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Sample records for ileostomy

  1. Ileostomy and your diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... ileostomy - diet; Abdominal pouch - diet; End ileostomy - diet; Ostomy - diet ... odor: Eating parsley, yogurt, and buttermilk Keeping your ostomy devices clean Using special deodorants or adding vanilla ...

  2. Ileostomy and your child

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000069.htm Ileostomy and your child To use the sharing features on this page, ... health counselor may help you. Caring for Your Child's Ileostomy Your child will need help and support. ...

  3. Ileostomy - caring for your stoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Continent ileostomy - stoma care; Abdominal pouch - stoma care; End ileostomy - stoma care; Ostomy - stoma care ... sticks out from the skin more), try a cold compress, like ice wrapped in a towel, to ...

  4. Spontaneous ileostomy closure

    PubMed Central

    Alyami, Mohammad S.; Lundberg, Peter W.; Cotte, Eddy G.; Glehen, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ileostomies are routinely placed during colorectal surgery for the diversion of intestinal contents to permit healing of the distal anastomosis prior to elective reversal. We present an interesting case of spontaneous closure of a diverting ileostomy without any adverse effects to the patient. A 65-year-old woman, positive for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer type-I, with locally invasive cancer of the distal colon underwent en-bloc total colectomy, hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingoophorectomy with creation of a proximal loop ileostomy. The ostomy temporarily closed without reoperation at 10 weeks, after spontaneously reopening, it definitively closed, again without surgical intervention at 18 weeks following the original surgery. This rare phenomenon has occurred following variable colorectal pathology and is poorly understood, particularly in patients with aggressive disease and adjunct perioperative interventions. PMID:27279518

  5. Ghost ileostomy: real and potential advantages.

    PubMed

    Miccini, Michelangelo; Amore Bonapasta, Stefano; Gregori, Matteo; Barillari, Paolo; Tocchi, Adriano

    2010-10-01

    Loop ileostomy is created to minimize the clinical impact of colorectal anastomotic leak. However, a lot of complications may be associated with ileostomy presence and with its reversal. Moreover, patients hardly accept the quality of life resulting from ileostomy. We describe a simple technique (ghost ileostomy) to combine all the advantages of a disposable ileostomy without entailing its complications in patients submitted to low rectal resection. In case of uneventful postoperative course, the ghost ileostomy prevents all complications related to defunctioning ileostomy. At the same time, in case of anastomotic leakage, the ghost ileostomy is easily and safely converted into a defunctioning ileostomy. PMID:20887836

  6. A continent ileostomy device.

    PubMed Central

    Pemberton, J H; van Heerden, J A; Beart, R W; Kelly, K A; Phillips, S F; Taylor, B M

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of achieving fecal continence by mechanical occlusion of an end-ileostomy is explored. Accordingly, progressive stomal occlusion with an indwelling occluding device was evaluated in four healthy patients with Brooke ileostomies. Pre-occlusion clinical and physiologic tests were done, including fat balance, intestinal transit time, ileal motility and absorption, ileal compliance, ileal radiography, and ileoscopy. Progressive stomal occlusion was then employed until periods of occlusion of 5 to 8 hours were achieved after 10 to 16 weeks. Pre-occlusion tests were then repeated. Patients mastered use of the occluding device rapidly, and the device achieved reliable stomal continence in each patient. Whereas ileal capacity was small initially, intermittent occlusion resulted in a large, capacious ileal reservoir. Fasting ileal motility was increased slightly by stomal occlusion, although intestinal transit during feeding was not altered. Also, ileal absorption of glucose, electrolytes, vitamin B-12, and fat were not changed, and ileal mucosa at the site of occlusion remained intact endoscopically. The authors concluded that chronic intermittent occlusion of a Brooke ileostomy with an indwelling stomal device achieved enteric continence without impairing intestinal function. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:6847281

  7. Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you take ... Ostomy - what to ask your doctor; What to ask your doctor about ileostomy or colostomy; Colostomy - what to ask your doctor

  8. Ileostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this surgery. Some are: Inflammatory bowel disease ( ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease ). This is the most common ... chronic condition, such as Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis, you may need ongoing medical treatment.

  9. Ileostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some are: Inflammatory bowel disease ( ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease ). This is the most common reason for this ... If you have a chronic condition, such as Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis, you may need ongoing medical ...

  10. Defunctioning Ileostomy Reversal Rates and Reasons for Delayed Reversal: Does Delay Impact on Complications of Ileostomy Reversal? A Study of 170 Defunctioning Ileostomies

    PubMed Central

    Waterland, Peter; Goonetilleke, Kolitha; Naumann, David N.; Sutcliff, Mathew; Soliman, Faris

    2015-01-01

    Background Temporary defunctioning ileostomy can reduce the consequences of anastomotic leak following low anterior resection. However, some patients never have their ileostomy reversed and in other cases the time to reversal of ileostomy can be delayed. The aim of this study was to identify the ileostomy closure rate following anterior resection, time to closure of ileostomy, reasons for delay in reversal and whether delay was associated with an increased complication rate. Methods Data were collected retrospectively on consecutive patients undergoing defunctioning ileostomy following anterior resection for rectal cancer, between January 2009 and August 2013. Data were collected on reversal of ileostomy rates, time to reversal, reasons for delayed reversal (defined as > 6 months) and complications following reversal. Results One hundred seventy patients were studied (median age 69 years, range 41 - 90 years), of whom 117 (69%) were male. One hundred twenty-seven (75%) patients had their ileostomies reversed. Median time to reversal was 6 months (range 1 - 42). In 63 patients who had delayed reversal, reasons were adjuvant chemotherapy (22, 35%), medical illness (14, 22%), anastomotic leak (9, 14%), and others (4, 7%). Postoperative complications occurred in 33 patients (26%). There was no postoperative mortality. Univariate analysis showed that delayed reversal was associated with an increased rate of complications and longer length of hospital stay following reversal (P < 0.05). Conclusions One in four defunctioning ileostomies are not closed following anterior resection in our unit. Of those that are closed, approximately 50% have delayed closure beyond 6 months which is associated with increased risk of complications following their ileostomy reversal. PMID:26251682

  11. Ileorectal Anastomosis and Proctocolectomy with End Ileostomy for Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Andre da Luz; Lavery, Ian C.

    2010-01-01

    Until the development of the ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in the early 1980s, proctocolectomy with end ileostomy was the only definitive surgery for ulcerative colitis and colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis was the procedure of choice for affected patients who were reluctant to have a permanent ileostomy. Currently, ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the most common procedure for patients with ulcerative colitis requiring surgical treatment. However, there is still a role for ileorectal anastomosis and proctocolectomy with end ileostomy for a selected group of patients. In this review, the authors summarize the current indications for ileorectal anastomosis and proctocolectomy with end ileostomy in patients with ulcerative colitis. PMID:22131897

  12. Trace mineral absorption status in infants with ileostomies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infants with ileostomies are often supplemented with zinc and limited in copper, because of potential increased bilious zinc loss and increased cholestasis due to reduced copper excretion. However, no data exist on zinc or copper balance in infants with ileostomies. To determine the effect of an ile...

  13. Primary Adenocarcinoma of an Ileostomy in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Meena A.; Lo, Amy; Bellaguarda, Emanuelle; Strong, Scott; Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Although Crohn's disease has been associated with an increased risk of small bowel adenocarcinoma, primary adenocarcinoma arising from an ileostomy is a complication that has been rarely documented in Crohn's disease. Chronic small bowel inflammation may lead to development of malignancy through the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. We report a case of a 61-year-old woman with Crohn's ileocolitis diagnosed with a primary adenocarcinoma at the ileostomy with metastases to the liver 47 years after proctocolectomy, and review the literature.

  14. Stagnant loop syndrome in patients with continent ileostomy (intra-abdominal ileal reservoir).

    PubMed Central

    Schjonsby, H; Halvorsen, J F; Hofstad, T; Hovdenak, N

    1977-01-01

    Intestinal absorption and bacteriology of the ileal contents were compared in seven patients with continent ileostomy and seven patients with conventional ileostomy. The absorption of vitamin B12 was reduced in five patients with continent ileostomy and subnormal in two patients with conventional ileostomy. Steatorrhoea was present in four patients with continent and one patient with conventional ileostomy. Increased concentrations of total anaerobic bacteria and Bacteroides were found in the ileum of the patients with continent ileostomy. After an oral dose of (1-14C) glycocholic acid there was no difference in the faecal excretion of radioactivity, whereas the 14CO2-expiration was increased in two patients with continent ileostomy. In four patients with continent ileostomy and malabsorption of B12, there was evidence of a stagnant loopsyndrome as oral lincomycin treatment resulted in increased absorption of B12 decreased excretion of faecal fat, and decreased concentrations of Bacteroides in the ileum. PMID:590837

  15. Is stoma care effective in terms of morbidity in complicated ileostomies?

    PubMed Central

    Sarkut, Pinar; Dundar, Halit Ziya; Tirnova, Ismail; Ozturk, Ersin; Yilmazlar, Tuncay

    2015-01-01

    Background Performing transient or permanent ileostomy is one of the common procedures involved in colorectal surgery. Complication rates up to 40% have been reported in ileostomies. In this report, the effect of specific stoma care unit on ileostomy and its complications were investigated. Methods A total of 141 patients, who were operated and underwent ileostomy, due to different causes, at Department of General Surgery, Uludağ University, Bursa, Turkey, between 2003 and 2006, were examined, retrospectively. Patient records were examined in terms of age, sex, surgery indications, urgent/elective state, benign/malign origin, ileostomy type, complications and stoma care, and education. χ2 test was used to compare the categorical data. Results Among the patients, 95 (67%) were male and 46 (33%) were female. The mean age was 47 years (17–67). Some of the subjects (49%) were operated urgently and some (51%) were under elective conditions. The ileostomy types used included the following: end ileostomy (43%), loop ileostomy (46%), and double-barrel ileostomy (11%). Permanent ileostomy was performed in 23 patients and transient ileostomy was performed in 118 patients. The patients were operated because of either benign (48%) or malign (52%) causes. Complications developed in 37 (26%) patients. The rate of development of complication was markedly higher in ileostomies performed under urgent conditions (61% vs 39%) (P<0.001). The complications included mucocutaneous separation (12 patients), maceration in the peristomal skin (ten patients), retraction (five patients), necrosis (three patients), prolapsus (three patients), and other metabolic complications (four patients). The complications were treated with care (68%) and surgical revision (32%). Conclusion The rate of ileostomy was found to be higher in the male patients compared to female patients. The risk of development of complications was found to be higher in ileostomies performed under urgent conditions. The

  16. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876.5030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876.5030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent...

  18. Adenocarcinoma arising at ileostomy sites: Two cases and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Procaccino, Lauren; Rehman, Sameer; Abdurakhmanov, Alexander; McWhorter, Peter; La Gamma, Nicholas; Bhaskaran, Madhu C; Maurer, James; Grimaldi, Gregory M; Rilo, Horacio; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene; Molmenti, Ernesto P; Procaccino, John

    2015-01-01

    Total colectomy with ileostomy placement is a treatment for patients with inflammatory bowel disease or familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). A rare and late complication of this treatment is carcinoma arising at the ileostomy site. We describe two such cases: a 78-year-old male 30 years after subtotal colectomy and ileostomy for FAP, and an 85-year-old male 50 years after colectomy and ileostomy for ulcerative colitis. The long latency period between creation of the ileostomies and development of carcinoma suggests a chronic metaplasia due to an irritating/inflammatory causative factor. Surgical excision of the mass and relocation of the stoma is the mainstay of therapy, with possible benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy. Newly developed lesions at stoma sites should be biopsied to rule out the possibility of this rare ileostomy complication. PMID:26131331

  19. Feasibility and Outcome of Proximal Catheter Ileostomy – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Maulana M.; Ahmad, Shakeel; Hasan, Syed H.; Haleem, Shahla

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Loop ileostomy has high complication rates and causes much patient inconvenience. This study was carried out to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of a proximal catheter ileostomy in place of loop ileostomy in patients treated by intestinal repair and/or resection-anastomosis.Design: Prospective study.Setting: J. N. Medical College Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. Patients and Methods: From November 2006 to November 2009, in all patients treated surgically by primary repair and/or resection-anastomosis of small and/or large bowel, we constructed a catheter ileostomy when a defunctioning proximal protective loop ileostomy was considered advisable. Catheter ileostomy was constructed in the fashion of catheter jejunostomy, with postoperative saline irrigation. Results: Catheter ileostomy was performed in 20 patients in the 3-year period. The mean age of the subjects was 28.6 years and the male: female ratio was 1.86:1. Four patients died of septicemia and multiple organ failure unrelated to catheter ileostomy in the immediate postoperative period. Catheter ileostomy started functioning within 48 hours of the operation, and twice-daily irrigation was found sufficient in 81.25% of the surviving patients. Only one patient developed peritubal leak with mild skin excoriation that cleared within 5 days. Another patient with Koch's abdomen underwent conversion to loop colostomy on re-exploration for postoperative adhesive obstruction. There was no instance of intestinal leak. Ileostomy wounds closed spontaneously within 7–14 days of catheter removal, and none required formal closure. Hospital stay ranged from 12–35 days (mean: 23 days). Conclusions: Catheter ileostomy is effective in protecting intestinal anastomosis/repair; there is minimal morbidity and no catheter-related leak/mortality, and we recommend the procedure. PMID:21727735

  20. Considerations for diagnosis and management of ileostomy-related malignancy: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex; Davis, Bradley; Snyder, Jon; Pulskamp, Sara; Nestok, Blake; Rafferty, Janice; Marcello, Peter; Paquette, Ian M

    2014-05-01

    Malignancy associated with a long-standing ileostomy is a rare occurrence reported as early as 3 years after ileostomy placement. Patients most commonly present first to their ostomy care nurse with peristomal skin changes unresponsive to conservative measures. To elucidate presentation and management, two cases of male patients with ileostomy-related with malignancy (one lymphoma and one squamous cell carcinoma) are discussed. Both patients had undergone proctocolectomy with end ileostomy decades prior. Symptoms in the lymphoma patient included complaints of skin irritation, stoma mucosa changes and friability, and a persistent rash around the ostomy; he was found to have small bowel friability and a peristomal mass arising from the terminal ileum that was resected en bloc with the ileostomy, the surrounding skin, and associated abdominal wall musculature. The patient with squamous cell carcinoma had developed a gray-tan skin lesion around his ileostomy site; he underwent exploratory laparotomy with wide local excision of the abdominal wall including ileostomy site, distal ileum, and squamous cell carcinoma, and resiting of the ileostomy to the contralateral abdominal wall. Ostomy care providers should be aware of the clinical presentation of ostomy-associated malignancy to ensure thorough evaluation and prompt referral for surgical management are provided. PMID:24919214

  1. Diet and health of people with an ileostomy. 1. Dietary assessment.

    PubMed

    Bingham, S; Cummings, J H; McNeil, N I

    1982-05-01

    1. People with an ileostomy experience digestive problems with some foods. Why those foods are avoided is not known nor is it certain whether this interferes with the nutritional adequacy of their diet. 2. A detailed dietary assessment has therefore been made of thirty-seven subjects with ileostomies and a similar number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All food and drink eaten over 1 week was weighed and recorded. In addition. A larger group of seventy-nine ileostomy subjects and seventy matched controls answered a questionnaire designed to identify foods which upset them and which they avoided. 3. Total nutrient and energy intakes were similar in the two groups but the subjects with an ileostomy ate less dietary fibre (g/d; mean + SD: ileostomy subjects 18.0 +/- 5.9, controls 20.9 +/- 5.5; P less than 0.05) mainly due to lower fruit and vegetable intakes. Iron and vitamins A and C intakes were also less. 4. A majority of ileostomy subjects had a pattern of food intake different from the controls, taking more of their energy in the morning and less at night. A variety of food items upset more than half of them including nuts, pips, seeds, skins, onions, beetroot, lettuce, raw cabbage and carrot, peas, sweetcorn, mushrooms and dried fruit. 5. On the basis of the results it is possible to formulate general dietary advice for people with an ileostomy. PMID:6282301

  2. Reduction of an incarcerated, prolapsed ileostomy with the assistance of sugar as a desiccant.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R; Chin, E H; Steinhagen, R M

    2010-09-01

    Prolapse is a well-described complication after ileostomy or colostomy, and is typically asymptomatic and easily reduced. Acute incarceration of a prolapsed stoma is a rare event, however. A patient presented with an incarcerated, prolapsed ileostomy causing small bowel obstruction and stomal ischemia. Successful reduction was performed with the assistance of sugar as a desiccant. Incarceration of a prolapsed ileostomy is highly atypical, but can be approached in a similar manner to an incarcerated rectal prolapse. Successful reduction can prevent an emergent operation, allowing for medical optimization and elective surgical treatment if necessary. PMID:19593624

  3. Assessment of the defunctioning efficiency of the loop ileostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Winslet, M.C.; Drolc, Z.; Allan, A.; Keighley, M.R. )

    1991-08-01

    The defunctioning efficiency of the loop ileostomy has been assessed using a radioisotope and dye technique. The median defunctioning capacity in patients without episodes of fecal discharge per rectum (n = 18) was 99.99% and was not affected by body position or the formation of a dependent stoma. In patients (n = 4) who passed fecal material per rectum but who had no stomal retraction, the median defunctioning efficiency was 99.99%, and continued fecal discharge was considered to be due to mucopurulent secretion from active distal disease. In patients who passed fecal material per rectum and also had a retracted stoma (n = 4), the defunctioning efficiency was significantly reduced (median = 84.70 (31.2-99.10 percent; P less than 0.01)), owing to the overspill into the distal limb. Two patients underwent stomal revision, with an improvement in defunctioning efficiency to 99.99%.

  4. Strangulated ileostomy evisceration following lateralizing mesh repair of parastomal hernia.

    PubMed

    Ramly, E P; Crosslin, T; Orkin, B; Popowich, D

    2016-04-01

    Parastomal hernia formation and ostomy prolapse are relatively common complications of intestinal ostomy construction. Underlay mesh placement with lateralization of the stoma limb appears to be the method of repair with the lowest recurrence rate. Prophylaxis of new stomas with mesh is advocated by many authors. We report the case of an 81-year-old man with chronic steroid-dependent COPD who presented to the emergency department with strangulated small bowel evisceration 9 days following completion abdominal colectomy, and creation of an end ileostomy reinforced with intraperitoneal mesh. This rare complication was related to this patient's risk factors for poor healing including poor nutrition, age, chronic COPD and coughing and steroid dependence with immunosuppression. PMID:24777430

  5. Temporary Diverting Ileostomy via the Umbilicus: a Small Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Mushaya, C. D.; Chandra, Raaj; Sansom, Wendy; Keck, James

    2015-01-01

    The umbilicus, a natural orifice, which is used as an access port during laparoscopic surgery, can be used as a stoma site with potential superior cosmetic results as one less incision is then required. Our objective was to assess the efficacy and safety of the umbilical stoma in a selected group of patients. This is a prospective case series in hospital patients admitted as emergency or elective. Patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery with a planned ileostomy at Box Hill Hospital were approached and invited to participate in the study, with the stoma being fashioned on the umbilicus. Outcomes of interest included demographics, the details regarding the original indication for operation, operative and hospital related outcomes, postoperative bowel related complications, and other surgical and medical complications. Outcomes of a total of 10 (5 males) patients who underwent umbilical covering ileostomy during the study period were analyzed. Two patients with ulcerative colitis had the second stage of their operation converting their end stomas to loop stoma. These were counted twice, totaling 12 stomas in 10 patients. Three patients had their umbistomas after receiving neoadjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. The median period patients have had umbistomas is 113 days. Overall morbidity during the initial operation was low, except for 1 patient who had a small bowel injury. There was no mortality. Minor peristomal skin changes were the most common postoperative complication. Three patients had their stomas reversed with excellent cosmesis. Umbistomas appear to be a safe and effective way to fashion covering stomas post laparoscopic surgery and save the patient an added incision with excellent cosmetic results. PMID:25785324

  6. Use of Ozone to Treat Ileostomy Dermatitis in an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Biçer, Şenol; Sayar, İlyas; Gürsul, Cebrail; Işık, Arda; Aydın, Merve; Peker, Kemal; Demiryilmaz, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Background Dermatitis associated with ileostomy is an important problem that affects many people, especially children. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of ozone on dermatitis due to ileostomy, and to develop an alternative treatment option. Material/Methods A total of 28 rats were divided into 4 groups: control, ileostomy, ozone, and zinc oxide. Ileostomy was performed in all rats except the control group. After a 1-week waiting time, the ozone group was administered ozone therapy and the zinc oxide group was administered zinc oxide cream locally once a day for a total of 7 days. All rats were sacrificed at the end of this period. The efficacy of treatment was examined by biochemical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical parameters. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), total glutathione (tGSH), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and total oxidant status (TOS) were measured from tissue. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were examined immunohistochemically. Results Dermatitis occurred pathologically in all rats that underwent ileostomy surgery. The lowest dermatitis score was in the ozone treatment group (p<0.05). Ileostomy dermatitis caused increased levels of MDA and TOS. Ozone treatment resulted in reduced MDA and TOS levels, while the levels of tGSH and TAC were increased (p<0.05). Both VEGF and PCNA immunostaining were augmented in the ozone treatment group (p<0.05). Conclusions Local ozone application may be a good alternative compared to the conventional treatment methods for the prevention of skin lesions that develop after ileostomy. PMID:26947591

  7. Use of Ozone to Treat Ileostomy Dermatitis in an Experimental Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Biçer, Şenol; Sayar, İlyas; Gürsul, Cebrail; Işık, Arda; Aydın, Merve; Peker, Kemal; Demiryilmaz, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dermatitis associated with ileostomy is an important problem that affects many people, especially children. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of ozone on dermatitis due to ileostomy, and to develop an alternative treatment option. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 28 rats were divided into 4 groups: control, ileostomy, ozone, and zinc oxide. Ileostomy was performed in all rats except the control group. After a 1-week waiting time, the ozone group was administered ozone therapy and the zinc oxide group was administered zinc oxide cream locally once a day for a total of 7 days. All rats were sacrificed at the end of this period. The efficacy of treatment was examined by biochemical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical parameters. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), total glutathione (tGSH), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and total oxidant status (TOS) were measured from tissue. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were examined immunohistochemically. RESULTS Dermatitis occurred pathologically in all rats that underwent ileostomy surgery. The lowest dermatitis score was in the ozone treatment group (p<0.05). Ileostomy dermatitis caused increased levels of MDA and TOS. Ozone treatment resulted in reduced MDA and TOS levels, while the levels of tGSH and TAC were increased (p<0.05). Both VEGF and PCNA immunostaining were augmented in the ozone treatment group (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Local ozone application may be a good alternative compared to the conventional treatment methods for the prevention of skin lesions that develop after ileostomy. PMID:26947591

  8. Ileostomy for Non-Traumatic Ileal Perforations: Is this the Beginning of the End?

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Rajashekara Gangappa; Chowdary, Prashanth Basappa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ileal perforations are a common place of occurrence in emergency operation rooms around India. They are also significant contributors to mortality in our country. They are very distressing for patients because of the high morbidity of a laparotomy and in certain cases a stoma if its necessity is felt by the operating surgeon. The nature of the disease itself predisposes to a number of complications including wound infections, faecal fistulas and complications associated with a stoma. Aim To evaluate the role of ileostomy in patients with non-traumatic ileal perforation. Materials and Methods A total of 192 cases of ileal perforation, diagnosed per-operatively, were prospectively studied between June 2012 and July 2014. Cases were treated according to standard resuscitation protocols and underwent repair of the ileal perforation either as primary closure or as a bowel resection and anastomosis with or without a proximal diversion ileostomy. Cases were followed up for a period of six months and immediate and late complications and outcomes were noted. Results A total of 192 patients were studied during the given study period out of which 170 (88.5%) were males. The disease was treated primarily without diversion stoma in 176 patients and in 16 patients a proximal diversion ileostomy was performed. The overall mortality was 15 (7.8%) that was noted to be not significantly different in patients with respect to the performance of a stoma. Enterocutaneous fistula was a complication seen exclusively in the non-ileostomy group whereas stomal complications were expectedly noted only in the stoma group. Conclusion The authors found that though conventional ileostomy diversion may appear a safe option in patients with ileal perforations, it has its own additional morbidity, which at times can be very difficult to manage. An ileostomy is of use in a very small group of patients that is diminishing as better facilities and equipment are obtained to manage this

  9. Obstructed ileostomy in the third trimester of pregnancy due to compression from the gravid uterus: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Hugh; Seeho, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Ileostomy obstruction in pregnancy, although rare, is a significant complication with associated morbidity and mortality. Early studies recommended immediate surgical intervention for cases of ileostomy obstruction in pregnancy. We present a case of ileostomy obstruction at 29-week gestation in which a laparotomy was performed for presumed adhesions. When adhesiolysis failed to resolve the obstruction, it became clear that the obstruction was caused by external compression from the enlarging gravid uterus. The remainder of the pregnancy was successfully managed by daily aspiration of bowel contents using a large bore drainage tube, and total parental nutrition. Recent studies have utilised MRI to distinguish between adhesions and uterine compression as the cause of ileostomy obstruction in pregnancy. In the few cases of obstruction caused by uterine compression, patients have been safely managed with conservative therapy, thereby avoiding the risks of surgery. PMID:25139926

  10. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors Associated With the Nonreversal Ileostomy Following Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Gil Jae; Park, Sung Won; Lee, Won-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A loop ileostomy is used to protect an anastomosis after anal sphincter-preserving surgery, especially in patients with low rectal cancer, but little information is available concerning risk factors associated with a nonreversal ileostomy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors of ileostomy nonreversibility after a sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. Methods Six hundred seventy-nine (679) patients with rectal cancer who underwent sphincter-preserving surgery between January 2004 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 679, 135 (19.9%) underwent a defunctioning loop ileostomy of temporary intent, and these patients were divided into two groups, that is, a reversal group (RG, 112 patients) and a nonreversal group (NRG, 23 patients) according to the reversibility of the ileostomy. Results In 23 of the 135 rectal cancer patients (17.0%) that underwent a diverting ileostomy, stoma reversal was not possible for the following reasons; stage IV rectal cancer (11, 47.8%), poor tone of the anal sphincter (4, 17.4%), local recurrence (2, 8.7%), anastomotic leakage (1, 4.3%), radiation proctitis (1, 4.3%), and patient refusal (4, 17.4%). The independent risk factors of the nonreversal group were anastomotic leakage or fistula, stage IV cancer, local recurrence, and comorbidity. Conclusion Postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage or fistula, advanced primary disease (stage IV), local recurrence and comorbidity were identified as risk factors of a nonreversal ileostomy. These factors should be considered when drafting prudential guidelines for ileostomy closure. PMID:26161377

  11. Prospective analysis of indications and early complications of emergency temporary loop ileostomies for perforation peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Poras; Nabi, Ishaq; Ranjan, Gyan; Tiwari, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Kapur, Arun; Arora, Mohinder P.

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the indications, nature, and rate of early complications of temporary loop ileostomy created in emergency for benign diseases, their management, and to find out the associated risk factors. Methods A total of 630 patients undergoing temporary loop ileostomy for benign diseases were studied prospectively over a period of 6 years. Stoma-related early complications occurring within 6-8 weeks were analyzed. Only emergency cases were included in this study. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data and statistical significance was evaluated by applying the Pearson’s chi-square test. Results Typhoid perforation (n=402) was the most commonpathology, followed by tuberculosis (n=106); trauma (n=81); and intestinal obstruction with gangrenous bowel (n=41). 299 patients had no stoma-related complications. Skin excoriation was the most commonstoma-related complication. Age more than 50 years; shock at presentation; delay in presentation; delay in surgery; presence of comorbidities; and surgery done out of working hours, were associated with increased complications. Conclusion Temporary loop ileostomy for perforation peritonitis due to benign systemic diseases like typhoid fever and tuberculosis confers a very high morbidity. PMID:25609137

  12. [A Case of a Desmoid Tumor the Developed Around Ileostomy in a Patient with FAP].

    PubMed

    Chika, Noriyasu; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Suzuki, Okihide; Yamamoto, Azusa; Tajima, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Onozawa, Hisashi; Matsuzawa, Takeaki; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    A 21-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic total colectomy for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) 1 year 3 months previously presented with a mass larger than 10 cm around the ileostomy. Multiple tumors in the mesentery around the ileostomy and anterior to the sacrum, accompanied by bilateral hydronephrosis, were detected by computed tomography. The patient was diagnosed with intraabdominal desmoid tumors, stage Ⅳ according to the Church's classification. The desmoid tumor (15×9 cm) around the ileostomy was completely resected surgically, whereas another desmoid tumor (5×4 cm) was incompletely resected. We found a desmoid tumor of more than 10 cm in size and many fibromatous plaques in the mesentery. We then performed 4 courses of systemic chemotherapy with dacarbazine and doxorubicin in for the residual desmoid tumors after surgery. There was no growth of the residual desmoid tumors for 12 months after chemotherapy. Genetic tests detected a pathogenic germline mutation of the APC gene in the high-risk region of the desmoid tumor. We also confirmed somatic mutations in the resected specimens. PMID:26805226

  13. Changes in the absorption of bile acids after total colectomy in patients with an ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nasmyth, D.G.; Johnston, D.; Williams, N.S.; King, R.F.; Burkinshaw, L.; Brooks, K.

    1989-03-01

    Bile acid absorption was investigated using /sup 75/Se Taurohomocholate (SeHCAT) in controls and patients who had undergone total colectomy with either conventional ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis or adenomatous polyposis. Whole-body retention of SeHCAT after 168 hours was greater in the controls than the patients who had undergone colectomy (P less than .05). Retention of SeHCAT did not differ significantly between patients with an ileostomy and patients with pouch-anal anastomosis, but patients with an ileostomy and ileal resection of more than 20 cm retained less SeHCAT than patients with a pouch-anal anastomosis (P less than .01). Analysis of fecal bile acids from ileostomies and pouches showed that bacterial metabolism of primary conjugated bile acids was greater in patients with a pouch. It was concluded that bile acid absorption was not significantly impaired by construction of a pouch compared with conventional ileostomy, but bacterial metabolism of bile acids was greater in the pouches.

  14. Effect of Plantago ovata (psyllium) husk and seeds on sterol metabolism: studies in normal and ileostomy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, I C; Brodie, B; Eastwood, M A

    1994-02-01

    The diet of six normal and five ileostomy subjects was supplemented with 10 g/d Plantago ovata psyllium husk for 3 wk while six normal and four ileostomy subjects received 10 g/d psyllium seed. Fecal and ileostomy output, sterol excretion, serum cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured before and after supplementation. The husk had no effect on cholesterol or triglyceride concentrations in either normal or ileostomy subjects. Total and high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were reduced on average by 6.4% and 9.3%, respectively, in the normal group after seed supplementation. No effect on fecal bile acid excretion in the normal subjects was found after both regimes. Ileostomy bile acids were increased (on average 25%) after seed supplementation, whereas no effect on cholesterol concentrations was found. These results suggest that psyllium seed might be more effective than the husk in reducing serum cholesterol, that this cholesterol-lowering effect is not mediated by increased fecal bile acid losses, and increased ileal losses of bile acids might be compensated for by enhanced reabsorption in the colon. PMID:8310991

  15. Purse-String Versus Linear Conventional Skin Wound Closure of an Ileostomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Alvandipour, Mina; Gharedaghi, Babak; Khodabakhsh, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Infection is one of the most frequent complications that can occur after ileostomy closure. The incidence of wound infection depends on the skin closure technique, but there is no agreement on the perfect closure method for an ileostomy wound. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of infection, the patient's approval, and the patient's pain between purse-string closure (PSC) and the usual linear closure (LC) of a stoma wound. Methods This randomized clinical trial enrolled 66 patients who underwent a stoma closure from February 2015 to May 2015 in Sari Emam Khomeini Hospital. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the stoma closing method: the PSC group (n = 34) and the LC group (n = 32). The incidences of infection for the 2 groups were compared, and the patients' satisfaction and pain with the stoma were determined by using a questionnaire. Results Infection occurred in 1 of 34 PSC patients (2.9%) and in 7 of 32 LC patients (21.8%), and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.021). Patients in the PSC group were more satisfied with the resulting wound scar and its cosmetic appearance at one month and three months after surgery (P = 0.043). Conclusion After stoma closure, PSC was associated with a significantly lower incidence of wound infection and greater patient satisfaction compared to LC. However, the healing period for patients who underwent PSC was longer than it was for those who underwent LC. PMID:27626025

  16. Study of ion transport across biopsies of ileostomy in vitro: search for evidence of intestinal 'adaptation' after colectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Hawker, P C; Morris, A I; McKay, J; Turnberg, L A

    1980-01-01

    To explore the possibility that small intestinal 'adaptation' may occur after colectomy we examined the ability of ileal mucosal biopsies, taken from patients with ileostomies, to transport electrolytes in vitro. Ileostomy mucosal electrical potential difference was higher (5.4+/-0.5 mV) than in normal mucosa (3.3+/-0.3, P less than 0.001), resistance was higher (98+/-12, against 40.3+/-2.8 omega cm-2), while short circuit current was lower (54.8+/-6.0; against 89.9+/-6.1 muA.cm-2). Net sodium absorption, 1.25+/-0.41 mumol.cm-2.h-1 (n=6), rose on addition of glucose (15 mM.1-1) to 11.57+/-0.8 mumol.cm-2.h-1 (n=4), and these were similar to results from normal ileum. Net chloride transport was also similar to noraml. In one subject, with intermittent ileostomy diarrhoea, net sodium absorption was normal, 2.14 mumol.cm-2.h-1, but there was marked active chloride secretion, 14.03 mumol.cm-2.h-1. These studies do not provide any evidence of enhanced electrolyte absorption across ileal mucosa as a response to colectomy. Some cases of ileostomy diarrhoea may be due to active chloride secretion. PMID:7380338

  17. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  18. Ileostomy obstruction by ingested apricot stone with clinical-radiological-pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    George, A J; Fallaize, R C; Bennett, J; Shabbir, J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with stomas often present with bowel obstruction, often secondary to adhesions. This case describes the presentation, investigation and management of a 62-year-old woman with an end ileostomy, who presented to hospital with acute abdominal pain and subacute bowel obstruction. Further questioning revealed the recent ingestion of an apricot stone and this was identified by multimodality imaging as the cause of the luminal obstruction in the distal ileum, just proximal to the stoma. After a failed period of conservative management, examination under anaesthesia was performed and digital extraction attempted, but this was unsuccessful. Rather than surgical stoma revision, endoscopic removal was achieved. The patient improved and was discharged the following day. However, her small bowel obstruction relapsed within 48 h. She was readmitted and underwent stoma revision with no further problems. PMID:26374775

  19. Laparoscopic and natural orifice transluminal restorative proctocolectomy: no abdominal incision for specimen extraction or ileostomy

    PubMed Central

    Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Soyer, Vural

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy (LRPC) without additional abdominal incisions. Two sisters with familial adenomatous polyposis were enrolled. The colon and rectum were mobilized entirely through the five abdominal trocars. The terminal ileum and distal rectum were transected with endoscopic staplers. The entire colorectal specimen was extracted transanally. A circular stapler anvil was introduced transanally. The J-pouch was created intracorporeally. The rectal stump was re-closed and a pouch-anal anastomosis was created using a circular stapler. We used a transanal tube for decompression of the pouch instead of a diverting ileostomy. The patients were discharged on the 10th and 12th days uneventfully. Both were doing well with their pouches after 18.5 and 12.1 months of follow-up. With the help of transanal specimen extraction and transanal tube decompression, additional abdominal incisions can be avoided following LRPC. PMID:27458493

  20. Hand-suture versus stapling for closure of loop ileostomy: HASTA-Trial: a study rationale and design for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the second most common tumor in developed countries, with a lifetime prevalence of 5%. About one third of these tumors are located in the rectum. Surgery in terms of low anterior resection with mesorectal excision is the central element in the treatment of rectal cancer being the only option for definite cure. Creating a protective diverting stoma prevents complications like anastomotic failure and meanwhile is the standard procedure. Bowel obstruction is one of the main and the clinically and economically most relevant complication following closure of loop ileostomy. The best surgical technique for closure of loop ileostomy has not been defined yet. Methods/Design A study protocol was developed on the basis of the only randomized controlled mono-center trial to solve clinical equipoise concerning the optimal surgical technique for closure of loop ileostomy after low anterior resection due to rectal cancer. The HASTA trial is a multi-center pragmatic randomized controlled surgical trial with two parallel groups to compare hand-suture versus stapling for closure of loop ileostomy. It will include 334 randomized patients undergoing closure of loop ileostomy after low anterior resection with protective ileostomy due to rectal cancer in approximately 20 centers consisting of German hospitals of all level of health care. The primary endpoint is the rate of bowel obstruction within 30 days after ileostomy closure. In addition, a set of surgical and general variables including quality of life will be analyzed with a follow-up of 12 months. An investigators meeting with a practical session will help to minimize performance bias and enforce protocol adherence. Centers are monitored centrally as well as on-site before and during recruitment phase to assure inclusion, treatment and follow up according to the protocol. Discussion Aim of the HASTA trial is to evaluate the efficacy of hand-suture versus stapling for closure of loop ileostomy in

  1. Development and validation of a quality of life questionnaire for patients with colostomy or ileostomy

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Luis; Thorsen, Hanne; Juul, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    Background Quality of life of stoma patients is increasingly being addressed in clinical trials. However, the instruments used in the majority of these studies have not been validated specifically for stoma patients. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and validation of a quality-of-life instrument, "Stoma-QOL", specifically for patients with colostomy or ileostomy. Methods Potential items were formulated in English on the basis of the results of a series of semi-structured interviews with 169 adult stoma patients. The process resulted in a preliminary 37-item version, which was translated into French, German, Spanish and Danish, and administered repeatedly to 182 patients with colostomy or ileostomy. A psychometric selection of items was performed through Rasch Analysis. The measurement properties of the final questionnaire version were subsequently tested. Results The 20 items in the final questionnaire covered four domains – sleep, sexual activity, relations to family and close friends, and social relations to other than family and close friends. These items were found to define a unidimensional variable according to Rasch specifications (Infit MNSQ < 1.3). Internal consistency reliability calculated as Cronbach's alpha was 0.92, i.e., highly reliable. Spearman's correlation coefficients of scores across times of administration was >0.88 (p < 0.01), indicating a high test-retest reliability. Item calibrations by country calculated as ICC were 0.81 (0.67–0.91 95% CI), confirming cross-cultural comparability across the European countries included in the study. Conclusion Given the adequacy of the metric properties of the Stoma-QOL suggested by the psychometric analyses, this study confirms the suitability of the instrument in clinical practice and in clinical research. PMID:16219109

  2. Ileostomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prune juice, licorice, large meals, spicy foods, beer, red wine, and chocolate Some foods will make your stool thicker. Some of these are applesauce, baked potatoes, rice, bread, peanut butter, pudding, and baked apples. Drink 8 to 10 glasses of fluid a ...

  3. Ileostomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... dried fruits (such as raisins), mushrooms, chunky relishes, coconut, and some Chinese vegetables. Tips for when no ... foods are salted snacks. Pretzels may help reduce water loss in stool. They also have extra sodium. ...

  4. Primary stomal lymphoma. An unusual complication of ileostomy in a patient with transfusion-related acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levecq, H; Hautefeuille, M; Hoang, C; Galian, A; Hautefeuille, P; Rambaud, J C

    1990-02-15

    A 73-year-old heterosexual man developed a high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the site of an ileostomy only 2 years after proctectomy for undetermined colitis not cured by previous colectomy. In fact, the early occurrence of this usually very late and rare complication of ileostomy was probably favored by the simultaneous presence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) due to repeated blood transfusions for refractory anemia with excess blasts. The intestinal location of the tumor, its high-grade malignancy and B-cell origin are all features of AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This case report seems to be one of the rarely identified examples of the cooperation between general predisposing factors and local irritating agents at the origin of a malignant tumor. PMID:2297651

  5. Comparative study between transanal tube and loop ileostomy in low anterior resection for mid rectal cancer: a retrospective single center trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ki; Won, Dae-Youn; Lee, Jin-Kwon; Kang, Won-Kyung; Kim, Jun-Gi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy and safety of the transanal tube (TAT) in preventing anastomotic leak (AL) in rectal cancer surgery. Methods Clinical data of the patients who underwent curative surgery for mid rectal cancer from February 2010 to February 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Rectal cancers arising 5 to 10 cm above the anal verge were selected. Patients were divided into the ileostomy, TAT, or no-protection groups. Postoperative complications including AL and postoperative course were compared. Results We included 137 patients: 67, 35, and 35 patients were included in the ileostomy, TAT, and no-protection groups, respectively. Operation time was longer in the ileostomy group (P = 0.029), and more estimated blood loss was observed (P = 0.018). AL occurred in 5 patients (7.5%) in the ileostomy group, 1 patients (2.9%) in the TAT group, and 6 patients (17.1%) in the no-protection group (P = 0.125). Patients in the ileostomy group resumed diet more than 1 day earlier than those in the other groups (P = 0.000). Patients in the no-protection group had about 1 or 2 days longer postoperative hospital stay (P = 0.048). The ileostomy group showed higher late complication rates than the other groups as complications associated with the stoma itself or repair operation developed (P = 0.019). Conclusion For mid rectal cancer surgery, the TAT supports anastomotic site protection and diverts ileostomy-related complications. Further large scale randomized controlled studies are needed to gain more evidence and expand the range of TAT usage. PMID:25960989

  6. Surgical Audit of Patients with Ileal Perforations Requiring Ileostomy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Hemkant; Pandey, Siddharth; Sheoran, Kapil Dev; Marwah, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Ileal perforation peritonitis is a frequently encountered surgical emergency in the developing countries. The choice of a procedure for source control depends on the patient condition as well as the surgeon preference. Material and Methods. This was a prospective observational study including 41 patients presenting with perforation peritonitis due to ileal perforation and managed with ileostomy. Demographic profile and operative findings in terms of number of perforations, site, and size of perforation along with histopathological findings of all the cases were recorded. Results. The majority of patients were male. Pain abdomen and fever were the most common presenting complaints. Body mass index of the patients was in the range of 15.4–25.3 while comorbidities were present in 43% cases. Mean duration of preoperative resuscitation was 14.73 + 13.77 hours. Operative findings showed that 78% patients had a single perforation; most perforations were 0.6–1 cm in size and within 15 cm proximal to ileocecal junction. Mesenteric lymphadenopathy was seen in 29.2% patients. On histopathological examination, nonspecific perforations followed by typhoid and tubercular perforations respectively were the most common. Conclusion. Patients with ileal perforations are routinely seen in surgical emergencies and their demography, clinical profile, and intraoperative findings may guide the choice of procedure to be performed. PMID:26247059

  7. Can Postoperative Nutrition be Favourably Maintained by Oral Diet in Patients with Emergency Temporary Ileostomy? A Tertiary Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Debabrata; Dey, Ramprasad; Choudhury, Krishnangshu Bhanja; Das, Gautam; Bhattacharya, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Temporary ileostomy is an emergency procedure performed in cases having septic peritonitis in presence of perforation or obstruction or gangrene of small intestine. These patients usually suffer from gross malnutrition following surgery. Aim To measure nutritional status of patients with emergency temporary ileostomy and to determine whether their postoperative nutrition can be favourably maintained by oral diet alone. Materials and Methods Sixty patients were enrolled for the study on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria during the study period from January 2012 to December 2013. Oral feeding was started as soon as ileostomy started functioning and patients expressed hunger, about 48-72 hours postoperatively. An individualized diet chart was formulated for each patient using Harris Benedict Equation. Nutritional assessment was done on 1) 1st day of oral feeding, 2) After 7 days of oral feeding, 3). After three months of oral feeding. Nutritional parameters (anthropometric, biochemical) employed were tabulated and statistically analysed with SPSS v 17, Chicago. Results Out of 60 patients, 36 males and 24 females were enrolled in the study. The patients were in the age group of 20-60 years with a mean age of 45 years. After 7 days of oral nutrition the nutritional status deteriorated with a significant decrease in body weight (p<0.001) and serum haemoglobin (p <0.001). However, at the end of the study, the patients had their nutritional status restored satisfactorily with normalization of basic parameters like bodyweight, haemoglobin and serum albumin (p<0.001). Conclusion Proper dietary advice and oral nutrition were found to be sufficient for gradual restoration and maintenance of satisfactory nutritional status in the postoperative period. PMID:26816941

  8. Comparison between the bacterial and oligosaccharide content of ileostomy effluent in subjects taking diets rich in refined or unrefined carbohydrate.

    PubMed Central

    Berghouse, L; Hori, S; Hill, M; Hudson, M; Lennard-Jones, J E; Rogers, E

    1984-01-01

    Dietary surveys have shown that patients with Crohn's disease tend to eat more sucrose than control subjects and this investigation was undertaken to determine whether a diet rich in refined carbohydrate affects the bacterial flora of the terminal ileum. Ileostomy effluent in five patients with Crohn's disease and five with ulcerative colitis after two weeks on a diet rich in sucrose and refined cereal has been compared with the same period on a diet low in sucrose and rich in unrefined cereal. Observations were made hourly for nine hours after equicaloric breakfasts representing the two diets. The amount of ileostomy effluent was greater on the unrefined carbohydrate diet both in terms of wet weight (238 +/- 89 g vs 162 +/- 79 g, p less than 0.02) and dry weight (23 X 6 +/- 6.8 g vs 14.9 +/- 6.6 g, p less than 0.01); surprisingly, the amount of glucose and oligosaccharide was also greater (169 +/- 41 mg vs 82 +/- 26 mg, p less than 0.001) in all 10 volunteers. The bacteriological flora per gram was also higher on the unrefined carbohydrate diet after the test meal (p less than 0.02 between three and six hours) as a result of a general increase in all organisms. The relative proportions of the organisms did not vary between the two diets. No differences were detected between patients with ulcerative colitis and those with Crohn's disease. PMID:6090279

  9. Inhibition of S-fimbria-mediated adhesion to human ileostomy glycoproteins by a protein isolated from bovine colostrum.

    PubMed Central

    Ouwehand, A C; Conway, P L; Salminen, S J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and purify the component in bovine colostrum which is responsible for the inhibition of S-fimbria-mediated adhesion of Escherichia coli. Whey from defatted colostrum was fractionated by ultrafiltration, and the < 100K, < 30K, and < 10K fractions and the colostral whey were tested for inhibition of in vitro adhesion of radiolabelled S-fimbria-bearing E. coli to human ileostomy glycoproteins, which provide a model for human intestinal mucus. The inhibiting compound was purified from a dialyzed < 30K fraction with an anion exchange column which was eluted with a NaCl gradient (0 to 1.0 M). The compound was found to be a heat-resistant but pepsin-sensitive protein with an Mr of approximately 18,000 and an isoelectric point of approximately 5.75. The protein appears to block receptor sites for S-fimbriae on ileostomy glycoproteins, with steric hindrance being the most likely mechanism. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of the amino terminus of the 18K protein showed similarity with the sequence of beta-lactoglobulin. PMID:7591156

  10. Clinical and physiological study of anal sphincter and ileal J pouch before preileostomy closure and 6 and 12 months after closure of loop ileostomy.

    PubMed

    Chaussade, S; Michopoulos, S; Hautefeuille, M; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Guerre, J; Couturier, D

    1991-02-01

    Spontaneous evolution of pouch and anal function, and absorption features has been assessed in 15 patients who underwent proctocolectomy with J ileal pouch anastomosis without conservation of a rectal muscular cuff. All the patients were studied before preileostomy closure and six and 12 months after the closure of the protection loop ileostomy. Stool frequency was identical at six and 12 months (mean +/- SEM: 5.0 +/- 0.4 and 5.3 +/- 0.5/day, respectively). Sixty-six percent of patients at six months and 40% of patients at 12 months need to defecate at least one time during night. Stool weight as well as steatorrhea decreased significantly six months after the closure of loop ileostomy (P less than 0.05). Mean resting anal pressure remained unchanged six and 12 months after closure of the loop ileostomy (41 +/- 6 and 45 +/- 5 cm H2O, respectively). Maximum squeeze anal pressures increased significantly at six (P less than 0.05) and 12 months (P less than 0.05). The rectoanal inhibitory reflex was always absent at the same period. The maximum pouch capacity increased significantly during the first six months (P less than 0.01) from 142 +/- 17 to 279 +/- 27 ml. The maximum infused volume during a saline continence test was not significantly different at six and 12 months; the percentage of evacuation of the reservoir and the volume at which the first ileal contraction appeared in the reservoir increased significantly (P less than 0.05) at six and 12 months. In conclusion, in patients with ileoanal anastomosis and pouch reservoir, the closure of the loop ileostomy is associated with spontaneous modifications of the anal and pouch parameters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1988259

  11. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Liver Resection for Colorectal Metastasis through Stoma Site at Time of Reversal of Diversion Ileostomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Røsok, Bård I.; Edwin, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques for liver tumors are gaining increased acceptance as an alternative to traditional resections by laparotomy. In this article we describe a laparoscopic liver resection of a metastatic lesion in a patient primarily operated for colorectal cancer. The resection was conducted as a single port procedure through the stoma aperture at time of reversal of the diversion ileostomy. Sigle incision liver resections may be less traumatic than conventional laparoscopy and could be applied in selected patients with both benign and malignant liver tumors. PMID:22091359

  12. Antibiotic Regimen after a Total Abdominal Colectomy with Ileostomy for Fulminant Clostridium difficile Colitis: A Multi-Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Wilden, Gwendolyn M.; Subramanian, Melanie P.; Chang, Yuchiao; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Sawyer, Robert; Davies, Stephen W.; Ferrada, Paula; Han, Jinfeng; Beekley, Alec; Velmahos, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Fulminant Clostridium difficile colitis (fCDC) is a highly lethal disease with mortality rates ranging between 12% and 80%. Although often these patients require a total abdominal colectomy (TAC) with ileostomy, there is no established management protocol for post-operative antibiotics. In this study we aim to make some recommendations for post-operative antibiotic usage, while describing the practice across different institutions. Methods: Multi-institutional retrospective case series including fCDC patients who underwent a TAC between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2012. We first analyzed the complete cohort and consecutively performed a survivor analysis, comparing different antibiotic regimens. Additionally we stratified by time interval (antibiotics for ≤7 d, or ≥8 d). Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Additional secondary outcomes included hospital length of stay (HLOS), ICU LOS, number of ventilator-free days, and occurrence of intra-abdominal complications (proctitis, abscess, sepsis, etc.). Results: A total of 100 fCDC patients that underwent a TAC were included across five institutions. Four different antibiotic regimens were compared; A (metronidazole IV+vancomycin PO), B (metronidazole IV), C (metronidazole IV+vanco PO and PR), and D (metronidazole IV+vancomycin PR). The combination of IV metronidazole with or without PO vancomycin showed superior outcomes in terms of a shorter ICU length of stay and more ventilator-free days. However, when comparing metronidazole alone vs. metronidazole and any combination of vancomycin, no significant differences were found. Neither the addition of vancomycin enema, nor the time interval changed outcomes. Conclusion: Patients, after a TAC for fCDC, may be placed on either IV metronidazole or PO vancomycin depending upon local antibiograms, and proctitis may be treated with the addition of a vancomycin enema (PR). There was no data to support routine treatment of more than 7

  13. Total proctocolectomy with ileostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scar tissue may form in your belly and cause blockage of your intestines Your wound may break open or heal poorly Poor absorption of nutrients from food Phantom rectum, a feeling that your rectum is still there (similar to people who have amputation of a limb)

  14. Ileostomy and your diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... devices clean Using special deodorants or adding vanilla oil or peppermint extract to your pouch before closing it. Ask your health care provider about this. Control gas, if it is a problem: Eat on a ...

  15. Total proctocolectomy with ileostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammatory bowel disease. This includes ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease . This surgery may also be done if you ... If you have a chronic condition, such as Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis, you may need ongoing medical ...

  16. Living with your ileostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... feelings will help intimacy get better over time. Sports An ostomy should not keep you from being ... distance Lift weights Ski Swim Play most other sports. Ask your doctor which sports you can take ...

  17. Meta-analysis of elective surgical complications related to defunctioning loop ileostomy compared with loop colostomy after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hong Zhi; Nasier, Dilidan; Liu, Bing; Gao, Hua; Xu, Yi Ke

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Defunctioning loop ileostomy (LI) and loop colostomy (LC) are used widely to protect/treat anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. However, it is not known which surgical approach has a lower prevalence of surgical complications after low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma (LARRC). Methods We conducted a literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid, Embase and Cochrane databases to identify studies published between 1966 and 2013 focusing on elective surgical complications related to defunctioning LI and LC undertaken to protect a distal rectal anastomosis after LARRC. Results Five studies (two randomized controlled trials, one prospective non-randomized trial, and two retrospective trials) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Outcomes of 1,025 patients (652 LI and 373 LC) were analyzed. After the construction of a LI or LC, there was a significantly lower prevalence of sepsis (p=0.04), prolapse (p=0.03), and parastomal hernia (p=0.02) in LI patients than in LC patients. Also, the prevalence of overall complications was significantly lower in those who received LIs compared with those who received LCs (p<0.0001). After closure of defunctioning loops, there were significantly fewer wound infections (p=0.006) and incisional hernias (p=0.007) in LI patients than in LC patients, but there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of overall complications. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that a defunctioning LI may be superior to LC with respect to a lower prevalence of surgical complications after LARRC. PMID:26274752

  18. Manipulation of starch bioaccessibility in wheat endosperm to regulate starch digestion, postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and gut hormone responses: a randomized controlled trial in healthy ileostomy participants12

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Cathrina H; Grundy, Myriam ML; Grassby, Terri; Vasilopoulou, Dafni; Frost, Gary S; Butterworth, Peter J; Berry, Sarah EE; Sanderson, Jeremy; Ellis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cereal crops, particularly wheat, are a major dietary source of starch, and the bioaccessibility of starch has implications for postprandial glycemia. The structure and properties of plant foods have been identified as critical factors in influencing nutrient bioaccessibility; however, the physical and biochemical disassembly of cereal food during digestion has not been widely studied. Objectives: The aims of this study were to compare the effects of 2 porridge meals prepared from wheat endosperm with different degrees of starch bioaccessibility on postprandial metabolism (e.g., glycemia) and to gain insight into the structural and biochemical breakdown of the test meals during gastroileal transit. Design: A randomized crossover trial in 9 healthy ileostomy participants was designed to compare the effects of 55 g starch, provided as coarse (2-mm particles) or smooth (<0.2-mm particles) wheat porridge, on postprandial changes in blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, lipids, and gut hormones and on the resistant starch (RS) content of ileal effluent. Undigested food in the ileal output was examined microscopically to identify cell walls and encapsulated starch. Results: Blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide concentrations were significantly lower (i.e., 33%, 43%, 40%, and 50% lower 120-min incremental AUC, respectively) after consumption of the coarse porridge than after the smooth porridge (P < 0.01). In vitro, starch digestion was slower in the coarse porridge than in the smooth porridge (33% less starch digested at 90 min, P < 0.05, paired t test). In vivo, the structural integrity of coarse particles (∼2 mm) of wheat endosperm was retained during gastroileal transit. Microscopic examination revealed a progressive loss of starch from the periphery toward the particle core. The structure of the test meal had no effect on the amount or pattern of RS output. Conclusion: The structural integrity of wheat

  19. Children with Ileostomies (for Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that happens, your child can go to the school nurse. Or you might pick up your child for ... visit the principal, the classroom teacher, the physical education teacher, and the nurse to explain your child’s needs. You’ll find ...

  20. Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... have an opening in your belly called a stoma. Waste will pass through the stoma into a pouch that collects it. You will need to take care of your stoma and empty the pouch. Below are some questions ...

  1. Large bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... before their surgery. This includes most sports, travel, gardening, hiking, other outdoor activities, and most types of ... diet Changing your ostomy pouch Ileostomy and your child Ileostomy and your diet Ileostomy - caring for your ...

  2. Total proctocolectomy and ileal - anal pouch

    MedlinePlus

    ... before their surgery. This includes most sports, travel, gardening, hiking, and other outdoor activities, and most types ... colitis Patient Instructions Bland diet Ileostomy and your child Ileostomy and your diet Ileostomy - caring for your ...

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids in ileal effluent after consuming different foods containing microencapsulated fish oil powder - an ileostomy study.

    PubMed

    Sanguansri, Luz; Shen, Zhiping; Weerakkody, Rangika; Barnes, Mary; Lockett, Trevor; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3 LCPUFA), [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)], after consuming fish oil gelatine capsules or different food products fortified with microencapsulated fish oil, was determined using human ileostomates. The total amount of ω3 LCPUFA consumed per dose of fish oil capsule was 266 mg while that for fortified orange juice, yoghurt and cereal bar was 284 mg per serving of food product. In a time course experiment ω3 LCPUFA was measured in ileal effluent over 24 h post ingestion. Only 0.58-0.73% of the total ω3 LCPUFA dose was recovered in the ileal effluent irrespective of whether the fish oil was delivered in a gelatine capsule or in the form of a microencapsulated powder incorporated into fortified foods. Excretion of ω3 LCPUFA was detected in the 2-18 h effluent collections with none detected at 0 h or 24 h. post ingestion. The transit time of the minimal amount of ω3 LCPUFA that remained in the ileal effluent was dependent on the method of delivery of the fish oil. The ω3 LCPUFA content in the ileal effluent peaked at 2-8 h and declined after 10 h after consumption of fish oil capsules and fortified orange juice. In contrast, two peaks in ω3 LCPUFA content were observed in the ileal effluent, first at 2-8 h and again at 14-16 h, after consumption of fortified yoghurt and cereal bar. The highest recovery of the small amount of ω3 LCPUFA in the ileal effluent at 14-16 h was obtained when fortified cereal bar was consumed. The results suggest that the delivery of fish oil through food products fortified with microencapsulated fish oil does not compromise the bioavailability of the ω3 LCPUFA as evidence by no statistical differences detected in the remaining portion of ω3 LCPUFA in the ileal effluent (p = 0.58). However, the food matrix in which the microencapsulated oil was delivered may alter the transit kinetics of the ω3 LCPUFA through the small intestine. PMID:22992723

  4. Low zinc status and absorption exist in infants with jejunostomies or ileostomies which persists after intestinal repair

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is very little data regarding trace mineral nutrition in infants with small intestinal ostomies. Here we evaluated 14 infants with jejunal or ileal ostomies to measure their zinc absorption and retention and biochemical zinc and copper status. Zinc absorption was measured using a dual-tracer s...

  5. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bowel are reconnected. In some cases, a colostomy or ileostomy is needed. The blockage of arteries ... Intestinal infarction may require a colostomy or ileostomy, which may be ... is common in these cases. People who have a large amount ...

  6. Intestinal obstruction repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal wall. This may be done using a colostomy , ileostomy , or mucous fistula. The surgeon will also ... which may cause life-threatening problems Problems with colostomy or ileostomy Temporary paralysis (freezing up) of the ...

  7. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Internal Use § 357.803 Definitions. As used in this subpart: (a) Colostomy. An external operative opening... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An...

  8. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Internal Use § 357.803 Definitions. As used in this subpart: (a) Colostomy. An external operative opening... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An...

  9. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Internal Use § 357.803 Definitions. As used in this subpart: (a) Colostomy. An external operative opening... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An...

  10. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Internal Use § 357.803 Definitions. As used in this subpart: (a) Colostomy. An external operative opening... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An...

  11. 21 CFR 357.803 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Internal Use § 357.803 Definitions. As used in this subpart: (a) Colostomy. An external operative opening... from conditions such as colostomies, ileostomies, or fecal incontinence. (c) Ileostomy. An...

  12. 42 CFR 488.110 - Procedural guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Injections Parenteral fluids Tube feeding/gastrostomy Colostomy/ileostomy Respiratory therapy Tracheostomy... —Rehabilitation service —Colostomy/ileostomy care —Respiratory care —Tracheostomy care —Suctioning —Tube feeding.../Ileostomy, Respiratory Care, Tracheostomy Care, Suctioning, Tube Feeding • Rehabilitative Services...

  13. 42 CFR 488.110 - Procedural guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Injections Parenteral fluids Tube feeding/gastrostomy Colostomy/ileostomy Respiratory therapy Tracheostomy... —Rehabilitation service —Colostomy/ileostomy care —Respiratory care —Tracheostomy care —Suctioning —Tube feeding.../Ileostomy, Respiratory Care, Tracheostomy Care, Suctioning, Tube Feeding • Rehabilitative Services...

  14. 42 CFR 488.110 - Procedural guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Injections Parenteral fluids Tube feeding/gastrostomy Colostomy/ileostomy Respiratory therapy Tracheostomy... —Rehabilitation service —Colostomy/ileostomy care —Respiratory care —Tracheostomy care —Suctioning —Tube feeding.../Ileostomy, Respiratory Care, Tracheostomy Care, Suctioning, Tube Feeding • Rehabilitative Services...

  15. 42 CFR 488.110 - Procedural guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Injections Parenteral fluids Tube feeding/gastrostomy Colostomy/ileostomy Respiratory therapy Tracheostomy... —Rehabilitation service —Colostomy/ileostomy care —Respiratory care —Tracheostomy care —Suctioning —Tube feeding.../Ileostomy, Respiratory Care, Tracheostomy Care, Suctioning, Tube Feeding • Rehabilitative Services...

  16. Loperamide

    MedlinePlus

    ... with ileostomies (surgery to create an opening for waste to leave the body through the abdomen). Loperamide ... it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).Unneeded medications ...

  17. Crohn disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements to help keep your bones strong Vitamin B12 to prevent anemia If you have an ileostomy, ... joints Lack of important nutrients, such as vitamin B12 and iron Problems with maintaining a healthy weight

  18. Total abdominal colectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... The procedure is done for people who have: Crohn disease that has not spread to the rectum or ... more surgery and an ileostomy if you have Crohn disease and it spreads to your rectum. Most people ...

  19. Crohn disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... beans. Ask your doctor about extra vitamins and minerals you may need, such as: Iron supplements (if ... intestine Surgeries that may be done include: Ileostomy Removal of part of the large bowel or small ...

  20. Olive oil phenols are absorbed in humans.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Maud N; Zock, Peter L; Roodenburg, Annet J C; Leenen, Rianne; Katan, Martijn B

    2002-03-01

    Animal and in vitro studies suggest that olive oil phenols are effective antioxidants. The most abundant phenols in olive oil are the nonpolar oleuropein- and ligstroside-aglycones and the polar hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the metabolism of those phenols in humans. We measured their absorption in eight healthy ileostomy subjects. We also measured urinary excretion in the ileostomy subjects and in 12 volunteers with a colon. Subjects consumed three different supplements containing 100 mg of olive oil phenols on separate days in random order. Ileostomy subjects consumed a supplement with mainly nonpolar phenols, one with mainly polar phenols and one with the parent compound oleuropein-glycoside. Subjects with a colon consumed a supplement without phenols (placebo) instead of the supplement with oleuropein-glycoside. Ileostomy effluent and urine were collected for 24 h after supplement intake. Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol concentrations were low (< 4 mol/100 mol of intake) in the ileostomy effluent, and no aglycones were detected. We estimated that the apparent absorption of phenols was at least 55-66% of the ingested dose. Absorption was confirmed by the excretion of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol in urine. In ileostomy subjects, 12 mol/100 mol and in subjects with a colon, 6 mol/100 mol of the phenols from the nonpolar supplement were recovered in urine as tyrosol or hydroxytyrosol. In both subject groups, 5--6 mol/100 mol of the phenols was recovered from the polar supplement. When ileostomy subjects were given oleuropein-glycoside, 16 mol/100 mol was recovered in 24-h urine, mainly in the form of hydroxytyrosol. Thus, humans absorb a large part of ingested olive oil phenols and absorbed olive oil phenols are extensively modified in the body. PMID:11880564

  1. Microbiota diversity and stability of the preterm neonatal ileum and colon of two infants

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Eoin; Guinane, Caitriona M; Ryan, C Anthony; Dempsey, Eugene M; Murphy, Brendan P; O'Toole, Paul W; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The composition of the microbiota associated with the human ileum and colon in the early weeks of life of two preterm infants was examined, with particular emphasis on the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium members. Culturing work showed that bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the ileostomy changed over time, compared with the colostomy effluent where there was far less variation. The colostomy infant was dominated by two phyla, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, while in the ileostomy samples, Proteobacteria emerged at the expense of Actinobacteria. Bacteroidetes were only detected following the reversal of the ileostomy in the final fecal sample and were not detected in any colonic fluid samples. Clostridia levels were unstable in the colostomy fluid, suggesting that the ileostomy/colostomy itself influenced the gut microbiota, in particular the strict anaerobes. Pyrosequencing analysis of microbiota composition indicated that bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are among the dominant genera in both the ileal and colonic fluids. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli levels were unstable in the ileostomy fluid, with large reductions in numbers and relative proportions of both observed. These decreases were characterized by an increase in proportions of Streptococcus and Enterobacteriaceae. Clostridium was detected only in the colonic effluent, with large changes in the relative proportions over time. PMID:23349073

  2. Treatment of Crohn's disease recurrence after ileoanal anastomosis by azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Berrebi, W; Chaussade, S; Bruhl, A L; Pariente, A; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Couturier, D

    1993-08-01

    Ileoanal anastomosis is a surgical procedure performed in patients with ulcerative colitis. In a small number of patients operated on for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease occurs in the reservoir, mimicking pouchitis, and may lead to pouch excision and to a permanent terminal ileostomy. Two patients with recurrent Crohn's disease in the reservoir after ileoanal anastomosis were treated with azathioprine for 18 and 24 months, respectively. Azathioprine induced a complete clinical and endoscopic remission. These two observations suggested that immunosuppressive drugs were a good option for permanent ileostomy in cases of recurrence of Crohn's disease in the reservoir after ileoanal anastomosis. PMID:8344116

  3. Over-the-scope-clipping system for anastomotic leak after colorectal surgery: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hirotoshi; Kikuchi, Akifumi; Okazaki, Satoshi; Ishiguro, Megumi; Ishikawa, Toshiaki; Iida, Satoru; Uetake, Hiroyuki; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    An anastomotic leak is one of the major complications following colorectal surgery. Standard treatments for anastomotic leak are total parenteral nutrition or temporary ileostomy. The over-the-scope-clipping (OTSC) system was originally developed to treat intestinal perforation or to close the tissue after natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Two cases of successful management of an anastomotic leak after colorectal surgery using the OTSC system are reported. One patient avoided a temporary ileostomy. In the other, hospitalization was shortened by the use of the OTSC system. The OTSC system can be a potential option in the management of anastomotic leaks after colorectal surgery. PMID:24976736

  4. 42 CFR 483.25 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., or ileostomy care; (4) Tracheostomy care; (5) Tracheal suctioning; (6) Respiratory care; (7) Foot... duplicate drug therapy); or (ii) For excessive duration; or (iii) Without adequate monitoring; or (iv...) Residents who have not used antipsychotic drugs are not given these drugs unless antipsychotic drug...

  5. 42 CFR 483.25 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., or ileostomy care; (4) Tracheostomy care; (5) Tracheal suctioning; (6) Respiratory care; (7) Foot... duplicate drug therapy); or (ii) For excessive duration; or (iii) Without adequate monitoring; or (iv...) Residents who have not used antipsychotic drugs are not given these drugs unless antipsychotic drug...

  6. 42 CFR 483.25 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., or ileostomy care; (4) Tracheostomy care; (5) Tracheal suctioning; (6) Respiratory care; (7) Foot... duplicate drug therapy); or (ii) For excessive duration; or (iii) Without adequate monitoring; or (iv...) Residents who have not used antipsychotic drugs are not given these drugs unless antipsychotic drug...

  7. 42 CFR 483.25 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., or ileostomy care; (4) Tracheostomy care; (5) Tracheal suctioning; (6) Respiratory care; (7) Foot... duplicate drug therapy); or (ii) For excessive duration; or (iii) Without adequate monitoring; or (iv...) Residents who have not used antipsychotic drugs are not given these drugs unless antipsychotic drug...

  8. Local regulation of postprandial motor responses in ileal pouches

    PubMed Central

    Mularczyk, A; Contessini-Avesan..., E; Cesana, B; Bianchi, P; Basilisco, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Local mechanisms are involved in the postprandial regulation of ileal tone in healthy subjects, but whether these mechanisms affect the postprandial tonic response of ileal pouches has not yet been investigated.
AIMS—To study the effect of a meal on pouch tone and phasic motor activity in patients with gut continuity or ileostomy and, in the latter group, the effect of a pouch perfusion with chyme or saline.
PATIENTS—Twenty patients with ileal pouches: 10 with gut continuity and 10 with ileostomy.
METHODS—Pouch tone and the frequency of phasic volume events were recorded with a barostat under fasting and postprandial conditions and after perfusion of the isolated pouch with chyme or saline.
RESULTS—The meal increased pouch tone and the frequency of phasic volume events in the patients with gut continuity, but not in those with ileostomy. Pouch perfusion with chyme induced a greater increase in pouch tone than saline.
CONCLUSIONS—The meal stimulated pouch tone and phasic motor activity. These effects were at least partially related to local pouch stimulation by intraluminal contents.


Keywords: ileal pouches; postprandial motor responses; ileal tone; ileostomy; motor activity; barostat PMID:10486368

  9. Episiotomy dehiscence that required intestinal diversion.

    PubMed

    Rose, Carl H; Blessitt, Kristi L; Araghizadeh, Farshid; Morrison, John C

    2005-11-01

    Postpartum episiotomy dehiscence is a rare complication of vaginal delivery. Forceps-assisted vaginal delivery over mediolateral episiotomy was complicated by infection and dehiscence with rectal injury. A diverting ileostomy was used to permit healing. Episiotomy infection requires early recognition and thorough evaluation to exclude occult rectal injury. PMID:16260226

  10. The Ostomy: Part One of Two Parts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Rosemary C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Teaches nurses to identify four common indications for fecal diversion surgery: list three types of colostomies; distinguish a colostomy from an ileostomy; describe the two basic methods of colostomy management; and identify factors that influence the choice of method of colostomy care. (CT)

  11. Specialized Health Care Procedures in the Schools: Training and Service Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Fredrick, Laura D.; Best, Sherwood; Dykes, Mary Kay; Cohen, Elisabeth Tucker

    2000-01-01

    A study involving 342 nonmedical personnel found that although the teachers and paraprofessionals regularly performed health care procedures for students with disabilities, only about half reported being very knowledgeable about them. Procedures most commonly performed solely by teachers and paraprofessionals were colostomy/ileostomy care, tube…

  12. Is STEP the future for patients requiring proctocolectomy? A new therapeutic proposal from pediatric experience

    PubMed Central

    Mangray, Hansraj; Ghimenton, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a pediatric case of medically unmanageable juvenile colonic polyposis, initially treated with subtotal colectomy and an ileostomy followed by a proctectomy, ileal-J-pouch and serial transverse enteroplasties (STEP) of the distal ileum. The STEP procedure in an adequate length was able to control stooling of our patient. PMID:26273442

  13. Ostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... examples are Ileostomy - the bottom of the small intestine (ileum) is attached to the stoma. This bypasses the colon, rectum and anus. Colostomy - ... urine to the bladder are attached to the stoma. This bypasses the bladder. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  14. [Treatment of a severe Clostridium difficile infection with colonic lavages. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Quezada, Felipe; Castillo, Richard; Villalón, Constanza; Zúñiga, José Miguel; Manterola, Carla; Molina, María Elena; Bellolio, Felipe; Urrejola, Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    A loop ileostomy with intraoperative anterograde colonic lavage has been described as an alternative to colectomy in the management of cases of Clostridium difficile infection refractory to medical treatment. We report a 69 years old diabetic women admitted with a septic shock. An abdominal CAT scan showed a pan-colitis that seemed to be infectious. A polymerase chain reaction was positive for Clostridium Difficile. Due to the failure to improve after full medical treatment, a derivative loop ileostomy and intra-operatory colonic lavage were performed, leaving a Foley catheter in the proximal colon. In the postoperative period, anterograde colonic instillations of Vancomycin flushes through the catheter were performed every 6 hours. Forty eight hours after surgery, the patient improved. A colonoscopy prior to discharge showed resolution of the pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:26203580

  15. The Appendix and Aganglionosis. A Note of Caution—How the Histology Can Mislead the Surgeon in Total Colonic Hirschsprung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Victoria Alison; Levitt, Marc A.; Baker, Peter; Minneci, Peter; Deans, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a child with presumed total colonic Hirschsprung disease (HD) to highlight the problems the surgeon is likely to encounter if he/she relies on the appendix alone for histopathologic diagnosis. A newborn male infant, who was presumed to have total colonic aganglionosis when the appendix was found to be aganglionic at the time of initial exploratory laparoscopy, was managed with an ileostomy in the newborn period; however, at the time of his planned pull-through procedure, the rectal biopsy revealed normal ganglion cells. The child was subsequently managed with ileostomy closure and observed for normal feeding and stooling prior to discharge home. We discuss the histopathologic findings of the appendix in separate cases of confirmed total colonic HD seen in our center, and review the normal histopathologic findings of the appendix. PMID:26171305

  16. Marathon without a colon: salt and water balance in endurance running ileostomates.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, P.

    1984-01-01

    Five trained ileostomates completed a marathon in a cool environment without ill effect. During the race, the ileostomy losses of sodium (1.0-2.7 mmol.h-1) and of water (9.2-19 ml.h-1) were small, but urinary excretion of sodium was very low (0.2-0.75 mmol.h-1) despite drinking a combination of water and glucose-electrolyte solution. The concentration of potassium in the ileostomy discharge tended to increase, also suggesting a sodium retaining state. Healthy ileostomates after suitable training are successful marathon runners, but the prevalence of mild salt depletion in ileostomates generally suggests that it may be advisable for them to take only glucose-electrolyte solutions when competing at any ambient temperature or when preparing for a marathon which is to take place in a warm environment. Images p295-a PMID:6525499

  17. Multi-stage resection and repair for the treatment of adult giant sacrococcygeal teratoma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    SHENG, QIN-SONG; XU, XIANG-MING; CHENG, XIAO-BIN; WANG, WEI-BING; CHEN, WEN-BIN; LIN, JIAN-JIANG; XU, JIA-HE

    2015-01-01

    Sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT) is a sacrococcygeal neoplasm derived from more than one primitive germ layer and is only occasionally encountered in adults. The primary treatment for all primary SCTs is surgical excision. The present study reports the case of a giant SCT in a middle-aged female with a history lasting >3 decades. Multi-staged surgical treatment was performed, including ileostomy plus tumor excision, four debridement plus flap repair procedures, and closure of the ileostomy. Follow-up showed improved quality of life without evidence of local recurrence after resection. The study also presents a brief overview of the relevant literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of multi-staged surgical treatment for giant SCT in an adult patient. PMID:26171044

  18. Meckel's diverticular perforation presenting as acute abdomen in the second trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Z; Chhabra, S; Kankaria, J; Jenaw, R K

    2016-01-01

    Meckel's diverticular perforation is a rare cause of acute abdomen during pregnancy. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman at 24 weeks of gestation who presented with abdominal pain for 4 days accompanied with abdominal distension, tenderness and guarding in right lower quadrant. Ultrasonography was inconclusive. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with the clinical suspicion of appendicular perforation peritonitis. Intraoperatively, a perforated Meckel's diverticulum was detected. Owing to gross contamination of the peritoneal cavity, a diverticulectomy with ileostomy was performed. She had a normal full-term vaginal delivery, and ileostomy was reversed 1 month after delivery. The physiological and anatomical changes in pregnancy can make a straightforward clinical diagnosis difficult. A high index of suspicion is required to prevent delay in diagnosis and surgical intervention, which could prove detrimental to the mother and fetus. PMID:27507693

  19. Orazipone, a locally acting immunomodulator, ameliorates intestinal radiation injury: A preclinical study in a novel rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Richter, Konrad K.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intestinal radiation injury (radiation enteropathy) is relevant to cancer treatment, as well as to radiation accidents and radiation terrorism scenarios. This study assessed the protective efficacy of orazipone, a locally-acting small molecule immunomodulator. Methods and Materials: Male rats were orchiectomized, a 4-cm segment of small bowel was sutured to the inside of the scrotum, a proximal anteperistaltic ileostomy was created for intraluminal drug administration, and intestinal continuity was re-established by end-to-side anastomosis. After three weeks postoperative recovery, the intestine in the 'scrotal hernia' was exposed locally to single-dose or fractionated X-radiation. Orazipone (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered daily through the ileostomy, either during and after irradiation, or only after irradiation. Structural, cellular, and molecular aspects of intestinal radiation toxicity were assessed two weeks after irradiation. Results: Orazipone significantly ameliorated histologic injury and transforming growth factor-{beta} immunoreactivity levels, both after single-dose and fractionated irradiation. Intestinal wall thickness was significantly reduced after single-dose and nonsignificantly after fractionated irradiation. Mucosal surface area and numbers of mast cells were partially restored by orazipone after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This work (1) demonstrates the utility of the ileostomy rat model for intraluminal administration of response modifiers in single-dose and fractionated radiation studies; (2) shows that mucosal immunomodulation during and/or after irradiation ameliorates intestinal toxicity; and (3) highlights important differences between single-dose and fractionated radiation regimens.

  20. Outcome of surgical treatment of intestinal perforation in typhoid fever

    PubMed Central

    Sümer, Aziz; Kemik, Özgür; Dülger, Ahmet Cumhur; Olmez, Aydemir; Hasirci, Ismail; Kişli, Erol; Bayrak, Vedat; Bulut, Gulay; Kotan, Çetin

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To represent our clinical experience in the treatment of intestinal perforation arising from typhoid fever. METHODS: The records of 22 surgically-treated patients with typhoid intestinal perforation were evaluated retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 18 males and 4 females, mean age 37 years (range, 8-64 years). Presenting symptoms were fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea or constipation. Sixteen cases were subjected to segmental resection and end-to-end anastomosis, while 3 cases received 2-layered primary repair following debridement, one case with multiple perforations received 2-layered primary repair and end ileostomy, one case received segmental resection and end-to-end anastomosis followed by an end ileostomy, and one case received segmental resection and end ileostomy with mucous fistula operation. Postoperative morbidity was seen in 5 cases and mortality was found in one case. CONCLUSION: Intestinal perforation resulting from Salmonella typhi is an important health problem in Eastern and Southeastern Turkey. In management of this illness, early and appropriate surgical intervention is vital. PMID:20806433

  1. The Reversal of Stoma Following Open Abdomen Management.

    PubMed

    Yetişir, Fahri; Şarer, AkgünEbru; Acar, H Zafer; Çiftciler, Erdinç

    2016-06-01

    Bowel stoma formation is very often required during open abdomen (OA) management; we aim to report our stoma reversal series following OA management retrospectively. A retrospective analysis of 31 patients who underwent the reversal of the stoma created during OA management between January 2008 and September 2014 was performed. Twenty-eight of these 31 patients were included in this study. The stoma-related complications are more common after OA management during waiting time interval for reversal. At this time interval, patients with jejunostomy had more stoma-related complications than patients with ileostomy (p = 0.008) and colostomy. (p = 0.001). Waiting time interval was shorter for reversal of jejunostomy than reversal of ileostomy (p = 0.014) and colostomy (p = 0.001). Operation time for jejunostomy (p = 0.016) and colostomy reversal (p = 0.001) were significantly longer than the ileostomy reversal. There was no difference between early and late reversal of stoma regarding morbidity and mortality. The stoma-related complications are more common following OA management during waiting time interval for stoma reversal. The reversal time is more critical for this kind of patients especially with life-threatening complicated jejunostomy. For loop stoma created during OA management, the reversal may be performed after average 50 days without increasing morbidity and mortality. The reversal of end stoma created during OA management has high morbidity. If it is possible, loop stoma should be preferred during OA management. PMID:27358511

  2. Managing severe dermatitis caused by ileal peristomal leakage using a mushroom-type (de Pezzer) catheter in infants: a case series.

    PubMed

    Banani, Seyed Abbas; Banani, Seyed Javad

    2013-12-01

    Skin damage secondary to peristomal leakage is a fairly common complication of ileostomies in infants. Traditional conservative measures, including skin barriers, ointments, and agents to reduce bowel movements, initially may be helpful but not in all patients. The purpose of this case series was to describe a new and relatively simple procedure to temporarily manage severe peristomal dermatitis caused by ileal peristomal leakage in infants. After obtaining informed consent from the parents, a mushroom-type (de Pezzer) catheter was inserted into the ileostomy of 11 1- to 4-month-old infants (seven males, four females) with severe peristomal dermatitis. Eight had total aganglionic colon (TAC), two had meconium ileus (cystic fibrosis), and one had meconium peritonitis due to bowel perforation proximal to ileal atresia. The severity of the peristomal dermatitis improved remarkably in all patients after 2 to 3 days. In eight patients, minimal (if any) dermatitis was noted within 5 to 7 days after tube insertion. Six patients who initially had poor weight gain (mean 345 g/month) developed acceptable weight gain (mean 648 g/month) (P <0.03) within 2 to 4 months. In seven patients with TAC, the tube was maintained for 2 to 4 months until definitive pull-through procedure; in four other patients, the tube remained in place for 3 to 7 days as a step for preoperative build-up. None of the patients developed any complications. The procedure requires the presence of a pediatric or trained surgeon, and care must be taken to prevent iatrogenic damage. In this case series, an appropriate-size, mushroom-type (de Pezzer) catheter placed within the ileostomy was a practical mode for temporary control of ileal peristomal leakage that causes severe peristomal dermatitis in infants, particularly in those not responding to medical therapy. Larger studies are needed to develop evidence-based protocols of care for the prevention and management of ileostoma complications in infants. PMID

  3. The Role of Surgery in the Management of Patients With Refractory Chronic Granulomatous Disease Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Downing, Melissa M.; Kamal, Natasha; Inchauste, Suzanne M.; Khangura, Sajneet K.; Malech, Harry L.; Holland, Steven M.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Heller, Theo; Sherry, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic granulomatous disease is a rare immunodeficiency complicated by dysregulated inflammation and granulomatous complications of the gastrointestinal tract. The management of chronic granulomatous disease colitis presents the dilemma of an immunocompromised host requiring immunosuppressive therapy which can potentiate fatal infections. Objective To identify the types of gastrointestinal surgery performed in patients and determine the role of surgery in the management of refractory colitis. Design and Settings A retrospective single institution chart review was performed. Patients Of 268 patients with chronic granulomatous disease treated at the National Institutes of Health between 1985 and 2011, 98 (37%) were identified as having colitis; 27 (10%) had a history of gastrointestinal luminal surgery. Main outcome measures Patient characteristics, type of gastrointestinal surgery and clinical outcomes were documented. Results A total of 62 gastrointestinal luminal surgeries were performed in 27 patients with chronic granulomatous disease and colitis. All 27 had a history of perineal disease requiring intervention. Four (15%) had additional surgery performed for reasons other than colitis. Otherwise, 12 (44%) had surgery limited to the perineum, 2 (7%) had a segmental resection and 13 (48%) underwent fecal diversion with ileostomy or colostomy. Despite local procedures, 7 (58%) patients in the perineal only group remained symptomatic. Both patients with a segmental resection had persistent perineal disease and 1 had a recurrent colovesicular fistula. Of the 13 ostomy patients, 11 initially received a diverting ostomy. Eight (73%) of these ultimately required additional procedures for refractory disease and 4 (36%) developed peristomal pyoderma gangrenosum. Four patients who underwent proctocolectomy with end ileostomy, either initially (2) or as a definitive procedure (2), experienced resolution of colitis and perineal disease. Limitations This study is

  4. Oral Rehydration Therapy and Feeding Replaces Total Parenteral Nutrition: A Clinical Vignette.

    PubMed

    Wright, Scott Mitchell; Noon, Muhammad Jawad; Greenough, William Bates

    2016-02-01

    A 27-year-old patient with spina bifida and a high output loss of water and electrolytes from her ileostomy was successfully liberated from dependency on total parenteral nutrition and intravenous fluid and electrolyte replacement by the use of a rice-based oral rehydration therapy (ORT). This allowed her to return home to the care of her mother. We suggest that ORT can be effective in the context of modern high-technology settings, as well as in resource-poor situations. PMID:25982236

  5. [Surgical treatment of toxic megacolon complicating pseudomembranous colitis. Apropos of a case, review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Panis, Y; Hautefeuille, P; Hecht, Y; Le Houelleur, J; Gompel, H

    1992-01-01

    Toxic megacolon complicating pseudomembranous colitis has been rarely observed. Only 36 cases have been previously reported. We present herein a new case report in which pseudomembranous colitis was secondary to prophylactic antibiotherapy with pefloxacin for hip prosthesis. Despite specific oral treatment (against Clostridium difficile) by vancomycin, toxic megacolon required urgent subtotal colectomy with ileostomy and sigmoidostomy. Postoperative course was uneventful. Analysis of the reported cases demonstrates the high overall mortality of the series (32%); the procedure of choice seems to be subtotal colectomy, which removes the septic focus, with a 12% operative mortality rate. PMID:1416759

  6. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  7. [A case of total intestinal aganglionosis. 2 years of survival].

    PubMed

    López Gútiérrez, J C; de Agustín, J C; Murcia, J; Carrero, C; Muguerza, R; Soto, C; Utrilla, J G; Lassaletta, L

    1991-10-01

    A two-year-old male is presented. Small bowel aganglionosis was proved to extend to 3 cm below ligament of Treitz. Gastrostomy and ileostomy was done. He received his caloric intake by cyclic home parenteral nutrition trough implantable venous system. At eighteen months of age, intestinal transplantation was refused and reoperation was done. The child underwent Ziegler's miotomymiectomy on 60 cm of aganglionic jejunum. Now at twenty seven months of age he receives cyclic parenteral nutrition, and enteral feedings are being increased slowly. The weight/height was at 91 per 100 standard, intestinal motility appears much better on contrast study and he is developmentally a normal child. PMID:1760266

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Ingimarsson, Johann P; Krambeck, Amy E; Pais, Vernon M

    2016-06-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common affliction, affecting approximately 10% of adults. Potentially presenting with acute abdominal or flank pain, nausea, or emesis, it may pose as a general surgical condition. Therefore, recognition, diagnosis, and management concerns are pertinent to the general surgeon. Furthermore, the risk of nephrolithiasis is increased in common general surgical conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, hyperparathyroidism, and short gut. Nephrolithiasis may be induced as a result of general surgical interventions, including gastric bypass and bowel resection with ileostomy. An understanding of this common disease will improve coordination of patient care between urologists and general surgeons. PMID:27261792

  9. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-07-01

    In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease.We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index < 17.5) or at high risk of nutrition-related problems (modified nutritional risk index < 83.5) were regarded as having a poor nutritional status. Preliminary remnant small bowel length cut-offs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Variables associated with poor nutritional status were assessed retrospectively using Student t tests, chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression analyses.The mean follow-up period was 52.9 months and the mean patient ages at the time of the last bowel surgery and last follow-up were 31.2 and 35.7 years, respectively. The mean remnant small bowel length was 331.8 cm. Forty-three patients (10.9%) underwent ileostomy, 309 (78.4%) underwent combined small bowel and colon resection, 111 (28.2%) had currently active disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P < 0.001), ileostomy (odds ratio: 4.70, P < 0.001), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.16, P < 0.001). The independent factors affecting high nutritional risk were remnant small bowel length ≤230 cm (odds ratio: 2.84, P = 0.012), presence of ileostomy (odds ratio: 3.36, P = 0.025), and currently active disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P < 0.001).Currently active disease, ileostomy, and remnant small

  10. Degloving Injury of Bowel: An Unheard Complication of Surgical Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sandhya; Suneja, Amita; Guleria, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Unsafe abortion is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality. Various types of intestinal injury in form of haematoma, perforation, contusion and transection have been reported. Degloving injury of intestine is one of the rarest complications. We report a case of 32-year-old lady Gravida 4, para 3 admitted with history of induced surgical abortion by a quack with degloving injury to bowel. Though there was no fecal soiling of peritoneal cavity but large segment of bowel was lost. She was managed by end ileostomy and discharged in stable condition. PMID:27437310

  11. Rectovaginal fistula after gastrointestinal tract continuity restoration using a stapler--case report.

    PubMed

    Welanyk, Joanna; Wysocki, Tomasz; Nowobilski, Wiesław; Dobosz, Marek

    2011-12-01

    The authors presented a case of rectovaginal fistula in a 40-year old female patient after gastrointestinal tract continuity restoration (Hartmann's operation) performed because of iatrogenic rectal damage. The most likely cause of rectovaginal fistula development was the erroneous introduction of the stapler into the vagina and sigmoidovaginostomy during an attempt to reconstruct the continuity of the gastrointestinal tract. In order to reconstruct the continuity of the gastrointestinal tract the patient was subject to anterior rectal resection, sigmoidorectostomy, and closure of the fistula inside the vaginal wall by its duplication. Additionally, a double protective ileostomy was performed, which was subject to closure after three months. PMID:22343206

  12. Degloving Injury of Bowel: An Unheard Complication of Surgical Abortion.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sonia; Jain, Sandhya; Suneja, Amita; Guleria, Kiran

    2016-05-01

    Unsafe abortion is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality. Various types of intestinal injury in form of haematoma, perforation, contusion and transection have been reported. Degloving injury of intestine is one of the rarest complications. We report a case of 32-year-old lady Gravida 4, para 3 admitted with history of induced surgical abortion by a quack with degloving injury to bowel. Though there was no fecal soiling of peritoneal cavity but large segment of bowel was lost. She was managed by end ileostomy and discharged in stable condition. PMID:27437310

  13. First Australian isolation of epidemic Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027.

    PubMed

    Riley, Thomas V; Thean, Sarah; Hool, Graham; Golledge, Clayton L

    2009-06-15

    We report the first isolation in Australia of a hypervirulent epidemic strain of Clostridium difficile, PCR ribotype 027. It was isolated from a 43-year-old woman with a permanent ileostomy, who appears to have been infected while travelling in the United States. The isolate was positive for toxin A, toxin B and binary toxin, and resistant to fluoroquinolone antimicrobials, and had characteristic deletions in the tcdC gene. All diagnostic laboratories and health care facilities in Australia should now be on high alert for this organism. PMID:19527210

  14. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS): a case report in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Manop, Jirapa; Chamnanvanakij, Sangkae; Wattanasarn, Charnvit

    2004-11-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare congenital disease with high mortality rate. The authors report a case of a female term infant with massive abdominal distension at birth. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a huge cystic mass resolved after urinary catheterization. Exploratory laparotomy was performed and intraoperative findings were an enlarged urinary bladder, microcolon, short bowel and malrotation of the small intestine. Ladd's procedure, ileostomy and vesicostomy were performed. Pathological findings of rectal biopsy revealed normal ganglion cells. Although prokinetic drugs were given for promoting bowel motility, enteral feedings were not tolerated. She died from septicemia at the age of 50 days. PMID:15825718

  15. Toxic megacolon complicating a first course of Crohn's disease: about two cases.

    PubMed

    Hefaiedh, Rania; Cheikh, Mariem; Ennaifer, Rym; Gharbi, Lassad; Hadj, Najet Bel

    2013-08-01

    Toxic megacolon is a rare and serious complication of Crohn's disease. Because of the associated high morbidity and mortality, early recognition and management of toxic megacolon is important. Through two cases of toxic megacolon complicating Crohn's disease, we assessed the clinical, radiologic and therapeutic characteristics of this complication. A 35-year-old man presented a first course of Crohn's disease treated with corticosteroid. He exhibited sudden severe abdominal pain and distension with shock. A plain abdominal radiography revealed toxic megacolon. He underwent medical therapy, but symptoms not relieved. The patient underwent subtotal colectomy with ileostomy. The resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis. Recovery of digestive continuity was performed. Endoscopic evaluation six months later did not shown recurrence. A 57-year-old man presented with severe acute colitis inaugurating Crohn's disease, was treated with corticosteroid and antibiotics. He exhibited signs of general peritonitis. Computed tomographic examination revealed toxic megacolon with free perforation, showing prominent dilation of the transverse colon and linear pneumatosis. The patient underwent emergent subtotal colectomy and ileostomy. The final histological patterns were consisting with diagnosis of Crohn's disease associated with cytomegalovirus infection. The patient underwent antiviral therapy during 15 days. Because of the high risk of postoperative recurrence, he underwent immunosuppressive therapy. Recovery of digestive continuity was performed successfully. Toxic megacolon in Crohn's disease is a serious turning of this disease. We underscore the importance of early diagnosis of toxic megacolon and rapid surgical intervention if improvement is not observed on medical therapy. PMID:24765512

  16. Comparison of proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis to colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Koskenvuo, L; Mustonen, H; Renkonen-Sinisalo, L; Järvinen, H J; Lepistö, A

    2015-06-01

    Prophylactic surgical options for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) are either colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) or proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). The aim of this study was to analyse the short-term and long-term outcomes of these two operative techniques. All patients with FAP in Finland have been prospectively recorded in a database since 1963 were retrospectively reviewed in this analysis. Altogether 140 (61%) colectomies with IRA and 88 (39%) proctocolectomies with IPAA have been performed. Complications occurred in 28 (21%) patients after IRA and in 26 (30%) patients after IPAA. There were 15 (11%) severe complications for IRA and 5 (6%) for IPAA. Twenty-one (15%) patients of the IRA group ended up in conventional ileostomy whereas 3 (3.4%) patients of the IPAA group had their ileal reservoir converted to an ileostomy (p = 0.01). Cumulative survival for IRA was lower than for the IPAA (p = 0.03), but if accounting only for operations made after the IPAA era had commenced, there was no significant difference. IPAA was associated with improved long-term survival without an increase in postoperative complications. The risk of death after colectomy and IRA seemed to be predominantly related to the remaining risk of rectal cancer. Therefore, we favour proctocolectomy with IPAA as the prophylactic surgical procedure for FAP with intermediate or severe polyposis. PMID:25504366

  17. The Kock pouch reconsidered: an alternative surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Alison; Williams, Julia; Woodhouse, Fran

    2014-09-24

    The psychological impact stoma surgery can have on an individual is well documented within the literature ( White and Hunt, 1997 ; Borwell, 2009 ; Williams, 2005 ; Brown, 2005 ). For many years, surgeons have explored and developed innovations in surgical techniques, in particular restorative procedures with a view of preventing permanent stoma formation; ileal anal pouch (IAP) now being the surgical procedure of choice for treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). However, high morbidity rates are associated with pouch longevity ( Castillo et al 2005 ; Nessar and Wu, 2012 ) and once removed can lead to a high-output ileostomy with risks of electrolyte imbalance and malabsorption. This then creates the dilemma of whether the Kock pouch (KP) should be offered as a surgical option. This article offers a historical perspective of the KP and its place in the surgical management of UC and FAP. This article also presents results from a recent audit funded by the Ileostomy Association (IA), highlighting how patients manage their KP and the importance of maintaining bowel control and being free of an incontinent stoma as a means of coming to terms with their condition. PMID:25251313

  18. Rupture of sigmoid colon caused by compressed air.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wan-Bin; Hu, Ji-Lin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Xian-Xiang; Zhang, Mao-Shen; Liu, Guang-Wei; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Lu, Yun

    2016-03-14

    Compressed air has been generally used since the beginning of the 20(th) century for various applications. However, rupture of the colon caused by compressed air is uncommon. We report a case of pneumatic rupture of the sigmoid colon. The patient was admitted to the emergency room complaining of abdominal pain and distention. His colleague triggered a compressed air nozzle against his anus as a practical joke 2 h previously. On arrival, his pulse rate was 126 beats/min, respiratory rate was 42 breaths/min and blood pressure was 86/54 mmHg. Physical examination revealed peritoneal irritation and the abdomen was markedly distended. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed a large volume of air in the abdominal cavity. Peritoneocentesis was performed to relieve the tension pneumoperitoneum. Emergency laparotomy was done after controlling shock. Laparotomy revealed a 2-cm perforation in the sigmoid colon. The perforation was sutured and temporary ileostomy was performed as well as thorough drainage and irrigation of the abdominopelvic cavity. Reversal of ileostomy was performed successfully after 3 mo. Follow-up was uneventful. We also present a brief literature review. PMID:26973403

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of Gardner syndrome with gastric polyposis: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Guo-Li; Wang, Shi-Lin; Wei, Xue-Ming; Bai, Li

    2008-01-01

    Gardner syndrome (GS) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the presence of colonic polyposis, osteoma and soft tissue tumors. It is regarded as a clinical subgroup of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and may present at any age from 2 mo to 70 years with a variety of symptoms, either colonic or extracolonic. We present a case of a 23-year-old female patient with GS who presented with gastric polyposis and was successively treated with restorative proctocolectomy in combination with ileal pouch anal anastomosis (RPC/IPAA), ileostomy, ileostomy closure operation, snare polypectomy during 8 mo. After operation, the patient took oral traditional Chinese medicine pills made of Fructus mume and Bombyx batryticatu for about 6 mo. The innutrition and anaemia of this patient were gradually improved. Gastroscopy showed that the remnant gastric polypi gradually decreased and finally disappeared 19 mo after the first operation. The patient had 2-3 times of solid stool per day at the time we wrote this paper. PMID:18395919

  20. Rectovaginal fistula in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J L; Stricker, J W; Schoetz, D J; Coller, J A; Veidenheimer, M C

    1989-10-01

    Rectovaginal fistulas in the setting of Crohn's disease present a difficult management dilemma. Some patients with this problem require proctocolectomy, yet other patients with minimal symptoms never require an operation for treatment of the rectovaginal fistula. For a small percentage of patients, local surgical repair of the fistula may be warranted. Since 1980, this study has attempted local repair in seven patients with symptomatic rectovaginal fistulas from Crohn's disease. Five patients underwent staged repair of the fistula. Closure of the colostomy was eventually possible in three of these patients. Two of the three patients have had no evidence of recurrence at followup in excess of two years. The third patient required an ileostomy for intestinal disease and had no recurrence of the fistula. Two patients underwent primary repair of the rectovaginal fistula without fecal diversion; in one of these patients, the fistula recurred ten days after operation, necessitating a diverting ileostomy. The other patient remains cured 26 months after repair. The results of this review indicate that in the setting of quiescent rectal disease, an attempt to repair the fistula can be expected to have a reasonable chance of success. The presence of a rectovaginal fistula in a patient with Crohn's disease does not mandate removal of the rectum. PMID:2791765

  1. Do non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase colonic permeability?

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, A P; Trew, D R; Crump, B J; Nukajam, W S; Foley, J A; Menzies, I S; Creamer, B

    1991-01-01

    Urinary excretion of orally administered lactulose and 51 chromium labelled ethylenediamine tetra-acetate (51Cr-EDTA) was measured in 12 healthy adult subjects and in six patients with ileostomies to assess intestinal permeability. In normal subjects, 24 hour urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA was significantly greater than that of lactulose (mean (SEM) 2.27 (0.15) v 0.50 (0.08)% oral dose; p less than 0.001), but in ileostomy patients recovery of the two markers was the same. In normal subjects, therefore, the difference between the two markers may arise from bacterial break-down of lactulose but not of 51Cr-EDTA in the distal bowel, urinary excretion of lactulose representing small intestinal permeation and that of 51Cr-EDTA representing both small and large intestinal permeation. The markers were then given simultaneously to nine patients receiving non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The 24 hour urinary recovery of 51Cr-EDTA in the patients was significantly greater than normal (4.64 (1.20) v 2.27 (0.15)% oral dose; p less than 0.01), but that of lactulose was not significantly affected. Moreover, the increase in 51Cr-EDTA recovery was most noticeable in the later urine collections. Both of these findings suggest that NSAIDs may increase colonic permeability. PMID:1899408

  2. Spontaneous perforation of Meckel's diverticulum: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Farah, Robleh Hassan; Avala, Prude; Khaiz, Driss; Bensardi, Fatmazahra; Elhattabi, Khalid; Lefriyekh, Rachid; Berrada, Saad; Fadil, Abdelaziz; Zerouali, Najib Ouariti

    2015-01-01

    Meckel's diverticulum is the commonest congenital abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract. Hemorrhage, obstruction and inflammation are the three main categories of complications resulting from Meckel's diverticulum. Spontaneously perforation of Meckel's diverticulum is very rare and mimics acute appendicitis. We report a case of 26 year-old male, who presented since 5 days worsening abdominal pain predominantly in the right iliac fossa associated with high grade fever. On physical examination his abdomen was distended with guarding and rigidity. A provisional diagnosis of appendiculaire peritonitis was made. Our patient had an emergency laparotomy, where a perforated Meckel's diverticulum and advanced peritonitis were discovered. A diverticulectomy with ileostomy were performed. Heterotopic mucosa of diverticulitis was confirmed on histopathology. The patient made an uneventful recovery postoperatively and ileostomy reconstruction was done two months later. This case report is an interesting and unusual case of Meckel's diverticulum complications and highlights the importance of considering Meckel's diverticulum as a differential diagnosis in every patient presenting with acute abdomen. PMID:26175810

  3. Risk factors causing structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage in mid to low rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Woong Bae; Kwak, Jung Myun; Kim, Jin; Um, Jun Won; Kim, Seon Hahn

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk factors causing structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage in patients with mid to low rectal cancer. METHODS: Prospectively collected data of consecutive subjects who had anastomotic leakage after surgical resection for rectal cancer from March 2006 to May 2013 at Korea University Anam Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Two subgroup analyses were performed. The patients were initially divided into the sequelae (stricture, fistula, or sinus) and no sequelae groups and then divided into the permanent stoma (PS) and no PS groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors of structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage. RESULTS: Structural sequelae after anastomotic leakage were identified in 29 patients (39.7%). Multivariate analysis revealed that diversion ileostomy at the first operation increases the risk of structural sequelae [odds ratio (OR) = 6.741; P = 0.017]. Fourteen patients (17.7%) had permanent stoma during the follow-up period (median, 37 mo). Multivariate analysis showed that the tumor level from the dentate line was associated with the risk of permanent stoma (OR = 0.751; P = 0.045). CONCLUSION: Diversion ileostomy at the first operation increased the risk of structural sequelae of the anastomosis, while lower tumor location was associated with the risk of permanent stoma in the management of anastomotic leakage. PMID:26019455

  4. Recycling of jejunal effluent to enable enteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephen; McCain, Scott; Harris, Andrew; McCallion, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman developed severe abdominal pain, distension and faeculent vomiting. CT of abdomen and pelvis revealed small bowel malrotation with a right paraduodenal hernia. At emergency laparotomy, a right paraduodenal hernia containing jejunum and ileum was identified. She had a viable duodenum with 50 cm of ischaemic proximal jejunum which was exteriorised as an end jejunostomy; 180 cm of infarcted jejunum and ileum was resected. The proximal end of 150 cm of healthy ileum was exteriorised as a closed mucous fistula and 50 cm distally a feeding ileostomy was constructed. On day 5 postoperatively, jejunal effluent began to be recycled via her feeding ileostomy and she never required parenteral nutrition. Despite having only 50 cm of jejunum proximal to her stoma, recycling of effluent enabled her electrolytes to remain normal. She put on weight postoperatively and proceeded to closure of her stomas at 6 months, not requiring laparotomy. PMID:24872491

  5. Presence of PAF-acether in stool of patients with pouch ileoanal anastomosis and pouchitis.

    PubMed

    Chaussade, S; Denizot, Y; Valleur, P; Nicoli, J; Raibaud, P; Guerre, J; Hautefeuille, P; Couturier, D; Benveniste, J

    1991-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor is an endogenous phospholipid produced by a wide variety of inflammatory cells. Platelet-activating factor induces severe pathological changes in various organs and, among numerous potent effects, causes bowel necrosis. Pouchitis is a poorly understood complication of ileoanal pouch anastomosis which occurs in patients who undergo surgery for ulcerative colitis. The aim of this study was to measure ileal or fecal platelet-activating factor and lyso platelet-activating factor contents in normal volunteers (n = 12), in patients with terminal ileostomy (n = 7), and in patients with ileoanal anastomosis (n = 15) (8 patients have pouchitis defined by the presence of ulcerations on the reservoir). Fecal samples were processed and assessed for platelet-activating factor by platelet aggregation assay. The aggregating material was further characterized as platelet-activating factor by the following: inhibition of the platelet aggregation it induced by specific platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist (BN 52021; IHB, Le Plessis Robinson, France); abolition of platelet aggregation after incubation with phospholipase A2 but not with lipase A1; and retention time on high-performance liquid chromatography. Stool platelet-activating factor content (in nanograms per gram of stool, mean +/- 1SD) was significantly increased in patients with pouchitis (22.2 +/- 16 ng/g) compared with patients with normal reservoir (1.59 +/- 0.63 ng/g, P less than 0.01), terminal ileostomy (0.59 +/- 0.43 ng/g, P less than 0.01), and healthy controls (0 +/- 0 ng/g of stool, P less than 0.001). Lyso platelet-activating factor (nanograms per gram of stool) was increased in patients with pouchitis (10,704 +/- 5499 ng/g) compared with patients with normal reservoir (4721 +/- 4549 ng/g of stool, P less than 0.05), terminal ileostomy (3042 +/- 4019 ng/g, P less than 0.02), and healthy volunteers (128 +/- 107 ng/g, P less than 0.001). In patients with ileoanal anastomosis and

  6. Ulcerative colitis associated with the herbal weight loss supplement Hydroxycut

    PubMed Central

    Sivarajah, Vernon; Abdul, Quddus; Pardoe, Helen; Lunniss, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A 25-year-old Iranian gentleman was admitted to hospital with severe bloody diarrhoea and abdominal pain. He had similar episodes in the past. On each occasion his symptoms developed following the consumption of the herbal weight loss supplement Hydroxycut Hardcore X. On this admission, a (CT) scan demonstrated bowel wall thickening and peri-colonic fat stranding in the sigmoid colon. On flexible sigmoidoscopy, a continuous length of congested mucosa with multiple small ulcers was seen extending up to the mid-transverse colon, in keeping with ulcerative colitis. Histological analysis of biopsies was taken at the time and confirmed this. He was started on steroids early during his admission but this only provided a transient clinical improvement. The addition of cyclosporine, which was later changed to azathioprine, did not improve his condition either. He therefore underwent an open subtotal colectomy with end ileostomy. He made a slow but steady recovery and was discharged 3 weeks later. PMID:23291814

  7. Colon Adenoma Implicating Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report of a Patient with Postcolectomy Complications.

    PubMed

    Papachatzakis, Y; Tseliou, E; Tatouli, I; Dialoupi, I; Michas, F; Papadopoulou, E; Kousouris, D; Kontogiannis, S; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old patient with myasthenia gravis (MG) due to acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR) who underwent colectomy due to colon adenoma and developed myasthenic crisis and anastomosis leakage after surgery. The patient underwent two plasma exchanges, 4 and 6 days preoperatively, and received intravenous prednisolone and immunoglobulin infusion due to the crisis, which included primarily bulbar symptoms. The patient developed on the 10th postoperative day bowel obstruction symptoms and anastomosis leakage which required surgical repair and ileostomy. Bowel obstruction occurred in a patient with AChR related myasthenia after plasma exchange and during immunosuppression although it is more commonly reported in patients with thymoma related myasthenia. PMID:27610255

  8. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema and pneumomediastinum due to a diastatic rupture of the cecum

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; INTAGLIATA, E.; BASILE, F.; SPATARO, C.; GIULIA, G.; LEANZA, V.; MARCHESE, S.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum usually occurs after esophageal or chest trauma. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema as a presentation of non-traumatic colonic perforation following colorectal cancer or diverticulitis, is very rare. We report a case of a patient with rectal cancer who developed a diastatic cecum retroperitoneal perforation with a secondary pneumo-mediastinum and cervical emphysema. The patient was in treatment with a neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for a low rectal cancer. Treatment consisted in an emergency right hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and performance of distal colonic fistula. The Authors discuss the occurrence of pneumomediastinum and cervical emphysema complicating rectal cancer, pointing out ethio-pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. The importance of performing a diverting colostomy when neoadjuvant chemotherapy is scheduled in patients with stenotic rectal cancer, although not clinically occluded PMID:26888704

  9. Salvage repair of anastomotic dehiscence following colon surgery using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft.

    PubMed

    Uzun, M A; Koksal, N; Ozkan, O F; Kayahan, M; Gumrukcu, G

    2012-04-01

    Anastomotic dehiscence is a serious complication of colorectal surgery that causes death in up to 40% of cases in which it occurs. Edema and inflammation due to abdominal sepsis can prevent the use of standard management (i.e., colostomy, ileostomy or Hartmann's procedure), in which case alternative salvage repair methods are required. The present report describes the treatment of a 73-year-old female patient at high risk of mortality because of intraabdominal sepsis due to suture dehiscence following a right hemicolectomy and ileo-transversostomy. Several surgical repair procedures were tried, but all failed. We then used an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) graft in salvage repair, and this approach proved successful. This is the first report to describe clinical, macroscopic and histopathological findings, following use of an ePTFE graft in colorectal repair in humans. PMID:20694495

  10. Acute Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction (Ogilvie's Syndrome) Following Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Cebola, Monique; Eddy, Eliza; Davis, Suzanne; Chin-Lenn, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO), or Ogilvie's syndrome, is paramount in the management of this condition, which, if unresolved, can progress to bowel ischemia and perforation with significant morbidity and mortality. We present the first case report, to our knowledge, of ACPO following total laparoscopic hysterectomy. We describe the presentation and management of ACPO in a patient who underwent uncomplicated total laparoscopic hysterectomy to treat menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea after declining conservative treatment. Following initial conservative management, the patient rapidly deteriorated and required laparotomy for clinically suspected cecal ischemia. Cecal resection, colonic decompression, and end ileostomy formation were performed. A brief review of the current literature is presented with respect to the case report. PMID:26164536

  11. Considering the benefits of a new stoma appliance: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Trine Møller; Størling, Zenia Marian

    2015-12-10

    For people living with a stoma, leakage is one of the main problems compromising quality of life. The right choice of stoma appliance is therefore of utmost importance. This randomised, controlled clinical trial investigated the benefits of a new stoma appliance, SenSura Mio Convex Soft, specifically for people who experience leakage using a flat stoma appliance. The degree of leakage under the baseplate was measured using a new objective method. The study included 38 participants with an ileostomy or colostomy. Results showed that while being flexible and comfortable, the new appliance reduced leakage significantly and provided a better feeling of security when compared with the participants' own flat stoma appliance. The product was the preferred of the convex stoma appliances in the study. This study demonstrated that it may be a solution for people with a stoma challenged by leakage using flat stoma appliances. PMID:26653717

  12. Rationale and Early Experience with Prophylactic Placement of Mesh to Prevent Parastomal Hernia Formation after Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion and Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Timothy F; Cha, Eugene K; Bochner, Bernard H

    2016-02-01

    Parastomal hernias (PH) represent a clinically significant problem for many patients after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion. The prevalence may be as high as 60% and in some series, up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to the complications of pain, poor fit of an ostomy appliance, leakage, urinary obstruction, and bowel obstruction or strangulation. Due to the potential morbidity associated with PH repair, there have been efforts to prevent PH development at the time of the index surgery. Four randomized trials of prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have demonstrated significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication rates. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors behind its development, and the rationale behind prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion. Additionally, we report our experience with prophylactic mesh placed at radical cystectomy at our institution. PMID:26757903

  13. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema and pneumomediastinum due to a diastatic rupture of the cecum.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, R; Intagliata, E; Basile, F; Spataro, C; Giulia, G; Leanza, V; Marchese, S

    2015-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum usually occurs after esophageal or chest trauma. Subcutaneous cervical emphysema as a presentation of non-traumatic colonic perforation following colorectal cancer or diverticulitis, is very rare. We report a case of a patient with rectal cancer who developed a diastatic cecum retroperitoneal perforation with a secondary pneumomediastinum and cervical emphysema. The patient was in treatment with a neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for a low rectal cancer. Treatment consisted in an emergency right hemi-colectomy with ileostomy and performance of distal colonic fistula. The Authors discuss the occurrence of pneumomediastinum and cervical emphysema complicating rectal cancer, pointing out ethiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. The importance of performing a diverting colostomy when neoadjuvant chemotherapy is scheduled in patients with stenotic rectal cancer, although not clinically occluded. PMID:26888704

  14. Conversion Therapy Using mFOLFOX6 With Panitumumab for Unresectable Liver Metastases From Multiple Colorectal Cancers With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kitajima, Takahito; Okigami, Masato; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old man received a diagnosis of unresectable multiple liver metastases from multiple colorectal cancers with familial adenomatous polyposis. After construction of an ileostomy, modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) with panitumumab was administrated because rectal cancer and sigmoid colon cancer are KRAS wild type. The 13 courses of chemotherapy resulted in a marked reduction in the size of liver metastases and sigmoid colon cancer. Consequently, curative resection with total colectomy, ileal pouch anal anastomosis, and liver metastasis resection with radiofrequency ablation was performed. Progression of KRAS wild-type rectal cancer after chemotherapy suggested that each clone from rectal and sigmoid colon cancer might have a different sensitivity to epidermal growth factor receptor antibody. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed loss of PTEN expression in rectal cancer compared with liver metastases from sigmoid colon cancer, showing that the difference of mFOLFOX6 with panitumumab might be related to activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway. PMID:25437589

  15. A case of repeated small bowel perforations in a short period in a patient with cholesterol crystal embolism.

    PubMed

    Shinozuka, Eriko; Yamada, Takeshi; Kan, Hayato; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Koizumi, Michihiro; Shinji, Seiichi; Arai, Hiroki; Naito, Zenya; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of jejunal perforation related to cholesterol crystal embolism (CCE) in a woman in her seventies. The jejunum was partially resected;histological examination of the resected tissue revealed that the perforation was caused by CCE. On postoperative day 12, computed tomography (CT) showed free air in the abdomen. We then performed a second operation to alleviate the anastomotic leakage. Subsequently, 26 days after the second surgery, CT again showed free air in the abdomen. A third operation was performed, and multiple perforations of the jejunum were detected. She died of multiple organ failure 43 days after the first surgery. The prognosis of CCE with gastrointestinal perforation is reported to beextremely poor, and there is a high rate of anastomotic leakage. Partial resection of the intestine and ileostomy might be useful for removing the intestinal perforations caused by a CCE. Steroid administration should be continued, however, because discontinuation may worsen the problem. PMID:27151477

  16. Cylindroma-like basaloid anal cancer presenting as a large pelvic mass in a patient with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sugong; Tan, Sanda A.; Shon, Wonwoo; Shaw, Christiana M.

    2015-01-01

    Basaloid cancers of the lower gastrointestinal tract are rare. The lack of mucosal involvement of this type of tumor is uncharacteristic and, to our knowledge, has not been described. In addition, the cylindroma-like appearance of this cancer has only a few examples in the literature. A 51-year-old male presented to us with a history of ulcerative colitis (UC) and obstruction of the anal canal. Imaging and colonoscopy revealed an entirely extraluminal tumor. Percutaneous biopsy yielded a diagnosis of cylindroma-like basaloid carcinoma of the anal region. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation resulted in stable disease by RECIST criteria. Surgical planning ensued, which led to R0 resection of the tumor, total colectomy and end ileostomy for his UC, and reconstruction of the perineal defect with a rectus myocutaneous flap. Surveillance at 6 months demonstrated no evidence of disease. PMID:26224891

  17. [A Case of Fournier's Gangrene Caused by Small Intestinal Perforation during Bevacizumab Combination Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takashi; Shinozaki, Hiroharu; Ozawa, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Toshimichi; Kato, Subaru; Wakabayashi, Taiga; Matsumoto, Kenji; Sasakura, Yuuichi; Shimizu, Tetsuichiro; Terauchi, Toshiaki; Kimata, Masaru; Furukawa, Junji; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ogata, Yoshiro

    2016-07-01

    A 51-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for advanced rectal cancer at a hospital. He attended our outpatient clinic 58 months later with pain in the external genitalia, and was diagnosed with local pelvic recurrence and metastasis to the para-aortic lymph node and both adrenal glands. He received a total of 30 Gy of radiation for analgesia; subsequently, chemotherapy(mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab)was initiated. However, extreme left buttock and left femoral pain developed after the 6 courses of chemotherapy. Abdominal CT revealed Fournier's gangrene caused by small intestinal perforation. Emergency drainage under spinal anesthesia was immediately performed. Two additional drainage procedures were required thereafter and an ileostomy was constructed. The patient was discharged 100 days after the initial drainage. This is an extremely rare example of a bevacizumab-related small intestinal perforation that developed into Fournier's gan- grene. PMID:27431640

  18. Secondary pouchitis in a pediatric patient successfully treated by salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yoshiki; Araki, Toshimitsu; Uchida, Keiichi; Matsushita, Kohei; Kawamura, Mikio; Koike, Yuhki; Otake, Kohei; Inoue, Mikihiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Ohi, Masaki; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2016-07-01

    Apart from primary pouchitis, patients with secondary pouchitis caused by surgical complications require surgical management. The use of abdomino-anal salvage surgery to treat secondary pouchitis caused by surgical complications in pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) has not been reported in detail. A girl was diagnosed with UC at 8 years old. She underwent restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) at 9 years old. She presented at 12 years old because of chronic antibiotic-refractory pouchitis. The fistula and stricture failed to improve despite multiple local salvage surgeries and ileostomy construction. At 15 years old, she underwent redo IPAA. The patient was well at 20 years old with no signs of pouchitis. Early treatment by abdomino-anal salvage surgery might be indicated to improve quality of life in pediatric patients with secondary pouchitis caused by surgical complication unresponsive to defunctioning and local salvage surgery. PMID:27097567

  19. Dietary habits after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Chartrand-Lefebvre, C; Heppell, J; Davignon, I; Dubé, S; Pomp, A

    1990-04-01

    Dietary habits of patients who had undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis were assessed and correlated with bowel function. Twenty-four well-adapted patients (11 women, 13 men; mean age 32 years) voluntarily entered the study 30 +/- 4 months after closure of the diverting ileostomy. A standardized questionnaire on 108 food items and a 3-day food journal were used in the assessment. Twenty-one patients had no difficulty in selecting an appropriate diet. Caloric intake was adequate. Specific symptoms associated with several foods were as follows: increased stool frequency (beer, spirits, chinese food), decreased stool consistency (beer, wine, fried fish), perianal irritation (spicy foods), undigested particles (grapefruit, lettuce), odours (eggs). Pasta and bananas were associated with increased stool consistency. The authors believe that these observations may help in dietary counselling after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. PMID:2268807

  20. Colosplenopleural fistula: An unusual colonic fistula in a 44-year-old male with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Michael W.; Lee, Steven

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old male with a history of well-controlled human immunodeficiency virus disease and Crohn's disease presented with fever, cough, and left-sided chest pain with radiation to his back. His medical history was notable for a medically managed spontaneous microperforation of the colon at the splenic flexure 30 months prior, and recurrent left-lower-lobe pneumonia with empyema and a splenic abscess within the past 24 months. CT demonstrated a complex left pleural fluid collection with fistulous connection through the spleen and into the large bowel. The patient tolerated a diverting loop ileostomy without complications and was discharged home with plans for resection of the fistulous tract and splenectomy in several months.

  1. Acute fulminant necrotizing amoebic colitis: a rare and fatal complication of amoebiasis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Onkar; Shukla, Sumit; Raj, Mathur K

    2009-01-01

    Acute Fulminant Necrotizing Amoebic Colitis is a rare complication of amoebiasis that is associated with high mortality. Only one to four such cases are seen per year in large hospitals of India, and only few such cases have been reported in the literature. The condition requires early diagnosis and surgical intervention. We recently cared for a patient who presented with acute abdomen with history of intermittent abdominal pain and diarrhea. Before presenting to our institution he was misdiagnosed as a case of inflammatory bowel disease and had been treated with steroids. On emergency exploration, extensive necrosis and multiple perforations in retroperitoneum involving entire colon were seen. Total colectomy with ileostomy was performed. Postoperative course was marked by septicaemia and multi-organ failure followed by death. This case report emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of acute FAC, and associated high mortality. PMID:19918532

  2. Small cell carcinoma in ulcerative colitis - new treatment option: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The most common type of carcinoma associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) is adenocarcinoma. We present a case of primary rectal small cell carcinoma in a patient with a history of UC. Methods A 34-year-old male diagnosed with UC for 10 years was not consistent with the usual annual follow-up and presented with mucoid-bloody diarrhea. Colonoscopy revealed a rectal mass 2 cm distant from the anal verge. The patient underwent a total proctocolectomy with preservation of the anal sphincters, construction of an ileal reservoir, anastomosis of the reservoir to the anus (J configuration) and protective loop ileostomy. Results Histological examination showed undifferentiated small cell carcinoma. Conclusions This is the first case of small cell carcinoma in a background of UC reported to be treated surgically and the patient and has no reccurence 18 months postoperatively. PMID:21087512

  3. Colon Adenoma Implicating Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report of a Patient with Postcolectomy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Papachatzakis, Y.; Tatouli, I.; Dialoupi, I.; Michas, F.; Papadopoulou, E.; Kousouris, D.; Dimopoulos, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 63-year-old patient with myasthenia gravis (MG) due to acetylcholine receptor antibodies (AChR) who underwent colectomy due to colon adenoma and developed myasthenic crisis and anastomosis leakage after surgery. The patient underwent two plasma exchanges, 4 and 6 days preoperatively, and received intravenous prednisolone and immunoglobulin infusion due to the crisis, which included primarily bulbar symptoms. The patient developed on the 10th postoperative day bowel obstruction symptoms and anastomosis leakage which required surgical repair and ileostomy. Bowel obstruction occurred in a patient with AChR related myasthenia after plasma exchange and during immunosuppression although it is more commonly reported in patients with thymoma related myasthenia. PMID:27610255

  4. Rationale and early experience with prophylactic placement of mesh to prevent parastomal hernia formation after ileal conduit urinary diversion and cystectomy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.; Cha, Eugene K.; Bochner, Bernard H.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernias represent a clinically significant problem for many patients after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion. The prevalence may be as high as 60% and in some series, up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to the complications of pain, poor fit of an ostomy appliance, leakage, urinary obstruction, and bowel obstruction or strangulation. Due to the potential morbidity associated with PH repair, there have been efforts to prevent PH development at the time of the index surgery. Four randomized trials of prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have demonstrated significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication rates. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors behind its development, and the rationale behind prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion. Additionally, we report our experience with prophylactic mesh placed at radical cystectomy at our institution. PMID:26757903

  5. Managing acute colorectal obstruction by "bridge stenting" to laparoscopic surgery: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Bonfante, Pierfrancesco; D’Ambra, Luigi; Berti, Stefano; Falco, Emilio; Cristoni, Massimo Vittorio; Briglia, Romolo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To verify the clinical results of the endoscopic stenting procedure for colorectal obstructions followed by laparoscopic colorectal resection with “one stage anastomosis”. METHODS: From March 2003 to March 2009 in our surgical department, 48 patients underwent endoscopic stenting for colorectal occlusive lesion: 30 males (62.5%) and 18 females (37.5%) with an age range from 40 years to 92 years (median age 69.5). All patients enrolled in our study were diagnosed with an intestinal obstruction originating from the colorectal tract without bowel perforation signs. Obstruction was primitive colorectal cancer in 45 cases (93.7%) and benign anastomotic stricture in 3 cases (6.3%). RESULTS: Surgical resection was totally laparoscopic in 69% of cases (24 patients) while 17% (6 patients) of cases were video-assisted due to the local extension of cancer with infiltrations of surrounding structures (urinary bladder in 2 cases, ileus and iliac vessels in the others). In 14% of cases (5 patients), resection was performed by open surgery due to the high American Society of Anesthesiologists score and the elderly age of patients (median age of 89 years). We performed a terminal stomy in only 7 patients out of 35, 6 colostomies and one ileostomy (in a total colectomy). In the other 28 cases (80%), we performed bowel anastomosis at the same time as resection, employing a temporary ileostomy only in 5 cases. CONCLUSION: Colorectal stenting transforms an emergency operation in to an elective operation performable in a totally laparoscopic manner, limiting the confection of colostomy with its correlated complications. PMID:23493809

  6. Single-Site Laparoscopic Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bedros, Nicole; Hakiman, Hekmat; Araghizadeh, Farshid Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgery has been firmly established; however, few reports addressing this technique in the inflammatory bowel disease population exist. Methods: We conducted a case-matched retrospective review of 20 patients who underwent single-site laparoscopic procedures for inflammatory bowel disease compared with 20 matched patients undergoing multiport laparoscopic procedures. Data regarding these patients were tabulated in the following categories: demographic characteristics, operative parameters, and perioperative outcomes. Results: A wide range of cases were completed: 9 ileocolic resections, 7 cases of proctocolectomy with end ileostomy or ileal pouch anal anastomosis, 2 cases of proctectomy with ileal pouch anal anastomosis, and 2 total abdominal colectomies with end ileostomy were all matched to equivalent multiport laparoscopic cases. No single-incision cases were converted to multiport laparoscopy, and 2 single-incision cases (10%) were converted to an open approach. For single-incision cases, the mean length of stay was 7.7 days, the mean time to oral intake was 3.3 days, and the mean period of intravenous analgesic use was 5.0 days. There were no statistically significant differences between single-site and multiport cases. Conclusions: Single-site laparoscopic surgery is technically feasible in inflammatory bowel disease. The length of stay and period of intravenous analgesic use (in days) appear to be higher than those in comparable series examining outcomes of single-site laparoscopic colorectal surgery, and the outcomes are comparable with those of multiport laparoscopy. This may be because of the nature of inflammatory bowel disease, limiting the benefits of a single-site approach in this population. PMID:24960490

  7. Endorectal ileoanal anastomosis with isoperistaltic ileal reservoir after colectomy and mucosal proctectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Fonkalsrud, E W

    1984-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with chronic ulcerative colitis refractory to medical therapy and four with multiple polyposis have undergone total colectomy, mucosal protectomy, and endorectal ileal pull-through with ileoanal anastomosis at the UCLA Medical Center during the past 12 years (mean age, 19.4 years). Thirty-eight patients underwent second-stage closure of the ileostomy with construction of a side-to-side isoperistaltic ileal reservoir (mean, 6 months) after the ileal pullthrough operation. The anastomosis extended over a 20-30 cm distance and the lower end was placed within 6-8 cm of the ileonanal anastomosis. Transient reservoir inflammation, which occurred in half of the patients, was reduced by the use of oral metranidazole and was rarely found 6 months after operation. No patients died during the early or late post-operative periods. Cuff abscess in two patients and obstruction of the ileal reservoir outlet have required takedown of the reservoir (two patients) or temporary ileostomy (three patients). Of the 38 patients who have undergone lateral ileal reservoir construction, 33 have achieved a good to excellent result with complete continence and an average of five stools per 24 hours after 6 months. At least 12 patients now participate in competitive athletics; normal sexual activity has been achieved in all but one patient. Seven patients await construction of the reservoir. Although a technically difficult operation, the long-term results (mean, 19.4 months) indicate that the pullthrough operation is a good alternative to standard proctocolectomy. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6696530

  8. Intraepithelial lymphocytosis is a frequent finding in biopsies from ileal pouch-anal anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, David F; Walsh, Joanna C; Tyler, Andrea D; Ben-Bassat, Ofer; Silverberg, Mark S; Riddell, Robert H; Kirsch, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Following restorative proctocolectomy with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, the small bowel mucosa undergoes several specific histologic adaptions, which may be unrelated to the underlying disease or symptoms of pouchitis. An increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) has not been described as part of this spectrum. Mucosal biopsies of the ileal pouch and afferent limb of 230 patients (mean age: 45.7y [18.3-74.7], gender [female/male]: 117/113) with a functioning ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (mean time since ileostomy closure: 10.8months) and associated clinically annotated outcome data were assessed for IELs/100 enterocytes. Forty-two patients (18.3%) showed an increase in IELs (≥20 IELs/100 enterocytes [range 20-39]), in pouch and/or afferent limb biopsies. Intraepithelial lymphocytosis was more commonly observed in afferent limb compared to pouch biopsies (18.8% vs 8.3%; P = .42) and in familial adenomatous polyposis compared to ulcerative colitis patients (16% vs 8%; P = 0.36), but neither difference reached statistical significance. No cases with increased IELs displayed severe villous blunting. Increased IELs were not significantly associated with age, sex, ethnicity, smoking history, time since ileostomy, use of antibiotics, biologic agents, anti-diarrheal agents or probiotics, C-reactive protein levels or differential white cell count. None of the 42 patients with increased IELs had positive celiac serology (anti-human tissue transglutaminase IgA [ELISA] with corresponding total serum IgA). Intraepithelial lymphocytosis in pouch biopsies may represent a subclinical response to an altered bacterial microenvironment. Pathologists should be aware that intraepithelial lymphocytosis is part of the spectrum of changes in pouch biopsies, and only rarely is due to celiac disease. PMID:27063473

  9. T- and B-cell immune responses of patients who had undergone colectomies to oral administration of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Ty21a vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kilhamn, Jan; Lundin, Samuel B; Brevinge, Hans; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Jertborn, Marianne

    2003-05-01

    The capacity of an oral live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Ty21a vaccine to induce immune responses in patients who had undergone colectomies because of ulcerative colitis was evaluated, and these responses were compared with those of healthy volunteers. Purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from peripheral blood were stimulated in vitro by using the heat-killed Ty21a vaccine strain, and the proliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production were measured before and 7 or 8 days after vaccination. Salmonella-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibody responses in serum along with IgA antibody responses in ileostomy fluids from the patients who had undergone colectomies were also evaluated. Three doses of vaccine given 2 days apart failed to induce proliferative T-cell responses in all the six patients who had undergone colectomies, and increases in IFN-gamma production were found only among the CD8(+) cells from three of the patients. In contrast, both proliferative responses and increased IFN-gamma production were observed among CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from 3 and 6 of 10 healthy volunteers, respectively. Salmonella-specific IgA and/or IgG antibody responses in serum were observed for five (56%) of nine patients who had undergone colectomies and in 15 (88%) of 17 healthy volunteers. In ileostomy fluids, significant anti-Salmonella IgA antibody titer increases were detected in six (67%) of nine patients who had undergone colectomies. The impaired T- and B-cell immune responses found after vaccination in the circulation of patients who have undergone colectomies may be explained by a diminished colonization of the Ty21a vaccine strain due to the lack of a terminal ileum and colon. PMID:12738643

  10. Use of Valtrac™-Secured Intracolonic Bypass in Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Danyang; Lin, Jianjiang; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of anastomotic leakage (AL) remains a major concern in the early postoperative stage. Because of the relatively high morbidity and mortality of AL in patients with laparoscopic low rectal cancer who receive an anterior resection, a fecal diverting method is usually introduced. The Valtrac™-secured intracolonic bypass (VIB) was used in open rectal resection, and played a role of protecting the anastomotic site. This study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the VIB in protecting laparoscopic low rectal anastomosis and to compare the efficacy and complications of VIB with those of loop ileostomy (LI). Medical records of the 43 patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective laparoscopic low anterior resection and received VIB procedure or LI between May 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including the patients’ demographics, clinical features, and operative data. Twenty-four patients received a VIB and 19 patients a LI procedure. Most of the demographics and clinical features of the groups, including Dukes stages, were similar. However, the median distance of the tumor edge from the anus verge in the VIB group was significantly longer (7.5 cm; inter-quartile range [IQR] 7.0–9.5 cm) than that of the L1 group (6.0 cm; IQR 6.0–7.0 cm). None of the patients developed clinical AL. The comparisons between the LI and the VIB groups were adjusted for the significant differences in the tumor level of the groups. After adjustment, the LI group experienced longer overall postoperative hospital stay (14.0 days, IQR: 12.0, 16.0 days; P < 0.001) and incurred higher costs ($6300 (IQR: $5900, $6600)) than the VIB group (7.0 days, $4800; P < 0.05). Stoma-related complications in the ileostomy group included dermatitis (n = 2), stoma bleeding (n = 1), and wound infection after closure (n = 2). No BAR-related complications occurred. The mean time to Valtrac™ ring loosening was 14.1 ± 3

  11. Bariatric surgery and implications for stoma care.

    PubMed

    Swash, Carolyn

    In the UK, 62% of the population are now described as being either overweight or obese. People with weight-management issues are more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as having an increased risk of cancer, including bowel cancer. Following the initial National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance in 2006, revised in 2014, health professionals have a more proactive role in identifying people with weight-management issues and supporting them to achieve a weight that helps reduce their health risks. This includes referrals to bariatric surgeons for consideration for surgery if appropriate. One particular surgical procedure, the Roux-en-Y, is not reversible and alters the capacity of the stomach and function of the small bowel in order to achieve weight loss. Using a case study, this article will highlight the role of the stoma nurse in managing a patient, who previously had a Roux-en-Y procedure for weight loss and subsequently needed formation of a loop ileostomy after surgery for bowel cancer. PMID:26973009

  12. Beneficial effects of naloxone in a patient with intestinal pseudoobstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Schang, J.C.; Devroede, G.

    1985-06-01

    A 15-day course of Naloxone treatment was given to a patient with intestinal pseudoobstruction who had previously undergone subtotal colectomy with terminal ileostomy for invalidating constipation. The effects of the drug were assessed according to symptoms, by recording the myoelectric activity of the stomach, and by measuring gastric emptying of a radiolabeled solid-liquid meal and the intestinal transit time of radiopaque markers. All tests were performed 1) at baseline; 2) after 2 wk with Naloxone 1.6 mg subcutaneous per day; and 3) after 8 days of placebo. Results showed that before treatment gastric emptying of solids was delayed, emptying of liquids was normal, myoelectric activity of the stomach was normal, small intestinal transit time of radiopaque markers was considerably increased while ileal output was markedly decreased. After Naloxone, gastric emptying of solids was markedly accelerated, emptying of liquids remained normal, gastric electrical spiking activity increased, small intestinal transit time strikingly decreased, and ileal output increased. After placebo, a tendency to return to pretreatment values was observed. This observation suggests that Naloxone may be helpful in the treatment of some patients with intestinal pseudoobstruction.

  13. Effect of radiation and radioprotection on small intestinal function in canines

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, J.L.; Vigneulle, R.M.; Gage, T.; MacVittie, T.J.; Nold, J.B.; Dubois, A.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation with doses >7.5 Gy damages the canine intestinal mucosa, and pretreatment with WR2721 reduces this damage. However, the effects of radiation and of WR2721 on in vivo intestinal transport are unclear. Therefore, we determined canine survival, intestinal transport, and mucosal histology following unilateral abdominal irradiation. Isoperistaltic ileostomies were prepared in 23 dogs under general anesthesia and aseptic conditions. After a three-week recovery period, animals were given either placebo or WR2721, 150 mg/kg intravenously, 30 min prior to 10 Gy cobalt-60 abdominal irradiation. Ileal transport and histology were determined in both groups before exposure and one, four, and seven days after irradiation. Seven-day survival was significantly improved by pretreatment with WR2721 (91% vs 33%, P < 0.02). On day 4, both mucosal integrity and net intestinal absorption were significantly better (P < 0.05) after WR2721 than after placebo. Thus, radiation-induced damage to the ileal mucosa is accompanied by a reduction in net ileal absorption of water and electrolytes in vivo. In addition, pretreatment with WR2721 improves animal survival while reducing ileal damage and improving intestinal absorption.

  14. Evidence-based treatment of patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIANG; YANG, JIE; QIAN, QUN

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a worldwide disease whose incidence has increased significantly. Evidence-based medicine is a category of medicine that optimizes decision making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. Evidence-based medicine can be used to formulate a reasonable treatment plan for newly diagnosed rectal cancer patients. The current review focuses on the application of evidence-based treatment on patients with rectal cancer. The relationship between perioperative blood transfusion and recurrence of rectal cancer after surgery, the selection between minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and traditional laparotomy, choice of chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer prior to surgery, selection between stapled and hand-sewn methods for colorectal anastomosis during rectal cancer resection, and selection between temporary ileostomy and colostomy during the surgery were addressed. Laparoscopy is considered to have more advantages but is time-consuming and has high medical costs. In addition, laparoscopic rectal cancer radical resection is preferred to open surgery. In radical resection surgery, use of a stapling device for anastomosis can reduce postoperative anastomotic fistula, although patients should be informed of possible anastomotic stenosis. PMID:26998054

  15. Successful Treatment of a Large Pelvic Abscess Using Intraluminal VAC: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Abbas; Kiziltan, Remzi; Yilmaz, Özkan; Kotan, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The most feared complication of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is anastomotic leakage, which is related to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Here, we present a patient who could not be treated with surgical drainage but treated by intraluminal Vacuum Associated Closure (VAC). A 34-year-old male patient was treated for rectal cancer by low anterior resection, colorectal anastomosis, and diverting ileostomy following neoadjuvant CRT. The patient reported with a postoperative anastomotic disruption and a large pelvic abscess. Due to the continuation of foul-smell drainage inspite of perianal incision and drainage, intraluminal VAC was applied and the pelvic abscess and the foul-smell were successfully treated. The presence of an adequate anal sphincter tonus is a disadvantage in anastomotic leakage, since it prevents the emptying of the intestinal content and also precludes the drainage of the pelvic abscess. The endoluminal application of VAC, similar to the results of application of VAC in open wounds, has been demonstrated to decrease fibrin and necrotic tissue in the pelvic cavity and increase granulation tissue. VAC, which has long been used in the treatment of open wounds, is a promising method in the treatment of large pelvic abscesses due to anastomotic leakage following rectum resection. PMID:27190889

  16. Transaldolase Deficiency: A New Case Expands the Phenotypic Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Banne, Ehud; Meiner, Vardiella; Shaag, Avraham; Katz-Brull, Rachel; Gamliel, Ayelet; Korman, Stanley; Cederboim, Smadar Horowitz; Duvdevani, Morasha Plesser; Frumkin, Ayala; Zilkha, Amir; Kapuller, Vadim; Arbell, Dan; Cohen, Elite; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    Transaldolase (TALDO) deficiency has various clinical manifestations including liver dysfunction, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and dysmorphic features. We report a case presenting prenatally with hyperechogenic bowel and intrauterine growth restriction. The infant was born small for gestational age, with cutis laxa and hypertrichosis. Postnatally, meconium plug was identified, complicated with intestinal obstruction necessitating laparotomy, partial resection of the intestine, and ileostomy. Liver biopsy revealed cholangiolar proliferation and portal fibrosis. He also suffered from persistent congenital thrombocytopenia requiring platelet transfusions and severe hypothyroidism with normal anatomical and structural gland responding only to the combination of T3 and T4 treatment. Neurologically, severe hypotonia and anisocoria were noted at the age of 2 months. Brain MRI was normal. Shortly after the abdominal surgery, a rapid liver failure ensued, which eventually led to his death. Specific metabolic tests ruled out glycosylation disorders, yet urine analysis using 1H NMR showed accumulation of sedoheptulose which was previously described in patients with transaldolase deficiency. Sequencing of the gene-encoding transaldolase (TALDO1) revealed a homozygous stop mutation c.669C>G; p.Tyr223*. In conclusion, we present an infant with a novel homozygous mutation in TALDO1, causing TALDO deficiency, and extend the clinical characteristics of this rare syndrome. PMID:26238251

  17. Well leg compartment syndrome after surgery for ulcerative colitis in the lithotomy position: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Ohara, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Well leg compartment syndrome (WLCS) is an uncommon and severe complication that occurs after colorectal surgery in the lithotomy position. Presentation of case The current patient was a 28-year-old male suffering from ulcerative colitis. He was underwent elective proctectomy, including ileal J pouch formation and anal anastomosis with temporary loop ileostomy. The ileoanal pouch procedure was quite difficult, and during this procedure, the high lithotomy and head down tilt positions were continued for 255 min. After the operation, the patient complained of severe cramping pain, swelling and serious tenderness on palpation in both legs. On the first postoperative day, the patient's complaints gradually worsened. The intra-compartmental pressure was measured, and WLCS was diagnosed. Emergency bilateral fasciotomy was performed. Initially, the patient had a sensory deficit and analgesia, however, his sensory disturbance and pain had almost recovered two months after fasciotomy by rehabilitation. Discussion In the current case, the important factors associated with the development of WLCS are thought to be a prolonged operative time in which the patient is placed in the high lithotomy position during ileoanal pouch procedure. Conclusion We would thus like to emphasize that operations for the ileoanal pouch procedure to treat ulcerative colitis have a high potential for inducing WLCS, because it usually requires a prolonged operative time in which the patient remains in the high lithotomy position. PMID:27085103

  18. Fecal stream diversion and mucosal cytokine levels in collagenous colitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Daferera, Niki; Kumawat, Ashok Kumar; Hultgren-Hörnquist, Elisabeth; Ignatova, Simone; Ström, Magnus; Münch, Andreas

    2015-05-21

    In this case report, we examined the levels of cytokines expressed before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored in a patient with collagenous colitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with chronic, active collagenous colitis who either failed to achieve clinical remission or experienced adverse effects with the following drugs: loperamide, cholestyramine, budesonide, methotrexate and adalimumab. Due to the intractable nature of the disease and because the patient was having up to 15 watery bowel movements per day, she underwent a temporary ileostomy. Colonic biopsies were analyzed for mucosal cytokine protein levels before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored. Mucosal protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 A, IL-23, TNF, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 were all higher during active disease and decreased to non-detectable or considerably lower levels during fecal stream diversion. One month after the restoration of bowel continuity, when the patient experienced a relapse of symptoms, IL-2, IL-23 and IL-21 levels were again increased. Our results indicate that fecal stream diversion in this patient suppressed the levels of all cytokines analyzed in colonic biopsies. With the recurrence of clinical symptoms and histological changes after bowel reconstruction, the levels of primarily proinflammatory cytokines increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that a luminal factor triggers the inflammation observed in collagenous colitis. PMID:26019474

  19. [A Case of Double Cancer of Initially Unresectable Sigmoid Colon Cancer and Advanced Gastric Cancer Treated with Curative Resection after mFOLFOX6 Therapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Toru; Aoki, Kazunori; Mitsuhashi, Yuto; Tomiura, Satoko; Suto, Akiko; Miura, Takuya; Ikenaga, Shojirokazunori; Shibasaki, Itaru; Endo, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a complaint of blood in stool. He was diagnosed with advanced colon and gastric cancers. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a sigmoid tumor with invasion to the bladder, a metastatic tumor in the lateral segmental branch of the left hepatic lobe, and ascites. He was diagnosed with initially unresectable double cancer. Ileostomy was performed immediately, and he was treated with modified (m) FOLFOX6 regimen (oxaliplatin in combination with infusional 5-fluorouracil/Leucovorin). After 6 courses of the mFOLFOX6 regimen, CT revealed that the primary lesion of the sigmoid colon and liver metastasis had reduced in size, and the ascites had disappeared. Gastroscopy revealed that the gastric cancer had disappeared. Biopsy results were negative. Accordingly, his gastric cancer was diagnosed as treatment effect Grade 3. After 8 courses of mFOLFOX6 therapy, sigmoidectomy, partial resection of the bladder, and partial resection of the liver were performed. Gastric cancer was not resected in accordance with his will. Although 40 months has passed after the radical resection, neither the sigmoid colon cancer nor the gastric cancer recurred. PMID:27067857

  20. Radiological evidence of subcutaneous emphysema leading to a diagnosis of retroperitoneal perforated diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Sivarajah, Vernon; Jones, Christopher; Pittathankal, Antony

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This case report outlines the investigation and management of a young patient presenting with left iliac fossa pain and sepsis. A CT was performed which was initially reported as not showing a perforation, however closer analysis provided evidence of subcutaneous emphysema in the anterior abdominal wall. This evidence justified urgent operative intervention. We review the evidence with regard to this presentation. PRESENTATION OF CASE A previously fit 24-year-old male presented with left iliac fossa pain and features of sepsis. A CT provided subtle but distinctive evidence of retroperitoneal perforation secondary to diverticulitis, in the form of surgical emphysema in the anterior abdominal wall. In view of this, urgent operation was considered justified on suspicion of visceral perforation. A diverticular perforation was confirmed intra-operatively, and a sigmoid colectomy with primary anastomosis was performed, together with a covering ileostomy. The patient made a good post-operative recovery. DISCUSSION Diverticular disease and its complications are becoming more common in a younger age group, in whom perforation may present late or may not be suspected. In this context special attention must be paid to any radiological evidence of perforation. CONCLUSION Surgical emphysema in the abdominal wall is an indicator of retroperitoneal perforation, and its presence should be excluded before the possibility of perforation is dismissed. This may be of especial value in younger age groups amongst whom perforation may be less clinically obvious. PMID:23598175

  1. Usefulness of Anorectal Manometry for Diagnosing Continence Problems After a Low Anterior Resection

    PubMed Central

    Samalavicius, Narimantas E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose For several decades, the low anterior resection (LAR) with total mesorectal excision (TME) has been the gold standard for treating patients with rectal cancer. Up to 90% of patients undergoing sphincter-preserving surgery will have changes in bowel habits, so-called 'anterior resection syndrome.' This study examined patients' continence after a LAR for the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods This prospective study was performed between September 2014 and August 2015 at the National Cancer Institute and included 30 patients who underwent anorectal manometry preoperatively and at 3 and 4 months after a LAR, but 10 were excluded from further evaluation for various reasons. Wexner score was recorded preoperatively and 4 months after LAR (1 month after ileostomy repair). Results Postoperatively, 70% of patients complained of some degree of soiling (incontinence to liquid stool), and 30% experienced urgent defecation. Four months after surgery, these symptoms had somewhat abated. The anal resting pressure and the maximum squeezing pressure did not change significantly. Rectal capacity and compliance were reduced in all patients. The majority of patients demonstrated manometric anorectal changes and clinical anorectal function disorders during the first 4 months after surgery. The Wexner scores and the manometric findings showed no correlation. Conclusion Many patients undergoing a LAR with TME for the treatment of rectal cancer experience some degree of incontinence postoperatively. Anorectal manometry may be used as an additional tool for evaluating problems with continence after a LAR. No correlation between the Wexner score and the manometric findings was observed. PMID:27437391

  2. The diameter of the ileal J-pouch-anal anastomosis as an important risk factor of pouchitis – clinical observations

    PubMed Central

    Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Marciniak, Ryszard; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Meissner, Wiktor; Krokowicz, Piotr; Paszkowski, Jacek; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Majewski, Przemysław; Marszałek, Andrzej; Drews, Michał

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Patients’ quality of life after restorative proctocolectomy depends on the potential complications. Stricture of the ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is one of the complications following restorative proctocolectomy. Material/Methods We analyzed the correlation between the diameter of the anastomosis and clinical parameters, including pouchitis disease activity index (PDAI), the activity of fecal M2-pyruvate kinase and maximum tolerable volume of the pouch. The study group consisted of 31 patients in whom covering ileostomy had been closed 72±50 months before enrolement to the study. Restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis coli had been performed in this group. Results The study did not show any correlation between the diameter of the anastomosis and primary indication for surgery, the time elapsed after restoration of the bowel continuity, the activity of fecal M2-pyruvate kinase, or maximum tolerable volume. However, meaningful correlations between the stricture of the anastomosis and the presence and activity of pouchitis, together with the ileal villi atrophy, were detected. Conclusions Stricture of the anastomosis appears to be an important factor increasing the incidence of pouchitis, and is independent of the underlying condition and time after the operation. Dilation of the anastomosis and prevention of stricture should constitute a permanent element of postoperative follow-up. PMID:21278694

  3. Motility of the jejunum after proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anastomosis.

    PubMed Central

    Chaussade, S; Merite, F; Hautefeuille, M; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Couturier, D

    1989-01-01

    Proctocolectomy with ileal pouch anastomosis could modify motility of the small intestine through two mechanisms: obstruction or bacterial overgrowth. Motility of the jejunum was measured in 11 patients with ileoanal anastomosis six (n = 6), or 12 (n = 5) months after closure of the loop ileostomy. Manometric recording from the jejunum were made during fasting (four hours) and after a liquid meal (one hour). These findings were compared with those of six healthy volunteers. Motor events were classified as follows: migrating motor complex (MMC), propagated contractions, or discrete clustered contractions. All patients were investigated for bacterial overgrowth (D-glucose breath test). Only two patients had bacterial overgrowth. The frequency of MMC remained unchanged after ileo-anal anastomosis (2.83 (0.37)/four hours) compared with normal volunteers (2.81 (0.29)/four hours). During fasting, four patients had numerous propagated contractions in the jejunum. This condition was associated in two with bacterial overgrowth and in two with intubation of the reservoir. Discrete clustered contractions were found in the seven patients studied postprandially (7.6 (2.5)/h), but not in volunteers. These seven patients emptied their pouch spontaneously and bacterial overgrowth was found in only one. As this motility pattern was previously described in partial small intestinal obstruction, it is postulated that discrete clustered contractions could be the consequence of a functional obstruction as a result of anastomosis of the small intestine to the high pressure zone of the anal sphincters. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2707637

  4. Dieulafoy lesion of the gallbladder presenting with bleeding and a pseudo-mirizzi syndrome: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Stanes, Aaron; Mackay, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal bleeding can have significant morbidity and mortality. Pathological processes that cause it are diverse, and timely investigation and management are vital. Dieulafoy lesions are a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and here we describe a case of a gallbladder dieulafoy lesion causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Presentation of case Recently discharged from hospital following an open anterior resection and loop ileostomy for diverticular disease, an 84-year-old female re-presented with lower abdominal pain associated with jaundice and lymphocytosis. Imaging demonstrated two possible rectal stump collections (treated with antibiotics), and heterogeneous material in the gallbladder. The patient deteriorated, developing melena, coffee ground vomitus and right upper quadrant pain. Investigation sourced the bleeding to the gallbladder that resolved following cholecystectomy, and histopathology was consistent with a dieulafoy lesion. The patient made a full recovery. Discussion Dieulafoy lesions have rarely been reported in the gallbladder, and as such can be an occult source of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. It should be considered where gastrointestinal bleeding accompanies jaundice and abdominal pain. Conclusion This case highlights that dieulafoy lesions can occur in the gallbladder. Massive gastrointestinal bleeding can occur within the gallbladder, and a gallbladder dieulafoy lesion should be considered as a potential cause of such, especially when a source has not been identified on endoscopy. It also demonstrates the effectiveness of cholecystectomy as a definitive management strategy. PMID:26878358

  5. The Implementation of a Standardized Approach to Laparoscopic Rectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aslak, Katrine Kanstrup

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to audit our results after implementation of a standardized operative approach to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer within a fast-track recovery program. Methods: From January 2009 to February 2011, 100 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic surgery on an intention-to-treat basis for rectal cancer. The results were retrospectively reviewed from a prospectively collected database. Operative steps and instrumentation for the procedure were standardized. A standard perioperative care plan was used. Results: The following procedures were performed: low anterior resection (n=26), low anterior resection with loop-ileostomy (n=39), Hartmann's operation (n=14), and abdominoperineal resection (n=21). The median length of hospital stay was 7 days; 9 patients were readmitted. There were 9 cases of conversion to open surgery. The overall complication rate was 35%, including 6 cases (9%) of anastomotic leakages requiring reoperation. The 30-day mortality was 5%. The median number of harvested lymph nodes was 15 (range, 2 to 48). There were 6 cases of positive circumferential resection margins. The median follow-up was 9 (range, 1 to 27) months. One patient with disseminated cancer developed port-site metastasis. Conclusions: The results confirm the safety of a standardized approach, and the oncological outcomes are comparable to those of similar studies. PMID:23477176

  6. Bowel anastomoses: The theory, the practice and the evidence base

    PubMed Central

    Goulder, Frances

    2012-01-01

    Since the introduction of stapling instruments in the 1970s various studies have compared the results of sutured and stapled bowel anastomoses. A literature search was performed from 1960 to 2010 and articles relating to small bowel, colonic and colorectal anastomotic techniques were reviewed. References from these articles were also reviewed, and relevant articles obtained. Either a stapled or sutured gastrointestinal tract anastomosis is acceptable in most situations. The available evidence suggests that in the following situations, however, particular anastomotic techniques may result in fewer complications: A stapled side-to-side ileocolic anastomosis is preferable following a right hemicolectomy for cancer. A stapled side-to-side anastomosis is likely also preferable after an ileocolic resection for Crohn’s disease. Colorectal anastomoses can be sutured or stapled with similar results, although the incidence of strictures is higher following stapled anastomoses. Following reversal of loop ileostomy there is some evidence to suggest that a stapled side-to-side anastomosis or sutured enterotomy closure (rather than spout resection and sutured anastomosis) results in fewer complications. Non-randomised data has indicated that small bowel anastomoses are best sutured in the trauma patient. This article reviews the theory, practice and evidence base behind the various gastrointestinal anastomoses to help the practising general surgeon make evidence based operative decisions. PMID:23293735

  7. Novel association of rectal evacuation disorder and rumination syndrome: Diagnosis, comorbidities, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Iturrino, Johanna; Shin, Andrea; Vazquez-Roque, Maria; Katzka, David A; Snuggerud, Jill R; Seime, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with disorders of gastrointestinal function may undergo unnecessary treatment if misdiagnosed as motility disorders. Objective To report on clinical features, medical, surgical, and psychiatric comorbidities, and prior treatments of a patient cohort diagnosed concurrently with nonpsychogenic rumination syndrome and pelvic floor dysfunction (also termed rectal evacuation disorder). Methods From a consecutive series (1994–2013) of 438 outpatients with rectal evacuation disorders in the practice of a single gastroenterologist at a tertiary care centre, 57 adolescents or adults were diagnosed with concomitant rumination syndrome. All underwent formal psychological assessment or completed validated questionnaires. Results All 57 patients (95% female) fulfilled Rome III criteria for rumination syndrome; rectal evacuation disorder was confirmed by testing of anal sphincter pressures and rectal balloon evacuation. Prior to diagnosis, most patients underwent multiple medical and surgical treatments (gastrostomy, gastric fundoplication, other gastric surgery, ileostomy, colectomy) for their symptoms. Psychological comorbidity was identified in 93% of patients. Patients were managed predominantly with psychological and behavioural approaches: diaphragmatic breathing for rumination and biofeedback retraining for pelvic floor dysfunction. Conclusions Awareness of concomitant rectal evacuation disorder and rumination syndrome and prompt identification of psychological comorbidity are keys to instituting behavioural and psychological methods to avoid unnecessary treatment. PMID:24724013

  8. Ostomy Closures in Children: Variations in Perioperative Care Do Not Change the Outcome.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Yusuf Hakan; Karaman, Ayşe; Afşarlar, Çağatay Evrim; Karaman, İbrahim; Erdoğan, Derya; Özgüner, İsmet Faruk

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate ostomy closure applications and outcomes and determine the effect of personal differences among surgeons on patient postoperative course. Ninety-eight patients who underwent elective ostomy (ileostomy and colostomy) closure for 8 years at a pediatric surgery training department were investigated. Postoperative complications included superficial surgical site infection (SSI; 9.4 %), organ/cavity infection (1 %), small bowel adhesions (8.2 %), and incisional hernia (1 %). SSI and postoperative complications were not affected by the preoperative antibiotic regimen used. Operation duration, pre- and postoperative antibiotic use durations, postoperative inpatient period, ostomy type, primary diagnosis, performance of abdominal exploration, SSI, and postoperative complications were not significantly different. However, the time of nasogastric (NG) tube withdrawal, time to oral feeding initiation, abdominal closure method used, and preoperative antibiotic regimen were significantly different among different surgeons. We conclude that while surgeons used different preoperative antibiotic regimens and abdominal closure methods and stipulated different times for NG tube withdrawal and oral feeding initiation, the postoperative course and prognosis were unaffected Thus, the pre- and postoperative inpatient period and antibiotic use duration can be decreased in children by procedure standardization using practice guidelines; the procedures can also be performed with a more aesthetic, acceptable incision. PMID:27011524

  9. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-12-27

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann's procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented. PMID:26730283

  10. Transanal Pull-Through Procedure with Delayed versus Immediate Coloanal Anastomosis for Anus-Preserving Curative Resection of Lower Rectal Cancer: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yong; Huang, Ping; Ren, Qing-Gui

    2016-06-01

    This case-control study compared the effectiveness and safety of transanal pull-through procedure (TPP) with delayed or immediate coloanal anastomosis (CAA) for anus-preserving curative resection of lower rectal cancer. Lower rectal cancer patients (n = 128) were hospitalized between January 2003 and December 2013 for elective anus-preserving curative resection through a TPP with delayed (n = 72) or immediate (n = 56) CAA. Main outcome measures including surgical safety, resection radicality, and defecation function were assessed. The two groups were comparable in age, sex, gross pathology, histology, and tumor-node-metastasis staging. Both the delayed and immediate CAA TPPs had similar resection radicality and safety profiles. The immediate CAA was associated with a significantly higher risk of anastomotic leakage and defecation impairment. None of patients in the delayed CAA group experienced anastomotic leakage. In conclusion, TPP with delayed CAA may be superior to immediate CAA in minimizing the risk of anastomotic leakage and relevant surgical morbidities, and does not require a temporary ileostomy and second-look restoration of ostomy. PMID:27305886

  11. [Familial syndrome combining short small intestine, intestinal malrotation, pyloric hypertrophy and brain malformation. 3 anatomoclinical case reports].

    PubMed

    Nezelof, C; Jaubert, F; Lyon, G

    1976-01-01

    Anatomoclinical study of 3 cases of an exceptional malformative condition characterized by: --extreme shortness of the small intestine, --mesenterium commune, --hypertrophic pylorus, --malformation of the central nervous system (heterotopia, absence of operculum temporale). Clinically this malformative condition is characterized by failure and inertia of the intestinal peristalsis producing at intervals of 10-15 days episodes of subocclusion, the repetition of which causes death. The syndrome is familial and seems to be of autosomal recessive inheritance. The absence of mechanical obstruction, the repeated failure of colostomy and ileostomy, the normal aspect of the myenteric plexuses verified by cytoenzymatic and silver stains allow to individualize this anatomoclinical syndrome and to rule out the hypothesis of Hirschsprung's disease, Chagas' disease, idiopathic megacolon or hypoplasia of the myenteric plexuses. The association of cerebral malformations leads to consider the responsibility of a lack of synthesis of a same specific intermediate factor which is up to now poorly determined, implicated in the neuronal migration and neuromuscular transmission. PMID:1023783

  12. Optimal management of collagenous colitis: a review

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is an increasingly recognized cause of chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by watery non-bloody diarrhea. As a lesser studied inflammatory bowel disease, many aspects of the CC’s natural history are poorly understood. This review discusses strategies to optimally manage CC. The goal of therapy is to induce clinical remission, <3 stools a day or <1 watery stool a day with subsequent improved quality of life (QOL). Antidiarrheal can be used as monotherapy or with other medications to control diarrhea. Budesonide therapy has revolutionized treatment and is superior to prednisone, however, the treatment is associated with high-relapse rates and the management of refractory disease is challenging. Ongoing trials will address the safety and efficacy of low-dose maintenance therapy. For those with refractory disease, case reports and case series support the role of biologic agents. Diversion of the fecal stream normalizes colonic mucosal changes and ileostomy may be considered where anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents are contraindicated. Underlying celiac disease, bile salt diarrhea, and associated thyroid dysfunction should be ruled out. The author recommends smoking cessation as well as avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories as well as other associated medications. PMID:26929656

  13. Management of low colorectal anastomotic leak: Preserving the anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Blumetti, Jennifer; Abcarian, Herand

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leak continues to be a dreaded complication after colorectal surgery, especially in the low colorectal or coloanal anastomosis. However, there has been no consensus on the management of the low colorectal anastomotic leak. Currently operative procedures are reserved for patients with frank purulent or feculent peritonitis and unstable vital signs, and vary from simple fecal diversion with drainage to resection of the anastomosis and closure of the rectal stump with end colostomy (Hartmann’s procedure). However, if the patient is stable, and the leak is identified days or even weeks postoperatively, less aggressive therapeutic measures may result in healing of the leak and salvage of the anastomosis. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of pelvic collections with percutaneous treatments, and newer methods of endoscopic therapies for the acutely leaking anastomosis, such as use of the endosponge, stents or clips, have greatly reduced the need for surgical intervention in selected cases. Diverting ileostomy, if not already in place, may be considered to reduce fecal contamination. For subclinical leaks or those that persist after the initial surgery, endoluminal approaches such as injection of fibrin sealant, use of endoscopic clips, or transanal closure of the very low anastomosis may be utilized. These newer techniques have variable success rates and must be individualized to the patient, with the goal of treatment being restoration of gastrointestinal continuity and healing of the anastomosis. A review of the treatment of low colorectal anastomotic leaks is presented. PMID:26730283

  14. Fecal stream diversion and mucosal cytokine levels in collagenous colitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Daferera, Niki; Kumawat, Ashok Kumar; Hultgren-Hörnquist, Elisabeth; Ignatova, Simone; Ström, Magnus; Münch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this case report, we examined the levels of cytokines expressed before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored in a patient with collagenous colitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with chronic, active collagenous colitis who either failed to achieve clinical remission or experienced adverse effects with the following drugs: loperamide, cholestyramine, budesonide, methotrexate and adalimumab. Due to the intractable nature of the disease and because the patient was having up to 15 watery bowel movements per day, she underwent a temporary ileostomy. Colonic biopsies were analyzed for mucosal cytokine protein levels before and during fecal stream diversion and after intestinal continuity was restored. Mucosal protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17 A, IL-23, TNF, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 were all higher during active disease and decreased to non-detectable or considerably lower levels during fecal stream diversion. One month after the restoration of bowel continuity, when the patient experienced a relapse of symptoms, IL-2, IL-23 and IL-21 levels were again increased. Our results indicate that fecal stream diversion in this patient suppressed the levels of all cytokines analyzed in colonic biopsies. With the recurrence of clinical symptoms and histological changes after bowel reconstruction, the levels of primarily proinflammatory cytokines increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that a luminal factor triggers the inflammation observed in collagenous colitis. PMID:26019474

  15. Management of spontaneous colonic perforation in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julie R; Fishman, Steven J

    2004-02-01

    A 14-year-old girl with a family history of fatal colonic rupture, presented with a 2-day history of abdominal pain and signs of peritonitis. At laparotomy, a full-thickness perforation of the sigmoid colon was found, which was exteriorized as a loop colostomy. Subsequently, molecular studies of the patient's cultured fibroblasts found a point mutation in the COL3A1 gene, confirming a diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS-IV). Four and a half years later, a total abdominal colectomy and ileoproctostomy were performed, restoring intestinal continuity. At 5 years follow-up, the patient has had no further complications. Although spontaneous colonic perforation is a well-reported manifestation of EDS-IV, a consensus on the surgical management of this complication in EDS-IV has yet to be determined. Given the high rate of reperforation in EDS-IV when the colon is left in place and the low incidence of reported small bowel and rectal perforations, subtotal colectomy is a reasonable treatment. Primary anastomosis and avoidance of an end-ileostomy was possible in this young patient, with no evidence of anastomotic leakage nor reperforation to date. Lifelong close follow-up should be continued in these patients, because the natural history of this anatomy in EDS-IV is not known. PMID:14966763

  16. Intestinal Bacteria — The Role They Play in Normal Physiology, Pathologic Physiology, and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Finegold, Sydney M.

    1969-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria predominate in the normal human fecal flora, out-numbering aerobes at least 100 to one. The two most prevalent organisms are Bacteroides fragilis and Bifidobacterium. Ileostomy flora is, on the other hand, chiefly aerobic and the total count is lower (108 per ml of fluid, compared to 1010 per gram for feces). In normal people, small bowel bacterial counts are generally 105 per ml or less. The upper small bowel consists primarily of Gram-positive aerobes in small numbers. In the terminal ileum, counts are higher and aerobes and anaerobes are present in equal numbers. In the presence of acute obstruction and certain bowel stasis or other syndromes, the small bowel flora may become relatively profuse and fecal in type. The stomach normally has less than 103 organisms per ml but counts are higher in gastric samples with pH above 4.0. Intestinal bacteria are important in such processes as conversion of bilirubin to urobilinogen, supply of vitamin K to the host, defense against infection, bile acid deconjugation and conversion, infections related to the bowel, the malabsorption of blind loop and other bacterial overgrowth syndromes, and hepatic coma. PMID:5789139

  17. Stable isotope model for assessing production of short chain fatty acids from colon-derived sugar: application in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kien, C L; Murray, R D; Ailabouni, A; Powers, P; Kepner, J; Powers, L; Brunengraber, H

    1996-12-01

    Sugar reaching the colon because of intestinal maldigestion or malabsorption may be fermented to acetate and other short-chain fatty acids, resulting in stimulation of colonic water absorption and cell proliferation. To explore this phenomenon in more detail, we have developed a stable isotope model for estimating the fraction of colon-derived glucose or lactose that is fermented to acetate, propionate and butyrate. In an initial application of the model, [d3]-acetate and either [1-(13)C]-glucose or [D-1-(13)C]-lactose were infused into the cecum or colon of piglets, and plateau plasma acetate enrichment was monitored in the carotid artery. In acutely anesthetized piglets, the fractions of glucose and lactose fermented to acetate were 17.0 and 20.0%, respectively. In a chronically catheterized piglet, fermentation was higher (34.2%). When conducted in chronically catheterized animals or via a colostomy or ileostomy in infants, this model may be used to determine how age, previous surgery or antibiotic therapy affects the efficiency of colonic assimilation of carbohydrate. PMID:9001376

  18. Early manifestations of cystic fibrosis in a premature patient with complex meconium ileus at birth

    PubMed Central

    Del Ciampo, Ieda Regina Lopes; Oliveira, Tainara Queiroz; Del Ciampo, Luiz Antonio; Sawamura, Regina; Torres, Lidia Alice Gomes Monteiro Marin; Augustin, Albin Eugenio; Fernandes, Maria Inez Machado

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of a preterm infant with complex meconium ileus at birth and cystic fibrosis. CASE DESCRIPTION: A male infant was born by vaginal delivery at 33 weeks and 5 days of gestational age with respiratory distress and severe abdominal distension. The exploratory laparotomy in the first day of life identified meconium ileus and secondary peritonitis. Ileal resection and ileostomy were performed, followed by reconstruction of the bowel transit at 20 days of life. At 11 days of life, the first immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) was 154 ng/mL (reference value = 70), and oral pancreatic enzymes replacement therapy was started. After 23 days, the second IRT was 172ng/mL (reference value = 70). At 35 days of age he was discharged with referrals to primary care and to a special clinic for CF for the determination of sweat chloride. He was received in the outpatient clinic for neonatal screening for CF at 65 days of life presenting malnutrition and respiratory distress. The sweat chloride test was performed, with a positive result (126mEq/L). COMMENTS: This case illustrates the rapid evolution of CF in a premature patient with complex meconium ileus as the first clinical manifestation. PMID:25887928

  19. [Right ileocolonic intubation after resection of the terminal ileum for generalized peritonitis caused by ileal perforation. An African experience with 33 cases].

    PubMed

    Ribault, L; Veillard, J M; Sarre, B; Diouf, B; Bellier, L; Diagne, A L

    1990-01-01

    Generalized peritonitis due to ileal perforation is common in Africa, and is caused by typhoid fever in most cases. For various reasons, the patients arrive at hospital in a poor general condition. In spite of combined intensive care and surgery, the general evolution of the disease resulted in a high mortality rate. All surgical techniques requiring sutures on a poor-quality ileon, ie. excision and suture, limited segmental resection or extensive ileal resection, most often lead to the breakdown of suture lines, so that the patient enters the vicious circle of repeated peritonitis and hazardous re-operations. Even exteriorized suture lines turn into fistulae, and temporary terminal ileostomy requires an amount of maintenance that is sometimes difficult to ensure in Africa. The technique proposed by the authors was developed in the department of surgery of the Dakar Main Hospital and has several advantages: It is a simple and quick procedure, which does not require the surgeon to be very experienced and can be performed in underequipped hospitals. There is no procedure-associated mortality. Morbidity decreases as the surgeon's experience increases. GI continuity can be established even in a septic environment. No second-look operation is necessary, so that the stay at hospital becomes shorter and the costs of treatment lower. Lastly, this type of restoration can be applied to other indications such as right colectomy and ileocolic or transverse ileal intubation. PMID:2279440

  20. [A Case of Pathologically Complete Response of a Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Treatment with mFOLFOX6 and Radiation Therapy].

    PubMed

    Note, Hiromasa; Shimizu, Shinichiro; Ariga, Takashi; Suzuki, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Naoto; Kanada, Yoko; Senba, Yoshihide; Yoshioka, Takafumi; Sato, Yayoi; Miyazaki, Akinari; Natsume, Toshiyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hajime; Maruyama, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    A 60-year-old man who had bloody stools after sigmoid colonoscopy was admitted to our hospital. A digital examination and sigmoid colonoscopy showed a type 2 circular tumor at location Rb with incomplete mobility and tumor hemorrhage, and the result of a biopsy was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (tub2). Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging suggested a possibility of invasion of the primary rectal tumor to the sacrum. The clinical stage was cT4bN0M0H0P0, cStage Ⅱ, which is generally not treatable by surgery. Sigmoid colostomy was performed, and a central venous port was implanted. After a preoperative treatment consisting of 3 courses of mFOLFOX6 and radiation therapy, the clinical stage changed to ycT2N0M0H0P0, ycStageⅠ. Super-low anterior resection and covering ileostomy were performed 46 days after the preoperative treatment. A pathological examination revealed no residual cancer cells in the primary lesion and lymph node (Grade 3, pCR). The patient has been disease-free for 4 years and 9 months after the operation. PMID:26805067

  1. [Measures to anatomic variations of the colonic vessels in laparoscopic operations].

    PubMed

    Pan, Kai

    2013-10-01

    In laparoscopic colorectal resection, the poor blood supply of the anastomosis after tumor excision is difficult to be determined during the operations sometimes. The change in blood supply of the bowel is mainly due to the mesenteric anatomy and the operative techniques. The direct blood supply of colon is the marginal vessels in the mesentery. The integrity and patency of the marginal vessels determine the vitality of the bowel. However, the marginal vessels are different in diameter, pulsation or even discontinue in various areas, affecting the excision of the colon and following anastomosis. The most common three dangerous areas to anastomosis include:(1)area between ileocolic artery and right colonic artery; (2)area between middle colonic artery and left colonic artery-the Griffiths point. (3)area between the terminal branch of sigmoid colonic artery and superior rectal artery-Sudeck dangerous area. In laparoscopic colorectal resection, one should pay attention to protect the blood supply of the bowel and the marginal blood vessels, and be vigilant to the three vascular variations above mentioned. The vessels should be ligated accurately to ensure sufficient blood supply to the anastomosis and consequent normal healing of the rectal and colonic anastomosis. More attention should be paid to the elderly, morbid, and diabetic patients. If the safety of the anastomosis is unsure, prophylactic ileostomy should be performed. PMID:24158864

  2. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%–76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  3. Management of Septic Open Abdomen in a Morbid Obese Patient with Enteroatmospheric Fistula by Using Standard Abdominal Negative Pressure Therapy in Conjunction with Intrarectal One

    PubMed Central

    Yetisir, Fahri; Salman, A. Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Özer, Mehmet; Aygar, Muhittin; Osmanoglu, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Management of open abdomen (OA) with enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) in morbid obese patient with comorbid disease is challenging. We would like to report the management of septic OA in morbid obese patient with EAF which developed after strangulated recurrent giant incisional hernia repair. We would also like to emphasize, in this case, the conversion of EAF to ileostomy by the help of second Negative Pressure Therapy (NPT) on ostomy side, and the chance of new EAF occurrence was reduced with intrarectal NPT. Case Presentation. 62-year-old morbid obese woman became an OA patient with EAF after strangulated recurrent giant hernia. EAF was converted to ostomy with pezzer drain by the help of second NPT on ostomy. Colonic distention was reduced with the third NPT application via rectum. Abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) system was used for delayed abdominal closure. Conclusions. Using the 2nd NPT on ostomy side may help in the maturation of the ostomy created in a difficult condition in an open abdomen. Using the 3rd NPT through rectum may decrease the chance of EAF formation by reducing the pressure difference between intraluminal pressure and extraluminal pressure in hollow viscera. PMID:26779360

  4. [A rare case of an acute abdomen patient with gangrene of the colon as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Dolák, S; Prochotský, A; Mifkovič, A; Škultéty, J; Ježovít, M; Koudelka, P; Bluska, P

    2015-02-01

    The authors present a case report of a 39-year-old woman with acute abdomen - a comorbid patient with systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic renal insufficiency as a complication of lupus nephritis, included in a haemodialysis programme. The patient had also undergone transplantation of the left kidney in the past. She was initially admitted to the Department of Traumatology for a total endoprosthesis procedure due to bionecrosis of the head of the thigh bone. Postoperatively, the patients condition was complicated by gangrene of the colon confirmed by CT scan and during the operation. The patient was operated on - subtotal colectomy, terminal ileostomy and left-sided ovariectomy was performed. The postoperative course was complicated by perforation of the jejunum which was sutured. The patient was admitted to ICU and, after recovery, to our surgical department. Because of the metabolic disturbance she was treated in the internal medicine department. After 60 days she was discharged in a good condition, walking and with full per os realimentation.Key words: lupus erythematosus gangrene of the colon acute abdomen. PMID:25659257

  5. Amount and fate of egg protein escaping assimilation in the small intestine of humans.

    PubMed

    Evenepoel, P; Claus, D; Geypens, B; Hiele, M; Geboes, K; Rutgeerts, P; Ghoos, Y

    1999-11-01

    Studies attempting to evaluate protein assimilation in humans have hitherto relied on either ileostomy subjects or intubation techniques. The availability of stable isotope-labeled protein allowed us to determine the amount and fate of dietary protein escaping digestion and absorption in the small intestine of healthy volunteers using noninvasive tracer techniques. Ten healthy volunteers were studied once after ingestion of a cooked test meal, consisting of 25 g of (13)C-, (15)N-, and (2)H-labeled egg protein, and once after ingestion of the same but raw meal. Amounts of 5.73% and 35.10% (P < 0.005) of cooked and raw test meal, respectively, escaped digestion and absorption in the small intestine. A significantly higher percentage of the malabsorbed raw egg protein was recovered in urine as fermentation metabolites. These results 1) confirm that substantial amounts of even easily digestible proteins may escape assimilation in healthy volunteers and 2) further support the hypothesis that the metabolic fate of protein in the colon is affected by the amount of protein made available. PMID:10564098

  6. Digestibility of cooked and raw egg protein in humans as assessed by stable isotope techniques.

    PubMed

    Evenepoel, P; Geypens, B; Luypaerts, A; Hiele, M; Ghoos, Y; Rutgeerts, P

    1998-10-01

    Egg proteins contribute substantially to the daily nitrogen allowances in Western countries and are generally considered to be highly digestible. However, information is lacking on the true ileal digestibility of either raw or cooked egg protein. The recent availability of stable isotope-labeled egg protein allowed determination of the true ileal digestibility of egg protein by means of noninvasive tracer techniques. Five ileostomy patients were studied, once after ingestion of a test meal consisting of 25 g of cooked 13C- and 15N-labeled egg protein, and once after ingestion of the same test meal in raw form. Ileal effluents and breath samples were collected at regular intervals after consumption of the test meal and analyzed for 15N- and 13C-content, respectively. The true ileal digestibility of cooked and raw egg protein amounted to 90.9 +/- 0.8 and 51.3 +/- 9.8%, respectively. A significant negative correlation (r = -0.92, P < 0.001) was found between the 13C-recovery in breath and the recovery of exogenous N in the ileal effluents. In summary, using the 15N-dilution technique we demonstrated that the assimilation of cooked egg protein is efficient, albeit incomplete, and that the true ileal digestibility of egg protein is significantly enhanced by heat-pretreatment. A simple 13C-breath test technique furthermore proved to be a suitable alternative for the evaluation of the true ileal digestibility of egg protein. PMID:9772141

  7. Hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the colon in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Schaeffer, David F; Yoshida, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented of a 36-year-old male with primary sclerosing cholangitis-associated inflammatory bowel disease (PSC-IBD) and two synchronous stage 1 adenocarcinomata of the colon, who was initially treated with a subtotal colectomy with ileostomy. One year later, the patient presented with extensive intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy and peritoneal carcinomatosis, as well as a markedly elevated serum level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Fine needle aspiration biopsy of a porta hepatis lymph node revealed a metastatic hepatoid adenocarcinoma. Subsequent review of the previous colectomy specimen showed that one of the previously identified adenocarcinomata had features suggestive of a hepatoid colonic adenocarcinoma. The patient was subsequently treated with a cytotoxic regimen of FOLFOX (oxaliplatin, leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil) and bevacizumab, with stable results being achieved after six months. This case presents the first known report of PSC-IBD associated with synchronous typical and hepatoid adenocarcinomata of the colon and highlights the importance of considering hepatoid adenocarcinoma as a differential diagnosis in patients with an increasing serum AFP level. PMID:25253971

  8. [Surgery of ulcerative colitis using ileoanal anastomosis].

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, J; Oota, M; Matsumoto, M; Natori, H

    1985-09-01

    The ideal surgical treatment for ulcerative colitis is the ileoanal anastomosis (IAA), which, however, is not yet generally accepted as a practical procedure because of a suboptimal fecal function, frequent postoperative complications and technical difficulties. Based on one (U.) of the authors experiences on 36(34) polyposis and 19(12) colitis (paracentesis indicate the number of cases in (U.)'s previous appointment, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1977-1983). The practical procedure of IAA can be achieved by combining the following basic principles; a direct anastomosis of J-shape ileal pouch to the anal sphincteric mechanism, temporarily exclusion of the anastomosis by a loop-ileostomy, mucosectomy confined to the lower rectum leaving the short muscular cuff, and meticulous dissection of inflamed mucosa of the anal canal minimizing the damage to the internal sphincter which is achieved by the prone ano-abdominal approach. At elective operation, the procedure can be performed either as primary surgery or as the secondary following rectum preserving operation, in which, coeco-rectal anastomosis is advisable for preserving the ileocolic vessels that is helpful for J-pouch construction. In emergency surgical program, IAA is still be preserved as a final restructive surgery following colectomy with an open rectal exclusion or Turnbull' s total colonic exclusion. In this occasion, an ascendicostomy is advisable for preserving the ileocolic vessels. PMID:4088260

  9. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points. PMID:23614882

  10. Niti CAR 27 Versus a Conventional End-to-End Anastomosis Stapler in a Laparoscopic Anterior Resection for Sigmoid Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwag, Seung-Jin; Kim, Jun-Gi; Kang, Won-Kyung; Lee, Jin-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Niti CAR 27 (ColonRing) uses compression to create an anastomosis. This study aimed to investigate the safety and the effectiveness of the anastomosis created with the Niti CAR 27 in a laparoscopic anterior resection for sigmoid colon cancer. Methods In a single-center study, 157 consecutive patients who received an operation between March 2010 and December 2011 were retrospectively assessed. The Niti CAR 27 (CAR group, 63 patients) colorectal anastomoses were compared with the conventional double-stapled (CDS group, 94 patients) colorectal anastomoses. Intraoperative, immediate postoperative and 6-month follow-up data were recorded. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, gender, tumor location and other clinical characteristics. One patient (1.6%) in the CAR group and 2 patients (2.1%) in the CDS group experienced complications of anastomotic leakage (P = 0.647). These three patients underwent a diverting loop ileostomy. There were 2 cases (2.1%) of bleeding at the anastomosis site in the CDS group. All patients underwent a follow-up colonoscopy (median, 6 months). One patient in the CAR group experienced anastomotic stricture (1.6% vs. 0%; P = 0.401). This complication was solved by using balloon dilatation. Conclusion Anastomosis using the Niti CAR 27 device in a laparoscopic anterior resection for sigmoid colon cancer is safe and feasible. Its use is equivalent to that of the conventional double-stapler. PMID:24851217

  11. Single-Port Laparoscopic Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rijcken, Emile; Mennigen, Rudolf; Senninger, Norbert; Bruewer, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Background. Single Port Laparoscopic Surgery (SPLS) is being increasingly employed in colorectal surgery for benign and malignant diseases. The particular role for SPLS in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been determined yet. In this review article we summarize technical aspects and short term results of SPLS resections in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Methods. A systematic review of the literature until January 2012 was performed. Publications were assessed for operative techniques, equipment, surgical results, hospital stay, and readmissions. Results. 34 articles, published between 2010 and 2012, were identified reporting on 301 patients with IBD that underwent surgical treatment in SPLS technique. Surgical procedures included ileocolic resections, sigmoid resections, colectomies with end ileostomy or ileorectal anastomosis, and restorative proctocolectomies with ileum-pouch reconstruction. There was a wide variety in the surgical technique and the employed equipment. The overall complication profile was similar to reports on standard laparoscopic surgery in IBD. Conclusions. In experienced hands, single port laparoscopic surgery appears to be feasible and safe for the surgical treatment of selected patients with IBD. However, evidence from prospective randomized trials is required in order to clarify whether there is a further benefit apart from the avoidance of additional trocar incisions. PMID:22619710

  12. Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage: our experience and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Amilcare; Desiderio, Jacopo; Petrina, Adolfo; Trastulli, Stefano; Grassi, Veronica; Sani, Marco; Pironi, Daniele; Santoro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over the years various therapeutic techniques for diverticulitis have been developed. Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage (LPL) appears to be a safe and useful treatment, and it could be an effective alternative to colonic resection in emergency surgery. Aim This prospective observational study aims to assess the safety and benefits of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage in perforated sigmoid diverticulitis. Material and methods We surgically treated 70 patients urgently for complicated sigmoid diverticulitis. Thirty-two (45.7%) patients underwent resection of the sigmoid colon and creation of a colostomy (Hartmann technique); 21 (30%) patients underwent peritoneal laparoscopic lavage; 4 (5.7%) patients underwent colostomy by the Mikulicz technique; and the remaining 13 (18.6%) patients underwent resection of the sigmoid colon and creation of a colorectal anastomosis with a protective ileostomy. Results The 66 patients examined were divided into 3 groups: 32 patients were treated with urgent surgery according to the Hartmann procedure; 13 patients were treated with resection and colorectal anastomosis; 21 patients were treated urgently with laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. We had no intraoperative complications. The overall mortality was 4.3% (3 patients). In the LPL group the morbidity rate was 33.3%. Conclusions Currently it cannot be said that LPL is better in terms of mortality and morbidity than colonic resection. These data may, however, be proven wrong by greater attention in the selection of patients to undergo laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. PMID:27458487

  13. Outcomes After Kidney injury in Surgery (OAKS): protocol for a multicentre, observational cohort study of acute kidney injury following major gastrointestinal and liver surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality following cardiac surgery. Data focusing on the patterns of AKI following major gastrointestinal surgery could inform quality improvement projects and clinical trials, but there is a lack of reliable evidence. This multicentre study aims to determine the incidence and impact of AKI following major gastrointestinal and liver surgery. Methods and analysis This prospective, collaborative, multicentre cohort study will include consecutive adults undergoing gastrointestinal resection, liver resection or reversal of ileostomy or colostomy. Open and laparoscopic procedures in elective and emergency patients will be included in the study. The primary end point will be the incidence of AKI within 7 days of surgery, identified using an adaptation of the National Algorithm for Detecting Acute Kidney Injury, which is based on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) AKI guidelines. Secondary outcomes will include persistent renal dysfunction at discharge and 1 year postoperatively. The 30-day adverse event rate will be measured using the Clavien-Dindo scale. Data on factors that may predispose to the development of AKI will be collected to identify variables associated with AKI. Based on our previous collaborative studies, a minimum of 114 centres are expected to be recruited, contributing over 6500 patients in total. Ethics and dissemination This study will be registered as clinical audit at each participating hospital. The protocol will be disseminated through local and national medical student networks in the UK and Ireland. PMID:26769786

  14. [Two Cases of Rectal Cancer Resected Curatively after Chemotherapy with CapeOX plus Bmab].

    PubMed

    Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Wataru; Hashiba, Takahiro; Togawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-01

    We report 2 cases of locally far-advanced rectosigmoid cancer that were initially unresectable, but were successfully excised after treatment with CapeOX plus Bmab chemotherapy(capecitabine, L-OHP, and bevacizumab). Case 1: A 72-year-old man who complained of severe constipation initially received sigmoid colostomy because of far-advanced rectosigmoid cancer. After 4 courses of CapeOX plus Bmab chemotherapy administration, the size of the primary tumor remarkably decreased and curative resection could be performed. There has been no signs of recurrence for 27 months. Case 2: A 73-year-old man who complained of tenesmus initially received ileostomy because of far-advanced rectosigmoid cancer that directly invaded the appendix, ileum, and urinary bladder. After he received 3 courses of CapeOX plus Bmab chemotherapy, the primary tumor was found to have shrunk remarkably. Therefore, surgery was performed and the tumor was resected curatively. From these experiences, we conclude that some patients with locally far-advanced colorectal cancer can be treated effectively with CapeOX plus Bmab chemotherapy in a neoadjuvant setting. PMID:26805125

  15. Optimal management of collagenous colitis: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is an increasingly recognized cause of chronic inflammatory bowel disease characterized by watery non-bloody diarrhea. As a lesser studied inflammatory bowel disease, many aspects of the CC's natural history are poorly understood. This review discusses strategies to optimally manage CC. The goal of therapy is to induce clinical remission, <3 stools a day or <1 watery stool a day with subsequent improved quality of life (QOL). Antidiarrheal can be used as monotherapy or with other medications to control diarrhea. Budesonide therapy has revolutionized treatment and is superior to prednisone, however, the treatment is associated with high-relapse rates and the management of refractory disease is challenging. Ongoing trials will address the safety and efficacy of low-dose maintenance therapy. For those with refractory disease, case reports and case series support the role of biologic agents. Diversion of the fecal stream normalizes colonic mucosal changes and ileostomy may be considered where anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents are contraindicated. Underlying celiac disease, bile salt diarrhea, and associated thyroid dysfunction should be ruled out. The author recommends smoking cessation as well as avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories as well as other associated medications. PMID:26929656

  16. Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis: Points of controversy.

    PubMed

    Trigui, A; Frikha, F; Rejab, H; Ben Ameur, H; Triki, H; Ben Amar, M; Mzali, R

    2014-09-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has become the most commonly used procedure for elective treatment of patients with ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis. Since its original description, the procedure has been modified in order to obtain optimal functional results with low morbidity and mortality, and yet provide a cure for the disease. In this review of the literature of restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, we discuss these technical modifications, limiting our discussion to the current points of controversy. The current "hot topics" for debate are: indications for ileal pouch-anal or ileo-rectal anastomosis, indications for pouch surgery in the elderly, indeterminate colitis and Crohn's disease, the place of the laparoscopic approach, transanal mucosectomy with hand-sewn anastomosis vs. the double-stapled technique, the use of diverting ileostomy and the issue of the best route for delivery of pregnant women. Longer follow-up of patients and increased knowledge and experience with pouch surgery, coupled with ongoing prospective evaluation of the procedure are required to settle these issues. PMID:24999229

  17. Happily hopeless: Adaptation to a permanent, but not to a temporary, disability

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dylan M.; Loewenstein, George; Jankovich, Aleksandra; Ubel, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We tracked patients with either irreversible or reversible colostomies over a six month period, beginning a week after the procedure, to examine how they adapted hedonically over time. Based on prior research and theorizing, we hypothesized that, paradoxically, those with irreversible colostomies would adapt more fully, and become happier, than would those with colostomies that were potentially reversible. Design: We contacted 107 patients who had recently received either a colostomy or ileostomy. The initial interviews were conducted while patients were still in the hospital recovering from their surgery. Consenting participants were mailed surveys at three time points: 1 week after release from the hospital, one month after release, and six months after release. Main Outcome Measures: The surveys included measures of life satisfaction and perceived quality of life. Results: As predicted, overall life satisfaction and quality of life increased with time for patients with permanent, but not temporary, ostomies.. Conclusion: These findings suggest that knowing an adverse situation is temporary can interfere with adaptation, leading to a paradoxical situation in which people who are better off objectively are worse off subjectively. PMID:19916648

  18. Relationship between Fecal Content of Fatty Acids and Cyclooxygenase mRNA Expression and Fatty Acid Composition in Duodenal Biopsies, Serum Lipoproteins, and Dietary Fat in Colectomized Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Almendingen, K.; Høstmark, A. T.; Larsen, L. N.; Fausa, O.; Bratlie, J.; Aabakken, L.

    2010-01-01

    A few familial adenomatous polyposis studies have focused upon faecal sterols and bile acids but none has analysed the fecal content of fatty acids. We report here findings of an observational study on 29 colectomized familial adenomatous polyposis patients that describe the fecal content of fatty acids, and relate this to the proportions of fatty acids and levels of cyclooxygenase mRNA expression in duodenal biopsies, levels of serum lipoproteins, and diet. In the ileostomy group separately (n = 12), the fecal content of arachidonic acid was correlated negatively to the proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in duodenal biopsies. Total serum-cholesterol was negatively correlated to the fecal content of saturates and monounsaturates. The fecal palmitoleic acid/palmitic acid ratio was positively correlated to the levels of cyclooxygease-2 expression in duodenal biopsies.In the ileal-pouch-anal anastomosis group separately (n = 17), significant correlations were found between the fecal contents of oleic acid, linoleic acid, and alpha-linolenic acid, and the proportions of myristic acid, oleic acid and eicosaenoic acid in duodenal biopsies. Dietary monounsaturates were positively correlated to different fecal fatty acids. Future studies should focus on molecular mechanisms relevant to fatty acid metabolism, inflammation, and angiogenesis, in addition to nutrition. PMID:21052495

  19. Microscopic colitis: A review of etiology, treatment and refractory disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Tina; Cave, David; Marshall, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Microscopic colitis is a common cause of chronic, nonbloody diarrhea. Microscopic colitis is more common in women than men and usually affects patients in their sixth and seventh decade. This article reviews the etiology and medical management of microscopic colitis. The etiology of microscopic colitis is unknown, but it is associated with autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, polyarthritis, and thyroid disorders. Smoking has been identified as a risk factor of microscopic colitis. Exposure to medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, is suspected to play a role in microscopic colitis, although their direct causal relationship has not been proven. Multiple medications, including corticosteroids, anti-diarrheals, cholestyramine, bismuth, 5-aminosalicylates, and immunomodulators, have been used to treat microscopic colitis with variable response rates. Budesonide is effective in inducing and maintaining clinical remission but relapse rate is as high as 82% when budesonide is discontinued. There is limited data on management of steroid-dependent microscopic colitis or refractory microscopic colitis. Immunomodulators seem to have low response rate 0%-56% for patients with refractory microscopic colitis. Response rate 66%-100% was observed for use of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for refractory microscopic colitis. Anti-TNF and diverting ileostomy may be an option in severe or refractory microscopic colitis. PMID:26269669

  20. External Nursing Applications in the Supportive Management of Prolonged Postoperative Ileus: Description of Interventions and Case Report.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Bernhard; von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Voggenreiter, Bernd; Vagedes, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged postoperative ileus is a common but clinically challenging problem that leads to patient discomfort and prolonged hospitalization; the condition is managed through a multimodular program of supportive measures. In anthroposophic nursing, the management of prolonged postoperative ileus involves additional tools, including external abdominal compresses and massages with plant or silver-containing oils and ointments. We describe 3 typical techniques: Oxalis tincture compresses, Thuja/Argentum ointment compresses, and massage with "Wala Melissenöl" (containing Melissa officinalis, Carvum cari, Foeniculum amari, and Origanum majorana). A 61-year-old man with chronic pain from adhesions after multiple abdominal surgical procedures developed a prolonged postoperative ileus after an elective ileostomy reversal. Following slow recovery during the first postoperative days, he began vomiting. A nasogastric tube was inserted, and daily Oxalis tincture compresses and massage with "Wala Melissenöl" and Thuja/Argentum ointment compresses were applied on the abdomen. The patient's symptoms gradually improved over the next 10 days. No prokinetic medications were needed to manage this episode. External abdominal nursing applications with plant substances and silver can be an additional tool in the management of prolonged postoperative ileus. PMID:27309410

  1. Parastomal hernias after radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Timothy F; Bochner, Bernard H

    2016-07-01

    Parastomal hernia, defined as an "incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma", is a frequent complication after conduit urinary diversion that can negatively impact quality of life and present a clinically significant problem for many patients. Parastomal hernia (PH) rates may be as high as 65% and while many patients are asymptomatic, in some series up to 30% of patients require surgical intervention due to pain, leakage, ostomy appliance problems, urinary obstruction, and rarely bowel obstruction or strangulation. Local tissue repair, stoma relocation, and mesh repairs have been performed to correct PH, however, long-term results have been disappointing with recurrence rates of 30%-76% reported after these techniques. Due to high recurrence rates and the potential morbidity of PH repair, efforts have been made to prevent PH development at the time of the initial surgery. Randomized trials of circumstomal prophylactic mesh placement at the time of colostomy and ileostomy stoma formation have shown significant reductions in PH rates with acceptably low complication profiles. We have placed prophylactic mesh at the time of ileal conduit creation in patients at high risk for PH development and found it to be safe and effective in reducing the PH rates over the short-term. In this review, we describe the clinical and radiographic definitions of PH, the clinical impact and risk factors associated with its development, and the use of prophylactic mesh placement for patients undergoing ileal conduit urinary diversion with the intent of reducing PH rates. PMID:27437533

  2. [Colonic aganglionosis with ileal involvement. Ileocolic plasty].

    PubMed

    Núñez, R; Cabrera, R; Agulla, E; Moreno, C; Serrano, A; Ortiz, C; Blesa, E

    2001-04-01

    During 1994 through 1999, we have treated five patients (3 boys, 2 girls) with total colonic aganglionosis (TCA) and ileal involvement. In three of them we performed a diverting ileostomy in the neonatal period and at the age of four and five months respectively in the remaining two patients, due to intestinal obstruction. In these two last patients a diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease was made by anorectal manometry and rectal biopsies in the neonatal period. During laparotomy, a cutaneous ileostomy was created in all patients at the distal end of normal ileum, which was 30 to 110 cm (mean = 71 +/- 37 cm) from the ileocecal valve. After operation, a short bowel syndrome developed in three patients causing fluid and nutritional problems that required prolonged total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The definitive operative repair is performed at 4.5 to 14 months (mean = 8 +/- 3.7 months) by a 12 to 20 cm side-to-side ileocolostomy created between the ileum and aganglionic ascending color (Boley procedure) and ileorectal primary anastomosis (Rehbein procedure) using a circular stapler. Rectal dilatation, irrigation of the colon with saline, loperamide hydrochloride and resincholestyramine were begun in all patients postoperatively. Oral antibiotic prophylaxis, was given to the three patients who suffered from SBS. Oral feedings with semielemental diet were tolerated once stools were semiformed and TPN was discontinued at 8 to 34 days (mean = 21 +/- 1.7 days). postoperatively. After the definitive operation, enterocolitis developed in two patients, requiring one of them a short hospitalization during the episode. A possible explanation for the low incidence of enterocolitis in this series is the systematic postoperative use of irrigations of the colon with saline in all patients. These five patients have been followed-up for growth, development, bowel habit and continence. Follow-up has ranged from 15 to 62 months (mean = 32.2 +/- 19.2 months). Presently, all patients in

  3. Slow Transit Constipation.

    PubMed

    Wald, Arnold

    2002-08-01

    conceptually, it is worth attempting and certainly so in patients with associated pelvic floor dyssynergia. Subtotal colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis is often effective in those patients with colonic inertia, normal anorectal function, and lack of evidence of generalized intestinal dysmotility. However, morbidity is significant both early and late in the disease process and must be balanced against current disability. Ileostomy is preferred in the presence of anorectal dysfunction or with associated impairment of continence mechanisms. Similar considerations apply to the patient with disabling functional megacolon. An alternative approach is ileostomy with disconnection of the colon, which is more acceptable to some patients who may hope for future reconnection if recovery occurs. An additional alternative approach for patients with colonic inertia or megacolon who are not good surgical risks is tube cecostomy (or in children, use of the appendix as a conduit to the cecum). This permits either decompression (in megacolon) or antegrade enemas (in colonic inertia). Our surgeons are not enthusiastic about this approach, and I have little experience with it. In general, the use of partial resections of the colon should be discouraged, because marker studies do not define pathophysiology in patients with slow transit constipation. PMID:12095475

  4. [Focal spontaneous colic perforation in term or near-term neonates: rare and potentially insidious].

    PubMed

    Bartoli, F; Vasseur Maurer, S; Giannoni, E; Osterheld, M-C; Laubscher, B

    2011-04-01

    Two cases of neonatal focal spontaneous colic perforations are reported. The 1st infant, born at 36 3/7 weeks gestational age, presented on day 3 with crying, abdominal distension, and liquid stools. Clinical examination showed a slightly irritable hypothermic (35.7 °C) infant with a distended abdomen and few bowel sounds. Blood tests were normal apart from an elevated C-reactive protein level (59 mg/l). The abdomen x-ray was erroneously considered normal. The infant's condition remained stable for nearly 3 days. After reviewing the initial x-ray, pneumoperitoneum was suspected and confirmed by a cross-table lateral abdominal x-ray. The infant was started on antibiotics and operated. Macroscopically, the entire gut was normal apart from a focal sigmoid perforation, which was stitched. A transmural colic biopsy revealed focal vascular dilation but was negative for necrotising enterocolitis or Hirschsprung disease. The infant recovered quickly. She is now a healthy, normal 3-year-old. The 2nd infant, born at 38 5/7 weeks gestational age, presented between day 1 and 2 with clinical signs of infection associated with slowly progressive ileus. The chest and abdomen x-ray was mistakenly considered normal. Frank septicemia developed. After reviewing the initial x-ray, pneumoperitoneum was suspected and confirmed by a cross-table lateral abdominal x-ray. The infant was operated. Macroscopically, the small intestine was normal, the ascending and transverse colons were dilated, and the descending and sigmoid colons were narrow. Three cecal perforations were discovered and stitched. An ileostomy and multiple colic biopsies were also performed. The postoperative course was complicated by persistent septic ileus due to descending and sigmoid colon leaks, which led to colic resections with end-to-end anastomosis. Rectal aspiration biopsies were also performed. At 1 month of age, the infant was discharged from the hospital. The ileostomy was closed in two steps at 2 and 5 months

  5. New minimally invasive technique of parastomal hernia repair – methods and review

    PubMed Central

    Skoneczny, Paweł; Przywózka, Alicja; Czyżewski, Piotr; Bury, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Parastomal hernia is described as the most common complication in patients with ostomy. It is reported that its incidence varies from 3% to 39% for colostomies and 0 to 6% for ileostomies. Surgical repair remains the treatment of choice. There are three types of surgical treatment – fascial repair, stoma relocation and repair using prosthetic mesh via a laparoscopic or open approach. Recently there have been several meta-analyses and systematic reviews aiming to compare the results of surgical treatment, and the authors agreed that the quality of evidence precludes firm conclusions. Aim To describe the novel concept of parastomal hernia repair – HyPER/SPHR technique (hybrid parastomal endoscopic re-do/Szczepkowski parastomal hernia repair) and its early results in 12 consecutive cases. Material and methods Twelve consecutive patients were operated on due to parastomal hernia using the new HyPER hybrid technique between June 2013 and May 2014. The patients’ condition was evaluated during the perioperative period, 6 weeks and then every 3 months after surgery. Results After 6 weeks of follow-up we have not observed any mesh-related complications. All 12 patients were examined 3 months and 6 months after repair surgery for evaluation. No recurrence, stoma site infection or stoma-related problems were found. None of the patients complained of pain and none of them needed to be hospitalized again. Reported quality of life on a 0–10 scale after 6 weeks of follow-up was 8 (range: 7–10). Conclusions The HyPER procedure for treatment of parastomal hernias proposed by the authors is a safe and feasible surgical technique with a high patient satisfaction rate and a low number of complications. The hybrid procedure seems to be a promising method for parastomal hernia repair. PMID:25960785

  6. Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection and Eversion Technique Combined With a Nondog Ear Anastomosis for Mid- and Distal Rectal Neoplasms: A Preliminary and Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Changhua; Liang, Lei; Ying, Mingang; Li, Qingguo; Li, Dawei; Li, Yiwei; Peng, Junjie; Huang, Liyong; Cai, Sanjun; Li, Xinxiang

    2015-12-01

    The transanal eversion and prolapsing technique is a well-established procedure, and can ensure an adequate distal margin for patients with low rectal neoplasms. Potential leakage risks, however, are associated with bilateral dog ear formation, which results from traditional double-stapling anastomosis. The authors determined the feasibility of combining these techniques with a commercial stapling set to achieve a nondog ear (end-to-end) anastomosis for patients with mid- and distal rectal neoplasms. Patients with early-stage (c/ycT1-2N0), mid- to distal rectal neoplasms and good anal sphincter function were included in this study. Laparoscopic low anterior resection was performed with a standard total mesorectal excision technique downward to the pelvic floor as low as possible. The bowel was resected proximal to the lesion with an endoscopic linear stapler. An anvil was inserted extracorporeally into the proximal colon via an extended working pore. The distal rectum coupled with the lesion was prolapsed and everted out of the anus. The neoplasm was resected with a sufficient margin above the dentate line under direct sight. A transrectal anastomosis without dog ears was performed intracorporeally to reconstitute the continuity of the bowel. Eleven cases, 6 male and 5 female patients, were included in this study. The mean operative time was 191 (129-292) minutes. The mean blood loss was 110 (30-300) mL. The median distal margin distance from the lower edge of the lesion to the dentate line was 1.5 (0.5-2.5) cm. All the resection margins were negative. Most patients experienced uneventful postoperative recoveries. No patient had anastomotic leak. Most patients had an acceptable stool frequency after loop ileostomy closure. Our preliminary data demonstrated the safety and feasibility of achieving a sound anastomosis without risking potential anastomotic leakage because of dog ear formation. PMID:26683958

  7. Gastrointestinal Fistulas in Acute Pancreatitis With Infected Pancreatic or Peripancreatic Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Tong, Zhihui; Yang, Dongliang; Ke, Lu; Shen, Xiao; Zhou, Jing; Li, Gang; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) fistula is a well-recognized complication of acute pancreatitis (AP). However, it has been reported in limited literature. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and outcome of GI fistulas in AP patients complicated with infected pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis (IPN). Between 2010 and 2013 AP patients with IPN who diagnosed with GI fistula in our center were analyzed in this retrospective study. And we also conducted a comparison between patients with and without GI fistula regarding the baseline characteristics and outcomes. Over 4 years, a total of 928 AP patients were admitted into our center, of whom 119 patients with IPN were diagnosed with GI fistula and they developed 160 GI fistulas in total. Colonic fistula found in 72 patients was the most common form of GI fistula followed with duodenal fistula. All duodenal fistulas were managed by nonsurgical management. Ileostomy or colostomy was performed for 44 (61.1%) of 72 colonic fistulas. Twenty-one (29.2%) colonic fistulas were successfully treated by percutaneous drainage or continuous negative pressure irrigation. Mortality of patients with GI fistula did not differ significantly from those without GI fistula (28.6% vs 21.9%, P = 0.22). However, a significantly higher mortality (34.7%) was observed in those with colonic fistula. GI fistula is a common finding in patients of AP with IPN. Most of these fistulas can be successfully managed with different procedures depending on their sites of origin. Colonic fistula is related with higher mortality than those without GI fistula. PMID:27057908

  8. [Hypotension from endocrine origin].

    PubMed

    Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Douillard, Claire; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Hypotension is defined by a low blood pressure either permanently or only in upright posture (orthostatic hypotension). In contrast to hypertension, there is no threshold defining hypotension. The occurrence of symptoms for systolic and diastolic measurements respectively below 90 and 60 mm Hg establishes the diagnosis. Every acute hypotensive event should suggest shock, adrenal failure or an iatrogenic cause. Chronic hypotension from endocrine origin may be linked to adrenal failure from adrenal or central origin, isolated hypoaldosteronism, pseudohypoaldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, neuro-endocrine tumors (carcinoïd syndrome) or diabetic dysautonomia. Hypotension related to hypoaldosteronism associates low blood sodium and above all high blood potassium levels. They are generally classified according to their primary (hyperreninism) or secondary (hyporeninism) adrenal origin. Isolated primary hypoaldosteronisms are rare in adults (intensive care unit, selective injury of the glomerulosa area) and in children (aldosterone synthase deficiency). Isolated secondary hypoaldosteronism is related to mellitus diabetes complicated with dysautonomia, kidney failure, age, iatrogenic factors, and HIV infections. In both cases, they can be associated to glucocorticoid insufficiency from primary adrenal origin (adrenal failure of various origins with hyperreninism, among which congenital 21 hydroxylase deficiency with salt loss) or from central origin (hypopituitarism with hypo-reninism). Pseudohypoaldosteronisms are linked to congenital (type 1 pseudohypoaldosteronism) or acquired states of resistance to aldosterone. Acquired salt losses from enteric (total colectomy with ileostomy) or renal (interstitial nephropathy, Bartter and Gitelman syndromes…) origin might be responsible for hypotension and are associated with hyperreninism-hyperaldosteronism. Hypotension is a rare manifestation of pheochromocytomas, especially during surgical removal when the patient has not been

  9. “This bicycle gives me a headache”, a congenital anomaly

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Backround The combination of a presacral mass, a sacral bone deformity, and an anorectal malformation are also known as the Currarino triad or Currarino syndrome. The syndrome is associated with a very high rate of severe and intractable constipation and urinary incontinence. However, it can also result in less common complaints and symptoms. Although the syndrome is known since 1981 and the involved genes are clarified to a great extent, the diagnosis may be delayed or missed if unrecognized. Case presentation A 24-year old female presented with periodical headaches. She was born with an imperforate anus, absent rectum and colon, double bladder, and sacral defect. Soon after birth she underwent several surgical procedures for anorectal and bladder reconstructions. The patient now came to her pediatric urologist for urinary incontinence and mentioned severe headaches on the side, particularly when riding a bike. Finally, she solved her headache problem by stopping to ride her bicycle. On physical examination no abnormalities were found except the ileostomy that was present ever since soon after birth and her urinary incontinence. Blood tests showed no abnormalities. Additional MRI showed a large and previously not known anterior meningocele at the level of the sacrum. Surgical treatment consisted of closure of the dura by posterior approach. Conclusion In this case report we describe the late discovery with an atypical presentation of an anterior meningocele in a young adult with urinary incontinence, a sacral defect, an anorectal malformation and headaches during bicycle riding. After surgical treatment of our patient the meningocele regressed. Three months after successful surgery she had no complaints and was able to ride a bike again. PMID:24124700

  10. Transperitoneal versus extraperitoneal robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy: which one?

    PubMed

    Atug, F; Thomas, R

    2007-06-01

    As robotic surgery has proliferated, both in its availability as well as in its popularity, there are certainly several unresolved matters in the burgeoning field of robotic radical prostatectomy. Matters that are commonly discussed at forums relating to robotic prostatectomy include training, proctoring, overcoming the learning curve, positive surgical margins, quality of life issues, etc. Among the approaches available for robotic radical prostatectomy are the trans-peritoneal (TP) and the extraperitoneal (EP) approaches. Although use of the TP approach vastly outnumbers the EP approach by a wide margin, one must not discount the need for learning the EP approach, especially in patients who could greatly benefit from this approach. The obese, those who have had intraperitoneal procedures in the past, those with ostomies (colostomy, ileostomy) should be considered candidates for the EP approach. For the beginner, it is recommended that familiarizing oneself with the TP approach may be the quickest way to get proficient with use of the robot and for getting over the learning curve, which varies from surgeon to surgeon. Once comfortable with the TP approach, one should consider the application of the EP access, when indicated. One distinct disadvantage of the EP approach is the limited space available for robotic movements. This is why one would prefer getting experience in the TP before forging into the EP approach. Certainly, adequate balloon dissection of the retroperitoneal space above the bladder is critical, as well as additional dissection with the camera in place. Another criticism of the EP approach is the fact that one may not have enough space or ability to perform a complete pelvic lymph node dissection. However, in experienced hands, one is able to do a very comparable job. Though the TP approach would continue to be the premium approach for robotic and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, one should familiarize oneself with the EP approach since this

  11. Sampling gastro-enterologists' opinions and attitudes at two world congresses.

    PubMed

    Clamp, S E; Wenham, J S; Softley, A; Blackband, D; Chan, M

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of gastro-enterologists' opinions and attitudes at the Stockholm, Sweden, Seventh World Congress (June 1982), elicited via a standard questionnaire in three languages. Respondents' replies were compared with those from the previous (Sixth) World Congress (Madrid 1978) on a variety of topics. As regards peptic ulcer, little change has occurred in the last four years concerning surgery, though highly selective vagotomy has become more common for duodenal ulcer. As regards drugs in routine use, this survey confirms the considerable rise in the proportion of centres prescribing H2 receptor blockers (from 48% in 1978 to 81% in 1982). As regards inflammatory bowel disease, there has been little change overall in surgical procedures though 'small' procedures have grown in popularity (such as diverting ileostomy), largely at the expense of colectomy. Most physicians would now recommend some form of cancer surveillance both for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the most popular modality being clinical examination plus sigmoidoscopy at 6-12 month intervals, with colonoscopy or barium enema every two years. As regards GI cancer detection, endoscopy is now the modality of choice both for gastric cancer and colo-rectal cancer. Finally, the majority of respondents confirm that they frequently encounter ethical problems both in connection with routine practice and research. By and large ethical committees were felt to be ineffective, and guidance on ethical matters (absent in many centres!) rarely takes a structured form. This last finding possibly lends weight to the O.M.G.E.'s intention to provide such guidance via its newly founded Ethical Committee. PMID:6147011

  12. A high amylose (amylomaize) starch raises proximal large bowel starch and increases colon length in pigs.

    PubMed

    Topping, D L; Gooden, J M; Brown, I L; Biebrick, D A; McGrath, L; Trimble, R P; Choct, M; Illman, R J

    1997-04-01

    Young male pigs consumed a diet of fatty minced beef, safflower oil, skim milk powder, sucrose, cornstarch and wheat bran. Starch provided 50% of total daily energy either as low amylose cornstarch, high amylose (amylomaize) cornstarch or as a 50/50 mixture of corn and high amylose starch. Neither feed intake nor body weight gain as affected by dietary starch. Final plasma cholesterol concentrations were significantly higher than initial values in pigs fed the 50/50 mixture of corn and high amylose starch. Biliary concentrations of lithocholate and deoxycholate were lower in pigs fed high amylose starch. Large bowel length correlated positively with the dietary content of high amylose starch. Concentrations of butyrate in portal venous plasma were significantly lower in pigs fed high amylose starch than in those fed cornstarch. Neither large bowel digesta mass nor the concentrations of total or individual volatile fatty acids were affected by diet. However, the pool of propionate in the proximal colon and the concentration of propionate in feces were higher in pigs fed amylose starch. Concentrations of starch were uniformly low along the large bowel and were unaffected by starch type. In pigs with cecal cannula, digesta starch concentrations were higher with high amylose starch than with cornstarch. Electron micrographic examination of high amylose starch granules from these animals showed etching patterns similar to those of granules obtained from human ileostomy effluent. It appears that high amylose starch contributes to large bowel bacterial fermentation in the pig but that its utilization may be relatively rapid. PMID:9109613

  13. New technique for treating abdominal surgical site infection using CT woundgraphy and NPWT: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Eisaku; Yoshida, Masashi; Nakashima, Keigo; Suzuki, Norihiko; Imakita, Tomonori; Tsutsui, Nobuhiro; Ohdaira, Hironori; Kitajima, Masaki; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for abdominal surgical site infection (SSI) is becoming increasingly common, although enterocutaneous fistula (ECF) has been reported as a complication. To avoid ECF, we used computed tomography (CT) woundgraphy to evaluate the relationship between the wound and the intestine, and then safely treated the abdominal SSI with NPWT. Case presentation Following a laparoscopic intersphincteric resection for low rectal neuroendocrine tumor and covering ileostomy, a 59-year-old woman underwent stoma closure. Six days after surgery, we diagnosed SSI. We suspected ECF, because the wound was deep and the pus resembled enteric fluid. However, CT woundgraphy showed that the wound was separated from the abdominal cavity and the intestine by the abdominal rectus muscle. Accordingly, we performed NPWT. SSI was cured and the wound was well granulated. Twenty-three days after surgery, the patient was discharged. Eventually, the wound was completely epithelialized. Discussion Although successful NPWT has been reported for open abdominal wounds, ECF is a common complication. ECF can be prevented by separating the wound from the intestine by the omentum or muscle fascia, protecting the intestinal serosa during surgery, and applying low vacuum pressure. The relationships among the wound, the fascia, and the intestine must be evaluated before abdominal SSI treatment. One good method is CT woundgraphy, which evaluates wound extent and depth, closure of muscle fascia, and the relationship between the wound and the intestine. Conclusion We report a case of CT woundgraphy before NPWT for abdominal SSI. CT woundgraphy is a good candidate for evaluating wound condition. PMID:27002290

  14. Introduction of percutaneous-tunneled transfontanellar external ventricular drainage in the management of hydrocephalus in extremely low-birth-weight infants.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Mino; Lefosse, Mariella; Corvaglia, Luigi; Martini, Silvia; Sandri, Fabrizio; Soffritti, Silvia; Ancora, Gina; Mammoliti, Palma; Gargano, Giancarlo; Galassi, Ercole

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Hydrocephalus treatment in extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants still represents a challenge for the pediatric neurosurgeon, particularly when the patient weighs far less than 1000 g. In such cases, the benefits in terms of neurological outcome following early treatment do not always outweigh the surgical risks, especially considering the great difference in the surgical risk before patient weight increases. To assess the efficacy and reliability of a percutaneous-tunneled, transfontanellar external ventricular drain (PTTEVD) in ELBW infants, the authors started a new protocol for the early surgical treatment of hydrocephalus. METHODS Ten cases of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) in ELBW infants (5 cases < 700 g, range for all cases 550-1000 g) were treated with a PTTEVD that was implanted at bedside as the first measure in a stepwise approach. RESULTS The average duration of the procedure was 7 minutes, and there was no blood loss. The drain remained in place for an average of 24 days (range 8-45 days). In all cases early control of the hydrocephalus was achieved. One patient had a single episode of CSF leakage (due to insufficient CSF removal). In another patient Enterococcus in the CSF sample was detected the day after abdominal surgery with ileostomy (infection resolved with intrathecal vancomycin). One patient died of Streptococcus sepsis, a systemic infection existing prior to drain placement that never resolved. One patient had Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis prior to drain insertion; a PTTEVD was implanted, the infection resolved, and the hydrocephalus was treated in the same way as with a traditional EVD, while the advantages of a quick, minimally invasive, bedside procedure were maintained. Once a patient reached 1 kg in weight, when necessary, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was implanted and the PTTEVD was removed. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of PTTEVD placement in our standard protocol for the management of PHH has proved to be a wise

  15. Efficacy and safety of a NiTi CAR 27 compression ring for end-to-end anastomosis compared with conventional staplers: A real-world analysis in Chinese colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenhai; Peng, Jianhong; Li, Cong; Wang, Fulong; Jiang, Wu; Fan, Wenhua; Lin, Junzhong; Wu, Xiaojun; Wan, Desen; Pan, Zhizhong

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a new nickel-titanium shape memory alloy compression anastomosis ring, NiTi CAR 27, in constructing an anastomosis for colorectal cancer resection compared with conventional staples. METHODS: In total, 234 consecutive patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer receiving sigmoidectomy and anterior resection for end-to-end anastomosis from May 2010 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The postoperative clinical parameters, postoperative complications and 3-year overall survival in 77 patients using a NiTi CAR 27 compression ring (CAR group) and 157 patients with conventional circular staplers (STA group) were compared. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the patients in the two groups in terms of general demographics and tumor features. A clinically apparent anastomotic leak occurred in 2 patients (2.6%) in the CAR group and in 5 patients (3.2%) in the STA group (p=0.804). These eight patients received a temporary diverting ileostomy. One patient (1.3%) in the CAR group was diagnosed with anastomotic stricture through an electronic colonoscopy after 3 months postoperatively. The incidence of postoperative intestinal obstruction was comparable between the two groups (p=0.192). With a median follow-up duration of 39.6 months, the 3-year overall survival rate was 83.1% in the CAR group and 89.0% in the STA group (p=0.152). CONCLUSIONS: NiTi CAR 27 is safe and effective for colorectal end-to-end anastomosis. Its use is equivalent to that of the conventional circular staplers. This study suggests that NiTi CAR 27 may be a beneficial alternative in colorectal anastomosis in Chinese colorectal cancer patients. PMID:27276395

  16. A Retrospective, Observational Study of the Adequacy of Elective Loop Stoma Diversion.

    PubMed

    Shah, Puja; Mauro, David; Friel, Charles; Hedrick, Traci

    2016-05-01

    Diverting stomas are employed for various clinical indications and easier to revert than end stomas. General, plastic, and colorectal surgeons continue to debate whether a diverting loop stoma adequately diverts stool, preventing spillage into the distal limb, which does not receive stool. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted involving all patients who underwent loop ostomy surgery (colostomy or ileostomy) - defined by current procedural terminology (CPT) codes 44187, 44188, 44153, and 44155-44158 - between April 1, 2002 and October 12, 2010. The purpose of the study was to determine if a diverting loop stoma is completely diverting with no efflux into the distal limb by examining the rate of distal limb contamination. Two surgeons identified patients at the University of Virginia who had loop ostomy surgery and subsequently underwent computed tomography (CT) scan with oral contrast for clinical suspicion of abnormal pathology. A radiologist reviewed these images to evaluate the presence or absence of oral contrast in the ostomy distal limb. Distal progression of oral contrast was deemed adequate if oral contrast was visualized within the ostomy bag or if contrast was intraluminal distal to the loop ostomy. The loop ostomy was considered diverting if oral contrast was only visualized in the ostomy bag with no oral contrast distally. Of the 202 eligible patients, 26 (13%) underwent 41 postoperative CT scans of the abdomen/pelvis. Four (4) were excluded due to inadequate exam or confounding contrast (rectal contrast, contrast retention from preoperative scan). Of the remaining 22 patients with 35 CT scans (median age 54 [range 26-82] years, 10 men, 18 Caucasian, 18 having elective surgery), no patient (0%) had evidence of distal contrast. In this and other studies, loop stomas were found to provide adequate diversion without spillage into the nonfunctional limb for the vast majority of patients and should strongly be considered as the procedure of choice

  17. Fully covered self-expandable metal stent in the treatment of postsurgical colorectal diseases: outcome in 29 patients

    PubMed Central

    Cereatti, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Ceci, Vincenzo; Vergeau, Bertrand-Marie; Tuszynski, Thierry; Meduri, Bruno; Donatelli, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement is a minimally invasive treatment for palliation of malignant colorectal strictures and as a bridge to surgery. However, the use of SEMS for benign colorectal diseases is controversial. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fully covered SEMS (FCSEMS) placement in postsurgical colorectal diseases. Methods: From 2008 to 2014, 29 patients with 32 FCSEMS deployment procedures were evaluated. The indications for stent placement were: 17 anastomotic strictures (3/17 presented complete closure of the anastomosis); four anastomotic leaks; seven strictures associated with anastomotic leak; and one rectum-vagina fistula. Results: Clinical success was achieved in 18 out of 29 patients (62.1%) being symptom-free at an average of 19 months. In the remaining 11 patients (37.9%), a different treatment was needed: four patients required multiple endoscopic dilations, 4 patients colostomy confection, one patient definitive ileostomy and three patients revisional surgery. The FCSEMS were kept in place for a mean period of 34 (range: 6–65) days. Major complications occurred in 12 out of 29 patients (41.4%) and consisted of stent migration. Minor complications included two cases of transient fever, eight cases of abdominal or rectal pain, and one case of tenesmus. Conclusion: FCSEMS are considered a possible therapeutic option for treatment of postsurgical strictures and leaks. However, their efficacy in guaranteeing long-term anastomotic patency and leak closure is moderate. A major complication is migration. The use of FCSEMS for colonic postsurgical pathologies should be carefully evaluated for each patient. PMID:26929780

  18. Surgery for constipation in patients with prior spinal cord injury: The Department of Veterans Affairs experience

    PubMed Central

    West, Jason R.; Mohiuddin, Shoeb A.; Hand, William R.; Grossmann, Erik M.; Virgo, Katherine S.; Johnson, Frank E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) typically have difficulty with constipation. Some undergo surgery for bowel management. We predicted that SCI patients would have higher mortality and/or morbidity rates following such surgery than neurally intact patients receiving the same procedures. We sought to evaluate this using a large population-based data set. Methods Patients receiving care at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (DVAMCs) with computer codes for SCI and constipation who later underwent colectomy, colostomy, or ileostomy during fiscal years 1993–2002 were identified. Charts were requested from the VAMCs where the surgery had been performed and a retrospective chart review of these charts was done. We collected data on patient demographics, six specific pre-operative co-morbidities, surgical complications, and post-operative mortality. Comparisons were made to current literature evaluating a population receiving total abdominal colectomy and ileorectal anastomosis for constipation but not selected for SCI. Results Of 299 patients identified by computer search, 43 (14%) had codes for SCI and 10 of 43 (24%) met our inclusion criteria. All were symptomatic and had received appropriate medical management. Co-morbid conditions were present in 9 of 10 patients (90%). There were no deaths within 30 days. The complication rate was zero. The mean post-operative length of stay was 17 days. Conclusions Patients with SCI comprise about 14% of the population who receive surgery for severe constipation in the Department of Veterans Affairs system. The mortality and morbidity rates in these patients are similar to those reported in other constipated patients who have surgery for intractable constipation. Our data suggest that stoma formation ± bowel resection in patients with SCI is a safe and effective treatment for chronic constipation. PMID:23809590

  19. Robotic Low Ligation of the Inferior Mesenteric Artery for Rectal Cancer Using the Firefly Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Min, Byung Soh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose By integrating intraoperative near infrared fluorescence imaging into a robotic system, surgeons can identify the vascular anatomy in real-time with the technical advantages of robotics that is useful for meticulous lymphovascular dissection. Herein, we report our initial experience of robotic low ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) with real-time identification of the vascular system for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique. Materials and Methods The study group included 11 patients who underwent a robotic total mesorectal excision with preservation of the left colic artery for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique between July 2013 and December 2013. Results The procedures included five low anterior resections and six ultra-low anterior resections with loop ileostomy. The median total operation time was 327 min (226-490). The low ligation time was 10 min (6-20), and the time interval between indocyanine green injection and division of the sigmoid artery was 5 min (2-8). The estimated blood loss was 200 mL (100-500). The median time to soft diet was 4 days (4-5), and the median length of stay was 7 days (5-9). Three patients developed postoperative complications; one patients developed anal stricture, one developed ileus, and one developed non-complicated intraabdominal fluid collection. The median total number of lymph nodes harvested was 17 (9-29). Conclusion Robotic low ligation of the IMA with real-time identification of the vascular system for rectal cancer using the Firefly technique is safe and feasible. This technique can allow for precise lymph node dissection along the IMA and facilitate the identification of the left colic branch of the IMA. PMID:26069127

  20. Novel findings on the metabolic effects of the low glycaemic carbohydrate isomaltulose (Palatinose™)

    PubMed Central

    Holub, Ines; Gostner, Andrea; Theis, Stephan; Nosek, Leszek; Kudlich, Theodor; Melcher, Ralph; Scheppach, W.

    2010-01-01

    The slow digestible disaccharide isomaltulose (iso; Palatinose™) is available as novel functional carbohydrate ingredient for manufacturing of low glycaemic foods and beverages. Although basically characterised, various information on physiological effects of iso are still lacking. Thus, the objective of the present study was to expand scientific knowledge of physiological characteristics of iso by a set of three human intervention trials. Using an ileostomy model, iso was found to be essentially absorbed, irrespective of the nature of food (beverage and solid food). Apparent digestibility of 50 g iso from two different meals was 95·5 and 98·8 %; apparent absorption was 93·6 and 96·1 %, respectively. In healthy volunteers, a single dose intake of iso resulted in lower postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses than did sucrose (suc), while showing prolonged blood glucose delivery over 3 h test. In a 4-week trial with hyperlipidaemic individuals, regular consumption of 50 g/d iso within a Western-type diet was well tolerated and did not affect blood lipids. Fasting blood glucose and insulin resistance were lower after the 4-week iso intervention compared with baseline. This would be consistent with possible beneficial metabolic effects as a consequence of the lower and prolonged glycaemic response and lower insulinaemic burden. However, there was no significant difference at 4 weeks after iso compared with suc. In conclusion, the study shows that iso is completely available from the small intestine, irrespective of food matrix, leading to a prolonged delivery of blood glucose. Regular iso consumption is well tolerated also in subjects with increased risk for vascular diseases. PMID:20211041

  1. Metabolism of green tea catechins by the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Markus; Erk, Thomas; Richling, Elke

    2010-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown that green tea polyphenols can be degraded in the colon, and there is abundant knowledge about the metabolites of these substances that appear in urine and plasma after green tea ingestion. However, there is very little information on the extent and nature of intestinal degradation of green tea catechins in humans. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine in detail the microbial metabolism and chemical stability of these polyphenols in the small intestine using a well-established ex vivo model. For this purpose, fresh ileostomy fluids from two probands were incubated for 24 h under anaerobic conditions with (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin 3-O-gallate (ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epigallocatchin 3-O-gallate (EGCG) and gallic acid (GA). After lyophilisation and extraction, metabolites were separated, identified and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and HPLC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of EC and C (3', 4', 5'-trihydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactone and 3', 4'-dihydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactone) were identified. In addition, 3', 4', 5'-trihydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactone was detected as a metabolite of EGC, and (after 24-h incubation) pyrogallol as a degradation product of GA. Cleavage of the GA esters of EGCG and ECG was also observed, with variations dependent on the sources (probands) of the ileal fluids, which differed substantially microbiotically. The results provide new information about the degradation of green tea catechins in the gastrointestinal tract, notably that microbiota-dependent liberation of GA esters may occur before these compounds reach the colon. PMID:20931601

  2. Enteral Nutrient Deprivation in Patients Leads to a Loss of Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Ralls, Matthew W.; Demehri, Farokh R.; Feng, Yongjia; Woods Ignatoski, Kathleen M.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of nutrient withdrawal on human intestinal epithelial barrier function (EBF). We hypothesized that unfed mucosa results in decreased EBF. This was tested in a series of surgical small intestinal resection specimens. Design Small bowel specifically excluding inflamed tissue, was obtained from pediatric patients (aged 2 days to 19 years) undergoing intestinal resection. EBF was assessed in Ussing chambers for transepithelial resistance (TER) and passage of FITC-Dextran (4kD). Tight junction and adherence junction proteins were imaged with immunofluorescence staining. Expression of Toll like receptors (TLR) and inflammatory cytokines were measured in loop ileostomy takedowns in a second group of patients. Results Because TER increased with patient age (p<0.01), results were stratified into infant versus teenage groups. Fed bowel had significantly greater TER versus unfed bowel (p<0.05) in both age populations. Loss of EBF was also observed by an increase in FITC-Dextran permeation in nutrient-deprived segments (p<0.05). Immunofluorescence staining showed marked declines in intensity of ZO-1, occludin, Ecadherin and Claudin-4 in unfed intestinal segments, as well as a loss of structural formation of tight junctions. Analysis of cytokine and TLR expression showed significant increases in TNF-α and TLR4 in unfed segments of bowel compared to fed segments from the same individual. Conclusion EBF declined in unfed segments of human small bowel. This work represents the first direct examination of EBF from small bowel derived from nutrient-deprived humans and may explain the increased infectious complications seen in patients not receiving enteral feeds. PMID:25704423

  3. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision With Single-Incision Laparoscopy for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Dominic Chi-chung; Choi, Hok Kwok; Wei, Rockson; Yip, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There has been great enthusiasm for the technique of transanal total mesorectal excision. Coupled with this procedure, we performed single-incision laparoscopic surgery for left colon mobilization. This is a description of our initial experience with the combined approach. Methods: Patients with distal or mid rectal cancer were included. The operation was performed by 2 teams: one team performed the single-incision mobilization of the left colon via the right lower quadrant ileostomy site, and the other team performed the total mesorectal excision with a transanal platform. Results: During the study period, 10 patients (5 men) with cancer of the rectum underwent the surgery. The mean age was 62.2 ± 11.1 years, and the mean body mass index was 23.4 ± 3.2 kg/m2. The tumor's mean distance from the anal verge was 5.1 ± 2.5 cm. The median operating time was 247.5 minutes (range, 188–462 minutes). The mean estimated blood loss was 124 ± 126 mL (range, 10–188 mL). Conversion to multiport laparoscopy was needed in one case (10%). Postoperative pain, as reflected by the pain score, was minimal. The mean number of lymph nodes harvested was 15.6 ± 3.8. All specimens had clear distal and circumferential radial margins. The overall complication rate was 10%. Conclusion: Our experience showed transanal total mesorectal excision with single-incision laparoscopy to be a feasible option for rectal cancer. Patients reported minimal postoperative pain. Further studies on the long-term outcome are warranted. PMID:27186068

  4. Clinical profile and post-operative lifestyle changes in cancer and non-cancer patients with ostomy

    PubMed Central

    Anaraki, Fakhryalsadat; Vafaie, Mohamad; Behboo, Roobic; Maghsoodi, Nakisa; Esmaeilpour, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of this was to investigate some clinical profiles and lifestyle changes in stoma patients. Background Stoma patients experienced multiple complications due to their ostomy formation. Patients and methods A cross-sectional study performed on 102 random samples of stoma patients. Any patient with adequate physical and mental capability to participate and having had an ostomy in place for at least 3 months was eligible to enter the study. Participants asked to answer study questions concerning age, sex, type of stoma, having permanent or temporary ostomy, underlying cause of stoma formation, type of cancers cause of stoma. Patient also questioned about some lifestyle changes because of stoma including: changing diet, sexual satisfaction (if sexually active after stoma formation), sense of depression, changing job, change clothing style. Results Colostomy was the most common type of stoma followed by ileostomy and urostomy. In 80.4% of patients under study the stoma was permanent. Most patients had a stoma because of cancer (77.5%), with colon cancer (41.2%) being the most common malignant diagnosis. The mean age of cancer patients (56.1±10.9) with stoma was significantly higher than non-cancer patients (44.7±12.9) (p < 0.05). A significant differences were found regarding to sexual satisfaction after stoma formation between the two groups (p < 0.05) and the cancer group was less sexually satisfied post-ostomy. Conclusion In conclusion, stoma formation can caused multiple problems for both cancer and non-cancer patients. Counseling of patient is an important component of care that could help stoma patients to adjust with new situations. PMID:24834234

  5. Diversion of intestinal flow decreases the numbers of interleukin 4 secreting and interferon γ secreting T lymphocytes in small bowel mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, A; Van Gossum, A; Carol, M; Houben, J; Mascart, F

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—The intestinal immune system faces large amounts of antigens, and its regulation is tightly balanced by cytokines. In this study, the effect of intestinal flow diversion on spontaneous secretion of interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)- γ was analysed.
METHODS—Eight patients (two with Crohn's disease, four with ulcerative colitis, and two with previous colon cancer) carrying a double lumen small bowel stoma after a total colectomy procedure were included in the study. For each patient, eight biopsy samples were taken endoscopically from both the diverted and non-diverted part of the small bowel. Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated separately and assayed for numbers of cells spontaneously secreting IL-4 and/or IFN-γ by an ELISPOT technique.
RESULTS—Compared with the non-diverted mucosa, a significant decrease in the number of spontaneously IFN-γ secreting CD3 lymphocytes was observed in the diverted small bowel mucosa among both IELs (p = 0.008) and LPLs (p = 0.007). The same results, although less significant, were obtained for IL-4, especially in LPLs (p = 0.01).
CONCLUSION—The intestinal content influences the spontaneous secretion of IFN-γ and IL-4 by intestinal lymphocytes. These results could help to elucidate the anti-inflammatory role of split ileostomy in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases.


Keywords: intestine; T lymphocytes; mucosa; interleukin-4; interferon-γ; ELISPOT PMID:10601053

  6. Gastrointestinal Fistulas in Acute Pancreatitis With Infected Pancreatic or Peripancreatic Necrosis: A 4-Year Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Tong, Zhihui; Yang, Dongliang; Ke, Lu; Shen, Xiao; Zhou, Jing; Li, Gang; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) fistula is a well-recognized complication of acute pancreatitis (AP). However, it has been reported in limited literature. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence and outcome of GI fistulas in AP patients complicated with infected pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis (IPN).Between 2010 and 2013 AP patients with IPN who diagnosed with GI fistula in our center were analyzed in this retrospective study. And we also conducted a comparison between patients with and without GI fistula regarding the baseline characteristics and outcomes.Over 4 years, a total of 928 AP patients were admitted into our center, of whom 119 patients with IPN were diagnosed with GI fistula and they developed 160 GI fistulas in total. Colonic fistula found in 72 patients was the most common form of GI fistula followed with duodenal fistula. All duodenal fistulas were managed by nonsurgical management. Ileostomy or colostomy was performed for 44 (61.1%) of 72 colonic fistulas. Twenty-one (29.2%) colonic fistulas were successfully treated by percutaneous drainage or continuous negative pressure irrigation. Mortality of patients with GI fistula did not differ significantly from those without GI fistula (28.6% vs 21.9%, P = 0.22). However, a significantly higher mortality (34.7%) was observed in those with colonic fistula.GI fistula is a common finding in patients of AP with IPN. Most of these fistulas can be successfully managed with different procedures depending on their sites of origin. Colonic fistula is related with higher mortality than those without GI fistula. PMID:27057908

  7. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 {+-} 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 {+-} 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  8. [Interintestinal anastomoses formation using permanent magnet in surgical treatment of children with intestinal stomas].

    PubMed

    Gatkin, E Ya; Razumovsky, A Yu; Korsunsky, A A; Konovalov, A K; Sergeev, A V; Vinogradov, A Ya; Sein, V A

    2015-01-01

    It was analyzed the results of treatment of 48 children aged from 1 month to 14 years. In these observations by the 6th - 7th days after doubleintestinalstoma formation magnetic dies with inductance from 300 to 360 mTl and energy force at least 255 kJ/m3 were introduced into lumen of afferent and efferent intestinal loops. Attractive or compression force between dies was 600 g, i.e. force per 1 cm2 was 200 g according to dies' surface 1.12.83.0 cm. Magnets are not only surgical instruments but also physiotherapeutic devices improving microcirculation and stimulating regeneration in the area of anastomosis. Interintestinal anastomosis has been completely formed for 5-7 days. Thereafter magnetic dies have been removed. Stool was normalized in 45 of 48 observations after surgery (1-3 times daily). Intestinal discharge from ileostomy reduced to minimal amount. In 2 patients irregular bowel movements was observed due to adhesive stenosis of interintestinal anastomosis. Magnetic dies can't be established in 1 case due to adhesive process. Hospital stay was from 10 to 25 days in 41 children. 7 patients were discharged for outpatient treatment later. All children were under observation for the period 2-4 months after discharge. Signs of hypotrophy including body weight deficit within 10% of age norm were diagnosed only in 3 children with prematurity degree I-II. Hereafter children were repeatedly hospitalized; intestinal stomas were surgically removed using conventional technique. Thus complete convalescence was obtained. PMID:26271323

  9. Confusing untypical intestinal Behcet’s disease: Skip ulcers with severe lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Kai; Shi, Hui; Wang, Shao-Dong; Liu, Jiong; Zhu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Miao-Fang; Liu, Chan; Lu, Heng; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a rare and life-long disorder characterized by inflammation of blood vessels throughout the body. BD was originally described in 1937 as a syndrome involving oral and genital ulceration in addition to ocular inflammation. Intestinal BD refers to colonic ulcerative lesions documented by objective measures in patients with BD. Many studies have shown that over 40% of BD patients have gastrointestinal complaints. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, anorexia and abdominal distension. Although gastrointestinal symptoms are common, the demonstration of gastrointestinal ulcers is rare. This so-called intestinal BD accounts for approximately 1% of cases. There is no specific test for BD, and the diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. The manifestations of intestinal BD are similar to those of other colitis conditions such as Crohn’s disease or intestinal tuberculosis, thus, it is challenging for gastroenterologists to accurately diagnose intestinal BD in patients with ileo-colonic ulcers. However, giant ulcers distributed in the esophagus and ileocecal junction with gastrointestinal hemorrhage are rare in intestinal BD. Here, we present a case of untypical intestinal BD. The patient had recurrent aphthous ulceration of the oral mucosa, and esophageal and ileo-colonic ulceration, but no typical extra-intestinal symptoms. During examination, the patient had massive acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent ileostomy after an emergency right hemicolectomy and partial ileectomy, and was subsequently diagnosed with incomplete-type intestinal BD by pathology. The literature on the evaluation and management of this condition is reviewed. PMID:24527178

  10. Urolithiasis and crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Sandro Roberto da Silva; Mendonça, Tiago; Oliveira, Pedro; Oliveira, Tiago; Dias, José; Lopes, Tomé

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present an updated description of the relation between Crohn's disease (CD) and Urolithiasis. Patients and Methods: A literature search for English-language original and review articles was conducted in Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases in the month of December 2014 for papers either published or e-published up to that date, addressing the association between CD and urolithiasis as its consequence. All articles published in English language were selected for screening based on the following search terms: “CD,” “renal calculus,” “IBD,” and “urolithiasis.” We restricted the publication dates to the last 15 years (2000–2014). Results: In total, 901 patients were included in this review of which 95 were identified as having CD and urolithiasis simultaneously, for a total of 10.5%. Average age was 45.07 years old, irrespective of gender. 28.6% of patients received some kind of medical intervention without any kind of surgical technique involved, 50% of patients were submitted to a surgical treatment, and the remaining 21.4% were submitted to a combination of surgical and medical treatment. Urolithiasis and pyelonephritis incidence ranged from 4% to 23% with a risk 10–100 times greater than the risk for general population or for patients with UC, being frequent in patients with ileostomy and multiple bowel resections. We found that urolithiasis occurred in 95 patients from a total of 901 patients with CD (10.5%); 61.81% in men and 38.19% in women. Stone disease seems to present approximately 4–7 years after the diagnosis of bowel disease and CaOx seems to be the main culprit. Conclusions: CD is a chronic, granulomatous bowel disease, with urolithiasis as the most common extraintestinal manifestation (EIM), particularly frequent in patients submitted to bowel surgery. This complication needs to be recognized and addressed appropriately, especially in patients with unexplained renal dysfunction, abdominal pain, or recurrent urinary

  11. Surgical considerations in FAP-related pouch surgery: Could we do better?

    PubMed

    Möslein, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    The ileoanal pouch has become the standard restorative procedure of choice for patients with the classical phenotype in FAP (familial adenomatous polyposis) and also for ulcerative colitis (UC). Whilst we tend to encounter descriptive analyses comparing functional outcome, fertility and quality of life (QOL) between series in literature, there may be an urgent need to discuss the subtle technical modifications that may be pivotal for improving long-term QOL in FAP patients. Our aim is to review the current literature and discuss the aspects of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis that may require specific reevaluation for FAP. Surgical strategies aimed at minimizing post-interventional desmoid growth is one of the most important aspects. For this study, the following topics of interest were selected: Timing of surgery, IRA or ileoanal pouch for classical FAP, laparoscopic or conventional surgery, TME or mesenteric dissection, preservation of the ileocolic vessels, handsewn or double-staple anastomosis, shape and size of pouch, protective ileostomy, Last and definitely not least: how to manage desmoid plaques or desmoids at the time of prophylactic surgery. For the depicted technicalities of the procedure, a review of recent literature was performed and evaluated. For the topics selected, only sparse reference in literature was identified that was focused on the specific condition situation of FAP. Almost all pouch literature focusses on the procedural aspects, and FAP patients are always a very minor number. Therefore it becomes obvious that the specific entity is not adequately taken into account. This is a serious bias for identification of important steps in the procedure that may be beneficial for patients with either of the diseases. The results of this study demonstrate that several technical differences for construction of ileoanal pouches in FAP patients deserve more attention and prospective evaluation-perhaps even randomized trials. The role, importance and

  12. Transport, metabolism, and effect of chronic feeding of lagodeoxycholic acid. A new, natural bile acid.

    PubMed

    Schmassmann, A; Angellotti, M A; Clerici, C; Hofmann, A F; Ton-Nu, H T; Schteingart, C D; Marcus, S N; Hagey, L R; Rossi, S S; Aigner, A

    1990-10-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid, the 7 beta-hydroxy epimer of chenodeoxycholic acid, is more hydrophilic and less hepatotoxic than chenodeoxycholic acid. Because "lagodeoxycholic acid," the 12 beta-hydroxy epimer of deoxycholic acid, is also more hydrophilic than deoxycholic acid, it was hypothesized that it should also be less hepatotoxic than deoxycholic acid. To test this, lagodeoxycholic acid was synthesized, and its transport and metabolism were examined in the rat, rabbit, and hamster. The taurine conjugate of lagodeoxycholic acid was moderately well transported by the perfused rat ileum (Tmax = 2 mumol/min.kg). In rats and hamsters with biliary fistulas, the taurine conjugate of lagodeoxycholic acid was well transported by the liver with a Tmax greater than 20 mumol/min.kg; for the taurine conjugate of deoxycholic acid, doses infused at a rate greater than 2.5 mumol/min.kg are known to cause cholestasis and death. Hepatic biotransformation of lagodeoxycholic acid in the rabbit was limited to conjugation with glycine; in the hamster, lagodeoxycholic acid was conjugated with glycine or taurine; in addition, 7-hydroxylation occurred to a slight extent (approximately 10%). When lagodeoxycholic acid was instilled in the rabbit colon, it was absorbed as such although within hours it was progressively epimerized by bacteria to deoxycholic acid. When injected intravenously and allowed to circulate enterohepatically, lagodeoxycholic acid was largely epimerized to deoxycholic acid in 24 hours. Surgical creation of a distal ileostomy abolished epimerization in the rabbit, indicating that exposure to colonic bacterial enzymes was required for the epimerization. Lagodeoxycholic acid was administered for 3 weeks at a dose of 180 mumol/day (0.1% by weight of a chow diet; 2-4 times the endogenous bile acid synthesis rate); other groups received identical doses of deoxycholic acid (hamster) or cholyltaurine, a known precursor of deoxycholic acid (rabbit). After 3 weeks of

  13. Preservation of the vegetative pelvic nerves and local reccurence in the operative treatment of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jota, G J; Karadzov, Z; Panovski, M; Vasilevski, V; Serafimoski, V

    2006-12-01

    Life quality of the patients operated from rectal cancer is a serious problem. Despite the curing as a primary objective in the treatment of the rectal cancer, special attention is paid to the life quality upon the performed operation on the subjected patients. The analyzed series consists of 29 patients with rectal cancer, operated on at the Digestive Surgery Clinic within the framework of the Clinical Centre in Skopje, in the period between 2001-2006. Our series involves patients from the T2 and T3 stage of the illness, where it possible to preserve the vegetative pelvic nerves, that are characterized by a relatively long-lasting symptomatology and relatively high percentage of lymphatic metastases. The standardization of the operative intervention resulted in an increase in the number of patients with continuous operations and preservation of the neuro-vegetative plexus without influencing the radicalism of the intervention. The application of the Stapler and Double Stapler technique brought about an increase in the number of continuous operations characterized by a termino-terminal colorectal anastomosis. On the other hand the preventive creation of LOOP ileostomies in the case of the ultra low resections resulted in a decrease in the level of dehiscence of this type as one of the most common and most difficult complications. The preservation of the pelvic neuro-vegetative plexus prolongs the operation time by 30 to 60 minutes, depending on the case and the patient. We assume that the procedure does not have a particular influence on the frequency of the complications, and at the same time it positively affects the revival of the urinal and sexual function. Taking into consideration the fact that the lymphatic dissection increases the possibility of removal of the malignant tissue and enables an adequate "staging" and on the other hand the preservation of the pelvic plexus improves the quality of life, both in terms of the sexual function and the function of

  14. Giant colonic diverticulum: Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment: Systematic review of 166 cases

    PubMed Central

    Nigri, Giuseppe; Petrucciani, Niccolò; Giannini, Giulia; Aurello, Paolo; Magistri, Paolo; Gasparrini, Marcello; Ramacciato, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of giant colonic diverticulum (GCD, by means of a complete and updated literature review). GCD is a rare manifestation of diverticular disease of the colon. Less than 200 studies on GCD were published in the literature, predominantly case reports or small patient series. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the Embase and PubMed databases to identify all the GCD studies. The following MESH search headings were used: “giant colonic diverticulum”; “giant sigmoid diverticulum”. The “related articles” function was used to broaden the search, and all of the abstracts, studies, and citations were reviewed by two authors. The following outcomes were of interest: the disease and patient characteristics, study design, indications for surgery, type of operation, and post-operative outcomes. Additionally, a subgroup analysis of cases treated in the last 5 years was performed to show the current trends in the treatment of GCD. A GCD case in an elderly patient treated in our department by a sigmoidectomy with primary anastomosis and a diverting ileostomy is presented as a typical example of the disease. RESULTS: In total, 166 GCD cases in 138 studies were identified in the literature. The most common clinical presentation was abdominal pain, which occurred in 69% of the cases. Among the physical signs, an abdominal mass was detected in 48% of the cases, whereas 20% of the patients presented with fever and 14% with abdominal tenderness. Diagnosis is based predominantly on abdominal computed tomography. The most frequent treatment was colic resection with en-bloc resection of the diverticulum, performed in 57.2% of cases, whereas Hartmann’s procedure was followed in 11.4% of the cases and a diverticulectomy in 10.2%. An analysis of sixteen cases reported in the last 5 years showed that the majority of patients were treated with sigmoidectomy and en-bloc resection of

  15. A Prospective, Multicentered Study to Assess Social Adjustment in Patients With an Intestinal Stoma in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Karadağ, Ayişe; Karabulut, Hatice; Baykara, Zehra G; Harputlu, Deniz; Toyluk, Eylem; Ulusoy, Birgül; Karadağ, Sercan; Kahraman, Aysel; Hin, Aysel Ören; Altinsoy, Meral; Akıl, Yasemin; Leventoğlu, Sezai

    2015-10-01

    Patients with a stoma undergo physiological, psychological, and social adjustment to their new life situation. A descriptive, prospective study was conducted to assess adaptation among patients >18 years of age with a new temporary or permanent colostomy or ileostomy living in Turkey and receiving care at a participating stomatherapy unit. The study took place between September 1, 2011, and September 1, 2012. During hospitalization and following discharge, patients with a stoma received training and counseling according to their individual characteristics and their physiological, psychological, and social needs. Each participant completed the 19-item "Identification Form for Patients with a Stoma" at the beginning of the study to document sociodemographic and stoma characteristics. To assess adjustment to the stoma, The Ostomy Assessment Inventory (OAI-23) was administered 2 times - the first within 1 month and the second within 6 months after surgery or when a temporary stoma was closed (whichever came first). This instrument comprised 23 items regarding adaptation to the stoma using Likert-type response options (0-4 range). Total scores ranged from 10 to 92, with higher scores indicating better adjustment. The instruments were completed by stoma and wound care nurses during face-to-face interviews. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests. Of the 135 participants, the majority (77, 57.0%) were male; 73 (54.1%) had a colostomy, and 106 (78.5%) had a temporary stoma. The primary reason for stoma creation was cancer (89, 65.9%). Mean total OAI-23 scores were 48.63 ± 13.75 at the first administration and 50.59 ± 13.89 for the second. In terms of sociodemographic factors, significant increases in mean scores from the first to the second survey time were noted among patients in the 50-69 age group, women, married persons, and unemployed persons (P less than 0.05). With regard to stoma characteristics, the OAI-23 scores of patients

  16. A Descriptive Study Assessing Quality of Life for Adults With a Permanent Ostomy and the Influence of Preoperative Stoma Site Marking.

    PubMed

    Maydick, Diane

    2016-05-01

    Diseases or anomalies of the genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract often require removal of organs and creation of an artificial opening (stoma) to allow for elimination of urine or stool. Preoperative stoma site marking can affect quality of life (QoL). A descriptive study was conducted to assess the relationship between QoL and preoperative stoma site marking in adults with a permanent ostomy. Using convenience sampling methods, 230 eligible participants attending a United Ostomy Association of America conference were invited to complete a survey of demographics regarding age, gender, time since surgeries, and ostomy type and the City of Hope National Medical Center Quality of Life Ostomy Questionnaire. The latter contains 2 sections of 30 and 43 items each that address life impact and quality of life, respectively. The researcher explained the study and provided a study packet to volunteers who were interested in participating. Volunteers were to complete the surveys over a 4-day period while at the conference; the investigator collected all study materials. Inclusion criteria stipulated study participants must be English writing/reading persons at least 18 years of age with a colostomy, ileostomy, or urostomy. All descriptive statistics (means, standard deviation, frequency, and percents) used to describe demographic and surgical history and quantitative data (logistic regression, cross-tabulation, Pearson product moment correlations, and analysis of covariance) used to determine relationships among factors were entered and analyzed using a computer software program. Of the 140 participants who met inclusion criteria and provided data, the majority (85, 60.7%) had their stoma site marked by a wound, ostomy, continence (WOC) nurse. WOC nurse marking was more likely in recent years, and WOC nurse marking was 1.03 times more likely for each year since stoma surgery (M = 13.44, SD = 13.48). Mean QoL was 7.56 (SD = 1.59, range 3.84-10.00) and was positively