosequencing to examine the impact of diet supplements and Eimeria infection on individual constituents in the fungal community, while DGGE was used to compare more qualitative changes in ileal and cecal communities. Pyrosequencing identified three phyla, seven classes, eight orders, 13 families, 17 genera, and 23 fungal species. Ileal and cecal DGGE patterns showed fungal communities were clustered mainly into pre- and post-infection patterns. Post-infection Unmedicated-Uninfected patterns were clustered with pre-infection groups demonstrating a strong effect of Eimeria infection on digestive fungal populations. These combined techniques offered added versatility towards unraveling the effects of enteropathogen infection and performance enhancing feed additives on broiler digestive microflora. PMID:22779701

  4. Ileal amino acid digestibilities in pigs of barley-based diets with inclusion of lucerne (Medicago sativa), white clover (Trifolium repens), red clover (Trifolium pratense) or perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne).

    PubMed

    Reverter, M; Lundh, T; Lindberg, J E

    1999-08-01

    Two experiments were performed with post-valve T-cannulated growing pigs, using five animals in each experiment in a change-over design to evaluate the effect of inclusion of four different dried forage meals on ileal crude protein (CP) and amino acid (AA) digestibilities. The control diets (C1 and C2) were barley-based and the experimental diets were formulated by replacing the barley with 100 or 200 g/kg of either lucerne (Medicago sativa) or white clover (Trifolium repens) meal in Expt 1 and red clover (Trifolium pratense) or perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) meal in Expt 2. A decrease (P < 0.05) in the apparent ileal digestibility of CP and most of the essential and nonessential AA was found with the inclusion of luceme, white clover and perennial ryegrass meal in the barley-based diets. When red clover meal was included, only the apparent ileal digestibilities of CP, leucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine and glutamic acid were found to decrease (P < 0.05). The estimated apparent ileal digestibilities of most essential AA in the forage meals were lower than in the barley-based diets. The ileal flow of glucosamine and ornithine was found to increase (P < 0.05) with increasing proportion of fibre in the diet, suggesting an increase in endogenous N secretions and small-intestinal microbial activity. With the minor changes found for ileal essential AA digestibilities with forage meal inclusion in the diet the present data confirm the potential of forage meals as a source of protein in pig diets. PMID:10743486

  5. Silver(I) Complex formation with Cysteine, Penicillamine and Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Bonnie O.; Jalilehvand, Farideh; Mah, Vicky; Parvez, Masood; Wu, Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The complex formation between silver(I) and cysteine (H2Cys), penicillamine (H2Pen) or glutathione (H3Glu) in alkaline aqueous solution was examined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and 109Ag NMR spectroscopic techniques. The complexes formed in 0.1 mol·dm?3 Ag(I) solutions with cysteine and penicillamine were investigated for ligand/Ag(I) (L/Ag) mole ratios increasing from 2.0 to 10.0. For the series of cysteine solutions (pH 10 - 11) a mean Ag-S bond distance 2.45 ± 0.02 Å consistently emerged, while for penicillamine (pH 9) the average Ag-S bond distance gradually increased from 2.40 to 2.44 ± 0.02 Å. EXAFS and 109Ag NMR spectra of a concentrated Ag(I)-cysteine solution (CAg(I) = 0.8 mol·dm?3, L/Ag = 2.2) showed the mean Ag-S bond distance 2.47 ± 0.02 Å and ?(109Ag) = 1103 ppm, consistent with prevailing, partially oligomeric AgS3 coordinated species, while for penicillamine (CAg(I) = 0.5 mol·dm?3, L/Ag = 2.0) the mean Ag-S bond distance 2.40 ± 0.02 Å and ?(109Ag) = 922 ppm indicate that mononuclear AgS2 coordinated complexes dominate. For Ag(I)-glutathione solutions (CAg(I) = 0.01 mol·dm?3, pH ~ 11), mononuclear AgS2 coordinated species with the mean Ag-S bond distance 2.36 ± 0.02 Å dominate for L/Ag mole ratios from 2.0 to 10.0. The crystal structure of the silver(I)-cysteine compound (NH4)Ag2(HCys)(Cys)·H2O (1) precipitating at pH ~ 10 was solved and showed a layer structure with both AgS3 and AgS3N coordination to the cysteinate ligands. A redetermination of the crystal structure of Ag(HPen)·H2O (2) confirmed the proposed digonal AgS2 coordination environment to bridging thiolate sulfur atoms in polymeric intertwining chains forming a double helix. A survey of Ag-S bond distances for crystalline Ag(I) complexes with S-donor ligands in different AgS2, AgS2(O/N) and AgS3 coordination environments was used, together with a survey of 109Ag NMR chemical shifts, to assist assignments of the Ag(I) coordination in solution. PMID:23556419

  6. Ca2+ entry activated by emptying of intracellular Ca2+ stores in ileal smooth muscle of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, T; Kawai, K; Ito, S; Nakazato, Y

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores on muscle tension and the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+])i were studied in fura-2 loaded longitudinal smooth muscle cells of the rat ileum. 2. After exposure to a Ca(2+)-free solution, application of Ca2+ caused a small contraction and a rise in [Ca2+]i, both of which were potentiated when the muscle was challenged with carbachol or caffeine before the addition of Ca2+. 3. Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a specific inhibitor of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, dose-dependently decreased tension development and the rises in [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol and caffeine in the Ca(2+)-free solution, but conversely increased the Ca(2+)-induced responses even in the presence of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blockers, methoxyverapamil and nifedipine. 4. The contraction and rise in [Ca2+]i evoked by Ca2+ gradually declined with time after removal of CPA, while the reverse was the case for the responses to carbachol and caffeine. 5. The Ca(2+)-induced contraction and rise in [Ca2+]i in the presence of CPA were inhibited by the replacement of Na+ with K+ or Cs+, and by the addition of Cd2+, Ba2+, Ni2+ or La3+. 6. The influx of Mn2+ was much greater in extent in the presence of CPA than in its absence. 7. These results suggest that the emptying of intracellular Ca2+ stores may activate Ca2+ influx not associated with voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in the rat ileal smooth muscle. PMID:7620706

  7. Responses in ileal and cecal bacteria to low and high amylose/amylopectin ratio diets in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-Heng; Yang, Can; Wright, André-Denis G; He, Jun; Chen, Dai-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Dietary starch that escapes digestion in the small intestine may serve as a carbon source for bacterial fermentation in the distal intestine. This study aimed to compare the bacterial community in the ileal and cecal digesta of growing pigs fed diets with low (0.14, LR pigs) and high (0.43, HR pigs) amylose/amylopectin ratio. Pyrosequencing based on MiSeq 2000 platform showed that in ileum digesta, Bacteroidetes of LR pigs was markedly higher than that in HR pigs (P < 0.05). Megasphaera and Prevotella were the two most predominant genera in LR pigs, and Prevotella was significantly higher in LR pigs than in HR pigs (P < 0.05). Prevotella was predominant in cecal samples from both LR and HR pigs, although no significant differences were found between the two groups. In the ileum, Megasphaera elsdenii and Mitsuokella multacida were significantly (P < 0.01) higher in LR pigs along with an increase of acetate and butyrate concentrations. Halomonas pacifica, Escherichia fergusonii, and Actinobacillus minor which belong to class Gammaproteobacteria were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in HR pigs with a significant increase (P < 0.01) of Lactobacillus acetotolerans-like bacteria. Therefore, the changed bacterial community may lead to a transformation of microbial function, such as the alteration of fermentation mode which is showed on the change of microbial metabolites like the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), to a response to the switch of dietary composition, and in turn, to help host absorb and utilize nutrients efficiently. The increase of dietary amylose induced the reduction of conditioned pathogens which may probably be due to the increase of some probiotics such as Lactobacillus, thus reducing the risk of intestinal disease. PMID:26318448

  8. Ileal Interposition Surgery Improves Glucose and Lipid Metabolism and Delays Diabetes Onset in the UCD-T2DM Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Bethany P.; Strader, April D.; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Graham, James L.; Lee, Jennifer; Raybould, Helen E.; Baskin, Denis G.; Havel, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Bariatric surgery has been shown to reverse type 2 diabetes, however the mechanisms by which this occurs remain undefined. Ileal interposition (IT) is a surgical model that isolates the effects of increasing the delivery of unabsorbed nutrients to the lower gastrointestinal tract. In this study we investigated the effects of IT surgery on glucose tolerance and diabetes onset in UCD-T2DM rats, a polygenic obese animal model of type 2 diabetes. Methods IT or sham surgery was performed on 4 month old male UCD-T2DM rats. All animals underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). A subset was euthanized 2 months after surgery for tissue analyses. The remainder was followed until diabetes onset and underwent an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT). Results IT surgery delayed diabetes onset by 120 ± 49 days compared with sham surgery (P< 0.05) without a difference in body weight. During OGTT, IT-operated animals exhibited lower plasma glucose excursions (P< 0.05), improved early insulin secretion (P< 0.01) and 3-fold larger plasma GLP-17–36 excursions (P< 0.001) and no difference in GIP responses compared with sham-operated animals. Total plasma PYY excursions during the OFTT were 3-fold larger in IT-operated animals (P< 0.01). IT-operated animals exhibited lower adiposity (P< 0.05), smaller adipocyte size (P< 0.05), 25% less ectopic lipid deposition, lower circulating lipids and greater pancreatic insulin content compared with sham-operated animals (P< 0.05). Conclusions IT surgery delays the onset of diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats which may be related to increased nutrient-stimulated secretion of GLP-17–36 and PYY and improvements of insulin sensitivity, ?-cell function and lipid metabolism. PMID:20226188

  9. Estimation of the optimal standardized ileal digestible lysine requirement for primiparous lactating sows fed diets supplemented with crystalline amino acids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Meng; Zang, Jianjun; Li, Zhongchao; Shi, Chuanxin; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Zhengpeng; Li, Defa

    2015-10-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the optimal standardized ileal digestible lysine (SID Lys) level in diets fed to primiparous sows during lactation. A total of 150 (Landrace?×?Large White) crossbred gilts (weighing 211.1?±?3.5?kg with a litter size of 11.1?±?0.2) were fed lactation diets (3325 kcal metabolizable energy (ME)/kg) containing SID Lys levels of 0.76, 0.84, 0.94, 1.04 or 1.14%, through 28 days lactation. Gilts were allocated to treatments based on their body weight and backfat thickness 48 h after farrowing. Gilt body weight loss was significantly (P?

  10. Rat cholangiocytes absorb bile acids at their apical domain via the ileal sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Lazaridis, K N; Pham, L; Tietz, P; Marinelli, R A; deGroen, P C; Levine, S; Dawson, P A; LaRusso, N F

    1997-01-01

    Although bile acid transport by bile duct epithelial cells, or cholangiocytes, has been postulated, the details of this process remain unclear. Thus, we performed transport studies with [3H]taurocholate in confluent polarized monolayers of normal rat cholangiocytes (NRC). We observed unidirectional (i.e., apical to basolateral) Na+-dependent transcellular transport of [3H]taurocholate. Kinetic studies in purified vesicles derived from the apical domain of NRC disclosed saturable Na+-dependent uptake of [3H]taurocholate, with apparent Km and Vmax values of 209+/-45 microM and 1.23+/-0.14 nmol/mg/10 s, respectively. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) using degenerate primers for both the rat liver Na+-dependent taurocholate-cotransporting polypeptide and rat ileal apical Na+-dependent bile acid transporter, designated Ntcp and ASBT, respectively, revealed a 206-bp product in NRC whose sequence was identical to the ASBT. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the size of the ASBT transcript was identical in NRC, freshly isolated cholangiocytes, and terminal ileum. In situ RT-PCR on normal rat liver showed that the message for ASBT was present only in cholangiocytes. Immunoblots using a well-characterized antibody for the ASBT demonstrated a 48-kD protein present only in apical membranes. Indirect immunohistochemistry revealed apical localization of ASBT in cholangiocytes in normal rat liver. The data provide direct evidence that conjugated bile acids are taken up at the apical domain of cholangiocytes via the ASBT, and are consistent with the notion that cholangiocyte physiology may be directly influenced by bile acids. PMID:9389734

  11. Two Different Surgical Approaches for Prostatic Stromal Sarcoma: Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy and Open Radical Cysto-Prostatectomy With Ileal Conduit

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seock Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Chung, Sung Kwang; Kim, Bup Wan

    2014-01-01

    Stromal sarcoma of the prostate is very rare and shows rapid growth, which consequently is related to poor prognosis. Recently, we treated two cases of prostatic stromal sarcoma: one with robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and the other with open radical cysto-prostatectomy with an ileal conduit. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a prostatic stromal sarcoma managed by use of a robotic procedure. Here, we report of our experiences in the treatment of prostatic stromal sarcoma by use of two different methods. PMID:25237465

  12. Unbalanced Activation of Glutathione Metabolic Pathways Suggests Potential Involvement in Plant Defense against the Gall Midge Mayetiola destructor in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R. Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J.; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, ?-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72?hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data suggest the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and potentially other pests as well. PMID:25627558

  13. Glucose-induced glutathione reduction in mitochondria is involved in the first phase of pancreatic ?-cell insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Han, Shuai; Yang, Ying; Kang, Jiuhong; Wu, Jiarui

    2015-08-28

    Glucose can acutely reduce mitochondrial glutathione redox state in rat islets. However, whether glucose-stimulated mitochondrial glutathione redox state relates to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) remains unknown. We used genetically encoded redox-sensitive GFPs to target the mitochondria to monitor glutathione redox changes during GSIS in rat pancreatic ?-cells. The results showed that mitochondrial glutathione was more reduced during GSIS, whereas inhibition of this glutathione reduction impaired insulin secretion. In isolated rat pancreatic islets glutathione reduction in mitochondria and the first phase of GSIS were concurrence at the early stage of glucose-stimulation. Our results suggest that the glucose-induced glutathione reduction in mitochondria is primarily required for the first phase of GSIS. PMID:26164230

  14. Remote ischemic postconditioning protects against gastric mucosal lesions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Zhou, Ye-Ting; Chen, Xin-Nian; Zhu, An-Xiang; Wu, Bo-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effects of remote ischemic postconditioning (RIP) against limb ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced gastric mucosal injury. METHODS: Gastric IR was established in male Wistar rats by placing an elastic rubber band under a pressure of 290-310 mmHg on the proximal part of both lower limbs for 3 h followed by reperfusion for 0, 1, 3, 6, 12 or 24 h. RIP was performed using three cycles of 30 s of reperfusion and 30 s of reocclusion of the femoral aortic immediately after IR and before reperfusion for up to 24 h. Rats were randomly assigned to receive IR (n = 36), IR followed by RIP (n = 36), or sham treatment (n = 36). Gastric tissue samples were collected from six animals in each group at each timepoint and processed to determine levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), xanthine oxidase (XOD) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Additional samples were processed for histologic analysis by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Blood samples were similarly collected to determine serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and interleukin (IL)-10. RESULTS: The pathologic changes in gastric tissue induced by IR were observed by light microscopy. Administration of RIP dramatically reduced the gastric damage score after 6 h of reperfusion (5.85 ± 0.22 vs 7.72 ± 0.43; P < 0.01). In addition, RIP treatment decreased the serum activities of LDH (3.31 ± 0.32 vs 6.46 ± 0.03; P < 0.01), CK (1.94 ± 0.20 vs 4.54 ± 0.19; P < 0.01) and the concentration of TNF-? (53.82 ± 0.85 vs 88.50 ± 3.08; P < 0.01), and elevated the concentration of IL-10 (101.46 ± 5.08 vs 99.77 ± 4.32; P < 0.01) induced by IR at 6 h. Furthermore, RIP treatment prevented the marked elevation in MDA (3.79 ± 0.29 vs 6.39 ± 0.81) content, XOD (7.81 ± 0.75 vs 10.37 ± 2.47) and MPO (0.47 ± 0.05 vs 0.82 ± 0.03) activities, and decrease in SOD (4.95 ± 0.32 vs 3.41 ± 0.38; P < 0.01) activity in the gastric tissue as measured at 6 h. CONCLUSION: RIP provides effective functional protection and prevents cell injury to gastric tissue induced by limb IR via anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions. PMID:25071347

  15. Mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase 4 disruption causes male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Manuela; Förster, Heidi; Boersma, Auke; Seiler, Alexander; Wehnes, Helga; Sinowatz, Fred; Neumüller, Christine; Deutsch, Manuel J; Walch, Axel; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Ursini, Fulvio; Roveri, Antonella; Maleszewski, Marek; Maiorino, Matilde; Conrad, Marcus

    2009-09-01

    Selenium is linked to male fertility. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4), first described as an antioxidant enzyme, is the predominant selenoenzyme in testis and has been suspected of being vital for spermatogenesis. Cytosolic, mitochondrial, and nuclear isoforms are all encoded by the same gene. While disruption of entire GPx4 causes early embryonic lethality in mice, inactivation of nuclear GPx4 does not impair embryonic development or fertility. Here, we show that deletion of mitochondrial GPx4 (mGPx4) allows both normal embryogenesis and postnatal development, but causes male infertility. Infertility was associated with impaired sperm quality and severe structural abnormalities in the midpiece of spermatozoa. Knockout sperm display higher protein thiol content and recapitulate features typical of severe selenodeficiency. Interestingly, male infertility induced by mGPx4 depletion could be bypassed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection. We also show for the first time that mGPx4 is the prevailing GPx4 product in male germ cells and that mGPx4 disruption has no effect on proliferation or apoptosis of germinal or somatic tissue. Our study finally establishes that mitochondrial GPx4 confers the vital role of selenium in mammalian male fertility and identifies cytosolic GPx4 as the only GPx4 isoform being essential for embryonic development and apoptosis regulation. PMID:19417079

  16. Glutathione Decrement Drives Thermogenic Program In Adipose Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lettieri Barbato, Daniele; Tatulli, Giuseppe; Maria Cannata, Stefano; Bernardini, Sergio; Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria R.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolically adapts to external stimuli. We demonstrate that the induction of the thermogenic program in white adipocytes, through cold exposure in mice or in vitro adrenergic stimulation, is accompanied by a decrease in the intracellular content of glutathione (GSH). Moreover, the treatment with a GSH depleting agent, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), recapitulates the effect of cold exposure resulting in the induction of thermogenic program. In particular, BSO treatment leads to enhanced uncoupling respiration as demonstrated by increased expression of thermogenic genes (e.g. Ucp1, Ppargc1a), augmented oxygen consumption and decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Buffering GSH decrement by pre-treatment with GSH ester prevents the up-regulation of typical markers of uncoupling respiration. We demonstrate that FoxO1 activation is responsible for the conversion of white adipocytes into a brown phenotype as the “browning” effects of BSO are completely abrogated in cells down-regulating FoxO1. In mice, the BSO-mediated up-regulation of uncoupling genes results in weight loss that is at least in part ascribed to adipose tissue mass reduction. The induction of thermogenic program has been largely proposed to counteract obesity-related diseases. Based on these findings, we propose GSH as a novel therapeutic target to increase energy expenditure in adipocytes. PMID:26260892

  17. Glutathione reductase in wheat grain. 1. Isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    de Lamotte, F; Vianey-Liaud, N; Duviau, M P; Kobrehel, K

    2000-10-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum durum, Desf.) endosperm of mature kernels contained a single form of glutathione reductase (GR); it appeared about the 18th day after anthesis while another isoform, present at the early stages of grain development, disappeared between the 20th and 30th days after flowering. The form that was present at grain maturity was isolated and characterized. It was composed of two monomers, each one having an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. The K(m) values for NADPH and for GSSG were 3.7 and 9.1 microM, respectively, and the V(m) values for NADPH and for GSSG were 594 and 575 microkat.mg(-)(1) protein, respectively. The pH(i) of the enzyme was situated between pH 4.4 and 4.5. At a constant temperature of 25 degrees C, the optimum GR activity was found to be between pH 7.5 and 8.0. It was relatively resistant to high temperatures and was very resistant to very low temperatures. PMID:11052765

  18. Hepatic mitochondrial glutathione: transport and role in disease and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Checa, Jose C. . E-mail: checa229@yahoo.com; Kaplowitz, Neil . E-mail: kaplowitz@hsc.usc.edu

    2005-05-01

    Synthesized in the cytosol of cells, a fraction of cytosolic glutathione (GSH) is then transported into the mitochondrial matrix where it reaches a high concentration and plays a critical role in defending mitochondria against oxidants and electrophiles. Evidence mainly from kidney and liver mitochondria indicated that the dicarboxylate and the 2-oxoglutarate carriers contribute to the transport of GSH across the mitochondrial inner membrane. However, differential features between kidney and liver mitochondrial GSH (mGSH) transport seem to suggest the existence of additional carriers the identity of which remains to be established. One of the characteristic features of the hepatic mitochondrial transport of GSH is its regulation by membrane fluidity. Conditions leading to increased cholesterol deposition in the mitochondrial inner membrane such as in alcohol-induced liver injury decrease membrane fluidity and impair the mitochondrial transport of GSH. Depletion of mitochondrial GSH by alcohol is believed to contribute to the sensitization of the liver to alcohol-induced injury through tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated hepatocellular death. Through control of mitochondrial electron transport chain-generated oxidants, mitochondrial GSH modulates cell death and hence its regulation may be a key target to influence disease progression and drug-induced cell death.

  19. Hydrogen Exchange Equilibria in Glutathione Radicals: Rate Constants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The reduction of oxidized glutathione GSSG by hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms to form GSSG•? is quantitative. The radical anion dissociates into GS• and GS?, and the S-centered radical subsequently abstracts a hydrogen intramolecularly. We observe sequential development of UV absorbance signatures that indicate the formation of both ?- and ?-carbon-centered radicals. From experiments performed at pH 2 and pH 11.8, we determined forward and reverse rate constants for the overall equilibrium between sulfur-centered and carbon-centered radicals: kforward = 3·105 s?1, kreverse = 7·105 s?1, and K = 0.4. Furthermore, on the basis of the differences between the kinetics traces at 240 and 280 nm, we estimate that ?- and ?-carbon-centered radicals are formed at a surprising ratio of 1:3. The ratios found at pH 2 also apply to pH 7, with the conclusion that the equilibrium ratio of S-centered:?-centered:?-centered radicals is, very approximately, 8:3:1. The formation of carbon-centered radicals could lead to irreversible damage in proteins via the formation of carbon?carbon bonds or backbone fragmentation. PMID:20882988

  20. New role for leucyl aminopeptidase in glutathione turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Cappiello, Mario; Lazzarotti, Alessandra; Buono, Francesca; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Amodeo, Pietro; Méndez, Blanca L; Pelosi, Paolo; Del Corso, Antonella; Mura, Umberto

    2004-01-01

    A manganese-dependent cysteinyl-glycine hydrolysing activity has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens. The characterization of the purified enzyme (molecular mass of the native protein, molecular mass of the subunit and extensive primary structure analysis) allowed the unequivocal attribution of the cysteinyl-glycine hydrolysing activity, which is usually associated with alanyl aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.2) or membrane-bound dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19), to LAP (leucyl aminopeptidase; EC 3.4.11.1). Analysis of the pH dependence of Cys-Gly hydrolysis catalysed by LAP, supported by a molecular modelling approach to the enzyme-substrate conformation, gave insights into the ability of the enzyme to recognize Cys-Gly as a substrate. Due to the effectiveness of LAP in hydrolysing Cys-Gly (K(m)=0.57 mM, kcat=6.0x10(3) min(-1) at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C) with respect to other dipeptide substrates, a new role for this enzyme in glutathione turnover is proposed. PMID:14583094

  1. A Novel Approach to Enhancing Cellular Glutathione Levels

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Pamela; Lewerenz, Jan; Lozano, Carles; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and GSH-associated metabolism provide the major line of defense for the protection of cells from oxidative and other forms of toxic stress. Of the three amino acids that comprise GSH, cysteine is limiting for GSH synthesis. Since extracellularly cysteine is readily oxidized to form cystine, cystine transport mechanisms are essential to provide cells with cysteine. Cystine uptake is mediated by system xc?, a Na+-independent cystine/glutamate antiporter. Inhibition of system xc? by millimolar concentrations of glutamate, a pathway termed oxidative glutamate toxicity, results in GSH depletion and nerve cell death. Recently, we described a series of compounds derived from the conjugation of epicatechin with cysteine and cysteine derivatives that protected nerve cells in culture from oxidative glutamate toxicity by maintaining GSH levels. In this paper, we characterize an additional epicatechin conjugate, cysteamine-epicatechin, that is 5-10 fold more potent than the earlier conjugates. In addition, we show that these epicatechin conjugates maintain GSH levels by enhancing the uptake of cystine into cells through induction of a disulfide exchange reaction, thereby uncoupling the uptake from system xc?. Thus, these novel epicatechin conjugates have the potential to enhance GSH synthesis under a wide variety of forms of toxic stress. PMID:18702664

  2. Role of glutathione transport processes in kidney function

    SciTech Connect

    Lash, Lawrence H. . E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2005-05-01

    The kidneys are highly dependent on an adequate supply of glutathione (GSH) to maintain normal function. This is due, in part, to high rates of aerobic metabolism, particularly in the proximal tubules. Additionally, the kidneys are potentially exposed to high concentrations of oxidants and reactive electrophiles. Renal cellular concentrations of GSH are maintained by both intracellular synthesis and transport from outside the cell. Although function of specific carriers has not been definitively demonstrated, it is likely that multiple carriers are responsible for plasma membrane transport of GSH. Data suggest that the organic anion transporters OAT1 and OAT3 and the sodium-dicarboxylate 2 exchanger (SDCT2 or NaDC3) mediate uptake across the basolateral plasma membrane (BLM) and that the organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP1 and at least one of the multidrug resistance proteins mediate efflux across the brush-border plasma membrane (BBM). BLM transport may be used pharmacologically to provide renal proximal tubular cells with exogenous GSH to protect against oxidative stress whereas BBM transport functions physiologically in turnover of cellular GSH. The mitochondrial GSH pool is derived from cytoplasmic GSH by transport into the mitochondrial matrix and is mediated by the dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate exchangers. Maintenance of the mitochondrial GSH pool is critical for cellular and mitochondrial redox homeostasis and is important in determining susceptibility to chemically induced apoptosis. Hence, membrane transport processes are critical to regulation of renal cellular and subcellular GSH pools and are determinants of susceptibility to cytotoxicity induced by oxidants and electrophiles.

  3. Cheminformatics Models for Inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sonam; Jamal, Salma; Open Source Drug Discovery Consortium

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by a parasite Schistosoma mansoni and affects over 200 million annually. There is an urgent need to discover novel therapeutic options to control the disease with the recent emergence of drug resistance. The multifunctional protein, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), an essential enzyme for the survival of the pathogen in the redox environment has been actively explored as a potential drug target. The recent availability of small-molecule screening datasets against this target provides a unique opportunity to learn molecular properties and apply computational models for discovery of activities in large molecular libraries. Such a prioritisation approach could have the potential to reduce the cost of failures in lead discovery. A supervised learning approach was employed to develop a cost sensitive classification model to evaluate the biological activity of the molecules. Random forest was identified to be the best classifier among all the classifiers with an accuracy of around 80 percent. Independent analysis using a maximally occurring substructure analysis revealed 10 highly enriched scaffolds in the actives dataset and their docking against was also performed. We show that a combined approach of machine learning and other cheminformatics approaches such as substructure comparison and molecular docking is efficient to prioritise molecules from large molecular datasets. PMID:25629082

  4. Regional modulation of the response to glutathione in Hydra vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Pierobon, Paola

    2015-07-01

    In the presence of prey, or upon exposure to reduced glutathione (GSH), Hydra polyps open a mouth to ingest the captured prey and close it after feeding; at rest the mouth is not evident. In previous papers we have shown that GABA, glycine and NMDA modulate the mechanisms of mouth closure through ligand-gated-ion-channel receptors that are similar to their mammalian analogues in terms of biochemical and pharmacological properties. In order to study the regional distribution of these receptors, we have applied the GSH assay to polyps amputated at different levels of the body column. The response to 1-10?µmol l(-1) GSH of polyps lacking either peduncle and foot or the entire body columns (heads) was not different from control, whole animals. In the presence of GABA or muscimol, duration of the response was significantly decreased in heads; the decrease was suppressed by the GABA antagonists gabazine and bicuculline. By contrast, in animals lacking peduncle and foot, duration of the response did not vary upon GABA administration. Conversely, in the presence of glycine, duration of the response in heads preparations was similar to control, whereas in footless polyps, it was significantly reduced. The decrease was mimicked by the glycine agonists taurine and ?-alanine, and counteracted by strychnine. These results suggest a regional distribution of receptors to GABA and glycine in the neuromuscular circuitry modulating the feeding behaviour. PMID:25987735

  5. Assessment of blood glutathione peroxidase activity in the dromedary camel.

    PubMed

    Corbera, J A; Gutierrez, C; Morales, M; Montel, A; Montoya, J A

    2001-01-01

    Blood glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) levels in 709 normal dromedary camels (442 females and 267 males) were assessed in the Canary Islands. All animals were intensively reared, and three different nutritional systems were evaluated, depending on selenium content of the diet. Mean GSH-Px level in the total population was 288.5+/-157.2 IU x g(-1) Hb. Reference ranges were estimated and enzymatic activities below 51 IU x g(-1) Hb were considered inadequate. GSH-Px activities obtained in females (298.1+/-155.7 IU x g(-1) Hb) were significantly (P = 0.037) higher than in males (272.6+/-157.2 IU x g(-1) Hb). When age groups were compared, only males between 6 and 12 months old exhibited significantly lower mean GSH-Px (P = 0.006) than females. A high correlation (r = 0.88) between serum selenium concentration and blood GSH-Px activity was estimated, and the regression equation was y = 2.5101x + 42.423. Selenium content of the diet above 0.1 mg x kg(-1) DM seems to supply adequate selenium requirements for dromedaries under intensive husbandry. PMID:11361154

  6. Glutathione revisited: a better scavenger than previously thought

    PubMed Central

    Haenen, Guido R. M. M.; Bast, Aalt

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the classical example of a scavenging antioxidant. It forms the first line of defense and efficiently scavenges reactive species, e.g., hypochlorous acid (HOCl), before they inflict damage to biomolecules. Scavenging antioxidant activity is best established in competition assays (that closely mimics molecular mechanism of the biological effect). In this type of assay, the antioxidant competes with a molecule that functions as an easy read-out detector for a reactive species. It is generally assumed that the scavenging antioxidant activity reflects the reaction rate constant of the antioxidant with the reactive species (ka). However, critical appraisal of several competition assays of GSH with HOCl as reactive species, reveals that ka does not determine the scavenging antioxidant activity. Assays using acetylcholine esterase, alpha1-antiprotease, methionine, and albumin as detector are compared. The total number of molecules of the reactive species scavenged by GSH plus that by partially oxidized forms of the GSH, reflect the scavenging activity of GSH. The contribution of the partially oxidized forms of GSH depends on the reactivity of the competing molecule. In several assays the partially oxidized forms of GSH have a substantial contribution to the scavenging activity of GSH. In contrast to the prevailing perception, not the reaction rate but rather the total number of molecules of the reactive species scavenged reflects the true scavenging activity of an antioxidant like GSH. PMID:25505886

  7. The evolution of glutathione metabolism in phototrophic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Robert C.; Buschbacher, Ralph M.; Newton, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    The low molecular weight thiol composition of a variety of phototropic microorganisms is examined in order to ascertain how evolution of glutathione (GSH) production is related to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cells were extracted in the presence of monobromobimane (mBBr) to convert thiols (RSH) to fluorescent derivatives (RSmB) which were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Significant levels of GSH were not found in green sulfur bacteria. Substantial levels were present in purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and eukaryotic algae. Other thiols measured included cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, thiosulfate, coenzyme A, and sulfide. Many of the organisms also exhibited a marked ability to reduce mBBr to syn-(methyl,methyl)bimane, an ability which was quenched by treatment with 2-pyridyl disulfide or 5,5 prime-bisdithio - (2-nitrobenzoic acid) prior to reaction with mBBr. These observations indicate the presence of a reducing system capable of electron transfer to mBBr and reduction of reactive disulfides. The distribution of GSH in phototropic eubacteria indicates that GSH synthesis evolved at or around the time that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved.

  8. MITOCHONDRIAL GLUTATHIONE: FEATURES, REGULATION AND ROLE IN DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Marí, Montserrat; Morales, Albert; Colell, Anna; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Kaplowitz, Neil; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mitochondria are the powerhouse of mammalian cells and the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with oxygen consumption. In addition, they also play a strategic role in controlling the fate of cells through regulation of death pathways. Mitochondrial ROS production fulfills a signaling role through regulation of redox pathways, but also contributes to mitochondrial damage in a number of pathological states. SCOPE OF REVIEW Mitochondria are exposed to the constant generation of oxidant species, and yet the organelle remains functional due to the existence of an armamentarium of antioxidant defense systems aimed to repair oxidative damage, of which mitochondrial glutathione (mGSH) is of particular relevance. Thus, the aim of the review is to cover the regulation of mGSH and its role in disease. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS Cumulating evidence over recent years has demonstrated the essential role for mGSH in mitochondrial physiology and disease. Despite its high concentration in the mitochondrial matrix, mitochondria lack the enzymes to synthesize GSH de novo, so that mGSH originates from cytosolic GSH via transport through specific mitochondrial carriers, which exhibit sensitivity to membrane dynamics. Depletion of mGSH sensitizes cells to stimuli leading to oxidative stress such as TNF, hypoxia or amyloid ?-peptide, thereby contributing to disease pathogenesis. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE Understanding the regulation of mGSH may provide novel insights to disease pathogenesis and toxicity and the opportunity to design therapeutic targets of intervention in cell death susceptibility and disease. PMID:23123815

  9. Intragastric inulin as a measure of mucosal damage caused by aspirin

    SciTech Connect

    Wittmers, L.E. Jr.; Anderson, L.A.; Fall, M.M.; Alich, A.A. )

    1990-11-01

    In an attempt to find a method of gastric mucosal damage assessment that yields consistent results, the experiments presented here employed the measurement of the movement of inulin out of the gastric contents into the stomach wall and vascular compartment as an estimate of mucosal damage. Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats were functionally nephrectomized and were administered a control or test solution containing 3H-inulin. The test solutions contained one of three doses of aspirin. Blood samples were taken at 15-min intervals over a 90-min exposure period. The stomach was removed from the animal and full-thickness tissue samples taken for measurement of 3H-inulin content. When the gastric mucosa was exposed to the test agents, there was a significantly greater accumulation of inulin in the body and antrum as well as in the plasma when compared to controls. We conclude that intragastric inulin can be employed to estimate gastric mucosal damage.

  10. Murine CMV infection induces the continuous production of mucosal resident T cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Caldeira-Dantas, Sofia; Turula, Holly; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a herpesvirus that persists for life and maintains extremely large numbers of T cells with select specificities in circulation. However, it is unknown how viral persistence impacts T cell populations in mucosal sites. We found that many murine (M)CMV-specific CD8s in mucosal tissues became resident memory T cells (TRM). These cells adopted an intraepithelial localization in the salivary gland that correlated with, but did not depend on, expression of the integrin CD103. MCMV-specific TRM cells formed early after infection and spleen-localized cells had reduced capacities to become TRM at late times. Surprisingly however, small numbers of new TRM cells were formed from the circulating pool throughout infection, favoring populations maintained at high levels in the blood and shifting the immunodominance within the TRM populations over time. These data show that mucosal TRM populations can be dynamically maintained by a persistent infection. PMID:26526996

  11. Lymphotoxin beta receptor signaling limits mucosal damage through driving IL-23 production by epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Macho-Fernandez, E; Koroleva, E P; Spencer, C M; Tighe, M; Torrado, E; Cooper, A M; Fu, Y-X; Tumanov, A V

    2015-03-01

    The immune mechanisms regulating epithelial cell repair after injury remain poorly defined. We demonstrate here that lymphotoxin beta receptor (LT?R) signaling in intestinal epithelial cells promotes self-repair after mucosal damage. Using a conditional gene-targeted approach, we demonstrate that LT?R signaling in intestinal epithelial cells is essential for epithelial interleukin-23 (IL-23) production and protection against epithelial injury. We further show that epithelial-derived IL-23 promotes mucosal wound healing by inducing the IL-22-mediated proliferation and survival of epithelial cells and mucus production. Additionally, we identified CD4(-)CCR6(+)T-bet(-) RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (ROR?t)(+) lymphoid tissue inducer cells as the main producers of protective IL-22 after epithelial damage. Thus, our results reveal a novel role for LT?R signaling in epithelial cells in the regulation of intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis to limit mucosal damage. PMID:25183367

  12. Oral capsaicin provides temporary relief for oral mucositis pain secondary to chemotherapy/radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Berger, A; Henderson, M; Nadoolman, W; Duffy, V; Cooper, D; Saberski, L; Bartoshuk, L

    1995-04-01

    Pain from oral mucositis afflicts from 40% to 70% of patients receiving chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Current methods of clinical pain management (for example, topical anesthetics, systemic analgesics) have limited success. In a pilot study, we examined the ability of oral capsaicin to provide temporary relief of oral mucositis pain. Capsaicin, the active ingredient in chili peppers, desensitizes some neurons and has provided moderate pain relief when applied to the skin surface. Oral capsaicin in a candy (taffy) vehicle produced substantial pain reduction in 11 patients with oral mucositis pain from cancer therapy. However, this pain relief was not complete for most patients and was only temporary. Additional research is needed to fully utilize the properties of capsaicin desensitization and thus optimize analgesia. PMID:7629418

  13. Murine CMV Infection Induces the Continuous Production of Mucosal Resident T Cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Corinne J; Caldeira-Dantas, Sofia; Turula, Holly; Snyder, Christopher M

    2015-11-10

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a herpesvirus that persists for life and maintains extremely large numbers of T cells with select specificities in circulation. However, it is unknown how viral persistence impacts T cell populations in mucosal sites. We found that many murine (M)CMV-specific CD8s in mucosal tissues became resident memory T cells (TRM). These cells adopted an intraepithelial localization in the salivary gland that correlated with, but did not depend on, expression of the integrin CD103. MCMV-specific TRM cells formed early after infection, and spleen-localized cells had reduced capacities to become TRM at late times. Surprisingly, however, small numbers of new TRM cells were formed from the circulating pool throughout infection, favoring populations maintained at high levels in the blood and shifting the immunodominance within the TRM populations over time. These data show that mucosal TRM populations can be dynamically maintained by a persistent infection. PMID:26526996

  14. Development of Mucosal Immunity in Children: A Rationale for Sublingual Immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    The mucosal immune system has bidirectional tasks to mount an effective defense against invading harmful pathogens and to suppress the immune response to alimentary antigens and commensal bacterial flora. Oral tolerance is a suppression of the mucosal immune pathway related to a specific immunophenotype of the dendritic cells and an induction of the regulatory T cells as well as with the silencing of the effector T cell response by anergy and deletion. The physiological dynamic process of the anatomical and functional maturation of the immune system occurring in children during pre- and postnatal periods is a significant factor, having an impact on the fine balance between the activation and the suppression of the immune response. In this paper, mechanisms of mucosal immunity and tolerance induction in terms of maturational issues are discussed with a special emphasis on the implications for a novel therapeutic intervention in allergic diseases via the sublingual route. PMID:22121386

  15. A Molecular Mucosal Adjuvant To Enhance Immunity Against Pneumococcal Infection In The Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Ikeda, Yorihiko; Ohori, Junichiro; Sugita, Gen; Aso, Kazuyoshi; Fujihashi, Keiko; Briles, David E.; McGhee, Jerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) causes a major upper respiratory tract infection often leading to severe illness and death in the elderly. Thus, it is important to induce safe and effective mucosal immunity against this pathogen in order to prevent pnuemocaccal infection. However, this is a very difficult task to elicit protective mucosal IgA antibody responses in older individuals. A combind nasal adjuvant consisting of a plasmid encoding the Flt3 ligand cDNA (pFL) and CpG oligonucleotide (CpG ODN) successfully enhanced S. pneumoniae-specific mucosal immunity in aged mice. In particular, a pneumococcal surface protein A-based nasal vaccine given with pFL and CpG ODN induced complete protection from S. pneumoniae infection. These results show that nasal delivery of a combined DNA adjuvant offers an attractive potential for protection against the pneumococcus in the elderly. PMID:25713504

  16. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase is a gut mucosal defense factor maintained by enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Ross F.; Austen, William G.; Zhang, Xiaobo; Munene, Gitonga; Mostafa, Golam; Biswas, Shaluk; McCormack, Michael; Eberlin, Kyle R.; Nguyen, John T.; Tatlidede, Hamit S.; Warren, H. Shaw; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, Jose L.; Hodin, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Under conditions of starvation and disease, the gut barrier becomes impaired, and trophic feeding to prevent gut mucosal atrophy has become a standard treatment of critically ill patients. However, the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effects of enteral nutrition have remained a mystery. Using in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrate that the brush–border enzyme, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), has the ability to detoxify lipopolysaccharide and prevent bacterial invasion across the gut mucosal barrier. IAP expression and function are lost with starvation and maintained by enteral feeding. It is likely that the IAP silencing that occurs during starvation is a key component of the gut mucosal barrier dysfunction seen in critically ill patients. PMID:18292227

  17. Reactivation of Mucosal and Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in a Renal Transplanted Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tuon, Felipe F.; Bombonatto, Giovana Marina; Battaglin, Eveline Roesler; Sakumoto, Marcus Henrique; Amato, Valdir Sabbaga; de Camargo, Raphael Abegão; Nicodemo, Antônio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is a chronic form of tegumentary leishmaniasis, which causes destructive lesions of nasal, pharyngeal, and laryngeal mucosa. We describe a case of leishmaniasis reactivation with simultaneous cutaneous and mucosal forms in a renal transplanted patient with no history of prior leishmaniasis. Reactivation after renal transplantation was not reported in Brazil. A 67-year-old woman receiving prednisone 20 mg/day, tacrolimus 1 mg/day, and mycophenolic acid 360 mg/day presented with nose edema with erythema and cutaneous lesions. Amastigotes were identified on biopsies and the polymerase chain reaction confirmed Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B but died 3 weeks after as a result of bacterial septic shock. In conclusion, tegumentary leishmaniasis can reactivate with simultaneous cutaneous and mucosal forms in a renal transplanted patient during the immunosuppressant therapy. PMID:24732458

  18. Modeling laser irradiation conditions for mucosal tissues in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Astaf'eva, L. G.; Plavskii, V. Yu.

    2012-05-01

    We use computer modeling to analzye empirically selected conditions for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy of mucosal tissues. We calculate the optical and thermal fields for experimental conditions for low-intensity (cold) laser irradiation used in treatment of lesions in mucosal tissues stained by methylene blue: ? = 670 nm, power density 150-300 mW/cm2, doses 9-18 J/cm2; ? = 632.8 nm, 15 mW/cm2, dose 4.5 J/cm2. For numerical estimates, we used the optical characteristics of methylene blue and three layers of mucosal tissues at the laser radiation wavelengths, and also the thermal characteristics of the tissues. The experimental conditions were optimized using the ratio of the tissue penetration depth for the absorbed optical energy and the penetration depth of methylene blue into the lesion, while maintaining safe tissue heating temperatures.

  19. Induction of mucosal tolerance in SLE: A sniff or a sip away from ameliorating lupus?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Henry Yim

    2009-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by aberrant immune responses against intracellularly derived self antigens. Treatment for SLE relies on the use of aggressive immunosuppressants and steroids that are nonspecific and can cause serious adverse effects. The observation that a systemic immune tolerance to self antigens or generation of regulatory T cells may follow mucosal (nasal or oral) exposure to self proteins or monoclonal antibody against CD3 respectively suggests that induction of mucosal tolerance offers the basis of a side effect free therapy that could re-establish the ability to distinguish self from non-self and restore peripheral tolerance in individuals susceptible to developing autoimmune diseases. Here I review studies on mucosal tolerance in autoimmune diseases and discuss the therapeutic potential of inducing tolerance for the treatment of SLE. PMID:18938110

  20. Intestinal CD169+ macrophages initiate mucosal inflammation by secreting CCL8 that recruits inflammatory monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Kenichi; Takahashi, Naomichi; Ushiki, Mikiko; Monya, Misa; Aihara, Fumiaki; Kuboki, Erika; Moriyama, Shigetaka; Iida, Mayumi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Qiu, Chun-Hong; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Masato

    2015-01-01

    Lamina propria (LP) macrophages are constantly exposed to commensal bacteria, and are refractory to those antigens in an interleukin (IL)-10-dependent fashion. However, the mechanisms that discriminate hazardous invasion by bacteria from peaceful co-existence with them remain elusive. Here we show that CD169+ macrophages reside not at the villus tip, but at the bottom-end of the LP microenvironment. Following mucosal injury, the CD169+ macrophages recruit inflammatory monocytes by secreting CCL8. Selective depletion of CD169+ macrophages or administration of neutralizing anti-CCL8 antibody ameliorates the symptoms of experimentally induced colitis in mice. Collectively, we identify an LP-resident macrophage subset that links mucosal damage and inflammatory monocyte recruitment. Our results suggest that CD169+ macrophage-derived CCL8 serves as an emergency alert for the collapse of barrier defence, and is a promising target for the suppression of mucosal injury. PMID:26193821

  1. Effects of intraepithelial lymphocyte-derived cytokines on intestinal mucosal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuan; Yang, Hua

    2013-10-01

    The mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract directly interacts with the mucosal lumen, which is continuously exposed to foreign antigens. Specialized intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), located between the basolateral surfaces of the epithelial cells, are important as the first line of defense against microbes as well as for their role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier homeostasis. Although IELs are mainly composed of T cells, they are phenotypically and functionally distinct from T cells in peripheral blood or the spleen. Not only are IELs stimulated by the antigens of the intestinal lumen but are they also stimulated by regulatory immune cells. The integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier is closely tied to the IEL function. Cytokines produced by IELs modulate the cellular functions that trigger the downstream signaling pathways and mediate the barrier homeostasis. In this review, we will address the broad spectrum of cytokines that are derived from IELs and the functional regulation of these cytokines on the intestinal barrier. PMID:23692551

  2. Effect of oral epidermal growth factor on mucosal healing in rats with duodenal ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jane CJ; Liu, Kuo-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Hsuan; Fang, Chia-Lang; Tsao, Chih-Wei

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on mucosal healing in rats with duodenal ulcer. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham operation without EGF, sham operation with EGF, duodenal ulcer without EGF, or duodenal ulcer with EGF groups. Additionally, normal rats without operation served as the control group. Duodenal ulcer was induced in rats by 300 mL/L acetic acid. Rats with EGF were orally administered at a dose of 60 ?g/kg/day in drinking water on the next day of operation (day 1). Healing of duodenal ulcer was detected by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Cell growth of damaged mucosa was determined by the contents of nucleic acids and proteins. The level of EGF in duodenal mucosa was measured by ELISA. RESULTS: The pathological results showed that duodenal ulcer rats with EGF improved mucosal healing compared with those without EGF after day 5. Duodenal ulcer rats with EGF significantly increased duodenal DNA content compared with those without EGF on day 15 (6.44 ± 0.54 mg/g vs 1.45 ± 0.52 mg/g mucosa, P < 0.05). Duodenal RNA and protein contents did not differ between duodenal ulcer rats with and without EGF during the experimental period. Sham operation and duodenal ulcer rats with EGF significantly increased duodenal mucosal EGF content compared with those without EGF on day 5 (76.0 ± 13.7 ng/g vs 35.7 ± 12.9 ng/g mucosa in sham operation rats, and 68.3 ± 10.9 ng/g vs 28.3 ± 9.2 ng/g mucosa in duodenal ulcer rats, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Oral EGF can promote mucosal healing of the rats with duodenal ulcer by stimulating mucosal proliferation accompanied by an increase in mucosal EGF content. PMID:14562389

  3. Pentoxifylline prevents indomethacin induced acute gastric mucosal damage in rats: role of tumour necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, L; Fiorucci, S; Giansanti, M; Brunori, P M; Di Matteo, F M; Morelli, A

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophil adherence within the gastric microcirculation is thought to be a major step in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal damage induced by indomethacin. Pentoxifylline, a methylxanthine derivative, prevents leukocyte adherence to vascular endothelium and protects organs from shock by reducing tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) concentrations. Rats were treated with 20 mg/kg oral indomethacin, pretreated with vehicle or with four different doses of pentoxifylline intraperitoneally, and killed after three hours. The gross gastric mucosal injury, neutrophil margination into the gastric microcirculation, mucosal concentrations of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (PGF1 alpha), and PGE2 and serum TNF alpha values were measured. Whether the pentoxifylline induced protection involved nitric oxide mediated pathways or gastric acid secretion was evaluated. The data indicate that pentoxifylline reduces indomethacin induced mucosal damage and neutrophil margination in a dose dependent manner without exerting any effect on gastric mucosal prostaglandin concentrations. The maximally effective dose (200 mg/kg) of pentoxifylline reduced gastric damage by 90% and slightly stimulated acid secretion. The effect of pentoxifylline was not affected by pretreatment with the nitric oxide inhibitor. Pentoxifylline prevented the indomethacin induced increase in TNF alpha concentrations in a dose dependent fashion. Serum TNF alpha values were 30.5 (7.0) IU/ml (mean (SEM)) in rats treated with indomethacin alone and 5.0 (2.5) IU/ml (p < 0.01) in rats treated with indomethacin plus 200 mg/kg pentoxifylline. Pentoxifylline, therefore, prevents the acute gastric mucosal damage and neutrophil margination induced by indomethacin and reduces indomethacin induced release of TNF alpha. PMID:8063218

  4. Clinical applications of palifermin: amelioration of oral mucositis and other potential indications

    PubMed Central

    Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Goldberg, Jenna D; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Berger, Dietmar P; Brink, Marcel RM

    2013-01-01

    Mucositis is one of the most significant toxicities in cancer patients undergoing cytotoxic treatment. It can have a negative impact on both quality of life and health economics. Severe oral mucositis can contribute to hospitalization, need for narcotic analgesics, total parentral nutrition, suboptimal delivery of anti-neoplastic treatment, and morbidity and mortality. Palifermin, a recombinant derivative of human keratinocyte growth factor, is the first active agent approved by the FDA for the prevention of severe oral mucositis in patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Several studies have also shown significant reduction in the incidence, severity and/or duration of oral mucositis in other high-risk settings such as concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CT/RT) for patients with head and neck cancer, and use of mucotoxic chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin in sarcoma and fluorouracil for the treatment of colorectal cancer. The reduction in mucositis has translated into amelioration of symptoms and improvement in daily functioning as measured by patient-reported outcome in multiple studies. The clinical response to palifermin appears to be related in part to epithelial proliferation and mucosal thickening. Palifermin also has other potential clinical applications including the acceleration of immune reconstitution and inhibition of graft-versus-host disease in patients undergoing HSCT, and mitigation of dysphagia in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent CT/RT. Palifermin is generally well tolerated with mild-to-moderate skin and oral adverse events. Future studies may expand the use of palifermin into other areas that would benefit from its cytoprotective and regenerative effects. PMID:24251854

  5. Use of Curcumin Mouthrinse in Radio-Chemotherapy Induced Oral Mucositis Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Guledgud, Mahima V.; Kulkarni, P.K.; Keshari, Deepika; Tayal, Srishti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oral Mucositis is a complex and distinct pathobiologic entity resulting in injuries in mucosa that is a common complication in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy (CT) and radiation therapy (RT). Phytochemicals, such as Curcumin, turmeric extract, has attracted great attention for its therapeutic benefits in clinical oncology due to its chemopreventive, antitumoral, chemosensibilizing and radiosensibilizing activities against various types of cancers and the complications associated with their management. Aim To evaluate the efficacy and safety of curcumin mouthwash in the management of Oral Mucositis in cancer patients undergoing radio-chemotherapy. Materials and Methods The research group consisted of 20 adult cancer patients undergoing radio-chemotherapy at the Regional Oncology Centre, who were evaluated for signs and symptoms of oral mucositis and then randomly divided into two groups. Standard preventive oral care i.e. chlorhexidine mouthwash 0.2% was given to one group while the other group was provided with freshly prepared curcumin mouthwash; each to be used thrice daily. Oral mucositis was assessed at days 0, 10 and 20. The World Health Organization (WHO) scale, the Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale (OMAS), and a Numerical Rating Scale (NRS; patient reporting scale of 0-10) were used. Adverse events were tracked. Statistical Analysis Descriptive statistics, Independent sample t-test and repeated measure ANOVA test were performed. Results Statistically significant difference was found in the NRS (p=0.000), Erythema (p=0.050), ulceration (p=0.000) and WHO scores (p=0.003) between the two groups. Conclusion Curcumin was found to be better than chlorhexidine mouth wash in terms of rapid wound healing and better patient compliance in management of radio-chemotherapy induced oral mucositis. No oral or systemic complications were reported. PMID:26436049

  6. Bone Marrow Transplantation Helps Restore the Intestinal Mucosal Barrier after Total Body Irradiation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sarita; Wang, Wenze; Prabath, Biju G; Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Zhou, Daohong; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) substantially improves 10-day survival after total body irradiation (TBI), consistent with an effect on intestinal radiation death. Total body irradiation, in addition to injuring the intestinal epithelium, also perturbs the mucosal immune system, the largest immune system in the body. This study focused on how transplanted bone marrow cells (BMCs) help restore mucosal immune cell populations after sublethal TBI (8.0 Gy). We further evaluated whether transplanted BMCs: (a) home to sites of radiation injury using green fluorescent protein labeled bone marrow; and (b) contribute to restoring the mucosal barrier in vivo. As expected, BMT accelerated recovery of peripheral blood (PB) cells. In the intestine, BMT was associated with significant early recovery of mucosal granulocytes (P = 0.005). Bone marrow transplantation did not affect mucosal macrophages or lymphocyte populations at early time points, but enhanced the recovery of these cells from day 14 onward (P = 0.03). Bone marrow transplantation also attenuated radiation-induced increase of intestinal CXCL1 and restored IL-10 levels (P = 0.001). Most importantly, BMT inhibited the post-radiation increase in intestinal permeability after 10 Gy TBI (P = 0.02) and modulated the expression of tight junction proteins (P = 0.01–0.05). Green fluorescent protein-positive leukocytes were observed both in intestinal tissue and in PB. These findings strongly suggest that BMT, in addition to enhancing general hematopoietic and immune system recovery, helps restore the intestinal immune system and enhances intestinal mucosal barrier function. These findings may be important in the development and understanding of strategies to alleviate or treat intestinal radiation toxicity. PMID:24568131

  7. Skin and Mucosal Human Papillomavirus Seroprevalence in Persons with Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Joseph J.; Stern, Joshua E.; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda S.; Mehta, Parinda A.; Sauter, Sharon L.; Galloway, Denise A.; Winer, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Persons with Fanconi anemia (FA) are at risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers; however, their natural HPV exposure and infection rates are unknown as is the adequacy with which they mount antibodies to HPV vaccination. This study aimed to determine, in 62 persons with FA, the seroprevalence of skin and mucosal HPV types, the seroprevalence in individuals self-reporting a history of HPV vaccination, and the factors associated with HPV seropositivity. A bead Luminex assay was used to determine seropositivity for HPV1, -2, and -4 (low-risk skin), -6 and -11 (low-risk mucosal, included in one HPV vaccine), -16 and -18 (high-risk mucosal, included in both HPV vaccines), and -52 and -58 (high-risk mucosal). Health- and behavior-related questionnaires were completed. Type-specific seroprevalence estimates and participant characteristics associated with seroprevalence were calculated; 48% reported HPV vaccination. Type-specific seropositivity in unvaccinated persons ranged from 7 to 21% for skin HPV types and 7 to 38% for mucosal HPV types. Among the unvaccinated participants, adults versus children demonstrated increased HPV1, -6, -16, and -58 seroprevalence of 45% versus 6%, 64% versus 22%, 64% versus 17%, and 36% versus 0%, respectively (all P < 0.05). The vaccinated participants versus the nonvaccinated participants demonstrated increased seroprevalence of HPV6, -11, -16, and -18 of 92% versus 38%, 92% versus 24%, 96% versus 34%, and 75% versus 7%, respectively (all P < 0.0001). Our data demonstrate that the unvaccinated participants had serologic evidence of prior skin and mucosal HPV infections and that seroprevalence increased among adults; in self-reported vaccinees, seroprevalence of HPV vaccine types was 75 to 96%. PMID:25651924

  8. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  9. High performance liquid chromatographic assay for the quantitation of total glutathione in plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abukhalaf, Imad K.; Silvestrov, Natalia A.; Menter, Julian M.; von Deutsch, Daniel A.; Bayorh, Mohamed A.; Socci, Robin R.; Ganafa, Agaba A.

    2002-01-01

    A simple and widely used homocysteine HPLC procedure was applied for the HPLC identification and quantitation of glutathione in plasma. The method, which utilizes SBDF as a derivatizing agent utilizes only 50 microl of sample volume. Linear quantitative response curve was generated for glutathione over a concentration range of 0.3125-62.50 micromol/l. Linear regression analysis of the standard curve exhibited correlation coefficient of 0.999. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) values were 5.0 and 15 pmol, respectively. Glutathione recovery using this method was nearly complete (above 96%). Intra-assay and inter-assay precision studies reflected a high level of reliability and reproducibility of the method. The applicability of the method for the quantitation of glutathione was demonstrated successfully using human and rat plasma samples.

  10. Microinjected glutathione reductase crystals as indicators of the redox status in living cells.

    PubMed

    Keese, M A; Saffrich, R; Dandekar, T; Becker, K; Schirmer, R H

    1999-03-26

    The flavoenzyme glutathione reductase catalyses electron transfer reactions between two major intracellular redox buffers, namely the NADPH/NADP+ couple and the 2 glutathione/glutathione disulfide couple. On this account, microcrystals of the enzyme were tested as redox probes of intracellular compartments. For introducing protein crystals into human fibroblasts, different methods (microinjection, particle bombardment and optical tweezers) were explored and compared. When glutathione reductase crystals are present in a cytosolic environment, the transition of the yellow Eox form to the orange-red 2-electron reduced charge transfer form, EH2, is observed. Taking into account the midpoint potential of the Eox/EH2 couple, the redox potential of the cytosol was found to be < -270 mV at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C. As a general conclusion, competent proteins in crystalline--that is signal-amplifying--form are promising probes for studying intracellular events. PMID:10214933

  11. Separation of multiple forms of glutathione S-transferase from the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, P J; Sheehan, D

    1993-08-01

    1. Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes from Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis have been partially purified by glutathione-sepharose affinity chromatography followed by Mono Q anion exchange fast protein liquid chromatography (f.p.l.c.). 2. The tissue distribution of glutathione S-transferase in M. edulis has been studied. Using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate, highest specific activity is observed in the gill, the main feeding organ. Affinity-purified extracts of this organ give a characteristic f.p.l.c. profile. A similar profile is obtained with affinity-purified extracts of the digestive gland of M. galloprovincialis. 3. The subunit structure of the purified isoenzymes has been studied by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and reversed-phase h.p.l.c. The subunits have similar molecular weights and h.p.l.c. retention times to rat glutathione S-transferases. PMID:8284941

  12. Magnetically separable nanoferrite-anchored glutathione: Aqueous homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A highly active, stable and magnetically separable glutathione based organocatalyst provided good to excellent yields to symmetric biaryls in the homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation. Symmetrical biaryl motifs are present in a wide range of natural p...

  13. [The availability of prostaglandin derivatives in a treatment and prevention for gastrointestinal mucosal injury].

    PubMed

    Harada, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Edogawa, Shoko; Ota, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Yuichi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-07-01

    Prostaglandins play important roles in the gastric mucosal protection and gastric ulcer healing. Administration of the prostaglandin derivatives has been proven to be effective for both treatment and prevention of gastric ulcers associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The risk of postoperative hemorrhage following gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is higher in patients with antithrombotic therapy. Mucosal protective agents, including prostaglandin derivatives, may be effective in preventing post-ESD hemorrhage in patients on antithrombotic therapy. Recently, NSAIDs-induced small intestinal damages are recognized by video capsule endoscopy and balloon endoscopy. Prostaglandin derivatives are also useful for these small intestinal damages. PMID:26165072

  14. Oral Mucosal Lesions Associated with Smokers and Chewers – A Case-Control Study in Chennai Population

    PubMed Central

    Masthan, Mahaboob Kader; Narayanasamy, Aravindha Babu

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives To determine the association of oral mucosal lesions in a group of Chennai population aged 15 years and above with smoking and chewing habits. To also determine the dose-response relationship of these habits associated with the risk of oral mucosal lesions. Materiala and Methods The study was undertaken with 450 subjects with smoking and/or chewing habits aged 15 years and over gathered through random selection in Chennai, India. Subjects with alcohol intake were excluded from the study. Based on the habits the study group was categorized into smokers, chewers and mixed (smoking+chewing). One hundred and fifty subjects diagnosed with oral mucosal lesions designated as “cases” and 300 lesion-free “controls”, frequency matched for age, sex, habit and family income were assessed during the study. The study protocol included a visual oral soft tissue examination and a questionnaire-based interview. In addition, those requiring further examination, scalpel biopsies were performed to establish a definitive diagnosis. Results Irrespective of the type of habit, 78% of cases smoked and/or chewed for more than 10 years as compared to 37.4% of the control group. Similarly, 71.3% of cases smoked and/or chewed more than 5 times per day as compared to 25.6% of the control group. Eleven habits related mucosal lesions of the oral cavity were encountered. Smoker’s melanosis was the most common oral mucosal lesion followed by Oral submucous fibrosis and Leukoplakia. Dose-response relationships were observed for both duration and frequency of habits on the risk of oral mucosal lesions. Conclusion The result of the present study provides information on the association of oral mucosal lesions in smokers, chewers and patients with mixed habits. The mucosal lesions encountered included a few potentially malignant conditions and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Habits were more prevalent in men thus more lesions were encountered in males than in females. Moreover, increase in the duration and frequency of habits was significant predictors of risk in the case population. PMID:26393198

  15. Comparison of effects of calcium carbasalate and aspirin on gastroduodenal mucosal damage in human volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, F E; Hudson, N; Atherton, J C; Cole, A T; Scheck, F; Hawkey, C J

    1996-01-01

    Calcium carbasalate is a therapeutically active salicylate which seems to cause less gastroduodenal mucosal damage than aspirin in laboratory animals. This endoscopist-blinded, randomised, cross over trial aimed to compare acute gastric mucosal damage in 20 healthy volunteers treated with acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) (650 mg three times daily) and effervescent calcium carbasalate (ECC) (826.8 mg three times daily) bioequivalent to 650 mg ASA over a five day period. Endoscopy was performed immediately before treatment and on day 5 of each treatment. Serum salicylate, thromboxane B2, and gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations were measured after endoscopy. ECC caused fewer gastric mucosal erosions than ASA. The total number of gastric erosions was 23.8 (16.1) in the ASA treated subjects compared with 9.1 (8.7) in ECC treated subjects (p = 0.004). Differences between ASA and ECC were significant for both the gastric antrum and body, and for both haemorrhagic and non-haemorrhagic erosions. The mean gastric body Lanza score for mucosal damage was lower after ECC than ASA (p = 0.003). The visual analogue score for gastric body damage was lower for ECC (16.9 mm (15.9)) than for ASA (32.7 mm (20.8)), p = 0.008. Serum salicylate concentrations were similar after both preparations (ASA: 66 (23) mg/l, versus ECC: 58 (17) mg/l, NS). Serum thromboxane B2 was similarly reduced using both preparations-97.2 (3.5)% inhibition with ASA, 95.2 (5.5)% inhibition with calcium carbasalate (NS). Suppression of gastric mucosal PGE2 synthesis was similar with both preparations (ASA: 83.4 (17.1)%; ECC 84.3 (12.9)%; NS). It is concluded that ECC causes significantly less gastroduodenal mucosal damage than ASA administered at bioequivalent doses as judged by serum salicylate, serum thromboxane, and mucosal PGE2 values. ECC may therefore be a less harmful alternative treatment to plain ASA. PMID:8566836

  16. Interactions between HIV-1 and Mucosal Cells in the Female Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ruizhong; Richter, Holly E.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the heterosexual route is the prevalent mode of HIV-1 transmission, and the female reproductive tract accounts for approximately 40% of all HIV-1 transmissions. HIV-1 infection in the female reproductive tract involves three major events: entry through the mucosal epithelium, productive infection in subepithelial mononuclear cells, and delivery to lymph nodes to initiate systemic infection. Here, we provide a focused review of the interaction between HIV-1 and mucosal epithelial cells, lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells in female genital mucosa. Increased understanding of these interactions could illuminate new approaches for interdicting HIV-1 heterosexual transmission. PMID:24689653

  17. Low dose, early mucosal exposure will minimize the risk of microbial disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, James A; Harrison, Linda M; Lauder, Robert M; Telford, David R; Neary, Richard

    2012-11-01

    In the 21st century we will rediscover the germ theory of disease: germs not only cause infection as described in standard textbooks but also have a pathogenic role in autoimmunity, atherosclerosis, cancer and even acute psychiatric conditions. In order to reduce morbidity and mortality caused by common organisms we should ensure that exposure is early, often, by the mucosal route and in low dose. Micro-organisms should be delivered daily throughout life by respiratory mucosal spray or enteric coated pill, in precise dose and in a predetermined schedule. PMID:22959998

  18. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (mucosal neuroma syndrome, Wagenmann-Froboese syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, P J; Nevin, N C

    1996-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B), or the mucosal neuroma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant hamartoneoplastic syndrome. Features include multiple mucosal neuromas, phaeochromocytoma, medullary thyroid carcinoma, and Marfanoid body habitus with a characteristic dysmorphic facies. The gene responsible is the receptor tyrosine kinase (RET) proto-oncogene on chromosome 10. The mutational spectrum of MEN 2B is remarkably narrow, with over 95% of cases being caused by a single methionine to threonine substitution in the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Recent biochemical evidence suggests that this mutation alters the substrate specificity of intracellular signal transduction. Images PMID:8880581

  19. A Case of Dermatomyositis with Esophageal Fistula in Whom Blind Mucosal Biopsy Detected Occult Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kabuto, Miho; Fujimoto, Noriki; Teramura, Kazuya; Tateishi, Midori; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Fujimoto, Manabu; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of anti-transcription intermediary factor 1 (anti-TIF-1) antibody-positive dermatomyositis with concomitant esophageal fistula and extensive truncal erythema. The characteristic cutaneous features and presence of anti-TIF-1 antibodies were predictive for internal malignancy. However, repeated examinations for internal malignancy showed none, and blind mucosal biopsy was needed to diagnose oropharyngeal carcinoma. We should note the possibility of occult nasopharyngeal carcinoma and consider performing blind mucosal biopsy in dermatomyositis with esophageal fistula, especially with extensive truncal erythema. PMID:25852538

  20. Acute bovine viral diarrhea associated with extensive mucosal lesions, high morbidity, and mortality in a commercial feedlot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2008, a northwest Texas feedlot underwent an outbreak of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) disease causing high morbidity and mortality involving two lots of calves (Lots A and B). Severe mucosal surface lesions were observed grossly in the oral cavity, larynx and esophagus. Mucosal lesions vari...

  1. Contribution of mucosal maltase-glucoamylase to mouse small intestinal starch alpha-glucogenesis and total glucose metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digestion of starch requires four mucosal maltases; sucrase and isomaltase (Si) and maltase and glucoamylase (Mgam). We ablated Mgam to study its roles. The in vitro effect was a slowing of null mucosal activity to 10% of WT. Here we report in vivo effects of Mgam KO on mouse glucose metabolism. alp...

  2. Unexpected high digestion rate of cooked starch by the Ct-Maltase-Glucoamylase small intestine mucosal alpha-glucosidase subunit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For starch digestion to glucose, two luminal alpha-amylases and four gut mucosal alpha-glucosidase subunits are employed. The aim of this research was to investigate, for the first time, direct digestion capability of individual mucosal alpha-glucosidases on cooked (gelatinized) starch. Gelatinized ...

  3. Slow starch digestion redefined at limit dextrin level by mucosal maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucosal maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) digest free glucose from food starches. Amylase (AMY) amplifies these mucosal activities by production of soluble limit dextrins (LDx). This network of enzyme activities determines rate of LDx entry into either the glycemic or the ferme...

  4. Mucosal maltase-glucoamylase plays a crucial role in starch digestion and prandial glucose homeostasis of mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is the major source of food glucose, and its digestion requires small intestinal alpha-glucosidic activities provided by the 2 soluble amylases and 4 enzymes bound to the mucosal surface of enterocytes. Two of these mucosal activities are associated with sucrase-isomaltase complex, while anot...

  5. Glutathione-related antioxidant defense system in elderly patients treated for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rybka, J; Kupczyk, D; K?dziora-Kornatowska, K; Motyl, J; Czuczejko, J; Szewczyk-Golec, K; Kozakiewicz, M; Pawluk, H; Carvalho, L A; K?dziora, J

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze glutathione antioxidant defense system in elderly patients treated for hypertension. Studies were carried out in the blood collected from 18 hypertensive and 15 age- and sex-matched controls, all subjects age over 60. Hypertensives were on their usual antihypertensive treatment at the time of blood collection. The concentration of glutathione (GSH) in whole blood and activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1), glutathione transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) in erythrocytes were measured. The data from patients and controls were compared using independent-samples t test. P value of 0.05 and less was considered statistically significant. We observed increased glutathione-related antioxidant defense in treated hypertensive elderly patients (HT) when compared with healthy controls (C). Mean GSH concentration was significantly higher in HT when compared with C: 3.1 ± 0.29 and 2.6 ± 0.25 mmol/L, respectively, P < 0.001. Mean activity of GR was significantly higher in HT group if compared with C: 83.4 ± 15.25 U/g Hb versus 64.2 ± 8.26 U/g Hb, respectively, P < 0.001. Mean activity of GST was significantly higher in HT group compared with C: 3.0 ± 0.60 mmol CDNB-GSH/mgHb/min and 2.6 ± 0.36 mmol CDNB-GSH/mgHb/min, respectively, P < 0.05. No difference in GPx activity was observed between two groups. These results show that glutathione-related antioxidant defense system was enhanced in elderly hypertensive patients treated for their conditions. This suggests important role of glutathione system in blood pressure regulation. Alterations in concentration and activity of antioxidants observed during antihypertensive medication are likely to be related to the effect of the treatment on NO bioavailability. PMID:21140238

  6. Glutathione-Related Antioxidant Defense System in Elderly Patients Treated for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kupczyk, D.; K?dziora-Kornatowska, K.; Motyl, J.; Czuczejko, J.; Szewczyk-Golec, K.; Kozakiewicz, M.; Pawluk, H.; Carvalho, L. A.; K?dziora, J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze glutathione antioxidant defense system in elderly patients treated for hypertension. Studies were carried out in the blood collected from 18 hypertensive and 15 age- and sex-matched controls, all subjects age over 60. Hypertensives were on their usual antihypertensive treatment at the time of blood collection. The concentration of glutathione (GSH) in whole blood and activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1), glutathione transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) in erythrocytes were measured. The data from patients and controls were compared using independent-samples t test. P value of 0.05 and less was considered statistically significant. We observed increased glutathione-related antioxidant defense in treated hypertensive elderly patients (HT) when compared with healthy controls (C). Mean GSH concentration was significantly higher in HT when compared with C: 3.1 ± 0.29 and 2.6 ± 0.25 mmol/L, respectively, P < 0.001. Mean activity of GR was significantly higher in HT group if compared with C: 83.4 ± 15.25 U/g Hb versus 64.2 ± 8.26 U/g Hb, respectively, P < 0.001. Mean activity of GST was significantly higher in HT group compared with C: 3.0 ± 0.60 mmol CDNB-GSH/mgHb/min and 2.6 ± 0.36 mmol CDNB-GSH/mgHb/min, respectively, P < 0.05. No difference in GPx activity was observed between two groups. These results show that glutathione-related antioxidant defense system was enhanced in elderly hypertensive patients treated for their conditions. This suggests important role of glutathione system in blood pressure regulation. Alterations in concentration and activity of antioxidants observed during antihypertensive medication are likely to be related to the effect of the treatment on NO bioavailability. PMID:21140238

  7. Efficacy of free glutathione and niosomal glutathione in the treatment of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats

    PubMed Central

    Vulcano, L.A. Denzoin; Confalonieri, O.; Franci, R.; Tapia, M.O.; Soraci, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) administration results in hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats. The response to three different treatments against APAP poisoning was evaluated. Free glutathione (GSH) (200mg/kg), niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) and free amino acids (180 mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine and 280 mg/kg of methionine) were administered to cats that were intoxicated with APAP (a single dose of 150 mg/kg, p.o.). Serum concentration of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) along with serum, liver and erythrocyte concentration of GSH and methemoglobin percentage were measured before and 4, 24 and 72 hours after APAP administration. Free GSH (200 mg/kg) and niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) were effective in reducing hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats intoxicated with a dose of 150 mg/kg APAP. We conclude that both types of treatments can protect the liver and haemoglobin against oxidative stress in APAP intoxicated cats. Furthermore, our results showed that treatment with niosomal GSH represents an effective therapeutic approach for APAP poisoning. PMID:26623313

  8. Intact protein folding in the glutathione-depleted endoplasmic reticulum implicates alternative protein thiol reductants

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Satoshi; Avezov, Edward; Zyryanova, Alisa; Konno, Tasuku; Mendes-Silva, Leonardo; Pinho Melo, Eduardo; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) requires efficient protein thiol oxidation, but also relies on a parallel reductive process to edit disulfides during the maturation or degradation of secreted proteins. To critically examine the widely held assumption that reduced ER glutathione fuels disulfide reduction, we expressed a modified form of a cytosolic glutathione-degrading enzyme, ChaC1, in the ER lumen. ChaC1CtoS purged the ER of glutathione eliciting the expected kinetic defect in oxidation of an ER-localized glutathione-coupled Grx1-roGFP2 optical probe, but had no effect on the disulfide editing-dependent maturation of the LDL receptor or the reduction-dependent degradation of misfolded alpha-1 antitrypsin. Furthermore, glutathione depletion had no measurable effect on induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR); a sensitive measure of ER protein folding homeostasis. These findings challenge the importance of reduced ER glutathione and suggest the existence of alternative electron donor(s) that maintain the reductive capacity of the ER. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03421.001 PMID:25073928

  9. Rapid colorimetric determination of reduced and oxidized glutathione using an end point coupled enzymatic assay.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Mario; Peroni, Eleonora; Lepore, Ambra; Moschini, Roberta; Del Corso, Antonella; Balestri, Francesco; Mura, Umberto

    2013-02-01

    A simple and rapid colorimetric coupled enzymatic assay for the determination of glutathione is described. The proposed method is based on the specific reaction catalyzed by ?-glutamyltransferase, which transfers the ?-glutamyl moiety from glutahione to an acceptor, with the formation of the ?-glutamyl derivative of the acceptor and cysteinylglycine. The latter dipeptide is a substrate of leucyl aminopeptidase, which hydrolyzes cysteinylglycine to glycine and cysteine that can be easily measured spectrophotometrically. The proposed method was used to measure the content of glutathione in acid extracts of bovine lens, to follow the NADPH-dependent reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) catalyzed by the enzyme glutathione reductase and to determine the glutathione content in human astrocytoma ADF cells subjected to oxidative stress. The results obtained showed that the method can be suitably used for the determination of GSH and GSSG in different biological samples and to monitor tissue or cell redox status under different conditions. It is also applicable for following reactions involving GSH and/or GSSG. PMID:23203508

  10. The binding sites of cadmium to a reduced form of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Glusic, Martina; Ropret, Polona; Vogel-Mikus, Katarina; Grdadolnik, Joze

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant low molecular weight thiol-containing molecule in biological cells with a strong tendency to interact with metal ions. Among the eight possible glutathione binding sites, only two are determined as groups that interact with the Cd2+ ion. Analysis of vibrational spectra and 13C and 1H NMR spectra revealed that thiol and glutamyl's carboxylic groups are groups that cooperate in interaction with Cd2+ ions. The coordination of Cd2+ with those groups was supported by the application of auxiliary molecules (D-penicillamine, glycine, cysteine and glutamic acid dipeptides, mercaptosuccinic acid and N-acetyl-L-cysteine). These molecules provide a reliable assignment of the fundamental vibrations in the glutathione vibrational spectra. Concentration-dependent measurements of Cd2+ ions showed that the optimal stoichiometry of coordination with the glutathione molecule is 1:1. The analysis of 3J (Halpha, H(N)) coupling constants and conformational sensitive bands in the glutathione vibrational spectra suggest that interaction with Cd2+ ions significantly alters glutathione backbone conformation. The binding of ions induced the conformational change of the cysteine backbone from a predominantly beta structure to P(II). PMID:23841333

  11. A selenium-containing phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Maiorino, M; Roche, C; Kiess, M; Koenig, K; Gawlik, D; Matthes, M; Naldini, E; Pierce, R; Flohé, L

    1996-06-15

    The 100000Xg supernatant parasite platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni exhibits a glutathione peroxidase activity with the substrate phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide. Purification yielded a protein of 20 kDa molecular mass both on gel filtration column chromatography and SDS/PAGE, thus suggesting that S. mansoni expresses a protein similar to the mammalian selenoenzynic phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase. Kinetic analysis and substrate specificity corroborated this assumption, the second-order rate constants for the oxidation of the ground-state enzyme (k+1) being higher with phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide than with other peroxide substrates, such as cumene liydroperoxide or H2O2, and quantitatively similar to those of mammalian phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase. Partial sequencing of the protein and selenium measurement by neutron activation analysis established that the purified peroxidase corresponded to the product of the S. mansoni gene previously reported and supposed to encode a selenium-containing glutathione peroxidase [Roche, C., Williams, D. L., Khalife, J., LePresle, T., Capron, A. & Pierce, R. J. (1994) Cloning and characterization of gene encoding Schistosoma mansoni glutathione peroxidase, Gene 138, 149 - 152]. S. mansoni thus contains a scienoperoxidase sharing molecular mass, catalytic efficiency and substrate specificity with phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, dismantling the concept that those enzymes are unique to vertebrate organisms. PMID:8706688

  12. Study of Linkage between Glutathione Pathway and the Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli from Patients’ Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Kominkova, Marketa; Michalek, Petr; Cihalova, Kristyna; Guran, Roman; Cernei, Natalia; Nejdl, Lukas; Smerkova, Kristyna; Dostalova, Simona; Chudobova, Dagmar; Heger, Zbynek; Vesely, Radek; Gumulec, Jaromir; Kynicky, Jindrich; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we focused on the differences between bacterial cultures of E. coli obtained from swabs of infectious wounds of patients compared to laboratory E. coli. In addition, blocking of the protein responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (?-glutamylcysteine synthase—GCL) using 10 mM buthionine sulfoximine was investigated. Each E. coli showed significant differences in resistance to antibiotics. According to the determined resistance, E. coli were divided into experimental groups based on a statistical evaluation of their properties as more resistant and more sensitive. These groups were also used for finding the differences in a dependence of the glutathione pathway on resistance to antibiotics. More sensitive E. coli showed the same kinetics of glutathione synthesis while blocking GCL (Km 0.1 µM), as compared to non-blocking. In addition, the most frequent mutations in genes of glutathione synthetase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were observed in this group compared to laboratory E.coli. The group of “more resistant” E. coli exhibited differences in Km between 0.3 and 0.8 µM. The number of mutations compared to the laboratory E. coli was substantially lower compared to the other group. PMID:25837469

  13. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathermolting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  14. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathera??molting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  15. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with ileal transposition – an alternative surgical treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus and gastroesophageal reflux

    PubMed Central

    Duzkoylu, Yigit; Deniz, Mehmet Mehdi; Boz, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Currently, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is considered as a gastrointestinal disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated that bariatric operations ameliorate T2DM significantly. The laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (L-RYGB) is considered as the gold standard procedure. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and impact of L-RYGB with ileal transposition (or interposition) on diabetes resolution in a patient who has not benefited from any medical therapy, with its additional effect on the amelioration of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The patient was a 38-year-old diabetic woman with uncontrolled blood glucose despite medical treatment, with additional gastroesophageal reflux disease. Following the procedure, her biochemical parameters and reflux symptoms improved significantly within 10 months. We think that L-RYGB with ileal transposition may be easily employed to gain a maximum effect in diabetics with adverse prognosis. This technique may be an alternative in the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients with gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:26649100

  16. Contributions of O island 48 to adherence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 to epithelial cells in vitro and in ligated pig ileal loops.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xianhua; Wheatcroft, Roger; Chambers, James R; Liu, Bianfang; Zhu, Jing; Gyles, Carlton L

    2009-09-01

    O island 48 (OI-48) of Escherichia coli consists of three functional gene clusters that encode urease, tellurite resistance (Te(r)), and putative adhesins Iha and AIDA-1. The functions of these clusters in enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 infection are unknown. Deletion mutants for these three regions were constructed and evaluated for their ability to adhere to epithelial cells in vitro and in ligated pig ileal loops. Deletion of the Te(r) gene cluster reduced the ability of the organism to adhere to and form large clusters on IPEC-J2 and HEp-2 cells. Complementation of the mutation by introducing the wild-type ter genes restored adherence and large-cluster formation. Tests in ligated pig ileal loops showed a decrease in colonization by the Te(r)-negative mutant, but the difference was not significant compared to colonization by the wild type (26.4% +/- 21.2% versus 40.1% +/- 19.1%; P = 0.168). The OI-48 aidA gene deletion had no effect on adherence in vitro or in vivo. Deletion of the iha and ureC genes had no effect on adherence in vitro but significantly reduced the colonization of EHEC O157:H7 in the ligated pig intestine. These data suggest that Te(r), Iha, and urease may contribute to EHEC O157:H7 pathogenesis by promoting adherence of the pathogen to the host intestinal epithelium. PMID:19633120

  17. Detection and characterization of a glutathione conjugate of ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian; Park, Gyungse; Wright, Marcus W; Adams, Marissa; Akman, Steven A; Manderville, Richard A

    2002-12-01

    The ability of the carcinogenic mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) to react with reduced glutathione (GSH) has been assessed using electrospray ionization (ES)-MS techniques. On the basis of the assumption that OTA undergoes biotransformation into the reactive quinone species OTQ (6), a synthetic sample of the reduced form of OTQ (6), hydroquinone OTHQ (5), was prepared and photoreacted with 6 M equiv of GSH to yield an authentic sample of the conjugate 8 that was definitively identified by mass spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy and NMR. With the authentic sample of 8 in hand, it was demonstrated that the same conjugate is produced from reaction of 100 microM OTA (1) in the presence of 5 mM GSH following incubation for 1 h with either horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/H(2)O(2), rat liver microsomes (RLM)/NADPH or free Fe(II). In each of these oxidative systems the conjugate 8 was generated in less than 1% yield and the parent OTA molecule is poorly metabolized. Comparison of the peak area ratio of the conjugate 8 to that for the hydroxyOTA metabolite from the RLM/NADPH system implied that the conjugate was produced at a rate of approximately 1-3 pmol min(-)(1) (mg of protein)(-)(1). These studies are the first to demonstrate that OTA undergoes biotransformation to a reactive intermediate [OTQ (6)] that covalently reacts with GSH to yield the conjugate 8. The biological implications of the reactivity of OTA toward GSH are discussed. PMID:12482240

  18. The evolution of glutathione metabolism in phototrophic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, R. C.; Buschbacher, R. M.; Newton, G. L.

    1987-01-01

    Of the many roles ascribed to glutathione (GSH) the one most clearly established is its role in the protection of higher eucaryotes against oxygen toxicity through destruction of thiol-reactive oxygen byproducts. If this is the primary function of GSH then GSH metabolism should have evolved during or after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. That many bacteria do not produce GSH is consistent with this view. In the present study we have examined the low-molecular-weight thiol composition of a variety of phototrophic microorganisms to ascertain how evolution of GSH production is related to evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cells were extracted in the presence of monobromobimane (mBBr) to convert thiols to fluorescent derivatives, which were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Significant levels of GSH were not found in the green bacteria (Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus). Substantial levels of GSH were present in the purple bacteria (Chromatium vinosum, Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and Rhodocyclus gelatinosa), the cyanobacteria [Anacystis nidulans, Microcoleus chthonoplastes S.G., Nostoc muscorum, Oscillatoria amphigranulata, Oscillatoria limnetica, Oscillatoria sp. (Stinky Spring, Utah), Oscillatoria terebriformis, Plectonema boryanum, and Synechococcus lividus], and eucaryotic algae (Chlorella pyrenoidsa, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena gracilis, Scenedesmus obliquus, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Other thiols measured included cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, thiosulfate, coenzyme A, and sulfide; several unidentified thiols were also detected. Many of the organisms examined also exhibited a marked ability to reduce mBBr to syn-(methyl,methyl)bimane, an ability that was quenched by treatment with 2-pyridyl disulfide or 5,5'-bisdithio-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) prior to reaction with mBBr. These observations indicate the presence of a reducing system capable of electron transfer to mBBr and reduction of reactive disulfides. The distribution of GSH in phototrophic eubacteria indicates that GSH synthesis evolved at or around the time that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved.

  19. A supramolecular microgel glutathione peroxidase mimic with temperature responsive activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Jiao, Shufei; Lang, Chao; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-05-21

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) protects cells from oxidative damage by scavenging surplus reactive oxygen species (ROS). Commonly, an appropriate amount of ROS acts as a signal molecule in the metabolism. A smart artificial GPx exhibits adjustable catalytic activity, which can potentially reduce the amount of ROS to an appropriate degree and maintain its important physiological functions in metabolism. To construct an optimum and excellent smart artificial GPx, a novel supramolecular microgel artificial GPx (SM-Te) was prepared based on the supramolecular host-guest interaction employing the tellurium-containing guest molecule (ADA-Te-ADA) and the cyclodextrin-containing host block copolymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-[polyacrylamides-co-poly(6-o-(triethylene glycol monoacrylate ether)-?-cyclodextrin)], PPAM-CD) as building blocks. Subsequently, based on these building blocks, SM-Te was constructed and the formation of its self-assembled structure was confirmed by dynamic light scattering, NMR, SEM, TEM, etc. Typically, benefitting from the temperature responsive properties of the PNIPAM scaffold, SM-Te also exhibited similar temperature responsive behaviour. Importantly, the GPx catalytic rates of SM-Te displayed a noticeable temperature responsive characteristic. Moreover, SM-Te exhibited the typical saturation kinetics behaviour of a real enzyme catalyst. It was proved that the changes of the hydrophobic microenvironment and the pore size in the supramolecular microgel network of SM-Te played significant roles in altering the temperature responsive catalytic behaviour. The successful construction of SM-Te not only overcomes the insurmountable disadvantages existing in previous covalent bond crosslinked microgel artificial GPx but also bodes well for the development of novel intelligent antioxidant drugs. PMID:24652520

  20. Beta-amyloidolysis and glutathione in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lasierra-Cirujeda, J; Coronel, P; Aza, MJ; Gimeno, M

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we hypothesized the importance of the interaction between the brain glutathione (GSH) system, the proteolytic tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)/plasminogen/ plasmin system, regulated by plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), and neuroserpin in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. The histopathological characteristic hallmark that gives personality to the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is the accumulation of neurofibroid tangles located intracellularly in the brain, such as the protein tau and extracellular senile plaques made primarily of amyloidal substance. These formations of complex etiology are intimately related to GSH, brain protective antioxidants, and the proteolytic system, in which t-PA plays a key role. There is scientific evidence that suggests a relationship between aging, a number of neurodegenerative disorders, and the excessive production of reactive oxygen species and accompanying decreased brain proteolysis. The plasminogen system in the brain is an essential proteolytic mechanism that effectively degrades amyloid peptides (“beta-amyloidolysis”) through action of the plasmin, and this physiologic process may be considered to be a means of prevention of neurodegenerative disorders. In parallel to the decrease in GSH levels seen in aging, there is also a decrease in plasmin brain activity and a progressive decrease of t-PA activity, caused by a decrease in the expression of the t-PA together with an increase of the PAI-1 levels, which rise to an increment in the production of amyloid peptides and a lesser clearance of them. Better knowledge of the GSH mechanism and cerebral proteolysis will allow us to hypothesize about therapeutic practices. PMID:23650462