Science.gov

Sample records for iliac screw fixation

  1. S-1 and S-2-alar-iliac screw fixation via intraoperative navigation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin H; Jakoi, Andre M; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Adult deformity patients often require fixation to the sacrum and pelvis for construct stability and improved fusion rates. Although certain sacropelvic fixation techniques can be challenging, the availability of intraoperative navigation has made many of these techniques more feasible. In this video case presentation, the authors demonstrate the techniques of S-1 bicortical screw and S-2-alar-iliac screw fixation under intraoperative navigation in a 67-year-old female. This instrumentation placement was part of an overall T-10-pelvis construct for the correction of adult spinal deformity. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/3HZo-80jQr8 . PMID:27364427

  2. Technique and nuances of an S-2 alar iliac screw for lumbosacral fixation in patients with transitional and normal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Junichi; Vogel, Todd D; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berven, Sigurd; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    S-2 alar iliac (S2AI) screw fixation has recently been recognized as a useful technique for pelvic fixation. The authors demonstrate two cases where S2AI fixation was indicated: one case was a sacral insufficiency fracture following a long-segment fusion in a patient with a transitional S-1 vertebra; the other case involved pseudarthrosis following lumbosacral fixation. S2AI screws offer rigid fixation, low profile, and allow easy connection to the lumbosacral rod. The authors describe and demonstrate the surgical technique and nuances for the S2AI screw in a case with transitional S-1 anatomy and in a case with normal S-1 anatomy. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/Sj21lk13_aw . PMID:27364429

  3. Biomechanical Evaluation of Supplemental Percutaneous Lumbo-Sacro-iliac Screws For Spino-pelvic Fixation Following Total Sacrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Le, Vu H.; Heckmann, Nathanael; Jain, Nickul; Wang, Lawrence; Turner, Alexander W. L.; Lee, Thay Q.; Bederman, S. Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design This is a cadaveric biomechanical study evaluating the biomechanical properties of a novel spino-pelvic fixation technique with percutaneous lumbo-sacro-iliac (LSI) screws in an unstable total sacrectomy model. Objective To compare standard posterior dual rod spino-pelvic fixation alone with dual rod fixation supplemented with LSI screw fixation. Summary of Background Data Primary or metastatic tumors of the sacrum requiring a total sacrectomy can result in spino-pelvic instability if inadequate fixation is achieved. Many fixation techniques have been proposed to address this instability. However, to date, an optimal fixation technique has not been established. Methods Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric spino-pelvic specimens were randomized according to bone mineral density (BMD) to either posterior rod fixation (control group) or posterior rod fixation with supplemental LSI screws (LSI group). Following fixation, a total sacrectomy of each specimen was performed. Specimens where then potted and axially loaded in a caudal direction. Stiffness, yield load, energy absorbed at yield load, ultimate load, and energy absorbed at ultimate load were computed. A students t-test was used for statistical analysis with significance set at p<0.05. Results The average age and BMD were not significantly different between the control and LSI groups (age, p=0.255; BMD, p=0.810). After normalizing for BMD, there were no significant differences detected for any of the biomechanical parameters measured between the two fixation techniques: stiffness (p=0.857), yield load (p=0.219), energy at yield load (p=0.293), ultimate load (p=0.407), and energy at ultimate load (p=0.773). However, both fixation techniques were able to withstand physiological loads. Conclusions Our study did not demonstrate any biomechanical advantage for supplemental LSI screw fixation in our axial loading model. However, given the theoretical advantage of this percutaneous technique, further studies are

  4. Percutaneous iliac screws for minimally invasive spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael Y

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females). Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs. PMID:22900162

  5. A 10-year follow-up of transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or intervertebral B-Twin system in failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The spine surgeons have been combining anterior and posterolateral fusion (circumferential fusion) as the final solution to treat spinal disorders and many have been using it to treat failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). In present study, we analyzed and compared the clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral B-Twin system for FBSS with a follow-up period of 10 years after the surgery. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective case study performed on 55 patients with FBSS. Clinical and radiological changes were compared between the two groups of patients on the basis of improvement of back pain, radicular pain, and work capacity. Outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year from before surgery until 2012. We analyzed the evolution of 55 cases of FBSS those underwent segmental circumferential posterior fusions from June 2001 to February 2003, operated by a single surgeon and followed up during 10 years until February 2012. The patients were divided into 2 groups: In 25 patients, posterolateral fusions with Legacy™ (Medtronic, Inc. NYSE: MDT) screws and intersomatic autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft was performed, and, in 30 patients, posterolateral fusions with the same screws and intersomatic fusion B-Twin (Biomet Spain Orthopaedics, S.L.) system was performed. In all cases, we used posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) approach for intervertebral graft, and the artrodesis was supplemented at intertransverse level with Autologus Growth Factor (AGF-MBA INCORPORADO, S.A.). The outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year and compared

  6. A novel approach to navigated implantation of S-2 alar iliac screws using inertial measurement units.

    PubMed

    Jost, Gregory F; Walti, Jonas; Mariani, Luigi; Cattin, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT The authors report on a novel method of intraoperative navigation with inertial measurement units (IMUs) for implantation of S-2 alar iliac (S2AI) screws in sacropelvic fixation of the human spine and its application in cadaveric specimens. METHODS Screw trajectories were planned on a multiplanar reconstruction of the preoperative CT scan. The pedicle finder and screwdriver were equipped with IMUs to guide the axial and sagittal tilt angles of the planned trajectory, and navigation software was developed. The entry points were chosen according to anatomical landmarks on the exposed spine. After referencing, the sagittal and axial orientation of the pedicle finder and screwdriver were wirelessly monitored on a computer screen and aligned with the preoperatively planned tilt angles to implant the S2AI screws. The technique was performed without any intraoperative imaging. Screw positions were analyzed on postoperative CT scans. RESULTS Seventeen of 18 screws showed a good S2AI screw trajectory. Compared with the postoperatively measured tilt angles of the S2AI screws, the IMU readings on the screwdriver were within an axial plane deviation of 0° to 5° in 15 (83%) and 6° to 10° in 2 (11%) of the screws and within a sagittal plane deviation of 0° to 5° in 15 (83%) and 6° to 10° in 3 (17%) of the screws. CONCLUSIONS IMU-based intraoperative navigation may facilitate accurate placement of S2AI screws. PMID:26565762

  7. Lumbosacral fixation using sacroiliac buttress screws: a modification to the Jackson technique with intrasacral rods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of intrasacral rods has been previously reported for posterior lumbosacral fixation. However, problems associated with this technique include poor stability of the rod in the sacrum, difficulty in contouring the rod to fit the lateral sacral mass, and the complicated assembly procedure for the rod and pedicle screws in the thoracolumbar segments after insertion of the rod into the sacrum. Methods We used a screw with a polyaxial head instead of an intrasacral rod, which was inserted into the lateral sacral mass and assembled to the rod connected cephalad to pedicle screws. The dorsal side of the screw was stabilized by the sacral subchondral bone at the sacroiliac joint with iliac buttress coverage, and the tip of the screw was anchored by the sacral cortex. Results Three different cases were used to illustrate lumbosacral fixation using intrasacral screws as an anchor for the spinal instrumentation. Effective resistance of flexural bending moment and fusion were achieved in these patients at the lumbosacral level. Conclusions An intrasacral screw can be stabilized by subchondral bone with iliac buttress coverage at the dorsal and ventral sacral cortex. Posterior spinal fusion with this screw technique enables easier assembly of the instrumentation and presents better stabilization than that provided by the previously reported intrasacral rod technique for correction and fusion of thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis. PMID:25050132

  8. Posterior Spinal Reconstruction with Pedicle Screws, Multiple Iliac Screws and Wisconsin Spinal Wires in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Scoliosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woong-Beom; Park, Young-Seop; Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-09-01

    A 54-year-old female with neurofibromatosis type 1 presented with progressing truncal shift owing to spinal deformity. On plain radiograph, the Cobb angle was 54 degree in coronal plane. Radiological examinations showed severe dystrophic change with dysplastic pedicles, bony scalloping, neural foraminal widening from dural ectasia. The patient underwent deformity correction and reconstruction surgery from the T9 to the pelvis using multiple iliac screws and Wisconsin interspinous segmental instrumentation by wiring due to maximize fixation points. The postoperative course was uneventful. One-year follow-up radiographs showed a successful curve correction with solid fusion. We report a case of pedicle dysplasia and dystrophic change treated by posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion with help of multiple iliac screws and modified Wisconsin interspinous segmental wiring. PMID:26512279

  9. Posterior Spinal Reconstruction with Pedicle Screws, Multiple Iliac Screws and Wisconsin Spinal Wires in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Scoliosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong-Beom; Park, Young-Seop; Park, Jong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old female with neurofibromatosis type 1 presented with progressing truncal shift owing to spinal deformity. On plain radiograph, the Cobb angle was 54 degree in coronal plane. Radiological examinations showed severe dystrophic change with dysplastic pedicles, bony scalloping, neural foraminal widening from dural ectasia. The patient underwent deformity correction and reconstruction surgery from the T9 to the pelvis using multiple iliac screws and Wisconsin interspinous segmental instrumentation by wiring due to maximize fixation points. The postoperative course was uneventful. One-year follow-up radiographs showed a successful curve correction with solid fusion. We report a case of pedicle dysplasia and dystrophic change treated by posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion with help of multiple iliac screws and modified Wisconsin interspinous segmental wiring. PMID:26512279

  10. Strength comparison of allogenic bone screws, bioabsorbable screws, and stainless steel screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Rano, James A; Savoy-Moore, Ruth T; Fallat, Lawrence M

    2002-01-01

    Allogenic bone screws are new to the fixation market and have yet to be tested against current fixation materials. An in vitro comparison of the same sizes of stainless steel, bioabsorbable, and allogenic bone screws was undertaken to assess screw resistance to the forces of bending, pullout, and shear. Using aluminum plates to support the screws, forces up to 1000 Newtons were applied to six to eight samples of each type of screw. During each test, stainless steel screws withstood the maximum force that could be exerted by the testing apparatus without failing (bending, 113.9 +/- 11.8 N mean +/- SE; pullout 999.1 +/- 33.7 N; and shear, 997.5 +/- 108.8 N). In each test, compared to bioabsorbable screws, allogenic bone screws failed faster (pullout, allogenic: 12.4 +/- 1.1 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 120.6 +/- 13.8 seconds; p = .001; bending, allogenic: 53.4 +/- 4.8 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 201.9 +/- 11.1 seconds; p = .001; shear, allogenic 13.5 +/- 1.4 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 43.8 +/- 0.9 seconds; p = .001) under equivalent (pullout: bioabsorbable, 385.0 +/- 18.4 N vs. allogenic, 401.0 +/- 35.9 N; p = .001) or lower (bending, allogenic: 4.7 +/- 0.2 N vs. bioabsorbable, 11.0 +/- 0.9 N; p = .675; shear, allogenic: 312.1 +/- 15.5 N vs. bioabsorbable 680.9 +/- 8.5 N; p = .001) loads, and in a highly variable fashion. Overall, the bioabsorbable screws withstood the forces of bending, pullout, and shear better than the allogenic screws, and stainless steel screws outperformed both bioabsorbable and allogenic screws. Despite these results, allogenic screws could still be useful in compliant patients who would benefit from their osteoconductive properties. PMID:11858609

  11. Scaphoid Fracture Fixation with an Acutrak(®) Screw.

    PubMed

    Loving, Vilert A; Richardson, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of fixation of a scaphoid fracture using an Acutrak(®) screw. This screw is cannulated and headless, which allows it to be implanted below the surface of the bone. It uses the same concept of variable thread pitch as the Herbert screw, but unlike the Herbert screw, is fully threaded, with continuously varying pitch along its length. This variable pitch creates constant compression across a fracture as the screw is advanced, and gives the screw its unique appearance. This feature may improve internal holding power, as well as allow a fracture or osteotomy site to lie anywhere along the length of the screw. PMID:27298683

  12. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880 Section 872.4880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES.... (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  13. Design and testing of external fixator bone screws.

    PubMed

    Evans, M; Spencer, M; Wang, Q; White, S H; Cunningham, J L

    1990-11-01

    In external fixation, bone screw loosening still presents a major clinical problem. For this study, the design factors influencing the mechanics of the bone-screw interface were analysed and various experimental screws designed with the intention of maximizing the strength and stiffness of the inserted screw. Push-in, pull-out and bending tests were then carried out on the three experimental screws, and on two commercially available screws in both a synthetic material and in cadaveric bone; photoelastic tests on different screw threadforms were also performed. The results of the push-in and pull-out tests indicate that both the screw threadform and cutting head have a significant effect on the holding strength of the screw. The photoelastic tests show that most of the applied load is distributed over the first few threads closest to the load, and that the area between the thread crests is subjected to high shear stresses. PMID:2266740

  14. Iliac vein compression syndrome from anterior perforation of a pedicle screw.

    PubMed

    Woo, Edward J; Ogilvie, Ross A; Krueger, Van Schaumburg; Lundin, Michael; Williams, David M

    2016-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome is an anatomic variant where the right common iliac artery compresses the left common iliac vein. The variant exists in a significant portion of the population, but is usually asymptomatic; however, clinically significant stenosis can occur by iatrogenic means. In this report, we describe a patient who presents with left lower extremity pain and swelling. Initial workup for deep vein thrombosis was negative. After being referred to our venous clinic, a magnetic resonance angiography revealed narrowing of the left common iliac vein with a tortuous right common iliac artery crossing over the constriction. During left iliac vein stent placement, a pedicle screw from a prior L2-S1 spinal fusion was noted to be perforated through L5 vertebral body impinging the posterior aspect of the vein. This case demonstrates that increased scrutiny must be applied when dealing with pathology in close proximity to any implanted medical device. PMID:26912480

  15. Iliac vein compression syndrome from anterior perforation of a pedicle screw

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Edward J.; Ogilvie, Ross A.; Krueger, Van Schaumburg; Lundin, Michael; Williams, David M.

    2016-01-01

    May–Thurner syndrome is an anatomic variant where the right common iliac artery compresses the left common iliac vein. The variant exists in a significant portion of the population, but is usually asymptomatic; however, clinically significant stenosis can occur by iatrogenic means. In this report, we describe a patient who presents with left lower extremity pain and swelling. Initial workup for deep vein thrombosis was negative. After being referred to our venous clinic, a magnetic resonance angiography revealed narrowing of the left common iliac vein with a tortuous right common iliac artery crossing over the constriction. During left iliac vein stent placement, a pedicle screw from a prior L2–S1 spinal fusion was noted to be perforated through L5 vertebral body impinging the posterior aspect of the vein. This case demonstrates that increased scrutiny must be applied when dealing with pathology in close proximity to any implanted medical device. PMID:26912480

  16. Use of polymethylmethacrylate to enhance screw fixation in bone.

    PubMed

    Cameron, H U; Jacob, R; Macnab, I; Pilliar, R M

    1975-07-01

    Pull-out testing of screws inserted into cement and bone under various conditions showed that the cement-screw complex was significantly stronger when the screw was placed in soft cement and the cement was allowed to polymerize without further manipulation. When screw fixation in osteoporotic bone was reinforced with cement, the bone was the weakest component in the system. Fixation under these conditions should be enhanced by increasing the area of contact between the cement and bone. By cooling the cement to prolong its working time, it could be injected with a syringe in such a way that maximum endosteal and periosteal contact was provided. PMID:1150708

  17. Outcome comparison of Lisfranc injuries treated through dorsal plate fixation versus screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sun-jun; Chang, Shi-min; Li, Xiao-hua; Yu, Guang-rong

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this prospective study was to test whether the treatment of Lisfranc injuries with open reduction and dorsal plate fixation would have the same or better functional outcomes as treatment with standard trans-articular screw fixation. METHODS: Sixty patients with primarily isolated Lisfranc joint injury were treated by open reduction and dorsal plate fixation or standard screw fixation. The patients were followed on average for 31 months. Evaluation was performed with patients' chief complaint, clinical examination, radiography, and AOFAS Midfoot Scale. RESULTS: Thirty two patients were treated with open reduction and dorsal plate fixation, and twenty eight patients were treated with open reduction and screw fixation. After two years follow-up, the mean AOFAS Midfoot score was 83.1 points in the dorsal plate fixation group and 78.5 points in the screw fixation group (p<0.01). Of the dorsal plate fixation group, radiographic analysis revealed anatomic reduction in twenty-nine patients (90.6%, 29/32) and nonanatomic reduction in three patients. Of the screw fixation group, radiographic analysis revealed anatomic reduction in twenty-three patients and nonanatomic reduction in five patients (82.1%, 23/28). CONCLUSIONS: Open reduction and dorsal plate fixation for a dislocated Lisfranc injury do have better short and median term outcome and a lower reoperation rate than standard screw ORIF. In our experience, we recommend using dorsal plate in ORIF on dislocated Lisfranc injuries. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:25538478

  18. Sacroiliac screw fixation: A mini review of surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Farid-Escorcia, Hector; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The sacral percutaneous fixation has many advantages but can be associated with a significant exposure to X-ray radiation. Currently, sacroiliac screw fixation represents the only minimally invasive technique to stabilize the posterior pelvic ring. It is a technique that should be used by experienced surgeons. We present a practical review of important aspects of this technique. PMID:25336831

  19. Use of small cannulated screws for fixation in foot surgery.

    PubMed

    Burns, A E

    2000-05-01

    Use of cannulated bone screws, as compared with use of traditional bone screws, has been reported to decrease surgical time, allow for more precise screw placement, and reduce sources of error. Cannulation of the smaller-size screws that are routinely used in foot surgery has not been available until the last few years. This article reports on the use of the small cannulated screws manufactured by Alphatec Manufacturing, Inc (Palm Desert, California). The screw sizes available in the Mini Lag Screw System are 2.7, 3.5, and 4.0 mm. A long-term clinical and radiographic prospective evaluation of 70 procedures performed on 49 patients was conducted. The follow-up time for all patients was 2 years. None of the 70 implants fractured, and seven procedures (in seven patients) resulted in some type of implant-fixation failure. All of the fixation failures, however, appeared to be related to an untoward event or patient noncompliance. These smaller cannulated screws proved to be a reliable and effective means of fixation in foot surgery. PMID:10833872

  20. Biomechanical Analysis of Pedicle Screw Fixation for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Matthew; Shah, Kalpit N; Paller, David J; Thakur, Nikhil A; Koruprolu, Sarath; Palumbo, Mark A; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures remains controversial. Long-segment pedicle screw constructs may be stiffer and impart greater forces on adjacent segments compared with short-segment constructs, which may affect clinical performance and long-term out come. The purpose of this study was to biomechanically evaluate long-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation (LSPF) vs short-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation (SSPF) for unstable burst fractures. Six unembalmed human thoracolumbar spine specimens (T10-L4) were used. Following intact testing, a simulated L1 burst fracture was created and sequentially stabilized using 5.5-mm titanium polyaxial pedicle screws and rods for 4 different constructs: SSPF (1 level above and below), SSPF+L1 (pedicle screw at fractured level), LSPF (2 levels above and below), and LSPF+L1 (pedicle screw at fractured level). Each fixation construct was tested in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation; range of motion was also recorded. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to identify differences between treatment groups and functional noninstrumented spine. Short-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation did not achieve stability seen in an intact spine (P<.01), whereas LSPF constructs were significantly stiffer than SSPF constructs and demonstrated more stiffness than an intact spine (P<.01). Pedicle screws at the fracture level did not improve either SSPF or LSPF construct stability (P>.1). Long-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation constructs were not associated with increased adjacent segment motion. Al though the sample size of 6 specimens was small, this study may help guide clinical decisions regarding burst fracture stabilization. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e514-e518.]. PMID:27135451

  1. Robot-assisted Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Wang, Han; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Anterior odontoid screw fixation has been proved to be effective but technically challenging because the difficult approach is associated with high risks of screw malposition and damage to surrounding vital structures. Navigation techniques are therefore increasingly being used to improve safety and accuracy. However, no robot-assisted odontoid screw fixation has yet been reported. We here report a 61-year-old woman with a type II dens fracture on whom anterior odontoid screw fixation was performed under the guidance of a newly developed robotic system (TiRobot, co-designed by Beijing Jishuitan Hospital and TINAVI Medical Technologies). One odontoid screw was safely and accurately placed, the calculated deviation between the planned and actual positions being 0.9 mm. No intraoperative complications were identified and the patient was discharged on Day 5. Follow-up studies after 2 weeks showed good clinical and radiological results. We believe this is the first reported case of robot-assisted anterior odontoid screw fixation. We consider that complicated procedures can become feasible, safe and accurate using TiRobot systems. PMID:27627725

  2. Minifragment screw fixation of oblique metacarpal fractures: a biomechanical analysis of screw types and techniques.

    PubMed

    Liporace, Frank A; Kinchelow, Tosca; Gupta, Salil; Kubiak, Erik N; McDonnell, Matthew

    2008-12-01

    The lag screw technique has historically been a successful and accepted way to treat oblique metacarpal fractures. However, it does take additional time and involve multiple steps that can increase the risk of fracture propagation or comminution in the small hand bones of the hand. An alternate fixation technique uses bicortical interfragmentary screws. Other studies support the clinical effectiveness and ease of this technique. The purpose of this study is to biomechanically assess the strength of the bicortical interfragmentary screw versus that of the traditional lag screw. Using 48 cadaver metacarpals, oblique osteotomies were created and stabilized using one of four methods: 1.5 mm bicortical interfragmentary (IF) screw, 1.5 mm lag technique screw, 2.0 mm bicortical IF screw, or 2.0 mm lag technique screw. Biomechanical testing was performed to measure post cyclic displacement and load to failure. Data was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There was no significant difference among the fixation techniques with regard to both displacement and ultimate failure strength. There was a slight trend for a higher load to failure with the 2.0 mm IF screw and 2.0 mm lag screw compared to the 1.5 mm IF and 1.5 mm lag screws, but this was not significant. Our results support previously established clinical data that bicortical interfragmentary screw fixation is an effective treatment option for oblique metacarpal fractures. This technique has clinical importance because it is an option to appropriately stabilize the often small and difficult to control fracture fragments encountered in metacarpal fractures. PMID:18780019

  3. Hemispheric titanium porous coated acetabular component without screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Dorr, L D; Wan, Z; Cohen, J

    1998-06-01

    One hundred fifteen hips in 108 patients with primary total hip arthroplasty using the anatomic porous replacement hemispheric acetabular component implanted without adjunctive screw fixation had a mean postoperative followup time of 6 years (range, 5-7.4 years). Clinical evaluation was performed using the Harris hip score and patient self assessment using a modified Short Form-36 questionnaire. Radiographs were measured for radiolucent lines, polyethylene wear, osteolysis, migration, and fractures. No acetabular metal shell had been revised for loosening or was radiographically loose with or without migration (more than 3 mm) at final followup. Reoperation was done in nine (8%) hips because of polyethylene insert wear or disassembly. No fracture of the acetabular bone occurred at the time of surgery or was observed on radiograph. Fixation of the metal shell was stable, with progressive radiolucent lines observed at final followup in 2% of the hips. Osteolysis was recorded in one patient with two acetabular components. The fixation of noncemented hemispheric porous coated acetabular components is more related to the technique of acetabular bone preparation and press fit implantation than to whether additional screws or peg fixation are used. Fixation of this acetabular component without screws at an average of 6 years after surgery is reproducible and predictable in primary hip arthroplasty. The design of modular polyethylene inserts has been improved and should reduce the wear rate of reoperations of the polyethylene insert. PMID:9646758

  4. Percutaneous screw fixation of acetabular fractures: applicability of hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Chouhan, Devendra Kumar; Oh, Kwang-Jun

    2010-11-01

    Percutaneous screw fixation of the anterior column of the acetabulum has been a challenging task because of its unique anatomy and a risk of intra-articular penetration. Evidence is lacking for any tools to provide visual scrutiny of fracture reduction and intra-articular screw penetration. We report 2 cases of fracture of the acetabulum that developed in young female athletes, in which the anterior column was fixed with a percutaneous screw by use of hip arthroscopy as an assisting tool for intra-articular observation. In our experience this method was found to be promising in terms of anatomic reduction of the fracture site, avoiding articular penetration during screw insertion, with additional advantages of joint debridement, lavage, and reduction in radiation exposure. PMID:20888169

  5. Tibiofibular screw fixation for syndesmotic ruptures: a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Stein, G; Eichler, C; Ettmann, L; Koebke, J; Müller, L P; Thelen, U; Skouras, E

    2012-09-01

    The mechanisms of injuries to the tibiofibular syndesmosis include isolated rupture and rupture in combination with ankle fractures. Current concepts of surgical treatment are fixation using bioabsorbable screws, syndesmotic stapling, syndesmotic hooks, and the widely used screw fixation. Postoperative care utilises passive motion of the ankle joint either with or without axial weight-bearing. The aim of our investigation was to quantify the motion of the mortise during axial load. Therefore, photoelastic tests, on the one hand, and biomechanical tests of cadaveric specimens, on the other, using axial loads of up to 2,000 N were used. Our photoelastic investigations showed force distribution through the screw into the cranial and caudal parts of the distal fibula. Biomechanical testing showed a progressive dehiscence in both ruptured and fixated specimens up to 2.89 (ruptured) and 2.42 mm (despite screw). Our findings strongly suggest a concept of partial weight-bearing at most to support regeneration of scar tissue and to prevent the appearance of instability in the ankle joint. PMID:22415030

  6. Fixation Strength of Caudal Pedicle Screws after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with the Modified Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw Method

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Clinical case series. Purpose In the posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure in our institute, the cephalad screw trajectory follows a mediolateral and caudocephalad directed path according to the original cortical bone trajectory (CBT) method. However, the starting point of the caudal screw is at the medial border of the pedicle on an articular surface of the superior articular process, and the trajectory takes a mediolateral path parallel to the cephalad endplate. The incidence of caudal screw loosening after PLIF with this modified CBT screw method was investigated, and significant risk factors for caudal screw loosening were evaluated. Overview of Literature A biomechanical study of this modified caudal screw trajectory using the finite element method reported about a 20% increase in uniaxial yield pullout load compared with the traditional trajectory. However, there has been no clinical study concerning the fixation strength of this modified caudal screw trajectory. Methods The subjects were 193 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF with modified CBT screw fixation. Caudal screw loosening was checked in computed tomography at 6 months after surgery, and screw loosening was defined as a radiolucency of 1 mm or more at the bone-screw interface. Results The incidence of caudal screw loosening after lumbosacral PLIF (46.2%) was significantly higher than that after floating PLIF (6.0%). No significant differences in sex, brand of the instruments, and diameter and length of the caudal screw were evident between patients with and without caudal screw loosening. Patients with caudal screw loosening were significantly older at the time of surgery than patients without caudal screw loosening. Conclusions Fixation strength of the caudal screw after floating PLIF with this modified CBT screw technique was sufficiently acceptable. Fixation strength after the lumbosacral procedure was not. PMID:27559442

  7. Minimally invasive dynamic hip screw for fixation of hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Michael; Garau, Giorgio; Walley, Gayle; Oliva, Francesco; Panni, Alfredo Schiavone; Longo, Umile Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We compared a minimally invasive surgical technique to the conventional (open approach) surgical technique used in fixation of hip fractures with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) device. Using a case-control design (44 cases and 44 controls), we tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference between the two techniques in the following outcome measures: duration of surgery, time to mobilisation and weight bearing postoperatively, length of hospital stay, mean difference of pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels, position of the lag screw of the DHS device in the femoral head, and the tip–apex distance. The minimally invasive DHS technique had significantly shorter duration of surgery and length of hospital stay. There was also less blood loss in the minimally invasive DHS technique. The minimally invasive DHS technique produces better outcome measures in the operating time, length of hospital stay, and blood loss compared to the conventional approach while maintaining equal fixation stability. PMID:18478227

  8. Intramedullary screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Massada, Marta Maria Teixeira de Oliveira; Pereira, Manuel Alexandre Negrais Pinho Gonçalves; de Sousa, Ricardo Jorge Gomes; Costa, Paulo Guimarães; Massada, José Leandro da Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to review the short- and long-term clinical and radiological results of intramedullary compression screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures in athletes. Methods Eleven male and six female active patients with fifth metatarsal zone II and zone III fractures fixed with a 4.5-mm cannulated compression screw were evaluated by chart review, review of radiographs, and clinical evaluation. Fifteen of the patients were high-level athletes (soccer: n=11; basketball: n=1; track and field: n=3) and two were recreational-level athletes. Mean follow-up from surgery to evaluation was 54 (38-70) months. Results Mean time to healing as shown on radiographs and mean time to return to full activity after surgery were 7.3 and 7.5 weeks, respectively. All patients were able to return to their previous levels of activity. There were no reports of union delay, nonunion or refracture to date. Conclusion In our patients, cannulated screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures was a reliable procedure with low morbidity associated that provided athletes a quick return to activity. Level of Evidence I, Case Series. PMID:24453614

  9. Study of Bone-screw Surface Fixation in Lumbar Dynamic Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun-Gang; Yu, Tao; Liu, Guo-Min; Yang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to use the animal model of dynamic fixation to examine the interaction of the pedicle screw surface with surrounding bone, and determine whether pedicle screws achieve good mechanical stability in the vertebrae. Methods: Twenty-four goats aged 2–3 years had Cosmic® pedicle screws implanted into both sides of the L2-L5 pedicles. Twelve goats in the bilateral dynamic fixation group had fixation rods implanted in L2-L3 and L4-L5. Twelve goats in the unilateral dynamic fixation group had fixation rods randomly fixed on one side of the lumbar spine. The side that was not implanted with fixation rods was used as a static control group. Results: In the static control group, new bone was formed around the pedicle screw and on the screw surface. In the unilateral and bilateral dynamic fixation groups, large amounts of connective tissue formed between and around the screw threads, with no new bone formation on the screw surface; the pedicle screws were loose after the fixed rods were removed. The bone mineral density and morphological parameters of the region of interest (ROI) in the unilateral and bilateral dynamic fixation group were not significantly different (P > 0.05), but were lower in the fixed groups than the static control group (P < 0.05). This showed the description bone of the ROI in the static control group was greater than in the fixation groups. Under loading conditions, the pedicle screw maximum pull force was not significantly different between the bilateral and unilateral dynamic fixation groups (P > 0.05); however the maximum pull force of the fixation groups was significantly less than the static control group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Fibrous connective tissue formed at the bone-screw interface under unilateral and bilateral pedicle dynamic fixation, and the pedicle screws lost mechanical stability in the vertebrae. PMID:25635433

  10. Multiple cannulated screw fixation of young femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yong; Kong, Gyu Min; Park, Dae Hyun; Kim, Dae Yoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We wanted to analyze the factors affecting the results of multiple cannulated screws fixation in patients less than 60 years old with femoral neck fracture (FNF). Methods: We reviewed 52 patients (30 males, 22 females) who were treated with multiple cannulated screws fixation for FNFs. They were followed up for more than one year during January 2002 to December 2012. They were classified by Garden’s classification. The anatomic reduction was evaluated by Garden’s alignment index on hip both anteroposterior and lateral images. Postoperative complications were analyzed during follow up periods. Results: By Garden’s classification, 6 cases were in stage I, 13 cases in stage II, 30 cases in stage III and 3 cases in stage IV. During follow up periods, avascular necrosis of the femoral head was observed in 12 cases (23%) and nonunion was observed in 5 cases (9%). The 16 patients who had complications underwent total hip arthroplasty (31%). In non-displaced fracture groups (Garde I, II) did not have AVN nor nonunion. The incidence of complications in displaced fracture group was 51.5%. The complicated cases showed tendency for increased apex anterior angulation of femoral neck on hip lateral images and the result was statistically significant. (p=0.0260). Conclusion: The patients less than 60 years old who were treated with multiple cannulated screws fixation for displaced FNFs showed the incidence of complications was more than 50%. It needs a cautious approach for anatomical reduction, especially related to anterior angulation on hip lateral image. PMID:26870127

  11. Complete Arcuate Foramen Precluding C1 Lateral Mass Screw Fixation in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Michael J; Glaser, John A

    2003-01-01

    Case report of a complete arcuate foramen in a human atlas vertebra inhibiting the placement of lateral mass screw instrumentation at C1. Our objective is to report the presentation of the case, the operative considerations, and the management for this anatomic variation. The groove for the vertebral artery on the posterolateral surface of the atlas (C1) varies in size and depth from a slight impression to a clear sulcus. With anomalous ossification the sulcus can be bridged which results in a posterolateral tunnel within the posterior arch of the atlas. With increasing rates of screw fixation instrumentation that include the atlas, it is of paramount importance to know the location and course of the vertebral artery in relation to the planned route of instrumentation. The patient underwent a posterolateral fusion from C1 to C4 using autogenous iliac crest bone graft. Internal fixation from C2 to C4 was obtained using lateral mass screw instrumentation. After the vertebral artery was identified passing through the posterior arch of C1, sublaminar wires were utilized for fixation from C1 to C2. The patient responded well to surgical intervention without complications. Abnormal vertebral artery coursing through a posterolateral tunnel in the posterior arch of C1 has been described and its incidence has a range from 1.14% to 18%. When this variant is present, lateral mass screw fixation at C1 may be contraindicated. We recommend close scrutiny of preoperative radiographs to avoid the possibility of endangering the vertebral artery when this situation exists. PMID:14575258

  12. Biomechanical Evaluation of Plate Versus Lag Screw Only Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Amirhossein; Doan, Josh; Bastrom, Tracey; Pennock, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional fixation of unstable Orthopaedic Trauma Association type B/C ankle fractures consists of a lag screw and a lateral or posterolateral neutralization plate. Several studies have demonstrated the clinical success of lag screw only fixation; however, to date no biomechanical comparison of the different constructs has been performed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biomechanical strength of these different constructs. Osteotomies were created in 40 Sawbones(®) distal fibulas and reduced using 1 bicortical 3.5-mm stainless steel lag screw, 2 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, 3 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, or a single 3.5-mm lag screw coupled with a stainless steel neutralization plate with 3 proximal cortical and 3 distal cancellous screws. The constructs were tested to determine the stiffness in lateral bending and rotation and failure torque. No significant differences in lateral bending or rotational stiffness were detected between the osteotomies fixed with 3 lag screws and a plate. Constructs fixed with 1 lag screw were weaker for both lateral bending and rotational stiffness. Osteotomies fixed with 2 lag screws were weaker in lateral bending only. No significant differences were found in the failure torque. Compared with lag screw only fixation, plate fixation requires larger incisions and increased costs and is more likely to require follow-up surgery. Despite the published clinical success of treating simple Orthopaedic Trauma Association B/C fractures with lag screw only fixation, many surgeons still have concerns about stability. For noncomminuted, long oblique distal fibula fractures, lag screw only fixation techniques offer construct stiffness similar to that of traditional plate and lag screw fixation. PMID:25990534

  13. Fracture fixation with two locking screws versus three non-locking screws

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, B.; Le, T.; Williamson, S.; Archdeacon, A.; Zardiackas, L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to further evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of two locking screws versus three standard bicortical screws in synthetic models of normal and osteoporotic bone. Methods Synthetic tubular bone models representing normal bone density and osteoporotic bone density were used. Artificial fracture gaps of 1 cm were created in each specimen before fixation with one of two constructs: 1) two locking screws using a five-hole locking compression plate (LCP) plate; or 2) three non-locking screws with a seven-hole LCP plate across each side of the fracture gap. The stiffness, maximum displacement, mode of failure and number of cycles to failure were recorded under progressive cyclic torsional and eccentric axial loading. Results Locking plates in normal bone survived 10% fewer cycles to failure during cyclic axial loading, but there was no significant difference in maximum displacement or failure load. Locking plates in osteoporotic bone showed less displacement (p = 0.02), but no significant difference in number of cycles to failure or failure load during cyclic axial loading (p = 0.46 and p = 0.25, respectively). Locking plates in normal bone had lower stiffness and torque during torsion testing (both p = 0.03), but there was no significant difference in rotation (angular displacement) (p = 0.84). Locking plates in osteoporotic bone showed lower torque and rotation (p = 0.008), but there was no significant difference in stiffness during torsion testing (p = 0.69). Conclusions The mechanical performance of locking plate constructs, using only two screws, is comparable to three non-locking screw constructs in osteoporotic bone. Normal bone loaded with either an axial or torsional moment showed slightly better performance with the non-locking construct. PMID:23610681

  14. Biomechanical analysis of expansion screws and cortical screws used for ventral plate fixation on the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Bernhard; Huber, Gerd; Morlock, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to bicortical screws, the surgical risk of injuring intraspinal structures can be minimized with the use of monocortical screws. However, this reduction should not be achieved at the expense of the stability of the fixation. With monocortical stabilization, the expansion screws have the potential of absorbing high loads. Therefore, they are expected to be a suitable alternative to bicortical screws for revision surgeries and in osteoporotic bone. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the stiffness of the two screw-plate systems used for ventral stabilization of the cervical spine, by focusing on the suitability of expansion screws as tools for revision treatments. The study was conducted in ten functional units of human cervical spines. The device sample stiffness was determined for four conditions using a turning moment of 2.25 N m each around one of the three principle axes. The conditions were native, destabilized, primarily stabilized with one of the screw-plate systems, followed by secondary stabilization using the expansion screw implant. The stabilized samples achieved a comparable, in most cases higher stiffness than the native samples. The samples undergoing secondary stabilization using expansion screws tend to display greater stiffness for all three axes compared to the primarily stabilized samples. The achieved tightening moment of the screws was higher than the one achieved with primary fixation. Both plates revealed similar primary stability. Revision surgeries with secondary instrumentation achieve a high stiffness of the screwed up segments. Monocortical expansion screws combined with a trapezoidal plate allow ventral stabilization of the cervical spine that is comparable to the plate fixation using bicortical screws. PMID:19588171

  15. Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft or Cage: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si-Dong; Chen, Qian; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Shen, Yong; Yang, Da-Long

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the clinical efficacy of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (UPSFB) in treating single-segment lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), as compared to bilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (BPSFB) or with cage (BPSFC). Material/Methods Medical records were retrospectively collected between 01/2010 and 02/2015 in Longyao County Hospital. According to surgical methods used, all patients were divided into 3 groups: UPSFB group, BPSFB group, and BPSFC group. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by blood loss, blood transfusion, duration of operation, hospital stay, postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, medical expenses, patient satisfaction survey, and JOA score. Results Ninety-five patients were included and underwent 2.5-year follow-up, with 7 patients lost to regular follow-up. As compared to the BPSFB group and BPSFC group, the UPSFB group had less blood loss and less blood transfusion, as well as shorter hospital stay (p<0.05). Medical expenses were far lower in the UPSFB group (p<0.001). There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, JOA score, and patient satisfaction (all p>0.05). Conclusions As compared to BPSFB and BPSFC, UPSFB has the same reliability and effectiveness in treating single-segment LDD with unilateral radicular symptoms in a single lower extremity, with the additional advantage being less expensive. PMID:26988532

  16. Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft or Cage: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si-Dong; Chen, Qian; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Shen, Yong; Yang, Da-Long

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the clinical efficacy of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (UPSFB) in treating single-segment lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), as compared to bilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (BPSFB) or with cage (BPSFC). MATERIAL AND METHODS Medical records were retrospectively collected between 01/2010 and 02/2015 in Longyao County Hospital. According to surgical methods used, all patients were divided into 3 groups: UPSFB group, BPSFB group, and BPSFC group. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by blood loss, blood transfusion, duration of operation, hospital stay, postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, medical expenses, patient satisfaction survey, and JOA score. RESULTS Ninety-five patients were included and underwent 2.5-year follow-up, with 7 patients lost to regular follow-up. As compared to the BPSFB group and BPSFC group, the UPSFB group had less blood loss and less blood transfusion, as well as shorter hospital stay (p<0.05). Medical expenses were far lower in the UPSFB group (p<0.001). There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, JOA score, and patient satisfaction (all p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS As compared to BPSFB and BPSFC, UPSFB has the same reliability and effectiveness in treating single-segment LDD with unilateral radicular symptoms in a single lower extremity, with the additional advantage being less expensive. PMID:26988532

  17. Comparative study between lag screw and miniplate fixation for straight midline mandibular osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dediol, E; Čvrljević, I; Dobranić, M; Uglešić, V

    2014-04-01

    The mandibular swing approach is a surgical approach for the resection of malignant lesions localized in the posterior oral cavity and oropharynx. We analyzed 15 years of experience with fixation of the straight midline mandibulotomy and compared two fixation methods: lag screws and miniplates. A total of 117 patients underwent a straight midline mandibulotomy during the study period; 85 had fixation with two lag screws and 32 with two miniplates. The overall complication rate was low and there was no significant difference in complication rate regarding the fixation method (9% for miniplates vs. 7% for lag screws). The most serious complication over the whole study period was non union, which occurred in only two patients, followed by orocutaneous fistula and infection. Radiotherapy did not cause serious complications and is not regarded as hazardous in midline mandibulotomy patients. We conclude that lag screw fixation is at least as safe as miniplate fixation, but because of better fragment compression, offers faster bone healing. PMID:24100153

  18. Dorsal multiple plating without routine transarticular screws for fixation of Lisfranc injury.

    PubMed

    Stern, Richard E; Assal, Mathieu

    2014-12-01

    Following a Lisfranc joint injury, stable fixation of the tarsometatarsal joints is crucial to avoid deformity and posttraumatic osteoarthritis, but the ideal method of fixation remains controversial. Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation of all involved joints with cast immobilization resulted in loss of position, and was replaced by open reduction with improved fixation using transarticular screws. However, it seems intuitive that transarticular screws will result in further damage to already traumatized joints, and this has led to plate-spanning techniques. The objective of this study was to describe the method of dorsal multiple plating without the routine use of transarticular screws, and to report on the ability of plate fixation to maintain alignment comparable to that of transarticular screw fixation in 15 patients. PMID:25437072

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Osteosynthesis Screw Fixation in the Bone Stock: An Appropriate Method for Automatic Screw Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  20. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    PubMed

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  1. Biomechanical competence of six different bone screws for reconstructive surgery in three different transplants: Fibular, iliac crest, scapular and artificial bone.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Arnold P; Raith, Stefan; Ode, Jan-Eric; Teichmann, Jan; Lethaus, Bernd; Möhlhenrich, Stephan C; Hölzle, Frank; Duda, Georg N; Steiner, Timm

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine a combination of screw and transplantation type that offers optimal primary stability for reconstructive surgery. Fibular, iliac crest, and scapular transplants were tested along with artificial bone substrate. Six different kinds of bone screws (Medartis(©)) were compared, each type utilized with one of six specimens from human transplants (n = 6). Controlled screw-in-tests were performed and the required torque was protocolled. Subsequently, pull-out-tests were executed to determine the retention forces. The artificial bone substitute material showed significantly higher retention forces than real bone samples. The self-drilling screws achieved the significantly highest retention values in the synthetic bone substitute material. Cancellous screws achieved the highest retention in the fibular transplants, while self-drilling and cancellous screws demonstrated better retention than cortical screws in the iliac crest. In the scapular graft, no significant differences were found between the screw types. In comparison to the human transplant types, the cortical screws showed the significantly highest values in the fibula and the lowest values in the iliac crest. The best retention was found in the combination of cancellous screws with fibular graft (514.8 N + -252.3 N). For the flat bones (i.e., scapular and illiac crest) we recommend the cancellous screws. PMID:27107477

  2. Prediction at long-term condyle screw fixation of temporomandibular joint implant: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Duarte, R J; Mesnard, M

    2015-05-01

    The fixation of commercial temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implant is accomplished by using screws, which, in some cases, can lead to loosening of the implant. The aim of this study was to predict the evolution of fixation success of a TMJ. Numerical models using a Christensen TMJ implant were developed to analyze strain distributions in the adjacent mandibular bone. The geometry of a human mandible was developed based on computed tomography (CT) scans from a cadaveric mandible on which a TMJ implant was subsequently placed. In this study, the five most important muscle forces acting were applied and the anatomical conditions replicated. The evolution of fixation was defined according to bone response methodology focused in strain distribution around the screws. Strain and micromotions were analyzed to evaluate implant stability, and the evolution process conduct at three different stages: start with all nine screws in place (initial stage); middle stage, with three screws removed (middle stage), and end stage, with only three screws in place (final stage). With regard to loosening, the implant success fixation changed the strains in the bone between 21% and 30%, when considering the last stage. The most important screw positions were #1, #7, and #9. It was observed that, despite the commercial Christensen TMJ implant providing nine screw positions for fixation, only three screws were necessary to ensure implant stability and fixation success. PMID:25819477

  3. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing

    PubMed Central

    Le Cann, Sophie; Cachon, Thibaut; Viguier, Eric; Miladi, Lotfi; Odent, Thierry; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Chabrand, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age) of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic) and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical) on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old) tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level), the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout. PMID:26451947

  4. Interference Screw vs. Suture Anchor Fixation for Open Subpectoral Biceps Tenodesis: Does it Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Peter J; Sanders, Brett; Gobezie, Reuben; Braun, Sepp; Warner, Jon JP

    2008-01-01

    Background Bioabsorbable interference screw fixation has superior biomechanical properties compared to suture anchor fixation for biceps tenodesis. However, it is unknown whether fixation technique influences clinical results. Hypothesis We hypothesize that subpectoral interference screw fixation offers relevant clinical advantages over suture anchor fixation for biceps tenodesis. Study Design Case Series. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a consecutive series of 88 patients receiving open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with either interference screw fixation (34 patients) or suture anchor fixation (54 patients). Average follow up was 13 months. Outcomes included Visual Analogue Pain Scale (0–10), ASES score, modified Constant score, pain at the tenodesis site, failure of fixation, cosmesis, deformity (popeye) and complications. Results There were no failures of fixation in this study. All patients showed significant improvement between their preoperative and postoperative status with regard to pain, ASES score, and abbreviated modified Constant scores. When comparing IF screw versus anchor outcomes, there was no statistical significance difference for VAS (p = 0.4), ASES score (p = 0.2), and modified Constant score (P = 0.09). One patient (3%) treated with IF screw complained of persistent bicipital groove tenderness, versus four patients (7%) in the SA group (nonsignificant). Conclusion Subpectoral biceps tenodesis reliably relieves pain and improves function. There was no statistically significant difference in the outcomes studied between the two fixation techniques. Residual pain at the site of tenodesis may be an issue when suture anchors are used in the subpectoral location. PMID:18793424

  5. Osteosynthesis of ununited femoral neck fracture by internal fixation combined with iliac crest bone chips and muscle pedicle bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Baksi, D D; Pal, A K; Baksi, D P

    2016-01-01

    screw fixation, iliac crest bone chips and quadratus femoris MPBG. Results: The mean followup is 12.5 years (range 3-35). The union of fractures occurred in 202 (82.8%), delayed union in 18 (7.3%), and established nonunion in 24 (9.8%) patients. Full weight bearing was permitted at 16–22 weeks after union of fractures. Mean Harris hip score at the longest followup was 85.5. Among the complications, superficial wound infection occurred in 20 (8.2%), deep infection in seven (2.9%), and coxa vara in 39 (16%) patients. Preoperative radiodensity of femoral head disappeared mostly after the union of fracture whereas fresh radiodensity of femoral head appeared in 20 (8%) patients; nine (45%) of them developed segmental collapse. Conclusion: Ununited femoral neck fractureis characterized by absorption of femoral neck, posterior cortical defect, smoothening and overriding of fracture surfaces with intervening fibrous tissues associated with or without AVN of femoral head. The above method of osteosynthesis rectified the above pathology and provided satisfactory results with union of fractures in 90.1% patients at long term followup. PMID:27512217

  6. Treatment of Unstable Thoracolumbar Fractures through Short Segment Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques Using Pedicle Fixation at the Level of the Fracture: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changqing; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Hongwei; Liu, Jun; Xiang, Liangbi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the von Mises stresses of the internal fixation devices among different short segment pedicle screw fixation techniques to treat thoracic 12 vertebral fractures, especially the mono-segment pedicle screw fixation and intermediate unilateral pedicle screw fixation techniques. Methods Finite element methods were utilised to investigate the biomechanical comparison of the four posterior short segment pedicle screw fixation techniques (S4+2: traditional short-segment 4 pedicle screw fixation [SPSF]; M4+2: mono-segment pedicle screw fixation; I6+2: intermediate bilateral pedicle screw fixation; and I5+2: intermediate unilateral pedicle screw fixation). Results The range of motion (ROM) in flexion, axial rotation, and lateral bending was the smallest in the I6+2 fixation model, followed by the I5+2 and S4+2 fixation models, but lateral bending was the largest in the M4+2 fixation model. The maximal stress of the upper pedicle screw is larger than the lower pedicle screw in S4+2 and M4+2. The largest maximal von Mises stress was observed in the upper pedicle screw in the S4+2 and M4+2 fixation models and in the lower pedicle screw in the I6+2 and I5+2 fixation models. The values of the largest maximal von Mises stress of the pedicle screws and rods during all states of motion were 263.1 MPa and 304.5 MPa in the S4+2 fixation model, 291.6 MPa and 340.5 MPa in the M4+2 fixation model, 182.9 MPa and 263.2 MPa in the I6+2 fixation model, and 269.3 MPa and 383.7 MPa in the I5+2 fixation model, respectively. Comparing the stress between different spinal loadings, the maximal von Mises stress of the implants were observed in flexion in all implanted models. Conclusion Additional bilateral pedicle screws at the level of the fracture to SPSF may result in a stiffer construct and less von Mises stress for pedicle screws and rods. The largest maximal von Mises stress of the pedicle screws during all states of motion were observed in the mono-segment pedicle

  7. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury. Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation. Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but <17.1 mm (disc depth). Except the axial screw length, increase in all the measurements was seen with level up to C5–C6 segment. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimens demonstrated that ATAS fixation could be successfully performed at C2–C3, C3–C4, C4–C5, and C5–C6 levels, but impossible at C6–C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens. The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning. PMID:27495016

  8. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-08-01

    Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury.Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation.Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but <17.1 mm (disc depth). Except the axial screw length, increase in all the measurements was seen with level up to C5-C6 segment. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimens demonstrated that ATAS fixation could be successfully performed at C2-C3, C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6 levels, but impossible at C6-C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens.The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning. PMID:27495016

  9. Serum albumin and fixation failure with cannulated hip screws in undisplaced intracapsular femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Riaz, O; Arshad, R; Nisar, S; Vanker, R

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Internal fixation of undisplaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures with cannulated hip screws is a widely accepted surgical technique, despite reported failure rates of 12%-19%. This study determined whether preoperative serum albumin levels are linked to fixation failure. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 251 consecutive undisplaced intracapsular femoral neck fracture patients treated with cannulated hip screws in a district general hospital. Preoperative albumin levels were measured, and the fixation technique, classification and posterior tilt on radiography assessed. Fixation failure was defined as a screw cut, avascular necrosis (AVN) or non-union. Results Of the patients, 185 were female and 66 male. The mean age was 77 years (range 60-101 years). Thirty seven (15%) patients had fixation failure: 10 (4%) due to AVN; 12 (5%) due to non-union; and 15 (6%) due to fixation collapse. Low serum albumin levels were significantly associated with failure (p=0.01), whereas gender (p=0.56), operated side (p=0.62), age (p=0.34) and screw configuration (p=0.42) were not. A posterior tilt angle greater than 20° on lateral radiography significantly predicted failure (p=0.002). Conclusions Preoperative serum albumin is an independent predictor of cannulated hip screw fixation failure in undisplaced femoral neck fractures. Nutritional status should therefore be considered when deciding between surgical fixation and arthroplasty to avoid the possibility of revision surgery, along with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. PMID:27055409

  10. Translaminar screw fixation of a kyphosis of the cervical and thoracic spine in neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A; Millner, P; Liddington, M; Towns, G

    2009-09-01

    The spinal manifestations of neurofibromatosis include cervicothoracic kyphosis, in which scalloping of the vertebral body and erosion of the pedicles may render conventional techniques of fixation impossible. We describe a case of cervicothoracic kyphosis managed operatively with a vascularised fibular graft anteriorly across the apex of the kyphus, followed by a long posterior construct using translaminar screws, which allow segmental fixation in vertebral bodies where placement of the pedicle screws was impracticable. PMID:19721057

  11. Superior Gluteal Artery Injury during Percutaneous Iliosacral Screw Fixation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk; Chung, Phil Hyun; Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Eum, Gyeong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation is commonly practiced to treat unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries. The number of reported cases of iatrogenic complications is increasing. We present a case of superior gluteal artery injury during bilateral percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation in a patient with sacral fracture of spino-pelvic dissociation. This complication was managed by arterial embolization. We discussed the cause, prevention and treatment of arterial injury along with a review of literature.

  12. The Surgical Management of Traumatic Lower Cervical Spondylolisthesis with Posterior Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Peng; Ni, Wen-Fei; Wu, Yao-Sen; Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi

    2015-01-01

    We reported a technical report of traumatic lower cervical spondylolisthesisca used by bilateral pedicle fracture, without neurological compression. The patient was treated with the minimally invasive technique of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. Fracture healing and normal cervical motion were confirmed by plain films and physical examinations on the 18-monthpostoperatively. The technique of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation might be an alternative strategy for the treatment of traumatic lower cervical spondylolisthesis with pedicle fracture. PMID:25901240

  13. Optimizing the biomechanical compatibility of orthopedic screws for bone fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Gefen, A

    2002-06-01

    Progressive loosening of bone fixation screws is a well-documented phenomenon, induced by stress shielding and subsequent adaptive bone remodeling which results in bone loss around the screw. A set of two-dimensional computational (finite element) models was developed in order to test the effect of various engineering designs of fixation screws on the predicted screw-bone stress transfer, and consequently, on the biomechanical conditions for osteosynthesis. A dimensionless set of stress-transfer parameters (STP) was developed to quantify the screw-bone load sharing, enabling a convenient rating to be given of the biomechanical compatibility of practically any given screw design according to the nature of the simulated mechanical interaction. The results indicated that newly proposed screw designs, i.e. a "graded-stiffness" composite screw with a reduced-stiffness-titanium core and outer polymeric threads and an "active-compression" hollow screw which generates compressive stresses on the surrounding bone, are expected to provide significantly better biomechanical performances in terms of the STP criteria, compared with conservative screw designs. Accordingly, the present work demonstrates that finite element computer simulations can be used as a powerful tool for design and evaluation of bone screws, including geometrical features, material characteristics and even coatings. PMID:12052361

  14. Anatomic considerations for dorsal sacral plate-screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Xu, R; Ebraheim, N A; Mohamed, A; el-Gamal, H; Yeasting, R A

    1995-10-01

    Five cadaveric pelves and 40 dry bony specimens were used to assess the feasibility of the lumbosacral plate fixation extending to beyond the S1 region and quantitatively to evaluate the posterior sacroiliac region and the dimensions of S1 and S2 pedicle and lateral mass. Partial removal of the posterior ilium was undertaken to measure the surface area available for plate fixation on the dorsal aspect of the sacrum. The results showed that the average distances between the outer edges of S1 and S2 dorsal foramina and the medial edge of the posterior ilium increased from 11.3 mm before removal of a portion of the medial posterior ilium to 16.6 mm after removal at the S1 level, and from 8.4 mm before removal of partial medial posterior ilium to 13 mm after removal at the S2 level, respectively. The average depths of the S1 and S2 pedicles were 37.1 and 32.2 mm in the direction anteromedial to the sagittal plane, respectively. The average depths of the S1 and S2 lateral mass were 37.3 and 33.9 mm in the direction anterolateral to the sagittal plane, respectively. In cases of vertebral metastases or osteoporosis, plating extending to S2 may be needed if good bony purchase cannot be achieved by the S1 pedicle or lateral mass screw. This study suggested also that partial removal of the posterior ilium enhances the space on the posterior aspect of the sacrum without severe compromise of the sacroiliac joint. PMID:8563154

  15. Polymethylmethacrylate-augmented screw fixation for stabilization in metastatic spinal tumors. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jee Soo; Lee, Sang Ho; Rhee, Chang Hun; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2002-01-01

    Screw fixation augmented with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or some other biocompatible bone cement has been used in patients with osteoporosis requiring spinal fusion. No clinical studies have been conducted on PMMA-augmented screw fixation for stabilization of the vertebral column in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether screw fixation augmented with PMMA might be suitable in patients treated for multilevel metastatic spinal tumors. Ten patients with metastatic spinal tumors involving multiple vertebral levels underwent stabilization procedures in which PMMA was used to augment screw fixation after decompression of the spinal cord. Within 15 days, partial or complete relief from pain was obtained in all patients postoperatively. Two of four patients in whom neurological deficits caused them to be nonambulatory before surgery were able to ambulate postoperatively. Neither collapse of the injected vertebral bodies nor failure of the screw fixation was observed during the mean follow-up period of 6.7 months. Screw fixation augmented with PMMA may offer stronger stabilization and facilitate the instrumentation across short segments in the treatment of multilevel metastatic spinal tumors. PMID:11795702

  16. Inferolateral Entry Point for C2 Pedicle Screw Fixation in High Cervical Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Lee, Chul Hee; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Park, In Sung; Jung, Jin Myung

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of atlantoaxial stabilization using a new entry point for C2 pedicle screw fixation. Methods Data were collected from 44 patients undergoing posterior C1 lateral mass screw and C2 screw fixation. The 20 cases were approached by the Harms entry point, 21 by the inferolateral point, and three by pars screw. The new inferolateral entry point of the C2 pedicle was located about 3-5 mm medial to the lateral border of the C2 lateral mass and 5-7 mm superior to the inferior border of the C2-3 facet joint. The screw was inserted at an angle 30° to 45° toward the midline in the transverse plane and 40° to 50° cephalad in the sagittal plane. Patients received followed-up with clinical examinations, radiographs and/or CT scans. Results There were 28 males and 16 females. No neurological deterioration or vertebral artery injuries were observed. Five cases showed malpositioned screws (2.84%), with four of the screws showing cortical breaches of the transverse foramen. There were no clinical consequences for these five patients. One screw in the C1 lateral mass had a medial cortical breach. None of the screws were malpositioned in patients treated using the new entry point. There was a significant relationship between two group (p=0.036). Conclusion Posterior C1-2 screw fixation can be performed safely using the new inferolateral entry point for C2 pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of high cervical lesions. PMID:22200017

  17. Monoaxial Pedicle Screws Are Superior to Polyaxial Pedicle Screws and the Two Pin External Fixator for Subcutaneous Anterior Pelvic Fixation in a Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Rahul; Onwudiwe, Ndidi; Roth, Matthew; Sethi, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Comparison of monoaxial and polyaxial screws with the use of subcutaneous anterior pelvic fixation. Methods. Four different groups each having 5 constructs were tested in distraction within the elastic range. Once that was completed, 3 components were tested in torsion within the elastic range, 2 to torsional failure and 3 in distraction until failure. Results. The pedicle screw systems showed higher stiffness (4.008 ± 0.113 Nmm monoaxial, 3.638 ± 0.108 Nmm Click-x; 3.634 ± 0.147 Nmm Pangea) than the exfix system (2.882 ± 0.054 Nmm) in distraction. In failure testing, monoaxial pedicle screw system was stronger (360 N) than exfixes (160 N) and polyaxial devices which failed if distracted greater than 4 cm (157 N Click-x or 138 N Pangea). The exfix had higher peak torque and torsional stiffness than all pedicle systems. In torsion, the yield strengths were the same for all constructs. Conclusion. The infix device constructed with polyaxial or monoaxial pedicle screws is stiffer than the 2 pin external fixator in distraction testing. In extreme cases, the use of reinforcement or monoaxial systems which do not fail even at 360 N is a better option. In torsional testing, the 2 pin external fixator is stiffer than the pedicle screw systems. PMID:24368943

  18. Screw fixation of medial malleolar fractures: a cadaveric biomechanical study challenging the current AO philosophy.

    PubMed

    Parker, L; Garlick, N; McCarthy, I; Grechenig, S; Grechenig, W; Smitham, P

    2013-12-01

    The AO Foundation advocates the use of partially threaded lag screws in the fixation of fractures of the medial malleolus. However, their threads often bypass the radiodense physeal scar of the distal tibia, possibly failing to obtain more secure purchase and better compression of the fracture. We therefore hypothesised that the partially threaded screws commonly used to fix a medial malleolar fracture often provide suboptimal compression as a result of bypassing the physeal scar, and proposed that better compression of the fracture may be achieved with shorter partially threaded screws or fully threaded screws whose threads engage the physeal scar. We analysed compression at the fracture site in human cadaver medial malleoli treated with either 30 mm or 45 mm long partially threaded screws or 45 mm fully threaded screws. The median compression at the fracture site achieved with 30 mm partially threaded screws (0.95 kg/cm(2) (interquartile range (IQR) 0.8 to 1.2) and 45 mm fully threaded screws (1.0 kg/cm(2) (IQR 0.7 to 2.8)) was significantly higher than that achieved with 45 mm partially threaded screws (0.6 kg/cm(2) (IQR 0.2 to 0.9)) (p = 0.04 and p < 0.001, respectively). The fully threaded screws and the 30mm partially threaded screws were seen to engage the physeal scar under an image intensifier in each case. The results support the use of 30 mm partially threaded or 45 mm fully threaded screws that engage the physeal scar rather than longer partially threaded screws that do not. A 45 mm fully threaded screw may in practice offer additional benefit over 30 mm partially threaded screws in increasing the thread count in the denser paraphyseal region. PMID:24293597

  19. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. RESULTS All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. CONCLUSIONS Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  20. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. Material/Methods We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. Results All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. Conclusions Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  1. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Technique in the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine-Tips and Tricks.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The need for spinal fixation in patients who cannot tolerate classical open surgery has led in recent years to the development of minimally invasive approaches. The use of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation offers several advantages, such as less blood loss and postoperative pain due to blunt separation of the muscles with reduction of soft tissue dissection. Medical records and demographic information, diagnosis, and preoperative pain levels of 63 patients who underwent percutaneous minimally invasive thoracolumbar spine stabilization using the Illico® Fixation System (Alphatec Spine, Carlsbad, California) were analysed: a total of 344 screws were implanted. Preoperative and postoperative clinical assessment of the patients were based on a visual analogue scale. Because percutaneous techniques do not allow gross visualization of the vertebra and erroneous placement of the screw may be high in the initial cases, we discuss the techniques for a safe implantation of pedicle screws using a single or double intraoperative fluoroscopy. We report tips and tricks for technical challenges including fixation in osteoporotic patients, percutaneous insertion of long rods, compression/distraction using multiaxial screws turning into monoaxial, and use of minimally invasive retractror for interbody fusion. Recently, indications for minimally invasive percutaneous fixation have expanded and my results support that it may be considered a safe and effective option for the treatment of degenerative and traumatic thoracolumbar spinal diseases. PMID:27121407

  2. COMPLICATIONS OF THE SCREW/WASHER TIBIAL FIXATION TECHNIQUE FOR KNEE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Roveda, Gilberto; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Sartor, Vanderlei; Alves, Soraya Melina

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of pain at the site of the surgical incision and the need to remove the tibial fixation screw in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, in relation to sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A group of 265 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral flexor tendon grafts from the thigh in which the tibial fixation technique consisted of using a cortical screw and metal washer, between July 2000 and November 2007, were evaluated. Results: 176 patients were evaluated for an average of 33.3 ± 19.5 months; median of 29.5 months; IIQ: 17-45 months; minimum of 8 and maximum of 87 months. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.272) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.633) between sexes. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.08) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.379) according to BMI. Conclusion: The pain complaint rate at the screw site from the screw and metal washer method used for tibial fixation in ACL reconstruction was of the order of 25%, and the screw had to be removed in 10.8% of the cases. There was no predominance of pain complaints at the surgical wound between the sexes. There was a greater tendency to complain about pain among patients with BMI < 25. There was no predominance of screw and washer removal between the sexes or between individuals with different BMIs. PMID:27022587

  3. Cervical Pedicle Screw Fixation: Anatomic Feasibility of Pedicle Morphology and Radiologic Evaluation of the Anatomical Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Study Design All parameters were measured manually and with a computed tomography (CT) scanner. For the manual measurements, a Vernier scale instrument was used. Purpose This study evaluates quantitatively pedicles of middle and lower cervical spine (C3 to C7) and to evaluate the possibilities of using these structures as anchors in posterior cervical fusion. Overview of Literature Pedicle screws may be an alternative fixation technique for posterior cervical instrumentation. Methods Twenty-two bony sets of adult cervical spines were studied (110 vertebrae, 220 pedicles) from C3 down to C7. Results CT measurement of cervical pedicles appeared to be accurate and valuable for preoperative planning of cervical pedicle screw instrumentation. The study showed a high correlation between the values obtained by manual and CT measurements of pedicle dimensions. The technical challenge of insertion is the obvious theoretical drawback of the use of cervical pedicle screws. Many technical factors are important to consider, namely, the point of screw entry, the pedicle dimensions, the screw direction according to the pedicle angle and orientation, the screw diameter and length, and the method of screw introduction. Conclusions Transpedicular screw fixation of the cervical spine appears to be promising. Anatomic limitations should be clear to the surgeon. Further clinical and biomechanical studies are needed to settle this technique. PMID:24967041

  4. Increase of stability in external fracture fixation by hydroxyapatite-coated bone screws.

    PubMed

    Augat, P; Claes, L; Hanselmann, K F; Suger, G; Fleischmann, W

    1995-01-01

    A major problem in fracture treatment by external fixation is screw loosening, which often results in reduced stability and can lead to prolonged treatment. A load-carrying experiment was conducted to determine whether coating implants with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) increases screw stability. Twelve HA-coated ASIF screws with 3 different macroporosities were inserted in 12 sheep that had already been fitted with a 6-pin external fixator for the treatment of a tibial osteotomy. The same number of uncoated polished steel screws served as controls. Although initial stability was not different for HA-coated screws, average removal torque after a 9-week implantation period increased with increasing macroporosity of the HA coating (p < .002). Instability of some screws was accompanied by histologic findings of cartilagenous tissue and proliferation of periosteal callus. Near the threads in the tibial cortex and in the shaft area of the screw were seen large numbers of HA particles that had been sheared off during implantation as well as during screw removal because of high contact forces between the HA coating and bone. Particulate debris of HA particles as well as the release of small bone fragments during explanation is likely to be unavoidable since HA adherence to bone is greater than adherence to steel after several weeks of implantation. PMID:7640445

  5. Implant failure in a proximal femoral fracture treated with dynamic hip screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Dabis, John; Abdul-Jabar, Hani B.; Dabis, Hosam

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw fixation is a common orthopaedic procedure and to date, still can cause difficulties to the senior trauma surgeon. We present a case where an extra-capsular fracture of the proximal femur was managed with a dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation. She proceeded to the operating theatre, where the fracture was stabilized with a 75-mm DHS and short-barrelled plate. The implant position was checked with intraoperative screening and the position accepted. Following attempted mobilization at 11 days post-operatively, the patient developed a recurrence of her preoperative pain. X-ray showed that the implant screw had separated from the barrel. Later scrutiny of the intraoperative screening films revealed that the barrel and screw were not engaged at the time of surgery. Intraoperative screening films should be carefully checked to ensure congruity of implant components. PMID:26136561

  6. Implant failure in a proximal femoral fracture treated with dynamic hip screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Dabis, John; Abdul-Jabar, Hani B; Dabis, Hosam

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw fixation is a common orthopaedic procedure and to date, still can cause difficulties to the senior trauma surgeon. We present a case where an extra-capsular fracture of the proximal femur was managed with a dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation. She proceeded to the operating theatre, where the fracture was stabilized with a 75-mm DHS and short-barrelled plate. The implant position was checked with intraoperative screening and the position accepted. Following attempted mobilization at 11 days post-operatively, the patient developed a recurrence of her preoperative pain. X-ray showed that the implant screw had separated from the barrel. Later scrutiny of the intraoperative screening films revealed that the barrel and screw were not engaged at the time of surgery. Intraoperative screening films should be carefully checked to ensure congruity of implant components. PMID:26136561

  7. Cortical and Standard Trajectory Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques in Stabilizing Multisegment Lumbar Spine with Low Grade Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    İnceoğlu, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cortical screw (CS) fixation has been recently proposed as an alternative to the standard pedicle screw (PS) fixation technique. Biomechanical studies involving individual screw pullout and single level motion segment stabilization showed comparable performance of both techniques. However, whether this new fixation technique can be applied to the stabilization of multilevel lumbar segments with significant destabilization has been unclear. Purpose To compare stability of CS fixation to the traditional PS fixation in an unstable 3 level spondylolisthesis model. Study Design This is a biomechanical study comparing cortical trajectory pedicle screw fixation to traditional trajectory pedicle screw fixation in an unstable cadaveric model using nondestructive flexibility test. Methods Eight fresh frozen cadaveric lumbar spines (T12- S1) were obtained. After intact baseline testing, a 3-level lowgrade spondylolisthesis was simulated at the L1-4. Each specimen was instrumented with the PS and CS fixation systems. Standard nondestructive flexibility test was performed. Range of motion at each level was compared between the constructs during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Results The destabilization model significantly increased the ROM in all planes (P<0.05). Both fixation techniques provided significant reduction in the ROM (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in ROM between the PS and CS groups in any of planes (P>0.05). Conclusions Cortical trajectory pedicle screw fixation provided stabilization to multilevel lumbar segment with low-grade spondylolisthesis comparable to the standard trajectory pedicle screw construct. PMID:26484009

  8. Hydroxyapatite composite resin cement augmentation of pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Alexander W L; Gillies, R Mark; Svehla, Martin J; Saito, Masanobu; Walsh, William R

    2003-01-01

    Pedicle screw stability is poor in osteopenic vertebrae attributable, in part, to low screw-bone interface strength. The current authors examined cement augmentation using a low curing temperature hydroxyapatite and bis-phenol-A glycidol methacrylate-based composite resin. This cement may stiffen the screw-bone interface and reduce the harmful effects associated with polymethylmethacrylate regarding temperature and toxic monomer. Thirty-five lumbar vertebrae from human cadavers were instrumented with pedicle screws, with one pedicle previously injected with cement and the other as the control. Caudocephalad toggling of +/- 1 mm for 1600 cycles was applied to the pedicle screws, and the resulting forces supported by the implant-bone interface were captured by a load cell. A curve was constructed from the peak caudal load for each cycle and three mechanical measures parameterized this curve: (1) initial load; (2) rate of load decay during the first 400 cycles; and (3) final load. The initial load increased by 16% as a result of cement augmentation, the final load increased by 65%, and the rate of load decay decreased by 59%. Cement augmentation of pedicle screws increased the stiffness and stability of the screw-bone interface. PMID:12579026

  9. Suture anchor versus screw fixation for greater tuberosity fractures of the humerus--a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Hong, Chih-Kai; Jou, I-Ming; Lin, Chii-Jeng; Su, Fong-Chin; Su, Wei-Ren

    2012-03-01

    Suture anchors and screws are commonly used for fixation of humeral greater tuberosity (GT) fractures in either arthroscopic or open surgeries, but no biomechanical studies have been performed to compare the strength of fixation constructs using these two implants. This cadaveric study aimed to compare the biomechanical strength of three different fixation constructs in the management of GT fractures: Double-Row Suture Anchor Fixation (DR); Suture-Bridge Technique using suture anchors and knotless suture anchors (SB); and Two-Screw Fixation (TS). The experimental procedure was designed to assess fracture displacement after cyclic loading, failure load, and failure mode of the fixation construct. Significant differences were found among the SB (321 N), DR (263 N), and TS (187 N) groups (SB > DR > TS, p < 0.05) in the mean force of cyclic loading to create 3 mm displacement. Regarding the mean force of cyclic loading to create 5 mm displacement and ultimate failure load, no significant difference was found between the DR (370 N, 480 N) and SB (399 N, 493 N) groups, but both groups achieved superior results compared with the TS group (249 N, 340 N) (p < 0.05). The results suggested that the suture anchor constructs would be stronger than the fixation construct using screws for the humeral GT fracture. PMID:21858857

  10. C2 nerve dysfunction associated with C1 lateral mass screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da-geng; Hao, Ding-jun; Li, Guang-lin; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Yu-chen; He, Bao-rong

    2014-11-01

    The C1 lateral mass screw technique is widely used for atlantoaxial fixation. However, C2 nerve dysfunction may occur as a complication of this procedure, compromising the quality of life of affected patients. This is a review of the topic of C2 nerve dysfunction associated with C1 lateral mass screw fixation and related research developments. The C2 nerve root is located in the space bordered superiorly by the posterior arch of C1 , inferiorly by the C2 lamina, anteriorly by the lateral atlantoaxial joint capsule, and posteriorly by the anterior edge of the ligamentum flavum. Some surgeons suggest cutting the C2 nerve root during C1 lateral mass screw placement, whereas others prefer to preserve it. The incidence, clinical manifestations, causes, management, and prevention of C2 nerve dysfunction associated with C(1) lateral mass screw fixation are reviewed. Sacrifice of the C2 nerve root carries a high risk of postoperative numbness, whereas postoperative nerve dysfunction can occur when it has been preserved. Many surgeons have been working hard on minimizing the risk of postoperative C2 nerve dysfunction associated with C1 lateral mass screw fixation. PMID:25430709

  11. The sustentaculum tali screw fixation for the treatment of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qing-Jiang; Yu, Xiao; Guo, Zong-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the surgery of calcaneal fracture, whether the sustentaculum tali screw should always be placed is widely controversial. The aim of this study was to explore the necessity and function of the sustentaculum tali screw placement for the treatment of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture. Methods: The finite element analysis was used in this study. After the establishment of the finite element model of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture, the two internal fixation simulations were designed. In one model, the AO calcaneal plate was simulated on the lateral side of the calcanues with 7 screws being fixated at different position of the plate. In the other model, the calcaneus was fixated with the same AO calcaneal plate together with an additional screw being infiltrated into the sustentaculum tali. The two models were simulated under the same loading and the displacement of the fracture line and the stress distribution in the two models were calculated respectively. Results: The maximum principal stress focused on the cortical bone of sustentaculum tali in both the models under the same loading. The displacement of the fracture line, the maximum principal stress of calcaneus and internal fixation system in the model with sustentaculum screw fixation were smaller than that in the model without sustentaculum screw fixation. The stress in the model with sustentaculum screw fixation was more dispersed. Conclusions: The placement of sustentaculum tali screw is essential for fixation of type II calcaneal fracture to achieve the biomechanical stability. PMID:25225534

  12. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kouvidis, George K; Sommers, Mark B; Giannoudis, Peter V; Katonis, Pavlos G; Bottlang, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe) and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes) were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS) of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with the HIPS model. In this

  13. Titanium screw entered into maxillary sinus: a rare incident during rigid fixation of the porous polyethylene implant in enophthalmos correction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xi; Liu, JianFeng; Zou, Chong; Rui, Lu; Gui, Lai

    2014-07-01

    Screw fixation is used for accurate augmentation by porous polyethylene implant in traumatic enophthalmos correction to avoid complications such as migration and protrusion. We report an incident of titanium screw entered into the maxillary sinus during enophthalmos correction with porous polyethylene implant. Such incident could be avoided by standard manipulation. We here present the rare case and offer proposals for the screw fixation of porous polyethylene implant during traumatic enophthalmos correction. PMID:25006927

  14. Biomechanical evaluation of four different posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the treatment of the odontoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Liu, Wen-Fei; Jiang, Hong-Kun; Li, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Problems that screw cannot be inserted may occur in screw-rod fixation techniques such as Harms technique. We compared the biomechanical stability imparted to the C-2 vertebrae by four designed posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the management of odontoid fractures. A three-dimensional finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established by subtracting several unit structures from the normal model from a healthy male volunteer. 4 different fixation techniques, shown as follows: ① C-1 lateral mass and C-2 pedicle screw fixation (Harms technique); ② C-1 lateral mass and unilateral C-2 pedicle screw fixation combined with ipsilateral laminar screw fixation; ③ Unilateral C-1lateral mass combined with ipsilateral C-1 posterior arch, and C-2 pedicle screw fixation; and ④ Unilateral C1 lateral mass screw connected with bilateral C2 pedicle screw fixation was performed on the odontoid fracture model. The model was validated for axial rotation, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and tension for 1.5 Nm. Changes in motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were calculated. The finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established in this paper. All of the four screw-rod techniques significantly decreased motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, as compared with the destabilized odontoid fracture complex (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in stability among the four screw techniques. We concluded that the first three fixation techniques are recommended to be used as surgical intervention for odontoid fracture, while the last can be used as supplementary for the former three methods. PMID:26309508

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of four different posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the treatment of the odontoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Liu, Wen-Fei; Jiang, Hong-Kun; Li, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Problems that screw cannot be inserted may occur in screw-rod fixation techniques such as Harms technique. We compared the biomechanical stability imparted to the C-2 vertebrae by four designed posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the management of odontoid fractures. A three-dimensional finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established by subtracting several unit structures from the normal model from a healthy male volunteer. 4 different fixation techniques, shown as follows: ① C-1 lateral mass and C-2 pedicle screw fixation (Harms technique); ② C-1 lateral mass and unilateral C-2 pedicle screw fixation combined with ipsilateral laminar screw fixation; ③ Unilateral C-1lateral mass combined with ipsilateral C-1 posterior arch, and C-2 pedicle screw fixation; and ④ Unilateral C1 lateral mass screw connected with bilateral C2 pedicle screw fixation was performed on the odontoid fracture model. The model was validated for axial rotation, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and tension for 1.5 Nm. Changes in motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were calculated. The finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established in this paper. All of the four screw-rod techniques significantly decreased motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, as compared with the destabilized odontoid fracture complex (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in stability among the four screw techniques. We concluded that the first three fixation techniques are recommended to be used as surgical intervention for odontoid fracture, while the last can be used as supplementary for the former three methods. PMID:26309508

  16. A biomechanical study on fixation stability with twin hook or lag screw in artificial cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Olsson, O; Tanner, K E; Ceder, L; Ryd, L

    2002-01-01

    The twin hook has been developed as an alternative to the conventional lag screw to be combined with a barrelled side-plate in the treatment of trochanteric hip fractures. With two oppositely directed apical hooks introduced into the subchondral bone of the femoral head, the twin hook provides different stabilising properties to the lag screw. The femoral head purchase of the twin hook and the lag screw were compared in a biomechanical study using artificial cancellous bone, and responses to axial and torsional loading was determined. A distinct yield point in load and torque was noted for the lag screw, representing failure of the laminas supporting the threads. For the twin hook, gradual increase of load and torque occurred during impaction of the bone supporting the hooks. The peak loads and torques were higher for the lag screw, but were similar for both devices after 8 mm deformation. The stiffness was higher for the lag screw, but in counter-clockwise rotation the stiffness for the lag screw was negligible. The twin hook appeared to provide fixation stability comparable to that offered by the lag screw, but with conceivable advantages in terms of a deformation response involving bone impaction and gradually increasing stability. PMID:12466867

  17. A video guided solution for screw insertion in orthopedic plate fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaraggia, J.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Angelopoulou, E.; Hornegger, J.

    2013-03-01

    In orthopedic and trauma surgery, metallic plates are used for reduction and fixation of bone fractures. In clinical practice, the intra-operative planning for screw fixation is usually based on fluoroscopic images. Screw fixation is then performed on a free-hand basis. As such, multiple attempts may be required in order to achieve an optimal positioning of the fixing screws. To help the physician insert the screws in accordance to the planned position, we propose a method for screw insertion guidance. Our approach uses a small video camera, rigidly placed on the drill, and a set of small markers that are rigidly fixed on a variable angle drill sleeve. In order to investigate the achievable accuracy of our setup, we simulate the estimation of the drill bit position under two different marker arrangements, planar and 3D, and different noise levels. Furthermore, we motivate our choices for marker design and position given the limited space available for marker positioning, the requirement for accurate position estimation of the drill bit and the illumination changes that could affect the surgical site. We also describe our proposed marker detection and tracking pipeline. Our simulation results let us conclude that we can achieve an accuracy of 1° and 1mm in the estimation of angular orientation and tip position of the drill bit respectively, provided that we have accurate marker detection.

  18. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Young; Chung, Woo Chull; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  19. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin young; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  20. Evaluation of the Effect of Fixation Angle between Polyaxial Pedicle Screw Head and Rod on the Failure of Screw-Rod Connection.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Engin; Özkaya, Mustafa; Güler, Ümit Özgür; Acaroğlu, Emre; Demir, Teyfik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Polyaxial screws had been only tested according to the ASTM standards (when they were perpendicularly positioned to the rod). In this study, effects of the pedicle screws angled fixation to the rod on the mechanical properties of fixation were investigated. Materials and Method. 30 vertically fixed screws and 30 screws fixed with angle were used in the study. Screws were used in three different diameters which were 6.5 mm, 7.0 mm, and 7.5 mm, in equal numbers. Axial pull-out and flexion moment tests were performed. Test results compared with each other using appropriate statistical methods. Results. In pull-out test, vertically fixed screws, in 6.5 mm and 7.0 mm diameter, had significantly higher maximum load values than angled fixed screws with the same diameters (P < 0.01). Additionally, vertically fixed screws, in all diameters, had significantly greater stiffness according to corresponding size fixed with angle (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Fixing the pedicle screw to the rod with angle significantly decreased the pull-out stiffness in all diameters. Similarly, pedicle screw instrumentation fixed with angle decreased the minimum sagittal angle between the rod and the screw in all diameters for flexion moment test but the differences were not significant. PMID:27019578

  1. Intramedullary fixation with screwed, conical stems--unsolicited results from animal experiments.

    PubMed

    van Loon, P J; Weinans, H; Huiskes, R; de Groot, K; Slooff, T J

    1992-01-01

    For the purpose of studying bone remodeling around prostheses, a segmental replacement for the goat tibia was designed, using a conical, screw-threaded, hydroxyapatite-coated stem for fixation. Eight goats were provided with the implant, seven of which loosened within 10 days post-operatively, displaying progressive radiolucency and gross rotational motion. The eighth one also loosened radiographically, but developed a stabilizing callus bridge to prevent motion. A second design of similar shape and coating, but lacking the screw threads, was designed and also applied in eight animals. In this case, no loosening occurred in the first 6 weeks post-operatively. It is concluded that the application of screwed intramedullary stems for prosthetic fixation is not a viable concept, because the threads prevent the stem from subsiding and restabilizing when minor initial interface stress-relaxation and remodeling has occurred. PMID:10149986

  2. An analysis of screw fixation of the femoral component in cementless hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Sugiyama, H; Kaiser, A D; Van Hoech, J; Whiteside, L A

    1990-01-01

    A cementless hip stem that allows screw fixation of the collar to cortical bone in the calcar region was found to achieve enhanced rotational stability when implanted in preserved cadaveric human femora. Although the implants with screws showed less tendency for subsidence than the implants without screws, rotational micromotion was not found to be statistically different under light loading conditions. When implanted in composite bone, the addition of screws in the configuration tested was associated with significant metal-on-metal wear during combined compression and rotational cyclic loading. This finding is of concern due to potential wear particle toxicity and possible lowered fatigue life of the prosthesis. Therefore, specific design changes are recommended. PMID:2243211

  3. Significantly lower femoral neck growth in screw fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Wölfle-Roos, Julia V; Urlaub, Stefanie; Reichel, Heiko; Taurman, Rita

    2016-05-01

    There is an ongoing debate on which fixation technique should be preferred for the prophylactic fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). In the case of Kirschner-wire (K-wire) fixation, there is a possibility of secondary loss of fixation because of longitudinal growth of the physis, whereas in screw fixation, physeal growth of the femoral neck might be impaired. The aim of this matched-pair study was to compare the longitudinal growth of the femoral neck in screw fixation versus K-wire fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in SCFE. All 18 patients (female : male=3 : 15), who had undergone screw fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip between 9/2001 and 9/2011, were matched according to age, bone age, sex, and time to follow-up to another 18 patients with K-wire fixation. The length of the femoral neck of the contralateral hip was measured in parallel to either screw or K-wire from the apex of the femoral head to the opposite cortical bone. The ratio of the femoral neck length measured directly after surgery and on follow-up was defined as femoral neck growth. There was no significant difference between groups with respect to age, modified Oxford Bone age score, and time to follow-up. We found a significant difference in femoral neck growth between patients with screw fixation (5.5±4.3%) compared with K-wire fixation (8.9±5.7%, P=0.048 matched Wilcoxon test). The difference in femoral neck growth of patients with K-wire or screw fixation of the contralateral asymptomatic hip in SCFE was small, but statistically significant. Thus, despite high rates of secondary loss of fixation, K-wire fixation should still be considered, especially in very young patients. PMID:26919622

  4. Biomechanical study of the sacroiliac fracture fixation with titanium rods and pedicle screws

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Fabrício Hidetoshi; Pisani, Marina Justi; Machado, André Nunes; Rodrigues, Fábio Lucas; Fujiki, Edison Noburo; Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess biomechanically different fixations means of the sacroiliac joint with pedicle screws and to compare the traditional head height with reduced ones. METHODS: We used a polyethylene model representing the pelvic ring and simulated a unilateral sacroiliac dislocation. We set up three different constructions: 1) two screws attached to a rod; 2) two rods connected to two small head screws each; and 3) two rods connected to two average headed screws each. We conducted tests in a biomechanical testing and a mechanized processing laboratory. RESULTS: Group 1 supported an average maximum load of 99.70 N. Group 2 supported an average maximum load of 362.46 N. Group 3 endured an average maximum load of 404.15 N. In the assembly with one rod, the resistance decreased as compared with the one with two bars: 72.5 % compared to small-headed screws and 75.3 % to the traditional screw. CONCLUSION: The assembly with a single bar presented inferior results when compared to the double bar assembly. There was no statistical difference in the results between the screws used. Experimental Study. PMID:26207094

  5. Short segment screw fixation without fusion in treatment for unstable thoracolumbar burst fracture

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jiaguang; Liu, Yishan; Cao, Zheng; Hu, Yuan; Lu, Xiang; Lin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate clinical efficacy of short segment pedicle screw fixation without bone fusion for unstable thoracolumbar burst fracture. Nineteen patients younger than 40 years old with unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures were included. The surgical procedure included postural reduction for 3 days and screw fixations at one level above, one level below and at the fractured level itself. The implants were removed 12 months after initial operation. Imaging and clinical findings were analyzed at preoperative, 12 months after surgery, just before implant removal, and at six months after implant removal. Results indicated that difference was statistically significant between preoperative period or postoperative 1 year follow-up, just before implant removal and 6 months after implant removal (P < 0.05). Results at postoperative 1 year follow-up, just before implant removal and 6 months after implant removal were better than preoperative period. There were no significant complications or neurological deterioration after screws insert and removal in any patient. The rate of clinical outcome with excellent and good was 94.7%. In conclusion, short segment pedicle screw fixation without bone fusion can be an effective and safe operative srategytechnique in the management of young patients suffering from unstable burst fracture. PMID:25664090

  6. Root contact with maxillomandibular fixation screws in orthognathic surgery: incidence and consequences.

    PubMed

    Camargo, I B; Van Sickels, J E; Laureano Filho, J R; Cunningham, L L

    2016-08-01

    The use of maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) screws in orthognathic surgery has become common in recent years. The risk of injury to adjacent roots with their placement in this population has not been studied extensively. The aim of this study was to review the incidence and consequences of root contact/injury in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery. A retrospective analysis of the treatment and radiographic records of patients who underwent orthognathic surgery between January 2013 and September 2014 at a university in Kentucky, USA was performed. The mean number of screws used was correlated to the mean number of roots affected using Spearman's test, set to a level of significance of 5%. Of 125 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery, 15 (12%) had evidence of root contact. Subsequent radiographs showed resolution of the bone defects. There was no clinical evidence of pulpal necrosis or pain during follow-up. The average number of screws used was 3.14±0.35 per patient, with an average of 0.17±0.52 root contacts per patient. There was no correlation between the number of screws used and the number of roots injured (P=0.279). Based on these results, MMF screws can safely be used to establish interim fixation during orthognathic surgery. Caution should be taken during placement to avoid direct injury to the roots of teeth. PMID:26993104

  7. Sol-gel derived titania coating with immobilized bisphosphonate enhances screw fixation in rat tibia.

    PubMed

    Linderbäck, Paula; Areva, Sami; Aspenberg, Per; Tengvall, Pentti

    2010-08-01

    A variety of surface modifications have been tested for the enhancement of screw fixation in bone, and locally delivered anti-osteoporosis drugs such as bisphosphonates (BP) are then of interest. In this in vivo study, the impact of surface immobilized BP was compared with systemic BP delivery and screws with no BP. After due in vitro characterization, differently treated stainless steel (SS) screws were divided into four groups with 10 rats each. Three of the groups received screws coated with sol-gel derived TiO(2) and calcium phosphate (SS+TiO(2)+CaP). One of these had no further treatment, one had alendronate (BP) adsorbed to calcium phosphate mineral, and one received systemic BP treatment. The fourth group received uncoated SS screws and no BP (control). The screw pullout force was measured after 4 weeks of implantation in rat tibiae. The immobilized amount and release rate of alendronate could be controlled by different immersion times. The SS+TiO(2)+CaP coating did not increase the pullout force compared to SS alone. Surface delivered alendronate enhanced the pullout force by 93% [p = 0.000; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 67-118%] compared to SS, and by 39% (p = 0.044; 95% CI: 7-71%) compared to systemic alendronate delivery. Both surface immobilized and systemically delivered alendronate improved implant fixation. Also, locally delivered, that is, surface immobilized alendronate showed a better fixation than systemically delivered. Using sol-gel derived TiO(2) as a platform, it is possible to administer controllable amounts of a variety of BPs. PMID:20186735

  8. Evaluation of a new approach for modelling the screw-bone interface in a locking plate fixation: a corroboration study.

    PubMed

    Moazen, Mehran; Mak, Jonathan H; Jones, Alison C; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2013-07-01

    Computational modelling of the screw-bone interface in fracture fixation constructs is challenging. While incorporating screw threads would be a more realistic representation of the physics, this approach can be computationally expensive. Several studies have instead suppressed the threads and modelled the screw shaft with fixed conditions assumed at the screw-bone interface. This study assessed the sensitivity of the computational results to modelling approaches at the screw-bone interface. A new approach for modelling this interface was proposed, and it was tested on two locking screw designs in a diaphyseal bridge plating configuration. Computational models of locked plating and far cortical locking constructs were generated and compared to in vitro models described in prior literature to corroborate the outcomes. The new approach led to closer agreement between the computational and the experimental stiffness data, while the fixed approach led to overestimation of the stiffness predictions. Using the new approach, the pattern of load distribution and the magnitude of the axial forces, experienced by each screw, were compared between the locked plating and far cortical locking constructs. The computational models suggested that under more severe loading conditions, far cortical locking screws might be under higher risk of screw pull-out than the locking screws. The proposed approach for modelling the screw-bone interface can be applied to any fixation involved application of screws. PMID:23636756

  9. Application of bioabsorbable screw fixation for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Qiu, Xiaowen; Wang, Dong; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the application of bioabsorbable screws for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting fixation and to study their clinical effects in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. METHODS: From March 2007 to September 2012, 56 patients, 36 males and 20 females (38-79 years old, average 58.3±9.47 years), underwent a novel operation. Grafts were fixed by bioabsorbable screws (PLLA, 2.7 mm in diameter) after anterior decompression. The bioabsorbable screws were inserted from the midline of the graft bone to the bone surface of the upper and lower vertebrae at 45 degree angles. Patients were evaluated post-operatively to observe the improvement of symptoms and evaluate the fusion of the bone. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was used to evaluate the recovery of neurological functions. RESULTS: All screws were successfully inserted, with no broken screws. The rate of symptom improvement was 87.5%. All of the grafts fused well with no extrusion. The average time for graft fusion was 3.8±0.55 months (range 3-5 months). Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT scans demonstrated that the grafts fused with adjacent vertebrae well and that the screws were absorbed as predicted. The MRI findings showed that the cerebrospinal fluid was unobstructed. No obvious complications appeared in any of the follow-up evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical spondylosis with one- or two-level involvement can be effectively treated by anterior decompression and bone grafting with bioabsorbable screw fixation. This operative method is safe and can avoid the complications induced by metal implants. PMID:27438565

  10. Percutaneous Screw Fixation of Crescent Fracture-Dislocation of the Sacroiliac Joint.

    PubMed

    Shui, Xiaolong; Ying, Xiaozhou; Mao, Chuanwan; Feng, Yongzeng; Chen, Linwei; Kong, Jianzhong; Guo, Xiaoshan; Wang, Gang

    2015-11-01

    Crescent fracture-dislocation of the sacroiliac joint (CFDSIJ) is a type of lateral compression pelvic injury associated with instability. Open reduction and internal fixation is a traditional treatment of CFDSIJ. However, a minimally invasive method has never been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of closed reduction and percutaneous fixation for different types of CFDSIJ and present their clinical outcome. The authors reviewed 117 patients diagnosed with CFDSIJ between July 2003 and July 2013. Closed reduction and percutaneous fixation was performed in 73 patients. Treatment selection was based on Day's fracture classification. For type I fractures, fixation perpendicular to the fracture line were performed. For type II fractures, crossed fixation was performed. For type III fractures, fixation was performed with iliosacral screws. Forty-four patients were treated by open reduction and plate fixation. Demographics, fracture pattern distribution, blood loss, incision lengths, revision surgeries, radiological results, and functional scores were compared. All 117 patients were followed for more than 6 months (mean, 14 months [range, 6-24 months]). Blood loss, extensive exposure, duration of posterior ring surgery, duration of hospital stay, and infection rates were lower in the closed group (P<.01). Patients in the closed group achieved better functional performance (P<.01). There were no significant differences in reduction quality (P=.32), revision surgery rates (P=.27), and iatrogenic neurologic injuries (P=.2) between the 2 groups. The authors' results indicate that closed reduction and percutaneous fixation is a safe and effective surgical method for CFDSIJ. PMID:26558677

  11. Assessment of penetration of dorsal screws after fixation of the distal radius using ultrasound: cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Williams, D; Singh, J; Heidari, N; Ahmad, M; Noorani, A; Di Mascio, L

    2016-02-01

    Introduction Volar locking plates are used to treat unstable and displaced fractures of the distal radius. Potential advantages of stable anatomical reduction (eg early mobilisation) can be limited by penetration of dorsal screws, leading to synovitis and potential rupture of extensor tendons. Despite intraoperative imaging, penetration of dorsal screws continues to be a problem in volar plating of the distal radius. Ultrasound is a well recognised, readily available, diagnostic tool used to assess soft-tissue impingement by orthopaedic hardware. In this cadaveric study, we wished to ascertain the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for identification of protrusion of dorsal screws after volar plating of the distal radius. Methods Four adult, unpaired phenol-embalmed cadaveric distal radii were used. A VariAx™ Distal Radius Volar Locking Plate system (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI, USA) was employed for instrumented fixation. A portable SIUI CTS 900 ultrasound machine (Providian Medical, Eastlake, OH, USA) was used to image the dorsal cortex to ascertain screw penetration. Results Specificity and sensitivity of ultrasound for detection of screw protrusion through the dorsal cortex was 100%. Conclusions Ultrasound was found to be a safe and accurate method for assessment of dorsal-screw penetration through the dorsal cortex of the radius after volar plating of the distal radius. It also aids diagnosis of associated tendon disorders (eg tenosynovitis) that might cause pain and limit wrist function. PMID:26829667

  12. A new technique for lag screw placement in the dynamic hip screw fixation of intertrochanteric fractures: decreasing radiation time dramatically

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wei-Chao; Li, Jia-Zhen; Chen, Sheng-Hua

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to confirm the decrease in radiation time required for a new technique to place dynamic hip screws (DHS) in intertrochanteric fractures. Seventy-six patients were treated with DHS by either the new technique (NT) or the conventional technique (CT). The width of femoral shaft, the length of the hip screw to be implanted into the injured side, and the distance between the tip of the greater trochanter and the entry point of the guide wire were measured at the uninjured side on the anteroposterior pelvic radiograph preoperatively, and the actual width of the injured femoral shaft was measured intra-operatively. Finally, the entry point and the length of hip screw were obtained through an equation. Mean radiation time of the NT patients (24.57 ± 7.80 s) was significantly shorter than the CT patients (54.2 ± 18.26 s) (P  < 0.001). The new technique decreased radiation time dramatically in DHS fixation. PMID:18265981

  13. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation Using Cortical Bone Trajectory – A Prospective Cohort Study on Postoperative Pain Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Sayantan; Pham, Lan; Singh, Harminder

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to evaluate the clinical outcomes of cortical screws in regards to postoperative pain. Background: Pedicle screw fixation is the current mainstay technique for posterior spinal fusion. Over the past decade, a new technique called cortical screw fixation has been developed, which allows for medialized screw placement through stronger cortical bone. There have been several studies that showed either biomechanical equivalence or superiority of cortical screws. However, there is currently only a single study in the literature looking at clinical outcomes of cortical screw fixation in patients who have had no prior spine surgery. Methods: We prospectively looked at the senior author’s patients who underwent cortical versus pedicle lumbar screw fixation surgeries between 2013 and 2015 for lumbar degenerative disease. Eighteen patients underwent cortical screw fixation, and 15 patients underwent traditional pedicle screw fixation. We looked at immediate postoperative pain, changes in short-term pain (six to 12 weeks post-surgery), and changes in long-term pain (six to eight months). All pain outcomes were measured using a visual analog scale ranging from 1 to 10. Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to measure continuous data, and the Fisher Exact test was used to measure categorical data as appropriate. Results: Our results showed that the cortical screw cohort showed a trend towards having less peak postoperative pain (p = 0.09). The average postoperative pain was similar between the two cohorts (p = 0.93). There was also no difference in pain six to 12 weeks after surgery (p = 0.8). However, at six to eight months, the cortical screw cohort had worse pain compared to the pedicle screw cohort (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The cortical screw patients showed a trend towards less peak pain in the short-term (one to three days post-surgery) and more pain in the long-term (six to eight months post-surgery) compared to pedicle screw patients

  14. Endovascular Treatment of a Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Posterior C1-C2 Transarticular Screw Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Jose C. Gonzalez-Llanos, Francisco

    2005-01-15

    We present a case of vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm after a posterior C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation procedure that was effectively treated with endovascular coil occlusion. Vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm complicating posterior C1-C2 transarticular fixation is extremely rare, with only one previous case having been reported previously. Endovascular occlusion is better achieved in the subacute phase of the pseudoaneurysm, when the wall of the pseudoaneurysm has matured and stabilized. Further follow-up angiographies are mandatory in order to confirm that there is no recurrence of the lesion.

  15. Transpedicular screw fixation for type II Hangman's fracture: a motion preserving procedure.

    PubMed

    ElMiligui, Yasser; Koptan, Wael; Emran, Ihab

    2010-08-01

    Opinions have varied regarding the optimal treatment of an unstable Hangman's fracture. C2 pedicle screw instrumentation is a biomechanically strong fixation which although done through a simple posterior approach, is a technically demanding procedure. This prospective, non-randomized multicentre study included 15 consecutive patients with displaced type II traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis. There were nine males and six females with a mean age of 37 years at surgery. The cause of injury was a road traffic accident in 11 patients and a fall from height in 4 patients. All patients had a single stage reduction and direct transpedicular screw fixation through the C2 pedicles. During follow-up, clinical evaluation and plain X-rays were performed at each visit; at 6-month follow-up, additional dynamic lateral flexion/extension views and a CT scan were performed. The average follow-up period was 32 months (range 25-56 months). At final follow-up, all patients were asymptomatic and regained a good functional outcome with no limitation of range of motion; all the patients showed solid union with no implant failure. There were no neurological complications. At 6-month follow-up, CT evaluation showed fusion in all patients and an adequate position of 28 screws. Two pedicle screws (6.6%) showed minimal (defined as <2 mm) intrusion; one into the spinal canal and the other into the vertebral foreamen. Transpedicular screw fixation through the C2 pedicles is a safe and effective method in treating type II traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis resulting in good clinical and radiological outcomes. Adequate reduction was achieved and motion segments were preserved with its use. PMID:20401619

  16. Combined Percutaneous Iliosacral Screw Fixation With Sacroplasty Using Resorbable Calcium Phosphate Cement for Osteoporotic Pelvic Fractures Requiring Surgery.

    PubMed

    Collinge, Cory A; Crist, Brett D

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporotic sacral fractures, including acute and chronic insufficiency fractures, are increasing in frequency and present a number of management problem. Many of these patients are treated nonoperatively with relative immobility (eg, bedrest, wheelchair, or weight-bearing restrictions) and analgesics, which likely make the osteoporotic component worse. Surgery in this patient population may be desirable in some cases with the goals of improving mobility, relieving pain, and healing in an aligned position while minimizing deformity progression. However, internal fixation of the osteoporotic pelvis can be difficult. Large unicortical lag screws are the workhorse of posterior pelvic fixation, and yet fixation in cancellous bone corridors of an osteoporotic sacrum seems unlikely to achieve optimal fixation. As a result, the operative management and clinical results of these difficult injuries may not be uniformly successful. The authors present a technique for treating osteoporotic patients with a sacral fracture when operative treatment is indicated using percutaneous screw fixation combined with screw augmentation using a resorbable calcium phosphate bone substitute or "cement." The guide wire for a 7.3-mm or other large cannulated lag screw is fully inserted along the desired bony sacral corridor as is standard. The lag screw is then inserted over the wire to the depth where cement is desired. The guide wire is removed, and the aqueous calcium phosphate is injected through the screw's cannulation. For acute fractures, cement was applied to the areas distant to the fracture; whereas in insufficiency fractures, the cement was inserted along most of the screw path. The guide wire then can be reinserted and the lag screw fully inserted. The rationale for using these 2 modalities is their synergistic effect: the cannulated screw provides typical screw fixation and also a conduit for cement application. The cement augments the lag screw's purchase in osteoporotic bone

  17. Optimization of volar percutaneous screw fixation for scaphoid waist fractures using traction, positioning, imaging, and an angiocatheter guide.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Knutsen, Elisa; Yao, Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Percutaneous screw fixation of nondisplaced or reducible scaphoid fractures has become more popular as techniques and implants have improved. Many authors have advocated for the dorsal approach, citing difficulties with adequate screw placement from the volar approach. We have developed a straightforward and reproducible technique for volar percutaneous scaphoid screw fixation that mitigates most of the drawbacks of the approach. The wrist is held in extension and ulnar deviation with traction through the thumb. A 14-gauge angiocatheter needle is then used to localize the starting point and as a cannula for the guide wire. Specific fluoroscopic views help to confirm optimal guide wire placement. PMID:21527146

  18. C1-c2 pedicle screw fixation for treatment of old odontoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Li, Mu; Zhang, Shuai; Si, Haipeng; Xue, Jingsong

    2015-02-01

    Nonunion and C1-C2 instability of odontoid fractures usually result from delayed diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. However, the available treatment options for odontoid fractures remain controversial. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of internal screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle in cases of old odontoid fractures. This retrospective study included 21 patients with old odontoid fractures (13 men and 8 women; mean age, 46.5 years; range, 24-69 years). Internal screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle was performed in all patients. Fracture reduction and C1-C2 fusion were assessed with imaging. The neck pain visual analog scale score and cervical spinal cord functional Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (for those who had cervical spinal cord injury) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. Postoperative complications were recorded. Postoperative imaging showed that the C1-C2 dislocation was satisfactorily repositioned in all patients. Bone fusion was observed 1 year after surgery in all patients. No loosening or breaking of internal fixation occurred. The preoperative neck pain visual analog scale score was 5.9±1.5 and improved significantly to 1.8±0.8 after surgery (P<.001). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association score in patients with cervical spinal injury (n=14) was 9.2±1.9 and also significantly improved to 13.8±1.9 at the last follow-up examination (P<.001), with an average improvement rate of 61.0%. No iatrogenic vertebral artery injury or severe spinal cord injury occurred. Screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle was found to be an effective and safe surgical approach for the treatment of old odontoid fractures with C1-C2 dislocation or instability. PMID:25665108

  19. Effects of Lateral Mass Screw Rod Fixation to the Stability of Cervical Spine after Laminectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Ruwaida; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    There are many cases of injury in the cervical spine due to degenerative disorder, trauma or instability. This condition may produce pressure on the spinal cord or on the nerve coming from the spine. The aim of this study was, to analyze the stabilization of the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy via computational simulation. For that purpose, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the multilevel cervical spine segment (C1-C7) was developed using computed tomography (CT) data. There are various decompression techniques that can be applied to overcome the injury. Usually, decompression procedures will create an unstable spine. Therefore, in these situations, the spine is often surgically restabilized by using fusion and instrumentation. In this study, a lateral mass screw-rod fixation was created to stabilize the cervical spine after laminectomy. Material properties of the titanium alloy were assigned on the implants. The requirements moments and boundary conditions were applied on simulated implanted bone. Result showed that the bone without implant has a higher flexion and extension angle in comparison to the bone with implant under applied 1Nm moment. The bone without implant has maximum stress distribution at the vertebrae and ligaments. However, the bone with implant has maximum stress distribution at the screws and rods. Overall, the lateral mass screw-rod fixation provides stability to the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy.

  20. Pedicle Morphometry for Thoracic Screw Fixation in Ethnic Koreans : Radiological Assessment Using Computed Tomographic Myelography

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Soo; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Kim, Young-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Objective In the thoracic spine, insertion of a pedicle screw is annoying due to small pedicle size and wide morphological variation between different levels of the spine and between individuals. The aim of our study was to analyze radiologic parameters of the pedicle morphometry from T1 to T8 using computed tomographic myelography (CTM) in Korean population. Methods For evaluation of the thoracic pedicle morphometry, the authors prospectively analyzed a consecutive series of 26 patients with stable thoracic spines. With the consent of patients, thoracic CTM were performed, from T1 to T8. We calculated the transverse outer diameters and the transverse angles of the pedicle, distance from the cord to the inner cortical wall of the pedicle, and distance from the cord to the dura. Results Transverse outer pedicle diameter was widest at T1 (7.66 ± 2.14 mm) and narrowest at T4 (4.38 ± 1.55 mm). Transverse pedicle angle was widest at T1 (30.2 ± 12.0°) and it became less than 9.0° below T6 level. Theoretical safety zone of the medial perforation of the pedicle screw, namely, distance from the cord to inner cortical wall of the pedicle was more than 4.5 mm. Conclusion Based on this study, we suggest that the current pedicle screw system is not always suitable for Korean patients. Computed tomography is required before performing a transpedicular screw fixation at the thoracic levels. PMID:19893719

  1. Modified lapidus arthrodesis with crossed screw fixation: early weightbearing in 136 patients.

    PubMed

    King, Christy M; Richey, Johanna; Patel, Sandeep; Collman, David R

    2015-01-01

    Modified Lapidus arthrodesis is a versatile and powerful procedure for correcting the hallux valgus deformity typically associated with significant metatarsus primus varus or increased first ray mobility. Traditionally, patients have remained non-weightbearing until the arthrodesis has consolidated. More recently, numerous studies have evaluated the outcomes of early postoperative weightbearing using a variety of fixation constructs. The present retrospective cohort study evaluated 136 consecutive patients who had undergone modified Lapidus arthrodesis for hallux valgus deformity with conventional, crossed, solid core, screw fixation, were enrolled in an early weightbearing protocol, and were followed for 12 months. All the patients were partial weightbearing in a protective boot a mean of 12.2 (SD ± 4.36) days after surgery, with full weightbearing at 34.4 (SD ± 11.89) days. Union was achieved in 133 patients (97.8%). Of the 3 (2.2%) patients with nonunion, 2 (1.5%) remained asymptomatic. The mean time to radiographic union was 65 (SD ± 37.24) days. Significant improvement was seen in the first intermetatarsal angle and hallux abductus angle after surgery (p < .0001). Deformity correction was not compromised by early weightbearing and was well maintained over time. These results support early weightbearing with traditional crossed screw fixation for modified Lapidus arthrodesis with outcomes and complication rates comparable to those previously published. PMID:25451208

  2. Delayed Union of a Sacral Fracture: Percutaneous Navigated Autologous Cancellous Bone Grafting and Screw Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Huegli, R. W. Messmer, P.; Jacob, A. L.; Regazzoni, P.; Styger, S.; Gross, T.

    2003-09-15

    Delayed or non-union of a sacral fracture is a serious clinical condition that may include chronic pain, sitting discomfort, gait disturbances, neurological problems, and inability to work. It is also a difficult reconstruction problem. Late correction of the deformity is technically more demanding than the primary treatment of acute pelvic injuries. Open reduction, internal fixation (ORIF), excision of scar tissue, and bone grafting often in a multi-step approach are considered to be the treatment of choice in delayed unions of the pelvic ring. This procedure implies the risk of neurological and vascular injuries, infection, repeated failure of union, incomplete correction of the deformity, and incomplete pain relief as the most important complications. We report a new approach for minimally invasive treatment of a delayed union of the sacrum without vertical displacement. A patient who suffered a Malgaigne fracture (Tile C1.3) was initially treated with closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation (CRPF) of the posterior pelvic ring under CT navigation and plating of the anterior pelvic ring. Three months after surgery he presented with increasing hip pain caused by a delayed union of the sacral fracture. The lesion was successfully treated percutaneously in a single step procedure using CT navigation for drilling of the delayed union, autologous bone grafting, and screw fixation.

  3. CT-Guided Transfacet Pedicle Screw Fixation in Facet Joint Syndrome: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Manfré, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Axial microinstability secondary to disc degeneration and consequent chronic facet joint syndrome (CFJS) is a well-known pathological entity, usually responsible for low back pain (LBP). Although posterior lumbar fixation (PIF) has been widely used for lumbar spine instability and LBP, complications related to wrong screw introduction, perineural scars and extensive muscle dissection leading to muscle dysfunction have been described. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of facet joints zygapophyseal nerves conventionally used for pain treatment fails in approximately 21% of patients. We investigated a “covert-surgery” minimal invasive technique to treat local spinal instability and LBP, using a novel fully CT-guided approach in patients with axial instability complicated by CFJS resistant to radioablation, by introducing direct fully or partially threaded transfacet screws (transfacet fixation - TFF), to acquire solid arthrodesis, reducing instability and LBP. The CT-guided procedure was well tolerated by all patients in simple analogue sedation, and mean operative time was approximately 45 minutes. All eight patients treated underwent clinical and CT study follow-up at two months, revealing LBP disappearance in six patients, and a significant reduction of lumbar pain in two. In conclusion, CT-guided TFF is a fast and safe technique when facet posterior fixation is needed. PMID:25363265

  4. Intermaxillary fixation screws versus Erich arch bars in mandibular fractures: A comparative study and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ahtesham Ahmad; Reddy, Umesh K.; Warad, N. M.; Badal, Sheeraz; Jamadar, Amjad Ali; Qurishi, Nilofar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Various techniques have been employed from time to time to achieve maxillomamdibular fixation. Although arch bars provide an effective and versatile means of maxillomandibular fixation, their use is not without shortcomings. However the introduction of intermaxillary fixation screws (IMF) has eliminated many of these issues of arch bars. The aim of the present study was to compare the advantages and disadvantages of intermaxillary fixation screws over the Erich arch bars in mandibular fractures. Materials and Methods: Sixty dentulous patients who reported to Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Al-Ameen Dental College and Hospital, Bijapur with mandibular fractures and required intermaxillary fixation as a part of treatment plan followd by open reduction and internal fixation under GA were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups of 30 patients each that is Group A and Group B. Group A included patients who received intermaxillary fixation with Erich arch bars. Group B includes patients who received intermaxillary fixation with IMF Screws. The parameters compared in both the groups included, surgical time taken, gloves perforation, post-operative occlusion, IMF stability, oral hygiene, patient acceptance and comfort and non-vitality characteristics. Results: The average surgical time taken and gloves perforations were more in Group A,the patient acceptance and oral hygiene was better in Group B, there was not much statistically significant difference in postoperative occlusion and IMF stability in both groups. Accidental root perforation was the only limitation of IMF screws. Conclusion: Intermaxillary fixation with IMF screws is more efficacious compared to Erich arch bars in the treatment of mandibular fractures.

  5. Measurement of Optimal Insertion Angle for Iliosacral Screw Fixation Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Jae; Jung, Chul-Young; Eastman, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation can provide stable fixation with a minimally invasive surgical technique for unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries. This surgical technique is not limited by cases of difficult fracture patterns, sacral dysplasia, and small sacral pedicles that can occur in Asians. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of the sacral dysplasia in the Korean population and determine the optimal direction of iliosacral screws by analyzing pelvic three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans. Methods One hundred adult patients who had pelvic 3D-CT scans were evaluated. The upper sacral morphology was classified into three groups, i.e., normal, transitional, and dysplastic groups; the cross-sectional area of the safe zone was measured in each group. S1 pedicle with a short width of more than 11 mm was defined as safe pedicle. The incidences of safe pedicles at different angles ranging from 0° to 15° were investigated in order to determine optimal angle for screw direction. Results The incidence of normal, transitional, and dysplastic group was 46%, 32%, and 22%, respectively. There were significant increases of the cross-sectional area of the safe zones by increasing the angles from 0° to 15° in all groups. The incidence of safe pedicles increased similar to the changes in cross-sectional area. The overall incidence of safe pedicles was highest at the 10° tilt angle. Conclusions The incidence of sacral dysplasia in Koreans was 54%, which is higher than previous studies for Western populations. The cross-sectional area of the safe zone can be increased by anteromedial direction of the iliosacral screw. Considering the diversity of sacral morphology present in the Korean population, a tilt angle of 10° may be the safest angle. PMID:27247736

  6. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  7. Is anterior release necessary in severe scoliosis treated by posterior segmental pedicle screw fixation?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hyok; Cho, Kyu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Joon; Han, Yong-Taek

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of segmental pedicle screw fixation that enables more powerful corrective forces, it is postulated that an additional anterior procedure may be unnecessary even in severe deformities. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the results of a posterior procedure alone using segmental pedicle screw fixation in severe scoliotic curves over 70°. Thirty-five scoliosis patients treated by pedicle screw fixation and rod derotation were retrospectively analyzed after a minimum follow-up of 2 years (range 2–10.4). The mean age of patients was 15.3 years (range 9.8–34.2). Diagnoses were idiopathic scoliosis in 29, neuromuscular scoliosis in 3 and scoliosis associated with Marfan syndrome in 3. Scoliosis consisted of single thoracic curve in 18, double thoracic in 5 and double major in 12. Twenty-five patients showed a major thoracic curve greater than 70° (range 70–100), and different ten patients showed a major lumbar curve greater than 70° (range 70–105), pre-operatively. The deformity angle, lowest instrumented vertebral tilt (LIVT) and spinal balance were measured. Pre-operatively there were nine patients with coronal decompensation. The pre-operative thoracic curve of 80 ± 9° with the flexibility of 45 ± 11% (45 ± 11° in side-bending film) was corrected to 27 ± 10° at the most recent follow-up, showing a correction of 66% (53°) and loss of correction of 3.0% (3.7°). The pre-operative lumbar curve of 79 ± 12° with the flexibility of 62 ± 14% (30 ± 11° in side-bending film) was corrected to 33 ± 14° at the most recent follow-up [59% (46°) curve correction, 3.5% (3.0°) loss of curve correction]. The pre-operative LIVT of 30 ± 8° was corrected to 11 ± 6°, showing a correction of 62% (19°). Residual coronal decompensation was observed in three patients postoperatively. Pre-operative thoracic kyphosis of 27° (range 0–82) improved postoperatively to 31° (range 14–53). In conclusion, posterior

  8. Balancing Rigidity and Safety of Pedicle Screw Fixation via a Novel Expansion Mechanism in a Severely Osteoporotic Model

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Thomas M.; Doulgeris, James J.; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A.; Lee, William E.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    Many successful attempts to increase pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic bone have been accompanied with an increased risk of catastrophic damage to the patient. To avoid this, a single-armed expansive pedicle screw was designed to increase fixation strength while controlling postfailure damage away from the nerves surrounding the pedicle. The screw was then subsequently tested in two severely osteoporotic models: one representing trabecular bone (with and without the presence of polymethylmethacrylate) and the other representing a combination of trabecular and cortical bone. Maximum pullout strength, stiffness, energy to failure, energy to removal, and size of the resulting block damage were statistically compared among conditions. While expandable pedicle screws produced maximum pullout forces less than or comparable to standard screws, they required a higher amount of energy to be fully removed from both models. Furthermore, damage to the cortical layer in the composite test blocks was smaller in all measured directions for tests involving expandable pedicle screws than those involving standard pedicle screws. This indicates that while initial fixation may not differ in the presence of cortical bone, the expandable pedicle screw offers an increased level of postfailure stability and safety to patients awaiting revision surgery. PMID:25705655

  9. Ipsilateral Intracapsular Hip Fracture 2 Years after Fixation of Extracapsular Fracture by Dynamic Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Farhan; Nunag, Perrico; Mustafa, Abubakar; Pillai, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sustaining an intracapsular fracture in a hip which was previously fixed with dynamic hip screw for extracapsular fracture, is a very rarely reported occurrence. We present one such case in order to discuss the presentation and management of this fracture. We have also reviewed the literature and pooled the previously reported cases to look at potential cause & risk factors. Case Report: A 92 year old female, presented with new onset hip pain following a trivial injury. Couple of years back, she had sustained an extracapsular fracture on same side which was treated by DHS fixation. Further investigations confirmed a de-novo fracture which was treated by removal of DHS and cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Conclusion: This complication might not be as rare as earlier thought to be. All patients, especially elderly females who present with new onset hip pain following DHS fixation of their hip fracture previously must be evaluated for a de-novo intracapsular fracture. On confirmation of diagnosis, they can be treated by removal of dynamic hip screw and hemiarthroplasty as most of these are low demand elderly patients. PMID:27299034

  10. Efficacy of Pedicle Screw Fixation in Unstable Upper and Middle Thoracic Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Amir Abbas; Ashoori, Soudabeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of unstable upper and middle thoracic spine fractures remains controversial. There is no consensus regarding optimal treatment. Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of pedicular screw in the management of middle thoracic spine fractures to correct kyphosis and anterolisthesis and improve neurologic condition of patients. Patients and Methods: Twenty-five patients with unstable T1-T10 fractures treated with pedicle screw fixation technique were studied. Neurologic situation, preoperative and postoperative radiographs were evaluated. Radiographic measurements included kyphotic deformity and anterolisthesis. An American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale was used for neurologic classification of the patients. Results: From a total of 25 patients, 21 cases were male and 4 were female. The mean age of the patients was 35.40 ± 14.39 years. The mean degree of kyphosis improved from 27.04 ± 7.33 degrees preoperatively to 15.96 ± 5.76 degrees at final follow-up. The mean of anterolisthesis improved from 6.44 ± 4.93 mm to 0.96 ± 0.36 mm at final follow-up. Kyphosis (P = 0.0001), anterolisthesis (P = 0.0001) and neurological state (P = 0.01) improved significantly after operation. No cases of hardware failure, neurological deterioration and loss of correction were reported. Conclusions: Application of pedicular screw in unstable upper and middle thoracic spine fractures is an effective method that can correct kyphotic deformity and anterolisthesis and improve neurologic deficit. PMID:27218058

  11. The importance of trochanteric lag screws to achieve primary stability in cementless fixation of the RM hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Heitemeyer, U; Hierholzer, G; Haines, J

    1987-01-01

    To allow the bony incorporation of a cementless prosthesis it is important to achieve stability at the time of operation. To neutralize tension and torsional stresses the RM-shaft prosthesis is fixed with two lag screws in the trochanteric part of the femur. By measuring the applied torque intraoperatively we could demonstrate that the threads of the screws found a better grip when inserted from the bone to the prosthesis. Thus, the stronger fixation of the screws enhanced the primary stability of the cementless prosthesis. PMID:3566504

  12. Iliac Crest Avulsion Fracture in a Young Sprinter

    PubMed Central

    Casabianca, L.; Rousseau, R.; Loriaut, P.; Massein, A.; Mirouse, G.; Gerometta, A.; Khiami, F.

    2015-01-01

    Avulsion fracture of the iliac crest is an uncommon pathology. It usually occurs in teenagers during sport activities, more common in boys. We report a case of 16-year-old male competitive sprinter, who had an avulsion of a part of the iliac crest and the anterior-superior iliac spine during a competition. The traumatism occurred during the period of acceleration phase out of the blocks which corresponds to the maximum traction phase on the tendons. Then a total loss of function of the lower limb appears forcing him to stop the run. X-ray and CT scan confirmed the rare diagnosis of avulsion of the quasitotality of the iliac crest apophysis, corresponding to Salter 2 fracture. We performed an open reduction and internal fixation with two screws, allowing a return to sport after 3 months and his personal best record in the 100 meters at the 6th postoperative month. PMID:26421205

  13. Management of Unstable Thoracolumbar Spinal Fractures by Pedicle Screws and Rods Fixation

    PubMed Central

    B.M., Muralidhar; Hegde, Durgaprasad; Hussain, P.S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The thoracolumbar junction is the most common area of injury to the axial skeleton. Forces along the long stiff kyphotic thoracic spine switch abruptly into the mobile lordotic lumbar spine at the thoracolumbar junction. Goals of treatment are to obtain a painless, balanced, stable spine with optimum neurological function and maximum spine mobility. The present prospective study has evaluated the effectiveness of pedicle screw instrumentation in various fractures around the TL spine to overcome the complications encountered in the conservative line of management of these fractures. Materials & Methods: Thirty cases of fractures around the TL spine were operated with posterior pedicle screw fixation one or two level above and below the fracture. The cases were followed up for a mean of 9.5 months with radiological and neurological evaluation. Results: The average age groups of the patients studied were 21 to 53 years majority were males, fall from height being the predominant mode of injury involving the T12 and L1 vertebral body. The unstable burst fractures the most common type of fracture, radiological parameters sagittal angle and index were recorded pre and post-operatively. The neurological grading was done using the ASIA score. Follow-up was done for a minimum of 5 months where sagittal angle reduction achieved was 10.75 at final follow-up from 23.5 pre-operative. The sagittal index achieved at final follow-up was 72% compared to the pre-operative mean of 53%. The neurological improvement was regarded to be fair enough for the type of injury sustained and fixation achieved. Conclusion: We found that the application of posterior instrumentation using pedicle screw and rod resulted in a reasonable correction of the deformity with a significant reduction in recumbency-associated complications; the limiting factor being the small study group and short follow-up period. PMID:24701500

  14. Intraoperative Computed Tomography Navigation for Transpedicular Screw Fixation to Treat Unstable Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures. From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C. In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2–3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws. The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  15. Feasibility of absorbable plates and screws for fixation in reduction malarplasty with L-shaped osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wuyuan; Niu, Feng; Yu, Bing; Gui, Lai

    2011-03-01

    Reduction malarplasty with L-shaped osteotomy has been widely applied to correct malar prominence because of its simple manipulation, satisfactory outcome, and few complications in east Asians. Secondary surgery for the removal of titanium miniplates or microplates and screws is often needed because of the drawbacks of implants. To overcome the disadvantage, the authors applied absorbable plates and screws instead of titanium fixation system and evaluated the feasibility of them. A total of 47 women (mean age, 26.8 y) diagnosed with malar prominence were randomly selected and received L-shaped osteotomy for malar reduction from January 2008 to December 2009. Of these, 22 patients (group A) received absorbable plates and screws (Fixsorb-MX, Takiron, Japan) for fixation and 25 patients received titanium fixation system as control (group B). The outcomes were evaluated by photographs and x-ray films. The distance of the anterior protrusive point of the bilateral zygoma (Zv-Zv), the distance from the paries anterior of acoustic duct (P) to the anterior protrusive point of zygoma (P-Zv), and the angle formed by the nasion-Zv line and the P-Zv line (∠NZP) were analyzed through posteroanterior and lateral cephalograms preoperatively, 10 days postoperatively, and at 6 to 12 months of follow-up, respectively. In group A, 20 patients (90.9%) were satisfied with the outcomes compared with 92.0% in group B. No zygomatic nonunion and other complications occurred after surgery in both groups. In group A, the values of Zv-Zv and P-Zv were 88.4±1.6 and 68.6±6.8 mm at 10 days after surgery, which increased to 90.6±1.5 and 70.7±3.0 mm at 6 to 12 months of follow-up. The value of ∠NZP was 105.0±4.3 degrees at 10 days after surgery and 103.2±3.6 degrees at 6 to 12 months after surgery. In group B, the values of distance and degree maintained almost the same at different time points after surgery. The results had no significant difference between groups A and B (P>0.05). The

  16. Superior fixation of pegged trabecular metal over screw-fixed pegged porous titanium fiber mesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Lasting stability of cementless implants depends on osseointegration into the implant surface, and long-term implant fixation can be predicted using radiostereometric analysis (RSA) with short-term follow-up. We hypothesized that there would be improved fixation of high-porosity trabecular metal (TM) tibial components compared to low-porosity titanium pegged porous fiber-metal (Ti) polyethylene metal backings. Methods In a prospective, parallel-group, randomized unblinded clinical trial, we compared cementless tibial components in patients aged 70 years and younger with osteoarthritis. The pre-study sample size calculation was 22 patients per group. 25 TM tibial components were fixed press-fit by 2 hexagonal pegs (TM group) and 25 Ti tibial components were fixed press-fit and by 4 supplemental screws (Ti group). Stereo radiographs for evaluation of absolute component migration (primary effect size) and single-direction absolute component migration (secondary effect size) were obtained within the first postoperative week and at 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years. American Knee Society score was used for clinical assessment preoperatively, and at 1 and 2 years. Results There were no intraoperative complications, and no postoperative infections or revisions. All patients had improved function and regained full extension. All tibial components migrated initially. Most migration of the TM components (n = 24) occurred within the first 3 months after surgery whereas migration of the Ti components (n = 22) appeared to stabilize first after 1 year. The TM components migrated less than the Ti components at 1 year (p = 0.01) and 2 years (p = 0.004). Interpretation We conclude that the mechanical fixation of TM tibial components is superior to that of screw-fixed Ti tibial components. We expect long-term implant survival to be better with the TM tibial component. PMID:21434781

  17. Biomechanical Comparison Between Bashti Bone Plug Technique and Biodegradable Screw for Fixation of Grafts in Ligament surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashti, Kaveh; Tahmasebi, Mohammad N; Kaseb, Hasan; Farahmand, Farzam; Akbar, Mohammad; Mobini, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ligament reconstruction is a common procedure in orthopedic surgery. Although several popular techniques are currently in use, new methods are proposed for secure fixation of the tendon graft into the bone tunnel. Purposes: We sought to introduce our new technique of Bashti bone plug for fixation of soft tissue graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to compare its biomechanical features with conventional absorbable interference screw technique in a bovine model. Methods: Twenty pairs of bovine knees were harvested after death. Soft tissue was removed and the Achilles tendon was harvested to be used as an ACL graft. It was secured into the bone tunnel on the tibial side via two different methods: Bashti Bone Plug technique and conventional screw method. Biomechanical strength was measured using 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading on the graft. Pull out strength was also tested until the graft fails. Results: No graft failure was observed after 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading in either fixation methods. When testing for pull out failure, 21 tendons (53%) were torn and 19 tendons (48%) slipped out. No fixation failure occurred, which did not reveal a significant difference between the bone plug or interference screw group (P=0.11). The mean pull out force until failure of the graft was 496±66 N in the screw group and 503±67 N in the bone plug group (P=0.76). Conclusions: Our suggested fixation technique of Bashti bone plug is a native, cheap, and feasible method that provides comparable biomechanical strength with interference screw when soft tissue fixation was attempted in bovine model. PMID:25692166

  18. Porous-coated acetabular components with screw fixation. Five to ten-year results.

    PubMed

    Latimer, H A; Lachiewicz, P F

    1996-07-01

    The results of 136 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by one surgeon with the Harris-Galante-I porous-coated acetabular component were reviewed at a mean of seven years (range, five to ten years). In all hips, the outer diameter of the acetabular component was the same as the diameter of the final reamer used in the preparation of the acetabulum. However, this reamer was used only briefly at the rim of the acetabulum, and therefore the components had so-called press-fit stability. A mean of four screws (range, three to six screws) were used for additional fixation of the component. The clinical evaluation was performed with use of the Harris hip score. Standardized anteroposterior radiographs of the pelvis were assessed for migration of the component, radiolucent and radiodense lines, linear wear of the polyethylene, and osteolysis. No acetabular component had been revised for loosening and none were radiographically loose at the time of the most recent follow-up evaluation. There were no complications related to the use of the screws, and no screw had bent or broken. A non-progressive radiolucent line was seen in one acetabular zone in thirty-four hips (25 per cent) and in two acetabular zones in six hips (4 per cent). No hip had a radiolucent line in all three acetabular zones. The mean rate of linear wear of the polyethylene was 0.1 millimeter per year. There was no dissociation of the acetabular liner from the metal shell. Two hips (1 per cent) had asymptomatic osteolysis in the ischium and adjacent to the rim of the acetabular component; this was treated with grafting at the site of the lesion and exchange of the femoral head and the worn polyethylene liner. Five femoral components inserted without cement and one inserted with cement were revised because of loosening. The data suggest that, at a mean of seven years, fixation of this porous-coated component was uniformly excellent. The low prevalence of radiolucent lines and the absence of

  19. Soft tissue fixation with a cortical button and interference screw: a novel technique in foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Shinabarger, Andrew B; Manway, Jeffrey M; Nowak, Jessica; Burns, Patrick R

    2015-02-01

    Tendon transfers are commonly performed procedures in the foot and ankle. They have been described for multiple tendons and a myriad of pathologies. One issue with these procedures has always been inadequate fixation with several methods available to the surgeon. In this report, we describe a novel technique in foot and ankle surgery using a cortical button and an interference screw. PMID:25534315

  20. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Mo Lin, Ruey; Chen, Hsiang-Ho; Tsai, Kai-Jow

    2007-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block) and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1) large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2) polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3) polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment is set at large lordotic

  1. Use of a Percutaneous Pointed Reduction Clamp Before Screw Fixation to Prevent Gapping of a Fifth Metatarsal Base Fracture: A Technique Tip.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eric W; Cata, Ezequiel; Schon, Lew C

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary screw fixation has become widely accepted as the standard of care for operative treatment of Jones fractures, allowing not only accelerated rehabilitation but also reduction of the risk of repeat fracture. The unique anatomy of the fifth metatarsal--mainly its inherent lateral curvature--makes fixation technically challenging. In general, surgical fixation should be performed with the largest screw possible, in both diameter and length, which will provide the strongest possible construct. However, an increased screw length and width have been associated with complications, including lateral gapping and distraction of the fracture site and malreduction of the fracture. The use of a pointed reduction clamp is a simple, yet effective, method of preventing iatrogenic displacement and gapping at the fracture site during placement of an intramedullary screw. Percutaneous reduction and stabilization of the fracture using this technique could help limit the complications associated with large screw fixation of Jones fractures. PMID:26188626

  2. Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infected Wound following Dynamic Hip Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Nizamoglu, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an inflammatory ulcerative neutrophilic dermatosis that can occur following skin trauma. The correct diagnosis is not often made immediately as the condition can mimic an infective appearance. This leads to delays in the appropriate management of high dose steroids. Although debridement can offer aid in resolving lesions, this is contraindicated in the acute phase as this can cause acceleration of the pathogenic process. Biopsy of the lesion does not offer a definitive diagnosis; therefore suspicion must be maintained as the diagnosis is ultimately a clinical one. Any postoperative pustular ulcerative lesion not improving despite antibiotic therapy that also yields negative bacteriological and fungal studies should lead to consideration of this diagnosis. We document the first case of PG developing following intertrochanteric femur fracture fixation using dynamic hip screw. PMID:26380139

  3. Straight, semi-anatomic and anatomic TMJ implants: the influence of condylar geometry and bone fixation screws.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Completo, A; Relvas, C; Mesnard, M; Simões, J A

    2011-07-01

    A 3D finite element model of in vitro intact and implanted mandibles with different temporomandibular joints (TMJ) was analyzed. Three TMJ implant geometries were assessed. The displacements, stress and strain fields on the condyle were obtained for both simulated cases. Strains were also assessed near the screws that fixate the implant to the mandible. The geometry of the mandible was obtained through 3D digitalization of a synthetic model. The TMJ implants studied were modelled considering a commercial implant which was also used to create semi-anatomic and anatomic implants that were analyzed and to assess the influence of the geometry. Numerical finite element models were built and the implants were positioned by an experienced orofacial surgeon. All implants were fixed by four screws which were placed in the same position on the mandible. The boundary conditions were simulated considering the support on the incisive tooth, the loads of the five most important muscular forces and a 5mm mouth aperture. This study indicates that the deformation on the intact mandible was similar when an anatomic implant was considered in the implanted mandible. However, the anatomic geometry presented some problems concerning the implant integrity due to geometric variations. The geometry of TMJ implant also played a role relatively to the screws structural integration and bone fixation. The geometry of TMJ implant defines the necessary number of screws and position in the mandible fixation. PMID:20801667

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of Fusion Segment Rigidity Upon Stress at Both the Fusion and Adjacent Segments: A Comparison between Unilateral and Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of unilateral pedicle screw fixation on the fusion segment and the superior adjacent segment after one segment lumbar fusion using validated finite element models. Materials and Methods Four L3-4 fusion models were simulated according to the extent of decompression and the method of pedicle screws fixation in L3-4 lumbar fusion. These models included hemi-laminectomy with bilateral pedicle screw fixation in the L3-4 segment (BF-HL model), total laminectomy with bilateral pedicle screw fixation (BF-TL model), hemi-laminectomy with unilateral pedicle screw fixation (UF-HL model), and total laminectomy with unilateral pedicle screw fixation (UF-TL model). In each scenario, intradiscal pressures, annulus stress, and range of motion at the L2-3 and L3-4 segments were analyzed under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsional moments. Results Under four pure moments, the unilateral fixation leads to a reduction in increment of range of motion at the adjacent segment, but larger motions were noted at the fusion segment (L3-4) in the unilateral fixation (UF-HL and UF-TL) models when compared to bilateral fixation. The maximal von Mises stress showed similar patterns to range of motion at both superior adjacent L2-3 segments and fusion segment. Conclusion The current study suggests that unilateral pedicle screw fixation seems to be unable to afford sufficient biomechanical stability in case of bilateral total laminectomy. Conversely, in the case of hemi-laminectomy, unilateral fixation could be an alternative option, which also has potential benefit to reduce the stress of the adjacent segment. PMID:25048501

  5. Surgical outcome of posterior short segment trans-pedicle screw fixation for thoracolumbar fractures

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Shailendra; Sharma, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Background Vast majority of spine fractures in thoracolumbar region are unstable and often associated with neurological deficit. With the advancement of technology, these fractures are now more often managed operatively. The present study aimed at evaluating the role of open reduction & internal fixation using pedicle screws and short segment fixation in patients with Thoracic and Lumbar spine fractures. Design In this prospective study, 25 patients in age group of 15–65 years (mean age 28.25 years) with thoracolumbar fractures with associated neurological deficit or compression fractures with loss of more than 50% vertebral height or angulations more than 20° with or without neurological deficit were included. The results were evaluated based on restoration and maintenance of vertebral body height, spinal lordosis/kyphosis and evaluation of the neurological recovery which was done at regular intervals using Frankel's grading. Results The mean follow-up period was 20.3 months. The average preoperative kyphotic angle as measured by Cobbs method was 20° which improved to 7.8° following instrumentation. The average preoperative vertebral height was 58.65% which improved to 78.55% postoperatively. Preoperatively, only 20% of patients had useful paraplegia (Frankel grade D and E) while 80% had useless paraplegia (Frankel's grade C and below). Following surgery, 60% patients had useful paraplegia while 40% had useless paraplegia. Conclusion Short segment trans-pedicle posterior fixation is helpful for not only stabilization of the fractures and restoration of anatomy, but also maintaining the same over a period with good functional outcome. PMID:24396235

  6. Analysis of the Stress and Displacement Distribution of Inferior Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Injuries Repaired with Screw Fixation: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qinghua; Zhang, Kun; Zhuang, Yan; Li, Zhong; Yu, Bin; Pei, Guoxian

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of syndesmosis injuries have concentrated on cadaver models. However, they are unable to obtain exact data regarding the stress and displacement distribution of various tissues, and it is difficult to compare models. We investigated the biomechanical effects of inferior tibiofibular syndesmosis injuries (ITSIs) and screw fixation on the ankle using the finite element (FE) method. Methodology/Principal Findings A three-dimensional model of a healthy ankle complex was developed using computed tomography (CT) images. We established models of an ITSI and of screw fixation at the plane 2.5 cm above and parallel to the tibiotalar joint surface of the injured syndesmosis. Simulated loads were applied under three conditions: neutral position with single-foot standing and internal and external rotation of the ankle. ITSI reduced contact forces between the talus and fibula, helped periarticular ankle ligaments withstand more load-resisting movement, and increased the magnitude of displacement at the lower extreme of the tibia and fibula. ITSI fixation with a syndesmotic screw reduced contact forces in all joints, decreased the magnitude of displacement at the lower extreme of the tibia and fibula, and increased crural interosseous membrane stress. Conclusions/significance Severe syndesmosis injuries cause stress and displacement distribution of the ankle to change multidirectional ankle instability and should be treated by internal fixation. Though the transverse syndesmotic screw effectively stabilizes syndesmotic diastasis, it also changes stress distribution around the ankle and decreases the joint's range of motion (ROM). Therefore, fixation should not be performed for a long period of time because it is not physiologically suitable for the ankle joint. PMID:24312464

  7. Comparison of Surgical Outcomes Between Short-Segment Open and Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques for Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Yaohua; Dong, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes between open pedicle screw fixation (OPSF) and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPSF) for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures, which has received scant research attention to date. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eight-four patients with acute and subacute thoracolumbar fractures who were treated with SSPSF from January 2013 to June 2014 at the Changzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Changzhou, China) were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 4 groups: the OPSF with 4 basic screws (OPSF-4) group, the OPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (OPSF-6) group, the PPSF with 4 basic screws (PPSF-4) group, and the PPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (PPSF-6) group. The intraoperative, immediate postoperative, and over 1-year follow-up outcomes were evaluated and compared among these groups. RESULTS Blood loss in the PPSF-4 group and the PPSF-6 group was significantly less than in the OPSF-4 group and the OPSF-6 group (P<0.05). The OPSF-6 group exhibited significantly higher immediate postoperative correction percentage of anterior column height of fractured vertebra than the other 3 groups (P<0.05), and higher correction of sagittal regional Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of injured vertebra than in the PPSF-4 and -6 groups (P<0.05). In addition, there was no significant difference in the correction loss of percentage of anterior column height, and loss of sagittal Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of fractured vertebrae at final follow-up among the 4 groups (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS OPSF with 6 screws had an advantage in the correction of injured vertebral height and kyphosis, and PPSF reduced the intraoperative blood loss of patients. PMID:27602557

  8. The effect of screws and pegs on the initial fixation stability of an uncemented unicondylar knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A D; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Two uncemented unicompartmental tibial components were examined for initial fixation stability. A conventional design that employed a single posteriorly angled peg was compared with a new design that was held in place by cancellous bone screws. The components were implanted into the medial condyles of 12 preserved human tibiae, and a cyclic load was first applied anteromedially and then posteromedially. The screwed implants failed at significantly higher loads (1634.8 +/- 121.6 N, mean +/- standard error of the mean) than the pegged implants (1103.3 +/- 152.0 N). On application of a 19.6-N preload, the screwed implants moved significantly less than the pegged implants. Although the differences in micromotion and subsidence were not always significant, there were definite trends. The screwed implants had much lower levels of temporary and permanent displacement compared with the pegged implants for all load levels from the initial load of 245.2 N up to and including the failure load. When the motion that resulted from moving the load from the anterior position to the posterior position was examined, the screwed implant's average total motion was less than 10 microns compared with almost 135 microns for the pegged implant after the 245.2-N load cycle. For the cycle before failure, the screwed implant's average motion increased to less than 29 microns, whereas the pegged implant's average total motion was almost 354 microns. From this information it appears clear that screws provide better initial fixation stability than angled pegs for uncemented unicondylar tibial components. PMID:2208852

  9. Effect of zoledronate acid treatment on osseointegration and fixation of implants in autologous iliac bone grafts in ovariectomized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Qi, Mengchun; Hu, Jing; Li, Jianping; Li, Jinyuan; Dong, Wei; Feng, Xiaojie; Yu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    One main problem associated with alveolar bone augmentation in implant dentistry is resorption of grafted bone, which may be further compromised by systemic skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis. Zoledronate acid (ZOL) is the most potent bisphosphonate to treat osteoporosis and therefore it is hypothesized to be able to invert the negative effect of osteoporosis on osseointegration and fixation of dental implants in autologous bone grafts. In this study, 56 rabbits received bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) (40 rabbits) or sham operation (16 rabbits). Three months later, 8 animals from each group were sacrificed for bone mineral density (BMD) examination. Then the remaining animals underwent bilateral autologous iliac bone grafting with simultaneous implantation of titanium implants in tibiae and were divided into 5 groups (n=8): Sham, OVX, Loc-ZOL (local treatment), Sys-ZOL (systemic treatment) and Loc+Sys-ZOL (local plus systemic) group. At 3 months after implantation, all animals were sacrificed and specimens were harvested for examinations. Both BMD and histological examinations of femurs showed osteoporotic changes after ovariectomy, while systemic treatment with ZOL restored mineralized bone. Micro-CT examination demonstrated that OVX group showed significant decrease of mineralized bone and implant-bone contact when compared with sham control, whereas both systemic and local treatments of ZOL significantly increased mineralized bone and implant-bone contact in ovariectomized animals. However, the best effects were observed in Loc+Sys-ZOL group (combined use of ZOL) and most of bone indices were similar to (IBCR, p>0.05) or higher than (BV/TV, Conn.D and Tb.N) (p<0.01) those of the sham group, except Tb.Th, which was still significantly lower (p<0.01), and Tb.Sp, which was further decreased (p<0.01). The aforementioned effects were also confirmed by histomorphometric analysis of bone indices on implant-bone contact and mineralized bone. In addition, biomechanical

  10. Minimally Invasive Multilevel Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation for Lumbar Spinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Son, Seong; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Woo Kyung

    2012-01-01

    Objective There are rare reports on the result of multilevel (≥3 levels) percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPF). The purpose of this study was to report the clinical experiences for multilevel PPF of the lumbar spine. Methods A total of 17 patients of lumbar spinal disease (7 degenerative diseases, 6 infectious diseases, and 4 traumatic instabilities) underwent neural decompression and multilevel PPF. There were 8 men and 9 women with a mean age of 61.4 years (range, 25-84) and a mean follow-up period of 23.2 months (range, 13-48). The average PPF level was 3.7. A retrospective review of clinical, radiological, and surgical data was conducted. Results "Excellent" or "good" clinical results were obtained in 15 patients (88.2%) according to the Odom's criteria. The average improvement of visual analogue scale was 5.2 points (from 9.3 to 4.1), and the average improvement of Oswestry Disability Index was 36.2 (from 71.2 to 35.0) at the last visit (p<0.05). The fusion rate was 88.2%, but, screw loosening was occurred in 2 patients, and adjacent segmental degeneration was occurred in 2 patients. There was no statistical significance in the change of total lumbar lordotic angle. The average operation time was 5.9 hours, with an estimated blood loss of 550 ml and bed rest duration of 2.0 days. Conclusion Although the current study examined a small sample with relatively short term follow up periods, our study results demonstrate that multilevel PPF is feasible and safe for selective lumbar spinal diseases. PMID:25983845

  11. [Sacroiliac fixation: a new technique after pelvic trauma].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E; Levassor, N; Rillardon, L; Lavelle, G; Guigui, P

    2003-12-01

    We propose a new technique for sacroiliac fixation for the treatment of pelvic fracture with vertical and horizontal instability (Tile class C). This fixation technique allows control of vertical displacement while allowing, if needed, a certain degree of movement in the horizontal plane to facilitate reduction of anterior lesions. The technique involves insertion of two sacral screws, one in S1 and one in S2, and two iliac screws. The iliac screws are inserted in the posterior iliac crest through two sacroiliac connectors placed on a rod linking the two sacral screws. Vertical displacement is controlled by blocking the screw heads on the connecting rod. If needed, a certain degree of horizontal mobility of the half pelvis can be allowed by loosening the connectors on the rods. This technique was used for 4 patients. Anatomic reduction was achieved and no secondary movement of the osteosynthesis material nor secondary displacement were observed. The quality of the fixation allowed rapid weight bearing in the standing position and early walking without crutches. This type of fixation can only be used for type C12 fractures in the Tile classification. PMID:14726839

  12. Treatment of Displaced Sacroiliac Fracture Using the Lateral Window for Short Plate Buttress Reduction and Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin G; Gill, James R; Carrothers, Andrew D; Hull, Peter D

    2016-04-01

    Fractures through the sacroiliac joint are very challenging to treat, technically difficult to reduce through closed methods on account of the multiaxial displacement of fractures fragments, frequently occur in very unwell patients, and have poor outcomes if malreduction is present. We describe a technique utilising the lateral window and a short buttress plate to reduce and stabilize the fragments prior to percutaneous fixation with sacroiliac screws. PMID:27200398

  13. Treatment of Displaced Sacroiliac Fracture Using the Lateral Window for Short Plate Buttress Reduction and Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Colin G.; Gill, James R.; Carrothers, Andrew D.; Hull, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Fractures through the sacroiliac joint are very challenging to treat, technically difficult to reduce through closed methods on account of the multiaxial displacement of fractures fragments, frequently occur in very unwell patients, and have poor outcomes if malreduction is present. We describe a technique utilising the lateral window and a short buttress plate to reduce and stabilize the fragments prior to percutaneous fixation with sacroiliac screws. PMID:27200398

  14. “NIMS technique” for minimally invasive spinal fixation using non-fenestrated pedicle screws: A technical note

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, Alugolu; Pelluru, Pavan Kumar; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Case series. Objective: To reduce the cost of minimally invasive spinal fixation. Background: Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery is an upcoming modality of managing a multitude of spinal pathologies. However, in a resource-limited situations, using fenestrated screws (FSs) may prove very costly for patients with poor affordability. We here in describe the Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences (NIMS) experience of using routine non-FSs (NFSs) for transpedicular fixation by the minimally invasive way to bridge the economic gap. Materials and Methods: A total of 7 patients underwent NFS-minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery. Male to female distribution was 6:1. The average blood loss was 50 ml and the mean operating time was 2 and 1/2 h. All patients were mobilized the very next day after confirming the position of implants on X-ray/computed tomography. Results: All 7 patients are doing well in follow-up with no complaints of a backache or fresh neurological deficits. There was no case with pedicle breach or screw pullout. The average cost of a single level fixation by FS and NFS was ₹1, 30,000/patient and ₹32,000/patient respectively (‘2166 and ‘530, respectively). At the end of 1-year follow-up, we had two cases of screw cap loosening and with a displacement of the rod cranio-caudally in one case which was revised through the same incisions. Conclusions: Transpedicular fixation by using NFS for thoracolumbar spinal pathologies is a cost-effective extension of MIS surgery. This may extend the benefits to a lower socioeconomic group who cannot afford the cost of fenestrated screw (FS). PMID:26692692

  15. Hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate-coated cups with and without screw fixation: a randomized study of 64 hips.

    PubMed

    Thanner, J; Kärrholm, J; Herberts, P; Malchau, H

    2000-06-01

    Sixty-two patients (64 hips) were provided with porous press-fit cups (Trilogy), plasma-sprayed with a coating consisting of 70% hydroxyapatite and 30% tricalcium phosphate. The patients were randomized to a cup with cluster holes for adjunctive screw fixation (n = 30) or to a cup without holes (n = 34). Radiostereometry was used to study migration and wear. Up to 2 years median translations and rotations <0.2 mm and <0.2 degrees were recorded in the 2 groups, without any difference. The median annual proximal wear (0.11 and 0.12 mm) was within the expected range despite the use of a ceramic coating, and it did not differ between the 2 designs. Radiolucent lines were frequently seen postoperatively but diminished during the follow-up without any sign of migration into the gaps. At 2 years, the median Harris scores were 99 points (range, 51-100 points) in the group with and 98 points (range, 69-100 points) in the group without screws. The results indicate that early fixation can be achieved for ceramic-coated press-fit cups without using additional screw fixation. PMID:10884197

  16. Biomechanical Comparison of Spinal Fusion Methods Using Interspinous Process Compressor and Pedicle Screw Fixation System Based on Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jisoo; Kim, Sohee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biomechanical effects of a newly proposed Interspinous Process Compressor (IPC) and compare with pedicle screw fixation at surgical and adjacent levels of lumbar spine. Methods A three dimensional finite element model of intact lumbar spine was constructed and two spinal fusion models using pedicle screw fixation system and a new type of interspinous devices, IPC, were developed. The biomechanical effects such as range of motion (ROM) and facet contact force were analyzed at surgical level (L3/4) and adjacent levels (L2/3, L4/5). In addition, the stress in adjacent intervertebral discs (D2, D4) was investigated. Results The entire results show biomechanical parameters such as ROM, facet contact force, and stress in adjacent intervertebral discs were similar between PLIF and IPC models in all motions based on the assumption that the implants were perfectly fused with the spine. Conclusion The newly proposed fusion device, IPC, had similar fusion effect at surgical level, and biomechanical effects at adjacent levels were also similar with those of pedicle screw fixation system. However, for clinical applications, real fusion effect between spinous process and hooks, duration of fusion, and influence on spinous process need to be investigated through clinical study. PMID:26962413

  17. A comparative study of pedicle screw fixation in dorsolumbar spine by freehand versus image-assisted technique: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Archit; Chauhan, Vijendra; Singh, Deepa; Shailendra, Raghuvanshi; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Juyal, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Background: New and expensive technology such as three-dimensional computer assisted surgery is being used for pedicle screw fixation in dorsolumbar spine. Their availability, expenses and amount of radiation exposure are issues in a developing country. On the contrary, freehand technique of pedicle screw placement utilizes anatomic landmarks and tactile palpation without fluoroscopy or navigation to place pedicle screws. The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare the accuracy of freehand and image-assisted technique to place pedicle screws in the dorsolumbar spine of cadavers by an experienced surgeon and a resident. Evaluation was done using dissection of pedicle and computed tomography (CT) imaging. Materials and Methods: Ten cadaveric dorsolumbar spines were exposed by a posterior approach. Titanium pedicle screws were inserted from D5 to L5 vertebrae by freehand and image-assisted technique on either side by an experienced surgeon and a resident. CT was obtained. A blinded radiologist reviewed the imaging. The spines were then dissected to do a macroscopic examination. Screws, having evidence of cortical perforation of more than 2 mm on CT, were considered to be a significant breach. Results: A total of 260 pedicle screws were placed. The surgeon and the resident placed 130 screws each. Out of 130 screws, both of them placed 65 screws each by freehand and image- assisted technique each. The resident had a rate of 7.69% significant medial and 10.76% significant lateral breach with freehand technique while with image-assisted had a rate of 3.07% significant medial and 9.23% significant lateral breach. The expert surgeon had a rate of 6.15% significant medial and 1.53% significant lateral breach with freehand technique while with image-assisted had a rate of 3.07% significant medial and 6.15% significant lateral breach on CT evaluation. Conclusion: Freehand technique is as good as the image-assisted technique. Under appropriate supervision, residents

  18. Clinical outcome of arthrodesis of the ankle using rigid internal fixation with cancellous screws.

    PubMed

    Monroe, M T; Beals, T C; Manoli, A

    1999-04-01

    Thirty consecutive patients underwent arthrodesis of the ankle using rigid internal fixation with cancellous screws between 1992 and 1996. One patient died of causes unrelated to the surgery before bony union. Primary fusion occurred in 27 of the remaining 29 patients (93%). The average time to primary union was 9 weeks. Two patients developed a delayed union and were treated with an additional bone-grafting procedure. Ultimately, each of the 29 patients went on to fusion. Use of tobacco during the postoperative period had no apparent effect on the rate of fusion or time to fusion. Twenty-five patients were available for clinical evaluation at an average of 24 months after surgery. Subjective evaluation using questionnaires revealed a high level of satisfaction. All patients stated that they would undergo the procedure again. The mean postoperative score on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale was 81 points, compared with 48 points preoperatively (of a possible 100). Constant pain was the reason given by all patients for seeking treatment. After the arthrodesis, pain was reported as absent in 13 and occasional in 12 patients. All patients noted less pain in the hindfoot after fusion of the ankle. Active litigation and Workers' Compensation claims during the perioperative period had a significant negative effect on scores on the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale and seemed to decrease patients' perceived ability to return to work. PMID:10229278

  19. When Planning Screw Fracture Fixation Why the 5.5 mm Screw is the Goldilocks Screw. An Observational Computer Tomographic Study of Fifth Metatarsal Bone Anatomy in a Sample of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Iselin, Lukas D.; Ramawat, Sunil; Hanratty, Brian; Klammer, Georg; Stavrou, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We wanted to verify our clinical experience that the 5.5 mm screw was ideal in the majority of fifth metatarsal fracture fixation. The size of a screw is important for the successful surgical treatment of these fractures in order to obtain the maximal stability while reducing the risk for iatrogenic fracture. A sample of patients undergoing computer tomographic imaging of the foot for investigation other than fifth metatarsal pathology were recruited. The parameters of the fifth metatarsal bone anatomy were measured. These parameters of the 5.5 mm screw were correlated with this data. The upper parameter (the diameter of the threads) was 5.5 and the lower parameter (the diameter of the shank) was 4.0 mm. Twenty seven patients were recruited. The proximal third internal diameter ranged from 3.6 to 7.0 mm with a mean of 5.0 mm. 93% of the metatarsals could easily accommodate the 5.5 mm screw. Two of the metatarsals had an internal diameter of < 4 mm (7%). It is our belief that the 5.5 mm screw may be used safely in the majority of patients with fifth metatarsal fractures. PMID:25950685

  20. Impact of Different Screw Designs on Durability of Fracture Fixation: In Vitro Study with Cyclic Loading of Scaphoid Bones

    PubMed Central

    Gruszka, Dominik; Herr, Robert; Hely, Hans; Hofmann, Peer; Klitscher, Daniela; Hofmann, Alexander; Rommens, Pol Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of new headless compression screws (HCSs) for scaphoid fixation is growing, but the nonunion rate has remained constant. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of fixation resulting from four modern HCSs using a simulated fracture model to determine the optimal screw design(s). Methods We tested 40 fresh-frozen cadaver scaphoids treated with the Acumed Acutrak 2 mini (AA), the KLS Martin HBS2 midi (MH), the Stryker TwinFix (ST) and the Synthes HCS 3.0 with a long thread (SH). The bones with simulated fractures and implanted screws were loaded uniaxially into flexion for 2000 cycles with a constant bending moment of 800 Nmm. The angulation of the fracture fragments was measured continuously. Data were assessed statistically using the univariate ANOVA test and linear regression analysis, and the significance level was set at p < 0.05. Results The median angulation of bone fragments φ allowed by each screw was 0.89° for AA, 1.12° for ST, 1.44° for SH and 2.36° for MH. With regards to linear regression, the most reliable curve was achieved by MH, with a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.827. This was followed by AA (R2 = 0.354), SH (R2 = 0.247) and ST (R2 = 0.019). Data assessed using an adapted ANOVA model showed no statistically significant difference (p = 0.291) between the screws. Conclusions The continuous development of HCSs has resulted in very comparable implants, and thus, at this time, other factors, such as surgeons’ experience, ease of handling and price, should be taken into consideration. PMID:26741807

  1. CT-based morphometric analysis of C1 laminar dimensions: C1 translaminar screw fixation is a feasible technique for salvage of atlantoaxial fusions

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Andrew; Lu, Derek; Lu, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Translaminar screw fixation has become an alternative in the fixation of the axial and subaxial cervical spine. We report utilization of this approach in the atlas as a salvage technique for atlantoaxial stabilization when C1 lateral mass screws are precluded. To assess the feasibility of translaminar fixation at the atlas, we have characterized the dimensions of the C1 lamina in the general adult population using computed tomography (CT)-based morphometry. Methods: A 46-year-old male with symptomatic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum underwent bilateral C1 and C2 translaminar screw/rod fixation as C1 lateral mass fixation was precluded by an anomalous vertebral artery. The follow-up evaluation 2½ years postoperatively revealed an asymptomatic patient without recurrent neck/shoulder pain or clinical signs of instability. To better assess the feasibility of utilizing this approach in the general population, we retrospectively analyzed 502 consecutive cervical CT scans performed over a 3-month period in patients aged over 18 years at a single institution. Measurements of C1 bicortical diameter, bilateral laminar length, height, and angulation were performed. Laminar and screw dimensions were compared to assess instrumentation feasibility. Results: Review of CT imaging found that 75.9% of C1 lamina had a sufficient bicortical diameter, and 63.7% of C1 lamina had sufficient height to accept bilateral translaminar screw placement. Conclusions: CT-based measurement of atlas morphology in the general population revealed that a majority of C1 lamina had sufficient dimensions to accept translaminar screw placement. Although these screws appear to be a feasible alternative when lateral mass screws are precluded, further research is required to determine if they provide comparable fixation strength versus traditional instrumentation methods. PMID:26005585

  2. The Use of Percutaneous Lumbar Fixation Screws for Bilateral Pedicle Fractures with an Associated Dislocation of a Lumbar Disc Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William D.; Harrison, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Case report. Objective. To identify a safe technique for salvage surgery following complications of total disc replacement. Summary of Background Data. Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) is considered by some as the gold standard for discogenic back pain. Revision techniques for TDR and their complications are in their infancy. This case describes a successful method of fixation for this complex presentation. Methods and Results. A 48-year-old male with lumbar degenerative disc disease and no comorbidities. Approximately two weeks postoperatively for a TDR, the patient represented with acute severe back pain and the TDR polyethylene inlay was identified as dislocated anteriorly. Subsequent revision surgery failed immediately as the polyethylene inlay redislocated intraoperatively. Further radiology identified bilateral pedicle fractures, previously unseen on the plain films. The salvage fusion of L5/S1 reutilized the anterior approach with an interbody fusion cage and bone graft. The patient was then turned intraoperatively and redraped. The percutaneous pedicle screws were used to fix L5 to the sacral body via the paracoccygeal corridor. Conclusion. The robust locking screw in the percutaneous screw allowed a complete fixation of the pedicle fractures. At 3-year followup, the patient has an excellent result and has returned to playing golf. PMID:24294533

  3. Long-term porous-coated cup survivorship using spikes, screws, and press-fitting for initial fixation.

    PubMed

    Engh, Charles A; Hopper, Robert H; Engh, C Anderson

    2004-10-01

    This study examined the long-term outcome of a single institution's experience with 4,289 primary total hip arthroplasties using hemispheric porous-coated cups. Initial fixation was achieved with spikes (255 AML TriSpike cups), by press-fitting with rim screws (427 Arthropor cups) or by press-fitting the component (83 Harris-Galante, 391 ACS Triloc+, 2,537 Duraloc, and 596 Pinnacle cups). Among 203 revised hips, only 18 cups were found to be loose at the time of revision. Using revision for any reason as an end point, 15-year survivorship was 82.9% +/- 5.6% (95% confidence interval) for spiked components, 71.6% +/- 8.5% for press-fit cups with adjunctive rim screws, and 72.0% +/- 12.6% for press-fit components (P<.001, log rank). Using revision for aseptic loosening as an end point, 15-year survivorship was 94.7% +/- 3.4% for spiked cups, 98.4% +/- 1.9% for press-fit cups with screws and 100% +/- 0.1% for press-fit cups. Despite an increasing incidence of polyethylene wear-related revisions, porous-coated acetabular components have demonstrated excellent long-term fixation. PMID:15457419

  4. Stability of bicortical screw versus plate fixation after mandibular setback with the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Moraissi, E A M; Ellis, E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is no difference in skeletal stability between bicortical screw and miniplate fixation after mandibular setback surgery with the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO). A systematic and electronic search of several databases with specific key words, a reference search, and a manual search through September 2014 was performed. The inclusion criteria encompassed clinical human studies, including randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), and retrospective studies, with the aim of comparing bicortical screw fixation to miniplate fixation after mandibular setback with the BSSO. Changes in both linear (horizontal and vertical) and angular measurements (SNB and mandibular plane) were analyzed. The initial PubMed search identified 317 studies, of which seven met the inclusion criteria-one RCT, four CCTs, and two retrospective studies. Bicortical screw fixation was found to provide slightly better skeletal stability than miniplate fixation after setback with the BSSO, but the difference was not statistically significant. The results of this meta-analysis support the hypothesis that there is no statistically significant difference in skeletal stability between bicortical screw fixation and plate fixation of the BSSO when used for mandibular setback. PMID:26474933

  5. Massive osteochondritis of the lateral femoral condyle associated with discoid meniscus: management with meniscoplasty, rim stabilization and bioabsorbable screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Camathias, Carlo; Rutz, Erich; Gaston, Mark S

    2012-09-01

    Discoid menisci without tears and before surgical intervention may be an aetiological factor in the development of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). We present the case of a massive OCD lesion in the lateral femoral condyle of a 12-year-old boy who presented with relatively few symptoms despite the size of the lesion. This was treated with meniscoplasty and rim stabilization, which has become established as the gold standard treatment for symptomatic discoid menisci. This was combined with bioabsorbable screw fixation of the OCD lesion, resulting in rapid resolution of symptoms and a return to normal magnetic resonance image appearances after 6 months. It is likely that instability of discoid menisci is a key causal component when present concurrently with OCD lesions. Therefore, stabilization of this is required as well as saucerization of the meniscus. OCD lesions which are of a sufficient size such that if they became unstable or dislocated would result in a significant defect should also be stabilized. We believe that bioabsorbable screw fixation presents a good solution for fixation in these cases and this combination of treatment should result in a satisfactory outcome. PMID:21817923

  6. An Unexpected Complication after Headless Compression Screw Fixation of an Osteochondral Fracture of Patella

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğmuş, Suavi; Keçeci, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated complications associated with implant depth in headless compression screw treatment of an osteochondral fracture associated with a traumatic patellar dislocation in a 21-year-old woman. Computed tomography and X-rays showed one lateral fracture fragment measuring 25 × 16 mm. Osteosynthesis was performed with two headless compression screws. Five months later, the screws were removed because of patella-femoral implant friction. We recommend that the screw heads be embedded to a depth of at least 3 mm below the cartilage surface. Further clinical studies need to examine the variation in cartilage thickness in the fracture fragment. PMID:27051547

  7. Failure of intertrochanteric fracture fixation with a dynamic hip screw in relation to pre-operative fracture stability and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Y; Han, C H; Park, J I; Kim, J Y

    2001-01-01

    We have reviewed 178 intertrochanteric fractures treated by dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation between March 1995 and December 1999 and followed for a minimum of 1 year. We used Singh's classification of the trabecular bone structure in the proximal femur as a measure of osteoporosis and also classified the fractures according to three different systems (Boyd-Griffin, Evans, AO). The postoperative radiographs were examined for loss of reduction, i.e. varus angulation >100, perforation of the femoral head, more than 20-mm extrusion of a lag screw or metal failure. We found 49 cases which showed radiographic failures. Two were stable fractures and 47 unstable fractures (Evans' classification). Unstable fractures with osteoporosis had a failure rate of more than 50%. In such cases DHS should not be the first choice for treatment. PMID:11820441

  8. Scar due to skin incision for screw fixation through the transbuccal approach after sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Muto, Toshitaka

    2012-05-01

    Most rigid fixation techniques after sagittal split ramus osteotomies of the mandible involve the transbuccal approach. A skin incision in the cheek carries with it possible undesirable sequelae, such as noticeable scarring. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is scarring in the face after this technique. For screw insertion, a 5-mm stab incision was performed on 40 Japanese patients (20 men and 20 women) with class III occlusion. After surgery, gross examination (via the naked eyes) of the skin incision was performed monthly for 1 year by the same oral surgeon. In all cases, the skin incision had disappeared by 1 year after the surgery. PMID:22627425

  9. 3D Mapping of Safe and Danger Zones in the Maxilla and Mandible for the Placement of Intermaxillary Fixation Screws

    PubMed Central

    Purmal, Kathiravan; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Pohchi, Abdullah; Abdul Razak, Noor Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Intermaxillary (IMF) screws feature several advantages over other devices used for intermaxillary fixation, but using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans to determine the safe and danger zones to place these devices for all patients can be expensive. This study aimed to determine the optimal interradicular and buccopalatal/buccolingual spaces for IMF screw placement in the maxilla and mandible. The CBCT volumetric data of 193 patients was used to generate transaxial slices between the second molar on the right to the second molar on the left in both arches. The mean interradicular and buccopalatal/buccolingual distances and standard deviation values were obtained at heights of 2, 5, 8 and 11 mm from the alveolar bone crest. An IMF screw with a diameter of 1.0 mm and length of 7 mm can be placed distal to the canines (2 - 11 mm from the alveolar crest) and less than 8 mm between the molars in the maxilla. In the mandible, the safest position is distal to the first premolar (more than 5 mm) and distal to the second premolar (more than 2 mm). There was a significant difference (p<0.05) between the right and left quadrants. The colour coding 3D template showed the safe and danger zones based on the mesiodistal, buccopalatal and buccolingual distances in the maxilla and mandible.The safest sites for IMF screw insertion in the maxilla were between the canines and first premolars and between the first and second molars. In the mandible, the safest sites were between the first and second premolars and between the second premolar and first molar. However, the IMF screw should not exceed 1.0 mm in diameter and 7 mm in length. PMID:24367643

  10. Posterior Titanium Screw Fixation without Debridement of Infected Tissue for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spontaneous Pyogenic Spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Nasi, Davide; Nocchi, Niccolo; Di Rienzo, Alessandro; di Somma, Lucia; Colasanti, Roberto; Vaira, Carmela; Benigni, Roberta; Liverotti, Valentina; Scerrati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose The aim of our study was to analyze the safety and effectiveness of posterior pedicle screw fixation for treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis (PSD) without formal debridement of the infected tissue. Overview of Literature Posterior titanium screw fixation without formal debridement of the infected tissue and anterior column reconstruction for the treatment of PSD is still controversial. Methods From March 2008 to June 2013, 18 patients with PSD underwent posterior titanium fixation with or without decompression, according to their neurological deficit. Postero-lateral fusion with allograft transplantation alone or bone graft with both the allogenic bone and the autologous bone was also performed. The outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and the Frankel grading system for neurological status. Normalization both of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was adopted as criterion for discontinuation of antibiotic therapy and infection healing. Segmental instability and fusion were also analyzed. Results At the mean follow-up time of 30.16 months (range, 24–53 months), resolution of spinal infection was achieved in all patients. The mean CRP before surgery was 14.32±7.9 mg/dL, and at the final follow-up, the mean CRP decreased to 0.5±0.33 mg/dL (p <0.005). Follow-up computed tomography scan at 12 months after surgery revealed solid fusion in all patients. The VAS before surgery was 9.16±1.29 and at the final follow-up, it improved to 1.38±2.03, which was statistically significant (p <0.05). Eleven patients out of eighteen (61.11%) with initial neurological impairment had an average improvement of 1.27 grades at the final follow-up documented with the Frankel grading system. Conclusions Posterior screw fixation with titanium instrumentation was safe and effective in terms of stability and restoration of neurological impairment. Fixation also rapidly reduced back pain

  11. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of a "carrot-stick" spinal fracture in an elderly man with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Huwart, Laurent; Amoretti, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of percutaneous fixation of a "carrot-stick" spinal fracture in an elderly patient with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A surgical stabilization was not possible in this 83-year-old man with comorbidities. Under local anesthesia, percutaneous screw fixation of a transdiscal shear fracture at the level T10-T11 was performed using computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance. Two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix facet joints using transfacet pedicle pathway. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 10, preoperatively, to 1 after the procedure. Radiographic fusion was observed at a 3-month post-procedural CT scan. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of spinal fractures could potentially be an alternative to surgery in elderly AS patients with poor performance status. PMID:23842576

  12. Posterior Interspinous Fusion Device for One-Level Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease : Comparison with Pedicle Screw Fixation - Preliminary Report of at Least One Year Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jung; Chun, Hyoung Joon; Oh, Suck Jun; Kang, Tae Hoon; Yang, Moon Sool

    2012-01-01

    Objective Transpedicular screw fixation has some disadvantages such as postoperative back pain through wide muscle dissection, long operative time, and cephalad adjacent segmental degeneration (ASD). The purposes of this study are investigation and comparison of radiological and clinical results between interspinous fusion device (IFD) and pedicle screw. Methods From Jan. 2008 to Aug. 2009, 40 patients underwent spinal fusion with IFD combined with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). In same study period, 36 patients underwent spinal fusion with pedicle screw fixation as control group. Dynamic lateral radiographs, visual analogue scale (VAS), and Korean version of the Oswestry disability index (K-ODI) scores were evaluated in both groups. Results The lumbar spine diseases in the IFD group were as followings; spinal stenosis in 26, degenerative spondylolisthesis in 12, and intervertebral disc herniation in 2. The mean follow up period was 14.24 months (range; 12 to 22 months) in the IFD group and 18.3 months (range; 12 to 28 months) in pedicle screw group. The mean VAS scores was preoperatively 7.16±2.1 and 8.03±2.3 in the IFD and pedicle screw groups, respectively, and improved postoperatively to 1.3±2.9 and 1.2±3.2 in 1-year follow ups (p<0.05). The K-ODI was decreased significantly in an equal amount in both groups one year postoperatively (p<0.05). The statistics revealed a higher incidence of ASD in pedicle screw group than the IFD group (p=0.029). Conclusion Posterior IFD has several advantages over the pedicle screw fixation in terms of skin incision, muscle dissection and short operative time and less intraoperative estimated blood loss. The IFD with PLIF may be a favorable technique to replace the pedicle screw fixation in selective case. PMID:23133725

  13. Is a Sliding Hip Screw or IM Nail the Preferred Implant for Intertrochanteric Fracture Fixation?

    PubMed Central

    Aros, Brian; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to determine whether patients who sustain an intertrochanteric fracture have better outcomes when stabilized using a sliding hip screw or an intramedullary nail. A 20% sample of Part A and B entitled Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older was used to generate a cohort of patients who sustained intertrochanteric femur fractures between 1999 and 2001. Two fracture implant groups, intramedullary nail and sliding hip screw, were identified using Current Procedural Terminology and International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes. The cohort consisted of 43,659 patients. Patients treated with an intramedullary nail had higher rates of revision surgery during the first year than those treated with a sliding hip screw (7.2% intramedullary nail versus 5.5% sliding hip screw). Mortality rates at 30 days (14.2% intramedullary nail versus 15.8% sliding hip screw) and 1 year (30.7% intramedullary nail versus 32.5% sliding hip screw) were similar. Adjusted secondary outcome measures showed significant increases in the intramedullary nail group relative to the sliding hip screw group for index hospital length of stay, days of rehabilitation services in the first 6 months after discharge, and total expenditures for doctor and hospital services. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18465180

  14. Is a single anterolateral screw-plate fixation sufficient for the treatment of spinal fractures in the thoracolumbar junction? A biomechanical in vitro investigation.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Bence, Tibor; Grupp, Thomas; Steinhauser, Erwin; Mückley, Thomas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Beisse, Rudolf

    2005-03-01

    Controversy exists about the indications, advantages and disadvantages of various surgical techniques used for anterior interbody fusion of spinal fractures in the thoracolumbar junction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stabilizing effect of an anterolateral and thoracoscopically implantable screw-plate system. Six human bisegmental spinal units (T12-L2) were used for the biomechanical in vitro testing procedure. Each specimen was tested in three different scenarios: (1) intact spinal segments vs (2) monosegmental (T12/L1) anterolateral fixation (macsTL, Aesculap, Germany) with an interbody bone strut graft from the iliac crest after both partial corpectomy (L1) and discectomy (T12/L1) vs (3) bisegmental anterolateral instrumentation after extended partial corpectomy (L1), and bisegmental discectomy (T12/L1 and L1/L2). Specimens were loaded with an alternating, nondestructive maximum bending moment of +/-7.5 Nm in six directions: flexion/extension, right and left lateral bending, and right and left axial rotation. Motion analysis was performed by a contact-less three-dimensional optical measuring system. Segmental stiffness of the three different scenarios was evaluated by the relative alteration of the intervertebral angles in the three main anatomical planes. With each stabilization technique, the specimens were more rigid, compared with the intact spine, for flexion/extension (sagittal plane) as well as in left and right lateral bending (frontal plane). In these planes the bisegmental instrumentation compared to the monosegmental case had an even larger stiffening effect on the specimens. In contrast to these findings, axial rotation showed a modest increase of motion after bisegmental instrumentation. To conclude, the immobilization of monosegmental fractures in the thoracolumbar junction can be secured by means of bone grafting and the implant used in this study for all three anatomical planes. After bisegmental anterolateral stabilization a

  15. One Month Old Neglected Lisfrancs Fracture Dislocation Treated with Wagner’s External Fixator and Percutaneous Screw Fixation : A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Dinesh R; Khadabadi, Nikhil A; Putti, Babu B; Jatti, Ravi S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Lisfrancs Fracture dislocation is not commonly seen and it often goes missed leading to numerous complications. We present a case of neglected Lisfrancs fracture dislocation who presented after 1 month and its management. Case Report: A 27-year-old man came with the complaints of pain and swelling of the right foot following a fall from a motorcycle 1 month back. On Radiographic evaluation it showed presence Lisfrancs fracture Dislocation with comminuted fracture of the proximal phalanx of the great toe and distal fibula fracture. Closed reduction was attempted initially which was unsuccessful and was followed by open reduction which also failed. Reduction was then achieved using Wagner’s external fixation distractor device and supplemented with percutaneously passed screws. The external fixator was continued for 3 weeks followed by below knee cast for 6 weeks. The patient regained normal gait and returned to work and his previous physical activity level without recurrent dislocation. Conclusion: This report highlights the necessity of prompt open reduction and the need of external fixation to achieve and maintain reduction in case of neglected cases. We advocate this approach to achieve reduction in neglected cases where open reduction is unsuccessful. PMID:27298958

  16. Cervical anterior transpedicular screw fixation (ATPS)--Part II. Accuracy of manual insertion and pull-out strength of ATPS.

    PubMed

    Koller, Heiko; Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Fox, Michael; Martin, Hudelmaier; Forstner, Rosmarie; Augat, Peter; Penzkofer, Rainer; Pirich, Christian; Kässmann, H; Resch, Herbert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Reconstruction after multilevel decompression of the cervical spine, especially in the weakened osteoporotic, neoplastic or infectious spine often requires circumferential stabilization and fusion. To avoid the additional posterior surgery in these cases while increasing rigidity of anterior-only screw-plate constructs, the authors introduce the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility as well as its indications in a previous study in Part I of our project. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to assess the ex vivo accuracy of placing ATPS into the cervical vertebra as well as the biomechanical performance of ATPS in comparison to traditional vertebral body screws (VBS) in terms of pull-out strength (POS). Twenty-three ATPS were inserted alternately to two screws into the pedicles and vertebral bodies, respectively, of six cadaveric specimens from C3-T1. For insertion of ATPS, a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique was used. Pre- and post insertional CT-scans were used to assess accuracy of ATPS insertion in the axial and sagittal planes. A newly designed grading system and accuracy score were used to delineate accuracy of ATPS insertion. Following insertion of screws, 23 ATPS and 22 VBS were subjected to pull-out testing (POT). The bone mineral density (BMD) of each specimen was assessed prior to POT. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of correctly placed screws and non-critical pedicles breaches in axial plane was 78.3%, and 95.7% in sagittal plane. Hence, according to our definition of "critical" pedicle breach that exposes neurovascular structures at risk, 21.7% (n = 5) of all ATPS inserted showed a critical pedicle breach in axial plane. Notably, no critical pedicle perforation occurred at the C6 to T1 levels. Pull-out testing of ATPS and VBS revealed that pull-out resistance of ATPS was 2.5-fold that of VBS. Mean POS of 23 ATPS with a mean BMD of 0.566 g/cm(2

  17. Effects of different mandibular fracture patterns on the stability of miniplate screw fixation in angle mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Pektas, Z O; Bayram, B; Balcik, C; Develi, T; Uckan, S

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of horizontally favourable and unfavourable mandibular fracture patterns on the fixation stability of titanium plates and screws by simulating chewing forces. Favourable and unfavourable mandibular fractures on 22 sheep hemimandibles were fixed with 4-hole straight titanium plates and 2.0mm×7mm titanium screws according to the Champy technique. Hemimandibles were mounted with a fixation device in a servohydraulic testing unit for compressive testing. Displacement values under 20, 60, 100, 120, 150, 200N, maximum displacements, and maximum forces the model could resist before breakage were recorded and compared. The authors found no statistically significant differences between the groups for the displacement values in the force range 60-200N (60, 100, 120, 150 and 200N). Statistically significant differences for maximum displacement values (displacement values at the breaking forces) between the groups were found (P<0.05). There was no evidence for the need to apply different treatment modalities to mandibular fractures regardless of whether the factures are favourable or not. PMID:22178275

  18. One-Stage Posterior Debridement and Transpedicular Screw Fixation for Treating Monosegmental Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Tuberculosis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhili; Peng, Aifeng; Long, Xinhua; Yang, Dong; Huang, Shanhu

    2014-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is still prevalent in some developing countries. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of one-stage posterior debridement, autogenous bone grafting, and transpedicular screw fixation in treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis in adults. 37 patients were retrospectively reviewed in this study. The data of images, operative time and blood loss volume, perioperative complications, time to achieve bony fusion, VAS score, and neurologic function preoperatively and postoperatively were collected. The mean follow-up period was 21.5 ± 3.5 months. The tuberculosis was cured after surgery in all patients, and no recurrence was observed. Bony fusion was achieved in all patients with a mean time of 5.6 ± 2.5 months. Neurological outcome did not change in one case with grade A, and increased by 1–3 grades in the other patients with nerve deficit. The average preoperative and postoperative VAS scores were 5.5 ± 2.23 and 1.5 ± 1.22, respectively; the difference was significant (P < 0.05). There were three perioperative complications (8.1%, 3/37) observed in this study. In conclusion, the procedure of one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with autogenous bone grafting, and posterior fixation with pedicle screw is effective and safe for treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis in adults. PMID:24701134

  19. Analysis of stress induced by screws in the vertebral fixation system

    PubMed Central

    Fakhouri, Sarah Fakher; Shimano, Marcos Massao; de Araújo, Cleudmar Amaral; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido; Shimano, Antônio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare, using photoelasticity, internal stress produced by USS II type screw with 5.2 and 6.2 mm external diameters, when submitted to three different pullout strengths. Methods: Two photoelastic models were especially made. The simulation was performed using loads of 1.8, 2.4 e 3.3 kgf.The fringe orders were evaluated around the screws. In all the models analyzed the shear stress were calculated. Results: Independently of the applied load, the smaller screw showed higher values of shear stress. Conclusion: According to the analysis performed, we observed that the place of highest stress was in the first thread of the lead, close to the head of the screws. Experimental study. PMID:24644414

  20. Limitation of total hip arthroplasty of the acetabular roof by press-fit without screw fixation: discussion of a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Akio; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Iwase, Hideaki

    2013-05-01

    In total hip arthroplasty of the acetabular roof fixed by press-fit without screw fixation, there is little possibility for loosening to occur, because it is difficult for wear debris to enter between the cup and the acetabular roof, as screw holes are not present. However, stability is provided only by contact. In the case of acetabular dysplasia, it is not well understood whether sufficient initial fixation power is provided. We performed a torsion test and a lever-out test. In the torsion test, in the case of a normal hip joint, as the cup grew bigger, the fixation power tended to increase in strength. In the acetabular dysplasia model, with cups of each size, as the protrusion angle increased, the fixation power of the cup tended to become weak. When the protrusion angle approaches 15 degrees, we must use a cup that is 4 mm larger than the original cup to achieve the same initial fixation power. Furthermore, when the protrusion angle is 15 degrees in cups that are over 48 mm in size, we obtain fixation power that is theoretically adequate, but when small cups, for example, 46 mm in size are set with protrusion, the initial fixation power decreases significantly, and we cannot obtain a fixation power that is theoretically adequate. PMID:23412291

  1. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous navigated guidewireless lumbosacral pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin S; Park, Paul

    2016-07-01

    This video details the minimally invasive approach for treatment of a symptomatic Grade II lytic spondylolisthesis with high-grade foraminal stenosis. In this procedure, the use of a navigated, guidewireless technique for percutaneous pedicle screw placement at the lumbosacral junction is highlighted following initial decompression and transforaminal interbody fusion. Key steps of the procedure are delineated that include positioning, exposure, technique for interbody fusion, intraoperative image acquisition, and use of a concise 2-step process for navigated screw placement without using guidewires. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/2u6H4Pc_8To . PMID:27364422

  2. Bone Anchor Fixation in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: A Useful Adjunct in Suprapubic and Para-iliac Hernia Repair.

    PubMed

    Blair, Laurel J; Cox, Tiffany C; Huntington, Ciara R; Ross, Samuel W; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Augenstein, Vedra A; Heniford, B Todd

    2015-07-01

    Suprapubic hernias, parailiac or flank hernias, and lumbar hernias are difficult to repair and are associated with high-recurrence rates owing to difficulty in obtaining substantive overlap and especially mesh fixation due to bone being a margin of the hernia. Orthopedic suture anchors used for ligament reconstruction have been used to attach prosthetic material to bony surfaces and can be used in the repair of these hernias where suture fixation was impossible. A prospective, single institution study of ventral hernia repairs involving bone anchor mesh fixation was performed. Demographics, operative details, and outcomes data were collected. Twenty patients were identified, with a mean age 53 (range: 35-70 years) and mean body mass index 28.4 kg/m(2) (range 21-38). Ten lumbar, seven suprapubic, and three parailiac hernias were studied. The majority were recurrent hernias (n = 13), with one to seven previously failed repairs. The mean hernia defect size was very large (270 cm(2); range: 56-832 cm(2)) with average mesh size of 1090 cm(2) (range 224-3640 cm(2)). Both Mitek GII (Depuy, Raynham, MA) and JuggerKnot 2.9-mm (Biomet, Biomedical Instruments, Warsaw, IN) anchors were used, with an average of four anchors/case (range: 1-16). Mean operative time was 218 minutes (120-495). There were three minor complications, no operative mortality, and no recurrences during an average follow-up of 24 months. Pelvic bone anchors permit mesh fixation in high-recurrence areas not amenable to traditional suture fixation. The ability to safely and effectively use bone anchor fixation is an essential tool in complex open ventral hernia repair. PMID:26140889

  3. The Harris-Galante porous acetabular component press-fit without screw fixation. Five-year radiographic analysis of primary cases.

    PubMed

    Schmalzried, T P; Wessinger, S J; Hill, G E; Harris, W H

    1994-06-01

    One hundred twenty-two primary total hip arthroplasties were followed for an average of 56 months (range, 48-66 months) in which the Harris-Galante (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN) porous ingrowth acetabular component had been press-fit into the innominate bone without screw fixation. There were no acetabular fractures. No socket was revised for loosening and none were radiographically loose. There was no evidence of disruption of the titanium porous mesh. There was no acetabular osteolysis. Compared to the authors' series of primary hip reconstructions using this same prosthesis inserted with line-to-line reaming and screw fixation, the data indicate that the tight peripheral fit associated with the press-fit technique is effective in reducing both the incidence and extent of bone-implant radiolucencies. However, the increased incidence of radiolucencies near the apex of the acetabulum also suggest that initial contact of the porous surface with live acetabular bone at this location is desirable in order to obtain and maintain an optimal bone-implant interface. Additional studies are necessary to further establish the relationship between the initial fit and long-term fixation of cementless acetabular components. Based on the data and other considerations for eliminating both vascular risk and the potential for fretting wear between the screws and shell, the authors recommend press-fitting without screw fixation for this acetabular component in primary cases when anatomy and bone stock permit. Full seating of the component is recommended in order to obtain dome contact. PMID:8077971

  4. Analysis of Orthopedic Screws for Bone Fracture Fixations with Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuib, Solehuddin; Ridzwan, M. I. Z.; Mohamad Ibrahim, M. N.; Tan, C. J.

    In this study, the influence of the orthopedic screws engineering design such as profile shape and geometrical parameters on its biomechanical compatibility in terms of load sharing with adjacent bone tissue was investigated. The study was conducted on a set of three-dimensional finite element design models. A dimension less Stress Transfer Parameter (STP) was utilized for gauging the performances of the different screws according to its load sharing capabilities. Stress-transfer behavior was found to be linear for varying load magnitudes. The geometric properties investigated; pitch, thread length, width, major diameter and thread angle showed different influences on the three different profiles studied (triangular, trapezoidal and rectangular). The results indicated that 13 out of 32 screw designs produced were to achieve STP values greater than 0.3 of these, 6 were the rectangular profile. The best design was of the rectangular profile (Design no. 24) with an STP value of 0.4344. It was concluded that the best biomechanical properties were found in rectangular screw profiles. However, due to mix trends for the different properties, the careful combination and consideration towards pullout strength was necessary to obtain a design with the highest biocompatibility.

  5. One-stage posterior C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation or combined anterior C2-C3 fusion for the treatment of unstable hangman’s fracture

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JINGCHEN; LI, YE; WU, YUNTAO

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of using one-stage posterior C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation or combined anterior C2-C3 fusion in the treatment of unstable hangman’s fracture. A total of 13 patients with unstable hangman’s fractures underwent C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation, lamina interbody fusion or combined anterior C2-C3 fusion and imaging examinations to evaluate the fracture fixation and healing condition at three days and three months following surgery. Postoperative X-ray and computed tomography (CT) results showed high fracture reduction, good internal fixation position and reliable fracture fixation. The three-month postoperative CT showed good vertebral fracture healing. C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation has a good curative effect in the treatment of unstable hangman’s fracture. The direct fixation of the fracture enables early ambulation by the patients. PMID:23408668

  6. [C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation of atlanto-axial instability with tetraparesis in rheumatoid patient--case report].

    PubMed

    Chrzanowska, Anetta; Chrzanowski, Robert; Skura, Antoni

    2010-01-01

    A case of a 50-year-old patient with C1-C2 subluxation and concomitant neurological deficits in the course of rheumatoid arthritis has been described. In the article the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, consisting mainly of surgical treatment, have been presented. Indications for the surgery were: a rapid disease progression observed during the last six months, and tetraparesis. The authors propose the choice of applied surgical technique by taking into account difficulties consequential to the anatomy of this region, as well as additional complications regarding the chronic inflammation process. The use of transarticular screw fixation method, together with concurrent spinal cord decompression allowed the stabilization of C1-C2 subluxation and improvement of the neurological state of the patient. PMID:21591367

  7. No effect of additional screw fixation of a cementless, all-polyethylene press-fit socket on migration, wear, and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Minten, Michiel J M; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; Spruit, Maarten

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Additional screw fixation of the all-polyethylene press-fit RM cup (Mathys) has no additional value for migration, in the first 2 years after surgery. However, the medium-term and long-term effects of screw fixation remain unclear. We therefore evaluated the influence of screw fixation on migration, wear, and clinical outcome at 6.5 years using radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients and methods - This study involved prolonged follow-up from a previous randomized controlled trial (RCT). We analyzed RSA radiographs taken at baseline and at 1-, 2-, and 6.5-year follow-up. Cup migration and wear were assessed using model-based RSA software. Wear was calculated as translation of the femoral head model in relation to the cup model. Total translation, rotation, and wear were calculated mathematically from results of the orthogonal components. Results - 27 patients (15 with screw fixation and 12 without) were available for follow-up at 6.5 (5.6-7.2) years. Total translation (0.50 mm vs. 0.56 mm) and rotation (1.01 degrees vs. 1.33 degrees) of the cup was low, and was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Wear increased over time, and was similar between the 2 groups (0.58 mm vs. 0.53 mm). Wear rate (0.08 mm/year vs. 0.09 mm/year) and clinical outcomes were also similar. Interpretation - Our results indicate that additional screw fixation of all-polyethylene press-fit RM cups has no additional value regarding medium-term migration and clinical outcome. The wear rate was low in both groups. PMID:27299418

  8. A Biomechanical Study Comparing Helical Blade with Screw Design for Sliding Hip Fixations of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiang; Lau, Tak-Wing; Leung, Frankie

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw (DHS) is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade) was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC), superior-centre (SC), inferior-center (IC), centre-anterior (CA), and centre-posterior (CP). All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups. PMID:23509433

  9. A biomechanical study comparing helical blade with screw design for sliding hip fixations of unstable intertrochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiang; Yuen, Grace; Lau, Tak-Wing; Yeung, Kelvin; Leung, Frankie

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw (DHS) is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade) was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC), superior-centre (SC), inferior-center (IC), centre-anterior (CA), and centre-posterior (CP). All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups. PMID:23509433

  10. Unstable Intertrochanteric Fracture Fixation – Is Proximal Femoral Locked Compression Plate Better Than Dynamic Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Qureshi, Owais Ahmad; Jilani, Latif Zafar; Hamesh, Tajdar; Jameel, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Background Intertrochanteric fractures are one of the most common fractures encountered in our practice. Most of them need operative intervention and union is achieved. As per the literature dynamic hip screw (DHS) is the gold standard for the treatment of these fractures, however problem arises with maintenance of neck shaft angle and proper reduction in unstable intertrochanteric fractures. The situation gets more complex when “cut out” of femoral head screw occurs either alone or in combination with varus collapse when they are treated with DHS. Here we are giving results of unstable intertrochanteric fractures treated with Proximal Femoral Locked Compression Plate (PFLCP) as compared with similar patients treated with Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS). Materials and Methods The study included a total of 27 patients (17 males, 10 females) with unstable intertrochanteric fractures who were subjected to PFLCP treatment from March 2011 to November 2012 in one group. Another was a similar group of 35 patients treated with DHS from March 2008 to February 2010. Results of group 1 were compared with group 2. Detailed clinical conditions of all patients, duration of surgery, blood loss, length of incision and duration of image intensifier use were recorded. Patients were revisited at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after operation. Results were evaluated clinically by Harris hip Score and radiologically for fracture union. Progress of union and complications (limb shortening, varus collapse, cut out of femoral head screw and medialization of distal fragment) were recorded. Results Among 27 patients treated with PFLCP, one patient expired 6 week postoperatively and one patient lost to follow up, so 25 patients were evaluated for final outcome of which 23 (92%) showed union at follow up of 12 months. One patient developed bending of proximal screws and three developed varus collapse. Among the group treated with DHS, eight patients developed varus collapse, seven

  11. Biomechanical comparison of unilateral and bilateral pedicle screws fixation for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion after decompressive surgery -- a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the biomechanical effectiveness of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) cages in different positioning and various posterior implants used after decompressive surgery. The use of the various implants will induce the kinematic and mechanical changes in range of motion (ROM) and stresses at the surgical and adjacent segments. Unilateral pedicle screw with or without supplementary facet screw fixation in the minimally invasive TLIF procedure has not been ascertained to provide adequate stability without the need to expose on the contralateral side. This study used finite element (FE) models to investigate biomechanical differences in ROM and stress on the neighboring structures after TLIF cages insertion in conjunction with posterior fixation. Methods A validated finite-element (FE) model of L1-S1 was established to implant three types of cages (TLIF with a single moon-shaped cage in the anterior or middle portion of vertebral bodies, and TLIF with a left diagonally placed ogival-shaped cage) from the left L4-5 level after unilateral decompressive surgery. Further, the effects of unilateral versus bilateral pedicle screw fixation (UPSF vs. BPSF) in each TLIF cage model was compared to analyze parameters, including stresses and ROM on the neighboring annulus, cage-vertebral interface and pedicle screws. Results All the TLIF cages positioned with BPSF showed similar ROM (<5%) at surgical and adjacent levels, except TLIF with an anterior cage in flexion (61% lower) and TLIF with a left diagonal cage in left lateral bending (33% lower) at surgical level. On the other hand, the TLIF cage models with left UPSF showed varying changes of ROM and annulus stress in extension, right lateral bending and right axial rotation at surgical level. In particular, the TLIF model with a diagonal cage, UPSF, and contralateral facet screw fixation stabilize segmental motion of the surgical level mostly in extension and contralaterally axial

  12. Supra-acetabular fixation and sacroiliac screws for treating unstable pelvic ring injuries: preliminary results from 20 patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; de Góes Ribeiro, Arthur; Ulson, Oliver; de Ávila, Ricardo Bertozzi; Ono, Nelson Keiske; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the treatment results from 20 patients who underwent an alternative osteosynthesis method as definitive treatment for pelvic ring fractures. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on a series of 20 patients with pelvic ring fractures (Tile type C) and a high risk of postoperative infection, who were treated at Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo between August 2004 and December 2012. The patients underwent percutaneous supra-acetabular external fixation in association with cannulated 7.0 mm iliosacral screws. Results The patients’ mean age was 40 years (range 22–77 years) and the mean length of follow-up was 18.5 months (range 3–69 months). At the end of the treatment, ten patients (50%) were classified as having good results, nine patients (45%) had fair results and one patient (5%) did not have any improvement. Six patients presented complications, and paresthesia of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was the most frequent of these (two patients). Conclusion Supra-acetabular external fixation in association with iliosacral percutaneous osteosynthesis is a good definitive treatment method for patients with a high risk of postoperative infection. PMID:27069879

  13. Radiological Evaluation of the Initial Fixation between Cortical Bone Trajectory and Conventional Pedicle Screw Technique for Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique versus conventional pedicle screws (PS) in radiographs of postsurgical lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Few reports have documented the holding strength of CBT technique for spondylolisthesis cases. Methods From October 2009 to June 2014, 21 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis were surgically treated in our institution. Ten were treated with conventional PS technique and 11 of with CBT technique. Mean lumbar lordosis and percent slippage were evaluated preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and 6 months and 1 year postoperatively using radiographs. We also investigated percent loss of slip reduction. Results There were statistically significant differences between preoperative percent slippage and postoperative slippage in both PS and CBT procedures over 1 year, and both techniques showed good slip reduction. On the other hand, lumbar lordosis did not change significantly in either the PS or CBT groups over 1 year. Conclusions CBT technique showed similarly good initial fixation compared with the PS procedure in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:27114765

  14. Clinical results of the re-fixation of a Chevron olecranon osteotomy using an intramedullary cancellous screw and suture tension band.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Marc L; Dezillie, Marleen; Hoendervangers, Yvette; Eygendaal, Denise

    2015-04-01

    Exposure of the distal humerus in case of an articular fracture is often performed through a Chevron osteotomy of the olecranon. Several options have been described for re-fixation of the Chevron osteotomy. Pull-out of the hard-wear is often seen as complication. In this study, an evaluation of the re-fixation of the Chevron osteotomy through a cancellous screw and suture tension band was performed. The data of 19 patients in whom a Chevron osteotomy was re-fixated with a cancellous screw in combination with a suture tension band were used. Evaluation was performed by assessment of the post-operative X-rays and documentation of complications. In all 19 cases, evaluation of the post-operative X-rays showed complete consolidation without dislocation or other complications. Re-fixation of a Chevron osteotomy of the olecranon with a large cancellous screw with a suture tension band provides adequate stability to result in proper healing of the osteotomy in primary cases when early post-operative mobilisation is allowed. Complications as pull-out of the hard-wear were not reported. PMID:25697273

  15. A novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Wenhai; Xu, Hui; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Xin-Dong; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate a novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its potential use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation. Methods. We have used the reverse engineering software (image-processing software and computer-aided design software) to create the approximate and optimal digital interarticular channel of atlas for 60 participants. Angles of channels, diameters of inscribed circles, long and short axes of ellipses were measured and recorded, and gender-specific analysis was also performed. Results. The channels provided sufficient space for one or two screws, and the parameters of channels are described. While the channels of females were smaller than that of males, no significant difference of angles between males and females were observed. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates the radiological features of approximate digital interarticular channels, optimal digital interarticular channels of atlas, and provides the reference trajectory of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. Additionally, we provide a protocol that can help make a pre-operative plan for accurate placement of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. PMID:26925345

  16. Four lateral mass screw fixation techniques in lower cervical spine following laminectomy: a finite element analysis study of stress distribution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral mass screw fixation (LSF) techniques have been widely used for reconstructing and stabilizing the cervical spine; however, complications may result depending on the choice of surgeon. There are only a few reports related to LSF applications, even though fracture fixation has become a severe complication. This study establishes the three-dimensional finite element model of the lower cervical spine, and compares the stress distribution of the four LSF techniques (Magerl, Roy-Camille, Anderson, and An), following laminectomy -- to explore the risks of rupture after fixation. Method CT scans were performed on a healthy adult female volunteer, and Digital imaging and communication in medicine (Dicom) data was obtained. Mimics 10.01, Geomagic Studio 12.0, Solidworks 2012, HyperMesh 10.1 and Abaqus 6.12 software programs were used to establish the intact model of the lower cervical spines (C3-C7), a postoperative model after laminectomy, and a reconstructive model after applying the LSF techniques. A compressive preload of 74 N combined with a pure moment of 1.8 Nm was applied to the intact and reconstructive model, simulating normal flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The stress distribution of the four LSF techniques was compared by analyzing the maximum von Mises stress. Result The three-dimensional finite element model of the intact C3-C7 vertebrae was successfully established. This model consists of 503,911 elements and 93,390 nodes. During flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation modes, the intact model’s angular intersegmental range of motion was in good agreement with the results reported from the literature. The postoperative model after the three-segment laminectomy and the reconstructive model after applying the four LSF techniques were established based on the validated intact model. The stress distribution for the Magerl and Roy-Camille groups were more dispersive, and the maximum von Mises stress

  17. Evaluation of implant loosening following segmental pedicle screw fixation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a 2 year follow-up with low-dose CT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The long term radiological status of screw fixation following scoliosis surgery with all pedicle screw construct is not previously studied. Aim To evaluate the incidence of loosening (implant failure) evaluated with low-dose CT two years following scoliosis surgery. Study design Retrospective study. Methods 81 consecutive patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), aged 18 ± 3 years at 2 years follow-up (83% were female), subjected for scoliosis corrective surgery with all pedicle screw construct (total of 1666 screws) has been examined with plain radiography and with low dose CT 6 weeks and 2 years postoperatively. Results In 26 out of 81 (32%) patients there were signs of loosening of one or more screws, a maximum 3 screws. 47 out of 1666 (2.8%) screws showed evidence of loosening. Preoperative Cobb angle was 56° among patients with loosening compared with 53° among patients with no evidence of loosening (P = 0.288). In males there were signs of loosening in 8 out of 14 (57%) and in females 18 out of 67 (27%), (P = 0.027). Among cases with loosening, 14% had suboptimal screw placement at the first postoperative CT compared with 11% among patients with no evidence of loosening (P = 0.254). One patient with a loosened L4 screw had neurological deficit and subjected for revision of the construct. Out of 26 patients with evidence of loosening, 5 patients reported minor pain or discomfort, 1 patient had a minor proximal junctional kyphosis of about 15° and 3 patients showed evidence of pull-out of 3–5 mm at the upper end of the construct but no clinical complaint. With plain radiography loosening could be observed only in 11 out of 26 cases, 5 were in the lumbar region. Conclusions In a consecutive series of 81 cases with AIS who had underwent scoliosis surgery, one third showed, 2 years after the intervention, minor screw loosening. Males were more prone to develop screw loosening. In CT system that enables low

  18. Sudden cerebral infarction after interventional vertebral artery embolism for vertebral artery injury during removal of C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Liu, Hao; Ma, Litai; Zeng, Jiancheng; Song, Yueming; Xie, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral artery injury (VAI) is a rare but serious complication of cervical spine surgery. Instrumented posterior surgery of the upper cervical spine places the vertebral artery at the highest risk of injury. However, VAI during removal of cervical internal fixation is really rare and unexpected. We present a case of 52-year-old male patient who suffered VAI during removal of C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation. An interventional vertebral artery embolism was performed and the patient suffered a sudden cerebral infarction one day after interventional vertebral artery embolism. From this case, removal of upper cervical pedicle screws of malposition is not recommended if it is not really necessary for some other reasons. Interventional vertebral artery embolism is an effective and less invasive procedure than open ligation surgery in the treatment of haemorrhage resulted from VAI but potential risk of cerebral infarction should not be ignored. PMID:26629224

  19. Novel Pedicle Screw and Plate System Provides Superior Stability in Unilateral Fixation for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: An In Vitro Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qingan; Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Huan; Huang, Zhiping; Shang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the biomechanical properties of the novel pedicle screw and plate system with the traditional rod system in asymmetrical posterior stabilization for minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). We compared the immediate stabilizing effects of fusion segment and the strain distribution on the vertebral body. Methods Seven fresh calf lumbar spines (L3-L6) were tested. Flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were induced by pure moments of ± 5.0 Nm and the range of motion (ROM) was recorded. Strain gauges were instrumented at L4 and L5 vertebral body to record the strain distribution under flexion and lateral bending (LB). After intact kinematic analysis, a right sided TLIF was performed at L4-L5. Then each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral pedicle screw and rod (UR); unilateral pedicle screw and plate (UP); UR and transfacet pedicle screw (TFS); UP and TFS; UP and UR. Results All instrumented constructs significantly reduced ROM in all motion compared with the intact specimen, except the UR construct in axial rotation. Unilateral fixation (UR or UP) reduced ROM less compared with the bilateral fixation (UP/UR+TFS, UP+UR). The plate system resulted in more reduction in ROM compared with the rod system, especially in axial rotation. UP construct provided more stability in axial rotation compared with UR construct. The strain distribution on the left and right side of L4 vertebral body was significantly different from UR and UR+TFS construct under flexion motion. The strain distribution on L4 vertebral body was significantly influenced by different fixation constructs. Conclusions The novel plate could provide sufficient segmental stability in axial rotation. The UR construct exhibits weak stability and asymmetrical strain distribution in fusion segment, while the UP construct is a good alternative choice for unilateral posterior fixation of MI-TLIF. PMID:25807513

  20. Time course of bone screw fixation following a local delivery of Zoledronate in a rat femoral model - a micro-finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Kettenberger, Ulrike; Latypova, Adeliya; Terrier, Alexandre; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2015-05-01

    A good fixation of osteosynthesis implants is crucial for a successful bone healing but often difficult to achieve in osteoporotic patients. One possible solution to this issue is the local delivery of bisphosphonates in direct proximity to the implants, A critical aspect of this method, that has not yet been well investigated, is the time course of the implant fixation following the drug release. Usual destructive mechanical tests require large numbers of animals to produce meaningful results. Therefore, a micro-finite element (microFE) approach was chosen to analyze implant fixation. In vivo micro computed tomography (microCT) scans were obtained, first weekly and later bi-weekly, after implantation of polymeric screws in the femoral condyles of ovariectomized rats. In one half of the animals, Zoledronate was released from a hydrogel matrix directly in the peri-implant bone stock, the other animals were implanted only with screws as control. The time course of the implant fixation was investigated with linear elastic microFE models that were created based on in vivo microCT scans. The numerical models were validated against experimental pullout-tests measurements in an additional cadaver study. The microFE analysis revealed a significant increase in force at yield of the Zoledronate treated group compared to the control group. The force of the treated group was 28% higher after 17 days of screw implantation, 42% higher after 31 days. The significant difference persisted until the end of the in vivo study at day 58 (p<0.01). The early onset and prolonged duration of the implant anchorage improvement that was found in this study indicates the great potential of Zoledronate-loaded hydrogel for an enhancement of osteosynthesis implant fixation in impaired bone. PMID:25679481

  1. The Radiological Feature of Anterior Occiput-to-Axis Screw Fixation as it Guides the Screw Trajectory on 3D Printed Models: A Feasibility Study on 3D Images and 3D Printed Models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Wan-Qing; Shao, Zhen-Xuan; Yang, Xin-Dong; Wang, Jian-Shun; Xu, Hua-Zi; Chi, Yong-Long

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Anterior occiput-to-axis screw fixation is more suitable than a posterior approach for some patients with a history of posterior surgery. The complex osseous anatomy between the occiput and the axis causes a high risk of injury to neurological and vascular structures, and it is important to have an accurate screw trajectory to guide anterior occiput-to-axis screw fixation. Thirty computed tomography (CT) scans of upper cervical spines were obtained for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Cylinders (1.75 mm radius) were drawn to simulate the trajectory of an anterior occiput-to-axis screw. The imitation screw was adjusted to 4 different angles and measured, as were the values of the maximized anteroposterior width and the left-right width of the occiput (C0) to the C1 and C1 to C2 joints. Then, the 3D models were printed, and an angle guide device was used to introduce the screws into the 3D models referring to the angles calculated from the 3D images. We found the screw angle ranged from α1 (left: 4.99 ± 4.59°; right: 4.28 ± 5.45°) to α2 (left: 20.22 ± 3.61°; right: 19.63 ± 4.94°); on the lateral view, the screw angle ranged from β1 (left: 13.13 ± 4.93°; right: 11.82 ± 5.64°) to β2 (left: 34.86 ± 6.00°; right: 35.01 ± 5.77°). No statistically significant difference was found between the data of the left and right sides. On the 3D printed models, all of the anterior occiput-to-axis screws were successfully introduced, and none of them penetrated outside of the cortex; the mean α4 was 12.00 ± 4.11 (left) and 12.25 ± 4.05 (right), and the mean β4 was 23.44 ± 4.21 (left) and 22.75 ± 4.41 (right). No significant difference was found between α4 and β4 on the 3D printed models and α3 and β3 calculated from the 3D digital images of the left and right sides. Aided with the angle guide device, we could achieve an optimal screw trajectory for anterior occiput-to-axis screw fixation on

  2. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation with Polymethylmethacrylate Augmentation for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Intravertebral Pseudoarthrosis Associated with Kummell's Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of short-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture with osteonecrosis. Methods. Osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fractures with avascular necrosis were treated by short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation. Eighteen were followed up for more than 2 years. The kyphotic angle, compression ratio, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were analyzed. In addition, radiologic and clinical parameters of PPF group were compared with percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) group. Results. Vertebral height and kyphotic angle of the compressed vertebral bodies were significantly corrected after the operation (P < 0.05). Further, restored vertebral height was maintained during the 2 or more years of postoperative follow-up. Compared to the PVP group the postoperative compression ratio and kyphotic angle were significantly lower in the PPF group (P < 0.05). The postoperative ODI and VAS of the PVP group were significantly higher than the PPF (P < 0.05). Conclusions. According to our results, short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation may be an effective minimally invasive treatment for osteoporosis in cases of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with Kummell's osteonecrosis. PMID:27595101

  3. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation with Polymethylmethacrylate Augmentation for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Intravertebral Pseudoarthrosis Associated with Kummell's Osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeun-Sung; Heo, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of short-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture with osteonecrosis. Methods. Osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fractures with avascular necrosis were treated by short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation. Eighteen were followed up for more than 2 years. The kyphotic angle, compression ratio, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were analyzed. In addition, radiologic and clinical parameters of PPF group were compared with percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) group. Results. Vertebral height and kyphotic angle of the compressed vertebral bodies were significantly corrected after the operation (P < 0.05). Further, restored vertebral height was maintained during the 2 or more years of postoperative follow-up. Compared to the PVP group the postoperative compression ratio and kyphotic angle were significantly lower in the PPF group (P < 0.05). The postoperative ODI and VAS of the PVP group were significantly higher than the PPF (P < 0.05). Conclusions. According to our results, short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation may be an effective minimally invasive treatment for osteoporosis in cases of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with Kummell's osteonecrosis. PMID:27595101

  4. Vertebroplasty plus short segment pedicle screw fixation in a burst fracture model in cadaveric spines.

    PubMed

    Grossbach, Andrew J; Viljoen, Stephanus V; Hitchon, Patrick W; DeVries Watson, Nicole A; Grosland, Nicole M; Torner, James

    2015-05-01

    The current project investigates the role of vertebroplasty in supplementing short segment (SS) posterior instrumentation, only one level above and below a fracture. In the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures, long segment (LS) posterior instrumentation two levels above and below the fracture level has been used. In our study, burst fractures were produced at L1 in eight fresh frozen human cadaveric spines. The spines were then tested in three conditions: 1) intact, 2) after LS (T11-L3), 3) SS (T12-L2) instrumentation with pedicle screws and rods, and 4) short segment instrumentation plus cement augmentation of the fracture level (SSC). LS instrumentation was found to significantly reduce the motion at the instrumented level (T12-L2) as well as the levels immediately adjacent in flexion, extension and lateral bending. Similarly, SSC augmentation was found to significantly reduce the motion compared to intact at T12-L2 but still maintained the adjacent level motion. However, SS instrumentation alone did not significantly reduce the motion at T12-L2 except for left lateral bending. While LS instrumentation remains the most stable construct, SS instrumentation augmented with vertebroplasty at the fracture level increases rigidity in flexion, extension and right lateral bending beyond SS instrumentation alone. PMID:25769251

  5. CT Morphometric Analysis to Determine the Anatomical Basis for the Use of Transpedicular Screws during Reconstruction and Fixations of Anterior Cervical Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Ruan, Dike; Wu, Changfu; Wu, Weidong; Sun, Peidong; Zhang, Yuanzhi; Wu, Jigong; Lu, Sheng; Ouyang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate placement of pedicle screw during Anterior Transpedicular Screw fixation (ATPS) in cervical spine depends on accurate anatomical knowledge of the vertebrae. However, little is known of the morphometric characteristics of cervical vertebrae in Chinese population. Methods Three-dimensional reconstructions of CT images were performed for 80 cases. The anatomic data and screw fixation parameters for ATPS fixation were measured using the Mimics software. Findings The overall mean OPW, OPH and PAL ranged from 5.81 to 7.49 mm, 7.77 to 8.69 mm, and 33.40 to 31.13 mm separately, and SPA was 93.54 to 109.36 degrees from C3 to C6, 104.99 degrees at C7, whereas, 49.00 to 32.26 degrees from C4 to C7, 46.79 degrees at C3 (TPA). Dl/rSIP had an increasing trend away from upper endplate with mean value from 1.87 to 5.83 mm. Dl/rTIP was located at the lateral portion of the anterior cortex of vertebrae for C3 to C5 and ipsilateral for C6 to C7 with mean value from −2.70 to −3.00 mm, and 0.17 to 3.18 mm. The entrance points for pedicular screw insertion for C3 to C5 and C6 to C7 were recommended −2∼−3 mm and 0–4 mm from the median sagittal plane, respectively, 1–4 mm and 5–6 mm from the upper endplate, with TPA being 46.79–49.00 degrees and 40.89–32.26 degrees, respectively, and SPA being 93.54–106.69 degrees and 109.36–104.99 degrees, respectively. The pedicle screw insertion diameter was recommended 3.5 mm (C3 and C4), 4.0 mm (C5 to C7), and the pedicle axial length was 21–24 mm for C3 to C7 for both genders. However, the ATPS insertion in C3 should be individualized given its relatively small anatomical dimensions. Conclusions The data provided a morphometric basis for the ATPS fixation technique in lower cervical fixation. It will help in preoperative planning and execution of this surgery. PMID:24349038

  6. Segmental correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis by all-screw fixation method in adolescents and young adults. minimum 5 years follow-up with SF-36 questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In our institution, the fixation technique in treating idiopathic scoliosis was shifted from hybrid fixation to the all-screw method beginning in 2000. We conducted this study to assess the intermediate -term outcome of all-screw method in treating adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Methods Forty-nine consecutive patients were retrospectively included with minimum of 5-year follow-up (mean, 6.1; range, 5.1-7.3 years). The average age of surgery was 18.5 ± 5.0 years. We assessed radiographic measurements at preoperative (Preop), postoperative (PO) and final follow-up (FFU) period. Curve correction rate, correction loss rate, complications, accuracy of pedicle screws and SF-36 scores were analyzed. Results The average major curve was corrected from 58.0 ± 13.0° Preop to 16.0 ± 9.0° PO(p < 0.0001), and increased to 18.4 ± 8.6°(p = 0.12) FFU. This revealed a 72.7% correction rate and a correction loss of 2.4° (3.92%). The thoracic kyphosis decreased little at FFU (22 ± 12° to 20 ± 6°, (p = 0.25)). Apical vertebral rotation decreased from 2.1 ± 0.8 PreOP to 0.8 ± 0.8 at FFU (Nash-Moe grading, p < 0.01). Among total 831 pedicle screws, 56 (6.7%) were found to be malpositioned. Compared with 2069 age-matched Taiwanese, SF-36 scores showed inferior result in 2 variables: physical function and role physical. Conclusion Follow-up more than 5 years, the authors suggest that all-screw method is an efficient and safe method. PMID:22340624

  7. New Technique for C1 Double-Door Laminoplasty Using Allograft Spacers and Titanium Miniplate Screw Fixation: Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok Woo; Lee, Jae-Hoo; Lee, Ho-Won; Oh, Jae-Keun; Kwak, Yoon-Hae

    2016-03-01

    Although conventional C1 laminectomy is the gold standard for decompression at the atlas, it provides little space for the bone graft to fuse. The fusion area can be extended cranially up to the occipital bone, but it requires sacrificing the function of the craniocervical junction. To date, no reports have focused on surgical techniques for successful decompression and fusion without disruption of the posterior C1 arch while providing enough room for the bone graft to fuse. This study introduces a new technique for C1-C2 fusion and C1 double-door laminoplasty in patients with C1-C2 instability, canal stenosis, and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A 66-year-old man who had undergone C1-C2 fusion at a local clinic 2 years earlier visited our hospital due to progressive myelopathy. A preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan showed the tip of the odontoid process, extending into the spinal canal. On the axial view of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, the tip of the odontoid process significantly compressed the spinal cord on the left side. The atlantodental interval was 7 mm on radiography; however, C1-C2 instability was not evident on flexion-extension X-rays due to the previous screw fixation. The patient underwent C1-C2 decompression and fusion surgery with our new surgical technique. The segmental screws were repositioned at C1 and C2, and we performed C1 double-door laminoplasty augmented with an allograft spacer and a titanium miniplate. A marked reduction was seen at postoperative radiograph and CT scan. Neurologic symptoms were relieved dramatically after surgery without any discomfort. No complications were noted. We introduced a new surgical technique that allows bone grafting, decompression, and fusion to be performed without disruption of the posterior C1 arch in the event of C1-C2 canal stenosis combined with instability. This technique may be indicated for other conditions that cause instability and stenosis at the C1-C2 area. PMID:26689563

  8. Limited Unilateral Decompression and Pedicle Screw Fixation with Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Unilateral Radiculopathy: A Retrospective Analysis of 25 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Miao, Hai-xiong; Wang, Yong; Chen, An-fu; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lumbar spinal stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical decompression. However, bilateral decompression and laminectomy is more invasive and may not be necessary for lumbar stenosis patients with unilateral radiculopathy. We aimed to report the outcomes of unilateral laminectomy and bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with unilateral lower extremity radiculopathy who received limited unilateral decompression and bilateral pedicle screw fixation were included and evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores preoperatively and at follow-up visits. Ligamentum flavum thickness of the involved segments was measured on axial magnetic resonance images. Results Twenty-five patients were included. The mean preoperative VAS score was 6.6±1.6 and 4.6±3.1 for leg and back pain, respectively. Ligamentum flavum thickness was comparable between the symptomatic and asymptomatic side (p=0.554). The mean follow-up duration was 29.2 months. The pain in the symptomatic side lower extremity (VAS score, 1.32±1.2) and the back (VAS score, 1.75±1.73) significantly improved (p=0.000 vs. baseline for both). The ODI improved significantly postoperatively (6.60±6.5; p=0.000 vs. baseline). Significant improvement in VAS pain and ODI scores were observed in patients receiving single or multi-segment decompression fusion with fixation (p<0.01). Conclusion Limited laminectomy and unilateral spinal decompression followed by bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion achieves satisfactory outcomes in patients with spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. This procedure is less damaging to structures that are important for maintaining posterior stability of the spine. PMID:26279816

  9. Arthroscopic Bioabsorbable Screw Fixation of Unstable Osteochondritis Dissecans in Adolescents: Clinical Results, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Second-Look Arthroscopic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Keun Churl; Kim, Kwang Mee; Jeong, Ki Joon; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in adolescent patients with unstable lesions causing pain. Methods The study included 11 patients (10 males and 1 female) with OCD who underwent arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation between July 2007 and February 2014 and were available for follow-up for more than 12 months. The mean age at diagnosis was 16.3 years (range, 11 to 19 years), and the average follow-up period was 51 months (range, 12 to 91 months). Clinical results were evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm knee score, and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score measured before surgery and at follow-up. Functional evaluation was made using the Tegner activity scale. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and second-look arthroscopy were performed at the 12-month follow-up. Results Between the preoperative assessment and follow-up, improvements were seen in the KOOS (range, 44.9 to 88.1), Lysholm knee score (range, 32.6 to 82.8), and IKDC score (range, 40.8 to 85.6). The Tegner activity scale also improved from 2.8 to 6.1. Based on postoperative MRI, there were eight Dipaola grade I cases and three grade II cases. No complications due to fixation failure developed in any case. Second-look arthroscopy at 12 months postoperatively revealed that the lesion was covered with cartilage in all cases. Conclusions For unstable OCD lesions causing pain in adolescents, arthroscopic bioabsorbable screw fixation provided favorable outcomes with reduced pain and restoration of movement. Therefore, it should be considered as an effective treatment for OCD. PMID:26929800

  10. Introduction to Lumbosacral and Sacropelvic Fixation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Patrick C; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    We are pleased to present this Neurosurgical Focus video supplement on lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation strategies. Despite advancement in surgical techniques and technologies in spine, achieving consistent solid fusion across the lumbosacral junction remains a major challenge. The anatomy of the lumbosacral junction allows for a higher range of motion compared to other areas of the thoracolumbar spine. The L5-S1 interspace is exposed to significant shear forces. As a result, complications such as pseudoarthrosis, screw pull-out, implant fracture, or sacral fractures can occur. Complications are particularly seen in long fusion constructs ending across the lumbosacral junction. To reduce these complications, various lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation techniques have been developed and utilized. The current supplement is intended to provide instructional videos that illustrate several current techniques for lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation. The collection includes techniques for anterior L5-S1 interbody fusion, minimally invasive L5-S1 interbody fusions, lumbosacral pedicle screw placement, sacroiliac fusion, and sacro-alar-iliac screw placement. The authors of the videos in the supplement have provided detailed narration and video illustration to describe the nuances of the various open and minimally invasive techniques for lumbosacral and sacral-pelvic fixation. We are pleased to have such a collection of quality video illustration from experts in the field. It's been our privilege to serve as guest editors for this supplement and we believe that you will enjoy the contents of this supplement. PMID:27364425

  11. Anterior subcutaneous internal fixation for treatment of unstable pelvic fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fractures of the pelvic ring including disruption of the posterior elements in high-energy trauma have both high morbidity and mortality rates. For some injury pattern part of the initial resuscitation includes either external fixation or plate fixation to close the pelvic ring and decrease blood loss. In certain situations – especially when associated with abdominal trauma and the need to perform laparotomies – both techniques may put the patient at risk of either pintract or deep plate infections. We describe an operative approach to percutaneously close and stabilize the pelvic ring using spinal implants as an internal fixator and report the results in a small series of patients treated with this technique during the resuscitation phase. Findings Four patients were treated by subcutaneous placement of an internal fixator. Screw fixation was carried out by minimally invasive placement of two supra-acetabular iliac screws. Afterwards, a subcutaneous transfixation rod was inserted and attached to the screws after reduction of the pelvic ring. All patients were allowed to fully weight-bear. No losses of reduction or deep infections occurred. Fracture healing was uneventful in all cases. Conclusion Minimally invasive fixation is an alternative technique to stabilize the pelvic ring. The clinical results illustrate that this technique is able to achieve good results in terms of maintenance of reduction the pelvic ring. Also, abdominal surgeries no longer put the patient at risk of infected pins or plates. PMID:24606833

  12. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  13. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. Material/Methods A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Results There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  14. The cause of 2S Diapason screw breakage after internal lumbar fixation: studies of the mechanical and material properties of the implant.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, P; Grabarczyk, J; Depczyk, T

    2002-08-30

    In the years 1994-99, unstable fractures of the lumbar spine were surgically treated with interbody fixation in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Nicholas Copernicus Voivodeship Specialized Hospital in Łódź, using stabilizers manufactured by various companies. Complications in the form of stabilizer breakage were observed in 1 case out of 22. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the reason why the Stryker 2S Diapason screws broke. Tests performed to measure the material and mechanical properties of the implant did not show any signs of material fatigue, nor were any material defects discovered. However, a scanning microscope investigation confirmed the hypothesis that the material had crumbled due to overload. This discovery led to the decision that screws would be mounted in the bodies of the vertebrae in a manner decreasing implant load. PMID:17679886

  15. Avulsion-fracture of the anterior superior iliac spine with meralgia paresthetica: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shinya; Nishiyama, Takayuki; Fujishiro, Takaaki; Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    We present a rare case of avulsion-fracture of the anterior superior iliac spine with meralgia paresthetica in a 16-year-old male basketball player. He had sensory disturbance affecting his left lateral thigh 10 days after the injury. Tinel's sign was elicited on percussing the avulsed bony fragment of the anterior superior iliac spine. He underwent open reduction and internal fixation. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was noted to be entrapped by one third of the avulsed bony fragment. That fragment was removed, and the remaining portion was reduced and fixed with 2 screws. At week 6, the patient had returned to basketball playing without pain. At week 8, sensory distribution in the left lateral thigh had returned to normal. PMID:22184178

  16. Pedicular and Extrapedicular Morphometric Analysis in the Korean Population : Computed Tomographic Assessment Relevance to Pedicle and Extrapedicle Screw Fixation in the Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Hak; Choi, Gyeong-Mi; Chang, In-Bok; Ahn, Sung-Ki; Song, Joon-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anatomical parameters that must be considered when performing thoracic transpedicular or extrapedicular screw fixation. Methods We selected 958 vertebrae (1,916 pedicles) from 98 patients for analysis. Eight parameters were measured from CT scans : the transverse outer pedicular diameter, transverse inner pedicular diameter, length, angle, chord length of the pedicles and the transverse width, angle, and chord length of the pedicle-rib units. Results The age of the patients ranged from 21 to 82 years (mean : 48.2 years) and there were 57 men and 41 women. The narrowest transverse outer pedicular diameter was at T5 (4.4 mm). The narrowest pedicle length was at T1 (15.9 mm). For pedicle angle, T1 was 31.6 degrees, which was the most convergent angle, and it showed the tendency of the lower the level, the lesser the convergent angle. The chord length showed a horizontal pattern with similar values at all levels. For the PRU width, T5 showed a similar pattern to the pedicle width at 13.4 mm. For the PRU angle, T1 was the largest angle at 46.2 degrees and the tendency was the lower the level, the narrower the angle. For chord length, T1 was the shortest at 46.9 mm and T8 was the longest at 60.1 mm. Conclusion When transpedicular screw fixations carried out at the mid-thoracic level, special care must be taken because there is a high chance of danger of medial wall violation. In these circumstances, extrapedicular screw fixation may be considered as an alternative treatment. PMID:19844615

  17. Posterior atlantoaxial screw-rod fixation in a case of aberrant vertebral artery course combined with bilateral high-riding vertebral artery.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Seop; Kang, Dong Ho; Park, Kyung Bum; Hwang, Soo Hyun

    2010-10-01

    We present a case of posterior atlantoaxial screw-rod fixation in a patient with an aberrant vertebral artery (VA) course combined with bilateral high-riding VA. An aberrant VA which courses below the posterior arch of the atlas (C1) that does not pass through the C1 transverse foramen and without an osseous anomaly is rare. However, it is important to consider an abnormal course of the VA both preoperatively and intraoperatively in order to avoid critical vascular injuries in procedures which require exposure or control of the VA, such as the far-lateral approach and spinal operations. PMID:21113368

  18. Cervical anterior transpedicular screw fixation (ATPS)—Part II. Accuracy of manual insertion and pull-out strength of ATPS

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Fox, Michael; Martin, Hudelmaier; Forstner, Rosmarie; Augat, Peter; Penzkofer, Rainer; Pirich, Christian; Kässmann, H.; Resch, Herbert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction after multilevel decompression of the cervical spine, especially in the weakened osteoporotic, neoplastic or infectious spine often requires circumferential stabilization and fusion. To avoid the additional posterior surgery in these cases while increasing rigidity of anterior-only screw-plate constructs, the authors introduce the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility as well as its indications in a previous study in Part I of our project. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to assess the ex vivo accuracy of placing ATPS into the cervical vertebra as well as the biomechanical performance of ATPS in comparison to traditional vertebral body screws (VBS) in terms of pull-out strength (POS). Twenty-three ATPS were inserted alternately to two screws into the pedicles and vertebral bodies, respectively, of six cadaveric specimens from C3–T1. For insertion of ATPS, a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique was used. Pre- and post insertional CT-scans were used to assess accuracy of ATPS insertion in the axial and sagittal planes. A newly designed grading system and accuracy score were used to delineate accuracy of ATPS insertion. Following insertion of screws, 23 ATPS and 22 VBS were subjected to pull-out testing (POT). The bone mineral density (BMD) of each specimen was assessed prior to POT. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of correctly placed screws and non-critical pedicles breaches in axial plane was 78.3%, and 95.7% in sagittal plane. Hence, according to our definition of “critical” pedicle breach that exposes neurovascular structures at risk, 21.7% (n = 5) of all ATPS inserted showed a critical pedicle breach in axial plane. Notably, no critical pedicle perforation occurred at the C6 to T1 levels. Pull-out testing of ATPS and VBS revealed that pull-out resistance of ATPS was 2.5-fold that of VBS. Mean POS of 23 ATPS with a mean BMD of 0.566

  19. Unilateral C1 Lateral Mass and C2 Pedicle Screw Fixation for Atlantoaxial Instability in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Comparison with the Bilateral Method

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Seung-Chull; Bak, Koang Hum; Ryu, Jeil; Choi, Kyu-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bilateral C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw fixation (C1LM-C2P) is an ideal technique for correcting atlantoaxial instability (AAI). However, the inevitable situation of vertebral artery injury or unfavorable bone structure may necessitate the use of unilateral C1LM-C2P. This study compares the fusion rates of the C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw in the unilateral and bilateral methods. Methods Over five years, C1LM-C2P was performed in 25 patients with AAI in our institute. Preoperative studies including cervical X-ray, three-dimensional computed tomography (CT), CT angiogram, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. To evaluate bony fusion, measurements of the atlanto-dental interval (ADI) and CT scans were performed in the preoperative period, immediate postoperative period, and postoperatively at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results Unilateral C1LM-C2P was performed in 11 patients (44%). The need to perform unilateral C1LM-C2P was due to anomalous course of the vertebral artery in eight patients (73%) and severe degenerative arthritis in three patients (27%). The mean ADI in the bilateral group was 2.09 mm in the immediate postoperative period and 1.75 mm in 12-months postoperatively. The mean ADI in the unilateral group was 1.82 mm in the immediate postoperative period and 1.91 mm in 12-months postoperatively. Comparison of ADI measurements showed no significant differences in either group (p=0.893), and the fusion rate was 100% in both groups. Conclusion Although bilateral C1LM-C2P is effective for AAI from a biomechanical perspective, unilateral screw fixation is a useful alternative in patients with anatomical variations. PMID:26180616

  20. A Prospective Study on Radiological and Functional Outcome of Displaced Tongue Type Intra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures Treated by Percutaneous Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Anoop; Mathias, Lawrence John; Shetty, Vikram; Shetty, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calcaneal fractures have posed a challenge to orthopaedic surgeon for many years. The major problem is to reconstruct the fracture and improve healing of the fracture and also the surrounding tissues. Anatomic restoration of the three-dimensional anatomy of the calcaneum is the goal of surgical management of calcaneal fractures. Over the years, various techniques have been developed to accomplish this goal. Aim To determine the functional outcome in displaced tongue-type calcaneal fracture treated by percutaneous screw fixation. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted from October 2012 and September 2014. A total of 23 patients with intra-articular ‘tongue type’ calcaneal fractures were included in the study. Complete clinical and radiological evaluation was done. The surgical procedure encompassed closed reduction and fixation with two criss-cross 6.5 mm cannulated cancellous across the fracture site under fluoroscopic guidance. Postoperatively, on day three ankle and toe mobilization was begun. Non-weight bearing crutch mobilization was begun on postoperative day three. Reviews were done at 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 24 weeks postoperatively. At 6 weeks partial weight bearing mobilization was started. Full weight bearing was begun at 12 weeks. The patient was finally reviewed at 24 weeks and assessment of ankle function was done as per the Maryland foot scoring system. Radiographs were compared and preoperative and postoperative Gissane’s and Bohler’s angles were also compared. The results were analysed as per descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage). The complications noted were documented. Results Of the 23 patients under the study, three had excellent results with mean score of 90, 17 had good results with mean score of 82.94 and three had fair results with mean score of 74. Only one patient had subtalar arthritis as a complication. No other complications were seen. Conclusion Percutaneous screw fixation of tongue type

  1. Biomechanical and finite element analyses of bone cement-Injectable cannulated pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoyao; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Dong; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Zehua; Dai, Fei

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the safety and biomechanical stability of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-augmented bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screw (CICPS) in cancellous bone model, and to analyze the stress distribution at the screw-cement-bone interface. The OMEGA cannulated pedicle screw (OPS) and conventional pedicle screw (CPS) were used as control groups. Safety of the CICPS was evaluated by the static bending and bending fatigue tests. Biomechanical stability was analyzed by the maximum axial pullout strength and maximum torque tests. Stress distribution at the screw-cement-bone interface was analyzed by the finite element (FE) method. The CICPS and CPS produced statistically similar values for bending stiffness, bending structural stiffness, and bending yield moment. The maximum pullout force was 53.47 ± 8.65 N in CPS group, compared to 130.82 ± 7.32 N and 175.45 ± 43.01 N in the PMMA-augmented OPS and CICPS groups, respectively (p < 0.05). The CICPS had a significantly greater torque than the OPS and CPS. The FE model did not reveal excessive stress at the screw-cement-bone interface in the CICPS group. In conclusion, PMMA-augmentation with CICPS may be a potentially useful method to increase the stability of pedicle screws in patients with osteoporosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 960-967, 2016. PMID:25976272

  2. Comparison of Head Center Position and Screw Fixation Options Between a Jumbo Cup and an Offset Center of Rotation Cup in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Computer Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Ahmad; Black, Brandon J; Fay, Brian D; Heffernan, Christopher D; Ries, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Jumbo acetabular cups are commonly used in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A straightforward reaming technique is used which is similar to primary THA. However, jumbo cups may also be associated with hip center elevation, limited screw fixation options, and anterior soft tissue impingement. A partially truncated hemispherical shell was designed with an offset center of rotation, thick superior rim, and beveled anterior and superior rims as an alternative to a conventional jumbo cup. A three dimensional computer simulation was used to assess head center position and safe screw trajectories. Results of this in vitro study indicate that a modified hemispherical implant geometry can reduce head center elevation while permitting favorable screw fixation trajectories into the pelvis in comparison to a conventional jumbo cup. PMID:26253481

  3. Latarjet Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Hasham M.; Monroe, Emily J.; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N.; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. Purpose: To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. Results: All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Clinical Relevance: Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option. PMID:27158630

  4. Mechanical comparison of biplanar proximal closing wedge osteotomy with plantar plate fixation versus crescentic osteotomy with screw fixation for the correction of metatarsus primus varus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J T; Schon, L C; Parks, B G; Wang, Y; Berger, B I

    1998-05-01

    Proximal crescentic metatarsal osteotomy is a clinically successful technique for correcting metatarsus primus varus in hallux valgus surgery. However, there have been instances of dorsal elevation of the metatarsal head with this technique. Mechanical testing on 10 matched pairs of cadaver feet was performed to evaluate a new technique combining a biplanar closing wedge osteotomy and plantar plate fixation versus crescentic metatarsal osteotomy. The specimens were tested in cantilever-bending mode on an MTS Mini Bionix test frame. The mean load-to-failure values were 127.2 +/- 81.9 N (SD) for biplanar osteotomy with plate fixation and 44.9 +/- 43.3 N for crescentic osteotomy (P = 0.019); the mean stiffness values at the initial portion of the load-deflection curve were 83.11 +/- 73.76 N/mm and 31.95 +/- 43.00 N/mm, respectively (P = 0.012). The biplanar wedge osteotomy with plantar plate fixation demonstrated significantly stronger fixation than the crescentic osteotomy, with higher mean load-to-failure and stiffness values. This newly described technique may provide an acceptable alternative for patients at risk for dorsal elevation of the metatarsal, particularly those who are noncompliant or have osteopenia. Clinical study will determine whether this new technique offers satisfactory long-term results. PMID:9622419

  5. Arterial Injury to the Profunda Femoris Artery following Internal Fixation of a Neck of Femur Fracture with a Compression Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of an 82-year-old woman who developed extensive proximal thigh swelling and persistent anaemia following internal fixation of an extracapsular neck of femur fracture with a dynamic hip screw (DHS). This was revealed to be a pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery on angiography. Her case was further complicated by a concurrent pulmonary embolism (PE). She underwent endovascular coil embolisation of the pseudoaneurysm. An IVC filter was inserted and the patient was fully anticoagulated once it had been ensured that there was no active bleeding. In this case, we review the potential for anatomical variations in the blood supply to this region and discuss treatment options for a complicated patient. We recommend that a pseudoaneurysm should be part of a differential diagnosis for postoperative patients with anaemia refractory to blood transfusion so as not to miss this rare but potentially serious complication. PMID:24455367

  6. Comparison of stability of 2.0 mm standard and 2.0 mm locking miniplate/screws for the fixation of sagittal split ramus osteotomy on sheep mandibles.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Yener; Saglam, Haci; Dolanmaz, Dogan; Uckan, Sina

    2011-03-01

    Ten unembalmed adult sheep mandibles were used. The mandibles were sectioned in the midline, followed by sagittal split ramus osteotomies to obtain 20 hemimandibles. Each distal segment was advanced 5mm on each hemimandible. Ten of the specimens were fixed with 4-hole extended 2.0 mm titanium miniplates and screws and the other 10 were fixed with 4-hole extended 2.0 mm locking miniplates/screws. Each fixed specimen was mounted on a servo-hydraulic testing unit with the fixation device, and was tested to a range of forces of 0-140 N. The displacement values (mm) under 20, 60, 120, and 140 N were compared with the help of the Mann-Whitney U-test, and there were no significant differences between them at any force tested. Locking miniplate/screws and standard miniplate/screws showed similar displacement values at the range of forces tested. PMID:20226575

  7. Evaluation of fracture healing and subimplant bone response following fixation with a locking miniplate and screw system for mandibular angle fractures in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Poon, C C H; Verco, S

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to establish a mandible fracture model, and to review fracture healing following fixation with a locking miniplate system. Eighteen 2-year-old sheep were divided into three groups of six. Each animal had a single fracture that was anatomically reduced and internally fixed by a single 4-hole plate with two monocortical screws each side of the fracture. The fractures were internally fixed with poorly contoured conventional miniplates or poorly contoured mini-locking plate or well contoured conventional miniplates. Two sheep in each of the three groups were killed at 2, 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. The mandibles were radiographed then decalcified specimens were reviewed microscopically. No clinical difference was observed between the groups. All fractures were at an advanced stage of bony union by 4 weeks. Fracture union appeared radiographically more advanced with the locking plate system. This study established a protocol for simulating a fracture model for the study of fracture healing. A more advanced stage of union was seen for fractures internally fixed with locking plates/screws than with a conventional system. The observations suggest the purported biological benefits of locking miniplate system do exist. PMID:23374732

  8. Minimally Invasive Unilateral vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation and Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Treatment of Multi-Segment Lumbar Degenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Guangrun; Wang, Jiefeng; Zhang, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    Background The choice for instrumentation with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in treatment of degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) remains controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes in consecutive patients with multi-segment DLD treated with unilateral pedicle screw (UPS) vs. bilateral pedicle screw (BPS) instrumented TLIF. Material/Methods Eighty-four consecutive patients who had multi-level MIS-TLIF were retrospectively reviewed. All data were collected to compare the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Results Both groups showed similar clinical function scores in VAS and ODI. The two groups differed significantly in operative time (P<0.001), blood loss (P<0.001), and fusion rate (P=0.043), respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated similar clinical outcomes between UPS fixation and BPS procedure after MIS-TLIF for multi-level DLD. Moreover, UPS technique was superior in operative time and blood loss, but represented lower fusion rate than the BPS construct did. PMID:26603050

  9. Poly L-lactide co-glycolide/β-tricalcium phosphate interference screw fixation for bone-patellar tendon bone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan; Hrnack, Scott A

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical effectiveness and radiographic response of a poly (l-lactide co-glycolide)/β-tricalcium phosphate (PlLA/PGA/β-TCP) interference screw used in bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. A prospective, consecutive series of 104 patellar tendon bone-tendon-bone ACL reconstructions fixed with PLLA/PGA/β-TCP biocomposite screws were studied. After receiving the approval from the Institutional Review Board, the following data were collected preoperatively from all patients: physical examination, Lysholm score, Cincinnati, and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) activity scores, and standard knee radiographs. In addition to these, follow-up assessments included Lachman and pivot-shift tests, Tegner scores, and KT side-to-side differences. Surgical failure was defined by a 2+ Lachman test, positive pivot-shift test, side-to-side KT difference of greater than 5 mm or subsequent ACL revision surgery. Approximately 95% of patients (99 of 104) with an average follow-up of 36 months (range, 24 to 68) are reported. The average age was 30 years (range, 13 to 57 years). Postoperatively, four patients demonstrated +1 Lachman score and one patient demonstrated a +2 Lachman score. Postoperative pivot-shift tests were a trace positive in one patients and +1 in two patients. The average KT side-to-side difference was 0.65 mm. All, but five patients, demonstrated KT side-to-side measurements of 3 mm or less and those five demonstrated measurements of 5 mm or less. No revision reconstructions were performed. Significant improvements in Cincinnati score (41 to 85 postoperative) and Lysholm score (46 to 90) were observed. The average postoperative Tegner score was 7. IKDC activity score increased from 2.3 to 3.1. Approximately 4% of patients (4 of 99) met the criteria for failure. A PLLA/PGA/β-TCP biocomposite interference fixation screw provides good graft

  10. Outcome of short proximal femoral nail antirotation and dynamic hip screw for fixation of unstable trochanteric fractures. A randomised prospective comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhavuk; Marimuthu, Kanniraj; Kumar, Vijay; Malhotra, Rajesh; Kotwal, Prakash P

    2011-01-01

    A prospective, randomised, controlled trial was performed to compare the outcome of treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures with either a short proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) or dynamic hip screw (DHS). Eighty one patients with unstable fracture of the proximal part of the femur were randomised, at the time of admission, for fixation with either a short PFNA (n=42) or DHS (n= 39). The primary outcome measure was reoperation within the first postoperative year and mortality at the end of one year. Operative time, fluoroscopy time, blood loss, and any intra-operative complication were recorded for each patient. Clinical and radiological follow-up was undertaken for a minimum of 36 months. Any changes in the position of the implant or fixation failure were recorded. Hip range of motion, pain in the hip or thigh and return to work were used to compare the outcomes. There was no significant difference between 1 year mortality rates for the two groups. The mean operative time was significantly less in PFNA group (25 min) than in the DHS group (38 min). Patients treated with a PFNA experienced a shorter fluoroscopy time and less blood loss. Six patients in DHS group had implant failure while none experienced this in PFNA group. The PFNA group had a better functional outcome than the DHS group. PMID:21948030

  11. Bony Healing of Unstable Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures in the Elderly Using Percutaneously Applied Titanium Mesh Cages and a Transpedicular Fixation System with Expandable Screws

    PubMed Central

    Eschler, Anica; Ender, Stephan Albrecht; Schiml, Katharina; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is a high incidence of vertebral burst fractures following low velocity trauma in the elderly. Treatment of unstable vertebral burst fractures using the same principles like in stable vertebral burst fractures may show less favourable results in terms of fracture reduction, maintenance of reduction and cement leakage. In order to address these shortcomings this study introduces cementless fixation of unstable vertebral burst fractures using internal fixators and expandable intravertebral titanium mesh cages in a one-stage procedure via minimum-invasive techniques. Material and Methods A total of 16 consecutive patients (median age 76 years, range 58–94) with unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures and concomitant osteoporosis were treated by an internal fixator inserted via minimum invasive technique one level above and below the fractured vertebra. Fracture reduction was achieved and maintained by transpedicular placement of two titanium mesh cages into the fractured vertebral body during the same procedure. Intra- and postoperative safety of the procedure as well as analysis of reduction quality was analysed by 3D C-arm imaging or CT, respectively. Clinical and radiographic follow-up averaged 10.4 months (range 4.5–24.5). Results Stabilization of the collapsed vertebral body was achieved in all 16 cases without any intraoperative complication. Surgical time averaged 102±6.6 minutes (71–194). The postoperative kyphotic angle (KA) and Cobb angle revealed significant improvements (KA 13.7° to 7.4°, p<0.001; Cobb 9.6° to 6.0°, p<0.002) with partial loss of reduction at final follow-up (KA 8.3°, Cobb 8.7°). VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) improved from 7.6 to 2.6 (p<0.001). Adjacent fractures were not observed. One minor (malposition of pedicle screw) complication was encountered. Conclusion Cementless fixation of osteoporotic burst fractures revealed substantial pain relief, adequate maintenance of reduction and a low complication rate

  12. Treatment of acute thoracolumbar burst fractures with kyphoplasty and short pedicle screw fixation: Transpedicular intracorporeal grafting with calcium phosphate: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Repantis, Thomas; George, Petsinis

    2007-01-01

    Background: In the surgical treatment of thoracolumbar fractures, the major problem after posterior correction and transpedicular instrumentation is failure to support the anterior spinal column, leading to loss of correction and instrumentation failure with associated complaints. We conducted this prospective study to evaluate the outcome of the treatment of acute thoracolumbar burst fractures by transpedicular balloon kyphoplasty, grafting with calcium phosphate cement and short pedicle screw fixation plus fusion. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three consecutive patients of thoracolumbar (T9 to L4) burst fracture with or without neurologic deficit with an average age of 43 years, were included in this prospective study. Twenty-one from the 23 patients had single burst fracture while the remaining two patients had a burst fracture and additionally an adjacent A1-type fracture. On admission six (26%) out of 23 patients had neurological deficit (five incomplete, one complete). Bilateral transpedicular balloon kyphoplasty with liquid calcium phosphate to reduce segmental kyphosis and restore vertebral body height and short (three vertebrae) pedicle screw instrumentation with posterolateral fusion was performed. Gardner kyphosis angle, anterior and posterior vertebral body height ratio and spinal canal encroachment were calculated pre- to postoperatively. Results: All 23 patients were operated within two days after admission and were followed for at least 12 months after index surgery. Operating time and blood loss averaged 45 min and 60 cc respectively. The five patients with incomplete neurological lesions improved by at least one ASIA grade, while no neurological deterioration was observed in any case. The VAS and SF-36 (Role physical and Bodily pain domains) were significantly improved postoperatively. Overall sagittal alignment was improved from an average preoperative 16° to one degree kyphosis at final followup observation. The anterior vertebral body height

  13. A RANDOMIZED, PROSPECTIVE STUDY COMPARING INTERTROCHANTERIC HIP FRACTURE FIXATION WITH THE DYNAMIC HIP SCREW AND THE DYNAMIC HELICAL HIP SYSTEM IN A COMMUNITY PRACTICE

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel C; Sheerin, Daniel V; Wolf, Brian R; Wuest, Thomas K

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical performance of the Dynamic Helical Hip System (DHHS) spiral blade relative to the Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) lag screw. Design Randomized prospective study. Setting One level-2 trauma center and one level-3 trauma center. Patients Fifty-one consecutive patients were recruited into the trial. Inclusion criteria included patients over 50 years of age with AO/OTA 31A1 or 31A2 fracture. Intervention Surgeries were performed by one of 15 participating community orthopaedic surgeons. The patients were randomized to either a DHHS or DHS implant. Follow-up occurred at two weeks and six weeks and then at six-week intervals until healing occurred. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcome variables included sliding of die implant on the final AP radiographs, failure by cut-out and implant failure. Results There were 24 patients in the DHS group and 27 in the DHHS group. There was no difference in age, gender, ASA score, fracture classification or in the quality of reduction measured on the immediate postoperative radiographs (p=0.28) between the two groups. The tip apex distance was 18.7 mm in the DHHS group and 18.5 mm in the DHS group (p=0.40). The DHHS group had average blade sliding of 7.4 mm while the DHS group had an average lag-screw sliding of 7.7 (p=0.45). The DHHS group had two failures by central protrusion of the blade through the femoral head without significant varus collapse or superior migration. One was revised to a DHS and healed, the other was revised to a proximal femoral locking plate, which also failed and eventually required revision to a total hip arthroplasty. Investigation of the implants post failure showed evidence of binding of the blade shaft in the barrel as a mechanism of failure in both cases. No DHS implants cut out in this series, although one patient was revised to a total hip arthroplasty for symptomatic segmental osteonecrosis. Conclusion Both implants performed well in a majority of cases. The higher

  14. A comparison of the rates of union after cancellous iliac crest bone graft and Kirschner-wire fixation in the treatment of stable and unstable scaphoid nonunion.

    PubMed

    Park, H Y; Yoon, J O; Jeon, I H; Chung, H W; Kim, J S

    2013-06-01

    This study was performed to determine whether pure cancellous bone graft and Kirschner (K-) wire fixation were sufficient to achieve bony union and restore alignment in scaphoid nonunion. A total of 65 patients who underwent cancellous bone graft and K-wire fixation were included in this study. The series included 61 men and four women with a mean age of 34 years (15 to 72) and mean delay to surgery of 28.7 months (3 to 240). The patients were divided into an unstable group (A) and stable group (B) depending on the pre-operative radiographs. Unstable nonunion was defined as a lateral intrascaphoid angle > 45°, or a radiolunate angle > 10°. There were 34 cases in group A and 31 cases in group B. Bony union was achieved in 30 patients (88.2%) in group A, and in 26 (83.9%) in group B (p = 0.439). Comparison of the post-operative radiographs between the two groups showed no significant differences in lateral intrascaphoid angle (p = 0.657) and scaphoid length (p = 0.670) and height (p = 0.193). The radiolunate angle was significantly different (p = 0.020) but the mean value in both groups was < 10°. Comparison of the dorsiflexion and palmar flexion of movement of the wrist and the mean Mayo wrist score at the final clinical visit in each group showed no significant difference (p = 0.190, p = 0.587 and p = 0.265, respectively). Cancellous bone graft and K-wire fixation were effective in the treatment of stable and unstable scaphoid nonunion. PMID:23723277

  15. One-stage partial vertebrectomy, titanium mesh implantation and pedicle screw fixation in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures through a posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueju; Li, Guangbin; Dong, Tianhua; Zhang, Yingze; Li, Heng

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical results of a partial vertebrectomy with titanium mesh implantation and pedicle screw fixation using a posterior approach to reconstruct the spine in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures. METHOD: From January 2006 to August 2008, 20 patients with severe thoracolumbar fractures were treated.For vertebral bodies associated with one injured intervertebral disk, subtotal vertebrectomy surgery and single-segment fusion were performed. For vertebral bodies with two injured adjacent intervertebral disks, partial vertebrectomy surgery and two-segment fusion were performed. RESULTS: All 20 patients were followed up for 12 to 24 months (average of 18 months). There were no complications such as wound infections, hemopneumothorax or abdominal infections in any of the patients. The neurological status of all of the patients was improved by at least one American Spinal Injury Association grade by the last follow-up. The anterior vertebral body height was an average of 50.77% before surgery, 88.51% after surgery and 87.86% at the last follow up; the sagittal Cobb angle was improved, on average, from 26.15° to 5.39° and was 5.90° at the last follow up. The percentage of spinal stenosis was improved, on average, from 26.07% to 4.93%° and was 6.15% at the last follow up. There were significant differences in the anterior vertebral body height pre- and post-surgery and in the sagittal Cobb angle and the percentage of spinal stenosis (p<0) in all patients. CONCLUSIONS: This surgical procedure is simple and can accomplish decompression, reduction, fixation and fusion of the spine in one stage. This approach could be widely used in orthopedics. PMID:25627991

  16. Histologic and Histometric Analysis of Bone Repair at the Site of Mandibular Body Osteotomy and at the Bone-Screw Interface After Using a Biodegradable 2.0-mm Internal Fixation System.

    PubMed

    Sverzut, Cassio Edvard; de Matos, Fernando Pando; Trivellato, Alexandre Elias; Kato, Rogerio Bentes; Sverzut, Alexander Tadeu; Taba Junior, Mario; de Rezende Duek, Eliana Aparecida; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate histologically and histometrically the bone repair at the mandibular body osteotomy and at the bone-screw interface after using a biodegradable 2.0-mm internal fixation system. Six dogs were subjected to an osteotomy in the mandibular body, which was stabilized by applying a fixation device manufactured with poly-L-DL-lactic acid (70:30). The dogs were euthanized at 2 and 18 weeks. Each screw was sectioned along its long axis, and the osteotomy sites were divided into 3 parts: the upper part was labeled the tension third (TT); the lower part, compression third (CT); and the part between the TT and CT, intermediary third (IT). Histologic analysis showed areas of direct contact between the screw surface and the parent lamellar bone at 2 weeks. At 18 weeks, 3 microscopically distinct layers at the bone-screw interface were noted. At the osteotomy sites, union between the bone fragments was observed at 18 weeks. Statistically significant differences in the newly formed bone among TT, IT, and CT (P = 0.019) were observed. In conclusion, the biomechanical environment created by the biodegradable IF system used in this study facilitated bone repair at the osteotomy site. PMID:26080160

  17. Transpedicular vertebral body augmentation reinforced with pedicle screw fixation in fresh traumatic A2 and A3 lumbar fractures: comparison between two devices and two bone cements.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective study compares efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty (BK) with calcium phosphate (Group A) versus KIVA implant with PMMA (Group B) reinforced with three vertebrae pedicle screw constructs for A2 and A3 single fresh non-osteoporotic lumbar (L1-L4) fractures in 38 consecutive age- and diagnosis-matched patient populations. Extracanal leakage of both low-viscosity PMMA and calcium phosphate (CP) as well as the following roentgenographic parameters: segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior (PVBHr) vertebral body height ratio, spinal canal encroachment (SCE) clearance, and functional outcome measures: VAS and SF-36, were recorded and compared between the two groups. All patients in both groups were followed for a minimum 26 (Group A) and 25 (Group B) months. Extracanal CP and PMMA leakage was observed in four (18 %) and three (15 %) vertebrae/patients of group A and B, respectively. Hybrid fixation improved AVBHr, SKA, SCE, but PVBHr only in group B. VAS and SF-36 improved postoperatively in the patients of both groups. Short-segment construct with the novel KIVA implant restored better than BK-fractured lumbar vertebral body, but this had no impact in functional outcome. Since there was no leakage difference between PMMA and calcium phosphate and no short-term adverse related to PMMA use were observed, we advice the use of PMMA in fresh traumatic lumbar fractures. PMID:23982115

  18. FIXATION OF SUPRACONDYLAR FEMORAL FRACTURES: A BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS COMPARING 95° BLADE PLATES AND DYNAMIC CONDYLAR SCREWS (DCS)

    PubMed Central

    Percope Andrade, Marco Antônio; Rodrigues, André Soares; Mendonça, Celso Junio; Santos Portela, Luiz Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine, by means of comparative biomechanical tests, whether greater compressive load resistance and flexion is presented by 95° angled blade plates or by dynamic condylar screws (DCS), and to correlate the failure type presented during the tests with each type of plate. Methods: Sixty-five porcine femurs were subjected to 1 cm medial wedge osteotomy, in the metaphysis, to simulate an unstable supracondylar femoral fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed on these pieces: 35 were fixed using 95° lateral blade plates and 30 with DCS plates. Another variable studied was the failure type presented in each group, in an attempt to correlate this with the type of plate. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in biomechanical resistance between the two types of plates, or between the failure type and the plate type used for the osteosynthesis. Conclusion: The two types of plate behaved in a similar fashion. However, the angled blade plate proved to be superior to the DCS in the flexion test. No statistical difference in failure type or type of plate used was observed. PMID:27022525

  19. Fixation using alternative implants for the treatment of hip fractures (FAITH): design and rationale for a multi-centre randomized trial comparing sliding hip screws and cancellous screws on revision surgery rates and quality of life in the treatment of femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are a common type of fragility fracture that afflict 293,000 Americans (over 5,000 per week) and 35,000 Canadians (over 670 per week) annually. Despite the large population impact the optimal fixation technique for low energy femoral neck fractures remains controversial. The primary objective of the FAITH study is to assess the impact of cancellous screw fixation versus sliding hip screws on rates of revision surgery at 24 months in individuals with femoral neck fractures. The secondary objective is to determine the impact on health-related quality of life, functional outcomes, health state utilities, fracture healing, mortality and fracture-related adverse events. Methods/Design FAITH is a multi-centre, multi-national randomized controlled trial utilizing minimization to determine patient allocation. Surgeons in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit a total of at least 1,000 patients with low-energy femoral neck fractures. Using central randomization, patients will be allocated to receive surgical treatment with cancellous screws or a sliding hip screw. Patient outcomes will be assessed at one week (baseline), 10 weeks, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post initial fixation. We will independently adjudicate revision surgery and complications within 24 months of the initial fixation. Outcome analysis will be performed using a Cox proportional hazards model and likelihood ratio test. Discussion This study represents major international efforts to definitively resolve the treatment of low-energy femoral neck fractures. This trial will not only change current Orthopaedic practice, but will also set a benchmark for the conduct of future Orthopaedic trials. Trial registration The FAITH trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT00761813). PMID:24965132

  20. Anterograde Fixation Module for Posterior Acetabular Column Fracture: Computer-Assisted Determination of Optimal Entry Point, Angle, and Length for Screw Insertion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongqiang; Lin, Chuangxin; Zhang, Lifeng; Lin, Miaoxiong; Lai, Jianqiang; Cao, Shenglu; Peng, Geng; Feng, Kai; Yan, Ge; Cai, Daozhang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to provide valid data for a plate-screw fixation model for fractured posterior-anterior columns of the acetabulum. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nineteen cadaveric bony hemi-pelvis specimens were obtained and 50 healthy adults were enrolled. The modified Stoppa approach and computed tomography (CT) imaging were used to collect the measured parameter data of the module. RESULTS The measured parameter data were as follows: OP, 0.96±0.32 cm in females and 0.92±0.16 cm in males (P>0.05); PI, 0.98±0.28 cm in females, and 0.75±0.23 cm in males (P>0.05); Ðϴ, 59.68°±6.28° in females and 56.75°±3.22° in males (P>0.05); and Ðφ, 41.27°±2.76° in females and 34.31°±2.78° in males (P<0.05). The corresponding CT image data were as follows: PI, 1.08±0.22 cm in females and 0.85±0.27 cm in males (P>0.05); OP, 1.06±0.29 cm in females and 1.12±0.24 cm in males (P>0.05); Ðϴ, 55.33°±4.00° in females and 55. 50°±3.43° in males (P>0.05); and Ðφ was 39.21°±2.45°in females and 35.58°±2.31°in males (P<0.05). No significant difference with respect to sex and side existed between specimens and healthy adults (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS The measured parameter data obtained in healthy adults and cadaveric specimens provided an anatomic basis for the designation of the guide module, and thus confirmed the accuracy and safety of screw placement in fractured columns of the acetabulum. PMID:27584820

  1. A laboratory investigation to assess the influence of cement augmentation of screw and plate fixation in a simulation of distal femoral fracture of osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Wähnert, D; Lange, J H; Schulze, M; Gehweiler, D; Kösters, C; Raschke, M J

    2013-10-01

    The augmentation of fixation with bone cement is increasingly being used in the treatment of severe osteoporotic fractures. We investigated the influence of bone quality on the mechanics of augmentation of plate fixation in a distal femoral fracture model (AO 33 A3 type). Eight osteoporotic and eight non-osteoporotic femoral models were randomly assigned to either an augmented or a non-augmented group. Fixation was performed using a locking compression plate. In the augmented group additionally 1 ml of bone cement was injected into the screw hole before insertion of the screw. Biomechanical testing was performed in axial sinusoidal loading. Augmentation significantly reduced the cut-out distance in the osteoporotic models by about 67% (non-augmented mean 0.30 mm (sd 0.08) vs augmented 0.13 mm (sd 0.06); p = 0.017). There was no statistical reduction in this distance following augmentation in the non-osteoporotic models (non-augmented mean 0.15 mm (sd 0.02) vs augmented 0.15 mm (sd 0.07); p = 0.915). In the osteoporotic models, augmentation significantly increased stability (p = 0.017). PMID:24078541

  2. Influence of the volume of bone defect, bone grafting methods, and hook fixation on stress on the Kerboull-type plate and screw in total hip arthroplasty: three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Nobuhiro; Hara, Katsutoshi; Tabata, Tomonori; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    For total hip arthroplasty or revision surgery using acetabular reinforcement cross-plates, choosing between bulk and morselized bone grafts for filling acetabular defects is challenging. We used finite element model (FEM) analysis to clarify various stresses on the cross-plate based on bone defect size, bone graft type, and presence or absence of hook fixation to the bone. We constructed 12-pattern FEMs and calculated the maximum stress generated on the Kerboull-type (KT) plate and screw. Bone defects were classified into four patterns according to the volume. Regarding the bone graft type, bulk bone grafts were considered as cortical bone, and morselized bone grafts were considered to consist of cancellous bone. Models were compared based on whether hook fixation was used and whether a gap was present behind the plate. The upper surface of the host bone was fixed, and a 1,000-N load was imposed on the horizontal axis at 71°. Larger bone defects increased the stress on the KT plate and screws. This stress increased when no bone was grafted; it was lower when bulk cortical bone grafts were used for filling than when morselized cancellous bone grafts were used. For cortical bone grafts, the increased stress on the KT plate and screws was lowered with hook removal. Attaching the hook to the bone and filling the gap behind the KT plate with an adequate bone graft reduced the stress on the KT plate and screws, particularly for large bone defects filled by bulk bone grafting. PMID:24964969

  3. Orientation of the "Lisfranc screw".

    PubMed

    Panchbhavi, Vinod K

    2012-11-01

    The reduction and stabilization of diastases between the medial cuneiform and the base of second metatarsal after a Lisfranc ligament injury is a crucial objective in the open reduction and internal fixation of these injuries. To achieve this objective, a single screw is used. The present practice is to insert the screw directed from the medial cuneiform bone into the base of the second metatarsal. This technique trick describes an easier method of insertion of the screw and one that possibly provides a better fixation. PMID:22549028

  4. Orthopedic prosthesis fixation.

    PubMed

    Park, J B

    1992-01-01

    The fixation of orthopedic implants has been one of the most difficult and challenging problems. The fixation can be achieved via: (a) direct mechanical fixation using screws, pins, wires, etc.; (b) passive or interference mechanical fixation where the implants are allowed to move or merely positioned onto the tissue surfaces; (c) bone cement fixation which is actually a grouting material; (d) biological fixation by allowing tissues to grow into the interstices of pores or textured surfaces of implants; (e) direct chemical bonding between implant and tissues; or (f) any combination of the above techniques. This article is concerned with various fixation techniques including the potential use of electrical, pulsed electromagnetic field, chemical stimulation using calcium phosphates for the enhancement of tissue ingrowth, direct bonding with bone by glass-ceramics and resorbable particle impregnated bone cement to take advantages of both the immediate fixation offered by the bone cement and long term fixation due to tissue ingrowth. PMID:1449228

  5. The reaction of cortical bone to compression by screw threads.

    PubMed

    Schatzker, J; Horne, J G; Sumner-Smith, G

    1975-09-01

    Cortical bone subjected to compression by screw threads retains its integrity and is not resorbed. Screws which generate compression at the interface of their threads with bone can be expected to provide adequate fixation until bone union occurs. PMID:1157421

  6. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Yi-Lu; Liu, Mu-Yi; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p < 0.001). For screws without cement augmentation, solid screws exhibited the lowest pullout strength compared to the four expansive groups (p < 0.01). No significant differences in pullout strength were observed between the expansive screws with different designs (p > 0.05). Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength. PMID:26720724

  7. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Yi-Lu; Liu, Mu-Yi; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p < 0.001). For screws without cement augmentation, solid screws exhibited the lowest pullout strength compared to the four expansive groups (p < 0.01). No significant differences in pullout strength were observed between the expansive screws with different designs (p > 0.05). Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength. PMID:26720724

  8. Posterior Fixation Techniques in the Subaxial Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Makanji, Heeren; Cha, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the historical context, indications, techniques, and complications of four posterior fixation techniques to stabilize the subaxial cervical spine. Specifically, posterior wiring, laminar screw fixation, lateral mass fixation, and pedicle screw fixation are among the common methods of operative fixation of the subaxial cervical spine. While wiring and laminar screw fixation are now rarely used, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation are technically challenging and present the risk of significant complications if performed incorrectly. With a sound understanding of anatomy and rigorous preoperative evaluation of bony structures, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation provide a safe and reliable method for subaxial cervical spine fixation. PMID:26594602

  9. Changes in the radiological measurements of the tibiofibular syndesmal area in patients with Weber C ankle fractures who were treated with open reduction, internal fixation, and transyndesmal screw.

    PubMed

    Jasqui-Remba, S; Torres-Gómez, A; Salas-Morales, G A; Hernández-Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    The tibiofibular syndesmosis provides stability to the ankle mortise. The ankle syndesmosis is compromised in all Weber C type injuries. The radiographic method described by Merle DAubigné considers the bony relationships as a measure of syndesmotic widening. We sought to investigate whether the patients with a C type ankle fracture treated with ORIF and placement of a transyndesmal screw have an increment of the tibiofibular space and decrease of the tibiofibular overlap after the transyndesmal screw is removed. Our sample included 52 patients with Weber C ankle fractures treated by ORIF and transyndesmal screw at a level II trauma center. We measured the tibiofibular clear space and tibiofibular overlap in each phase of the treatment. The transyndesmal screw was removed at day 55.56 (± 21.83). We found an increase of the tibiofibular overlap of 0.20 mm (± 2.29, p = 0.532); and 0.21 mm (± 0.97, p = 0.146) in the tibiofibular clear space. The changes of 2.38% in the tibiofibular overlap and 5.29% in the tibiofibular clear space between the postoperative and post-removal periods were not statistically significant. After removal of the syndesmal screw, there is a slight radiographic broadening of the syndesmosis; however, it is small and statistically not significant. PMID:27403518

  10. Less invasive reduction and fusion of fresh A2 and A 3 traumatic L 1-L 4 fractures with a novel vertebral body augmentation implant and short pedicle screw fixation and fusion.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to report on the efficacy in reduction and safety in PMMA leakage of a novel vertebral augmentation technique with PEEK and PMMA, together with pedicle screws in the treatment of fresh vertebral fractures in young adults. Twenty consecutive young adults aged 45 ± 11 years with fresh burst A3/AO or severely compressed A2/AO fractures underwent via a less invasive posterior approach one-staged reduction with a novel augmentation implant and PMMA plus 3-vertebrae pedicle screw fixation and fusion. Radiologic parameters as segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior vertebral body height ratio (PVBHr), spinal canal encroachment (SCE), cement leakage and functional parameters as VAS, SF-36 were measured pre- and post-operatively. Hybrid construct restored AVBHr (P < 0.000), PVBHr (P = 0.02), SKA (P = 0.015), SCE (P = 0.002) without loss of correction at an average follow-up of 17 months. PMMA leakage occurred in 3 patients (3 vertebrae) either anteriorly to the fractured vertebral body or to the adjacent disc, but in no case to the spinal canal. Two pedicle screws were malpositioned (one medially, one laterally to the pedicle at the fracture level) without neurologic sequelae. Solid posterolateral spinal fusion occurred 8-10 months post-operatively. Pre-operative VAS and SF-36 scores improved post-operatively significantly. This study showed that this novel vertebral augmentation technique using PEEK implant and PMMA reduces and stabilizes via less invasive technique A2 and A3 vertebral fractures without loss of correction and leakage to the spinal canal. PMID:24170266

  11. Torsional moment to failure for carbon fibre polysulphone expandable rivets as compared with stainless steel screws for carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy fracture plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Sell, P J; Prakash, R; Hastings, G W

    1989-04-01

    A method of securing carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates with carbon fibre polysulphone expanding rivets was investigated. Six carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates were secured to rods with carbon fibre polysulphone rivets and six were secured with standard cortical stainless steel screws. These constructions were then subjected to pure torsional load to failure. The carbon fibre expandable rivets failed at a greater torsional moment. PMID:2720038

  12. WRIST ARTHRODESIS WITH MINIMAL FIXATION PRESERVING THE CARPOMETACARPAL JOINTS

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Arlindo Gomes; Pádua Gonçalves, Rodolfo Fonseca; Freitas, Afrânio Donato; Chaves, Antonio Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Wrist arthrodesis is a surgical procedure that should always be considered in cases of pathological conditions in which anatomical and functional structures are altered. In general, the results are very satisfactory, particularly for pain relief, and in the majority of cases, there is considerable functional improvement. Various techniques have been described, with different methods of internal fixation, most of which include the carpometacarpal joints in the fusion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results from wrist arthrodesis using a technique that is simpler, more biological, less expensive, and does not involve the carpometacarpal joints. Methods: Fifteen patients with wrist arthrodesis were evaluated (six with sequelae from trauma, four with rheumatoid arthritis, three with Kienbock grade IV, one with Preiser and one with panarthrosis). The technique consisted of using an iliac bone plate and internal fixation with Kirschner wires, avoiding the carpometacarpal joints. Results: The evaluation was based on consolidation time (93% in seven weeks); movements of the fingers and pronosupination; pinch and grasp strength; functional evaluation through the DASH, pain and patient satisfaction questionnaires. In general, the results were similar to those of other, more aggressive techniques, and the non-inclusion of the carpometacarpal joints did not affect the final result. Conclusion: Wrist arthrodesis with fixation using Kirschner wires and an iliac bone plate, preserving the carpometacarpal joints, gives good or excellent results that are not inferior to those of other techniques that have been described. However, it presents major advantages over other methods: it is less aggressive and cheaper, and does not have the inconvenience and complications associated with the use of plates and screws. PMID:27022522

  13. SCREW MIGRATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: CLINICAL REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando; Tomé, José; Barreto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complications from total knee arthroplasty caused by the implanted material are rare, with the exception of polyethylene wear. Descriptions of screw migration into the knee joint cavity are very rare. The authors report intra-articular migration of a polyethylene safety screw in a case of total knee arthroplasty, with sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament (TKA Performance; Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA), which necessitated new surgery to remove the screw, replace the polyethylene insert and emplace a new fixation screw. PMID:27022526

  14. Arthroscopic Posterior Shoulder Stabilization With an Iliac Bone Graft and Capsular Repair: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tomas; Goede, Fabian; Struck, Melena; Wellmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Several surgical approaches have been described for the treatment of recurrent posterior shoulder instability. Many authors have performed posterior bone block procedures with good results not only in the presence of glenoid bone loss or dysplasia but also in the case of capsular hyperlaxity and poor soft-tissue quality. Open techniques often require an extensive approach with the disadvantage of a poor cosmetic result and possible insufficiency of the deltoid muscle. Furthermore, the treatment of concomitant pathologies and the correct placement of the bone graft are difficult. Therefore we describe an all-arthroscopic posterior shoulder stabilization technique with an iliac bone graft and capsular repair that is intended to improve the pre-existing open procedure. The key steps of the operation are the precise placement and screw fixation of the bone block at the posterior glenoid under arthroscopic control and the subsequent posterior capsular refixation and plication using 2 suture anchors to create an extra-articular graft position. PMID:23766993

  15. Comparison of the retro screw and standard interference screw for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Y; Arciero, Robert A; Obopilwe, Elifho; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2012-07-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the load to failure between a retro screw (RS) and a standard interference screw (IS) for tibial-sided anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) fixation. We used 20 bovine tibia and extensor tendons for the study. A group of 10 specimens underwent IS fixation while the other 10 underwent RS fixation. Within each group, five specimens had graft suture in contact (interdigitating) with the screw threads. All specimens were tested on the MTS 858 Mini Bionix II (MTS Systems, Shakopee, MN). There was no statistically significant difference between the RS and IS with respect to peak load to failure. IS with suture interdigitation failed at an average of 520 N (range: 358 to 793 N), while the RS with suture interdigitation failed at 613 N (range: 438 to 1089 N). The IS without suture interdigitation failed at 654 N and the RS without suture interdigitation at 531 N. Specimens with a whipstitch in contact with the screw did not demonstrate higher pull out strength. The RS fixation strength appears to equal the IS. Graft suture contact with screw threads does not increase fixation strength. Based on this study, using a RS for tibial ACL soft tissue graft fixation is feasible and provides equal fixation strength compared with the standard IS. PMID:23057142

  16. Pullout strength of pedicle screws with cement augmentation in severe osteoporosis: A comparative study between cannulated screws with cement injection and solid screws with cement pre-filling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pedicle screws with PMMA cement augmentation have been shown to significantly improve the fixation strength in a severely osteoporotic spine. However, the efficacy of screw fixation for different cement augmentation techniques, namely solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling versus cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation, remains unknown. This study aimed to determine the difference in pullout strength between conical and cylindrical screws based on the aforementioned cement augmentation techniques. The potential loss of fixation upon partial screw removal after screw insertion was also examined. Method The Taguchi method with an L8 array was employed to determine the significance of design factors. Conical and cylindrical pedicle screws with solid or cannulated designs were installed using two different screw augmentation techniques: solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling and cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation. Uniform synthetic bones (test block) simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a platform for each screw design and cement augmentation technique. Pedicle screws at full insertion and after a 360-degree back-out from full insertion were then tested for axial pullout failure using a mechanical testing machine. Results The results revealed the following 1) Regardless of the screw outer geometry (conical or cylindrical), solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling exhibited significantly higher pullout strength than did cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation (p = 0.0129 for conical screws; p = 0.005 for cylindrical screws). 2) For a given cement augmentation technique (screws without cement augmentation, cannulated screws with cement injection or solid screws with cement pre-filling), no significant difference in pullout strength was found between conical and cylindrical screws (p >0.05). 3) Cement infiltration into the open cell of the test block led to

  17. Periprosthetic fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Mark; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Wähnert, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Fixation techniques of periprosthetic fractures are far from ideal although the number of this entity is rising. The presence of an intramedullary implant generates its own fracture characteristics since stiffness is altered along the bone shaft and certain implant combinations affect load resistance of the bone. Influencing factors are cement fixation of the implant, intramedullary locking and extramedullary or intramedullary localization of the implant and the cortical thickness of the surrounding bone. Cerclage wires are ideally suited to fix radially displaced fragments around an intramedullary implant but they are susceptible to axial and torsional load. Screws should be added if these forces have to be neutralized. Stability of the screw fixation itself can be enhanced by embracement configuration around the intramedullary implant. Poor bone stock quality, often being present in metaphyseal areas limits screw fixation. Cement augmentation is an attractive option in this field to enhance screw purchase. PMID:27338227

  18. Single Stage Treatment of Non – Union of Transcervical Neck Femur Fracture with Shepherd Crook Deformity of Proximal Femur in A Case of Fibrous Dysplasia using Dynamic Hip Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    VK, Kandhari; SS, Bava; MM, Desai; RN, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fibrous dysplasia is a rare benign disorder of the skeletal system characterized by fibro osseous proliferation with intervening areas of normal or immature bone in the intramedullary region. It can either be a monostotic (involves one bone) or a polyostotic (involves more than one bone) presentation and usually occurs equally in males and females. Deformities like scoliosis and shepherd’s crook deformity are frequently encountered in the polyostotic form. We report a rare managed case of bilateral non-union of the pathological fracture of femur neck with shepherd’s crook deformity of the proximal femur in a case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. Case Report: A 16 years old female case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia had bilateral Shepherd’s crook deformity of the proximal femur with bilateral non – union of pathological fracture of neck femur. We managed each side in one stage with two osteotomies. On the right side, first oblique osteotomy was done from just distal to the greater trochanter up to the level of the neck and the second; lateral closing wedge abduction osteotomy was done at the subtrochanteric level. 2 months later on the left side double lateral closing wedge abduction osteotomies were performed both at the subtrochanteric level. Fixation of both the sides was done using a 135° Dynamic Richard’s screw with a long side plate to span the osteotomy sites and the lesion. Post – operatively we achieved a neck shaft angle of 135° on right side and 133° on the left side. Follow up imaging showed union at both the osteotomy sites bilaterally and also at the site of the pathological fracture of neck femur. Presently, at 18 months post – operatively, patient is walking full weight bearing without support and there are no signs of recurrence of lesions of fibrous dysplasia or the deformity. Conclusion: Double osteotomy is an easy and effective method to correct the shepherd’s crook deformity and achieve correct mechanical

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of a new composite bioresorbable screw.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C A; Kuiper, J H; Kelly, C P

    2006-04-01

    A new bioresorbable composite cannulated screw has been developed for small bone fracture fixation. The LG ("Little Grafter") screw is manufactured from Biosteon, which is a composite of poly L-lactic acid and hydroxyapatite. This study aimed to compare interfragmentary compression generated by this new screw with conventional metal screws commonly used in scaphoid fracture fixation. Four small metallic screws were compared with the LG screw, using a bone model produced from rigid polyurethane foam. The screws included the Acutrak, Asnis III, Herbert and Herbert-Whipple screws. The mean maximum compression forces for the LG screw, the Asnis and the Acutrak were comparable (LG 32.3 N, Asnis 32.8 N, Acutrak 38.3 N), whereas those using the Herbert and the Herbert-Whipple screw were significantly lower (Herbert 21.8 N, Herbert-Whipple 19.9 N). The bioresorbable LG screw has been shown to have good compressive properties compared to commonly used small bone fragment compression screws. PMID:16361004

  20. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating

    PubMed Central

    Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 106 cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). RESULTS The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). CONCLUSION The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws. PMID:26576253

  1. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  2. Novel, congenital iliac arterial anatomy: Absent common iliac arteries and left internal iliac artery

    PubMed Central

    Green, Christopher S.; Helmy, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the iliac arterial system are rare and can be associated with ischemia. With an increase in vascular imaging and interventions, such anomalies are likely to be encountered with greater frequency. We present the case of a 25-year-old female who was incidentally found to have absence of the common iliac arteries bilaterally and the left internal iliac artery, a constellation not previously reported in the literature. We present relevant imaging findings, review embryonic vascular development, and discuss potential clinical implications.

  3. Apparatus to test insertion and removal torque of bone screws.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, A; Santavirta, S; Lappalainen, R

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes affordable equipment for testing bone screw torque, corresponding to ASTM standard F543-00 for testing metallic medical bone screws. Correct testing of thin and long bone screws is essential due to screw failures during insertion and removal of the screws. Furthermore, insertion torque is an important factor in predicting fixation strength, screw pull-out force and effects of surface treatment of screws. The capability of the custom-built tester was determined using polytetrafluoroethylene and wood disc samples and bone screws. Bovine cortical bones allowed testing to the failure limit, i.e. the torque increased in long screws to the fracture limit. For 2.7 and 3.5 mm thick self-tapping cortical bone screws, the failure torques were 30-50 per cent higher than the minimum values required by the standard (1.0 and 2.3 N m respectively). The equipment provided reproducible results and fulfilled the ASTM standard very well. Preliminary testing with amorphous diamond coated bone screws showed good durability of the coating and on average 10-15 per cent lower torque values compared with uncoated screws. The equipment can be used to measure insertion and removal torques as described in the standard. Furthermore, it also allows testing of normal screws and bolts. PMID:14702987

  4. Solid and hollow pedicle screws affect the electrical resistance: A potential source of error with stimulus-evoked electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Liao, Xinhua; Ma, Xianguang; Li, Changqing; Han, Jianda; Zhou, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although stimulus evoked electromyography (EMG) is commonly used to confirm the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. There are no studies to differentiate between solid screws and hollow screws to the electrical resistance of pedicle screws. We speculate that the electrical resistance of the solid and hollow pedicle screws may be different and then a potential source of error with stimulus-evoked EMG may happen. Materials and Methods: Resistance measurements were obtained from 12 pedicle screw varieties (6 screws of each manufacturer) across the screw shank based on known constant current and measured voltage. The voltage was measured 5 times at each site. Results: Resistance of all solid screws ranged from 0.084 Ω to 0.151 Ω (mean =0.118 ± 0.024 Ω) and hollow screws ranged from 0.148 Ω to 0.402 Ω (mean = 0.285 ± 0.081 Ω). There was a significant difference of resistance between the solid screws and hollow screws (P < 0.05). The screw with the largest diameter no matter solid screws or hollow screws had lower resistance than screws with other diameters. No matter in solid screws group or hollow screws group, there were significant differences (P < 0.05) between the 5.0 mm screws and 6.0 mm screws, 6.0 mm screws and 7.0 mm screws, 5.0 mm screws and 7.0 mm screws, 4.5 mm screws and 5.5 mm screws, 5.5 mm screws and 6.5 mm screws, 4.5 mm screws and 6.5 mm screws. The resistance of hollow screws was much larger than the solid screws in the same diameter group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Hollow pedicle screws have the potential for high electrical resistance compared to the solid pedicle screws and therefore may affect the EMG response during stimulus-evoked EMG testing in pedicle screw fixation especially in minimally invasive percutaneous pedical screw fixation surgery. PMID:23960278

  5. Pull-out strength of screws from polymethylmethacrylate cement.

    PubMed

    Motzkin, N E; Chao, E Y; An, K N; Wikenheiser, M A; Lewallen, D G

    1994-03-01

    We aimed to determine the optimal method of inserting a screw into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement to enhance fixation. We performed six groups of ten axial pull-out tests with two sizes of screw (3.5 and 4.5 mm AO cortical) and three methods of insertion. Screws were placed into 'fluid' PMMA, into 'solid' PMMA by drilling and tapping, or into 'curing' PMMA with quarter-revolution turns every 30 seconds until the PMMA had hardened. After full hardening, we measured the maximum load to failure for each screw-PMMA construct. We found no significant difference in the pull-out strengths between screw sizes or between screws placed in fluid or solid PMMA. Screws placed in curing PMMA were significantly weaker: the relative strengths of solid, fluid and curing groups were 100%, 97% and 71%, respectively. We recommend the use of either solid or fluid insertion according to the circumstances and the preference of the surgeon. PMID:8113302

  6. A cementless, elastic press-fit socket with and without screws

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The acetabular component has remained the weakest link in hip arthroplasty regarding achievement of long-term survival. Primary fixation is a prerequisite for long-term performance. For this reason, we investigated the stability of a unique cementless titanium-coated elastic monoblock socket and the influence of supplementary screw fixation. Patient and methods During 2006–2008, we performed a randomized controlled trial on 37 patients (mean age 63 years (SD 7), 22 females) in whom we implanted a cementless press-fit socket. The socket was implanted with additional screw fixation (group A, n = 19) and without additional screw fixation (group B, n = 18). Using radiostereometric analysis with a 2-year follow-up, we determined the stability of the socket. Clinically relevant migration was defined as > 1 mm translation and > 2º rotation. Clinical scores were determined. Results The sockets without screw fixation showed a statistically significantly higher proximal translation compared to the socket with additional screw fixation. However, this higher migration was below the clinically relevant threshold. The numbers of migratory sockets were not significantly different between groups. After the 2-year follow-up, there were no clinically relevant differences between groups A and B regarding the clinical scores. 1 patient dropped out of the study. In the others, no sockets were revised. Interpretation We found that additional screw fixation is not necessary to achieve stability of the cementless press-fit elastic RM socket. We saw no postoperative benefit or clinical effect of additional screw fixation. PMID:23083434

  7. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  8. Biomechanical efficacy of monoaxial or polyaxial pedicle screw and additional screw insertion at the level of fracture, in lumbar burst fracture: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Li, Changqing; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Wei-dong; Zhou, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Background: Use of a pedicle screw at the level of fracture, also known as an intermediate screw, has been shown to improve clinical results in managing lumbar fracture, but there is a paucity of biomechanical studies to support the claim. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding intermediate pedicle screws at the level of a fracture on the stiffness of a short-segment pedicle fixation using monoaxial or polyaxial screws and to compare the strength of monoaxial and polyaxial screws in the calf spine fracture model. Materials and Methods: Flexibility of 12 fresh-frozen calf lumbar spine specimens was evaluated in all planes. An unstable burst fracture model was created at the level of L3 by the pre-injury and dropped-mass technique. The specimens were randomly divided into monoaxial pedicle screw (MPS) and polyaxial pedicle screw (PPS) groups. Flexibility was retested without and with intermediate screws (MPSi and PPSi) placed at the level of fracture in addition to standard screws placed at L2 and L4. Results: The addition of intermediate screws significantly increased the stability of the constructs, as measured by a decreased range of motion (ROM) in flexion, extension, and lateral bending in both MPS and PPS groups (P < 0.05). There was neither any significant difference in the ROM in the spines of the two groups before injury, nor a difference in the ROM between the MPSi and PPSi groups (P > 0.05), but there was a significant difference between MPS and PPS in flexion and extension in the short-segment fixation group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The addition of intermediate screws at the level of a burst fracture significantly increased the stability of short-segment pedicle screw fixation in both the MPS and PPS groups. However, in short-segment fixation group, monoaxial pedicle screw exhibited more stability in flexion and extension than the polyaxial pedicle screw. PMID:22912513

  9. Deep circumflex iliac perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2003-07-01

    The increased freedom of the DCIP flap from the harvested iliac crest facilitates correct positioning. To ensure that the DCIP flap can be safely elevated, however, the presence of perforators (approximately 1 cm in diameter) must be confirmed preoperatively and intraoperatively. PMID:12916597

  10. Reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Van Landuyt, P; Peter, B; Beluze, L; Lemaître, J

    1999-08-01

    The fixation of osteosynthesis screws remains a severe problem for fracture repair among osteoporotic patients. Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is routinely used to improve screw fixation, but this material has well-known drawbacks such as monomer toxicity, exothermic polymerization, and nonresorbability. Calcium phosphate cements have been developed for several years. Among these new bone substitution materials, brushite cements have the advantage of being injectable and resorbable. The aim of this study is to assess the reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement. Polyurethane foams, whose density is close to that of cancellous bone, were used as bone model. A hole was tapped in a foam sample, then brushite cement was injected. Trabecular osteosynthesis screws were inserted. After 24 h of aging in water, the stripping force was measured by a pull-out test. Screws (4.0 and 6.5 mm diameter) and two foam densities (0.14 and 0.28 g/cm3) were compared. Cements with varying solid/liquid ratios and xanthan contents were used in order to obtain the best screw reinforcement. During the pull-out test, the stripping force first increases to a maximum, then drops to a steady-state value until complete screw extraction. Both maximum force and plateau value increase drastically in the presence of cement. The highest stripping force is observed for 6.5-mm screws reinforced with cement in low-density foams. In this case, the stripping force is multiplied by 3.3 in the presence of cement. In a second experiment, cements with solid/liquid ratio ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 g/mL were used with 6.5-mm diameter screws. In some compositions, xanthan was added to improve injectability. The best results were obtained with 2.5 g/mL cement containing xanthan and with 3.0 g/mL cements without xanthan. A 0.9-kN maximal stripping force was observed with nonreinforced screws, while 1.9 kN was reached with reinforced screws. These first results are very promising regarding screw

  11. Biomechanical testing of a new design for Schanz pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Willett, K; Hearn, T C; Cuncins, A V

    1993-01-01

    Standard 5-mm AO Schanz pedicle screws were biomechanically compared with a new design, featuring 6-mm threads with a 5-mm core diameter continuous with the shaft. One each of the two screw designs was surgically inserted into the matching pedicles of 32 cadaveric vertebrae. The pull-out strengths of the screws were then determined by recording the peak force values during extraction under servohydraulic displacement control. The screws were also tested in three-point bending, varying the inner load point with respect to the shaft thread junction, within a clinically anticipated range. The mean pull-out strength for the 6-mm screw was 597 N, which was significantly greater than the mean strength of 405 N for the 5 mm screw (p = 0.002). The 6-mm screw was also stronger in three-point bending, and failed at the point of inner load application, with no evidence of a stress-raising effect at the shaft/thread junction. In contrast, the 5-mm screw withstood lower loads, and failed at the shaft/thread junction, regardless of the point of loading. Pedicle screw breakage and pull-out are the recognized modes of failure of spinal implants, which are dependent on pedicle screw fixation. The results suggest distinct biomechanical advantages for the 6-mm screw, which should be used whenever clinically feasible. PMID:8377050

  12. Surgical screw segmentation for mobile C-arm CT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Joseph; Brehler, Michael; Franke, Jochen; Wolf, Ivo; Vetter, Sven Y.; Grützner, Paul A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Nabers, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Calcaneal fractures are commonly treated by open reduction and internal fixation. An anatomical reconstruction of involved joints is mandatory to prevent cartilage damage and premature arthritis. In order to avoid intraarticular screw placements, the use of mobile C-arm CT devices is required. However, for analyzing the screw placement in detail, a time-consuming human-computer interaction is necessary to navigate through 3D images and therefore to view a single screw in detail. Established interaction procedures of repeatedly positioning and rotating sectional planes are inconvenient and impede the intraoperative assessment of the screw positioning. To simplify the interaction with 3D images, we propose an automatic screw segmentation that allows for an immediate selection of relevant sectional planes. Our algorithm consists of three major steps. At first, cylindrical characteristics are determined from local gradient structures with the help of RANSAC. In a second step, a DBScan clustering algorithm is applied to group similar cylinder characteristics. Each detected cluster represents a screw, whose determined location is then refined by a cylinder-to-image registration in a third step. Our evaluation with 309 screws in 50 images shows robust and precise results. The algorithm detected 98% (303) of the screws correctly. Thirteen clusters led to falsely identified screws. The mean distance error for the screw tip was 0.8 +/- 0.8 mm and for the screw head 1.2 +/- 1 mm. The mean orientation error was 1.4 +/- 1.2 degrees.

  13. Quantitative Anatomy of C7 Vertebra in Southern Chinese for Insertion of Lateral Mass Screws and Pedicle Screws

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chi Hin; Wong, Kam Kwong; Wong, Wing Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To analyze the quantitative anatomy of C7 vertebra for insertion of lateral mass screws and pedicle screws in Southern Chinese patients. Overview of Literature C7 lateral mass is smaller when compared to other subaxial cervical levels, which limits the length of lateral mass screws that can be used. Some studies have suggested pedicle screws for better fixation. But, this option is limited by the narrow pedicle width. Methods We have obtained computed tomography (CT) cervical spine data in 0.625 mm slices from our radiology department. The patients were adults. CTs were from May to August, 2015. The lateral mass screw length was measured using Margerl's technique and pedicle width and pedicle screw trajectory were determined in three-dimensional reformated images. Results CT scans of cervical spines of 94 patients were obtained and 188 lateral masses and pedicles of C7 vertebrae were measured. The mean lateral mass screw length was 13.2 mm (standard deviation [SD] 1.6 mm), mean outer pedicle width was 5.9 mm (SD 1.0 mm) and mean pedicle screw trajectory was 29.4 degrees (SD 3.6 degrees). Most (91.0%) of the pedicles had an outer diameter ≥4.5 mm. Conclusions The mean lateral mass screw length was longer when compared with other similar studies, while the mean outer pedicle width was narrower. Nearly 10% of the pedicles were unable to accommodate 3.5 mm screws. These findings favor the use of lateral mass screws to provide a safe and stable fixation for C7 vertebrae in Southern Chinese patients, while the final choice of fixation method should only be confirmed after careful preoperative planning with CT scan. PMID:27559451

  14. Emerging Techniques for Posterior Fixation of the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kushagra; Boniello, Anthony; Rihn, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Pedicle screw fixation is the preferred method of posterior fusion in lumbar spinal surgery. The technique provides three-column support of the vertebrae, contributing to the biomechanical strength of the construct. However, open pedicle screw fixation often necessitates wide posterior exposure and dissection with soft-tissue disruption of the facet joint. Alternative posterior fixation techniques have been developed to reduce surgical time, soft-tissue dissection, disruption of the adjacent facet joint capsule, neurologic risk, and implant cost. Results of these techniques are comparable to those of standard pedicle screw fixation systems. Certain patients, especially those at a lower risk of nonunion or those who require posterior fixation only as an adjunct to anterior column support, may benefit from the shorter surgical time and limited posterior exposure of the alternative techniques. However, the decreased rigidity of these alternative constructs can result in excessive motion, which can lead to nonunion and early hardware failure. PMID:27077477

  15. [Stabilizing the pelvic ring with the external fixator. Biomechanical studies and clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Egbers, H J; Draijer, F; Havemann, D; Zenker, W

    1992-11-01

    Experimental studies were performed on anatomic pelvis specimens. In different series of experiments the positioning of the screws and the assembly of the external fixator were changed. We tried fixing the external fixator to the screws at varying distances from the body surface. For stabilisation of the fractured pelvic girdle a self-constructed "bow fixator", fixed to supra-acetabular screws with proximal compression and distal traction showed the best results. Homogeneous distribution of the pressure could be achieved on the unstable dorsal pelvic ring structures. In clinical routine we used the triangular external fixator, which in the experimental situation yielded results close to those of the bow fixator. External fixation of the pelvic girdle has been performed 128 times since 1977, in January 1991 a prospective study was started. For Tile type B injuries the external fixator itself represents an effective, minimally invasive system, but type C fractures often require an additional internal fixation of the dorsal lesion. PMID:1475122

  16. Fatigue strength of common tibial intramedullary nail distal locking screws

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Lanny V; Harris, Robert M; Zubak, Joseph J

    2009-01-01

    withstanding more than a week of weight bearing. If two small diameter screws are used, our tests showed that the probability of withstanding a week of weight bearing increases from zero to about 20 percent, which is similar to having a single 4.5 mm diameter screw providing fixation. Conclusion Our results show that selecting the system that uses the largest distal locking screws would offer the best fatigue resistance for an unstable fracture pattern subjected to full weight bearing. Furthermore, using multiple screws will substantially reduce the risk of premature hardware failure. PMID:19371438

  17. COMPARISON OF VOLUMES OCCUPIED BY DIFFERENT INTERNAL FIXATION DEVICES FOR FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Lauxen, Daniel; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto; Souza, Ralf Wellis de; Zimmer, Cinthia Gabriely; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to measure the volume occupied by the most widely used internal fixation devices for treating femoral neck fractures, using the first 30, 40 and 50 mm of insertion of each screw as an approximation. The study aimed to observe which of these implants caused least bone aggression. Methods: Five types of cannulated screws and four types of dynamic hip screws (DHS) available on the Brazilian market were evaluated in terms of volume differences through water displacement. Results: Fixation with two cannulated screws presented significantly less volume than shown by DHS, for insertions of 30, 40 and 50 mm (p=0.01, 0.012 and 0.013, respectively), fixation with three screws did not show any statistically significant difference (p= 0.123, 0.08 and 0.381, respectively) and fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes than shown by DHS (p=0.072, 0.161 and 0.033). Conclusions: Fixation of the femoral neck with two cannulated screws occupied less volume than DHS, with a statistically significant difference. The majority of screw combinations did not reach statistical significance, although fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes on average than those occupied by DHS. PMID:27047886

  18. In vivo bone response and mechanical evaluation of electrosprayed CaP nanoparticle coatings using the iliac crest of goats as an implantation model.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Corinne; Meijer, Gert J; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; de Jonge, Lise T; Wolke, Joop G C; Spauwen, Paul H M; Jansen, John A

    2010-06-01

    Recent trends in clinical implantology include the use of endosseous dental implant surfaces embellished with nano-sized modifications. The current study was initiated to evaluate the mechanical properties, as well as the potential beneficial effects, of electrosprayed CaP nanoparticle-coated (nano-CaP) implants on the in vivo osteogenic response, compared with grit-blasted, acid-etched (GAE) implant surfaces as controls. For this purpose nano-CaP coatings were deposited on cylindrical screw-type (St) implants and implanted bilaterally into the iliac crest of goats for 6weeks. In addition to histological and histomorphometrical analyses, insertion torque and removal torque values were measured on implant placement and retrieval, respectively. The present study showed similar insertion and removal torque values for nano-CaP-coated and GAE control implants, with no statistically significant increase in torque value during the implant period for either group. With regard to bone-implant contact and peri-implant bone volume, no significant differences were found between nano-CaP-coated and GAE implants after 6weeks implantation. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that in situations in which implants are placed in a non-compromised situation using a standard press fit implantation strategy the performance of electrosprayed nano-CaP coatings is comparable with GAE implants, both with respect to implant fixation and bone healing response. PMID:19944782

  19. A biomechanical comparison of internal fixation techniques for ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Craig; Berg, Scott; McCann, Kevin; Hutchinson, Byron

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the primary bending stiffness characteristics of 5 different ankle arthrodesis fixation techniques: 3 compression screws, an anterior locking plate, a lateral locking plate, an anterior locking plate with a compression screw, and a lateral locking plate with a compression screw. A total of 25 full-scale anatomic models consisting of fourth-generation composite tibiae and tali were tested using an Instron 4505 Universal Testing System. We hypothesized that the use of a compression screw with a locking plate would add considerable stiffness to the fixation construct compared with the use of a locking plate alone. The data have shown that an anterior or lateral plate with a compression screw provides significantly greater stiffness than both a plate and 3 compression screws used individually. No significant difference was seen between the anterior plate with a compression screw and the lateral plate with a compression screw. No significant differences were found among the use of an anterior plate, a lateral plate, or 3 compression screws. We have concluded that when using a locking plate in an anterior or lateral configuration, the addition of a compression screw will considerably increase the primary bending stiffness of ankle arthrodesis. PMID:25116232

  20. Pullout performance comparison of pedicle screws based on cement application and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Tolunay, Tolga; Başgül, Cemile; Demir, Teyfik; Yaman, Mesut E; Arslan, Arslan K

    2015-11-01

    Pedicle screws are the main fixation devices for certain surgeries. Pedicle screw loosening is a common problem especially for osteoporotic incidents. Cannulated screws with cement augmentation are widely used for that kind of cases. Dual lead dual cored pedicle screw has already given promising pullout values without augmentation. This study concentrates on the usage of dual lead dual core with cement augmentation as an alternative to cannulated and standard pedicle screws with cement augmentation. Five groups (dual lead dual core, normal pedicle screw and cannulated pedicle screw with augmentation, normal pedicle screw, dual lead dual cored pedicle screw) were designed for this study. Healthy bovine vertebrae and synthetic polyurethane foams (grade 20) were used as embedding test medium. Test samples were prepared in accordance with surgical guidelines and ASTM F543 standard testing protocols. Pullout tests were conducted with Instron 3300 testing frame. Load versus displacement values were recorded and maximum pullout loads were stated. The dual lead dual cored pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation exhibited the highest pullout values, while dual lead dual cored pedicle screw demonstrated similar pullout strength as cannulated pedicle screw and normal pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation. The dual lead dual cored pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation can be used for osteoporotic and/or severe osteoporotic patients according to its promising results on animal cadaver and synthetic foams. PMID:26503840

  1. Lateral Mass Fixation in the Subaxial Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Kurd, Mark F; Millhouse, Paul W; Schroeder, Gregory D; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-08-01

    The use of lateral mass screws and rods in the subaxial spine has become the standard method of fixation for posterior cervical spine fusions. Multiple techniques have been described for the placement of lateral mass screws, including the Magerl, the Anderson, and the An techniques. While these techniques are all slightly different, the overall goal is to obtain solid bony fixation while avoiding the neurovascular structures. The use of lateral mass screws has been shown to be a safe and effective technique for achieving a posterior cervical fusion. PMID:26049972

  2. Quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knez, Dejan; Mohar, Janez; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    Spinal deformity correction with vertebral fixation is nowadays the preferred surgical treatment, where pedicle screws are inserted through pedicles into corresponding vertebral bodies and afterwards connected with rods. In clinical practice, the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique are currently being used for pedicle screw placement surgery. However, it is difficult to quantitatively compare both techniques and determine which technique is more adequate for each planned pedicle screw before surgery (i.e. preoperatively). In this paper, we therefore describe a framework for quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement surgery by evaluating the screw fastening strength. Quantitative comparisons were performed on computed tomography images of 11 patients with 74 manually planned pedicle screws, who underwent the vertebral fixation procedure. The first quantitative comparison was performed between the straight-forward and anatomical pedicle screw insertion technique, which resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.0mm in screw diameter, 2.9mm in screw length, 1.2mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.5° in screw inclinations. The second quantitative comparison was performed between the best resulting pedicle screw insertion technique and manually obtained pedicle screw plans, which again resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.5mm in screw diameter, 4.7mm in screw length, 2.4mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.0° in screw inclinations. Both the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique proved approximately equal in terms of the screw fastening strength.

  3. A Biomechanical Comparison of Three Different Posterior Fixation Constructs Used for C6–C7 Cervical Spine Immobilization: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    HONG, Jae Taek; QASIM, Muhammad; ESPINOZA ORÍAS, Alejandro A.; NATARAJAN, Raghu N.; AN, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    The intralaminar screw construct has been recently introduced in C6–C7 fixation. The aim of the study is to compare the stability afforded by three different C7 posterior fixation techniques using a three-dimensional finite element model of a C6–C7 cervical spine motion segment. Finite element models representing three different cervical anchor types (C7 intralaminar screw, C7 lateral mass screw, and C7 pedicle screw) were developed. Range of motion (ROM) and maximum von Mises stresses in the vertebra for the three screw techniques were compared under pure moments in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. ROM for pedicle screw construct was less than the lateral mass screw construct and intralaminar screw construct in the three principal directions. The maximum von Misses stress was observed in the C7 vertebra around the pedicle in all the three screw constructs. Maximum von Mises stress in pedicle screw construct was less than the lateral mass screw construct and intralaminar screw construct in all loading modes. This study demonstrated that the pedicle screw fixation is the strongest instrumentation method for C6–C7 fixation. Pedicle screw fixation resulted in least stresses around the C7 pedicle-vertebral body complex. However, if pedicle fixation is not favorable, the laminar screw can be a better option compared to the lateral mass screw because the stress around the pedicle-vertebral body complex and ROM predicted for laminar screw construct was smaller than those of lateral mass screw construct. PMID:24418790

  4. Relationship between foot length and the inter anterior superior iliac distance.

    PubMed

    Waikakul, S; Vanadurongwan, V; Sakarnkosol, S

    1998-12-01

    Reduction of unstable pelvic fracture by external fixator might be over or under corrected as there is no proper estimation from the surgical landmark. Radiographic evaluation after reduction must be carried out and improper reduction is found in a certain number. To find a better guide by normal surgical landmark the study was carried out as a survey research in 600 volunteers aged from 10 to 70 years. Simple caliper and tape were used to measure the height, foot length and inter anterior superior iliac spine distance. In 376/420 male volunteers (89%), the length between right heel and tip of the fourth toe was equal to the inter anterior superior iliac spine distance. In 173/180 female volunteers (96%), the length between right heel and tip of big toe was equal to the inter anterior superior iliac spine distance. The length of the right foot can be used as a reference in reducing unstable fractured pelvis by external fixation. These data were used in the management of 36 patients with unstable fractured pelvis with external fixation for reduction and stabilization. All had good results. PMID:10341900

  5. Editorial Commentary: Are Larger Screws the Answer When Anatomic Reconstruction of an Acromioclavicular Separation Fails?

    PubMed

    Denard, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    Although fixation methods have improved, failure after fixation of an acromioclavicular joint separation is not uncommon. This biomechanical study shows that in the setting of graft slippage through previously well-placed clavicular tunnels, a revision anatomic reconstruction is feasible with larger tenodesis screws. Although the risk of clavicular fracture increases with larger tunnels, anatomic revision with larger screws is an option in select cases. PMID:27495861

  6. Treatment of fractures of the condylar head with resorbable pins or titanium screws: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Matthias; Loukota, Richard; Kuchta, Anne; Stadlinger, Bernd; Jung, Roland; Speckl, Katrin; Schmiedekampf, Robert; Eckelt, Uwe

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to compare in vivo the stability of fixation of condylar fractures in sheep using sonic bone welding and standard titanium screws. We assessed stability of the osteosynthesis and maintenance of the height of the mandibular ramus. Height decreased slightly in both groups compared with the opposite side. The volume of the condyle increased considerably in both groups mainly because callus had formed. The results showed no significant disadvantages for pin fixation compared with osteosynthesis using titanium screws. PMID:22901526

  7. Addition of an anti-rotation screw to the dynamic hip screw for femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Makki, Daoud; Mohamed, Ahmed M; Gadiyar, Rajeev; Patterson, Marc

    2013-07-01

    The authors investigated the use of an anti-rotation screw with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) during internal fixation of Garden I and II femoral neck fractures. Sixty-five patients with Garden I and II femoral neck fractures (mean age, 70 years) were treated with internal fixation at the authors' institution. In 31 patients, a 2-hole DHS was used alone (group 1), and in 34 patients, the DHS was combined with an anti-rotation screw placed in the cranial part of femoral head and neck (group 2). Patients' preinjury function and mental level were assessed using the Barthel index and the Abbreviated Mental test, respectively. The outcome measures included cost implications, operative time, and intraoperative radiation dose. The modified Harris Hip Score and a radiological assessment were performed at a mean of 11 months (range, 8-24 months) postoperatively. The use of the anti-rotation screw was associated with a longer operative time (mean, 44.54 minutes in group 1 vs 51.52 minutes in group 2; P<.0001) and more fluoroscopy screening (mean dose area product, 28.39 cGy/cm(2) in group 1 vs 44.33 cGy/cm(2) in group 2; P=.03). The additional cost of using an anti-rotation screw was £106 ($170) per case. No difference existed between the 2 groups with regard to radiological union, onset of avascular necrosis, and rate of revision surgeries. An anti-rotation screw, used with the dynamic hip screw, involves extra costs, prolongs operative time, and requires more intraoperative fluoroscopy screening but offers no advantages with regard to fracture union. PMID:23823042

  8. Biomechanical analysis on transverse tibial fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Mendes, Mariane Henseler Damaceno; Claudino, Stephanie; Baracho, Filipe; Borges, Paulo César; da Cunha, Luiz Antonio Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify whether the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw fixation presents biomechanical advantages when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw fixation for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty-eight porcine knees and bovine extensor digitorum tendons were used as the graft materials. The tests were performed in three groups: (1) standard, used fourteen knees, and the grafts were fixated with the combination of femoral cross pin and a tibial screw; (2) inverted, used fourteen knees with an inverted combination of tibial cross pin and a femoral screw; (3) control, ten control tests performed with intact ACL. After the grafts fixation, all the knees were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength and ultimate strength. Results There was no statistically significant difference in survival techniques in regard to strength, yield load and tension. There was a higher survival compared in the standard curves of yield stress (p < 0.05). Conclusion There is no biomechanical advantage, observed in animal models testing, in the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw. PMID:26229913

  9. Anatomic Consideration of the C1 Laminar Arch for Lateral Mass Screw Fixation via C1 Lateral Lamina : A Landmark between the Lateral and Posterior Lamina of the C1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Han, Seung-Ho; Cho, Sung-Min; You, Seung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To clarify the landmark for deciding the entry point for C1 lateral mass screws via the posterior arch by using 3-dimensional (3D) computed images. Methods Resnick insisted that the C1 posterior arch could be divided into pure posterior and lateral lamina (C1 pedicle). Authors studied where this transition point (TP) is located between the posterior lamina and the C1 pedicle and how it can be recognized. The 3D computed images of 86 cadaver C1s (M : F=45 : 41) were used in this study. Results The superior ridge of the C1 posterior arch had 2 types of orientation. One was in the vertical direction in the C1 posterior lamina and the other was in the horizontal direction in the C1 pedicle. The TP was located at the border between the 2 areas, the same site as the posterior end of the groove of the vertebral artery. On posterior-anterior projection, the posterior arch was sharpened abruptly at TP. We were unable to identify the TP in 6.4% of specimens due to complete or partial osseous bridges. A total of 93.8% of the TP were located between the most enlarged point of the spinal canal and the medial wall of the vertebral artery. Conclusion The anatomic entry zone of C1 lateral laminar screws was clarified and identified based on the TP by using preoperative 3D computed images. PMID:24044076

  10. A Biomechanical Comparison of Three 1.5-mm Plate and Screw Configurations and a Single 2.0-mm Plate for Internal Fixation of a Mandibular Condylar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Aquilina, Peter; Parr, William C.H.; Chamoli, Uphar; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The most stable pattern of internal fixation for mandibular condyle fractures is an area of ongoing discussion. This study investigates the stability of three patterns of plate fixation using readily available, commercially pure titanium implants. Finite element models of a simulated mandibular condyle fracture were constructed. The completed models were heterogeneous in bone material properties, contained approximately 1.2 million elements and incorporated simulated jaw adducting musculature. Models were run assuming linear elasticity and isotropic material properties for bone. No human subjects were involved in this investigation. The stability of the simulated condylar fracture reduced with the different implant configurations, and the von Mises stresses of a 1.5-mm X-shaped plate, a 1.5-mm rectangular plate, and a 1.5-mm square plate (all Synthes (Synthes GmbH, Zuchwil, Switzerland) were compared. The 1.5-mm X plate was the most stable of the three 1.5-mm profile plate configurations examined and had comparable mechanical performance to a single 2.0-mm straight four-hole plate. This study does not support the use of rectangular or square plate patterns in the open reduction and internal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures. It does provide some support for the use of a 1.5-mm X plate to reduce condylar fractures in selected clinical cases. PMID:25136411

  11. Percutaneous limited internal fixation combined with external fixation to treat open pelvic fractures concomitant with perineal lacerations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linwei; Zhang, Guoyou; Wu, Yaoshen; Guo, Xiaoshan; Yuan, Wen

    2011-12-01

    External fixation combined with colostomy is a traditional management of the pelvic fractures associated with perineal lacerations. However, malunion and dysfunction caused by malreduction and loss of reduction are common. One-stage definitive fixation without soft tissue harassment is requisite for the treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of 1-stage definitive fixation by combining percutaneous limited internal fixation and external fixation in the treatment of pelvic fractures with perineal lacerations. Eighteen adults with high-energy unstable pelvic ring fractures associated with perineal lacerations were admitted between June 2003 and December 2010. Mean follow-up was 28 months. After wound closure and colostomy, 10 patients received external fixation and percutaneous screw fixation, and 8 patients underwent external fixation. Demographics, wound and fracture classification, and Injury Severity Score were comparable between the groups (P>.05). Initial reduction quality was comparable between the groups (P=.14), but the loss of reduction during follow-up was more significant in the external fixation group (P=.004). Combined fixation achieved better functional results than external fixation (P=.02). There were 2 cases of superficial wound infection in each group (P=1.0). By combining debridement, wound closure, colostomy, percutaneous limited internal fixation, and external fixation, we improved pelvic fracture recovery while reducing the risk of infection. One-stage definitive fixation is a better choice than external fixation in the treatment of open pelvic fracture concomitant with perineal wound. PMID:22146197

  12. Biomechanical impact of C2 pedicle screw length in an atlantoaxial fusion construct

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Risheng; Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Belkoff, Stephen M.; Langdale, Evan R.; McGovern, Kelly; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokalsan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Posterior, atlantoaxial (AA) fusions of the cervical spine may include either standard (26 mm) or short (16 mm) C2 pedicle screws. This manuscript focused on an in vitro biomechanical comparison of standard versus short C2 pedicle screws to perform posterior C1-C2 AA fusions. Methods: Twelve human cadaveric spines underwent C1 lateral mass screw and standard C2 pedicle screw (n = 6) versus short C2 pedicle screw (n = 6) fixation. Six additional controls were not instrumented. The peak torque, peak rotational interval, and peak stiffness of the constructs were analyzed to failure levels. Results: The peak torque to construct failure was not statistically significantly different among the control spine (12.2 Nm), short pedicle fixation (15.5 Nm), or the standard pedicle fixation (11.6 Nm), P = 0.79. While the angle at the peak rotation statistically significantly differed between the control specimens (47.7° of relative motion) and the overall instrumented specimens (P < 0.001), the 20.7° of relative rotation in the short C2 pedicle screw specimens was not statistically significantly higher than the 13.7° of relative rotation in the standard C2 pedicle screw specimens (P = 0.39). Similarly, although the average stiffness was statistically significantly lower in control group (0.026 Nm/degree) versus the overall instrumented specimens (P = 0.001), the standard C2 pedicle screws (2.54 Nm/degree) did not differ from the short C2 pedicle screws Conclusions: Both standard and short C2 pedicle screws allow for equally rigid fixation of C1 lateral mass-C2 AA fusions. Usage of a short C2 pedicle screw may be an acceptable method of stabilization in carefully selected patient populations. PMID:25289157

  13. Posterior cervical spine arthrodesis with laminar screws: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2007-04-01

    We performed fixation using laminar screws in 2 patients in whom lateral mass screws, pedicle screws or transarticular screws could not be inserted. One was a 56-year-old woman who had anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS). When a guide wire was inserted using an imaging guide, the hole bled massively. We thought the re-insertion of a guide wire or screw would thus increase the risk of vascular injury, so we used laminar screws. The other case was an 18-year-old man who had a hangman fracture. Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the left vertebral artery. A laminar screw was inserted into the patent side (i.e., the right side of C2). Cervical pedicle screws are the most biomechanically stable screws. However, their use carries a high risk of neurovascular complications during screw insertion, because the cervical pedicle is small and is adjacent laterally to the vertebral artery, medially to the spinal cord, and vertically to the nerve roots. Lateral mass screws are also reported to involve a risk of neurovascular injuries. The laminar screw method was thus thought to be useful, since arterial injuries could thus be avoided and it could also be used as a salvage modality for the previous misinsertion. PMID:17471313

  14. Iliac Artery Stent Placement Relieves Claudication in Patients with Iliac and Superficial Femoral Artery Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Shigeo Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of iliac artery stent placement for relief of claudication in patients with both iliac and superficial femoral artery (SFA) lesions. Methods. Stent placement for only iliac artery occlusive disease was performed in 94 limbs (74 patients) with both iliac and SFA occlusive disease on the same limb. All procedures were performed because intermittent claudication did not improve after continuation of antiplatelet medication therapy and home-based exercise for 3 months. Rutherford classification was 2 in 20 limbs and 3 in 74 limbs. Patients with critical limb ischemia were excluded. Median duration of follow-up was 40 months. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent, clinical improvement rates, and risk factors for requiring additional SFA procedures were evaluated. Results. Primary patency rates of the iliac stent at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 97, 93, 79, and 79 %, respectively. The initial clinical improvement rate was 87 %. Continued clinical improvement rates at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years were 87, 81, 69, and 66 %, respectively. SFA Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C/D lesion was a significant risk factor for requiring additional SFA procedures. Conclusion. Intermittent claudication was relieved by iliac stent placement in most patients with both iliac and SFA lesions. Thus, the indications for treatment of the SFA intended for claudicants should be evaluated after treatment of the iliac lesion.

  15. Cement leakage in pedicle screw augmentation: a prospective analysis of 98 patients and 474 augmented pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jan U; Baldauf, Joerg; Marx, Sascha; Kirsch, Michael; Schroeder, Henry W S; Pillich, Dirk T

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Loosening and pullout of pedicle screws are well-known problems in pedicle screw fixation surgery. Augmentation of pedicle screws with bone cement, first described as early as 1975, increases the pedicle-screw interface and pullout force in osteoporotic vertebrae. The aim of the present study was to identify cement leakage and pulmonary embolism rates in a large prospective single-center series of pedicle screw augmentations. METHODS All patients who underwent cement-augmented pedicle screw placement between May 2006 and October 2010 at the authors' institution were included in this prospective cohort study. Perivertebral cement leakage and pulmonary cement embolism were evaluated with a CT scan of the area of operation and with a radiograph of the chest, respectively. RESULTS A total of 98 patients underwent placement of cement-augmented pedicle screws; 474 augmented screws were inserted in 237 vertebrae. No symptomatic perivertebral cement leakage or symptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was observed, but asymptomatic perivertebral cement leakage was seen in 88 patients (93.6%) and in 165 augmented vertebrae (73.3%). Cement leakage most often occurred in the perivertebral venous system. Clinically asymptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was found in 4 patients (4.1%). CONCLUSIONS Perivertebral cement leakage often occurs in pedicle screw augmentation, but in most cases, it is clinically asymptomatic. Cement augmentation should be performed under continuous fluoroscopy to avoid high-volume leakage. Alternative strategies, such as use of expandable screws, should be examined in more detail for patients at high risk of screw loosening. PMID:26943258

  16. Plates, Screws, or Combination? Radiologic Outcomes After Lisfranc Fracture Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Simon; Howells, Nicholas; Millar, Michael; De Villiers, Daniel; Joseph, Samuel; Oppy, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, Lisfranc fracture dislocations have been treated with transarticular screw fixation. A more recent development has been the use of dorsal bridging plates. The aim of the present study was to compare the radiologic outcomes for these 2 methods. Currently, no data comparing the outcomes of these 2 treatment options have been reported. A total of 62 patients were treated for Lisfranc fracture dislocations during a 6-year period. The inclusion criteria included ≥6 months of follow-up data available. Each fracture was classified using the Hardcastle classification system. Each fracture was also allocated into 1 of 4 groups: transarticular screw fixation, dorsal plating, a combination of plate and screw fixation, and nonoperative management. The outcome measures included the Kellgren-Lawrence grading of osteoarthritis and the Wilppula classification of anatomic reduction. In terms of results, radiologic osteoarthritis is not associated with the type of injury according to the Hardcastle classification nor with having an open or closed fracture. The Hardcastle classification is not associated with the type of fixation used. Fractures fixed with a combination of plates and screws had a 3.01 (95% confidence interval 1.036 to 8.74) increased risk of having stage 3 or 4 radiologic osteoarthritis compared with being fixed solely with bridging plates (p = .009). Multivariate analysis revealed that this increased risk of osteoarthritis was dependent on the quality of reduction, with good reductions having a 18.2 (95% confidence interval 15.9 to 21.8) times decreased risk of severe osteoarthritis compared with fair or poor reductions, independent of the type of fixation used (p < .0001). No radiologic benefits were found when comparing plate or screw fixation for Lisfranc fracture dislocations (although screw fixation might be associated with a less planus foot and fewer complications). Instead, a good anatomic reduction was the only predictor of the

  17. Screw-locking wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A tool comprises a first handle and a second handle, each handle extending from a gripping end portion to a working end portion, the first handle having first screw threads disposed circumferentially about an inner portion of a first through-hole at the working end portion thereof, the second handle having second screw threads disposed circumferentially about an inner portion of a second through-hole at the working end portion thereof, the first and second respective through-holes being disposed concentrically about a common axis of the working end portions. First and second screw locks preferably are disposed concentrically with the first and second respective through-holes, the first screw lock having a plurality of locking/unlocking screw threads for engaging the first screw threads of the first handle, the second screw lock having a plurality of locking/unlocking screw threads for engaging the second screw threads of the second handle. A locking clutch drive, disposed concentrically with the first and second respective through-holes, engages the first screw lock and the second screw lock. The first handle and the second handle are selectively operable at their gripping end portions by a user using a single hand to activate the first and second screw locks to lock the locking clutch drive for either clockwise rotation about the common axis, or counter-clockwise rotation about the common axis, or to release the locking clutch drive so that the handles can be rotated together about the common axis either the clockwise or counter-clockwise direction without rotation of the locking clutch drive.

  18. Percutaneous Anterior Column Fixation for Acetabulum Fractures, Does It Have to Be Difficult?-The New Axial Pedicle View of the Anterior Column for Percutaneous Fixation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihai; Zhang, Wei; Mullis, Brian; Liu, Daohong; Xiong, Qi; Lv, Houchen; Ji, Xinran; Peng, Ye; Tang, Peifu

    2016-01-01

    Anterior column percutaneous screw fixation can be challenging. The purpose of this new technique is to offer a rapid, simple, and safe method to place an anterior screw. The authors used a 3-dimensional reconstruction simulation, cadaver study, and a clinical case series to demonstrate this new alternative to standard previously described techniques. PMID:26284439

  19. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of fractures..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures...

  2. Axial cyclic behavior of the bone-screw interface.

    PubMed

    Inceoğlu, Serkan; Ehlert, Mike; Akbay, Atilla; McLain, Robert F

    2006-11-01

    Screw fixation strength is investigated by using a pullout test. Despite many screw pullout studies, the effects of loading rate on the pullout behavior of pedicle screws are not known. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of loading rate on the pullout stiffness and strength of pedicle screws. Sixty pedicle screws were inserted in foam blocks and pulled out at four different rates: 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 mm/min. Twenty of these 60 screws were cycled non-destructively at four different rates sequentially, i.e., 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 mm/min prior to pullout. Ten additional pedicle screws were inserted in five calf lumbar vertebrae, cycled as in foam group, and pulled out at a rate of either 0.1 or 50 mm/min. The results showed that the stiffness was higher at all rates compared to 0.1 mm/min in foam model but in bone model only 1 and 5 mm/min groups were higher compared to 0.1 mm/min. The pullout strength in 50 mm/min group was higher than that in 0.1 mm/min group in both foam and bone model. The results suggested that loading rate influenced the mechanics of the bone-screw interface. Therefore, a fair comparison between the pullout studies can be achieved under same loading rate conditions. Moreover, the cycling of the pedicle screws in axial direction within a pre-yield region showed an unusual hysteresis curve. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the mechanics of the screw-bone interface. PMID:16458568

  3. Experimental study in order to assess the effects of limited periosteum stripping on the fracture healing and to compare osteosynthesis using plates and screws with intramedullary Kirschner wire fixation.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Tiberiu Paul; Enache, Valentin; Cocoloş, Ion; Ţigliş, Mirela; Cobilinschi, Cristian; Ţincu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    There are many studies that investigate indirect and direct fracture healing but few mention the effect of periosteum stripping on consolidation of fractures. Most of these studies use only one method of osteosynthesis for each group. Therefore, we reported a new developed murine model in order to assess if limited periosteum stripping influence significantly the quality of the fracture healing process by comparing two different osteosynthesis methods to reduce simultaneously bilateral femur fractures. We applied the experimental protocol for a number of 12 rats. We used plates and screws to reduce femoral osteotomy for the right hind limb and intramedullary Kirschner wire for the left hind limb. Clinical, radiological and histological assessments were made for a period of eight weeks. The absence of a healthy hind limb led to a slower healing process based on the histological findings and to implant failure based on radiological findings. In summary, complete fracture healing was not achieved during this experimental study. Therefore, we consider that future studies are needed for a better understanding of the effects of periosteum removal on the fracture healing process. PMID:27516016

  4. Retrospective Comparison of Percutaneous Fixation and Volar Internal Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Calderón, Santiago A.; Doornberg, Job N.

    2007-01-01

    A change in the practice of a single surgeon provided an opportunity for retrospective comparison of comparable cohorts treated with percutaneous fixation (17 patients) or a volar plate and screws (23 patients) an average of 30 months after surgery. The final evaluation was performed according to the Gartland and Werley and Mayo rating systems and the DASH questionnaire. There were no significant differences on the average scores for the percutaneous and volar plating groups, respectively: Gartland and Werley, 4 vs 5; Mayo, 82 vs 83; and DASH score 13 for both cohorts. Motion, grip, and radiographical parameters were likewise comparable. Volar internal plate and screw fixation can achieve results comparable to percutaneous fixation techniques in the treatment of fractures of the distal radius. PMID:18780085

  5. Mechanical performance of the standard Orthofix external fixator.

    PubMed

    Chao, E Y; Hein, T J

    1988-07-01

    Static and fatigue tests of the standard Orthofix unilateral external fixator (Orthofix SRL, Verona, Italy) were performed. Under similar fixation configurations, the Orthofix device offered higher bending stiffness in both directions, equal torsional stiffness, and lower axial stiffness when compared to the Hoffmann-Vidal quadrilateral frame with full pins. The bending resistance of the Orthofix ball joint was found to be proportional to its locking cam tightening torque. After applying 2 million loading cycles to the bone ends fixed by the device, the overall stiffness characteristics of the frame did not change significantly. Repetitive manual tightening and loosening of the ball joint caused abrasive wear on the cam and bushing surfaces. The locking position of the cam migrated for a mean of 45 degrees. After 50 cycles of tightening and bending to failure, the ball joint locking strength was reduced by 20% to 25%, but the stiffness did not change. Wear and stripping of the seat of the fixator body locking screw and the pin fixation screw threads were also noted. Based on the test results, the standard Orthofix device could be re-used, but certain fixator components must be inspected and replaced. The ball joint locking cam and fixation screws required periodic tightening during clinical application to prevent loss of frame stiffness under repetitive loading. Modifications of the fixator design are recommended to improve its mechanical performance. PMID:3405906

  6. Bicondylar tibial fractures: Internal or external fixation?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gunasekaran; Peterson, Nicholas; Narayan, Badri

    2011-03-01

    Bicondylar fractures of the tibia, representing the Schatzker V and VI fractures represent a challenging problem. Any treatment protocol should aim at restoring articular congruity and the metaphyseo-diaphsyeal dissociation (MDD)-both of these are equally important to long-term outcome. Both internal and external fixations have their proponents, and each method of treatment is associated with its unique features and complications. We review the initial and definitive management of these injuries, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method of definitive fixation. We suggest the use of a protocol for definitive management, using either internal or external fixation as deemed appropriate. This protocol is based on the fracture configuration, local soft tissue status and patient condition. In a nutshell, if the fracture pattern and soft tissue status are amenable plate fixation (single or double) is performed, otherwise limited open reduction and articular surface reconstruction with screws and circular frame is performed. PMID:21430865

  7. Modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Song, Dajiang; Li, Jinsong; Xu, Jian; Lv, Hongbin

    2015-04-01

    The paper aims to improve the operative technique of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvesting, further minimise morbidity of donor site, and improve the effect of recipient site reconstruction. From March 2005 to March 2011, 55 cases of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvested by different methods were performed to reconstruct the defects of the extremities. Twenty-nine cases were reconstructed with a traditional deep circumflex iliac artery osteomusculocutaneous flap. Twenty-six cases were repaired with modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps. In 29 cases with a traditional DCIA osteomusculocutaneous flap, two cases showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. Flapnecrosis was significant in two cases. Arterial compromise occurred in one case 5 days after operation completion and led to flap failure. Three flaps developed postoperative venous congestion, but only one flap received re-exploration. In the other two cases, some stitches were removed for decompression. All three flaps survived. In two cases, marginal flap necrosis occurred, but no secondary skin grafting was required. In 26 cases with modified flap transplantation, one case showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. All flaps survived totally. Osseous integration was achieved in all 55 cases in 3 ∼ 9 months after operation. The modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap technique enhances flap safety, provides the additional advantages of reducing donor-site morbidity, and improves the recipient-site contour. PMID:25001367

  8. Fixation strength analysis of cup to bone material using finite element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Saputra, Eko; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, Emile

    2016-04-01

    Fixation of acetabular cup to bone material is an important initial stability for artificial hip joint. In general, the fixation in cement less-type acetabular cup uses press-fit and screw methods. These methods can be applied alone or together. Based on literature survey, the additional screw inside of cup is effective; however, it has little effect in whole fixation. Therefore, an acetabular cup with good fixation, easy manufacture and easy installation is required. This paper is aiming at evaluating and proposing a new cup fixation design. To prove the strength of the present cup fixation design, the finite element simulation of three dimensional cup with new fixation design was performed. The present cup design was examined with twist axial and radial rotation. Results showed that the proposed cup design was better than the general version.

  9. Biomechanical Analysis of the Fixation System for T-Shaped Acetabular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanping; Lei, Jianyin; Zhu, Feng; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Weiyi; Liu, Ximing

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical mechanism of fixation systems in the most frequent T-shaped acetabular fracture using finite element method. The treatment of acetabular fractures was based on extensive clinical experience. Three commonly accepted rigid fixation methods (double column reconstruction plates (P × 2), anterior column plate combined with posterior column screws (P + PS), and anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws (P + QS)) were chosen for evaluation. On the basis of the finite element model, the biomechanics of these fixation systems were assessed through effective stiffness levels, stress distributions, force transfers, and displacements along the fracture lines. All three fixation systems can be used to obtain effective functional outcomes. The third fixation system (P + QS) was the optimal method for T-shaped acetabular fracture. This fixation system may reduce many of the risks and limitations associated with other fixation systems. PMID:26495030

  10. Improved Screw-Thread Lock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Malcolm

    1995-01-01

    Improved screw-thread lock engaged after screw tightened in nut or other mating threaded part. Device does not release contaminating material during tightening of screw. Includes pellet of soft material encased in screw and retained by pin. Hammer blow on pin extrudes pellet into slot, engaging threads in threaded hole or in nut.

  11. Anatomic Locking Plate Fixation for Scaphoid Nonunion

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Just; Sapienza, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Nonunion can occur relatively frequently after scaphoid fracture and appears to be associated with severity of injury. There have been a number of techniques described for bone grafting with or without screw fixation to facilitate fracture healing. However, even with operative fixation of scaphoid fractures with bone grafting nonunion or malunion rates of 5 to 10 percent are still reported. This is the first report of an anatomic locking plate for scaphoid fracture repair in a 25-year-old right hand dominant healthy male. PMID:27366338

  12. Strontium-impregnated bioabsorbable composite for osteoporotic fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Kuo, Chih-Lin; Fan, Fang-Yu; Yang, Kai-Chiang

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis impairs the bone-healing process as well as bone fracture fixation. The intervention of osteoporosis is considered to be one part of bone fracture treatment. Thus, orthopedic fixators impregnated with antiosteoporosis regimens will improve fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone. In this study, the strontium (Sr) and calcium phosphate ceramic (CPC) were mixed first and then mixed with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to fabricate a bioactive and bioabsorbable bone fixators. The prepared Sr-CPC/PCL screws were implanted into the distal femur of ovariectomized rabbits. The results showed that Sr-CPC/PCL composite had the appropriate mechanical properties, good biocompatibility, and radio-opacity. The Sr addition created a porous structure and accelerated the degradation of bone screws, but the degradation products did not acidify the surrounding environment. For osteoporotic animals, favorable osteointegration around the Sr-CPC/PCL screws was found, and the total porosity of trabecular bone was decreased under the inspections of micro-computerized tomography. Compared with PCL or CPC/PCL screw, animals which received Sr-CPC/PCL were found to have better results in terms of trabecular number, thickness, and separation. This study reveals that the Sr-impregnated bone fixator improves osseointegration in osteoporotic animals. Sr-CPC/PCL composite is a good candidate material for osteofixation in osteoporotic patients. PMID:25847487

  13. Comparison of compression and torque measurements of self-tapping and pretapped screws.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J H; Rahn, B A

    1989-03-01

    The choice of an internal fixation system for maxillofacial surgery is made difficult because of lack of information with respect to functional load. This study attempted to clarify some of the controversy with respect to maxillofacial use of these implants. Maximal compressive force to torque values were measured in standardized bone thicknesses of 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm. The screws tested were pretapped AO 1.5-, 2.0-, 2.7-, and 3.5-mm rescue screws and self-tapping Luhr, Champy, and AO 1.5- and 2.0-mm screws. Ten measurements were made for each screw type/bone thickness combination using a piezoelectric washer and torque screwdriver. It was apparent that for 1- and 2-mm bone thicknesses the use of self-tapping screws resulted in the highest compression values. In 3- and 4-mm bone thicknesses, pretapped screws offered the highest compression values. As expected, self-tapping screws had the highest torque values on insertion owing to torque loss in cutting the screw threads. The 2.7-mm screw offered no advantage over the 2.0-mm screws in 1- and 2-mm bone thicknesses but resulted in higher compression values in 3- and 4-mm bone thicknesses. PMID:2919199

  14. BIOMECHANICAL EVALUATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF CERVICAL SCREWS TAPPING AND DESIGN

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patricia; Rosa, Rodrigo César; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Albuquerque de Paula, Francisco José; Volpon, José Batista; Aparecido Defino, Helton Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess if the screw design (self-drilling/self-tapping) and the pilot hole tapping could affect the insertion torque and screw pullout strength of the screw used in anterior fixation of the cervical spine. Methods: Forty self-tapping screws and 20 self-drilling screws were inserted into 10 models of artificial bone and 10 cervical vertebrae of sheep. The studied parameters were the insertion torque and pullout strength. The following groups were created: Group I-self-tapping screw insertion after pilot hole drilling and tapping; Group II-self-tapping screw insertion after pilot hole drilling without tapping; Group III-self-drilling screw insertion without drilling and tapping. In Groups I and II, the pilot hole had 14.0 mm in depth and was made with a 3mmn drill, while tapping was made with a 4mm tap. The insertion torque was measured and the pullout test was performed. The comparison between groups was made considering the mean insertion torque and the maximum mean pullout strength with the variance analysis (ANOVA; p≤ 0.05). Results: Previous drilling and tapping of pilot hole significantly decreased the insertion torque and the pullout strength. Conclusion: The insertion torque and pullout strength of self-drilling screws were significantly higher when compared to self-tapping screws inserted after pilot hole tapping. PMID:27004189

  15. Effect of different radial hole designs on pullout and structural strength of cannulated pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chen, Jou-Wen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Yi-Long; Wang, Shih-Tien; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2015-08-01

    Cannulated pedicle screws are designed for bone cement injection to enhance fixation strength in severely osteoporotic spines. However, the screws commonly fracture during insertion. This study aims to evaluate how different positions/designs of radial holes may affect the pullout and structural strength of cannulated pedicle screws using finite element analysis. Three different screw hole designs were evaluated under torsion and bending conditions. The pullout strength for each screw was determined by axial pullout failure testing. The results showed that when the Von Mises stress reached the yield stress of titanium alloy the screw with four radial holes required a greater torque or bending moment than the nine and twelve hole screws. In the pullout test, the strength and stiffness of each screw with cement augmentation showed no significant differences, but the screw with four radial holes had a greater average pullout strength, which probably resulted from the significantly greater mean maximum lengths of cement augmentation. Superior biomechanical responses, with lower stress around the radial holes and greater pullout strength, represented by cannulated pedicle screw with four radial holes may worth recommending for clinical application. PMID:26054806

  16. Decompressive cervical laminectomy and lateral mass screw-rod arthrodesis. Surgical analysis and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the outcome and complications of decompressive cervical Laminectomy and lateral mass screw fixation in 110 cases treated for variable cervical spine pathologies that included; degenerative disease, trauma, neoplasms, metabolic-inflammatory disorders and congenital anomalies. Methods A retrospective review of total 785 lateral mass screws were placed in patients ages 16-68 years (40 females and 70 males). All cases were performed with a polyaxial screw-rod construct and screws were placed by using Anderson-Sekhon trajectory. Most patients had 12-14-mm length and 3.5 mm diameter screws placed for subaxial and 28-30 for C1 lateral mass. Screw location was assessed by post operative plain x-ray and computed tomography can (CT), besides that; the facet joint, nerve root foramen and foramen transversarium violation were also appraised. Results No patients experienced neural or vascular injury as a result of screw position. Only one patient needed screw repositioning. Six patients experienced superficial wound infection. Fifteen patients had pain around the shoulder of C5 distribution that subsided over the time. No patients developed screw pullouts or symptomatic adjacent segment disease within the period of follow up. Conclusion decompressive cervical spine laminectomy and Lateral mass screw stabilization is a technique that can be used for a variety of cervical spine pathologies with safety and efficiency. PMID:21595968

  17. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  18. Fixation of distal radius fractures in adults: a review.

    PubMed

    Obert, L; Rey, P-B; Uhring, J; Gasse, N; Rochet, S; Lepage, D; Serre, A; Garbuio, P

    2013-04-01

    In patients for whom function is a priority, anatomic reduction and stable fixation are prerequisites for good outcomes. Several therapeutic options exist, including orthopedic treatment and internal fixation with pins (intra- and extrafocal), external fixation which may or may not bridge the wrist, and different internal fixation techniques with dorsal or palmar plates using or not, locking screws. Arthroscopy may be necessary in case of articular fracture. In the presence of significant metaphyseal bone defects, filling of the comminution with phosphocalcic cements provides better graft stability. The level of evidence is too low to allow recommending one type of fixation for one type of fracture; and different fixation options to achieve stable reduction exist, each with its own specific complications. With the new generations of palmar plate, secondary displacement is becoming a thing of the past. PMID:23518070

  19. Arterio-Ureteric Fistula Following Iliac Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Aarvold, Alexander; Wales, Lucy Papadakos, Nikolaos; Munneke, Graham; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2008-07-15

    Arterio-ureteric fistulae are rare but can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a novel case in which an arterio-ureteric fistula occurred as a complication following external iliac artery angioplasty and stenting, in a patient who had undergone previous pelvic surgery, radiotherapy, ureteric stenting, and urinary diversion surgery. Prompt recognition enabled successful endovascular management using a covered stent.

  20. Clinical Results of Internal Fixation of Subcapital Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Joong Sup; Shin, Eun Ho; Ahn, Chi Hoon; Choi, Geon Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Subcapital femoral neck is known to cause many complications, such as avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head or nonunion, compared with other femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of AVN and fixation failures in patients treated with internal fixation using cannulated screws for the subcapital femoral neck fractures. Methods This study targeted a total of 84 cases of subcapital femoral neck fractures that underwent internal fixation using cannulated screws. The average follow-up time after surgery was 36.8 months (range, 24 to 148 months). Results Nine hips (10.7%) showing AVN of the femoral head and 6 hips (7.1%) showing fixation failures were observed. The factors affecting the incidence of AVN of the femoral head after sustaining fractures correlated well with fracture types in the Garden classification (p = 0.030). The factors affecting fixation failure were the degree of reduction (p = 0.001) measured by the Garden alignment index and firm fixation (p = 0.009) assessed using the technique of 3-point fixation through the inferomedial cortical bone of the femoral neck. Conclusions The complication rates for subcapital femoral neck fractures were lower than those previously reported; hence, internal fixation could be a primary treatment option for these fractures. PMID:27247738

  1. Percutaneous Transpedicular Fixation: Technical tips and Pitfalls of Sextant and Pathfinder Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed Salah Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design The efficacy of the operative techniques, possible benefits as well as pitfalls and limitations of the techniques are discussed. Potential drawbacks are also detected. Purpose This study aims to report indications, techniques, and our experience with the use of the Sextant and PathFinder percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation systems. Overview of Literature Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion is a novel technique. Successful percutaneous placement of pedicle screws requires surgical skill and experience because of lack of anatomic surface landmarks. Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous placement of pedicle screws is effective. Many systems are now available. Methods We conducted a prospective operative and postoperative analysis of 40 patients with absolute indication for thoracic or lumbar instability between January 2009 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with the Sextant (group A) and PathFinder (group B) systems under fluoroscopic guidance. Operative techniques are discussed and the results compared. Results Percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation minimizes the morbidity associated with open techniques without compromising the quality of fixation. A total of 190 screws were inserted. There was no additional morbidity. Postoperative computed tomography images and plain X-rays were analyzed. Reduction of visual analog scale scores of back pain was evident. Conclusions Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous pedicular screws are feasible and can be safely done. Current systems allow multi-segmental fixation with significantly less difficulties. The described techniques have acceptable intra- and postoperative complication rates, and overall sufficient pain control with early mobilization of patients. PMID:26949466

  2. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective

  3. Pullout strength of anterior spinal instrumentation: a product comparison of seven screws in calf vertebral bodies

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Dieter; Wild, Alexander; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Schneider, Erich; Linke, Berend

    2007-01-01

    A lot of new implant devices for spine surgery are coming onto the market, in which vertebral screws play a fundamental role. The new screws developed for surgery of spine deformities have to be compared to established systems. A biomechanical in vitro study was designed to assess the bone–screw interface fixation strength of seven different screws used for correction of scoliosis in spine surgery. The objectives of the current study were twofold: (1) to evaluate the initial strength at the bone–screw interface of newly developed vertebral screws (Universal Spine System II) compared to established systems (product comparison) and (2) to evaluate the influence of screw design, screw diameter, screw length and bone mineral density on pullout strength. Fifty-six calf vertebral bodies were instrumented with seven different screws (USS II anterior 8.0 mm, USS II posterior 6.2 mm, KASS 6.25 mm, USS II anterior 6.2 mm, USS II posterior 5.2 mm, USS 6.0 mm, USS 5.0 mm). Bone mineral density (BMD) was determined by quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Failure in axial pullout was tested using a displacement-controlled universal test machine. USS II anterior 8.0 mm showed higher pullout strength than all other screws. The difference constituted a tendency (P = 0.108) when compared to USS II posterior 6.2 mm (+19%) and was significant in comparison to the other screws (+30 to +55%, P < 0.002). USS II posterior 6.2 mm showed significantly higher pullout strength than USS 5.0 mm (+30%, P = 0.014). The other screws did not differ significantly in pullout strength. Pullout strength correlated significantly with BMD (P = 0.0015) and vertebral body width/screw length (P < 0.001). The newly developed screws for spine surgery (USS II) show higher pullout strength when compared to established systems. Screw design had no significant influence on pullout force in vertebral body screws, but outer diameter of the screw, screw length and BMD are good predictors

  4. C2 Pedicle Screw Placement: A Novel Teaching Aid

    PubMed Central

    Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    The C2 pedicle screw is more biomechanically stable and provides patients with increased postoperative range of motion in comparison to other methods of C2 fixation. However, as a result of the proximity of the C2 pedicle to the transverse foramen, there is a considerable risk of intraoperative morbidity due to vertebral artery injury laterally or vertebral canal breach medially. Other than the use of cadavers for the demonstration and practice of C2 pedicle screw placement, there are currently few other readily available teaching aids for the training of residents and fellows. Herein, we describe a simple and cost effective modality for the demonstration, evaluation, and practice of C2 pedicle screw placement in a laboratory setting. PMID:27433409

  5. The Effects of Screw Length on Stability of Simulated Osteoporotic Distal Radius Fractures Fixed with Volar Locking Plates

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Lindley B.; Brodt, Michael D.; Silva, Matthew J.; Boyer, Martin I.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Volar plating for distal radius fractures has caused extensor tendon ruptures secondary to dorsal screw prominence. This study was designed to determine the biomechanical impact of placing unicortical distal locking screws and pegs in an extra-articular fracture model. Methods Volar-locking distal radius plates were applied to 30 osteoporotic distal radius models. Radii were divided into 5 groups based on distal locking fixation: bicortical locked screws, 3 lengths of unicortical locked screws (abutting the dorsal cortex [full length], 75% length, and 50% length to dorsal cortex), and unicortical locked pegs. Distal radius osteotomy simulated a dorsally comminuted, extra-articular, fracture. Each constructs stiffness was determined under physiologic loads (axial compression, dorsal bending volar bending) before and after 1000 cycles of axial conditioning and prior to axial loading to failure (2mm of displacement) and subsequent catastrophic failure. Results Cyclic conditioning did not alter constructs stiffness. Stiffness to volar bending and dorsal bending forces were similar between groups. Final stiffness(N/mm) under axial load was statistically equivalent for all groups: bicortical screws(230), full-length unicortical screws(227), 75% length unicortical screws(226), 50% length unicortical screws(187), unicortical pegs(226). Force(N) at 2 mm displacement was significantly less for 50% length unicortical screws(311) compared to bicortical screws(460), full-length unicortical screws(464), 75% length unicortical screws(400), and unicortical pegs(356). Force(N) to catastrophic fracture was statistically equivalent between groups but mean values for pegs(749) and 50% length unicortical(702) screws were 16-21% less than means for bicortical(892), full-length unicortical(860), and 75% length(894) unicortical constructs. Discussion Locked unicortical distal screws of at least 75% length produce construct stiffness similar to bicortical fixation. Unicortical

  6. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  7. Subtrochanteric femur fracture after removal of screws for femoral neck fracture in a child.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook

    2015-01-01

    Displaced femoral neck fractures are rare in children and are associated with a high rate of complications. Subtrochanteric fractures after cannulated screw fixation of femoral neck fractures in adults are well recognized, and there are several reports on the topic. However, there are no reports on complications related to hardware or subtrochanteric fractures after removal of the screws in the treatment of femoral neck fractures in children. Here we report the case of a 10-year-old boy who sustained a subtrochanteric fracture after the screw removal and healing that followed a femoral neck fracture. PMID:25566556

  8. Do Newer-Generation Bioabsorbable Screws Become Incorporated into Bone at Two Years After ACL Reconstruction with Patellar Tendon Graft?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Charles L.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Leonard, James P.; Morris, Brent J.; Dunn, Warren R.; Reinke, Emily K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bioabsorbable interference screws are used frequently for graft fixation in ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) reconstruction. The resorption properties of many available screws that are marketed as bioabsorbable are not well defined. The CALAXO (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy) and MILAGRO (DePuy Synthes) bioabsorbable screws contain polymers of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) plus additives to encourage osseointegration over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) properties and compare patient-reported outcomes at a minimum of two years of follow-up after ACL reconstruction using CALAXO or MILAGRO bioabsorbable interference screws. Methods: A cohort of patients who underwent ACL reconstruction in which the fixation used was either CALAXO or MILAGRO screws returned for repeat radiographs for evaluation of tunnel widening, repeat MRI for evaluation of graft integrity and screw breakdown, and completion of the pain and symptom items of the KOOS (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) questionnaire. Results: At a mean of three years (range, 2.5 to 4.0 years) after surgery, thirty-one patients with sixty-two CALAXO screws and thirty-six patients with seventy-two MILAGRO screws returned for repeat evaluation. Two blinded, independent reviewers found no significant differences between the two screw types when comparing radiographs for tibial or femoral tunnel widening or MRIs for graft integrity, tibial and femoral foreign body reactions, or femoral screw degradation. Both reviewers found a significant difference between the two screw types when comparing tibial screw degradation properties (p < 0.01). All analyzed CALAXO screws were rated as partially intact or degraded; the MILAGRO screws were more likely to be rated as intact. No significant differences were noted between the two screw types when comparing the two KOOS subscales. Conclusions: CALAXO screws in the tibial tunnel were more likely

  9. Comparison of the bending performance of solid and cannulated spinal pedicle screws using finite element analyses and biomechanical tests.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Yu, Shan-Chuen; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2015-09-01

    Spinal pedicle screw fixations have been used extensively to treat fracture, tumor, infection, or degeneration of the spine. Cannulated spinal pedicle screws with bone cement augmentation might be a useful method to ameliorate screw loosening. However, cannulated spinal pedicle screws might also increase the risk of screw breakage. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the bending performance of different spinal pedicle screws with either solid design or cannulated design. Three-dimensional finite element models, which consisted of the spinal pedicle screw and the screw's hosting material, were first constructed. Next, monotonic and cyclic cantilever bending tests were both applied to validate the results of the finite element analyses. Finally, both the numerical and experimental approaches were evaluated and compared. The results indicated that the cylindrical spinal pedicle screws with a cannulated design had significantly poorer bending performance. In addition, conical spinal pedicle screws maintained the original bending performance, whether they were solid or of cannulated design. This study may provide useful recommendations to orthopedic surgeons before surgery, and it may also provide design rationales to biomechanical engineers during the development of spinal pedicle screws. PMID:26208430

  10. Management of Postoperative Spondylodiscitis with and without Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Tao, Hairong; Zhu, Yanhui; Lu, Xiongwei; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spondylodiscitis is relatively uncommon. This complication is associated with increased cost, and long-term of inability to work, and even morbidity. Although the majority of postoperative spondylodiscitis cases can be well managed by conservative treatment, postoperative spondylodiscitis after internal fixation and those cases that are unresponsive to the conservative treatment present challenges to the surgeon. Here, a review was done to analyze the treatment of postoperative spondylodiscitis with/without internal fixation. This review article suggested that majority of postoperative spondylodiscitis without internal fixation could be cured by conservative treatment. Either posterior or anterior debridement can be used to treat postoperative spondylodiscitis without internal fixation when conservative treatment fails. In addition, minimally invasive debridement and drainage may also be an alternative treatment. In case of postoperative spondylodiscitis after internal fixation, surgical treatment was required. In the cervical spine, it can be well managed by anterior debridement, removal of internal fixation, and reconstruction of the spinal stability by using bone grafting/cage/anterior plate. Postoperative spondylodiscitis after internal fixation is successfully managed by combined anterior debridement, fusion with posterior approach and removal of pedicle screw or extension of pedicle screw beyond the lesion site, in the thoracic and lumbar spine. PMID:26242325

  11. Bare metal stenting of the iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tanner I; Schneider, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    A significant subset of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) has iliac artery involvement that requires treatment. The development of bare metal stents has improved the short- and long-term outcomes of endovascular repair and has become first line therapy. Open surgical bypass has been reserved for extremely complex anatomic morphologies or endovascular failures. It is unclear whether primary stenting is superior to angioplasty with provisional stenting but if angioplasty is used alone, it is likely only appropriate for the most focal lesions. Self-expanding and balloon-expandable stents have unique characteristics that are suitable to different lesion morphologies. Both stent-types have demonstrated similar outcomes. Herein, we review the practice and results of bare metal stents in the iliac arteries. PMID:27035892

  12. Screw-Retaining Allen Wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granett, D.

    1985-01-01

    Steadying screws with fingers unnecessary. Crimp in uncompressed spring wire slightly protrudes from one facet of Allen wrench. Compressed spring retains Allen screw. Tool used with Allen-head screws in cramped spaces with little or no room for fingers to hold fastener while turned by wrench.

  13. A New Mini-External Fixator for Treating Hallux Valgus: A Preclinical, Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Erdil, Mehmet; Ceylan, Hasan Huseyin; Polat, Gokhan; Kara, Deniz; Bozdag, Ergun; Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2016-01-01

    Proximal metatarsal osteotomy is the most effective technique for correcting hallux valgus deformities, especially in metatarsus primus varus. However, these surgeries are technically demanding and prone to complications, such as nonunion, implant failure, and unexpected extension of the osteotomy to the tarsometatarsal joint. In a preclinical study, we evaluated the biomechanical properties of the fixator and compared it with compression screws for treating hallux valgus with a proximal metatarsal osteotomy. Of 18 metatarsal composite bone models proximally osteotomized, 9 were fixed with a headless compression screw and 9 with the mini-external fixator. A dorsal angulation of 10° and displacement of 10 mm were defined as the failure threshold values. Construct stiffness and the amount of interfragmentary angulation were calculated at various load cycles. All screw models failed before completing 1000 load cycles. In the fixator group, only 2 of 9 models (22.2%) failed before 1000 cycles, both between the 600th and 700th load cycles. The stability of fixation differed significantly between the groups (p < .001). The stability provided by the mini-external fixator was superior to that of compression screw fixation. Additional testing of the fixator is indicated. PMID:26190777

  14. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2 of 5 of... the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j). (2) Seat the... impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to the impactor...

  15. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accelerometer as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2... procedure. (1) Soak the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j... pelvis impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to...

  16. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accelerometer as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2... procedure. (1) Soak the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j... pelvis impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to...

  17. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2 of 5 of... the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j). (2) Seat the... impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to the impactor...

  18. 49 CFR 572.199 - Pelvis iliac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specified in 49 CFR 572.200(d), and iliac wing load cell SA572-S66, mounted as shown in sheet 2 of 5 of... the dummy assembly (180-0000) in a test environment as specified in 49 CFR 572.200(j). (2) Seat the... impactor is specified in 49 CFR 572.200(c). (8) The dummy is positioned with respect to the impactor...

  19. The use of silk-based devices for fracture fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Gabriel S.; Leisk, Gary G.; Lo, Tim J.; Moreau, Jodie E.; Haas, Dylan S.; Papenburg, Bernke J.; Golden, Ethan B.; Partlow, Benjamin P.; Fox, Sharon E.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Lin, Samuel J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic fixation systems are currently the gold standard for fracture fixation but have problems including stress shielding, palpability and temperature sensitivity. Recently, resorbable systems have gained interest because they avoid removal and may improve bone remodelling due to the lack of stress shielding. However, their use is limited to paediatric craniofacial procedures mainly due to the laborious implantation requirements. Here we prepare and characterize a new family of resorbable screws prepared from silk fibroin for craniofacial fracture repair. In vivo assessment in rat femurs shows the screws to be self-tapping, remain fixed in the bone for 4 and 8 weeks, exhibit biocompatibility and promote bone remodelling. The silk-based devices compare favourably with current poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid fixation systems, however, silk-based devices offer numerous advantages including ease of implantation, conformal fit to the repair site, sterilization by autoclaving and minimal inflammatory response.

  20. In vitro biomechanical study of pedicle screw pull-out strength based on different screw path preparation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moldavsky, Mark; Salloum, Kanaan; Bucklen, Brandon; Khalil, Saif; Mehta, Jwalant S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor screw-to-bone fixation is a clinical problem that can lead to screw loosening. Under-tapping (UT) the pedicle screw has been evaluated biomechanically in the past. The objective of the study was to determine if pedicle preparation with a sequential tapping technique will alter the screw-to-bone fixation strength using a stress relaxation testing loading protocol. Materials and Methods: Three thoracolumbar calf spines were instrumented with pedicle screws that were either probed, UT, standard-tapped (ST), or sequential tapped to prepare the pedicle screw track and a stress relaxation protocol was used to determine pull-out strength. The maximum torque required for pedicle screw insertion and pull-out strength was reported. A one-way ANOVA and Tukeys post-hoc test were used to determine statistical significance. Results: The pedicle screw insertion torques for the probed, UT, ST and sequentially tapped (SQT) techniques were 5.09 (±1.08) Nm, 5.39 (±1.61) Nm, 2.93 (±0.43) Nm, and 3.54 (±0.67) Nm, respectively. There is a significant difference between probed compared to ST (P ≤ 0.05), as well as UT compared to both ST and SQT (P ≤ 0.05). The pull-out strength for pedicle screws for the probed, UT, ST and SQT techniques was 2443 (±782) N, 2353(±918) N, 2474 (±521) N, and 2146 (±582) N, respectively, with no significant difference (P ≥ 0.05) between techniques. Conclusions: The ST technique resulted in the highest pull-out strength while the SQT technique resulted in the lowest. However, there was no significant difference in the pull-out strength for the various preparation techniques and there was no correlation between insertion torque and pull-out strength. This suggests that other factors such as bone density may have a greater influence on pull-out strength. PMID:27053808

  1. Strength analysis of clavicle fracture fixation devices and fixation techniques using finite element analysis with musculoskeletal force input.

    PubMed

    Marie, Cronskär

    2015-08-01

    In the cases, when clavicle fractures are treated with a fixation plate, opinions are divided about the best position of the plate, type of plate and type of screw units. Results from biomechanical studies of clavicle fixation devices are contradictory, probably partly because of simplified and varying load cases used in different studies. The anatomy of the shoulder region is complex, which makes it difficult and expensive to perform realistic experimental tests; hence, reliable simulation is an important complement to experimental tests. In this study, a method for finite element simulations of stresses in the clavicle plate and bone is used, in which muscle and ligament force data are imported from a multibody musculoskeletal model. The stress distribution in two different commercial plates, superior and anterior plating position and fixation including using a lag screw in the fracture gap or not, was compared. Looking at the clavicle fixation from a mechanical point of view, the results indicate that it is a major benefit to use a lag screw to fixate the fracture. The anterior plating position resulted in lower stresses in the plate, and the anatomically shaped plate is more stress resistant and stable than a regular reconstruction plate. PMID:25850983

  2. A Novel Blasted and Grooved Low Profile Pedicle Screw Able to Resist High Compression Bending Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Sung; Choi, Hong-June; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Jeong, Hyun-Yong; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Yoon, Young-Sul; Lee, Yoon-Chul; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Polyaxial pedicle screws are a safe, useful adjunct to transpedicular fixation. However, the large screw head size can cause soft tissue irritation, high rod positioning, and facet joint injury. However, the mechanical resistance provided by small and low profile pedicle screws is very limited. We therefore developed a novel, low profile pedicle screw using grooving and blasting treatment that is able to resist a high compression bending load. Methods We evaluated the compression bending force to displacement and yield loads for seven different screw head types that differed with regard to their groove intervals and whether or not they had been blasted. Results The rank order of screw types that had the greatest compression bending force to displacement was as follows: (1) universal polyaxial, (2) low polyaxial with 0.1mm grooves and blasting, (3) low polyaxial with blasting, (4) low polyaxial with 0.15mm grooves and blasting, (5) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves and blasting, (6) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves, (7) and low polyaxial. Low polyaxial screws with 0.1mm grooves and blasting had the maximum yield load and highest compression bending force to displacement of all seven polyaxial screw head systems evaluated. Conclusion Blasting and grooving treatment of pedicle screw heads resulted in screw heads with a high yield load and compression bending force relative to displacement because of increased friction. Low polyaxial pedicle screws with 0.1 mm grooves treated by blasting have mechanical characteristics similar to those of universal polyaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25983790

  3. Computational simulations of stress shielding and bone resorption around existing and computer-designed orthopaedic screws.

    PubMed

    Gefen, A

    2002-05-01

    Failure of an orthopaedic fixation due to stress shielding and consequent screw loosening is a major concern among surgeons: the loosened screws could not only interfere with the healing process but also endanger adjacent anatomical structures. In this study, the effect of the screw's engineering design (dimensions, profile shape and material properties) on the load sharing with adjacent bone and consequent bone resorption was tested, using a set of two-dimensional computational (finite element) models. An algorithm simulating local bone adaptation to strain energy density (SED) mechanical stimuli was developed and used to evaluate the biomechanical performances of different commercial screws. Two new designs, a 'graded-stiffness' composite screw, with a reduced-stiffness titanium core and outer polymeric threads, and an active-compression hollow screw that generates compressive stresses on the surrounding bone, were also evaluated. A dimensionless set of stress transfer parameters (STPs) were utilised for ranking the performances of the different screws according to the expected screw-bone load sharing and its evolution with adaptation of the surrounding tissue. The results indicated that commercial wide (6 mm thread diameter) trapezoidal and rectangular screw profiles have superior biomechanical compatibility with bone (i.e. predicted to be stable after 2 years). The graded-stiffness and active-compression screws provided the best biomechanical performances: bone loading around them was predicted to decrease by no more than 15% after 3 years, compared with a decrease of 55-70% in bone loading around commercially available screws. Computer simulations of bone adaptation around orthopaedic screws are demonstrated to be effective means for objective and quantitative evaluation of the biomechanical aspects of implant-tissue compatibility. PMID:12195978

  4. Cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Hanssen, Arlen D

    2008-10-01

    Cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has had limited use in recent decades due to past failures in the early generation of cementless designs. Screw track osteolysis, poor polyethylene, and metal-backed patellar component failures contributed to a controversial track record and created a reluctance to embrace cementless fixation in TKA; however, these failure mechanisms are correctable. In addition, there is renewed interest in cementless fixation due to the recent development of improved biomaterials, particularly highly porous metals and highly crosslinked polyethylene, as well as time-saving advantages and long-term osseointegration of cementless fixation. There are long-term reports of successful designs of cementless knee arthroplasty that are nearly equal to the results of cemented designs. This article discusses the past history, current long-term results, and future of cementless fixation in TKA. PMID:18979934

  5. A novel fixation system for acetabular quadrilateral plate fracture: a comparative biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Zha, Guo-Chun; Sun, Jun-Ying; Dong, Sheng-Jie; Zhang, Wen; Luo, Zong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the biomechanical properties of a novel fixation system (named AFRIF) and to compare it with other five different fixation techniques for quadrilateral plate fractures. This in vitro biomechanical experiment has shown that the multidirectional titanium fixation (MTF) and pelvic brim long screws fixation (PBSF) provided the strongest fixation for quadrilateral plate fracture; the better biomechanical performance of the AFRIF compared with the T-shaped plate fixation (TPF), L-shaped plate fixation (LPF), and H-shaped plate fixation (HPF); AFRIF gives reasonable stability of treatment for quadrilateral plate fracture and may offer a better solution for comminuted quadrilateral plate fractures or free floating medial wall fracture and be reliable in preventing protrusion of femoral head. PMID:25802849

  6. Finite Element Analysis of a New Pedicle Screw-Plate System for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) is increasingly popular for the surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar disc diseases. The constructs intended for segmental stability are varied in MI-TLIF. We adopted finite element (FE) analysis to compare the stability after different construct fixations using interbody cage with posterior pedicle screw-rod or pedicle screw-plate instrumentation system. Methods A L3–S1 FE model was modified to simulate decompression and fusion at L4–L5 segment. Fixation modes included unilateral plate (UP), unilateral rod (UR), bilateral plate (BP), bilateral rod (BR) and UP+UR fixation. The inferior surface of the S1 vertebra remained immobilized throughout the load simulation, and a bending moment of 7.5 Nm with 400N pre-load was applied on the L3 vertebra to recreate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Range of motion (ROM) and Von Mises stress were evaluated for intact and instrumentation models in all loading planes. Results All reconstructive conditions displayed decreased motion at L4–L5. The pedicle screw-plate system offered equal ROM to pedicle screw-rod system in unilateral or bilateral fixation modes respectively. Pedicle screw stresses for plate system were 2.2 times greater than those for rod system in left lateral bending under unilateral fixation. Stresses for plate were 3.1 times greater than those for rod in right axial rotation under bilateral fixation. Stresses on intervertebral graft for plate system were similar to rod system in unilateral and bilateral fixation modes respectively. Increased ROM and posterior instrumentation stresses were observed in all loading modes with unilateral fixation compared with bilateral fixation in both systems. Conclusions Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion augmentation with pedicle screw-plate system fixation increases fusion construct stability equally to the pedicle screw-rod system. Increased posterior

  7. Distal Locking Screws for Intramedullary Nailing of Tibial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Agathangelidis, Filon; Petsatodis, Georgios; Kirkos, John; Papadopoulos, Pericles; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Recently introduced tibial intramedullary nails allow a number of distal screws to be used to reduce the incidence of malalignment and loss of fixation of distal metaphyseal fractures. However, the number of screws and the type of screw configuration to be used remains obscure. This biomechanical study was performed to address this question. Thirty-six Expert tibial nails (Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland) were introduced in composite bone models. The models were divided into 4 groups with different distal locking configurations ranging from 2 to 4 screws. A 7-mm gap osteotomy was performed 72 mm from the tibial plafond to simulate a 42-C3 unstable distal tibial fracture. Each group was divided in 3 subgroups and underwent nondestructive biomechanical testing in axial compression, coronal bending, and axial torsion. The passive construct stiffness was measured and statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance. Although some differences were noted between the stiffness of each group, these were not statistically significant in compression (P=.105), bending (P=.801), external rotation (P=.246), and internal rotation (P=.370). This in vitro study showed that, when using the Expert tibial nail for unstable distal tibial fractures, the classic configuration of 2 parallel distal screws could provide the necessary stability under partial weight-bearing conditions. PMID:26840700

  8. Treatment of scaphoid waist fractures with the HCS screw

    PubMed Central

    Gehrmann, Sebastian V.; Grassmann, Jan-Peter; Wild, Michael; Jungbluth, Pascal; Kaufmann, Robert A.; Windolf, Joachim; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical results of the Headless Compression Screw (HCS, Synthes) when used for treatment of acute scaphoid waist fractures. The new screw design generates interfragmentary compression with use of a compression sleeve. Twenty-one patients were treated for acute scaphoid waist fractures type B2 with HCS screws. The average time to the final follow-up examination was 12.8 months. All 21 fractures united after a mean time of 7.2 weeks. The mean DASH score was 7.1. The average motion of the wrist in extension was 61°, flexion was 46°, radial abduction reached 25° and the ulnar abduction was 31°. The maximally achieved grip strength was 86% compared to the uninjured side. Treatment of type B2 scaphoid fractures with the Headless Compression Screw showed good functional and radiographic results. The results are similar to those identified using other screw fixation systems. PMID:26504721

  9. In vitro and in vivo studies on the degradation of high-purity Mg (99.99wt.%) screw with femoral intracondylar fractured rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Han, Pei; Cheng, Pengfei; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Changli; Ni, Jiahua; Zhang, Yuanzhuang; Zhong, Wanrun; Hou, Peng; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zheng, Yufeng; Chai, Yimin

    2015-09-01

    High-purity magnesium (HP Mg) takes advantage in no alloying toxic elements and slower degradation rate in lack of second phases and micro-galvanic corrosion. In this study, as rolled HP Mg was fabricated into screws and went through in vitro immersion tests, cytotoxicity test and bioactive analysis. The HP Mg screws performed uniform corrosion behavior in vitro, and its extraction promoted cell viability, bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation related gene, i.e. ALP, osteopontin (OPN) and RUNX2 of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Then HP Mg screws were implanted in vivo as load-bearing implant to fix bone fracture and subsequently gross observation, range of motion (ROM), X-ray scanning, qualitative micro-computed tomography (μCT) analysis, histological analysis, bending-force test and SEM morphology of retrieved screws were performed respectively at 4, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. As a result, the retrieved HP Mg screws in fixation of rabbit femoral intracondylar fracture showed uniform degradation morphology and enough bending force. However, part of PLLA screws was broken in bolt, although its screw thread was still intact. Good osseointegration was revealed surrounding HP Mg screws and increased bone volume and bone mineral density were detected at fracture gap, indicating the rigid fixation and enhanced fracture healing process provided by HP Mg screws. Consequently, the HP Mg showed great potential as internal fixation devices in intra-articular fracture operation. PMID:26117658

  10. Anterior and posterior fixation for delayed treatment of posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without fracture.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai Ming; Malhotra, Karan; Butler, Joseph S; Wu, Shi Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Posterior atlantoaxial dislocation (PAAD) without fracture of the odontoid process is a rare injury. Authors have variously reported closed or open reduction, followed by either anterior or posterior fixation, but there is no consensus on best treatment. We present a particularly unstable case of PAAD. Open reduction through a retropharyngeal approach with odontoidectomy was required for reduction. Anterior fixation with transarticular lag screws was required prior to posterior fixation with pedicle screws. Despite non-compliance with postoperative immobilisation, imaging at 20-month follow-up confirmed solid fusion. The patient is pain-free with a good range of movement of the neck and has returned to a manual job. Our case had a greater degree of instability than was previously reported, which necessitated 360° fixation. This is the first reported case of this treatment strategy, which provided a very stable fixation allowing fusion despite early movement and without causing undue stiffness. PMID:26516249

  11. Effect of immersion in simulated body environment on mechanical properties of twist-oriented poly(lactic acid) screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Masato; Kobayashi, Satoshi; composite engineering lab Collaboration

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) has been applied to bone fixation devices, since it has high biocompatibility. In order to apply PLA device to a higher loaded part, mechanical properties of PLA have been improved by uniaxial drawing. However, mechanical properties along the other loading direction than the drawing direction such as torsion were not improved. Therefore, surgeon should be carefully conducted not to brake the reinforced PLA screw when tightening. In this study, screw is focused on as a bone fixation device. In order to improve torsional strength of a PLA screw, twist-orientation method was developed. PLA screw is prepared through a series of routes including casting, extrusion drawing, twist-orientation and forging. This screw was immersed in the phosphate buffered solution for 0, 8, 16 and 24 weeks, then shear strength, orientation function, crystallinity and molecular weight were measured. As a result, twist-orientation improves the initial torsional strength of PLA screw without the decrease in initial shear strength. In addition, the shear strength on twist-oriented screw is equivalent that of non-twist oriented screw during immersion until 24 weeks. This result shown that the twist-orientation does not decrease shear strength after immersion.

  12. Computer-assisted periacetabular screw placement: Comparison of different fluoroscopy-based navigation procedures with conventional technique.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Björn Gunnar; Gonser, Christoph; Shiozawa, Thomas; Badke, Andreas; Weise, Kuno; Rolauffs, Bernd; Stuby, Fabian Maria

    2010-12-01

    The current gold standard for operatively treated acetabular fractures is open reduction and internal fixation. Fractures with minimal displacement may be stabilised by minimally invasive methods such as percutaneous periacetabular screws. However, their placement is a demanding procedure due to the complex pelvic anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of periacetabular screw placement assessing pre-defined placement corridors and comparing different fluoroscopy-based navigation procedures and the conventional technique. For each screw an individual periacetabular placement corridor was preoperatively planned using the planning software iPlan CMF(©) 3.0 (BrainLAB). 210 screws (retrograde anterior column screws, retrograde posterior column screws, supraacetabular ilium screws) were placed in an artificial Synbone pelvis model (30 hemipelves) and in human cadaver specimen (30 hemipelves). 2D- and 3D-fluoroscopy-based navigation procedures were compared to the conventional technique. Insertion time and radiation exposure to specimen were also recorded. The achieved screw position was postoperatively assessed by an Iso-C(3D) scan. Perforations of bony cortices or articular surfaces were analysed and the screw deviation severity (difference of the operatively achieved screw position and the preoperatively planned screw position in reference to the pre-defined corridors) was determined using image fusion. Using 3D-fluoroscopy-based navigation, the screw perforation rate (7%) was significantly lower compared to 2D-fluoroscopy-based navigation (20%). For all screws, the deviation severity was significantly lower using a 3D- compared to a 2D-fluoroscopy-based navigation and the conventional technique. Analysing the posterior column screws, the screw deviation severity was significantly lower using 3D- compared to 2D-fluoroscopy-based navigation. However, for the anterior column screw, the screw deviation severity was similar regardless of the imaging

  13. Comparison of Hallux Interphalangeal Joint Arthrodesis Fixation Techniques: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Thorud, Jakob C; Jolley, Tyler; Shibuya, Naohiro; Lew, Eric; Britt, Matthew; Butterfield, Ted; Boike, Alan; Hardy, Mark; Brancheau, Steven P; Motley, Travis; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the complications that occur after hallux interphalangeal joint arthrodesis. The present study evaluated complications in 152 patients aged 18 to 80 years from 2005 to 2012 from 4 different academic institutions after hallux interphalangeal joint arthrodesis. Overall, 65.8% of the patients had ≥1 complication. Infections occurred in 16.5%, dehiscence in 12.5%, and reoperations in 27.0%. The clinical nonunion rate was ≥17.8%, and the radiographic nonunion rate was ≥13.8%. After logistic regression analysis, only the study site and peripheral neuropathy were associated with having ≥1 complication (p < .01 and p < .05, respectively). Single screw fixation compared with other fixation did not have a statistically significant influence on the postoperative complications. However, when fixation was expanded to 4 categories, single screw fixation had lower infection and reoperation rates than either crossed Kirschner wires or other fixation category but not compared with crossed screws on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Although additional studies are warranted, the findings from the present study might aid in both the prognosis of complications and the support of the use of a single screw over crossed Kirchner wire fixation in hallux interphalangeal joint arthrodesis. PMID:25960055

  14. A capillary Archimedes' screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2014-11-01

    As used by Egyptians for irrigation and reported by Archimedes, a screw turning inside a hollow pipe can pull out a fluid againt gravity. At a centimetric scale, an analagous system can be found with a drop pending on a rotating spiral which is tilted toward the horizontal. The ascent of the drop to the top of the spiral is considered and a theoretical model based on geometrical considerations is proposed. The climb of the drop is limited by the fluid deposition on the screw at high capillary number and by a centrifugation phenomenon. We find out the range of fluid proprities and spiral characteristics for which an ascending motion of the drop is possible. Finally we discuss the efficiency of such system to extract a fluid from a bath at a centrimetric scale.

  15. NUT SCREW MECHANISMS

    DOEpatents

    Glass, J.A.F.

    1958-07-01

    A reactor control mechanism is described wherein the control is achieved by the partial or total withdrawal of the fissile material which is in the form of a fuel rod. The fuel rod is designed to be raised and lowered from the reactor core area by means of two concentric ball nut and screw assemblies that may telescope one within the other. These screw mechanisms are connected through a magnetic clutch to a speed reduction gear and an accurately controllable prime motive source. With the clutch energized, the fuel rod may be moved into the reactor core area, and fine adjustments may be made through the reduction gearing. However, in the event of a power failure or an emergency signal, the magnetic clutch will become deenergized, and the fuel rod will drop out of the core area by the force of gravity, thus shutting down the operation of the reactor.

  16. Intraosseous lipoma of the iliac: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Paranahyba, Rodrigo Marques; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Bonfim, Vinícius Mendes; Jordão, Nathalya Ducarmo; Souza, Raimundo Djalma

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas are benign tumors that attack fat cells and most often affecting soft tissues in adulthood. On rare occasions, they may affect bones, preferentially the metaphyses of the long bone. They are generally asymptomatic and radiography shows radiolucent lesions with a thin sclerotic rim or radiodense lesions with a thick sclerotic rim. Malignant transformation of these tumors is rare, as is their recurrence, and there is no need for surgery in most cases. In this report, we present a rare case of intraosseous lipoma in the iliac bone. PMID:26962507

  17. Intraosseous lipoma of the iliac: case report.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Paranahyba, Rodrigo Marques; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Bonfim, Vinícius Mendes; Jordão, Nathalya Ducarmo; Souza, Raimundo Djalma

    2016-01-01

    Lipomas are benign tumors that attack fat cells and most often affecting soft tissues in adulthood. On rare occasions, they may affect bones, preferentially the metaphyses of the long bone. They are generally asymptomatic and radiography shows radiolucent lesions with a thin sclerotic rim or radiodense lesions with a thick sclerotic rim. Malignant transformation of these tumors is rare, as is their recurrence, and there is no need for surgery in most cases. In this report, we present a rare case of intraosseous lipoma in the iliac bone. PMID:26962507

  18. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yogesh V.; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M.; Charalambous, Charalambos P.

    2015-01-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  19. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Yogesh V; Bhaskar, Deepu; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-12-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  20. Percutaneous Lumbopelvic Fixation for Reduction and Stabilization of Sacral Fractures With Spinopelvic Dissociation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Quinnan, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Sacral fractures that result in spinopelvic dissociation are unstable injuries that are often treated surgically, with iliosacral screw fixation and/or lumbopelvic fixation from L4 to the pelvis. Open lumbopelvic fixation allows for direct fracture reduction and immediate postoperative weight bearing, but is associated with a relatively high wound complication rate. Open surgery often takes several hours and can be associated with significant blood loss, and therefore may not be well tolerated physiologically in these patients who often have multiple injuries. We developed a percutaneous lumbopelvic reduction and fixation technique to address these issues. PMID:26894767

  1. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure. PMID:26258041

  2. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-01-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure. PMID:26258041

  3. The Endovascular Management of Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Stroumpouli, Evangelia; Nassef, Ahmed; Loosemore, Tom; Thompson, Matt; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2007-11-15

    Background: Isolated aneurysms of the iliac arteries are uncommon. Previously treated by conventional surgery, there is increasing use of endografts to treat these lesions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and durability of the stent-grafts for treatment of iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). The results of endografting for isolated IAAs over a 10-year period were analyzed retrospectively. The treatment methods differed depending on the anatomic location of the aneurysms. Twenty-one patients (1 woman, 20 men) underwent endovascular stent-graft repair, with one procedure carried out under emergency conditions after acute rupture. The mean aneurysm diameter was 4.6 cm.Results:The procedural technical success was 100%. There was zero 30-day mortality. Follow-up was by interval CT scans. At a mean follow-up of 51.2 months, the stent-graft patency rate was 100%. Reintervention was performed in four patients (19%): one patient (4.7%) with a type I endoleak and three patients (14.3%) with type II endoleaks.Conclusion:We conclude that endovascular repair of isolated IAAs is a safe, minimally invasive technique with low morbidity rates. Follow-up results up to 10 years suggest that this approach is durable and should be regarded as a first treatment option for appropriate candidates.

  4. Mini posterior lumbar interbody fusion with presacral screw stabilization in early lumbosacral instability

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Arjun; Kini, Abhishek R; Chacko, A; Sunil, Upadhyaya; Vinod, K; Geover, Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical options for the management of early lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability vary from open lumbar interbody fusion with transpedicular fixation to a variety of minimal access fusion and fixation procedures. We have used a combination of micro discectomy and axial lumbosacral interbody fusion with presacral screw fixation to treat symptomatic patients with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis or lumbosacral degenerative disc disease, which needed surgical stabilization. This study describes the above technique along with analysis of results. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with symptomatic lumbosacral (L5-S1) instability and degenerative lumbosacral disc disease were treated by micro discectomy and interbody fusion using presacral screw stabilization. Patients with history of bowel, bladder dysfunction and local anorectal diseases were excluded from this study. Postoperatively all patients were evaluated neurologically and radiologically for screw position, fusion and stability. Oswestry disability index was used to evaluate results. Results: We had nine females and three males with a mean age of 47.33 years (range 26–68 years). Postoperative assessment revealed three patients to have screw placed in anterior 1/4th of the 1st sacral body, in rest nine the screws were placed in the posterior 3/4th of sacral body. At 2 years followup, eight patients (67%) showed evidence of bridging trabeculae at bone graft site and none of the patients showed evidence of instability or implant failure. Conclusion: Presacral screw fixation along with micro discectomy is an effective procedure to manage early symptomatic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability. PMID:26015626

  5. Percutaneous screw placement in acetabular posterior column surgery: gender differences in implant positioning.

    PubMed

    Dienstknecht, Thomas; Müller, Michael; Sellei, Richard; Nerlich, Michael; Pfeifer, Christian; Krutsch, Werner; Fuechtmeier, Bernd; Berner, Arne

    2014-04-01

    Percutaneous reduction and periarticular screw implantation techniques have been successfully introduced in acetabular surgery. Image guided navigation techniques might be beneficial in increasing accuracy. However, a thorough understanding of standard values is needed to oversee pitfalls. This cadaver study was designed to identify reliable angulation values for screw implantation in the posterior acetabular column and to provide knowledge of the bony thickness for the periarticular corridor. Gender differences were specifically addressed. 27 embalmed cadaveric hemipelvic specimens (13 male, 14 female) were used. After soft-tissue removal posterior column acetabular screw placement was conducted by one experienced orthopaedic trauma surgeon under visibility. Radiographic verification of ideal screw placement was followed by radiographic assessment in three standard views and angulation values were assessed. Through bony dissection the maximal periarticular canal width was assessed. Various angulation values with regard to anatomical landmarks could be determined in the anteroposterior radiograph, as well as in the iliac oblique and the obturator oblique view. Gender differences were significant for all reference points with the pubic rami involved. The minimal canal width was 1.1cm in female and 1.6 cm in male specimen. The findings provide standard values for safe passages in percutaneous posterior column acetabular surgery. Gender differences have to be taken in consideration when planning the drill corridor. By adherence to standard values, screw placement can be performed safely. PMID:24182644

  6. Low noise lead screw positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A very precise and low noise lead screw positioner, for positioning a retroreflector in an interferometer is described. A gas source supplies inert pressurized gas, that flows through narrow holes into the clearance space between a nut and the lead screw. The pressurized gas keeps the nut out of contact with the screw. The gas flows axially along the clearance space, into the environment. The small amount of inert gas flowing into the environment minimizes pollution. By allowing such flow into the environment, no seals are required between the end of the nut and the screw.

  7. Assessing the Anatomical Variability of Deep Circumflex Iliac Vessels in Harvesting of Iliac Crest-Free Flap for Mandibular Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Ali A; Garajei, Ata; Kiafar, Mahyar; Nikparto, Nariman

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the authors' aims were to measure the length and location of branching of the pedicle from iliac artery, to describe the anatomical variability of iliac crest free flap with deep circumflex iliac (DCI) artery pedicle. Fourteen patients with ameloblastoma, osteosarcoma, and squamous cell carcinoma underwent mandibular resection and iliac crest-free flap reconstruction in one-step surgery. During surgery and before harvesting the deep circumflex iliac artery vascular pedicle, the location, origin, and the branching pattern of the pedicles were studied. Then, the pedicle length was measured and the data was analyzed using χ and independent samples t test. In all patients, the DCI vascular pedicles were separated with a common trunk from the external iliac artery and vein and the DCI arteries were posterior and lateral to the veins. Also after branching from the external iliac artery, all vascular DCI pedicles traveled upward and medially along the Iliacus muscle and the iliac fascia. The mean pedicle length was 21.78 mm for men and 19 mm for women. No statistically significant relationship was observed between the patient's age and the vascular pedicle length or number of branches. There are great variations in the anatomy of this vascular pedicle. According to the finding of this study, the length of the vascular pedicle is 2.78 mm higher in men which might help to increase the feasibility and success rate of this operation. No significant correlation was found between other variables. PMID:27100644

  8. Technical tips: dualplate fixation technique for comminuted proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungwook; Kang, Hyunseong; Bang, Hyeongsig

    2014-08-01

    The authors report dualplate fixation technique for providing stable fixation in comminuted proximal humerus fractures. This technique has been used for proximal humerus fractures with metaphyseal comminution and provides excellent anatomical reduction and neck shaft angle (NSA). The recently locking plate is clinically more widely used due to its small size, low rigidity, high elasticity, and biomechanical properties such as fixed initial angle and rotational stability. However, in severely comminuted complex type proximal metaphyseal humerus fractures, the use of locking plate alone does not provide stable fixation, leading to complications such as varus collapse, anterior-posterior angulation, screw cutout, nonunion, malunion, and metal failure. Therefore, a more robust and enhanced fixation method, the dual plating technique using the locking compression plate (Proximal Humeral Internal Locking System and Variable Angle Locking Compression Plate) was developed. PMID:24813097

  9. In vitro biomechanical evaluation of sagittal split osteotomy fixation with a specifically designed miniplate.

    PubMed

    Pereira Filho, V A; Iamashita, H Y; Monnazzi, M S; Gabrielli, M F R; Vaz, L G; Passeri, L A

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have evaluated many methods of internal fixation for sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO), aiming to increase stability of the bone segments while minimizing condylar displacement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, through biomechanical testing, the stability of the fixation comparing a specially designed bone plate to other two commonly used methods. Thirty hemimandibles were separated into three equal groups. All specimens received SSRO. In Group I the osteotomies were fixed with three 15 mm bicortical positional screws in an inverted-L pattern with an insertion angle of 90°. In Group II, fixation was carried out with a four-hole straight plate and four 6mm monocortical screws. In Group III, fixation was performed with an adjustable sagittal plate and eight 6mm monocortical screws. Hemimandibles were submitted to vertical compressive loads, by a mechanical testing unit. Averages and standard deviations were submitted to analysis of variance using the Tukey test with a 5% level of significance. Bicortical screws presented the greatest values of loading resistance. The adjustable miniplate demonstrated 60% lower resistance compared to bicortical screws. Group II presented on average 40% less resistant to the axial loading. PMID:22898312

  10. Biomechanical analysis and clinical effects of bridge combined fixation system for femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-xing; Xiong, Ying; Deng, Hong; Jia, Fu; Gu, Shao; Liu, Bai-lian; Li, Qun-hui; Pu, Qi; Zhang, Zhong-Zi

    2014-09-01

    This work aimed to compare the stress distribution and mechanical properties of our bridge combined fixation system and commonly used metal locking plate screw system by finite element analysis and by using the Zwick/Z100 testing machine. In addition, we also investigated the clinical outcome of our bridge combined fixation system for femoral fractures in 59 patients from June 2005 to January 2013. As a result, the stress distribution in the bone plate and screws of metal locking plate screw system during walking and climbing stairs was significantly lower than that of metal locking plate screw system. No significant difference in the displacement was observed between two systems. The equivalent bending stiffness of bridge combined fixation system was significantly lower than that of metal locking plate screw system. There were no significant differences in the bending strength, yield load, and maximum force between two systems. All the cases were followed up for 12-24 months (average 18 months). The X-ray showed bone callus was formed in most patients after 3 months, and the fracture line was faint and disappeared at 6-9 months postoperatively. No serious complications, such as implant breakage and wound infection, occurred postoperatively. According to self-developed standard for bone healing, clinical outcomes were rated as excellent or good in 55 out of 59 patients (success rate: 93.2%). Therefore, our findings suggest that our bridge combined fixation system may be a promising approach for treatment of long-bone fractures. PMID:25201264

  11. Better Axial Stiffness of a Bicortical Screw Construct Compared to a Cable Construct for Comminuted Vancouver B1 Proximal Femoral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Jamie T; Taheri, Arash; Day, Robert E; Yates, Piers J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to biomechanically evaluate the Locking attachment plate (LAP) construct in comparison to a Cable plate construct, for the fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures after cemented total hip arthroplasty. Each construct incorporated a locking compression plate with bi-cortical locking screws for distal fixation. In the Cable construct, 2 cables and 2 uni-cortical locking screws were used for proximal fixation. In the LAP construct, the cables were replaced by a LAP with 4 bi-cortical locking screws. The LAP construct was significantly stiffer than the cable construct under axial load with a bone gap (P=0.01). The LAP construct offers better axial stiffness compared to the cable construct in the fixation of comminuted Vancouver B1 proximal femoral fractures. PMID:26239233

  12. BIOMECHANICAL STUDY OF TRANSCORTICAL OR TRANSTRABECULAR BONE FIXATION OF PATELLAR TENDON GRAFT WITH BIOABSORBABLE PINS IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION IN SHEEP

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Mauro Batista; Borges, Paulo César; Namba, Mario Massatomo; da Silva, João Luiz Vieira; de Assis Pereira Filho, Francisco; Filho, Edmar Stieven; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the initial resistance of fixation using the Rigid Fix® system, and compare it with traditional fixation methods using metal interference screws; and to evaluate the resistance of the fixation with the rigid fix system when the rotational position of the bone block is altered in the interior of the femoral tunnel. Methods: forty ovine knee specimens (stifle joints) were submitted to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) using a bone-tendon-bone graft. In twenty specimens, the Rigid Fix method was used; this group was subdivided into two groups: ten knees the pins transfixed only the spongious area of the bone block, and ten for fixation passing through the layer of cortical bone. In the twenty remaining specimens, the graft was fixed with 9mm metal interference screws. Results: comparison of the RIGIDFIX® method with the metal interference screw fixation method did not show any statistically significant differences in terms of maximum load and rigidity; also, there were no statistically significant differences when the rotational position of the bone block was altered inside the femoral tunnel. For these evaluations, a level of significance of p < 0.017 was considered. Conclusion: fixation of the bone-tendon-bone graft with 2 bioabsorbable pines, regardless of the rotational position inside the femoral tunnel, gave a comparable fixation in terms of initial resistance to the metal interference screw, in this experimental model. PMID:27027081

  13. The Effects of Spinopelvic Parameters and Paraspinal Muscle Degeneration on S1 Screw Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Bum; Lee, Young-Seok; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Park, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for S1 screw loosening after lumbosacral fusion, including spinopelvic parameters and paraspinal muscles. Methods We studied with 156 patients with degenerative lumbar disease who underwent lumbosacral interbody fusion and pedicle screw fixation including the level of L5-S1 between 2005 and 2012. The patients were divided into loosening and non-loosening groups. Screw loosening was defined as a halo sign larger than 1 mm around a screw. We checked cross sectional area of paraspinal muscles, mean signal intensity of the muscles on T2 weight MRI as a degree of fatty degeneration, spinopelvic parameters, bone mineral density, number of fusion level, and the characteristic of S1 screw. Results Twenty seven patients showed S1 screw loosening, which is 24.4% of total. The mean duration for S1 screw loosening was 7.3±4.1 months after surgery. Statistically significant risk factors were increased age, poor BMD, 3 or more fusion levels (p<0.05). Among spinopelvic parameters, a high pelvic incidence (p<0.01), a greater difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordotic angle preoperatively (p<0.01) and postoperatively (p<0.05). Smaller cross-sectional area and high T2 signal intensity in both multifidus and erector spinae muscles were also significant muscular risk factors (p<0.05). Small converging angle (p<0.001) and short intraosseous length (p<0.05) of S1 screw were significant screw related risk factors (p<0.05). Conclusion In addition to well known risk factors, spinopelvic parameters and the degeneration of paraspinal muscles also showed significant effects on the S1 screw loosening. PMID:26587190

  14. Biomechanical Properties of a Novel Biodegradable Magnesium-Based Interference Screw

    PubMed Central

    Ezechieli, Marco; Meyer, Hanna; Lucas, Arne; Helmecke, Patrick; Becher, Christoph; Calliess, Tilman; Windhagen, Henning; Ettinger, Max

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA) were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57). Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05). Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesium-based screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32). MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future. PMID:27433303

  15. Biomechanical Properties of a Novel Biodegradable Magnesium-Based Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Ezechieli, Marco; Meyer, Hanna; Lucas, Arne; Helmecke, Patrick; Becher, Christoph; Calliess, Tilman; Windhagen, Henning; Ettinger, Max

    2016-06-27

    Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA) were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57). Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05). Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesium-based screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32). MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future. PMID:27433303

  16. Biomechanical comparison of different combinations of hook and screw in one spine motion unit - an experiment in porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The biomechanical performance of the hooks and screws in spinal posterior instrumentation is not well-characterized. Screw-bone interface failure at the uppermost and lowermost vertebrae is not uncommon. Some have advocated for the use of supplement hooks to prevent screw loosening. However, studies describing methods for combined hook and screw systems that fully address the benefits of these systems are lacking. Thus, the choice of which implant to use in a given case is often based solely on a surgeon’s experience instead of on the biomechanical features and advantages of each device. Methods We conducted a biomechanical comparison of devices instrumented with different combinations of hooks and screws. Thirty-six fresh low thoracic porcine spines were assigned to three groups (12 per group) according to the configuration used for of fixation: (1) pedicle screw; (2) lamina hook and (3) combination of pedicle screw and lamina hook. Axial pullout tests backward on transverse plane in the direction normal to the rods were performed using a material testing machine and a specially designed grip with self-aligned function. Results The pullout force for the pedicle screws group was significantly greater than for the hooks and the combination (p < 0.05). However, no significant difference was found between the hooks and the combination (p > 0.05). Conclusions Pedicle screws achieve the maximal pullout strength for spinal posterior instrumentation. PMID:24913189

  17. Intra-Pelvic Migration of Sliding Hip Screw During Osteosynthesis of Hip Fracture: A Rare Avoidable Intraoperative Complication

    PubMed Central

    Zarattini, G.; Breda, L.; Zacharia, M.; Sibona, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fractures, which are common among old patients, are classified into two groups: intracapsular and extracapsular fractures. Extracapsular fractures can be treated with extramedullary implants [e.g. dynamic hip screw (DHS)] or intramedullary nails. Dynamic hip screw is the treatment of choice in stable pertrochanteric fractures. Intrapelvic migration of the sliding screw is a very rare complication. Case Report: We report a case of a 90-year old Caucasian woman who had an unusual intraoperative complication during osteosynthesis procedure for extracapsular hip fracture fixation. In fact, the sliding hip screw went deep into the pelvis during surgery. This mishap required an abdominal surgical approach by the general surgeon to remove the screw. Conclusion: Taking into consideration the poor quality of the bone in very old patients, we emphasize the importance of following every single step of the surgical procedure, in order to minimize the risk of this complication. PMID:27299061

  18. The iliac bone or osteocutaneous transplant pedicled to the deep circumflex iliac artery. II. Clinical application.

    PubMed

    Bitter, K; Schlesinger, S; Westerman, U

    1983-12-01

    10 patients received a bone or osteocutaneous transplant pedicled to the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) after in-continuity resection of the mandible. 9 grafts healed primarily and were stable after a period of time corresponding to that needed in fractured bones. No infection or resorption occurred. In one case, varicosity made the vessel preparation impossible. Indications, reliability and pitfalls of this method are outlined and discussed in this paper. PMID:6361188

  19. Screw/stud removal tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, K.; Herrick, D. E.; Rothermel, L.

    1980-01-01

    Tool removes stubborn panheaded screws or studs where conventional tools would be either too weak or inconvenient to use. Screws with damaged heads or slots can also be removed this way. Tool can be worked with one hand and easily fits limited-access and blind areas. It can be made in various sizes to fit different screwheads.

  20. In-vitro development of a temporal abutment screw to protect osseointegration in immediate loaded implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE In this study, a temporal abutment fixation screw, designed to fracture in a controlled way upon application of an occlusal force sufficient to produce critical micromotion was developed. The purpose of the screw was to protect the osseointegration of immediate loaded single implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven different screw prototypes were examined by fixing titanium abutments to 112 Mozo-Grau external hexagon implants (MG Osseous®; Mozo-Grau, S.A., Valladolid, Spain). Fracture strength was tested at 30° in two subgroups per screw: one under dynamic loading and the other without prior dynamic loading. Dynamic loading was performed in a single-axis chewing simulator using 150,000 load cycles at 50 N. After normal distribution of obtained data was verified by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, fracture resistance between samples submitted and not submitted to dynamic loading was compared by the use of Student's t-test. Comparison of fracture resistance among different screw designs was performed by the use of one-way analysis of variance. Confidence interval was set at 95%. RESULTS Fractures occurred in all screws, allowing easy retrieval. Screw Prototypes 2, 5 and 6 failed during dynamic loading and exhibited statistically significant differences from the other prototypes. CONCLUSION Prototypes 2, 5 and 6 may offer a useful protective mechanism during occlusal overload in immediate loaded implants. PMID:25932315

  1. Reconstruction of the mandible with vascularized iliac crest flap--initial experience at the Tata Memorial Hospital.

    PubMed

    Savant, D N; Patel, S G; Verghese, T; Bhathena, H M; Kavarana, N M

    1995-01-01

    Resection of the mandible for cancer of the oral cavity can result in gross functional and aesthetic deformity. Inspite of technological advances, reconstruction of mandibular defects remains one of the most challenging procedures in head and neck surgery. Conventional methods like alloplastic implants and bone grafting have a high rate of failure. The advent of microvascular techniques for mandibular reconstruction has revolutionised the management of these patients. We present our initial experience based on 18 patients who underwent vascularised iliac creast transfer at the Tata Memorial Hospital between November, 1992 and January, 1994. The operative technique of raising, shaping and fixation of the iliac crest flap as well as advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Postoperative graft viability was assessed using 99mTc-MDP scans during the 1st, 3rd and 12th weeks after surgery. We lost 3 flaps (16.4%) due to uncontrolled infection and vessel thrombosis. All of the remaining patients demonstrated good uptake on bone scans and satisfactory bony union on OPG. We conclude that mandibular reconstruction using the vascularised iliac crest is reliable and produces acceptable postoperative functional results with 88% of patients having no swallowing difficulty, 83% with normal speech and excellent cosmesis in 83% (15/18) of the patients. PMID:8525747

  2. Vascularized iliac osteocutaneous flap based on the deep circumflex iliac vessels: experience in 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Minami, A; Ogino, T; Itoga, H

    1989-01-01

    We have carried out 13 vascularized iliac osteocutaneous flaps (VIOF) based on the deep circumflex artery (DCIA) and accompanying veins for cases with compound skin and bone defects. Ten of 13 cases obtained bony union at both ends of the iliac crest with only VIOF. Two of the remaining 3 cases obtained bony union at one end only with the VIOF but united at another end with an additional conventional bone grafting procedure. The final case, a traumatic bone defect of the tibia, failed to obtain bony union at either end of the iliac segment. In 5 of 11 patients in which an osteocutaneous flap was used, complete skin flap survival occurred. Of the remaining 6, one flap went on to complete necrosis, and five flaps were complicated by superficial or partial necrosis. The incidence of flap complications was analysed according to the size of flap. Five flaps with complete survival averaged 6.8 x 10.6 cm in size; however, five flaps with superficial or partial necrosis averaged 10.0 x 15.8 cm. These results suggest that the maximal safe skin flap dimension from the DCIA supply alone is probably 10 x 15 cm. PMID:2671586

  3. The Use of MMF Screws: Surgical Technique, Indications, Contraindications, and Common Problems in Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Ehrenfeld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mandibulo-maxillary fixation (MMF) screws are inserted into the bony base of both jaws in the process of fracture realignment and immobilisation. The screw heads act as anchor points to fasten wire loops or rubber bands connecting the mandible to the maxilla. Traditional interdental chain-linked wiring or arch bar techniques provide the anchorage by attached cleats, hooks, or eyelets. In comparison to these tooth-borne appliances MMF screws facilitate and shorten the way to achieve intermaxillary fixation considerably. In addition, MMF screws help to reduce the hazards of glove perforation and wire stick injuries. On the downside, MMF screws are attributed with the risk of tooth root damage and a lack of versatility beyond the pure maintenance of occlusion such as stabilizing loose teeth or splinting fragments of the alveolar process. The surgical technique of MMF screws as well as the pros and cons of the clinical application are reviewed. The adequate screw placement to prevent serious tooth root injuries is still an issue to rethink and modify conceptual guidelines. PMID:22110819

  4. An Innovative Universal Screw Removal Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Elmadağ, Mehmet; Uzer, Gökçer; Acar, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present the clinical benefits of an instrument designed to facilitate removal of polyaxial screws during revision surgery. Methods All polyaxial screws can be removed without additional materials or a large amount of debridement using our newly designed instrument. Forty-two screws were removed from five patients without any complications using this instrument. Results We removed the cap screws and rods from the 42 polyaxial screws in five patients and made them monoaxial using the new screw removal apparatus. The screws and rods were removed quickly in a minimally invasive way with no complications. No damage to the pedicle or surrounding soft tissue occurred during screw removal. No neurogenic changes developed during revision surgery after changing the screws. Conclusion This newly designed screw removal instrument was used safely and effectively to remove all polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25883660

  5. Percutaneous Endoluminal Bypass of Iliac Aneurysms with a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebben, Alexander; Tettoni, Serena; Muratore, Pierluigi; Rossato, Dennis; Savio, Daniele; Rabbia, Claudio

    1998-07-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous treatment of iliac aneurysms, a covered stent was inserted in nine men suffering from common iliac artery aneurysms (six cases), external iliac aneurysms (one case), or pseudoaneurysms (two cases). Placement of the stent was successful in all patients. In one patient, an endoprosthesis thrombosed after 15 days, but was successfully treated by thrombolysis and additional stent placement. At the follow-up examinations (mean period 22 months) all stent-grafts had remained patent. No late leakage or stenosis was observed.

  6. Iliac arterial-enteric fistulas occurring after pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vetto, J.T.; Culp, S.C.; Smythe, T.B.; Chang, A.E.; Sindelar, W.F.; Sugarbaker, P.H.; Heit, H.A.; Giordano, J.M.; Kozloff, L.

    1987-05-01

    Fistulas from the iliac artery to the bowel constitute a condition that is often lethal. Excluding fistulas related to vascular grafts, a review of previously reported cases shows that they are most often due to atherosclerotic iliac aneurysms. Three unusual cases of this condition that occurred after high-dose pelvic irradiation for treatment of cancer are presented; in no case was recurrent tumor evident. These cases suggest that high-dose pelvic irradiation can predispose to the formation of iliac arterial-enteric fistulas, particularly if sepsis or inflammation develops. The definitive surgical management of these fistulas entails bowel resection, arterial ligation, and extra-anatomic bypass.

  7. Monocortical Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Flap in Jaw Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong-Yong

    2015-06-01

    Conventionally deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap had been harvested as bicortical form. However, several complications and adverse effects occurred such as abnormal hip contour, hernia, severe bleeding tendency, gait disturbance, and hypoesthesia. All the 9 patients required reconstruction of the jaw with microvascular free flaps after radical resection. Monocortical bone segment was harvested from the anterior iliac crest, and the amount of bone harvested was from 47 to 90 mm (mean, 63 ± 14.6). Monocortical deep circumflex iliac artery flap has sufficient advantages in donor-site morbidity, which is one of the factors to choose flap. PMID:26080179

  8. Femoral neck fracture fixation: rigidity of five techniques compared.

    PubMed Central

    Mackechnie-Jarvis, A C

    1983-01-01

    Artificial cadaveric femoral neck fractures were internally fixed with five different devices and subjected to cyclical loading of 0-1.0 kilonewtons (approximately one body weight) whilst in an anatomical position. Displacement of the proximal fragment was detected by a transducer and charted. Bone strength was assessed by a preliminary control loading phase on the intact bone. Efficiency of each fracture fixator could then be directly compared by the relative movement in each case. Five specimens each were tested with Moore's Pins, Trifin Nail, Garden Screws and a sliding screw-plate (OEC Ltd). By the criteria of the experiment, which put a severe shearing load on the implant, none of these devices reliably bore the representative body weight. An extended barrel-plate, which supported the sliding screw almost up to the fracture line, was then made. This device, employing some of Charnley's concepts, tolerated body weight in four cases out of five. PMID:6887186

  9. Robot assisted navigated drilling for percutaneous pedicle screw placement: A preliminary animal study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Jun; Han, Jianda; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is much more radiation exposure to the surgeons during minimally invasive pedicle screws placement. In order to ease the surgeon's hand-eye coordination and to reduce the iatrogenic radiation injury to the surgeons, a robot assisted percutaneous pedicle screw placement is useful. This study assesses the feasibility and clinical value of robot assisted navigated drilling for pedicle screw placement and the results thus achieved formed the basis for the development of a new robot for pedicle screw fixation surgery. Materials and Methods: Preoperative computed tomography (CT) of eight bovine lumbar spines (L1–L5) in axial plane were captured for each vertebra, the entry points and trajectories of the screws were preoperatively planned. On the basis of preoperative CT scans and intraoperative fluoroscopy, we aligned the robot drill to the desired entry point and trajectory, as dictated by the surgeon's preoperative plan. Eight bovine lumbar spines were inserted 80 K-wires using the spine robot system. The time for system registration and pedicle drilling, fluoroscopy times were measured and recorded. Postoperative CT scans were used to assess the position of the K-wires. Results: Assisted by spine robot system, the average time for system registration was (343.4 ± 18.4) s, the average time for procedure of drilling one pedicle screw trajectory was (89.5 ± 6.1) s, times of fluoroscopy for drilling one pedicle screw were (2.9 ± 0.8) times. Overall, 12 (15.0%) of the 80 K-wires violated the pedicle wall. Four screws (5.0%) were medial to the pedicle and 8 (10.5%) were lateral. The number of K-wires wholly within the pedicle were 68 (85%). Conclusions: The preliminary study supports the view that computer assisted pedicle screw fixation using spinal robot is feasible and the robot can decrease the intraoperative fluoroscopy time during the minimally invasive pedicle screw fixation surgery. As spine robotic surgery is still in its infancy, further

  10. Fixation of basicervical and related fractures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We prospectively studied 42 patients in order to identify a group of proximal femoral fractures having liability for axial and rotational instability, and to present results of their fixation using the dynamic hip screw (DHS) with derotation screw (DRS). At 12 months postoperatively, patients were functionally evaluated and the radiological outcome was analysed. All fractures united within an average period of 11.5 weeks. The mean sliding distance was 5.5 mm and mean shortening of the limbs was 2 mm. According to the criteria of Kyle et al. (J Bone Joint Surg [Am] 61-A:216–221), 39 patients obtained excellent results, two good and one fair. We conclude that the AO types B2.1, A1.1, A2.1, A2.2 and A2.3 have a common instability denominator and therefore should be treated alike. The sliding component of the DHS allows solid fixation of the two major fragments in two planes and the DRS in the third plane. PMID:19475407

  11. Simple coating with fibronectin fragment enhances stainless steel screw osseointegration in healthy and osteoporotic rats.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rachit; González-García, Cristina; Torstrick, Brennan; Guldberg, Robert E; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel; García, Andrés J

    2015-09-01

    Metal implants are widely used to provide structural support and stability in current surgical treatments for bone fractures, spinal fusions, and joint arthroplasties as well as craniofacial and dental applications. Early implant-bone mechanical fixation is an important requirement for the successful performance of such implants. However, adequate osseointegration has been difficult to achieve especially in challenging disease states like osteoporosis due to reduced bone mass and strength. Here, we present a simple coating strategy based on passive adsorption of FN7-10, a recombinant fragment of human fibronectin encompassing the major cell adhesive, integrin-binding site, onto 316-grade stainless steel (SS). FN7-10 coating on SS surfaces promoted α5β1 integrin-dependent adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. FN7-10-coated SS screws increased bone-implant mechanical fixation compared to uncoated screws by 30% and 45% at 1 and 3 months, respectively, in healthy rats. Importantly, FN7-10 coating significantly enhanced bone-screw fixation by 57% and 32% at 1 and 3 months, respectively, and bone-implant ingrowth by 30% at 3 months compared to uncoated screws in osteoporotic rats. These coatings are easy to apply intra-operatively, even to implants with complex geometries and structures, facilitating the potential for rapid translation to clinical settings. PMID:26100343

  12. The iliac bone or osteocutaneous transplant pedicled to the deep circumflex iliac artery. I. Anatomical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Bitter, K; Danai, T

    1983-10-01

    The technique of microsurgical vessel anastomosis has brought about many new ideas in reconstructive surgery. Many bone sites have been examined for their suitability as donor areas. For reconstructive purposes in the maxillo-facial region, the iliac bone has proven to be the best because of its shape and bulk. A large part of this bone is nourished by the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA). Branches of this vessel surround the iliac crest, perforate the flat abdominal muscles, and supply blood to the overlying skin. The anatomical properties of this region present the possibility of raising a large osteomyocutaneous flap. PMID:6226758

  13. Endoscopic Management of Free Lying Migratory Orthopedic Screw in Bladder.

    PubMed

    P, Puvai Murugan; M, Ramalingam

    2016-09-01

    75-year old gentleman presented with acute urinary retention. He had met with road traffic accident 15 years back and sustained pelvic fracture and bladder rupture, underwent bladder repair and open reduction and internal fixation of pubic symphsis. Imaging studies showed the free lying encrusted orthopedic screw in the bladder, which was removed per urethra using nephroscope. Migratory foreign bodies in the urinary bladder are rare. However there is a possibility of longstanding foreign bodies in adjacent structures to erode and perforate into the bladder. Inside the bladder these foreign bodies act as nidus for stone formation. PMID:27500087

  14. [Observations on optimizing the mechanical properties of osteosynthesis screws].

    PubMed

    Zitter, H

    1988-06-01

    According to two agreeing standards, the mechanical requirements for bone screws consist of a minimum breaking torque and of the minimum angle of rotation to failure of 180 degrees. Apparently it has been overlooked that these requirements admit austenitic steels with a very low yield strength, which reach the required torque at fracture only by the work-hardening brought about during the torsion test. As a high yield strength is a prerequisite of a stable fixation, a formulation is proposed which guarantees not only a high elastic torque but also an adequate work of deformation in the plastic state as an insurance against embrittlement. PMID:3407018

  15. Rotational Stability of Scaphoid Osteosyntheses: An In Vitro Comparison of Small Fragment Cannulated Screws to Novel Bone Screw Sets

    PubMed Central

    Erhart, Jochen; Unger, Ewald; Schefzig, Philip; Varga, Peter; Trulson, Inga; Gormasz, Anna; Trulson, Alexander; Reschl, Martin; Hagmann, Michael; Vecsei, Vilmos; Mayr, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background The current standard of care for operative repair of scaphoid fractures involves reduction and internal fixation with a single headless compression screw. However, a compression screw in isolation does not necessarily control rotational stability at a fracture or nonunion site. The single screw provides rotational control through friction and bone interdigitation from compression at the fracture site. We hypothesize that osteosyntheses with novel bone screw sets (BSS) equipped with anti-rotational elements provide improved rotational stability. Methods Stability of osteosynthesis under increasing cyclic torsional loading was investigated on osteotomized cadaveric scaphoids. Two novel prototype BSS, oblique type (BSS-obl.) and longitudinal type (BSS-long.) were compared to three conventional screws: Acutrak2®mini, HCS®3.0 and Twinfix®. Biomechanical tests were performed on scaphoids from single donors in paired comparison and analyzed by balanced incomplete random block design. Loading was increased by 50 mNm increments with 1,000 cycles per torque level and repeated until a rotational clearance of 10°. Primary outcome measure was the number of cycles to 10° clearance, secondary outcome measure was the maximum rotational clearance for each torque level. Findings BSS-obl. performed significantly better than Acutrak2®mini and HCS® (p = 0.015, p<0.0001). BSS-long. performed significantly better than HCS® (p = 0.010). No significant difference in performance between BSS-obl. and BSS-long. (p = 0.361), between BSS obl. and Twinfix® (p = 0.50) and BSS long. and Twinfix® (p = 0.667) was detected. Within the torque range up to 200 mNm, four of 21 (19%) BSS-long. and four of 21 (19%) BSS-obl. preparations showed early failure. The same loading led to early failure in four (29%) Twinfix®, seven (50%) Acutrak2®mini and 10 (71%) HCS® of 14 screw samples, respectively. Conclusions For both BSS and to a lesser extent for Twinfix® (as dual-component screw

  16. Comparison of Biomechanical Characteristics and Pelvic Ring Stability Using Different Fixation Methods to Treat Pubic Symphysis Diastasis: A Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Feng; He, Yu; Qian, Hebu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Li, Qinghu

    2015-12-01

    The intention of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics using 5 internal fixation methods used clinically to stabilize a pubic symphysis diastasis (PSD, Tile type B1).A 3-dimensional finite element model of PSD was simulated using 5 implants, including single superior plate (Single-Plate), superior and anterior plate (Dual-Plate), single cannulated screw (Single-Screw), crossed dual cannulated screws (Cross-Screw), and parallel dual cannulated screws (Para-Screw). Three loads were distributed in all models, including dual-leg standing, single-leg stance, and rotation. To evaluate the biomechanical properties, the construct stiffness, the stress distribution, and the von Misses stress were recorded and analyzed. To evaluate pelvic ring stability, the micromotion of the pubic symphysis and iliosacral joint was analyzed.Disruption of pubic symphysis dramatically decreased the pelvic ring stability. Cross-screw and Para-Screw showed higher stiffness than other methods. All implants endured the maximum von Misses stress under single-leg stance. For Plate-Screw system, the maximum stress occurred at a place where it strides over pubic symphysis and adjacent Plate-Screw interface. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. Para-Screw showed the best fixation effect under dual-leg conditions. Cross-screw showed superior antishearing force capacity under single-leg stance. Dual-Plate provided maximum antihorizontal rotation. Para-Screw provided the maximum stabilization for the posterior pelvic ring.This study showed the biomechanical advantages of dual-implant for PSD only from the finite element view. The Para-Screw provided high construct stiffness under 3 load conditions. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. The better anterior and posterior pelvic stabilization were obtained by the dual-implant fixation than other methods. Therefore, the Cross-Screw and Dual-Plate fixation methods should be preferred in the

  17. Effect of twist-orientation on mechanical properties of self-reinforced poly(lactic acid) screws in simulated body environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Masato; Kobayashi, Satoshi; composite engineering lab Team

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) attracts much attention as a typical biodegradable polymer, and has been applied as a bone fixation device. As one of the methods to improve mechanical properties of PLA bone fixation device, orientations of molecular chains have been investigated. However, conventional uniaxial drawing could not improve mechanical properties along the other loading direction than the drawing direction, such as torsion. In this study, screw is treated as a bone fixation device. In order to improve torsional strength of a bioabsorbable PLA screw, twist-orientation method has been developed. PLA screw is prepared through a series of routes including extrusion molding, extrusion drawing, twist-orientation and forging. This screw was immersed in the phosphate buffer solution for 0, 8, 16 and 24 weeks, then shear strength, orientation function, crystallinity and molecular weight were measured. As a result, twist-orientation improves the initial torsional strength of PLA screw without the decrease in initial shear strength. In addition, the shear strength on twist-oriented screw is equivalent that of non-twist oriented screw during immersion until 24 weeks. This result shown that the twist-orientation does not decrease shear strength after immersion.

  18. Clear Zone Formation around Screws in the Early Postoperative Stages after Posterior Lumbar Fusion Using the Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique for posterior lumbar fusion through assessment of the clear zones around the screws and the risk factors involved. Overview of Literature Postoperative radiolucent zones (clear zones) are an indicator of poor conventional pedicle screw fixation. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, 19 patients (8 men and 11 women) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. A total of 109 screws were used for evaluation with measurement of the maximum insertional torque of last two screw rotations. Clear zone-positivity on plain radiographs was investigated 6 months after surgery. The relation between intraoperative insertional torque and clear zone-positivity was investigated by one-way analysis of variance. In addition, the correlation between clear zone-positivity and gender, age (<75 years old or >75 years old), or operative stabilization level (<2 or >3 vertebral levels) was evaluated using the chi-square test. Results Clear zones were observed around six screws (5.50%) in five patients (26.3%). The mean insertional torque (4.00±2.09 inlbs) of clear zone-positive screws was lower than that of clear zone-negative screws (8.12±0.50 in-lbs), but the difference was not significant. There was a significant correlation between clear zone-positivity and operative level of stabilization. Conclusions The low incidence of clear zone-positive screws indicates good initial fixation using the CBT technique. Multilevel fusions may be risk factors for clear zone generation. PMID:26713120

  19. Common iliac artery aneurysm presenting as acute sciatic nerve compression.

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, S. R.; Grimley, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Aneurysms of the iliac arteries usually remain silent, but when they rupture the consequences can be dramatic. They produce few clinical signs suggestive of their presence. However, such aneurysms have been found to be the cause of non-vascular clinical situations. Often they present with features of compression on adjacent viscera. We present a case in which a large common iliac artery aneurysm was found to be causing symptoms of acute sciatic nerve compression. PMID:3447118

  20. Split spline screw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A split spline screw type payload fastener assembly, including three identical male and female type split spline sections, is discussed. The male spline sections are formed on the head of a male type spline driver. Each of the split male type spline sections has an outwardly projecting load baring segment including a convex upper surface which is adapted to engage a complementary concave surface of a female spline receptor in the form of a hollow bolt head. Additionally, the male spline section also includes a horizontal spline releasing segment and a spline tightening segment below each load bearing segment. The spline tightening segment consists of a vertical web of constant thickness. The web has at least one flat vertical wall surface which is designed to contact a generally flat vertically extending wall surface tab of the bolt head. Mutual interlocking and unlocking of the male and female splines results upon clockwise and counter clockwise turning of the driver element.

  1. Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw Technique.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, John; Cho, Rosa; Reid, J Spence; Boateng, Henry; Copeland, Carol; Sirlin, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Remembering that preoperative planning, surgical indications, and fracture reduction are paramount for this procedure, presented here is our technique for performing percutaneous sacroiliac screws, both transiliac-transsacral and sacral style. A combination of video, still pictures, and fluoroscopy images will guide the viewer through the process we routinely use highlighting specific details. Patient positioning and intraoperative fluoroscopy imaging are critical to a successful procedure. Although inlet and outlet films remain important, we find the procedure best started on the lateral sacral view to reduce the need for start site, trajectory, and imaging position changes during the case. A cannulated pig sticker (drill guide) used with long drill tip guide wires provide improved manual control to both finding a good start site and directing the trajectory. For patient safety, sacral anatomy and safe zones are discussed as well. Using these technical points will help make this a successful procedure. PMID:27441927

  2. Current trends in pedicle screw stimulation techniques: lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical levels.

    PubMed

    Isley, Michael R; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Leppanen, Ronald E

    2012-06-01

    Unequivocally, pedicle screw instrumentation has evolved as a primary construct for the treatment of both common and complex spinal disorders. However an inevitable and potentially major complication associated with this type of surgery is misplacement of a pedicle screw(s) which may result in neural and vascular complications, as well as impair the biomechanical stability of the spinal instrumentation resulting in loss of fixation. In light of these potential surgical complications, critical reviews of outcome data for treatment of chronic, low-back pain using pedicle screw instrumentation concluded that "pedicle screw fixation improves radiographically demonstrated fusion rates;" however the expense and complication rates for such constructs are considerable in light of the clinical benefit (Resnick et al. 2005a). Currently, neuromonitoring using free-run and evoked (triggered) electromyography (EMG) is widely used and advocated for safer and more accurate placement of pedicle screws during open instrumentation procedures, and more recently, guiding percutaneous placement (minimally invasive) where the pedicle cannot be easily inspected visually. The latter technique, evoked or triggered EMG when applied to pedicle screw instrumentation surgeries, has been referred to as the pedicle screw stimulation technique. As concluded in the Position Statement by the American Society of Neurophysiological Monitoring (ASNM), multimodality neuromonitoring using free-run EMG and the pedicle screw stimulation technique was considered a practice option and not yet a standard of care (Leppanen 2005). Subsequently, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS) Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves published their "Guidelines for the Performance of Fusion Procedures for Degenerative Disease of the Lumbar Spine" (Heary 2005, Resnick et al. 2005a, Resnick et al. 2005b). It was concluded that the "primary

  3. Occipital condyle to cervical spine fixation in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Kosnik-Infinger, Libby; Glazier, Steven S; Frankel, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    Fixation at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) is necessary in a variety of pediatric clinical scenarios. Traditionally an occipital bone to cervical fusion is preformed, which requires a large amount of hardware to be placed on the occiput of a child. If a patient has previously undergone a posterior fossa decompression or requires a decompression at the time of the fusion procedure, it can be difficult to anchor a plate to the occipital bone. The authors propose a technique that can be used when faced with this difficult challenge by using the occipital condyle as a point of fixation for the construct. Adult cadaveric and a limited number of case studies have been published using occipital condyle (C-0) fixation. This work was adapted for the pediatric population. Between 2009 and 2012, 4 children underwent occipital condyle to axial or subaxial spine fixation. One patient had previously undergone posterior fossa surgery for tumor resection, and 1 required decompression at the time of operation. Two patients underwent preoperative deformity reduction using traction. One child had a Chiari malformation Type I. Each procedure was performed using polyaxial screw-rod constructs with intraoperative neuronavigation supplemented by a custom navigational drill guide. Smooth-shanked 3.5-mm polyaxial screws, ranging in length from 26 to 32 mm, were placed into the occipital condyles. All patients successfully underwent occipital condyle to cervical spine fixation. In 3 patients the construct extended from C-0 to C-2, and in 1 from C-0 to T-2. Patients with preoperative halo stabilization were placed in a cervical collar postoperatively. There were no new postoperative neurological deficits or vascular injuries. Each patient underwent postoperative CT, demonstrating excellent screw placement and evidence of solid fusion. Occipital condyle fixation is an effective option in pediatric patients requiring occipitocervical fusion for treatment of deformity and/or instability at

  4. Mechanical testing of a device for subcutaneous internal anterior pelvic ring fixation versus external pelvic ring fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although useful in the emergency treatment of pelvic ring injuries, external fixation is associated with pin tract infections, the patient’s limited mobility and a restricted surgical accessibility to the lower abdomen. In this study, the mechanical stability of a subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) system is investigated. Methods A standard external fixation and a SIAF system were tested on pairs of Polyoxymethylene testing cylinders using a universal testing machine. Each specimen was subjected to a total of 2000 consecutive cyclic loadings at 1 Hz with sinusoidal lateral compression/distraction (+/−50 N) and torque (+/− 0.5 Nm) loading alternating every 200 cycles. Translational and rotational stiffness were determined at 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 cycles. Results There was no significant difference in translational stiffness between the SIAF and the standard external fixation when compared at 500 (p = .089), 700 (p = .081), and 900 (p = .266) cycles. Rotational stiffness observed for the SIAF was about 50 percent higher than the standard external fixation at 300 (p = .005), 500 (p = .020), and 900 (p = .005) cycles. No loosening or failure of the rod-pin/rod-screw interfaces was seen. Conclusions In comparison with the standard external fixation system, the tested device for subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) in vitro has similar translational and superior rotational stiffness. PMID:24684828

  5. External-to-Internal Iliac Stent-Graft: Medium-Term Patency Following Exclusion of a Retrogradely Perfused Common Iliac Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, Marcus John; McPherson, Simon

    2010-08-15

    Following complicated aortic aneurysm surgery a complete left iliac occlusion resulted in buttock claudication. A retrogradely perfused right common iliac aneurysm expanded. Exclusion was by external-to-internal iliac stent-graft. No deterioration in claudication occurred with medium-term stent-graft patency.

  6. Removal torque of nail interlocking screws is related to screw proximity to the fracture and screw breakage.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander A; Kubacki, Meghan R; Samona, Jason; Telehowski, Paul; Atkinson, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Studies have shown that titanium implants can be challenging to explant due to the material's excellent biocompatibility and resulting osseointegration. Clinically, titanium alloy nail interlocking screws may require removal to dynamize a construct or revise the nail due to nonunion, infection, pain, or periprosthetic fracture. This study was designed to determine what variables influence the removal torque for titanium alloy interlocking screws. An intramedullary nail with four interlocking screws was used to stabilize a 1-cm segmental femoral defect in a canine model for 16 weeks. The animals were observed to be active following a several-day recovery after surgery. In six animals, the femora and implanted nail/screws were first tested to failure in torsion to simulate periprosthetic fracture of an implant after which the screws were then removed. In four additional animals, the screws were removed without mechanical testing. Both intraoperative insertional and extraction torques were recorded for all screws. Mechanical testing to failure broke 10/24 screws. On average, the intact screws required 70% of the insertional torque during removal while broken screws only required 16% of the insertional torque (p < 0.001). In addition, intact screws closer to the fracture required 2.8 times more removal torque than the outboard distal screw (p < 0.005). On average, the angle of rotation to peak torque was ∼80°. The peak axial load did not significantly correlate with the torque required to remove the screws. On average, the removal torque was lower than at the time of insertion, and less torque was required to remove broken screws and screws remote to the fracture. However, broken screws will require additional time to retrieve the remaining screw fragment. This study suggests that broken screws and screws in prematurely active patients will require less torque to remove. PMID:27129382

  7. Clival Screw Placement in Patient with atlas assimilation: A CT-based feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan; Wu, Zenghui

    2016-01-01

    Clival screw and plate fixation technique is an alternative or supplement to the occipitocervical instrumentation. However, no report has clarified the applied anatomy of clivus in patients with atlas assimilation (C1A), especially for clival screw fixation. Therefore, we measured the parameters of clival lengths, widths, putative screw lengths, clival-cervical angel and foramen magnum diameters on CT images in a cohort of 81 C1A patients and patients without C1A. The clivus showed a rectangular shape in 96.3% (78/81) of C1A patients, and a normal-like triangle shape in 3.7% (3/81) of C1A patients. The intracranial clival length decreased 13% (37 mm) in C1A patients, the extracranial clival length 14.8% (24.1 mm), the clival-cervical angle 6.2% (122.3°) and the superior screw length 11.3% (14.1 mm), the sagittal diameter of foramen magnum 16% (28.0 mm), respectively. There was no significant difference in the widest or narrowest clival width, or the middle screw length, or the transverse diameter of foramen magnum between groups. The inferior clivus was feasible for an average 9.7-mm-length screw placement in C1A patients, while not in patients without C1A. The present study characterizes clivus of C1A patients with an unnormal-like rectangular shape, and confirmes a screw placement at the inferior clivus. PMID:27539005

  8. Biomechanical analysis of different types of pedicle screw augmentation: a cadaveric and synthetic bone sample study of instrumented vertebral specimens.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kuo-Hua; Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Ming; McClean, Colin J; Fan, Chang-Yuan; Chang, Chia-Hao; Lin, Leou-Chyr; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to determine the pull-out strength, stiffness and failure pull-out energy of cement-augmented, cannulated-fenestrated pedicle screws in an osteoporotic cadaveric thoracolumbar model, and to determine, using synthetic bone samples, the extraction torques of screws pre-filled with cement and those with cement injected through perforations. Radiographs and bone mineral density measurements from 32 fresh thoracolumbar vertebrae were used to define specimen quality. Axial pull-out strength of screws was determined through mechanical testing. Mechanical pull-out strength, stiffness and energy-to-failure ratio were recorded for cement-augmented and non-cement-augmented screws. Synthetic bone simulating a human spinal bone with severe osteoporosis was used to measure the maximum extraction torque. The pull-out strength and stiffness-to-failure ratio of cement pre-filled and cement-injected screws were significantly higher than the non-cement-augmented control group. However, the cement pre-filled and cement-injected groups did not differ significantly across these values (p=0.07). The cement pre-filled group had the highest failure pull-out energy, approximately 2.8 times greater than that of the cement-injected (p<0.001), and approximately 11.5 times greater than that of the control groups (p<0.001). In the axial pull-out test, the cement-injected group had a greater maximum extraction torque than the cement pre-filled group, but was statistically insignificant (p=0.17). The initial fixation strength of cannulated screws pre-filled with cement is similar to that of cannulated screws injected with cement through perforations. This comparable strength, along with the heightened pull-out energy and reduced extraction torque, indicates that pedicle screws pre-filled with cement are superior for bone fixation over pedicle screws injected with cement. PMID:23669371

  9. Litanium expandable pedicle screw for the treatment of degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases in osteoporotic patients: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Roperto, Raffaelino; Fiore, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a major global health problem, with over 10 million people currently diagnosed with the disease. Although 80% of osteoporotic patients are women, a considerable number of men are also affected. Also, due to increasing life expectancy, the number of elderly patients with osteoporosis affected by degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases will increase further. Osteoporosis reduces bone quality through negative bone remodelling. Low bone quality can reduce the pull-out strength of pedicle screw, and negative bone remodelling can cause delayed bone fusion. However, pedicle screw instrumentation of the osteoporotic spine carries an increased risk of screw loosening, pull-out, and fixation failure. Our preliminary study aims to investigate the efficiency of expandable pedicle screws (OsseoScrew-Spinal Fixation System, Alphatec Spine Inc., Carlsbad, CA) in osteoporotic spinal patients. All osteoporotic patients with degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases admitted in our department underwent a pre-operative spinal x-Ray and MRI or CT. Pre-operative clinical assesment of patients was based on the visual analog scale (VAS) and Owestry Disability (ODI) questionnaire-a disease-specific outcome measure. Ten osteoporotic patients were treated with expandable pedicle screws (OsseoScrew). Post-operative clinical assessment of patients was based on the VAS and ODI questionnaire at 3 months and 1 year of follow-up. Post-operative radiologic follow-up was performed after 3 days (CT, x-ray); 3 months (x-ray); 6 months (spinal CT); and 1 year (spinal CT). Expandable pedicle screws improved pull-out strength as compared to standard pedicle screws in osteoporotic patients with degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases. PMID:23023577

  10. Self-energized screw coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.; Totah, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Threaded coupling carries its own store of rotational energy. Originally developed to ease task of astronauts assembling structures in space, coupling offers same advantages in other hazardous operations, such as underwater and in and around nuclear reactors. Coupling consists of two parts: crew portion and receptacle. When screw portion is inserted into receptacle and given slight push by operator, trigger pins release ratchet, allowing energy stored in springs to rotate screw into nut in receptacle.

  11. Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine Avulsion Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Serbest, Sancar; Tosun, Hacı Bayram; Tiftikçi, Uğur; Oktas, Birhan; Kesgin, Engin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Avulsion fractures of the pelvic apophyses rarely occur in adolescent athletes in the course of sudden strong contraction of muscle attached to growth cartilage. This injury may usually be misdiagnosed for tendon or muscle strain. Patient's history, physical examination, and radiologic studies are important for diagnosis. The literature includes only a few case reports but no case series as yet. The aim of this study was to present the results of 5 cases of anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) avulsion fractures treated conservatively. The study included 5 patients (4 male, 1 female, mean age 13.6 years) who underwent conservative treatment for AIIS avulsion fractures and had an adequate follow-up. All patients were admitted to the emergency department and misdiagnosed as muscle strain. Three of them were football player, 1 skier, and 1 fighter. Each patient was treated with immobilization and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. At follow-up, all patients showed relief from their pain and mechanical symptoms and regained full range of motion and returned to their previous levels of activity. Diagnosis requires careful attention to the physical examination and imaging. In this series, all pelvic avulsion fractures (100%) were managed successfully with a conservative approach. Good results and return to previous levels of activity can be achieved with conservative treatment. PMID:25700329

  12. Comparison of pullout strength of the thoracic pedicle screw between intrapedicular and extrapedicular technique: a meta-analysis and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Huafeng; Sribastav, Shilabant Sen; Ye, Fubiao; Liang, Chunxiang; Li, Zemin; Wang, Jianru; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intrapedicular fixation in thoracic spine is often limited, because of high risk of complication, especially in scoliosis patients. Extrapedicular screws fixation techniques provide an alternate solution for extremely small or abnormal thoracic pedicles deformity. However, the pullout resistance of extrapedicular screws has not been clearly defined. The aim of our study was to systematically review the existing evidence regarding the pullout resistance of thoracic extrapedicular screws compared with intrapedicular screws. Methods: A systematic search of all studies published through Nov 2014 was performed using Medline, EMBASE, OVID and other databases. All studies that compared the pullout resistance of thoracic extrapedicular screws with intrapedicular screws were selected. The data from the included studies were extracted and analyzed regarding pullout resistance force. Forest plots were constructed to summarize the data and compare the biomechanical stability achieved. Results: Five studies were included, with a total of 27 cadaveric specimens and 313 screws. The vertebral levels of the cadavers potted were T1-T8, T2-T12, T7-T9, T6-T11 and T4-T12 respectively. Overall, the results demonstrated that there was no significant difference in ultimate pullout strength between intrapedicular screws and extrapedicular screws (95% CI=-63.73 to 27.74; P=0.44); extrapedicular screws significantly increased the length of placements by a mean of 6.24 mm (95% CI=5.38 to 7.10; P<0.001); while the stiffness in intrapedicular screws was significantly stronger by a mean of 45.82 N/mm compared with extrapedicular screws (95% CI=-70.09 to -21.56; P<0.001). Conclusions: Meta-analysis of the existing literature showed that thoracic extrapedicular screws provided comparable but slightly lower pullout strength compared with intrapedicular screws, extrapedicular screws placement is much safer than intrapedicular screws. So thoracic extrapedicular screws offer a good

  13. Computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation: concepts and evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erin J; Ellis, Randy E; Pichora, David R

    2013-11-01

    Background The treatment for undisplaced scaphoid waist fractures has evolved from conventional cast immobilization to percutaneous screw insertion. Percutaneous fixation reduces some of the risks of open surgery, but can be technically demanding and carries the risk of radiation exposure. Recently, computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation (CAPSF) has been gaining interest. Materials and Methods Conventional percutaneous scaphoid fixation is performed under fluoroscopic guidance and involves insertion of a guide wire along the length of the scaphoid to facilitate placement of a cannulated screw. Adapting computer-assisted techniques for scaphoid fixation poses several unique challenges including patient tracking and registration. Results To date, five groups have successfully implemented systems for CAPSF. These systems have implemented wrist immobilization strategies to resolve the issue of patient tracking and have developed unique guidance techniques incorporating 2D fluoroscope, cone-beam CT, and ultrasound, to circumvent patient-based registration. Conclusions Computer-aided percutaneous pinning of scaphoid waist fractures can significantly reduce radiation exposure and has the potential to improve the accuracy of this procedure. This article reviews the rationale for, and the evolution of, CAPSF and describes the key principles of computer-assisted technology. PMID:24436833

  14. Computer-Assisted Percutaneous Scaphoid Fixation: Concepts and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erin J.; Ellis, Randy E.; Pichora, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The treatment for undisplaced scaphoid waist fractures has evolved from conventional cast immobilization to percutaneous screw insertion. Percutaneous fixation reduces some of the risks of open surgery, but can be technically demanding and carries the risk of radiation exposure. Recently, computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation (CAPSF) has been gaining interest. Materials and Methods Conventional percutaneous scaphoid fixation is performed under fluoroscopic guidance and involves insertion of a guide wire along the length of the scaphoid to facilitate placement of a cannulated screw. Adapting computer-assisted techniques for scaphoid fixation poses several unique challenges including patient tracking and registration. Results To date, five groups have successfully implemented systems for CAPSF. These systems have implemented wrist immobilization strategies to resolve the issue of patient tracking and have developed unique guidance techniques incorporating 2D fluoroscope, cone-beam CT, and ultrasound, to circumvent patient-based registration. Conclusions Computer-aided percutaneous pinning of scaphoid waist fractures can significantly reduce radiation exposure and has the potential to improve the accuracy of this procedure. This article reviews the rationale for, and the evolution of, CAPSF and describes the key principles of computer-assisted technology. PMID:24436833

  15. Parallel analysis of finite element model controlled trial and retrospective case control study on percutaneous internal fixation for vertical sacral fractures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although percutaneous posterior-ring tension-band metallic plate and percutaneous iliosacral screws are used to fix unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures, the biomechanical stability and compatibility of both internal fixation techniques for the treatment of Denis I, II and III type vertical sacral fractures remain unclear. Methods Using CT and MR images of the second generation of Chinese Digitized Human “male No. 23”, two groups of finite element models were developed for Denis I, II and III type vertical sacral fractures with ipsilateral superior and inferior pubic ramus fractures treated with either a percutaneous metallic plate or a percutaneous screw. Accordingly, two groups of clinical cases that were fixed using the above-mentioned two internal fixation techniques were retrospectively evaluated to compare postoperative effect and function. Parallel analysis was performed with a finite element model controlled trial and a case control study. Results The difference of the postoperative Majeed standards and outcome rates between two case groups was no statistically significant (P > 0.05). Accordingly, the high values of the maximum displacements/stresses of the plate-fixation model group approximated those of the screw-fixation model group. However, further simulation of Denis I, II and III type fractures in each group of models found that the biomechanics of the plate-fixation models became increasingly stable and compatible, whereas the biomechanics of the screw-fixation models maintained tiny fluctuations. When treating Denis III fractures, the biomechanical effects of the pelvic ring of the plate-fixation model were better than the screw-fixation model. Conclusions Percutaneous plate and screw fixations are both appropriate for the treatment of Denis I and II type vertical sacral fractures; whereas percutaneous plate fixation appears be superior to percutaneous screw fixation for Denis III type vertical sacral fracture. Biomechanical

  16. Influences of implant condyle geometry on bone and screw strains in a temporomandibular implant.

    PubMed

    Mesnard, M; Ramos, A; Simões, J A

    2014-04-01

    A 3D finite element model of an in vitro implanted mandible was analysed. The load point was placed on the condyle in three positions (inside the mouth, centred and outside) to simulate different contact points between the mandible condyle and the temporal bone. The strain fields in the condyle were assessed and detailed around the surgical screws. The temporomandibular implant studied here was modelled on a commercial device that uses four screws to fix it in vivo in a very similar position. The boundary conditions of the numerical model simulated a load on the incisors with a 15 mm mouth aperture. The same contact loads were applied to the two condyles. Numerical results were successfully obtained for the three different contact points: the inside contact produced lower strains on the condyle. The first screw created a critical strain distribution in the bone, just under the screw. The study shows that centred and inside contact induces lower strain distributions. This suggests that spherical condyle geometry should be applied in order to reduce the strains in fixation. As the top screw was observed to play the most critical role, the third screw is in fact unnecessary, since the lower strain distribution suggests that it will be loosened. PMID:23726645

  17. Treatment of proximal phalangeal fractures with an antegrade intramedullary screw: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Borbas, P; Dreu, M; Poggetti, A; Calcagni, M; Giesen, T

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the articular cartilage defect created with two different antegrade techniques of intramedullary osteosynthesis with a headless compression screw inserted through the metacarpophalangeal joint. In 12 out of 24 fingers from six cadaveric hands, a trans-articular technique with cannulated headless compression screws (2.2 and 3.0 mm diameter) was used; whereas in the other 12 fingers, an intra-articular fixation technique was used. The areas of the articular surface and the defects created were measured with a digital image software program. All measurements were made twice by two observers. In the intra-articular technique, the average defect in the base of the articular surface of the proximal phalanx was 4.6% with the 2.2 mm headless compression screw and 8.5% with the 3.0 mm screw. In the trans-articular technique, the defect size was slightly smaller; 4.2% with the 2.2 mm screw and 8% with the 3.0 mm screw, but the differences were not statistically significant. The main advantage of the intra-articular technique was that it avoided damage to the articular surface of the metacarpal head. PMID:27056278

  18. Technique tip: percutaneous fixation of partial incongruous Lisfranc injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Bleazey, Scott T; Brigido, Stephen A; Protzman, Nicole M

    2013-06-01

    Open reduction with screw fixation is considered the standard surgical approach for injuries of the Lisfranc complex in athletes. However, multiple incisions are required, which increase the risk for postoperative complications. We present a novel percutaneous reduction and solid screw fixation technique that may be a viable option to address partial incongruous injuries of the Lisfranc complex in athletes. At our institution, no intraoperative or postoperative complications have been encountered. Screw breakage did not occur. Reduction of the second metatarsal was considered anatomic across all patients. All patients have returned to their respective sport without limitation. The percutaneous approach appears to decrease complications while the targeting-reduction guide appears to precisely reduce the injury. Consequently, outcomes have been more consistent and predictable. The authors note that this percutaneous approach is specific to partial incongruous injuries of the Lisfranc complex. When presented with more extensive injuries, the authors advocate an open approach. PMID:23631892

  19. Pull-out strength comparison of a novel expanding fastener against an orthopaedic screw in an ovine vertebral body: an ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Oldakowski, Matthew; Oldakowska, Intan; Kirk, Thomas B; Ford, Chris T; Sercombe, Tim B; Hardcastle, Philip; Day, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to mechanically test a novel Unthreaded Expandable Fastener (UEF), manufactured using Selective Laser Melting, which was designed for fixation in the cervical lateral mass. The pull-out strength and stiffness of the prototype UEFs was evaluated in a non-osteoporotic ovine bone model against equivalent screws. The prototype UEF demonstrated a 41% increase in failure force and a 60% reduction in failure force standard deviation compared to the screws. All bone samples were micro CT-scanned and no significant differences in bone microstructural properties was found between the screw and UEF sample sets, indicating that the UEFs may be less sensitive to bone quality variation. This increased performance can potentially translate into improved surgical outcome and reduced surgical risk for lateral mass fixation. With further design optimisation, additional improvement in performance over screws may be possible in future studies. PMID:26758778

  20. Primary stability of inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Chae, Soo-Won; Lee, Haea; Kim, Soo Min; Lee, Juneyoung; Han, Seung-Ho; Kim, Soung-Yon

    2016-06-01

    Glenoid component fixation with inferior tilt has been suggested as one of the surgical methods to decrease scapular notching and improve stability, but its clinically beneficial effect remains a concern. We evaluated the influence of inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component on primary stability in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty by finite element analysis. Finite element models were constructed from cadaveric scapulae of females over the age of 60 years and glenoid components from reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The relative micromotion at the bone-glenoid component interface, distribution of bone stress under the glenoid component and around the screws, contact area between the bone and screws, and cut surface area of the cancellous bone exposed after glenoid reaming were analyzed and compared between a neutral and 10° inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component. The 10° inferior tilt fixation demonstrated greater relative micromotion and higher bone stress than the neutral tilt fixation. Eccentric reaming, which is done to produce the inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component, increased glenoid cancellous bone exposure and decreased bone-screws contact area. Inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component may adversely affect primary stability and longevity after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1061-1068, 2016. PMID:26621211

  1. Intramedullary Fixation of Clavicle Fractures: Anatomy, Indications, Advantages, and Disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Josef K; Balog, Todd P; Grassbaugh, Jason A

    2016-07-01

    Historically, management of displaced midshaft clavicle fractures has consisted of nonsurgical treatment. However, recent literature has supported surgical repair of displaced and shortened clavicle fractures. Several options exist for surgical fixation, including plate and intramedullary (IM) fixation. IM fixation has the potential advantages of a smaller incision and decreased dissection and soft-tissue exposure. For the last two decades, the use of Rockwood and Hagie pins represented the most popular form of IM fixation, but concerns exist regarding stability and complications. The use of alternative IM implants, such as Kirschner wires, titanium elastic nails, and cannulated screws, also has been described in limited case series. However, concerns persist regarding the complications associated with the use of these implants, including implant failure, migration, skin complications, and construct stability. Second-generation IM implants have been developed to reduce the limitations of earlier IM devices. Although anatomic and clinical studies have supported IM fixation of midshaft clavicle fractures, further research is necessary to determine the optimal fixation method. PMID:27227985

  2. Predictability of sacral base levelness based on iliac crest measurements.

    PubMed

    Dott, G A; Hart, C L; McKay, C

    1994-05-01

    A level sacral base plane is necessary to allow normalization of complex lumbosacral mechanics. Palpatory examinations are often used to evaluate for leg length discrepancy and pelvic obliquity despite improved accuracy and consistency of radiographic techniques. Treatment based on palpatory examinations suppose a direct and consistent relationship between the pelvic bones (innominates) and the sacral base. To evaluate the relationship between iliac crest levelness and sacral base levelness, a radiographic postural survey in the upright, weight-bearing position was performed on 358 men and women thought to have pelvic obliquity. Of these subjects, 293 demonstrated unlevel iliac crest heights or sacral base > or = 3/16 inch (4.76 mm), with iliac crest heights accurately predicting sacral base position 62% of the time. At > or = 3/8 inch (9.53 mm), 68% of the cases were accurately predicted. When the criterion for unlevelness was increased to > or = 1/2 inch (12.70 mm), the predictive accuracy improved to 83%. Radiographic findings in this study demonstrate a significant difference between iliac crest heights and sacral base position. In cases of mild to moderate short leg syndromes, the iliac crest height is an unreliable predictor of the direction or degree of sacral base levelness. PMID:8056627

  3. The biomechanical aspects of reconstruction for segmental defects of the mandible: a finite element study to assess the optimisation of plate and screw factors.

    PubMed

    Bujtár, Péter; Simonovics, János; Váradi, Károly; Sándor, George K B; Avery, C M E

    2014-09-01

    A bone plate is required to restore the load-bearing capacity of the mandible following a segmental resection. A good understanding of the underlying principles is crucial for developing a reliable reconstruction. A finite element analysis (FEA) technique has been developed to study the biomechanics of the clinical scenarios managed after surgical resection of a tumour or severe trauma to assist in choosing the optimal hardware elements. A computer aided design (CAD) model of an edentulous human mandible was created. Then 4 common segmental defects were simulated. A single reconstruction plate was designed to span the defects. The hardware variations studied were: monocortical or bicortical screw fixation and non-locking or locking plate design. A standardized load was applied to mimic the human bite. The von Mises stress and strain, spatial changes at the screw-bone interfaces were analysed. In general, the locking plate and monocortical screw fixation systems were most effective. Non-locking plating systems produced larger screw "pull-out" displacements, especially at the hemimandible (up to 5% strain). Three screws on either side of the defect were adequate for all scenarios except extensive unilateral defects when additional screws and an increased screw diameter are recommended. The simplification of screw geometry may underestimate stress levels and factors such as poor adaptation of the plate or reduced bone quality are likely to be indications for bicortical locking screw fixation. The current model provides a good basis for understanding the complex biomechanics and developing future refinements in plate or scaffold design. PMID:24467871

  4. Fixation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Fixation and regression were considered complementary by Freud. You tend to regress to a point of fixation. They are both opposed to progression. In the general area, Anna Freud has written (The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence. London: Hogarth and the Psycho-Analytic Institute, 1937), Sears has evaluated (Survey of Objective Studies of…

  5. The role of reduction and internal fixation of Lisfranc fracture–dislocations: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Stavlas, Panagiotis; Roberts, Craig S.; Xypnitos, Fragiskos N.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed in order to evaluate the role of reduction and internal fixation in the management of Lisfranc joint fracture–dislocations. Articles were extracted from the Pubmed database and the retrieved reports were included in the study only if pre-specified eligibility criteria were fulfilled. Eleven articles were eligible for the final analysis, reporting data for the management of 257 patients. Injuries of the first three metatarsal rays were treated by closed reduction and internal fixation with screws in 16.3% of the patients, open reduction and internal fixation with screws in 66.5% and open reduction and internal fixation with Kirschner wires (K-wires) in 17.1% of the patients. The preferred method for the stabilisation of the fourth and fifth metatarsal rays was K-wires. Screw-related complications were common and were reported in 16.1% of the cases. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society midfoot score was 78.1 points. Post-traumatic radiographic arthritis was reported in 49.6% of the patients, but only in 7.8% of them it was severe enough to warrant an arthrodesis. We conclude that open reduction and internal fixation of the first three metatarsal rays with screws is a reliable method for the management of Lisfranc injuries. This can be complemented by K-wires application in the fourth and fifth metatarsal rays if needed. PMID:20683593

  6. The Use of Intraosseous Screw for Upper Molar Distalization: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Polat-Özsoy, Ömür

    2008-01-01

    The use of implants has made a major change in orthodontic treatment mechanics. They have replaced conventional unaesthetic and compliance dependent extraoral appliances with well accepted intraoral mechanics. Implants can be used in molar and canine distalization, intrusion and in extraoral force applications. In the present case report, treatment of a case using an intermaxillary fixation screw (IMF) will be presented. The treatment results will be evaluated using pretreatment, post distalization and post treatment cephalometric radiographs and dental casts. PMID:19212521

  7. Spontaneous common iliac vein rupture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    DePass, Ian E.

    1998-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman, admitted because of acute lower quadrant abdominal pain but no history of trauma, underwent laparotomy for a suspected ruptured aortic aneurysm. Exploration revealed a 20-mm longitudinal tear in the left iliac vein. The vein was repaired primarily. Her postoperative course was complicated by deep vein thrombosis. Spontaneous rupture of the iliac vein without trauma is rare. but occurs predominantly in healthy white women between the ages of 40 and 80 years. Various causative mechanisms have been described: inflammation of the vessel wall secondary to thrombophlebitis, proximal obstruction of the iliac vein and spontaneous rupture without obstruction or thrombosis. In many cases an increase in intra-abdominal pressure is noted. PMID:9854541

  8. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Via Internal Iliac Artery Conduit].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Taro; Tobe, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Hironobu; Ijyuin, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Masato; Oka, Takanori; Misato, Takuya; Tsunemi, Kotaro; Tanimura, Nobuhiro

    2016-09-01

    A 77-year-old man with a history of stent implantation in the right common iliac artery(CIA) and the left external iliac artery(EIA) was admitted to our hospital for a rapid growth of an aneurysm( max 53 mm) at Th11 level of the descending aorta. Although thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was required, there were many problems about access rout. The infrarenal abdominal aorta and the left EIA were severely calcified, and the lumens of the right CIA stent(5.3 mm) and the left EIA stent( 4.3 mm) were small in size. Besides, the left CIA was short(13 mm). Therefore, TEVAR was performed by retrograde approach from the left internal iliac artery( IIA) with a tube graft conduit in the hybrid operation room. IIA is a useful option for an access rout in endovascular aortic repair. PMID:27586313

  9. In vivo degradation of a new concept of magnesium-based rivet-screws in the minipig mandibular bone.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Benoit; Saulacic, Nikola; Beck, Stefan; Imwinkelried, Thomas; Goh, Bee Tin; Nakahara, Ken; Hofstetter, Willy; Iizuka, Tateyuki

    2016-12-01

    Self-tapping of magnesium screws in hard bone may be a challenge due to the limited torsional strength of magnesium alloys in comparison with titanium. To avoid screw failure upon implantation, the new concept of a rivet-screw was applied to a WE43 magnesium alloy. Hollow cylinders with threads on the outside were expanded inside drill holes of minipig mandibles. During the expansion with a hexagonal mandrel, the threads engaged the surrounding bone and the inside of the screw transformed into a hexagonal screw drive to allow further screwing in or out of the implant. The in vivo degradation of the magnesium implants and the performance of the used coating were studied in a human standard-sized animal model. Four magnesium alloy rivet-screws were implanted in each mandible of 12 minipigs. Six animals received the plasmaelectrolytically coated magnesium alloy implants; another six received the uncoated magnesium alloy rivet-screws. Two further animals received one titanium rivet-screw each as control. In vivo radiologic examination was performed at one, four, and eight weeks. Euthanasia was performed for one group of seven animals (three animals with coated, three with uncoated magnesium alloy implants and one with titanium implant) at 12weeks and for the remaining seven animals at 24weeks. After euthanasia, micro-computed tomography and histological examination with histomorphometry were performed. Significantly less void formation as well as higher bone volume density (BV/TV) and bone-implant contact area (BIC) were measured around the coated implants compared to the uncoated ones. The surface coating was effective in delaying degradation despite plastic deformation. The results showed potential for further development of magnesium hollow coated screws for bone fixation. PMID:27612710

  10. Expandable insert serves as screw anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Expandable self-locking adapter secures components to panels having one accessible side. Mounting holes in the panels may not be threaded to accommodate screws, therefore, the adapter contains a female thread that will mate a mounting screw.

  11. A new adhesive technique for internal fixation in midfacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Kira; Marx, Rudolf; Tinschert, Joachim; Wirtz, Dieter Christian; Stoll, Christian; Riediger, Dieter; Smeets, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Background The current surgical therapy of midfacial fractures involves internal fixation in which bone fragments are fixed in their anatomical positions with osteosynthesis plates and corresponding screws until bone healing is complete. This often causes new fractures to fragile bones while drilling pilot holes or trying to insert screws. The adhesive fixation of osteosynthesis plates using PMMA bone cement could offer a viable alternative for fixing the plates without screws. In order to achieve the adhesive bonding of bone cement to cortical bone in the viscerocranium, an amphiphilic bone bonding agent was created, analogous to the dentin bonding agents currently on the market. Methods The adhesive bonding strengths were measured using tension tests. For this, metal plates with 2.0 mm diameter screw holes were cemented with PMMA bone cement to cortical bovine bone samples from the femur diaphysis. The bone was conditioned with an amphiphilic bone bonding agent prior to cementing. The samples were stored for 1 to 42 days at 37 degrees C, either moist or completely submerged in an isotonic NaCl-solution, and then subjected to the tension tests. Results Without the bone bonding agent, the bonding strength was close to zero (0.2 MPa). Primary stability with bone bonding agent is considered to be at ca. 8 MPa. Moist storage over 42 days resulted in decreased adhesion forces of ca. 6 MPa. Wet storage resulted in relatively constant bonding strengths of ca. 8 MPa. Conclusion A new amphiphilic bone bonding agent was developed, which builds an optimizied interlayer between the hydrophilic bone surface and the hydrophobic PMMA bone cement and thus leads to adhesive bonding between them. Our in vitro investigations demonstrated the adhesive bonding of PMMA bone cement to cortical bone, which was also stable against hydrolysis. The newly developed adhesive fixing technique could be applied clinically when the fixation of osteosynthesis plates with screws is impossible. With

  12. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture. A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups. There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture. The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  13. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture.A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups.There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture.The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluations of Nano-Hydroxyapatite/Polyamide 66/Glass Fibre (n-HA/PA66/GF) as a Novel Bioactive Bone Screw

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bao; Peng, Xiaohua; Jiang, Dianming; Wu, Jun; Qiao, Bo; Li, Weichao; Qi, Xiaotong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we prepared nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fibre (n-HA/PA66/GF) bioactive bone screws. The microstructure, morphology and coating of the screws were characterised, and the adhesion, proliferation and viability of MC3T3-E1 cells on n-HA/PA66/GF scaffolds were determined using scanning electron microscope, CCK-8 assays and cellular immunofluorescence analysis. The results confirmed that n-HA/PA66/GF scaffolds were biocompatible and had no negative effect on MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro. To investigate the in vivo biocompatibility, internal fixation properties and osteogenesis of the bioactive screws, both n-HA/PA66/GF screws and metallic screws were used to repair intercondylar femur fractures in dogs. General photography, CT examination, micro-CT examination, histological staining and biomechanical assays were performed at 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after operation. The n-HA/PA66/GF screws exhibited good biocompatibility, high mechanical strength and extensive osteogenesis in the host bone. Moreover, 24 weeks after implantation, the maximum push-out load of the bioactive screws was greater than that of the metallic screws. As shown by their good cytocompatibility, excellent biomechanical strength and fast formation and ingrowth of new bone, n-HA/PA66/GF screws are thus suitable for orthopaedic clinical applications. PMID:23861888

  15. Incidence of metastasis in circumflex iliac nodes distal to the external iliac nodes in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Kazuhira; Kato, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Objective A causal relationship between removal of circumflex iliac nodes distal to the external iliac nodes (CINDEIN) and lower leg edema has been recently suggested. The aim of this study was to elucidate the incidence of CINDEIN metastasis in cervical cancer. Methods A retrospective chart review was carried out for 531 patients with cervical cancer who underwent lymph node dissection between 1993 and 2014. CINDEIN metastasis was pathologically identified by microscopic investigation. After 2007, sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed selectively in patients with non-bulky cervical cancer. The sentinel node was identified using 99mTc-phytate and by scanning the pelvic cavity with a γ probe. Results Two hundred and ninety-seven patients (55.9%) underwent CINDEIN dissection and 234 (44.1%) did not. The percentage of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIb to IV (42.4% vs. 23.5%, p<0.001) was significantly higher in patients who underwent CINDEIN dissection than those who did not. CINDEIN metastasis was identified in 1.9% overall and in 3.4% of patients who underwent CINDEIN dissection. For patients with stage Ia to IIa disease, CINDEIN metastasis was identified in 0.6% overall and in 1.2% of patients who underwent CINDEIN dissection. Of 115 patients with sentinel node mapping, only one (0.9%) had CINDEIN detected as a sentinel node. In this case, the other three lymph nodes were concurrently detected as sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusion CINDEIN dissection can be eliminated in patients with stage Ia to IIa disease. CINDEIN might not be regional lymph nodes in cervical cancer. PMID:27102250

  16. Use of 2 column screws to treat transcondylar distal humeral fractures in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Paryavi, Ebrahim; O'Toole, Robert V; Frisch, Harold M; Andersen, Romney C; Eglseder, W Andrew

    2010-12-01

    We describe fixation of transcondylar distal humeral fractures with column screws in geriatric patients and review our initial results. We conducted a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database at a Level I trauma center. Six patients met inclusion criteria of age older than 65 years and treatment of minimally or nondisplaced transcondylar distal humeral fracture with column screws only. All were closed fractures with no associated nerve injuries. One patient was lost to follow-up. The mechanism of injury was low-energy fall for the 5 remaining patients (average age, 74 y; age range, 70 to 83 y; average follow-up duration, 10.6 wk). One patient had a traumatic brain injury and a contralateral metacarpal fracture that was treated with internal fixation. The remaining 4 patients sustained isolated distal humeral fractures. No complications were noted, and all fractures healed at an average radiographic union time of 7.2 weeks. Average range of motion was 22 degrees extension [95% CI (-1.47, 45.47)], 114 degrees flexion [95% CI (89.4, 138.6)], and 92 degrees arc of motion [95% CI (58.68, 125.38)]. Treatment of select transcondylar distal humeral fractures with column screws in geriatric patients provides an option for stable fixation that allows early range of motion with minimal surgical morbidity. PMID:21107215

  17. Comparing the Intramedullary Nailing Method Versus Dynamic Hip Screw in Treatment of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Ali; Taghavi, Roozbeh; Moghtadaei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dynamic Hip Screw fixation is currently considered as a standard treatment for pre-trochanteric fractures; however, due to the long-term hospitalization and some other complications, some researchers have proposed intramedullary nailing as the alternative surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to compare and examine the consequences of the using intramedullary nailing method versus Dynamic Hip Screw. Methods: In this study 114 patients with unstable Intertrochanteric fracture refer to Rasoul Akram hospital during 2011 to 2013 has been selected. After reduction, fixation surgery with PFN nail (60 patients) and Dynamic Hip Screw (54 patients) has been performed. All patients were screen during surgery and six months after surgery and some parameters like, bleeding, union, as well as complications such as collapse, varus and medialization of the distal fragment were record and patients. Results: About some parameters like cutting length, surgery duration, bleeding there were significant differences between two groups. In six months follow up period 2 patinas from nail and 8 patients from DHS group had non-union. Also from the point of radiologic and clinical parameters, like anterior thigh pain, cut out, medialization of the distal fragment, collapse of the neck, walking recovery and daily activities were significant between two groups. Conclusion: Due to the reduced hospital stay in intramedullary nailing method and the necessity of doing repeated surgery and applying intramedullary nailing when the patients are not treated with external fixation, the researchers recommend intramedullary nailing as the first option in treating such patients. PMID:26980933

  18. Bezoar: an unusual palpable mass in the right iliac fossa.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, A; Coulston, J; Mackey, P; Saxby, C; Eyre-Brook, I

    2015-02-01

    A 64-year-old gentleman presented with a 12-h history of right iliac fossa pain. On examination, the patient had a tender 8 × 6 cm mass in the right iliac fossa with localised peritonitis. The working diagnosis at this time was an appendix mass or caecal cancer. A computed tomography scan revealed the characteristic 'bird's nest' appearance of a bezoar. On further questioning, the patient confessed to regularly 'binging' on grapes. The patient described passing the mass and his symptoms completely resolved. This appears to be the only documented case of a bezoar affecting the ascending colon. PMID:25829720

  19. Preservation of Internal Iliac Artery after Endovascular Repair of Common Iliac Artery Dissection Using Modified Fenestrated Stent Graft

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Binshan; Liu, Bin; Ye, Yusheng; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Standard endovascular repair of iliac/aortoiliac pathologies can lead to complications, such as buttock claudication, colon ischemia and erectile dysfunction. Branch grafts have been developed but require at least 6 weeks for customization and are not currently available in China; they are also quite expensive. To our knowledge, modified fenestrated stent grafts (MFSGs) are a safe and effective alternative for treating patients with juxtarenal aneurysms. Most MFSGs are used for the preservation of renal and left subclavian arteries. Few cases of MFSGs have been reported in the treatment of iliac pathologies. The use of an MFSG is decided on a case-by-case basis. This report presents our first clinical use of an MFSG for preservation of the internal iliac artery. PMID:27275179

  20. External iliac artery polytetrafluoroethylene graft interposition: An effective rescuer for kidney transplant in progressive intimal dissection of external iliac artery

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Tanveer Iqbal; Tyagi, Vipin; Khawaja, Abdul Rouf; Chadha, Sudhir; Jauhari, Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The aim of this study is to highlight the use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) interposition graft as an important salvage procedure in case of irreparable intimal injury of external iliac artery during renal transplant recipient surgery. Materials and Methods: Since 1987, we encountered irreparable intimal dissection of external iliac artery in five cases just after opening the clamp. It was successfully managed by PTFE interposition graft with subsequent end to side anastomosis of donor renal artery to the vascular graft. Results: No patient had bleeding or infective complications related to the graft and three patients had immediate diuresis. Normal immediate graft function was present in three patients while the other two had delayed graft function. Conclusion: Polytetrafluoroethylene interposition graft is a successful procedure to salvage the kidney and lower limb in case of progressive intimal dissection of external iliac artery during renal transplant surgery. PMID:27141197

  1. Deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) free flap without DCIA: report of a unique case.

    PubMed

    Jairath, David; Hage, J Joris

    2004-10-01

    The iliac crest free flap is a reliable source of cancellous bone, muscle, and skin. The vascularization of this flap arises from the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) which allegedly is always present. The authors report a unique case of successful microvascular transplantation of an iliac crest osteomyocutaneous free flap in a patient in whom the DCIA and DCIV were absent. PMID:15534778

  2. A very unusual anatomical variation and complication of common iliac artery and ureter in retroperitonoscopic ureterolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Huri, Emre; Akgül, Turgay; Karakan, Tolga; Sargon, Mustafa; Germiyanoğlu, Cankon

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical localization of theureter comes along psoas major muscle and crosses over common iliac artery bifurcation. Common iliac artery aneurysm and impacted atherosclerosis are a rare condition that should be differed from the impacted ureter stone to avoid from undesirable complication. In this case, we present a very unusual anatomical variation and complication of common iliac artery and ureter in retroperitonoscopic ureterolithotomy. PMID:21523238

  3. Screw insertion in trabecular bone causes peri-implant bone damage.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Juri A; Ferguson, Stephen J; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2016-04-01

    Secure fracture fixation is still a major challenge in orthopedic surgery, especially in osteoporotic bone. While numerous studies have investigated the effect of implant loading on the peri-implant bone after screw insertion, less focus has been put on bone damage that may occur due to the screw insertion process itself. Therefore, the aim of this study was to localize and quantify peri-implant bone damage caused by screw insertion. We used non-invasive three-dimensional micro-computed tomography to scan twenty human femoral bone cores before and after screw insertion. After image registration of the pre- and post-insertion scans, changes in the bone micro-architecture were identified and quantified. This procedure was performed for screws with a small thread size of 0.3mm (STS, N=10) and large thread size of 0.6mm (LTS, N=10). Most bone damage occurred within a 0.3mm radial distance of the screws. Further bone damage was observed up to 0.6mm and 0.9mm radial distance from the screw, for the STS and LTS groups, respectively. While a similar amount of bone damage was found within a 0.3mm radial distance for the two screw groups, there was significantly more bone damage for the LTS group than the STS group in volumes of interest between 0.3-0.6mm and 0.6-0.9mm. In conclusion, this is the first study to localize and quantify peri-implant bone damage caused by screw insertion based on a non-invasive, three-dimensional, micro-CT imaging technique. We demonstrated that peri-implant bone damage already occurs during screw insertion. This should be taken into consideration to further improve primary implant stability, especially in low quality osteoporotic bone. We believe that this technique could be a promising method to assess more systematically the effect of peri-implant bone damage on primary implant stability. Furthermore, including peri-implant bone damage due to screw insertion into patient-specific in silico models of implant-bone systems could improve the

  4. Comparison of different fixation methods following sagittal split ramus osteotomies using three-dimensional finite elements analysis. Part 1: advancement surgery-posterior loading.

    PubMed

    Erkmen, E; Simşek, B; Yücel, E; Kurt, A

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical behavior of different fixation methods used in bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO). Part 1 comprises of the results of the analysis for mandibular advancement, four different fixation configurations of six hole fragmentation mini plates with monocortical screws and lag screws and posterior loading conditions in the molar and premolar region. The finite element analysis method (FEA) appears suitable for simulating complex mechanical stress situations in the maxillofacial region. The mechanical behavior of selected lag screws with linear or triangular configuration and double parallel or single oblique six hole mini plates with monocortical screws were compared by FEA after 5 mm BSSRO advancement procedure. Four separate three-dimensional finite element models of the mandible were created to simulate the BSSRO and corresponding fixation methods. These models consisted of 122,717 elements and 25,048 nodes. The mechanical parameters of the materials studied were adopted from the literature or were based on manufacturer's information. 500 N posterior occlusal loads were simulated on the distal segments. The commercial finite element solver MSC Marc software was utilized to calculate the stress fields on both the segments and fixative appliances. It was concluded that the use of 2.0mm lag screws placed in a triangular configuration following the BSSRO advancement surgery provides sufficient stability with any rotational movement and less stress fields at the osteotomy site, when compared with the other rigid fixation methods used in the current study. PMID:16053877

  5. Endovascular treatment of aortoiliac aneurysms: From intentional occlusion of the internal iliac artery to branch iliac stent graft

    PubMed Central

    Duvnjak, Stevo

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20%-40% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms can have unilateral or bilateral iliac artery aneurysms and/or ectasia. This influences and compromises the distal sealing zone during endovascular aneurysm repair. There are a few endovascular techniques that are used to treat these types of aneurysms, including intentional occlusion/over-stenting of the internal iliac artery on one or both sides, the “bell-bottom” technique, and the more recent method of using an iliac branch stent graft. In some cases, other options include the “snorkel and sandwich” technique and hybrid interventions. Pelvic ischemia, represented as buttock claudication, has been reported in 16%-55% of cases; this is followed by impotence, which has been described in 10%-17% of cases following internal iliac artery occlusion. The bell-bottom technique can be used for a common iliac artery up to 24 mm in diameter given that the largest diameter of the stent graft is 28 mm. There is a paucity of data and evidence regarding the “snorkel and sandwich” technique, which can be used in a few clinical scenarios. The hybrid intervention is comprised of a surgical operation, and is not purely endovascular. The newest branch stent graft technology enables preservation of the anterograde flow of important side branches. Technical success with the newest technique ranges from 85%-96.3%, and in some small series, technical success is 100%. Buttock claudication was reported in up to 4% of patients treated with a branch stent graft at 5-year follow-up. Mid- and short-term follow-up results showed branch patency of up to 88% during the 5-6-year period. Furthermore, branch graft occlusion is a potential complication, and it has been described to occur in 1.2%-11% of cases. Iliac branch stent graft placement represents a further development in endovascular medicine, and it has a high technical success rate without serious complications. PMID:27027393

  6. Endovascular treatment of aortoiliac aneurysms: From intentional occlusion of the internal iliac artery to branch iliac stent graft.

    PubMed

    Duvnjak, Stevo

    2016-03-28

    Approximately 20%-40% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms can have unilateral or bilateral iliac artery aneurysms and/or ectasia. This influences and compromises the distal sealing zone during endovascular aneurysm repair. There are a few endovascular techniques that are used to treat these types of aneurysms, including intentional occlusion/over-stenting of the internal iliac artery on one or both sides, the "bell-bottom" technique, and the more recent method of using an iliac branch stent graft. In some cases, other options include the "snorkel and sandwich" technique and hybrid interventions. Pelvic ischemia, represented as buttock claudication, has been reported in 16%-55% of cases; this is followed by impotence, which has been described in 10%-17% of cases following internal iliac artery occlusion. The bell-bottom technique can be used for a common iliac artery up to 24 mm in diameter given that the largest diameter of the stent graft is 28 mm. There is a paucity of data and evidence regarding the "snorkel and sandwich" technique, which can be used in a few clinical scenarios. The hybrid intervention is comprised of a surgical operation, and is not purely endovascular. The newest branch stent graft technology enables preservation of the anterograde flow of important side branches. Technical success with the newest technique ranges from 85%-96.3%, and in some small series, technical success is 100%. Buttock claudication was reported in up to 4% of patients treated with a branch stent graft at 5-year follow-up. Mid- and short-term follow-up results showed branch patency of up to 88% during the 5-6-year period. Furthermore, branch graft occlusion is a potential complication, and it has been described to occur in 1.2%-11% of cases. Iliac branch stent graft placement represents a further development in endovascular medicine, and it has a high technical success rate without serious complications. PMID:27027393

  7. Internal fixation of distal tibiofibular syndesmotic injuries: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Ma, Xin; Wang, Xu; Huang, Jiazhang; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Li

    2013-09-01

    No consensus had been reached about the optimal method for syndesmotic fixation. The present study analysed syndesmotic fixation based on the highest level of clinical evidence in order to obtain more reliable results. Medline, Embase and Cochrane database were searched through the OVID retrieval engine. Manual searching was undertaken afterward to identify additional studies. Only randomized controlled trials (RCT) and prospective comparative studies were selected for final inclusion. Study screening and data extraction were completed independently by two reviewers. All study characteristics were summarized into a table. The extracted data were used for data analysis. Twelve studies were finally included: six of them were RCTs, two were quasi-randomized studies and four were prospective comparative studies. Four comparisons with traditional metallic screw were identified in terms of bioabsorbable screws, tricortical fixation method, suture-button device as well as non-fixation choice in low syndesmotic injuries. Both absorbable screws and the tricortical fixation method showed almost no better results than traditional quadricortical metallic screw (p > 0.05). Additionally, existing studies could not illustrate their efficiency of reducing hardware removal rate. The suture button technique had significantly better functional score (p = 0.003), ankle motion (p = 0.02), time to full weightbearing (p < 0.0001) and much less complications (p = 0.0008) based on short and intermediate term follow-up data. Transfixation in low syndesmotic injuries showed poorer results than the non fixed group in all outcome measurements, but didn't reach a significant level (p > 0.05). The present evidence still couldn't find superior performance of the bioabsorbable screw and tricortical fixation method. Their true effects in decreasing second operation rate need further specific studies. Better results of the suture-button made it a promising technique, but it still needs long

  8. Biomechanical characteristics of C1-2 cable fixations.

    PubMed

    Dickman, C A; Crawford, N R; Paramore, C G

    1996-08-01

    and graft site. After the specimen was fatigued, the axes of rotation became more widely dispersed but were usually still localized near the cable and graft site. Adequate healing requires satisfactory control of C1-2 motion. Therefore, some adjunctive fixation is advocated to supplement the control of motion after C1-2 cable fixation (that is, a cervical collar, a halo brace, or rigid internal fixation with transarticular screws). PMID:8755762

  9. Are allogenic or xenogenic screws and plates a reasonable alternative to alloplastic material for osteosynthesis--a histomorphological analysis in a dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, C; Obwegeser, J A

    2010-12-01

    Despite invention of titanium and resorbable screws and plates, still, one of the main challenges in bone fixation is the search for an ideal osteosynthetic material. Biomechanical properties, biocompatibility, and also cost effectiveness and clinical practicability are factors for the selection of a particular material. A promising alternative seems to be screws and plates made of bone. Recently, xenogenic bone pins and screws have been invented for use in joint surgery. In this study, screws made of allogenic sheep and xenogenic human bone were analyzed in a vital and dynamic sheep-model and compared to conventional titanium screws over a standard period of bone healing of 56 days with a constant applied extrusion force. Biomechanical analysis and histomorphological evaluation were performed. After 56 days of insertion xenogenic screws made of human bone showed significantly larger distance of extrusion of on average 173.8 μm compared to allogenic screws made of sheep bone of on average 27.8 and 29.95 μm of the titanium control group. Severe resorption processes with connective tissue interposition were found in the histomorphological analysis of the xenogenic screws in contrast to new bone formation and centripetal vascularization of the allogenic bone screw, as well as in processes of incorporation of the titanium control group. The study showed allogenic cortical bone screws as a substantial alternative to titanium screws with good biomechanical properties. In contrast to other reports a different result was shown for the xenogenic bone screws. They showed insufficient holding strength with confirmative histomorphological signs of degradation and insufficient osseointegration. Before common clinical use of xenogenic osteosynthetic material, further evaluation should be performed. PMID:20813368

  10. Pseudoaneurysm of the deep circumflex iliac artery: a rare complication at an anterior iliac bone graft donor site treated by coil embolization.

    PubMed

    Chou, Andy Shau-Bin; Hung, Chein-Fu; Tseng, Jeng-Hwei; Pan, Kuang-Tse; Yen, Pao-Sheng

    2002-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm formation of the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) after harvesting an anterior iliac bone graft for spinal fusion is reported herein. A 76-year-old man with cervical myelopathy underwent anterior cervical decompression and fusion with a left anterior iliac bone graft. A painful left inguinal mass was noted 1 month later. He was admitted to our emergency ward. Angiography of the left external iliac artery was performed which showed a pseudoaneurysm of the DCIA. Selective transarterial coil embolization of the artery was performed, and bleeding was arrested. In a review of the previous literature, only 1 pseudoaneurysm of the DCIA was reported to be associated with anterior iliac bone graft. In conclusion, vascular injury after anterior iliac bone harvesting is rare but can occur. Selective transarterial coil embolization is a prompt and effective solution. PMID:12350036

  11. Early Experience with Biodegradable Fixation of Pediatric Mandibular Fractures.

    PubMed

    Mazeed, Ahmed Salah; Shoeib, Mohammed Abdel-Raheem; Saied, Samia Mohammed Ahmed; Elsherbiny, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    This clinical study aims to evaluate the stability and efficiency of biodegradable self-reinforced poly-l/dl-lactide (SR-PLDLA) plates and screws for fixation of pediatric mandibular fractures. The study included 12 patients (3-12 years old) with 14 mandibular fractures. They were treated by open reduction and internal fixation by SR-PLDLA plates and screws. Maxillomandibular fixation was maintained for 1 week postoperatively. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively. Radiographs were done at 1 week, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively to observe any displacement and fracture healing. All fractures healed both clinically and radiologically. No serious complications were reported in the patients. Normal occlusion was achieved in all cases. Biodegradable osteofixation of mandibular fractures offers a valuable clinical solution for pediatric patients getting the benefit of avoiding secondary surgery to remove plates, decreasing the hospital stay, further painful procedures, and psychological impact. PMID:26269728

  12. Causes and managements of postoperative complications after degenerative scoliosis treatments with internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Hong; Zheng, Jie; Lou, Shu-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the causes and managements of early postoperative complications of degenerative scoliosis (DS) treated with internal pedicle screw fixation. Methods: From Jan 2000 to Apr 2013, 325 DS patients treated with internal pedicle screw fixation in our hospital were retrospectively involved. The categories, causes, managements and outcomes of early postoperative complications were statistically analyzed. Results: Early postoperative complications occurred in 10.76% of the patients including 16 cases of lower limb numb or pain, 6 cases of decreased lower limb sensitivity and motor functions, which accounted for 62.86% of all complications, followed by incision infections (4/35, 11.43%) and rare cases of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, cardiac and renal inadequacy, urinary system and pulmonary infections. The incidence of overall complications (19.79%, p = 0.001) and nerve injuries (11.46%, p = 0.000) were significantly higher in long-segment than in short-segment fixations. Improper screw implanting, over correction of scoliosis and insufficient blood supply of the spinal cord during operation were risk factors for early postoperative complications and most of them were cured by anti-infection medication, incision dressing change, nerve nourishment, adjusting the screws and anti-osteoporosis treatments within 6 months after surgery. Only three cases with severe nerve injury did not improve until the 6 months postoperative follow-up. Conclusions: Most of the postoperative complications in our DS patients disappeared within 6 months after surgery and more than half of complications were nerve injuries. PMID:25550945

  13. [Internal fixation of radial shaft fractures: Anatomical and biomechanical principles].

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    Radius is a critical bone for functioning of the forearm and therefore its reconstruction following fracture of its shaft must be anatomical in all planes and along all axes. The method of choice is plate fixation. However, it is still associated with a number of unnecessary complications that were not resolved even by introduction of locking plates, but rather the opposite. All the more it is surprising that discussions about anatomical and biomechanical principles of plate fixation have been reduced to minimum or even neglected in the current literature. This applies primarily to the choice of the surgical approach, type of plate, site of its placement and contouring, its working length, number of screws and their distribution in the plate. At the same time it has to be taken into account that a plate used to fix radius is exposed to both bending and torsion stress. Based on our 30-year experience and analysis of literature we present our opinions on plate fixation of radial shaft fractures:We always prefer the volar Henry approach as it allows expose almost the whole of radius, with a minimal risk of injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve.The available studies have not so far found any substantial advantage of LCP plates as compared to 3.5mm DCP or 3.5mm LC DCP plates, quite the contrary. The reason is high rigidity of the locking plates, a determined trajectory of locking screws which is often unsuitable, mainly in plates placed on the anterior surface of the shaft, and failure to respect the physiological curvature of the radius. Therefore based on our experience we prefer "classical" 3.5mm DCP plates.Volar placement of the plate, LCP in particular, is associated with a number of problems. The volar surface covered almost entirely by muscles, must be fully exposed which negatively affects blood supply to the bone. A straight plate, if longer, either lies with its central part partially off the bone and overlaps the interosseous border, or its ends

  14. Air-Lubricated Lead Screw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    Air lubricated lead screw and nut carefully machined to have closely matched closely fitting threads. Compressed air injected into two plenums encircle nut and flow through orifices to lubricate mating threads. Originally developed to position precisely interferometer retroreflector for airborne measurement of solar infrared radiation, device now has positioning accuracy of 0.25 micron.

  15. Designs and techniques that improve the pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic vertebrae: current status.

    PubMed

    Shea, Thomas M; Laun, Jake; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A; Doulgeris, James J; Lee, William E; Aghayev, Kamran; Vrionis, Frank D

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion) is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant's trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device's effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein. PMID:24724097

  16. Designs and Techniques That Improve the Pullout Strength of Pedicle Screws in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Thomas M.; Laun, Jake; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A.; Doulgeris, James J.; Lee, William E.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion) is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant's trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device's effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein. PMID:24724097

  17. Recurrent laryngeal edema imitating angioedema caused by dislocated screw after anterior spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Piotr; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Migacz, Ewa; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis. PMID:25755901

  18. Fixation versus hemiarthroplasty for undisplaced intracapsular hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Parker, Martyn J; White, Andrew; Boyle, Adrian

    2008-07-01

    The conventional treatment for an undisplaced intracapsular hip fracture is internal fixation. A possible alternative treatment is replacement hemiarthroplasty. We have compared the outcomes of an age, sex and co-morbidity matched cohort of 346 patients who have had their undisplaced intracapsular hip fracture treated using cannulated screws with a group of 346 patients who have had a displaced intracapsular fracture treated using a hemiarthroplasty. Patients treated by internal fixation had a shorter operation time (43 versus 67 min), reduced orthopaedic ward stay (11 versus 15 days), lower incidence of peri-operative complications (24 versus 81), and a lower 1-year mortality (19% versus 26%). Additional benefits for the fixation group were less pain at 1 year, less reduction in mobility and lower dependence on walking aids. All these differences were statistically significant. Hemiarthroplasty had a lower re-admission rate (43 versus 14 cases) and re-operation rate (59 versus 22 cases). These results support the use of internal fixation for undisplaced intracapsular fractures and confirm that the final outcome for an undisplaced intracapsular hip fracture is significantly better than for a displaced intracapsular fracture, despite a higher re-operation rate after internal fixation. PMID:18407277

  19. Sharp Recanalization for Chronic Left Iliac Vein Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Nobutake Isfort, Peter; Penzkofer, Tobias; Grommes, Jochen; Greiner, Andreas; Mahnken, Andreas

    2012-08-15

    Endovascular treatment has emerged as a first-line treatment for venous occlusions, but is sometimes challenging with conventional approaches. This article describes a helpful technique using a Roesch-Uchida needle to cross a chronic occlusion of the iliac vein when conventional techniques have failed.

  20. Endovascular Stent-Grafting for Infected Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Sanada, Junichiro Matsui, Osamu; Arakawa, Fumitaka; Tawara, Mari; Endo, Tamao; Ito, Hiroshi; Ushijima, Satoshi; Endo, Masamitsu; Ikeda, Masahiro; Miyazu, Katsuyuki

    2005-01-15

    We report two cases of acutely infected pseudoaneurysms of the iliac arteries, successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafting. Two patients underwent stent-graft treatment for erosive rupture of the iliac artery caused by surrounding infection. The first case is that of a 61-year-old man who had undergone Miles' operation for an advanced rectal cancer. Postoperatively, he developed intrapelvic abscess formation, from which methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was cultured, followed by rupture of the right external iliac artery. The second case is that of a 60-year-old man who had a pseudoaneurysm of the left common iliac artery, which was contiguous with a left psoas muscle abscess, from which Streptococcus agalactiae was cultured. Both patients were successfully treated with only a stent-graft and antibiotic therapy, and remained symptom-free 12 months and 10 months later. Although endovascular stent-grafting should not be considered standard therapy for infected aneurysms, our cases suggest that it can result in repair of infected aneurysms even in the uncontrolled active stage.

  1. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Iliac Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, F. C. De Blas, Mariano; Merino, Santiago; Egana, Jose M.; Caldas, Jose G.M.P.

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of recanalization of chronic occluded iliac arteries with balloon angioplasty and stent placement.Methods: Sixty-nine occluded iliac arteries (mean length 8.1 cm; range 4-16 cm) in 67 patients were treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement. Evaluations included clinical assesment according to Fontaine stages, Doppler examinations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and bilateral lower extremity arteriograms. Wallstent and Cragg vascular stents were inserted for iliac artery recanalization under local anesthesia. Follow-up lasted 1-83 months (mean 29.5 months).Results: Technical success rate was 97.1% (67 of 69). The mean ABI increased from 0.46 to 0.85 within 30 days after treatment and was 0.83 at the most recent follow-up. Mean hospitalization time was 2 days and major complications included arterial thrombosis (3%), arterial rupture (3%) and distal embolization (1%). During follow-up 6% stenosis and 9% thrombosis of the stents were observed. Clinical improvement occurred in 92% of patients. Primary and secondary patency rates were 75% and 95%, respectively.Conclusion: The long-term patency rates and clinical benefits suggest that percutaneous endovascular revascularization with metallic stents is a safe and effective treatment for patients with chronic iliac artery occlusion.

  2. Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysm as a Complication of Paracentesis

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Duggal, Ramnik K.; Kohli, Supreethi

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the deep circumflex iliac artery, in an end-stage renal disease patient with gross ascitis, presenting with an anterior abdominal wall hematoma following paracentesis. Duplex Doppler sonography confirmed the presence of the pseudoaneurysm and multidetector computed tomography angiography delineated the detailed arterial anatomy. PMID:22779062

  3. Hemodynamic evaluation of transluminal iliac artery balloon dilatation.

    PubMed

    Breslau, P J; van Soest, M; Janevski, B; Jörning, P J

    1985-10-01

    In order to document the hemodynamic results of transluminal iliac artery balloon dilatation, 23 aortoiliac segments were evaluated before and after treatment. Hemodynamic parameters were: intra-arterial common femoral pressure measurements, indirect ankle pressure measurements and femoral velocity waveform analysis. The segments were divided into group (a) aortoiliac segments with an open superficial femoral artery (n = 8), and group (b) aortoiliac segments with an occluded superficial femoral artery (n = 15). In group (a) all patients were free of symptoms and ankle pressure improved significantly six months after dilatation. Velocity waveform analysis of the common femoral artery did not correlate with this improvement. In group (b) intra-arterial pressure measurements showed improvement in 60% (9/15) after six months. Ankle pressure measurements and velocity waveform analysis did not correlate with the intra-arterial pressure changes. Transluminal iliac artery balloon dilatation of iliac stenosis in patients with an open superficial femoral artery can be evaluated by indirect ankle pressure measurements. In patients with iliac stenosis in combination with occluded superficial femoral arteries intra-arterial pressure measurements are needed to demonstrate hemodynamic improvement. PMID:2932658

  4. Photographic fixative poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Photographic developer poisoning; Hydroquinone poisoning; Quinone poisoning; Sulfite poisoning ... Hydroquinones Quinones Sodium thiosulfate Sodium sulfite/bisulfite Boric acid Photographic fixative can also break down (decompose) to form sulfur dioxide gas.

  5. Assessment of sagittal split ramus osteotomy rigid internal fixation techniques using a finite element method.

    PubMed

    Albougha, S; Darwich, K; Darwich, M A; Albogha, M H

    2015-07-01

    In this study, finite element analysis (FEA) was used to evaluate nine rigid internal fixation techniques for sagittal split ramus osteotomy. To achieve this, a computed tomography (CT) scan of a healthy patient was obtained and used to generate the geometry of a half-mandible. The geometries of bicortical screws, miniplates, and monocortical screws were designed and combined with the mandible in nine models simulating various techniques. Four models used bicortical screws in various arrangements and four used miniplates of various designs. One model represented a hybrid technique. A load of 500 N was applied to the posterior teeth and FEA was applied. The most stable techniques were the hybrid technique and a single straight miniplate, presenting the least displacement among all models. Bicortical screws, while presenting reasonable stability, showed high strain areas near the anterior ramus ridge, superoposterior to the screws, implying a risk of bone fracture in this area. On the other hand, the T-shaped and double Y-shaped miniplates were associated with high von Mises stresses that would impair their rigidity, especially where angles appeared in their designs. We recommend the use of a single straight miniplate because it provides sufficient stable fixation with minimal risks or disadvantages. PMID:25766461

  6. Pregnancy management for a patient with graft occlusion after right iliac artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Ruriko; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Egawa-Takata, Tomomi; Mimura, Kazuya; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-06-01

    We describe an extremely rare case of a pregnant woman who had a successful delivery despite developing bypass graft occlusion after right external iliac bypass surgery. External and common iliac artery bypass surgery is often performed when arteriosclerosis obliterans or thromboangiitis obliterans result in iliac artery occlusion or when revascularization is required because of iliac artery injury. Because arteriosclerosis obliterans and thromboangiitis obliterans rarely develop in young women or girls, most physicians have little experience with graft occlusion after iliac artery bypass surgery. Here we describe and discuss the published work pertaining to this extremely rare case. PMID:25511914

  7. Metallurgical examination of gun barrel screws

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.; Clift, T.L.

    1996-06-01

    The examination was conducted to determine the extent of degradation that had occurred after a series of firings; these screws prevent live rounds of ammunition from being loaded into the firing chamber. One concern is that if the screw tip fails and a live round is accidentally loaded into the chamber, a live round could be fired. Another concern is that if the blunt end of the screw begins to degrade by cracking, pieces could become small projectiles during firing. All screws used in firing 100 rounds or more exhibited some degree degradation, which progressively worsened as the number of rounds fired increased. (SEM, metallography, x-ray analysis, and microhardness were used.) Presence of cracks in these screws after 100 fired rounds is a serious concern that warrants the discontinued use of these screws. The screw could be improved by selecting an alloy more resistant to thermal and chemical degradation.

  8. Iliocaval Stenosis and Iliac Venous Thrombosis in Retroperitoneal Fibrosis: Percutaneous Treatment by Use of Hydrodynamic Thrombectomy and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wendt, Georg; Neuerburg, Joerg; Schuermann, Karl

    1996-11-15

    A case of bilateral iliac stenosis and caval stenosis due to retroperitoneal fibrosis was treated by caval stenting and iliac balloon angioplasty, but was complicated by subsequent iliac thrombosis. Venous thrombectomy was successfully achieved by hydrodynamic thrombectomy, and iliac patency was stabilized by bilateral stent insertion.

  9. Negative pressure wound therapy and external fixation device: a simple way to seal the dressing.

    PubMed

    Bulla, Antonio; Farace, Francesco; Uzel, André-Pierre; Casoli, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Negative pressure therapy is widely applied to treat lower limb trauma. However, sealing a negative pressure dressing in the presence of an external fixation device may be difficult and time consuming. Therefore, screws, pins, wires, etc, may preclude the vacuum, preventing the plastic drape to perfectly adhere to the foam. To maintain the vacuum, we tried to prevent air leaking around the screws putting bone wax at the junction between the pins and the plastic drape. This solution, in our hands, avoids air leakage and helps maintain vacuum in a fast and inexpensive way. PMID:24296597

  10. Which spinal levels are identified by palpation of the iliac crests and the posterior superior iliac spines?

    PubMed Central

    Chakraverty, Robin; Pynsent, Paul; Isaacs, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The line joining the superior aspect of the iliac crests posteriorly (the intercristal line) is commonly stated to cross the midline at the L4 or L4–5 spinal level on imaging. This study aimed to assess the spinal level identified through palpation of surface anatomy (iliac crests and posterior superior iliac spines) in adults and the level of agreement compared with the intercristal line identified through imaging. The study participants included consecutive adult patients undergoing prone fluoroscopically guided spinal injections for chronic low back pain at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, between April and July 2004. Prior to fluoroscopic imaging, each patient's surface anatomy was palpated by two examiners and lines created to form the palpated intercristal line and the posterior superior iliac spine line. Following imaging, the mid-line spinal levels identified by these palpated lines were recorded and the level of agreement (kappa coefficient) with the intercristal line formed by imaging of the iliac crests was assessed. The results showed that although the L4 or L4–5 spinal levels were identified on imaging of the intercristal line in 86.7% of 75 patients (49 female), the intercristal line formed through palpation tended to identify higher levels; the L3 or L3–4 spinal levels in 77.3% of cases and more commonly in females than in males (85.7 vs. 61.5%) and in patients with higher body mass indices. The level of agreement between the two lines was poor (κ = 0.05). The posterior superior iliac spine line identified the S2 spinous process in 51% and the S1 in 44% of 60 (45 female) patients. The results suggest that formation of the intercristal line by palpation of the iliac crests identifies different spinal levels to those identified by imaging and that both methods should be regarded as different instruments. In the clinical situation, it may be more appropriate to consider that palpation of the intercristal line is a guide for identifying

  11. Unilateral lag-screw technique for an isolated anterior 1/4 atlas fracture

    PubMed Central

    Keskil, Semih; Göksel, Murat; Yüksel, Ulaş

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Fractures of the atlas are classified based on the fracture location and associated ligamentous injury. Among patients with atlas fractures treated using external immobilization, nonunion of the fracture could be seen. Objective: Ideally, treatment strategy for an unstable atlas fracture would involve limited fixation to maintain the fracture fragments in a reduced position without restricting the range of motion (ROM) of the atlantoaxial and atlantooccipital joints. Summary of Background Data: Such a result can be established using either transoral limited internal fixation or limited posterior lateral mass fixation. However, due to high infection risk and technical difficulty, posterior approaches are preferred but none of these techniques can fully address anterior 1/4 atlas fractures such as in this case. Materials and Methods: A novel open and direct technique in which a unilateral lag screw was placed to reduce and stabilize a progressively widening isolated right-sided anterior 1/4 single fracture of C1 that was initially treated with a rigid cervical collar is described. Results: Radiological studies made after the surgery showed no implant failure, good cervical alignment, and good reduction with fusion of C1. Conclusions: It is suggested that isolated C1 fractures can be surgically reduced and immobilized using a lateral compression screw to allow union and maintain both C1-0 and C1-2 motions, and in our knowledge this is the first description of the use of a lag screw to achieve reduction of distracted anterior 1/4 fracture fragments of the C1 from a posterior approach. This technique has the potential to become a valuable adjunct to the surgeon's armamentarium, in our opinion, only for fractures with distracted or comminuted fragments whose alignment would not be expected to significantly change with classical lateral mass screw reduction. PMID:27041886

  12. Freehand Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement: Review of Existing Strategies and a Step-by-Step Guide Using Uniform Landmarks for All Levels

    PubMed Central

    Baaj, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Pedicle screw fixation in the thoracic spine presents certain challenges due to the critical regional neurovascular anatomy as well as the narrow pedicular corridor that typically exists. With increased awareness of the dangers of intraoperative radiation, the ability to place pedicle screws with anatomic landmarks alone is paramount. In this study, we reviewed the literature from 1990 to 2015 for studies that included freehand pedicle screw placement in the thoracic spine with special emphasis on entry points and the trajectories of the screws. We excluded studies that used fluoroscopy guidance, navigation techniques, cadaveric and biomechanical articles, case reports, and experimental studies on animals. The search retrieved 40 articles, and after careful selection, seven articles were analyzed. Over 8,000 screws were placed in the different studies. The mean accuracy for placement of the thoracic screws was 93.3%. However, there is little consensus between studies in entry points, sagittal, and axial trajectories of the screws. We complete this review by presenting our step-by-step technique for the placement of freehand pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. PMID:27014535

  13. Freehand Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement: Review of Existing Strategies and a Step-by-Step Guide Using Uniform Landmarks for All Levels.

    PubMed

    Avila, Mauricio J; Baaj, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Pedicle screw fixation in the thoracic spine presents certain challenges due to the critical regional neurovascular anatomy as well as the narrow pedicular corridor that typically exists. With increased awareness of the dangers of intraoperative radiation, the ability to place pedicle screws with anatomic landmarks alone is paramount. In this study, we reviewed the literature from 1990 to 2015 for studies that included freehand pedicle screw placement in the thoracic spine with special emphasis on entry points and the trajectories of the screws. We excluded studies that used fluoroscopy guidance, navigation techniques, cadaveric and biomechanical articles, case reports, and experimental studies on animals. The search retrieved 40 articles, and after careful selection, seven articles were analyzed. Over 8,000 screws were placed in the different studies. The mean accuracy for placement of the thoracic screws was 93.3%. However, there is little consensus between studies in entry points, sagittal, and axial trajectories of the screws. We complete this review by presenting our step-by-step technique for the placement of freehand pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. PMID:27014535

  14. Absorbable scaphoid screw development: a comparative study on biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Song, Muguo; Xu, Yongqing; He, Xiaoqing; Zhu, YueLiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The scaphoid is critical for maintaining the stability and movement of the wrist joints. This study aimed to develop a new internal fixator absorbable scaphoid screw (ASS) for fixation of the scaphoid waist after fracture and to test the biomechanical characteristics of ASS. Materials and methods An ASS was prepared using polylactic acids and designed based on scaphoid measurements and anatomic features. Twenty fractured scaphoid waist specimens were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n=10/group). Reduction and internal fixation of the scaphoid were achieved with either Kirschner wires (K-wires) or ASS. A moving target simulator was used to test palmar flexion and dorsal extension, with the range of testing (waist movement) set from 5° of palmar flexion to 25° of dorsal extension. Flexion and extension were repeated 2,000 times for each specimen. Fracture gap displacements were measured with a computerized tomography scanning. Scaphoid tensile and bending strengths were measured by using a hydraulic pressure biomechanical system. Results Prior to biomechanical fatigue testing, fracture gap displacements were 0.16±0.02 mm and 0.22±0.02 mm in the ASS and K-wire groups, respectively. After fatigue testing, fracture gap displacements in the ASS and the K-wire groups were 0.21±0.03 mm and 1.52±0.07 mm, respectively. The tensile strengths for the ASS and K-wire groups were 0.95±0.02 MPa and 0.63±0.02 MPa, respectively. Conclusion Fixation using an ASS provided sufficient mechanical support for the scaphoid after fracture. PMID:27217756

  15. A novel radiographic targeting guide for percutaneous placement of transfacet screws in the cervical spine with limited fluoroscopy: A cadaveric feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David M.; Karp, Jacqueline E.; O'Brien, Joseph R.; Anderson, D. Greg; Gelb, Daniel E.; Ludwig, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background We describe a technique for percutaneous transfacet screw placement in the cervical spine without the need for lateral-view fluoroscopy. Methods Previously established articular pillar morphometry was used to define the ideal trajectory for transfacet screw placement in the subaxial cervical spine. A unique targeting guide was developed to allow placement of Kirschner wires across the facet joint at 90° without the guidance of lateral-view fluoroscopy. Kirschner wires and cannulated screws were placed percutaneously in 7 cadaveric specimens. Placement of instrumentation was performed entirely under modified anteroposterior-view fluoroscopy. All specimens were assessed for acceptable screw placement by 2 fellowship-trained orthopaedic spine surgeons using computed tomography. Open dissection was used to confirm radiographic interpretation. Acceptable placement was defined as a screw crossing the facet joint, achieving purchase in the inferior and superior articular processes, and not violating critical structures. Malposition was defined as a violation of the transverse foramen, spinal canal, or nerve root or inadequate fixation. Results A total of 48 screws were placed. Placement of 45 screws was acceptable. The 3 instances of screw malposition included a facet fracture, a facet distraction, and a C6-7 screw contacting the C7 nerve root in a specimen with a small C7 superior articular process. Conclusions Our data show that with the appropriate radiographic technique and a targeting guide, percutaneous transfacet screws can be safely placed at C3-7 without the need for lateral-view fluoroscopy during the targeting phase. Because of the variable morphometry of the C7 lateral mass, however, care must be taken when placing a transfacet screw at C6-7. Clinical Relevance This study describes a technique that has the potential to provide a less invasive strategy for posterior instrumentation of the cervical spine. Further investigation is needed before this

  16. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  17. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  18. Screw-fed pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Kenneth M

    2014-11-25

    A pump system includes a pump that includes a first belt and a second belt that are spaced apart from each other to provide generally straight sides of a passage there between. There is an inlet at one end of the passage and an outlet at an opposite end of the passage, with a passage length that extends between the inlet and the outlet. The passage defines a gap distance in a width direction between the straight sides at the passage inlet. A hopper includes an interior space that terminates at a mouth at the passage inlet. At least one screw is located within the interior space of the hopper and includes a screw diameter in the width direction that is less than or equal to the gap distance.

  19. Biomechanical failure of metacarpal fracture resorbable plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Lionelli, Gerald T; Korentager, Richard A

    2002-08-01

    Metacarpal fractures are a relatively common hand injury that may require operative intervention to ensure adequate reduction and stabilization. The use of permanent hardware, although acceptable, may lead to complications and an increased number of surgical procedures. The use of resorbable hardware such as poly-L-lactic acid and polyglycolic acid copolymer plates and screws may circumvent some of these complications. In vitro studies have demonstrated that the biomechanical characteristics of these resorbable plates may provide the rigid fixation necessary to allow for union of metacarpal fractures in vivo. However, limited clinical data are available regarding the success of their use in this application. The authors present what they believe is the first reported case of the failure of a poly-L-lactic acid and polyglycolic acid copolymer miniplate after use in the fixation of a metacarpal shaft fracture. PMID:12187350

  20. Polypyrrole coating on poly-(lactide/glycolide)-β-tricalcium phosphate screws enhances new bone formation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Dong; Björninen, Miina; Cao, Lu; Wang, Hui-Ren; Pelto, Jani; Li, Xiang-Qian; Hyttinen, Jari; Jiang, Yun-Qi; Kellomäki, Minna; Miettinen, Susanna; Sándor, George K; Seppänen, Riitta; Haimi, Suvi; Dong, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) has gained interest as an implant material due to its multifunctional properties and its high compatibility with several cell and tissue types. For the first time, the biocompatibility and osteointegration of PPy coating, incorporated with chondroitin sulfate (CS), were studied in vivo by implanting PPy-coated bioabsorbable bone fixation composite screws of poly-(lactide/glycolide) copolymer (PLGA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) into New Zealand white rabbits. Uncoated bioabsorbable polymer composite screws and commercially available stainless steel cortical screws were used as reference implants. The rabbits were euthanized 12 and 26 weeks after the implantation. The systemic effects were evaluated from food and water consumption, body weight, body temperature, clinical signs, blood samples, internal organ weights, and histological examination. Local effects were studied from bone tissue and surrounding soft tissue histology. New bone formation was evaluated by micro-computed tomography, tetracycline labeling and torsion tests. Torsion tests were performed in order to capture the peak value of the torsion force during the course of the screw's loosening. The coated screws induced significantly more bone formation than the uncoated screws. In addition, none of the implants induced any systemic or local toxicity. The results suggest that PPy is biocompatible with bone tissue and is a potential coating for enhancing osteointegration in orthopedic implants. PMID:26610717

  1. Analysis of plastic deformation in cortical bone after insertion of coated and non-coated self-tapping orthopaedic screws.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, A P; Korhonen, H; Kiviranta, I; Kröger, H; Lappalainen, R

    2011-07-01

    Insertion of internal fracture fixation devices, such as screws, mechanically weakens the bone. Diamond-like carbon has outstanding tribology properties which may decrease the amount of damage in tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate methods for quantification of cortical bone damage after orthopaedic bone screw insertion and to evaluate the effect of surface modification on tissue damage. In total, 48 stainless steel screws were inserted into cadaver bones. Half of the screws were coated with a smooth amorphous diamond coating. Geometrical data of the bones was determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Thin sections of the bone samples were prepared after screw insertion, and histomorphometric evaluation of damage was performed on images obtained using light microscopy. Micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy were also used to examine tissue damage. A positive correlation was found between tissue damage and the geometric properties of the bone. The age of the cadaver significantly affected the bone mineral density, as well as the damage perimeter and diameter of the screw hole. However, the expected positive effect of surface modification was probably obscured by large variations in the results and, thus, statistically significant differences were not found in this study. This can be explained by natural variability in bone tissue, which also made automated image analysis difficult. PMID:21870370

  2. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  3. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11–12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11–12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11–12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  4. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Ko; Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11-12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11-12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11-12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  5. Improving Carbon Fixation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that alternative pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials. PMID:22647231

  6. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  7. Aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome with visceral and iliac artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    van der Linde, Denise; Verhagen, Hence J. M.; Moelker, Adriaan; van de Laar, Ingrid M. B. H.; Van Herzeele, Isabelle; De Backer, Julie; Dietz, Harry C.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aneurysms-osteoarthritis syndrome (AOS), caused by SMAD3 mutations, is a recently described autosomal-dominant syndrome characterized by arterial aneurysms, tortuosity, and aortic dissections in combination with osteoarthritis. Our objective was to evaluate the AOS-related vascular consequences in the visceral and iliac arteries and raise awareness for this aggressive syndrome among vascular specialists. Methods All AOS patients were monitored regularly according to our clinical AOS protocol. The study included those with one or more visceral aneurysms or tortuosity, or both. Clinical and surgical data were obtained from record abstraction. Results The study included 17 AOS patients (47% men) aged 47 ± 13 years. A total of 73 aneurysms were encountered, of which 46 were located in the abdomen. The common iliac artery was most commonly affected (37%), followed by the superior mesenteric artery (15%), celiac trunk (11%), and splenic artery (9%). Rapid aneurysm growth ≤1 year was found in three arteries (gastric, hepatic, and vertebral artery). Furthermore, arterial tortuosity was noted in 94% of patients. Four patients underwent six elective (endo) vascular interventions for aneurysms in the iliac, hepatic, gastric, or splenic artery, without major perioperative or postoperative complications. Conclusions AOS predisposes patients to widespread visceral and iliac artery aneurysms and extreme arterial tortuosity. Early elective aneurysm repair should be considered because the risk of aneurysm rupture is estimated to be very high and elective (endo) vascular interventions were not complicated by fragility of arterial tissue. Given the aggressive behavior of AOS, it is of utmost importance that vascular specialists are aware of this new syndrome. PMID:22975338

  8. Emergency Endovascular 'Bridge' Treatment for Iliac-Enteric Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2011-10-15

    Aortic aneurysm has been reported to be the dominant cause of primary iliac-enteric fistula (IEF) in >70% of cases [1]; other less common causes of primary IEF include peptic ulcer, primary aortitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, or neoplastic erosion into an adjacent artery [2, 3]. We describe an unusual case of IEF managed with a staged approach using an endovascular stent-graft as a 'bridge' in the emergency setting to optimize the next elective definitive excision of the lesion.

  9. Biomechanical testing of the LCP--how can stability in locked internal fixators be controlled?

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Karl; Dieter, Ulrich; Stachowiak, Gwidon; Gächter, André; Kuster, Markus S

    2003-11-01

    New plating techniques, such as non-contact plates, have been introduced in acknowledgment of the importance of biological factors in internal fixation. Knowledge of the fixation stability provided by these new plates is very limited and clarification is still necessary to determine how the mechanical stability, e.g. fracture motion, and the risk of implant failure can best be controlled. The results of a study based on in vitro experiments with composite bone cylinders and finite element analysis using the Locking Compression Plate (LCP) for diaphyseal fractures are presented and recommendations for clinical practice are given. Several factors were shown to influence stability both in compression and torsion. Axial stiffness and torsional rigidity was mainly influenced by the working length, e.g. the distance of the first screw to the fracture site. By omitting one screw hole on either side of the fracture, the construct became almost twice as flexible in both compression and torsion. The number of screws also significantly affected the stability, however, more than three screws per fragment did little to increase axial stiffness; nor did four screws increase torsional rigidity. The position of the third screw in the fragment significantly affected axial stiffness, but not torsional rigidity. The closer an additional screw is positioned towards the fracture gap, the stiffer the construct becomes under compression. The rigidity under torsional load was determined by the number of screws only. Another factor affecting construct stability was the distance of the plate to the bone. Increasing this distance resulted in decreased construct stability. Finally, a shorter plate with an equal number of screws caused a reduction in axial stiffness but not in torsional rigidity. Static compression tests showed that increasing the working length, e.g. omitting the screws immediately adjacent to the fracture on both sides, significantly diminished the load causing plastic

  10. Scaphoid excision and 4-corner fusion using retrograde headless compression screws.

    PubMed

    Ball, Brandon; Bergman, Joseph W

    2012-12-01

    Scapholunate advanced collapse is a predictable form of wrist arthritis resulting from longstanding scapholunate instability. Four-corner fusion and scaphoid excision is a reliable procedure used to treat scapholunate advanced collapse wrist that improves pain and preserves range of motion. Multiple methods of achieving fixation have been described for the procedure including K-wires, staples, and headless compression screws. In previously described techniques, the compression screws are inserted in an antegrade manner, breaching the articular surface of the lunate. Even small areas of chondral damage may undermine the long-term durability of the radiocarpal joint. Given the 4-corner fusion relies on the integrity of the radiolunate articulation for success, it would seem advantageous to preserve the articular cartilage of the lunate. The technique described here involves retrograde insertion of headless compression screws to achieve a 4-corner fusion. Although it is still early, we anticipate that this procedure will result in similar fusion rates to other forms of fixation. PMID:23160552

  11. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  12. Percutaneous Treatment in Iliac Artery Occlusion: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Fabiano, Sebastiano; Chiocchi, Marcello; Chiappa, Roberto Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-11-15

    We evaluated the long-term results of recanalization with primary stenting for patients with long and complex iliac artery occlusions. This was a retrospective nonrandomised study. Between 1995 and 1999, 138 patients underwent recanalization of an occluded iliac artery with subsequent stenting. Patency results were calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The mean length of follow-up was 108 months. Variables affecting primary stent patency such as patient age; stent type and diameter; lesion site, shape, and length; Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology classification; total runoff score; Fontaine classification; and cardiovascular risk factors were analysed using Breslow test. These variables were then evaluated for their relation to stent patency using Cox proportional hazards test. Technical success was 99%. Primary patency rates were 90% (SE .024), 85% (SE .029), 80% (SE .034), and 68% (SE .052) at 3, 5, 7, and 10 years, respectively. Lesion site (p = 0.022) and stent diameter (p = 0.028) were shown to have a statistically significant influence on primary stent patency. Long-term results of iliac recanalization and stent placement were excellent, without major complications, even in highly complex vascular obstructions. A primary endovascular approach appears to be justified in the majority of patients as a less invasive alternative treatment to surgery. In any case, a first-line interventional approach should be considered in elderly patients or in patients with severe comorbidities.

  13. Screw Placement Accuracy and Outcomes Following O-Arm-Navigated Atlantoaxial Fusion: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacob D; Jack, Megan M; Harn, Nicholas R; B