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Sample records for image derived input

  1. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging Using Image-Derived Arterial Input Function

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Aldea, Patricia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid PET imaging is an indispensable tool widely used in the investigation, diagnosis and monitoring of Alzheimers disease (AD). Currently, a reference region based approach is used as the mainstream quantification technique for amyloid imaging. This approach assumes the reference region is amyloid free and has the same tracer influx and washout kinetics as the regions of interest. However, this assumption may not always be valid. The goal of this work is to evaluate an amyloid imaging quantification technique that uses arterial region of interest as the reference to avoid potential bias caused by specific binding in the reference region. 21 participants, age 58 and up, underwent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging and MR imaging including a time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) scan and a structural scan. FreeSurfer based regional analysis was performed to quantify PiB PET data. Arterial input function was estimated based on coregistered TOF MRA using a modeling based technique. Regional distribution volume (VT) was calculated using Logan graphical analysis with estimated arterial input function. Kinetic modeling was also performed using the estimated arterial input function as a way to evaluate PiB binding (DVRkinetic) without a reference region. As a comparison, Logan graphical analysis was also performed with cerebellar cortex as reference to obtain DVRREF. Excellent agreement was observed between the two distribution volume ratio measurements (r>0.89, ICC>0.80). The estimated cerebellum VT was in line with literature reported values and the variability of cerebellum VT in the control group was comparable to reported variability using arterial sampling data. This study suggests that image-based arterial input function is a viable approach to quantify amyloid imaging data, without the need of arterial sampling or a reference region. This technique can be a valuable tool for amyloid imaging, particularly in population where reference normalization may not be accurate. PMID:25849581

  2. FDG-PET Quantification of Lung Inflammation with Image-Derived Blood Input Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Landon W.; Williams, Mark B.; Fairchild, Karen D.; Zhong, Min; Kundu, Bijoy K.; Berr, Stuart S.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic FDG-PET imaging was used to study inflammation in lungs of mice following administration of a virulent strain of Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae. Net whole-lung FDG influx constant (Ki) was determined in a compartment model using an image-derived blood input function. Methods. K. pneumoniae (~3 x 105 CFU) was intratracheally administered to six mice with 6 other mice serving as controls. Dynamic FDG-PET and X-Ray CT scans were acquired 24 hr after K. pneumoniae administration. The experimental lung time activity curves were fitted to a 3-compartment FDG model to obtain Ki. Following imaging, lungs were excised and immunohistochemistry analysis was done to assess the relative presence of neutrophils and macrophages. Results. Mean Ki for control and K. pneumoniae infected mice were (5.1 1.2) 10?3 versus (11.4 2.0) 10?3?min?1, respectively, revealing a 2.24 fold significant increase (P = 0.0003) in the rate of FDG uptake in the infected lung. Immunohistochemistry revealed that cellular lung infiltrate was almost exclusively neutrophils. Parametric Ki maps by Patlak analysis revealed heterogeneous inflammatory foci within infected lungs. Conclusion. The kinetics of FDG uptake in the lungs of mice can be noninvasively quantified by PET with a 3-compartment model approach based on an image-derived input function. PMID:22187641

  3. Image-derived input function with factor analysis and a priori information

    PubMed Central

    Simon?i?, Urban; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background Quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies often require the cumbersome and invasive procedure of arterial cannulation to measure the input function. This study sought to minimize the number of necessary blood samples by developing a factor-analysis based image-derived input function (IDIF) methodology for dynamic PET brain studies. Methods IDIF estimation was performed as follows: 1) carotid and background regions were segmented manually on early PET time frame; 2) blood-weighted and tissue-weighted time activity curves (TAC) were extracted with factor analysis; 3) factor analysis results were de-noised and scaled by using the voxels with the highest blood signal; 4) using population data and one blood sample at 40 minutes, the whole-blood TAC was estimated from post-processed factor analysis results; and 5) the parent concentration was finally estimated by correcting the whole blood curve with measured radiometabolite concentrations. The methodology was tested using data from 10 healthy subjects imaged with [11C](R)-rolipram. The accuracy of IDIFs was assessed against full arterial sampling by comparing the area under the curve (AUC) of the input functions and by calculating the total distribution volume (VT). Results The shape of the image-derived whole-blood TAC matched well the reference arterial curves, and the whole-blood AUCs was accurately estimated (mean error 1.0 4.3%). The relative Logan-VT error was ?4.1 6.4%. Compartmental modeling and spectral analysis gave less accurate VT results than Logan. Conclusion A factor-analysis based IDIF for [11C](R)-rolipram brain PET studies that relies on single blood sample and population data can be used for accurate quantification of Logan-VT values. PMID:25321159

  4. A Multimodal Approach to Image-Derived Input Functions for Brain PET

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Edward K.; Planeta-Wilson, Beata; Mulnix, Tim; Carson, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed for generating an image-derived input function (IDIF) exclusively from PET images. The purpose of this study was to assess the viability of a multimodality approach utilizing registered MR images. 3T-MR and HRRT-PET data were acquired from human subjects. Segmentation of both the left and right carotid arteries was performed in MR images using a 3D level sets method. Vessel centerlines were extracted by parameterization of the segmented voxel coordinates with either a single polynomial curve or a B-spline curve fitted to the segmented data. These centerlines were subsequently re-registered to static PET data to maximize the accurate classification of PET voxels in the ROI. The accuracy of this approach was assessed by comparison of the area under the curve (AUC) of the IDIF to that measured from conventional automated arterial blood sampling. Our method produces curves similar in shape to that of blood sampling. The mean AUC ratio of the centerline region was 0.400.19 before re-registration and 0.690.26 after re-registration. Increasing the diameter of the carotid ROI produced a smooth reduction in AUC. Thus, even with the high resolution of the HRRT, partial volume correction is still necessary. This study suggests that the combination of PET information with MR segmented regions will demonstrate an improvement over regions based solely on MR or PET alone. PMID:20607124

  5. A method of generating image derived input function in quantitative 18F-FDG PET study based on the monotonicity of the input and output function curve

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shan; Chen, Kewei; Reiman, Eric M; Li, De-min; Shan, Baoci

    2013-01-01

    Objective A method for defining image-derived input function (IDIF) has been introduced and evaluated for the quantification of the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose in positron emission tomography studies. Methods The voxels in the brain vasculature are extracted based on the different monotonicity between the input and output function curves. The TACs of such voxels are averaged to get the uncorrected TAC of the brain vasculature. The IDIF was obtained from the raw TAC after correcting for the partial volume and spillover effects by an empirical formula in conjunction with single blood sample and the TAC of the brain tissue. Data from 16 human subjects were used to test the proposed method. The Patlak approach is used to calculate the net FDG clearance with plasma-derived input function (PDIF) and our generated IDIF, respectively. Results the net FDG clearances calculated with the image-derived input function generated by our approach are not only highly correlated (correlation coefficients close to 1) to, but also highly comparable (regression slopes close to 1, and intercepts close to 0) with those calculated with plasma-derived input function. Conclusion The method used in the present work is feasible and accurate. PMID:22262245

  6. Combining MRI with PET for partial volume correction improves image-derived input functions in mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Eleanor; Buonincontri, Guido; Izquierdo, David; Methner, Carmen; Hawkes, Rob C.; Ansorge, Richard E.; Krieg, Thomas; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate kinetic modelling using dynamic PET requires knowledge of the tracer concentration in plasma, known as the arterial input function (AIF). AIFs are usually determined by invasive blood sampling, but this is prohibitive in murine studies due to low total blood volumes. As a result of the low spatial resolution of PET, image-derived input functions (IDIFs) must be extracted from left ventricular blood pool (LVBP) ROIs of the mouse heart. This is challenging because of partial volume and spillover effects between the LVBP and myocardium, contaminating IDIFs with tissue signal. We have applied the geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method of partial volume correction (PVC) to 12 mice injected with 18F-FDG affected by a Myocardial Infarction (MI), of which 6 were treated with a drug which reduced infarction size [1]. We utilised high resolution MRI to assist in segmenting mouse hearts into 5 classes: LVBP, infarcted myocardium, healthy myocardium, lungs/body and background. The signal contribution from these 5 classes was convolved with the point spread function (PSF) of the Cambridge split magnet PET scanner and a non-linear fit was performed on the 5 measured signal components. The corrected IDIF was taken as the fitted LVBP component. It was found that the GTM PVC method could recover an IDIF with less contamination from spillover than an IDIF extracted from PET data alone. More realistic values of Ki were achieved using GTM IDIFs, which were shown to be significantly different (p<0.05) between the treated and untreated groups. PMID:26213413

  7. Image-derived input function obtained in a 3TMR-brainPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, N. A.; Herzog, H.; Weirich, C.; Tellmann, L.; Rota Kops, E.; Hautzel, H.; Almeida, P.

    2013-02-01

    Aim: The combination of a high-resolution MR-compatible BrainPET insert operated within a 3 T MAGNETOM Trio MR scanner is an excellent tool for obtaining an image derived input function (IDIF), due to simultaneous imaging. In this work, we explore the possibility of obtaining an IDIF from volumes of interest (VOI) defined over the carotid arteries (CAs) using the MR data. Material and methods: FDG data from three patients without brain disorders were included. VOIs were drawn bilaterally over the CAs on a MPRAGE image using a 50% isocontour (MR50VOI). CA PET/MR co-registration was examined based on an individual and combined CA co-registration. After that, to estimate the IDIF, the MR50VOI average (IDIF-A), four hottest pixels per plane (IDIF-4H) and four hottest pixels in VOI (IDIF-4V) were considered. A model-based correction for residual partial volume effects involving venous blood samples was applied, from which partial volume (PV) and spillover (SP) coefficients were estimated. Additionally, a theoretical PV coefficient (PVt) was calculated based on MR50VOI. Results: The results show an excellent co-registration between the MR and PET, with an area under the curve ratio between both co-registration methods of 1.00±0.04. A good agreement between PV and PVt was found for IDIF-A, with PV of 0.39±0.06 and PVt 0.40±0.03, and for IDIF-4H, with PV of 0.47±0.05 and PVt 0.47±0.03. The SPs were 0.20±0.03 and 0.21±0.03 for IDIF-A and IDIF-4H, respectively. Conclusion: The integration of a high resolution BrainPET in an MR scanner allows to obtain an IDIF from an MR-based VOI. This must be corrected for a residual partial volume effect.

  8. Noninvasive image derived heart input function for CMRglc measurements in small animal slow infusion FDG PET studies.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guoming; Paul, Cumming; Todica, Andrei; Hacker, Marcus; Bartenstein, Peter; Böning, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Absolute quantitation of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) can be obtained in positron emission tomography (PET) studies when serial measurements of the arterial [(18)F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) input are available. Since this is not always practical in PET studies of rodents, there has been considerable interest in defining an image-derived input function (IDIF) by placing a volume of interest (VOI) within the left ventricle of the heart. However, spill-in arising from trapping of FDG in the myocardium often leads to progressive contamination of the IDIF, which propagates to underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc. We therefore developed a novel, non-invasive method for correcting the IDIF without scaling to a blood sample. To this end, we first obtained serial arterial samples and dynamic FDG-PET data of the head and heart in a group of eight anaesthetized rats. We fitted a bi-exponential function to the serial measurements of the IDIF, and then used the linear graphical Gjedde-Patlak method to describe the accumulation in myocardium. We next estimated the magnitude of myocardial spill-in reaching the left ventricle VOI by assuming a Gaussian point-spread function, and corrected the measured IDIF for this estimated spill-in. Finally, we calculated parametric maps of CMRglc using the corrected IDIF, and for the sake of comparison, relative to serial blood sampling from the femoral artery. The uncorrected IDIF resulted in 20% underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc relative to the gold standard arterial input method. However, there was no bias with the corrected IDIF, which was robust to the variable extent of myocardial tracer uptake, such that there was a very high correlation between individual CMRglc measurements using the corrected IDIF with gold-standard arterial input results. Based on simulation, we furthermore find that electrocardiogram-gating, i.e. ECG-gating is not necessary for IDIF quantitation using our approach. PMID:23160517

  9. Noninvasive image derived heart input function for CMRglc measurements in small animal slow infusion FDG PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Guoming; Cumming, Paul; Todica, Andrei; Hacker, Marcus; Bartenstein, Peter; Bning, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Absolute quantitation of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) can be obtained in positron emission tomography (PET) studies when serial measurements of the arterial [18F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) input are available. Since this is not always practical in PET studies of rodents, there has been considerable interest in defining an image-derived input function (IDIF) by placing a volume of interest (VOI) within the left ventricle of the heart. However, spill-in arising from trapping of FDG in the myocardium often leads to progressive contamination of the IDIF, which propagates to underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc. We therefore developed a novel, non-invasive method for correcting the IDIF without scaling to a blood sample. To this end, we first obtained serial arterial samples and dynamic FDG-PET data of the head and heart in a group of eight anaesthetized rats. We fitted a bi-exponential function to the serial measurements of the IDIF, and then used the linear graphical Gjedde-Patlak method to describe the accumulation in myocardium. We next estimated the magnitude of myocardial spill-in reaching the left ventricle VOI by assuming a Gaussian point-spread function, and corrected the measured IDIF for this estimated spill-in. Finally, we calculated parametric maps of CMRglc using the corrected IDIF, and for the sake of comparison, relative to serial blood sampling from the femoral artery. The uncorrected IDIF resulted in 20% underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc relative to the gold standard arterial input method. However, there was no bias with the corrected IDIF, which was robust to the variable extent of myocardial tracer uptake, such that there was a very high correlation between individual CMRglc measurements using the corrected IDIF with gold-standard arterial input results. Based on simulation, we furthermore find that electrocardiogram-gating, i.e. ECG-gating is not necessary for IDIF quantitation using our approach.

  10. Cerebral blood flow with [15O]water PET studies using an image-derived input function and MR-defined carotid centerlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Edward K.; Carson, Richard E.

    2013-03-01

    Full quantitative analysis of brain PET data requires knowledge of the arterial input function into the brain. Such data are normally acquired by arterial sampling with corrections for delay and dispersion to account for the distant sampling site. Several attempts have been made to extract an image-derived input function (IDIF) directly from the internal carotid arteries that supply the brain and are often visible in brain PET images. We have devised a method of delineating the internal carotids in co-registered magnetic resonance (MR) images using the level-set method and applying the segmentations to PET images using a novel centerline approach. Centerlines of the segmented carotids were modeled as cubic splines and re-registered in PET images summed over the early portion of the scan. Using information from the anatomical center of the vessel should minimize partial volume and spillover effects. Centerline time-activity curves were taken as the mean of the values for points along the centerline interpolated from neighboring voxels. A scale factor correction was derived from calculation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using gold standard arterial blood measurements. We have applied the method to human subject data from multiple injections of [15O]water on the HRRT. The method was assessed by calculating the area under the curve (AUC) of the IDIF and the CBF, and comparing these to values computed using the gold standard arterial input curve. The average ratio of IDIF to arterial AUC (apparent recovery coefficient: aRC) across 9 subjects with multiple (n = 69) injections was 0.49 ± 0.09 at 0-30 s post tracer arrival, 0.45 ± 0.09 at 30-60 s, and 0.46 ± 0.09 at 60-90 s. Gray and white matter CBF values were 61.4 ± 11.0 and 15.6 ± 3.0 mL/min/100 g tissue using sampled blood data. Using IDIF centerlines scaled by the average aRC over each subjects’ injections, gray and white matter CBF values were 61.3 ± 13.5 and 15.5 ± 3.4 mL/min/100 g tissue. Using global average aRC values, the means were unchanged, and intersubject variability was noticeably reduced. This MR-based centerline method with local re-registration to [15O]water PET yields a consistent IDIF over multiple injections in the same subject, thus permitting the absolute quantification of CBF without arterial input function measurements.

  11. Image Derived Input Function for [18F]-FEPPA: Application to Quantify Translocator Protein (18 kDa) in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Rostom; Rusjan, Pablo M.; Mizrahi, Romina; Jacobs, Mark F.; Koshimori, Yuko; Houle, Sylvain; Ko, Ji Hyun; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2014-01-01

    In [18F]-FEPPA positron emission topography (PET) imaging, automatic blood sampling system (ABSS) is currently the gold standard to obtain the blood time activity curve (TAC) required to extract the input function (IF). Here, we compare the performance of two image-based methods of IF extraction to the ABSS gold standard method for the quantification of translocator protein (TSPO) in the human brain. The IFs were obtained from a direct delineation of the internal carotid signal (CS) and a new concept of independent component analysis (ICA). PET scans were obtained from 18 healthy volunteers. The estimated total distribution volume (VT) by CS-IF and ICA-IF were compared to the reference VT obtained by ABSS-IF in the frontal and temporal cortex, cerebellum, striatum and thalamus regions. The VT values estimated using ICA-IF were more reliable than CS-IF for all brain regions. Specifically, the slope regression in the frontal cortex with ICA-IF was r2?=?0.91 (p<0.05), and r2?=?0.71 (p<0.05) using CS-IF. PMID:25549260

  12. Input design for identification of aircraft stability and control derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for designing inputs to identify stability and control derivatives from flight test data is presented. This approach is based on finding inputs which provide the maximum possible accuracy of derivative estimates. Two techniques of input specification are implemented for this objective - a time domain technique and a frequency domain technique. The time domain technique gives the control input time history and can be used for any allowable duration of test maneuver, including those where data lengths can only be of short duration. The frequency domain technique specifies the input frequency spectrum, and is best applied for tests where extended data lengths, much longer than the time constants of the modes of interest, are possible. These technqiues are used to design inputs to identify parameters in longitudinal and lateral linear models of conventional aircraft. The constraints of aircraft response limits, such as on structural loads, are realized indirectly through a total energy constraint on the input. Tests with simulated data and theoretical predictions show that the new approaches give input signals which can provide more accurate parameter estimates than can conventional inputs of the same total energy. Results obtained indicate that the approach has been brought to the point where it should be used on flight tests for further evaluation.

  13. PRINCIPLES OF TOMOGRAPHICAL IMAGING WITH LIMITED-ANGLE INPUT

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, K. C.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1980-09-01

    The theory of tomographical imaging with limited-angular input is discussed , from which two reconstruction algorithms are derived. The existence of missing information due to incomplete angular coverage is demonstrated. and an iteration algorithm to recover this information from a priori knowledge on the finite extent of the object developed. Smoothing algorithms to stabilize reconstructions in the presence of noise are given. The effects of digitization and finite truncation of the reconstruction region in numerical computation are also analysed. It is shown that the limited-angle problem is governed by a set of eigenvalues whose spectrum is determined by the imaging angle and the finite extent of the object. The distortion on a point source caused by the missing information is calculated; from the results some properties of the iteration scheme, such as spatial uniformity, are derived.

  14. Fuzzy vision - Multiple inputs speed image understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, R. J., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The fuzzy vision system designed for the interpretation of multiple successive images is described. The system is noise insensitive and can be mapped directly onto parallel processing hardware. The system consists of a region generator and a viewer which access a common semantic net; the components and operation of these subsystems are examined. The advantages and disadvantages of the fuzzy vision system are discussed. Diagrams of the region generator, viewer, and a semantic net are provided. An example depicting the operation of the fuzzy vision system is presented.

  15. Position Estimation Using Image Derivative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortari, Daniele; deDilectis, Francesco; Zanetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an image processing algorithm to process Moon and/or Earth images. The theory presented is based on the fact that Moon hard edge points are characterized by the highest values of the image derivative. Outliers are eliminated by two sequential filters. Moon center and radius are then estimated by nonlinear least-squares using circular sigmoid functions. The proposed image processing has been applied and validated using real and synthetic Moon images.

  16. Robust image retrieval from noisy inputs using lattice associative memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urcid, Gonzalo; Nieves-V., Jos Angel; Garca-A., Anmi; Valdiviezo-N., Juan Carlos

    2009-02-01

    Lattice associative memories also known as morphological associative memories are fully connected feedforward neural networks with no hidden layers, whose computation at each node is carried out with lattice algebra operations. These networks are a relatively recent development in the field of associative memories that has proven to be an alternative way to work with sets of pattern pairs for which the storage and retrieval stages use minimax algebra. Different associative memory models have been proposed to cope with the problem of pattern recall under input degradations, such as occlusions or random noise, where input patterns can be composed of binary or real valued entries. In comparison to these and other artificial neural network memories, lattice algebra based memories display better performance for storage and recall capability; however, the computational techniques devised to achieve that purpose require additional processing or provide partial success when inputs are presented with undetermined noise levels. Robust retrieval capability of an associative memory model is usually expressed by a high percentage of perfect recalls from non-perfect input. The procedure described here uses noise masking defined by simple lattice operations together with appropriate metrics, such as the normalized mean squared error or signal to noise ratio, to boost the recall performance of either the min or max lattice auto-associative memories. Using a single lattice associative memory, illustrative examples are given that demonstrate the enhanced retrieval of correct gray-scale image associations from inputs corrupted with random noise.

  17. Restoration of images degraded by input scanner vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolberg, George; Loce, Robert P.

    1995-03-01

    Images scanned in the presence of mechanical vibrations are subject to artifacts such as brightness fluctuation and geometric warping. The goal of this work is to develop an algorithm to invert these distortions and produce an output digital image consistent with a scanner operating under ideal uniform motion conditions. The image restoration algorithm described in this paper applies to typical office scanners that employ a moving linear sensor array (LSA) or moving optics. The velocity of the components is generally not constant in time. Dynamic errors are introduced by gears, timing belts, motors, and structural vibrations. A companion paper characterizes the artifacts induced by nonuniform velocity. In this work, we make use of the instantaneous LSA velocity to reconstruct an underlying piecewise constant or piecewise linear model of the image irradiance function. The control points for the underlying model are obtained by solving a system of equations derived to relate the observed area samples with instantaneous LSA velocity and a spatially varying sampling kernel. An efficient solution exists for the narrow band diagonal matrix that results. The control points computed with this method fully define the underlying irradiance function. That function is then suitable for resampling under ideal scanning conditions to produce a restored output digital image.

  18. Approach for Input Uncertainty Propagation and Robust Design in CFD Using Sensitivity Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putko, Michele M.; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, Perry A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    2002-01-01

    An implementation of the approximate statistical moment method for uncertainty propagation and robust optimization for quasi 3-D Euler CFD code is presented. Given uncertainties in statistically independent, random, normally distributed input variables, first- and second-order statistical moment procedures are performed to approximate the uncertainty in the CFD output. Efficient calculation of both first- and second-order sensitivity derivatives is required. In order to assess the validity of the approximations, these moments are compared with statistical moments generated through Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainties in the CFD input variables are also incorporated into a robust optimization procedure. For this optimization, statistical moments involving first-order sensitivity derivatives appear in the objective function and system constraints. Second-order sensitivity derivatives are used in a gradient-based search to successfully execute a robust optimization. The approximate methods used throughout the analyses are found to be valid when considering robustness about input parameter mean values.

  19. Effects of Ground Motion Input on the Derived Fragility Functions: Case study of 2010 Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancilar, Ufuk; Harmandar, Ebru; akti, Eser

    2014-05-01

    Empirical fragility functions are derived by statistical processing of the data on: i) Damaged and undamaged buildings, and ii) Ground motion intensity values at the buildings' locations. This study investigates effects of different ground motion inputs on the derived fragility functions. The previously constructed fragility curves (Hancilar et al. 2013), which rely on specific shaking intensity maps published by the USGS after the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, are compared with the fragility functions computed in the present study. Building data come from field surveys of 6,347 buildings that are grouped with respect to structural material type and number of stories. For damage assessment, the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS-98) damage grades are adopted. The simplest way to account for the variability in ground motion input could have been achieved by employing different ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and their standard variations. However, in this work, we prefer to rely on stochastically simulated ground motions of the Haiti earthquake. We employ five different source models available in the literature and calculate the resulting strong ground motion in time domain. In our simulations we also consider the local site effects by published studies on NEHRP site classes and micro-zoning maps of the city of Port-au-Prince. We estimate the regional distributions from the waveforms simulated at the same coordinates that we have damage information from. The estimated spatial distributions of peak ground accelerations and velocities, PGA and PGV respectively, are then used as input to fragility computations. The results show that changing the ground motion input causes significant variability in the resulting fragility functions.

  20. Image tube. [deriving electron beam replica of image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, K. L.; Johnson, C. B. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    An optical image is projected onto a planar surface of a photocathode that derives an electron beam replica of the image. A target electrode displaced relative to the photocathode so that it does not obstruct the optical image includes a planar surface for receiving and deriving an accurate replica of the electron beam image. The two planar surfaces are parallel. The electron beam image is focused on the target electrode by providing throughout a region that extends between the planar surfaces of the photocathode and receiving electrode, constant homogeneous dc electric and magnetic fields. The electric field extends in a direction perpendicular to the planar surfaces while the magnetic field extends along a straight line that intersects the photocathode and target electrode at an acute angle.

  1. MRI-derived arterial input functions for PET kinetic modelling in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eleanor; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneous PET-MR acquisition provides the high temporal and spatial resolution of MRI with the specificity of PET. In PET, accurate modelling of physiological function in vivo requires the time-activity curve of tracer in blood plasma, known as the arterial input function (AIF). As the gold standard method of blood sampling is inherently prohibitive in the small animal case, here we discuss how we prepare to rapidly sample MRI signals from gadolinium-doped tracer to obtain the tracer input functions from a simultaneous PET-MR measurement. ?R2* measurements taken from EPI images were used to obtain first pass bolus AIFs in the rat brain from DSC-MRI datasets of 5 rats. AIFs obtained using our automatic algorithm were found to be consistent between animals and compared well with manual methods without need for a priori voxel selection. A variable flip angle FLASH sequence used for T1 mapping was successfully tested in a phantom study, providing accurate measurements of Gd concentration.

  2. Use of Ra isotopes to deduce rapid transfer of sediment-derived inputs off Kerguelen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanial, V.; van Beek, P.; Lansard, B.; Souhaut, M.; Kestenare, E.; d'Ovidio, F.; Zhou, M.; Blain, S.

    2014-09-01

    The Southern Ocean is known as the largest High-Nutrient, Low-Chlorophyll (HNLC) region of the global ocean due to iron limitation. However, a large phytoplankton bloom develops annually downstream of the Kerguelen Islands, which is sustained partly by iron released from the sediments deposited onto the margins. In the framework of the KEOPS-2 project, we used radium isotopes (224Ra, T1/2 = 3.66 d; 223Ra, T1/2 = 11.4 d; 228Ra, T1/2 = 5.75 yr) to provide information on the origin of iron fertilization and on the timescales of the transfer of sediment-derived inputs (including iron and other micronutrients) towards offshore waters. Significant 223Ra and 223Ra activities were found in the near vicinity of the Kerguelen Islands, in agreement with the short half-lives of these isotopes. Significant 224Ra and 223Ra activities were also detected up to 200 km downstream of the islands and more unexpectedly in offshore waters south of the Polar Front. These observations thus clearly indicate (i) that the sediment-derived inputs are rapidly transferred towards offshore waters (on timescales in the order of several days up to several weeks) and (ii) that the Polar Front is not a physical barrier for the chemical elements released from the sediments of Kerguelen Plateau. The Ra dataset suggests that iron and other micronutrients released by the shallow sediments of the Kerguelen margins may contribute to fuel the phytoplankton bloom downstream of the islands, despite the presence of the Polar Front. However, the heterogeneous distribution of the 224Ra and 223Ra activities in surface waters suggests that this supply across the front is not a continuous process, but rather a process that is highly variable in space and time.

  3. Use of Ra isotopes to deduce rapid transfer of sediment-derived inputs off Kerguelen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanial, V.; van Beek, P.; Lansard, B.; Souhaut, M.; Kestenare, E.; d'Ovidio, F.; Zhou, M.; Blain, S.

    2015-03-01

    The Southern Ocean is known to be the largest high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region of the global ocean due to iron limitation. However, a large phytoplankton bloom develops annually downstream of the Kerguelen Islands, a bloom which is sustained partly by iron released from the sediments deposited onto the shelves. In the framework of the KEOPS-2 project, we used radium isotopes (224Ra, T1/2 = 3.66 d; 223Ra, T1/2 = 11.4 d; 228Ra, T1/2 = 5.75 yr) to provide information on the origin of iron fertilization and on the timescales of the transfer of sediment-derived inputs (including iron and other micronutrients) towards offshore waters. Significant 224Ra and 223Ra activities were found in the near vicinity of the Kerguelen Islands, in agreement with the short half-lives of these isotopes. Significant 224Ra and 223Ra activities were also detected up to 200 km downstream of the islands and more unexpectedly in offshore waters south of the polar front. These observations thus clearly indicate (i) that the sediment-derived inputs are rapidly transferred towards offshore waters (on timescales on the order of several days up to several weeks) and (ii) that the polar front is not a physical barrier for the chemical elements released from the sediments of the Kerguelen Plateau. The Ra data set suggests that iron and other micronutrients released by the shelves of the Kerguelen Islands may contribute to fueling the phytoplankton bloom downstream of the islands, despite the presence of the polar front. However, the heterogeneous distribution of the 224Ra and 223Ra activities in surface waters suggests that this supply across the front is not a continuous process but rather a process that is highly variable in space and time.

  4. Mapping Synaptic Input Fields of Neurons with Super-Resolution Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Yaron M; Speer, Colenso M; Babcock, Hazen P; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-10-01

    As a basic functional unit in neural circuits, each neuron integrates input signals from hundreds to thousands of synapses. Knowledge of the synaptic input fields of individual neurons, including the identity, strength, and location of each synapse, is essential for understanding how neurons compute. Here, we developed a volumetric super-resolution reconstruction platform for large-volume imaging and automated segmentation of neurons and synapses with molecular identity information. We used this platform to map inhibitory synaptic input fields of On-Off direction-selective ganglion cells (On-Off DSGCs), which are important for computing visual motion direction in the mouse retina. The reconstructions of On-Off DSGCs showed a GABAergic, receptor subtype-specific input field for generating direction selective responses without significant glycinergic inputs for mediating monosynaptic crossover inhibition. These results demonstrate unique capabilities of this super-resolution platform for interrogating neural circuitry. PMID:26435106

  5. Maximum likelihood identification and optimal input design for identifying aircraft stability and control derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepner, D. E.; Mehra, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    A new method of extracting aircraft stability and control derivatives from flight test data is developed based on the maximum likelihood cirterion. It is shown that this new method is capable of processing data from both linear and nonlinear models, both with and without process noise and includes output error and equation error methods as special cases. The first application of this method to flight test data is reported for lateral maneuvers of the HL-10 and M2/F3 lifting bodies, including the extraction of stability and control derivatives in the presence of wind gusts. All the problems encountered in this identification study are discussed. Several different methods (including a priori weighting, parameter fixing and constrained parameter values) for dealing with identifiability and uniqueness problems are introduced and the results given. The method for the design of optimal inputs for identifying the parameters of linear dynamic systems is also given. The criterion used for the optimization is the sensitivity of the system output to the unknown parameters. Several simple examples are first given and then the results of an extensive stability and control dervative identification simulation for a C-8 aircraft are detailed.

  6. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

    2014-08-01

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  7. Image processing software for providing radiometric inputs to land surface climatology models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Goetz, Scott J.; Strebel, Donald E.; Hall, Forrest G.

    1989-01-01

    During the First International Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), 80 gigabytes of image data were generated from a variety of satellite and airborne sensors in a multidisciplinary attempt to study energy and mass exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere. To make these data readily available to researchers with a range of image data handling experience and capabilities, unique image-processing software was designed to perform a variety of nonstandard image-processing manipulations and to derive a set of standard-format image products. The nonconventional features of the software include: (1) adding new layers of geographic coordinates, and solar and viewing conditions to existing data; (2) providing image polygon extraction and calibration of data to at-sensor radiances; and, (3) generating standard-format derived image products that can be easily incorporated into radiometric or climatology models. The derived image products consist of easily handled ASCII descriptor files, byte image data files, and additional per-pixel integer data files (e.g., geographic coordinates, and sun and viewing conditions). Details of the solutions to the image-processing problems, the conventions adopted for handling a variety of satellite and aircraft image data, and the applicability of the output products to quantitative modeling are presented. They should be of general interest to future experiment and data-handling design considerations.

  8. Java Library for Input and Output of Image Data and Metadata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert; Levoe, Steven

    2003-01-01

    A Java-language library supports input and output (I/O) of image data and metadata (label data) in the format of the Video Image Communication and Retrieval (VICAR) image-processing software and in several similar formats, including a subset of the Planetary Data System (PDS) image file format. The library does the following: It provides low-level, direct access layer, enabling an application subprogram to read and write specific image files, lines, or pixels, and manipulate metadata directly. Two coding/decoding subprograms ("codecs" for short) based on the Java Advanced Imaging (JAI) software provide access to VICAR and PDS images in a file-format-independent manner. The VICAR and PDS codecs enable any program that conforms to the specification of the JAI codec to use VICAR or PDS images automatically, without specific knowledge of the VICAR or PDS format. The library also includes Image I/O plugin subprograms for VICAR and PDS formats. Application programs that conform to the Image I/O specification of Java version 1.4 can utilize any image format for which such a plug-in subprogram exists, without specific knowledge of the format itself. Like the aforementioned codecs, the VICAR and PDS Image I/O plug-in subprograms support reading and writing of metadata.

  9. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Thomas A.; Bunel, Florestan; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT)] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples. PMID:24709799

  10. Derivation of Auroral Conductances from IMAGE FUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immel, T. J.; Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Gerard, J.; Hubert, B.

    2001-05-01

    Auroral emissions are observed in 3 separate Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) wavelength regimes by IMAGE. The Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) is sensitive mainly to N2 LBH and N I emissions in the 140-190-nm range, while the Spectrographic Imager (SI) spectrally separates the OI 135.6-nm emission and Doppler shifted hydrogen emissions of the proton aurora at 121.8 nm. The brightness of the N2 LBH and OI 135.6-nm emissions depend in part on the spectrum and total energy flux of incoming electrons, and on the height-density profile of the respective species, and O2. Due mainly to these atmospheric factors, the ratio of the N2 and OI emissions depends strongly on the characteristic energy of precipitating electrons which, once estimated, can in turn be used to calculate the total energy flux. The proton aurora generates secondary electrons, which excite additional emissions of N2 and OI. It is not possible to absolutely determine either the total proton energy flux or the characteristic proton energy () with a single proton imaging channel. However, the proton-induced N2 and OI emissions depend mainly on the total proton energy flux, so reasonable estimates of can be used in the calculation of proton energy input. Ground-based or in-situ observations of proton energies can help in this determination. With accurate corrections for N2 and OI airglow emissions, and formulae such as those provided by Robinson et al. [1987], IMAGE FUV can provide global maps of height-integrated conductivity (conductance) in the auroral oval. It is also possible to examine the degree to which the proton aurora contributes to enhanced conductance on a global scale. The promise of providing these conductances using IMAGE's real-time capabilities will be discussed. Robinson, R. M., R. R. Vondrak, K. Miller, T. Dabbs, and D. Hardy, On Calculating Ionospheric Conductances from the Flux and Energy of Precipitating Electrons, J. Geophys. Res., 92, 2566, 1987.

  11. Regional biomass and leaf-area estimates derived from satellite imagery as inputs to spatial trace-gas flux models for arctic tundra

    SciTech Connect

    Shippert, M.M.; Walker, D.A.; Auerbach, N.A.; Lewis, B.E. )

    1994-06-01

    Reflectance spectra, leaf area index (LAI), and live biomass measurements were collected for 60 plots near Toolik Lake and Imnavait Creek, Alaska during July and August, 1993. Normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVI) were calculated from the reflectance spectra. NDVI was found to be highly correlated to both LAI and biomass. These relationships have been seen in temperate ecosystems, but have never been tested in Arctic tundra previous to this study. In addition, a clear relationship is seen between NDVI values and pH and moisture. Acidic plots have much higher NDVI values than non-acidic plots, while moist plots have high NDVI values relative to dry and wet plots. The average field NDVI measurements for major physiognomic categories were compared to average NDVI values for the same categories derived from a SPOT multispectral satellite image of the area. These values were also found to be highly correlated. However, field NDVI values were consistently about 40% higher than SPOT NDVI values. Possible explanations for this consistent trend include effects of low sun angle in the Arctic in combination with relatively high view angle of the SPOT sensor. Using the regression equations for the above relationships, biomass and LAI images were calculated from the SPOT image. The resulting images show expected trends in the LAI and biomass across the landscape. The image of biomass will be used as an input to a spatial model of methane emissions for the Alaskan Arctic. Another key input variable to the methane model will be soil moisture. Alternative image processing methods and/or radar images will be used to derive this important variable.

  12. Multiple-input multiple-output 3D imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunbo; Wu, Chao; Han, Xiang'e.

    2015-10-01

    A 3D (angle-angle-range) imaging laser radar (LADAR) based on multiple-input multiple-output structure is proposed. In the LADAR, multiple coherent beams are randomly phased to form the structured light field and an APD array detector is utilized to receive the echoes from target. The sampled signals from each element of APD are correlated with the referenced light to reconstruct the local 3D images of target. The 3D panorama of target can be obtained by stitching the local images of all the elements. The system composition is described first, then the operation principle is presented and numerical simulations are provided to show the validity of the proposed scheme.

  13. Improved factor analysis of dynamic PET images to estimate arterial input function and tissue curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Mitra, Debasis; Pan, Hui; Jagust, William; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-03-01

    Factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) is a methodology of extracting time-activity curves (TACs) for corresponding different tissue types from noisy dynamic images. The challenges of FADS include long computation time and sensitivity to the initial guess, resulting in convergence to local minima far from the true solution. We propose a method of accelerating and stabilizing FADS application to sequences of dynamic PET images by adding preliminary cluster analysis of the time activity curves for individual voxels. We treat the temporal variation of individual voxel concentrations as a set of time-series and use a partial clustering analysis to identify the types of voxel TACs that are most functionally distinct from each other. These TACs provide a good initial guess for the temporal factors for subsequent FADS processing. Applying this approach to a set of single slices of dynamic 11C-PIB images of the brain allows identification of the arterial input function and two different tissue TACs that are likely to correspond to the specific and non-specific tracer binding-tissue types. These results enable us to perform direct classification of tissues based on their pharmacokinetic properties in dynamic PET without relying on a compartment-based kinetic model, without identification of the reference region, or without using any external methods of estimating the arterial input function, as needed in some techniques.

  14. Classifiers vs. input variablesThe drivers in image classification for land cover mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinl, M.; Walde, J.; Tappeiner, G.; Tappeiner, U.

    2009-12-01

    The study investigates the performance of image classifiers for landscape-scale land cover mapping and the relevance of ancillary data for the classification success in order to assess and to quantify the importance of these components in image classification. Specifically tested are the performance of maximum likelihood classification (MLC), artificial neural networks (ANN) and discriminant analysis (DA) based on Landsat7 ETM+ spectral data in combination with topographic measures and NDVI. ANN produced high accuracies of more than 75% also with limited input information, while MLC and DA produced comparable results only by incorporating ancillary data into the classification process. The superiority of ANN classification was less pronounced on the level of the single land cover classes. The use of ancillary data generally increased classification accuracy and showed a similar potential for increasing classification accuracy than the selection of the classifier. Therefore, a stronger focus on the development of appropriate and optimised sets of input variables is suggested. Also the definition and selection of land cover classes has shown to be crucial and not to be simply adaptable from existing land cover class schemes. A stronger research focus towards discriminating land cover classes by their typical spectral, topographic or seasonal properties is therefore suggested to advance image classification.

  15. Extraction of an input function from dynamic micro-PET images using wavelet packet based sub-band decomposition independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jhih-Shian; Su, Kuan-Hao; Chang, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2012-11-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to quantify physiological parameters. However to perform quantification requires that an input function is measured, namely a plasma time activity curve (TAC). Image-derived input functions (IDIFs) are attractive because they are noninvasive and nearly no blood loss is involved. However, the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of PET images are low, which degrades the accuracy of IDIFs. The objective of this study was to extract accurate input functions from microPET images with zero or one plasma sample using wavelet packet based sub-band decomposition independent component analysis (WP SDICA). Two approaches were used in this study. The first was the use of simulated dynamic rat images with different spatial resolutions and SNRs, and the second was the use of dynamic images of eight Sprague-Dawley rats. We also used a population-based input function and a fuzzy c-means clustering approach and compared their results with those obtained by our method using normalized root mean square errors, area under curve errors, and correlation coefficients. Our results showed that the accuracy of the one-sample WP SDICA approach was better than the other approaches using both simulated and realistic comparisons. The errors in the metabolic rate, as estimated by one-sample WP SDICA, were also the smallest using our approach. PMID:22892332

  16. Estimation of Enterococci Input from Bathers and Animals on A Recreational Beach Using Camera Images

    PubMed Central

    D, Wang John; M, Solo-Gabriele Helena; M, Abdelzaher Amir; E, Fleming Lora

    2010-01-01

    Enterococci, are used nationwide as a water quality indicator of marine recreational beaches. Prior research has demonstrated that enterococci inputs to the study beach site (located in Miami, FL) are dominated by non-point sources (including humans and animals). We have estimated their respective source functions by developing a counting methodology for individuals to better understand their non-point source load impacts. The method utilizes camera images of the beach taken at regular time intervals to determine the number of people and animal visitors. The developed method translates raw image counts for weekdays and weekend days into daily and monthly visitation rates. Enterococci source functions were computed from the observed number of unique individuals for average days of each month of the year, and from average load contributions for humans and for animals. Results indicate that dogs represent the larger source of enterococci relative to humans and birds. PMID:20381094

  17. Reducing input data via image categorization to improve the speed of copyright content management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Watanabe, Eriko

    2015-02-01

    An optical correlator has the advantage of high data transfer speed and parallel operation. However, in copyright content management systems (CCMSs), the numerous video files that need to be downloaded from the Internet and input to the optical correlator constitute a bottleneck. This paper proposes an image categorization method for CCMSs that uses the difference in the color features between animation and live-action images to remove this bottleneck and increase the speed of CCMSs. The results of experiments conducted indicate that the proposed method achieves a live-action video true rejection rate of 86.7 % and an animation video false rejection rate of 13.3 %. This indicates that the proposed method can improve the overall speed of a CCMS more than twice the original speed.

  18. Cattle-derived microbial input to source water catchments: An experimental assessment of stream crossing modification.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Andrew; Rolls, Robert J; Ryder, Darren; Watkinson, Andrew; Mackenzie, Mark

    2015-06-01

    The provision of safe drinking water is a global issue, and animal production is recognized as a significant potential origin of human infectious pathogenic microorganisms within source water catchments. On-farm management can be used to mitigate livestock-derived microbial pollution in source water catchments to reduce the risk of contamination to potable water supplies. We applied a modified Before-After Control Impact (BACI) design to test if restricting the access of livestock to direct contact with streams prevented longitudinal increases in the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria and suspended solids. Significant longitudinal increases in pollutant concentrations were detected between upstream and downstream reaches of the control crossing, whereas such increases were not detected at the treatment crossing. Therefore, while the crossing upgrade was effective in preventing cattle-derived point source pollution by between 112 and 158%, diffuse source pollution to water supplies from livestock is not ameliorated by this intervention alone. Our findings indicate that stream crossings that prevent direct contact between livestock and waterways provide a simple method for reducing pollutant loads in source water catchments, which ultimately minimises the likelihood of pathogenic microorganisms passing through source water catchments and the drinking water supply system. The efficacy of the catchment as a primary barrier to pathogenic risks to drinking water supplies would be improved with the integration of management interventions that minimise direct contact between livestock and waterways, combined with the mitigation of diffuse sources of livestock-derived faecal matter from farmland runoff to the aquatic environment. PMID:25841195

  19. Groundwater-derived nutrient inputs to the Upper Gulf of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, William C.; Wattayakorn, Gullaya; Taniguchi, Makoto; Dulaiova, Henrieta; Sojisuporn, Pramot; Rungsupa, Sompop; Ishitobi, Tomotoshi

    2007-01-01

    We report here the first direct measurements of nutrient fluxes via groundwater discharge into the Upper Gulf of Thailand. Nutrient and standard oceanographic surveys were conducted during the wet and dry seasons along the Chao Phraya River, Estuary and out into the Upper Gulf of Thailand. Additional measurements in selected near-shore regions of the Gulf included manual and automatic seepage meter deployments, as well as nutrient evaluations of seepage and coastal waters. The river transects characterized the distribution of biogeochemical parameters in this highly contaminated urban environment. Seepage flux measurements together with nutrient analyses of seepage fluids were used to estimate nutrient fluxes via groundwater pathways for comparison to riverine fluxes. Our findings show that disseminated seepage of nutrient-rich mostly saline groundwater into the Upper Gulf of Thailand is significant. Estimated fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) supplied via groundwater discharge were 40-50% of that delivered by the Chao Phraya River, inorganic phosphate was 60-70%, and silica was 15-40%. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and phosphorus (DOP) groundwater fluxes were also high at 30-40% and 30-130% of the river inputs, respectively. These observations are especially impressive since the comparison is being made to the river that is the largest source of fresh water into the Gulf of Thailand and flows directly through the megacity of Bangkok with high nutrient loadings from industrial and domestic sources.

  20. Multi-modal pharmacokinetic modelling for DCE-MRI: using diffusion weighted imaging to constrain the local arterial input function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamy, Valentin; Modat, Marc; Shipley, Rebecca; Dikaios, Nikos; Cleary, Jon; Punwani, Shonit; Ourselin, Sebastien; Atkinson, David; Melbourne, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The routine acquisition of multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging data in oncology yields the possibility of combined model fitting of traditionally separate models of tissue structure and function. In this work we hypothesise that diffusion weighted imaging data may help constrain the fitting of pharmacokinetic models to dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI data. Parameters related to tissue perfusion in the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) modelling of diffusion weighted MRI provide local information on how tissue is likely to perfuse that can be utilised to guide DCE modelling via local modification of the arterial input function (AIF). In this study we investigate, based on multi-parametric head and neck MRI of 8 subjects (4 with head and neck tumours), the benefit of incorporating parameters derived from the IVIM model within the DCE modelling procedure. Although we find the benefit of this procedure to be marginal on the data used in this work, it is conceivable that a technique of this type will be of greater use in a different application.

  1. Combustion-derived substances in deep basins of Puget Sound: historical inputs from fossil fuel and biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Jung; Louchouarn, Patrick; Herbert, Bruce E; Brandenberger, Jill M; Wade, Terry L; Crecelius, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Reconstructions of 250 years historical inputs of two distinct types of black carbon (soot/graphitic black carbon (GBC) and char-BC) were conducted on sediment cores from two basins of the Puget Sound, WA. Signatures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also used to support the historical reconstructions of BC to this system. Down-core maxima in GBC and combustion-derived PAHs occurred in the 1940s in the cores from the Puget Sound Main Basin, whereas in Hood Canal such peak was observed in the 1970s, showing basin-specific differences in inputs of combustion byproducts. This system showed relatively higher inputs from softwood combustion than the northeastern U.S. The historical variations in char-BC concentrations were consistent with shifts in climate indices, suggesting an influence of climate oscillations on wildfire events. Environmental loading of combustion byproducts thus appears as a complex function of urbanization, fuel usage, combustion technology, environmental policies, and climate conditions. PMID:21236534

  2. Derivation of input function from FDG-PET studies in small hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsiao-Ming; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Allada, V.

    1996-10-01

    The extraction of pure arterial time-activity curves (TACs) from dynamic PET images of a small animal heart using factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) was found to be unsuccessful due to the small size of the cardiac chamber that causes extensive mixture of TACs of different structures. In this study, we used digital phantoms of the left ventricle (LV cavity size: 1-2 cm) and small monkey (LV cavity size: {approx} 2 cm) dynamic FDG PET studies to evaluate FADS for extracting the pure blood-pool TACs by adding a single blood sample (taken at a late scan time) constraint. In the digital phantom studies, spillover fractions in the extracted blood-pool TACs using FADS without a blood sample constraint (FADS(-)) and with a blood sample constraint (FADS(+)) were 3%-91% and < 3%, respectively. In the monkey studies (n = 4), FADS(+) extracted blood-pool TACs matched well with the arterialized well counter measurements (% differences of curve integration: FADS(-) < 82%; FADS(+) < 9%). The microparameters (K*{sub 1}, k*{sub 2}, k*{sub 3}, k*{sub 4}) and macroparameters (K{sub nlr}), obtained from the FADS(+) blood-pool TACs, were similar to those obtained from plasma samples in a three-compartment model fitting (% differences of K{sub nlr}: phantom studies < 5%; monkey studies < 9%). The FADS technique with a single-blood sample has the potential to extract the pure blood-pool TACs directly from dynamic PET images of a small animal without multiple blood sampling, region of interest definition or spillover correction. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Determination of electron and proton auroral energy inputs from FUV-IMAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grard, J.; Hubert, B.; Meurant, M.; Frey, H. U.; Mende, S. B.; Immel, T.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; Gladstone, G. R.

    2001-05-01

    The FUV experiment onboard the IMAGE spacecraft offers the unique possibility to obtain simultaneous snapshots of the global north aurora every 2 minutes in three different spectral channels. The WIC camera has a broadband channel covering the 135-190 nm interval including the N2 LBH bands, part of which may be absorbed by O2. The SI13 channel is centered on the OI 135.6 nm line which is optically thin and includes a ~ 40% LBH contribution. Finally, the SI12 camera images the Doppler-shifted Ly-? emission excited by the proton aurora. This set of instrumentation is combined with auroral models to determine the electron and the proton energy fluxes from the magnetosphere. Examples will be presented and compared with the values deduced from the NOAA satellites. Simultaneous in-situ measurements of the particle characteristic energy have been combined with the data extracted from the FUV images to validate the models and derive empirical relationships between the particle flux measured by the detectors and the brightness observed by FUV-IMAGE at the footprint of the same magnetic field line. Finally, we will assess the ability to deduce the characteristic energy of the auroral particles from the ratio of co-registered images in the WIC and SI13 cameras. This method is based on the difference of vertical distribution of the LBH and the OI 135.6 nm emissions. It offers the potential to globally remotely sense not only the energy flux from the magnetosphere but also the main features of the electron characteristic energy.

  4. A text input system developed by using lips image recognition based LabVIEW for the seriously disabled.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C; Shao, C L; Liang, C K; Lin, S W; Huang, T H; Hsieh, M C; Yang, C H; Luo, C H; Wuo, C M

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a text input system for the seriously disabled by using lips image recognition based on LabVIEW. This system can be divided into the software subsystem and the hardware subsystem. In the software subsystem, we adopted the technique of image processing to recognize the status of mouth-opened or mouth-closed depending the relative distance between the upper lip and the lower lip. In the hardware subsystem, parallel port built in PC is used to transmit the recognized result of mouth status to the Morse-code text input system. Integrating the software subsystem with the hardware subsystem, we implement a text input system by using lips image recognition programmed in LabVIEW language. We hope the system can help the seriously disabled to communicate with normal people more easily. PMID:17271421

  5. An improved temperature index model for alpine glaciers using derived degree-day factors from climatic inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, D. G.; Havens, A. P.; Rupper, S.; Christensen, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier melt rates are strongly affected by minor perturbations in climatic systems. Quantifying changes in glacier melt rates is therefore important, particularly in areas where melt-water contributes to hydroelectric power generation, irrigation, or flood risks. Several methods currently exist for modeling glacier melt rates, but one widely used method is temperature index modeling, also called positive degree-day modeling. This model is often applied due to its simplicity and small number of input variables, but it still depends on an empirically-measured scaling constant (the degree-day factor). These degree-day factors can vary by a factor of five from one glacier to the next, complicating the applicability of the approach to new regions, or to different time periods. Previous work suggests the degree-day factor may be a function of the surface albedo, solar radiation, and near-surface air temperature. Thus, it is possible the degree-day factor itself is predictable. In this study we present a method to derive these melt factors directly from easily obtained climatic variables, thus allowing for the ready application of temperature index modeling to a much wider suite of glaciers with greater accuracy. We used a full energy-balance model to calculate possible degree-day factors over the full range of climate conditions commonly encountered with alpine glaciers. We then constructed a statistical emulator (a linear model which considers numerous interactions and polynomial effects) using select climate variables (insolation, positive degree-days, and albedo) as inputs. The statistical model is tuned using the energy-balance output as training data. The model skill will be tested against a suite of empirically-derived degree-day factors. These results would allow for the application of more accurate glacier melt models with quantified uncertainties to under-sampled glacial regions and paleoclimate reconstructions.

  6. Star Classification for the Kepler Input Catalog: From Images to Stellar Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, T. M.; Everett, M.; Latham, D. W.; Monet, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    The Stellar Classification Project is a ground-based effort to screen stars within the Kepler field of view, to allow removal of stars with large radii (and small potential transit signals) from the target list. Important components of this process are: (1) An automated photometry pipeline estimates observed magnitudes both for target stars and for stars in several calibration fields. (2) Data from calibration fields yield extinction-corrected AB magnitudes (with g, r, i, z magnitudes transformed to the SDSS system). We merge these with 2MASS J, H, K magnitudes. (3) The Basel grid of stellar atmosphere models yields synthetic colors, which are transformed to our photometric system by calibration against observations of stars in M67. (4) We combine the r magnitude and stellar galactic latitude with a simple model of interstellar extinction to derive a relation connecting {Teff, luminosity} to distance and reddening. For models satisfying this relation, we compute a chi-squared statistic describing the match between each model and the observed colors. (5) We create a merit function based on the chi-squared statistic, and on a Bayesian prior probability distribution which gives probability as a function of Teff, luminosity, log(Z), and height above the galactic plane. The stellar parameters ascribed to a star are those of the model that maximizes this merit function. (6) Parameter estimates are merged with positional and other information from extant catalogs to yield the Kepler Input Catalog, from which targets will be chosen. Testing and validation of this procedure are underway, with encouraging initial results.

  7. Data-derived spatiotemporal resolution constraints for global auroral imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Donovan, Eric; Trondsen, Trond; Pineau, Deanna; Kozelov, Boris V.

    2010-09-01

    We present new data-derived constraints on spatiotemporal resolution of global auroral imagers. The reported results are based on an extensive set of images from two previously flown instruments, POLAR UVI and IMAGE WIC, processed using the event detection methodology developed by Uritsky et al. (2002, 2003, 2006). We use the cross-scale analysis of ground-based and spacecraft observations of auroral emission regions by Kozelov et al. (2004) to derive the power law exponent relating spatial and temporal scales of auroral precipitation events, and estimate the normalization factor entering this relation using the satellite data. Our results show the existence of a nontrivial scaling relation between the relaxation time and the spatial dimension of auroral emission events. We use this relation as a proxi to the resolution scaling function providing non-redundant combinations of spatial and temporal resolution of an optimized auroral imager consistent with the dynamics of multiscale auroral precipitation.

  8. Modular toolbox for derivative-based medical image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Astrid; Carlsen, Ingwer C.; Kabus, Sven; Netsch, Thomas; Pekar, Vladimir

    2005-04-01

    Registration of medical images, i.e. the integration of two or more images into a common geometrical system of reference so that corresponding image structures correctly align, is an active field of current research. Registration algorithms in general are composed of three main building blocks: a geometrical transformation is applied in order to transform the images into the geometrical system of reference, a similarity measure puts the comparison of the images into quantifiable terms, and an optimization algorithm searches for that transformation that leads to optimal similarity between the images. Whereas in the literature fixed configurations of registration algorithms are investigated, here we present a modular toolbox containing several similarity measures, transformation classes and optimization strategies. Derivative-free optimization is applicable for any similarity measure, but is not fast enough in clinical practice. Hence we consider much faster derivative-based Gauss-Newton and Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithms that can be used in conjunction with frequently needed similarity measures for which derivatives can be easily obtained. The implemented similarity measures, geometrical transformations and optimization methods can be freely combined in order to configure a registration algorithm matching the requirements of a particular clinical application. Test examples show that particular algorithm configurations out of this toolbox allow e.g. for an improved lesion identification and localization in PET-CT or MR registration applications.

  9. A hybrid clustering method for ROI delineation in small-animal dynamic PET images: application to the automatic estimation of FDG input functions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiujuan; Tian, Guangjian; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Feng, Dagan

    2011-03-01

    Tracer kinetic modeling with dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) requires a plasma time-activity curve (PTAC) as an input function. Several image-derived input function (IDIF) methods that rely on drawing the region of interest (ROI) in large vascular structures have been proposed to overcome the problems caused by the invasive approach for obtaining the PTAC, especially for small-animal studies. However, the manual placement of ROIs for estimating IDIF is subjective and labor-intensive, making it an undesirable and unreliable process. In this paper, we propose a novel hybrid clustering method (HCM) that objectively delineates ROIs in dynamic PET images for the estimation of IDIFs, and demonstrate its application to the mouse PET studies acquired with [ (18)F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-2-D-glucose (FDG). We begin our HCM using k-means clustering for background removal. We then model the time-activity curves using polynomial regression mixture models in curve clustering for heart structure detection. The hierarchical clustering is finally applied for ROI refinements. The HCM achieved accurate ROI delineation in both computer simulations and experimental mouse studies. In the mouse studies, the predicted IDIF had a high correlation with the gold standard, the PTAC derived from the invasive blood samples. The results indicate that the proposed HCM has a great potential in ROI delineation for automatic estimation of IDIF in dynamic FDG-PET studies. PMID:20952342

  10. Priming in permafrost soils: High vulnerability of arctic soil organic carbon to increased input of plant-derived compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Birgit; Gentsch, Norman; Capek, Petr; Diakova, Katerina; Alves, Ricardo; Barta, Jiri; Gittel, Antje; Guggenberger, Georg; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Knoltsch, Anna; Mikutta, Robert; Santruckova, Hana; Schnecker, Jörg; Shibistova, Olga; Takriti, Mounir; Urich, Tim; Watzka, Margarete; Richter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Arctic ecosystems are warming rapidly, resulting in a stimulation of both plant primary production and soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. In addition to this direct stimulation, SOM decomposition might also be indirectly affected by rising temperatures mediated by the increase in plant productivity. Higher root litter production for instance might decrease SOM decomposition by providing soil microorganisms with alternative C and N sources ("negative priming"), or might increase SOM decomposition by facilitating microbial growth and enzyme production ("positive priming"). With about 1,700 Pg of organic C stored in arctic soils, and 88% of that in horizons deeper than 30 cm, it is crucial to understand the controls on SOM decomposition in different horizons of arctic permafrost soils, and thus the vulnerability of SOM to changes in C and N availability in a future climate. We here report on the vulnerability of SOM in arctic permafrost soils to an increased input of plant-derived organic compounds, and on its variability across soil horizons and sites. We simulated an increased input of plant-derived compounds by amending soil samples with 13C-labelled cellulose or protein, and compared the mineralization of native, unlabelled soil organic C (SOC) to unamended control samples. Our experiment included 119 individual samples of arctic permafrost soils, covering four sites across the Siberian Arctic, and five soil horizons, i.e., organic topsoil, mineral topsoil, mineral subsoil and cryoturbated material (topsoil material buried in the subsoil by freeze-thaw processes) from the active layer, as well as thawed material from the upper permafrost. Our findings suggest that changes in C and N availability in Arctic soils, such as mediated by plants, have a high potential to alter the decomposition of SOM, but also point at fundamental differences between soil horizons. In the organic topsoil, SOC mineralization increased by 51% after addition of protein, but was not affected by cellulose, suggesting predominant N limitation of the microbial decomposer community, and a high vulnerability of SOM to increases in N availability. In contrast, in mineral subsoil and thawed permafrost, SOC mineralization was stimulated by both cellulose and protein (between 23 and 120%), cellulose- and protein-derived C was efficiently incorporated into the microbial biomass, and effects of both cellulose and protein were significantly correlated. These findings suggest predominant C limitation of the microbial decomposer community in deeper, mineral horizons of arctic permafrost soils, and point at a high vulnerability of SOM to increased C availability, e.g., due to higher root litter production. We estimate that on a circum-arctic scale, increases in C and N availability have the potential to stimulate SOC mineralization in the order of several Tg C per day. Together with the direct stimulation of SOC mineralization by rising temperatures, this indirect stimulation can counteract the increased CO2 fixation by plants, and thus reduce the C sink strength of arctic ecosystems or even provoke net ecosystem C losses that might induce a positive feedback to global warming.

  11. Direct Characterization of Arterial Input Functions by Fluorescence Imaging of Exposed Carotid Artery to Facilitate Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With the goal of facilitating tracer kinetic analysis in small-animal planar fluorescence imaging, an experimental method for characterizing tracer arterial input functions is presented. The proposed method involves exposing the common carotid arteries by surgical dissection, which can then be imaged directly during tracer injection and clearance. Procedures Arterial concentration curves of IRDye-700DX-carboxylate, IRDye-800CW-EGF, and IRDye-800CW conjugated to anti-EGFR Affibody are recovered from athymic female mice (n=12) by directly imaging exposed vessels. Images were acquired with two imaging protocols: a slow-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=45 s) to recover the arterial curves from two tracers simultaneously, and a fast-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=500 ms) to characterize the first-pass peak of a single tracer. Arterial input functions obtained by the carotid imaging technique, as well as plasma curves measured by blood sampling were fit with a biexponential pharmacokinetic model. Results Pharmacological fast- and slow-phase rate constants recovered with the proposed method were 0.370.26 and 0.0070.001 min?1, respectively, for the IRDye700DX-C. For the IRDye800CW-EGF, the rate constants were 0.110.13 and 0.0030.002 min?1. These rate constants did not differ significantly from those calculated previously by blood sampling, as determined by an F test; however, the between-subject variability was four times lower for arterial curves recovered using the proposed technique, compared with blood sampling. Conclusions The proposed technique enables the direct characterization of arterial input functions for kinetic analysis. As this method requires no additional instrumentation, it is immediately deployable in commercially available planar fluorescence imaging systems. PMID:24420443

  12. Historical changes in terrestrially derived organic carbon inputs to Louisiana continental margin sediments over the past 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampere, Troy P.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Allison, Mead A.

    2011-03-01

    Major rivers (and associated deltaic environments) provide the dominant pathway for the input of terrestrial-derived organic carbon in sediments (TOCT) to the ocean. Natural watershed processes and land-use changes are important in dictating the amount and character of carbon being buried on continental margins. Seven core sites were occupied on the Louisiana continental margin aboard the R/V Pelican in July 2003 along two major sediment transport pathways south and west of the Mississippi River mouth. Lignin profiles in these age-dated cores (210Pb geochronology) indicate artificial reservoir retention as a primary control on organic carbon quantity and quality reaching the margin post-1950, whereas pre-1950 sediments may reflect soil erosion due to land clearing and farming practices. Lignin (?8) concentrations (range 0.2 to 1.7) also indicate that TOCT delivery rates/decay processes have probably remained relatively consistent from proximal to distal stations along transects. The down-core profile at the Canyon station seems to be temporally linked and connected to inner shelf deposition, suggestive of rapid cross-shelf transport. Sources of terrestrially derived organic carbon were reflective of mixed angiosperms over the last 150 years in cores west and south of the Mississippi River delta. The lignin-phenol vegetation index (LPVI) (range 130.0 to 510) proved to be a sensitive indicator of source changes in these sediments and eliminated some of the variability compared to C/V (range 0.01 to 0.4) and S/V (range 0.9 to 2.1) ratios. Stochastic events such as hurricanes and large river floods have a measurable, albeit ephemeral, effect on the shelf TOCT record. Burial of TOCT on the river-dominated Louisiana continental margin is largely driven by anthropogenic land-use alterations in the last 150 years. Land-use changes in the Mississippi River basin and river damming have likely affected carbon cycling and TOCT burial on the Louisiana continental margin over a large spatial extent as observed by similar trends in cores from across and along the margin.

  13. Wh-Questions in Child L2 French: Derivational Complexity and Its Interactions with L1 Properties, Length of Exposure, Age of Exposure, and the Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prvost, Philippe; Strik, Nelleke; Tuller, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how derivational complexity interacts with first language (L1) properties, second language (L2) input, age of first exposure to the target language, and length of exposure in child L2 acquisition. We compared elicited production of "wh"-questions in French in two groups of 15 participants each, one with L1 English

  14. Defocusing as a method of optical image transformation at the technical and visual system inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, V. M.

    1981-02-01

    A new visual system model based on the separation of image informative fragments at defocusing has been proposed. Model operation is compared with physiological experimental data and with Ginsburg's model, based on spectral conception. Possible applications in technical systems for image recognition and TV have been described.

  15. Aerial infrared imaging reveals large nutrient-rich groundwater inputs to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Adam G.; Glenn, Craig R.; Burnett, William C.; Peterson, Richard N.; Lucey, Paul G.

    2008-08-01

    Regional high-resolution (0.1C, 0.5 m) low-altitude thermal infrared imagery (TIR) reveals the exact input locations and fine-scale mixing structure of massive, cool groundwaters that discharge into the coastal zone as both diffuse flows and as >30 large point-sourced nutrient-rich plumes along the dry western half of the large volcanic island of Hawaii. These inputs are the sole source of new nutrient delivery to coastal waters in this oligotrophic setting. Water column profiling and nutrient sampling show that the plumes are cold, buoyant, nutrient-rich brackish mixtures of groundwater and seawater. By way of example, we illustrate in detail one of the larger plumes, which discharges ca. 12,000 m3 d-1 (ca. 8,600 m3 d-1 freshwater), rates comparable in volume to high-flux groundwater outputs in better-known tropical karst terrains. We further show how nutrient mixing trends may be integrated into TIR sea surface temperatures to produce surface water nutrient maps of regional extent.

  16. Intensity Inhomogeneity Correction of Structural MR Images: A Data-Driven Approach to Define Input Algorithm Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ganzetti, Marco; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Intensity non-uniformity (INU) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a major issue when conducting analyses of brain structural properties. An inaccurate INU correction may result in qualitative and quantitative misinterpretations. Several INU correction methods exist, whose performance largely depend on the specific parameter settings that need to be chosen by the user. Here we addressed the question of how to select the best input parameters for a specific INU correction algorithm. Our investigation was based on the INU correction algorithm implemented in SPM, but this can be in principle extended to any other algorithm requiring the selection of input parameters. We conducted a comprehensive comparison of indirect metrics for the assessment of INU correction performance, namely the coefficient of variation of white matter (CVWM), the coefficient of variation of gray matter (CVGM), and the coefficient of joint variation between white matter and gray matter (CJV). Using simulated MR data, we observed the CJV to be more accurate than CVWM and CVGM, provided that the noise level in the INU-corrected image was controlled by means of spatial smoothing. Based on the CJV, we developed a data-driven approach for selecting INU correction parameters, which could effectively work on actual MR images. To this end, we implemented an enhanced procedure for the definition of white and gray matter masks, based on which the CJV was calculated. Our approach was validated using actual T1-weighted images collected with 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T MR scanners. We found that our procedure can reliably assist the selection of valid INU correction algorithm parameters, thereby contributing to an enhanced inhomogeneity correction in MR images. PMID:27014050

  17. Robust image region descriptor using local derivative ordinal binary pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jun; Chen, Chuanbo; Pei, Xiaobing; Liang, Hu; Tang, He; Sarem, Mudar

    2015-05-01

    Binary image descriptors have received a lot of attention in recent years, since they provide numerous advantages, such as low memory footprint and efficient matching strategy. However, they utilize intermediate representations and are generally less discriminative than floating-point descriptors. We propose an image region descriptor, namely local derivative ordinal binary pattern, for object recognition and image categorization. In order to preserve more local contrast and edge information, we quantize the intensity differences between the central pixels and their neighbors of the detected local affine covariant regions in an adaptive way. These differences are then sorted and mapped into binary codes and histogrammed with a weight of the sum of the absolute value of the differences. Furthermore, the gray level of the central pixel is quantized to further improve the discriminative ability. Finally, we combine them to form a joint histogram to represent the features of the image. We observe that our descriptor preserves more local brightness and edge information than traditional binary descriptors. Also, our descriptor is robust to rotation, illumination variations, and other geometric transformations. We conduct extensive experiments on the standard ETHZ and Kentucky datasets for object recognition and PASCAL for image classification. The experimental results show that our descriptor outperforms existing state-of-the-art methods.

  18. Genetic dissection of retinal inputs to brainstem nuclei controlling image stabilization.

    PubMed

    Dhande, Onkar S; Estevez, Maureen E; Quattrochi, Lauren E; El-Danaf, Rana N; Nguyen, Phong L; Berson, David M; Huberman, Andrew D

    2013-11-01

    When the head rotates, the image of the visual world slips across the retina. A dedicated set of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and brainstem visual nuclei termed the "accessory optic system" (AOS) generate slip-compensating eye movements that stabilize visual images on the retina and improve visual performance. Which types of RGCs project to each of the various AOS nuclei remain unresolved. Here we report a new transgenic mouse line, Hoxd10-GFP, in which the RGCs projecting to all the AOS nuclei are fluorescently labeled. Electrophysiological recordings of Hoxd10-GFP RGCs revealed that they include all three subtypes of On direction-selective RGCs (On-DSGCs), responding to upward, downward, or forward motion. Hoxd10-GFP RGCs also include one subtype of On-Off DSGCs tuned for forward motion. Retrograde circuit mapping with modified rabies viruses revealed that the On-DSGCs project to the brainstem centers involved in both horizontal and vertical retinal slip compensation. In contrast, the On-Off DSGCs labeled in Hoxd10-GFP mice projected to AOS nuclei controlling horizontal but not vertical image stabilization. Moreover, the forward tuned On-Off DSGCs appear physiologically and molecularly distinct from all previously genetically identified On-Off DSGCs. These data begin to clarify the cell types and circuits underlying image stabilization during self-motion, and they support an unexpected diversity of DSGC subtypes. PMID:24198370

  19. Genetic Dissection of Retinal Inputs to Brainstem Nuclei Controlling Image Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dhande, Onkar S.; Estevez, Maureen E.; Quattrochi, Lauren E.; El-Danaf, Rana N.; Nguyen, Phong L.

    2013-01-01

    When the head rotates, the image of the visual world slips across the retina. A dedicated set of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and brainstem visual nuclei termed the “accessory optic system” (AOS) generate slip-compensating eye movements that stabilize visual images on the retina and improve visual performance. Which types of RGCs project to each of the various AOS nuclei remain unresolved. Here we report a new transgenic mouse line, Hoxd10–GFP, in which the RGCs projecting to all the AOS nuclei are fluorescently labeled. Electrophysiological recordings of Hoxd10–GFP RGCs revealed that they include all three subtypes of On direction-selective RGCs (On–DSGCs), responding to upward, downward, or forward motion. Hoxd10–GFP RGCs also include one subtype of On–Off DSGCs tuned for forward motion. Retrograde circuit mapping with modified rabies viruses revealed that the On–DSGCs project to the brainstem centers involved in both horizontal and vertical retinal slip compensation. In contrast, the On–Off DSGCs labeled in Hoxd10–GFP mice projected to AOS nuclei controlling horizontal but not vertical image stabilization. Moreover, the forward tuned On–Off DSGCs appear physiologically and molecularly distinct from all previously genetically identified On–Off DSGCs. These data begin to clarify the cell types and circuits underlying image stabilization during self-motion, and they support an unexpected diversity of DSGC subtypes. PMID:24198370

  20. Single input state, single-mode fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging by eigenpolarization referencing.

    PubMed

    Lippok, Norman; Villiger, Martin; Jun, Changsu; Bouma, Brett E

    2015-05-01

    Fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging is more challenging than free-space implementations. Using multiple input states, fiber-based systems provide sample birefringence information with the benefit of a flexible sample arm but come at the cost of increased system and acquisition complexity, and either reduce acquisition speed or require increased acquisition bandwidth. Here we show that with the calibration of a single polarization state, fiber-based configurations can approach the conceptual simplicity of traditional free-space configurations. We remotely control the polarization state of the light incident at the sample using the eigenpolarization states of a wave plate as a reference, and determine the Jones matrix of the output fiber. We demonstrate this method for polarization-sensitive imaging of biological samples. PMID:25927775

  1. Design criteria for a multiple input land use system. [digital image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingsley, F. C.; Bryant, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    A design is presented that proposes the use of digital image processing techniques to interface existing geocoded data sets and information management systems with thematic maps and remote sensed imagery. The basic premise is that geocoded data sets can be referenced to a raster scan that is equivalent to a grid cell data set, and that images taken of thematic maps or from remote sensing platforms can be converted to a raster scan. A major advantage of the raster format is that x, y coordinates are implicitly recognized by their position in the scan, and z values can be treated as Boolean layers in a three-dimensional data space. Such a system permits the rapid incorporation of data sets, rapid comparison of data sets, and adaptation to variable scales by resampling the raster scans.

  2. Effects of reconstruction filter and input parameter variability on object detectability in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedeker, Kirsten L.

    The purpose of this work is to investigate and quantify the effects of technical parameter variability and reconstruction algorithm on image quality and object detectability. To accomplish this, metrics of both noise and signal to noise ratio (SNR) are explored and then applied in object detection tasks using a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system. The noise power spectrum (NPS) is investigated as a noise metric in that it describes both the magnitude of noise and the spatial characteristics of noise that are introduced by the reconstruction algorithm. The NPS was found to be much more robust than the conventional standard deviation metric. The noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) is also studied as a tool for comparing effects of acquisition parameters (esp. mAs) on noise and, as NEQ is not influenced by reconstruction filter or other post-processing, its utility for comparison across different techniques and manufacturers is demonstrated. The Ideal Bayesian Observer (IBO) and Non-Prewhitening Matched Filter (NPWMF) are investigated as SNR metrics under a variety of acquisition and reconstruction conditions. The signal and noise processes of image formation were studied individually, which allowed for analysis of their separate effects on the overall SNR. The SNR metrics were found to characterize the influence of reconstruction filter and technical parameter variability with high sensitivity. To correlate the above SNR metrics with detection, signal images were combined with noise images and passed to a CAD system. A simulated lung nodule detection task was performed on a series of objects of increasing contrast. The average minimum contrast detected and corresponding IBO and NPWMF SNR values were recorded over 100 trials for each reconstruction filter and technical parameter condition studied. Among the trends discovered, it was found that detectability scales with SNR as mAs is varied. Furthermore, the CAD system appears to under-perform when sharp algorithms are used. Conclusion. Robust noise metrics and SNR metrics were explored and applied under a variety of detections tasks. The results offer insight into both potential improvements for CAD, as well as for improving protocol design.

  3. Functional Imaging of the Human Brainstem during Somatosensory Input and Autonomic Output

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Luke A.; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past half a century, many investigations in experimental animal have explored the functional roles of specific regions in the brainstem. Despite the accumulation of a considerable body of knowledge in, primarily, anesthetized preparations, relatively few studies have explored brainstem function in awake humans. It is important that human brainstem function is explored given that many neurological conditions, from obstructive sleep apnea, chronic pain, and hypertension, likely involve significant changes in the processing of information within the brainstem. Recent advances in the collection and processing of magnetic resonance images have resulted in the possibility of exploring brainstem activity changes in awake healthy individuals and in those with various clinical conditions. We and others have begun to explore changes in brainstem activity in humans during a number of challenges, including cutaneous and muscle pain, as well as during maneuvers that evoke increases in sympathetic nerve activity. More recently we have successfully recorded sympathetic nerve activity concurrently with functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brainstem, which will allow us, for the first time to explore brainstem sites directly responsible for conditions such as hypertension. Since many pathophysiological conditions no doubt involve changes in brainstem function and structure, defining these changes will likely result in a greater ability to develop more effective treatment regimens. PMID:24062670

  4. Time-delayed fluorescence imaging of a porphycene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundy, Sarah L.; van der Putten, Wilhelm J.; Shearer, Andrew; Buckton, Daniel J.; Ryder, Alan G.; Ball, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Porphycenes are currently under investigation for use in Photodynamic therapy, which is a promising treatment for cancer. These materials, which display preferential uptake in cancerous cells, also exhibit high fluorescence yields, and can be used for tumour detection. Problems with steady-state fluorescence techniques such as background autofluorescence can be eliminated by the use of time-resolved techniques. Improved contrast can be obtained with time-resolved techniques because of the differing fluorescence lifetimes between autofluorescence and longer-living exogenous photosensitisers. An imaging system was constructed using a fast (200 ps) gated CCD camera and a pulsed 635 nm laser diode. A tissue phantom composed of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with thirty-six wells of varying diameter and depth (10 mm to 1 mm) was assembled to test the system. The system was used to record images of a porphycene derivative within the wells at differing concentrations in an organic solvent. A tissue imitator was placed on top of the PMMA block at varying thickness. 10-4 M zinc phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate was also placed on top of the block to mimic autofluorescence. The results indicate that the time-gated imaging system can prevent background excitation scatter and fluorescence from a shorter-lived fluorophore from distorting the fluorescence signal from a longer-lived photosensitiser.

  5. Detection of blood-related signal from a series of fingerprint images acquired during an input action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Ichiro; Hori, Atsushi; Kurita, Masashi

    2007-09-01

    When a finger is pressed against a flat plate and deformed, blood inside the finger moves away from the deformed area. This causes the finger to change its appearance from reddish to white. As the finger leaves the plate, the blood comes back and it looks reddish again. We have proposed to use this color change to distinguish genuine fingers from artificial ones for un-attended fingerprint identification systems. This blood-related signal may reflect the stiffness of the peripheral blood vessels and therefore it may be correlated with some health conditions such as blood pressure. In experiments, we used a fingerprint sensor based on scattered light detection. Because the spectra of the light scattered by the deformed fingers showed large changes mostly in the green portion, an LED emitting at 525 nm at peak strength was used. First, we compared series of fingerprint images acquired during a normal input action and those obtained while a rubber band occluded the blood flow. The occluded finger required a larger force to exhibit a similar change for these pixel values than the finger without the rubber band. Second, we analyzed fingerprint images recorded by six volunteers. We defined some indices based on the pixel values of the fingerprint images and the pressure applied to the fingers. The correlation coefficient of one of such indices and the average blood pressure of the participants was 0.86. Although the number of the subjects is small, this initial result is encouraging.

  6. Comparison of a Range of Terrain Variables Derived From DEMs Based on Different Resolutions and Input Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienzle, S. W.

    2002-12-01

    It is a well-known fact that the grid cell size of a raster digital elevation model has significant effects on derived terrain variables such as slope, aspect, plan and profile curvature or the wetness index. This poster presents vital information for users of DEMs generated from 100 m regularly sampled, or similar, elevation points such as those available province-wide for Alberta, Canada. Findings are valid for flat to moderately sloped terrain present in the North American prairies and foothills regions and other locations with similar terrain. DEMs with grid cell sizes ranging from 100 to 5 m were interpolated from both 100 and 10 m regularly spaced elevation points using the ANUDEM interpolation method. Significant differences in a number of terrain variables derived from DEMs with different resolutions using cumulative distribution functions and a subsequent Kolmogorov-Smirnov test are revealed. Terrain variables based on 100 m regularly sampled elevation points (100 m DEM) are compared to a DEM based on 10 m regularly sampled elevation points which serves as a benchmark. Correlation analysis reveals that only elevation and slope have a strong positive relationship while all other terrain derivatives are not represented realistically. Relative root mean square errors quantify the quality of terrain derivatives. Major findings are summarised as follows: (a) All computed terrain variables tested (slope, aspect, plan and profile curvature, curvature and the wetness index) vary significantly with a change in grid cell size; (b) the higher the order of the derivative, the smaller the DEM resolution should be; (c) only elevation and slope show a high correlation between the 100 m DEM and the benchmark DEM; (d) the 100 m DEM can, therefore, only be used to show the general range and general spatial distribution of terrain variables, but fails - with the exception of slope - to represent spatially correctly the terrain variables at the associated scale.

  7. Single input state, singlemode fiberbased polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging by eigenpolarization referencing

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Norman; Villiger, Martin; Jun, ChangSu; Bouma, Brett E.

    2015-01-01

    Fiberbased polarization sensitive OFDI is more challenging than freespace implementations. Using multiple input states, fiberbased systems provide sample birefringence information with the benefit of a flexible sample arm but come at the cost of increased system and acquisition complexity, and either reduce acquisition speed or require increased acquisition bandwidth. Here we show that with the calibration of a single polarization state, fiberbased configurations can approach the conceptual simplicity of traditional freespace configurations. We remotely control the polarization state of the light incident at the sample using the eigenpolarization states of a wave plate as a reference, and determine the Jones matrix of the output fiber. We demonstrate this method for polarization sensitive imaging of biological samples. PMID:25927775

  8. Linear alkylbenzenes as tracers of sewage-sludge-derived inputs of organic matter, PCBs, and PAHs to sediments at the 106-mile deep water disposal site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamoureux, E.M.; Brownawell, Bruce J.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1996-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) are sensitive source-specific tracers of sewage inputs to the marine environment. Because they are highly particle reactive and nonspecifically sorbed to organic matter, LABs are potential tracers of the transport of both sludge-derived organic matter and other low solubility hydrophobic contaminants (e.g., PCBs and PAHs); sediment trap studies at the 106-Mile Site have shown LABs to be valuable in testing models of sludge deposition to the sea floor. In this study we report on the distributions of LABs, PCBs, PAHs, and Ag in surface sediments collected within a month of the complete cessation of dumping (July, 1992) in the vicinity of the dump site. Total LAB concentrations were lower than those measured by Takada and coworkers in samples from nearby sites collected in 1989. LABs from both studies appear to be significantly depleted (6 to 25-fold) in surface sediments relative to excess Ag (another sludge tracer) when compared to sewage sludge and sediment trap compositions. Comparison of LAB sediment inventories to model predictions of sludge particle fluxes supports the contention that LABs have been lost from the bed. The use of LABs to examine the short-or long-term fate of sludge derived materials in deep-sea sediments should be questioned. The causes of this LAB depletion are unclear at this point, and we discuss several hypotheses. The concentrations of total PCBs and PAHs are both correlated with sludge tracers, suggesting that there may be a measurable contribution of sludge-derived inputs on top of other nonpoint sources of these contaminant classes. This possibility is consistent with the composition of these contaminants determined in recent and historical analyses of sewage sludge.

  9. Optimization of a Model Corrected Blood Input Function from Dynamic FDG-PET Images of Small Animal Heart In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Min; Kundu, Bijoy K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of mouse heart in vivo is challenging due to the small size of the heart and limited intrinsic spatial resolution of the PET scanner. Here, we optimized a compartment model which can simultaneously correct for spill over and partial volume effects for both blood pool and the myocardium, compute kinetic rate parameters and generate model corrected blood input function (MCBIF) from ordered subset expectation maximization maximum a posteriori (OSEM-MAP) cardiac and respiratory gated 18F-FDG PET images of mouse heart with attenuation correction in vivo, without any invasive blood sampling. Arterial blood samples were collected from a single mouse to indicate the feasibility of the proposed method. In order to establish statistical significance, venous blood samples from n=6 mice were obtained at 2 late time points, when SP contamination from the tissue to the blood is maximum. We observed that correct bounds and initial guesses for the PV and SP coefficients accurately model the wash-in and wash-out dynamics of the tracer from mouse blood. The residual plot indicated an average difference of about 1.7% between the blood samples and MCBIF. The downstream rate of myocardial FDG influx constant, Ki (0.150.03 min?1), compared well with Ki obtained from arterial blood samples (P=0.716). In conclusion, the proposed methodology is not only quantitative but also reproducible. PMID:24741130

  10. Classification and Visualization Based on Derived Image Features: Application to Genetic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Balliu, Brunilda; Wrtz, Rolf P.; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Bhringer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Data transformations prior to analysis may be beneficial in classification tasks. In this article we investigate a set of such transformations on 2D graph-data derived from facial images and their effect on classification accuracy in a high-dimensional setting. These transformations are low-variance in the sense that each involves only a fixed small number of input features. We show that classification accuracy can be improved when penalized regression techniques are employed, as compared to a principal component analysis (PCA) pre-processing step. In our data example classification accuracy improves from 47% to 62% when switching from PCA to penalized regression. A second goal is to visualize the resulting classifiers. We develop importance plots highlighting the influence of coordinates in the original 2D space. Features used for classification are mapped to coordinates in the original images and combined into an importance measure for each pixel. These plots assist in assessing plausibility of classifiers, interpretation of classifiers, and determination of the relative importance of different features. PMID:25405460

  11. Instrument requirements for imaging the magnetosphere in extreme-ultraviolet and energetic neutral atoms derived from computer-simulated images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, Edmond C.; Mauk, Barry H.; Meier, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific requirements for He(+)(304 A) and energetic neutral atom (ENA) magnetospheric imaging, as well as the derived instrumental requirements are presented. Both ENA imaging of the hot plasma and EUV imaging of the cold plasma are highlighted. The question of the accuracy with which physically significant parameters can be extracted from actual images using computerized algorithms is addressed. An example of an ENA image analyzed by means of the Powell minimization algorithm is given. Automated unfolding of global magnetospheric images is also discussed. A Mercator projection of a model INA image is shown.

  12. Using Sediment Records to Reconstruct Historical Inputs Combustion-Derived Contaminants to Urban Airsheds/Watersheds: A Case Study From the Puget Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louchouarn, P. P.; Kuo, L.; Brandenberger, J.; Marcantonio, F.; Wade, T. L.; Crecelius, E.; Gobeil, C.

    2008-12-01

    Urban centers are major sources of combustion-derived particulate matter (e.g. black carbon (BC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), anhydrosugars) and volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere. Evidence is mounting that atmospheric emissions from combustion sources remain major contributors to air pollution of urban systems. For example, recent historical reconstructions of depositional fluxes for pyrogenic PAHs close to urban systems have shown an unanticipated reversal in the trends of decreasing emissions initiated during the mid-20th Century. Here we compare a series of historical reconstructions of combustion emission in urban and rural airsheds over the last century using sedimentary records. A complex suite of combustion proxies (BC, PAHs, anhydrosugars, stable lead concentrations and isotope signatures) assisted in elucidating major changes in the type of atmospheric aerosols originating from specific processes (i.e. biomass burning vs. fossil fuel combustion) or fuel sources (wood vs. coal vs. oil). In all studied locations, coal continues to be a major source of combustion-derived aerosols since the early 20th Century. Recently, however, oil and biomass combustion have become substantial additional sources of atmospheric contamination. In the Puget Sound basin, along the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S., rural locations not impacted by direct point sources of contamination have helped assess the influence of catalytic converters on concentrations of oil-derived PAH and lead inputs since the early 1970s. Although atmospheric deposition of lead has continued to drop since the introduction of catalytic converters and ban on leaded gasoline, PAH inputs have "rebounded" in the last decade. A similar steady and recent rise in PAH accumulations in urban systems has been ascribed to continued urban sprawl and increasing vehicular traffic. In the U.S., automotive emissions, whether from gasoline or diesel combustion, are becoming a major source of combustion-derived PM and BC to the atmosphere and have started to replace coal as the major source in some surficial reservoirs. This increased urban influence of gasoline and diesel combustion on BC emissions was also observed in Europe both from model estimates as well as from measured fluxes in recent lake sediments.

  13. Detection and characterization of local to regional groundwater inputs to rivers, lakes and oceans with electrical imaging (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Befus, K. M.; Markowski, M.; Ong, J.; Zamora, P. B.; Siringan, F. P.; Zlotnik, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    Surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) interact at multiple levels in myriad settings and their interaction is an important hydrogeologic process that impacts ecological and biogeochemical functions. GW discharge and associated mixing with SW in these settings have been challenging to map with sufficient detail and coverage. Three examples are presented on the application of electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) for mapping GW discharge and for understanding SW-GW interactions: (1) a large regulated river, (2) several neighboring lakes, and (3) a fringing coral reef. (1) Time-lapse ERI was conducted at the Colorado River, Texas where the river stage varied by 0.7 m due to dam operations. Submerged and towed electrode cables were used to capture the subsurface mixing dynamics of SW and GW. Using temporal variability in electrical resistivity (ER) signatures, we identified a shallow well-flushed hyporheic zone, a transition zone where SW and GW mix, and a stable deep zone hosting only GW. (2) Towed ER surveys in alkaline lakes in the Nebraska Sand Hills helped distinguishing flow-through lakes, which have decreasing subsurface ER from GW inflow to outflow area, from pure GW discharge lakes, which have uniformly stratified increasing-with-depth ER profiles. (3) More than 30 km of ER profiles collected via towed surveys over a fringing coral reef in the Philippines identified areas of high ER within the reef that coincide with resistive zones in the seawater. Analysis of 222Rn of bottom waters and vertical conductivity-temperature-depth measurements show the persistence of fresh GW input into the ocean where low salinity and high 222Rn areas coincided with high ER areas. A 3D map showing sources and pathways for GW across the reef is developed. ERI is a powerful and convenient tool for mapping GW discharge and SW-GW interactions in rivers, lakes, and oceans.

  14. The least-squares mixing models to generate fraction images derived from remote sensing multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimabukuro, Yosio Edemir; Smith, James A.

    1991-01-01

    Constrained-least-squares and weighted-least-squares mixing models for generating fraction images derived from remote sensing multispectral data are presented. An experiment considering three components within the pixels-eucalyptus, soil (understory), and shade-was performed. The generated fraction images for shade (shade image) derived from these two methods were compared by considering the performance and computer time. The derived shade images are related to the observed variation in forest structure, i.e., the fraction of inferred shade in the pixel is related to different eucalyptus ages.

  15. Arterial input functions (AIFs) measured directly from arteries with low and standard doses of contrast agent, and AIFs derived from reference tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyang; Fan, Xiaobing; Medved, Milica; Pineda, Federico D; Yousuf, Ambereen; Oto, Aytekin; Karczmar, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of arterial input function (AIF) can have large systematic errors at standard contrast agent doses in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). We compared measured AIFs from low dose (AIFLD) and standard dose (AIFSD) contrast agent injections, as well as the AIF derived from a muscle reference tissue and artery (AIFref). Twenty-two prostate cancer patients underwent DCE-MRI. Data were acquired on a 3T scanner using an mDixon sequence. Gadobenate dimeglumine was injected twice, at doses of 0.015 and 0.085mmol/kg. Directly measured AIFs were fitted with empirical mathematical models (EMMs) and compared to the AIF derived from a muscle reference tissue (AIFref). EMMs accurately fitted the AIFs. The 1st and 2nd pass peaks were visualized in AIFLD, but not in AIFSD, thus the peak and shape of AIFSD could not be accurately measured directly. The average scaling factor between AIFSD and AIFLD in the washout phase was only 56% of the contrast dose ratio (~6:1). The shape and magnitude of AIFref closely approximated that of AIFLD after empirically determined dose-dependent normalization. This suggests that AIFref may be a good approximation of the local AIF. PMID:26523650

  16. Techniques to derive geometries for image-based Eulerian computations

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Seth; Buchholz, James; Vigmostad, Sarah; Kim, Hyunggun; Udaykumar, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The performance of three frequently used level set-based segmentation methods is examined for the purpose of defining features and boundary conditions for image-based Eulerian fluid and solid mechanics models. The focus of the evaluation is to identify an approach that produces the best geometric representation from a computational fluid/solid modeling point of view. In particular, extraction of geometries from a wide variety of imaging modalities and noise intensities, to supply to an immersed boundary approach, is targeted. Design/methodology/approach Two- and three-dimensional images, acquired from optical, X-ray CT, and ultrasound imaging modalities, are segmented with active contours, k-means, and adaptive clustering methods. Segmentation contours are converted to level sets and smoothed as necessary for use in fluid/solid simulations. Results produced by the three approaches are compared visually and with contrast ratio, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio measures. Findings While the active contours method possesses built-in smoothing and regularization and produces continuous contours, the clustering methods (k-means and adaptive clustering) produce discrete (pixelated) contours that require smoothing using speckle-reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD). Thus, for images with high contrast and low to moderate noise, active contours are generally preferable. However, adaptive clustering is found to be far superior to the other two methods for images possessing high levels of noise and global intensity variations, due to its more sophisticated use of local pixel/voxel intensity statistics. Originality/value It is often difficult to know a priori which segmentation will perform best for a given image type, particularly when geometric modeling is the ultimate goal. This work offers insight to the algorithm selection process, as well as outlining a practical framework for generating useful geometric surfaces in an Eulerian setting. PMID:25750470

  17. Simplified molecular input-line entry system and International Chemical Identifier in the QSAR analysis of styrylquinoline derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Alla P; Toropov, Andrey A; Benfenati, Emilio; Gini, Giuseppina

    2011-05-01

    The simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) and IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChI) were examined as representations of the molecular structure for quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), which can be used to predict the inhibitory activity of styrylquinoline derivatives against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Optimal SMILES-based descriptors give a best model with n = 26, r(2) = 0.6330, q(2) = 0.5812, s = 0.502, F = 41 for the training set and n = 10, r(2) = 0.7493, r(pred)(2) = 0.6235, R(m)(2) = 0.537, s = 0.541, F = 24 for the validation set. Optimal InChI-based descriptors give a best model with n = 26, r(2) = 0.8673, q(2) = 0.8456, s = 0.302, F = 157 for the training set and n = 10, r(2) = 0.8562, r(pred)(2) = 0.7715, R(m)(2) = 0.819, s = 0.329, F = 48 for the validation set. Thus, the InChI-based model is preferable. The described SMILES-based and InChI-based approaches have been checked with five random splits into the training and test sets. PMID:21352501

  18. Shear-wave velocity profile and seismic input derived from ambient vibration array measurements: the case study of downtown L'Aquila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giulio, Giuseppe; Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Cara, Fabrizio; Milana, Giuliano; Tallini, Marco

    2014-08-01

    Downtown L'Aquila suffered severe damage (VIII-IX EMS98 intensity) during the 2009 April 6 Mw 6.3 earthquake. The city is settled on a top flat hill, with a shear-wave velocity profile characterized by a reversal of velocity at a depth of the order of 50-100 m, corresponding to the contact between calcareous breccia and lacustrine deposits. In the southern sector of downtown, a thin unit of superficial red soils causes a further shallow impedance contrast that may have influenced the damage distribution during the 2009 earthquake. In this paper, the main features of ambient seismic vibrations have been studied in the entire city centre by using array measurements. We deployed six 2-D arrays of seismic stations and 1-D array of vertical geophones. The 2-D arrays recorded ambient noise, whereas the 1-D array recorded signals produced by active sources. Surface-wave dispersion curves have been measured by array methods and have been inverted through a neighbourhood algorithm, jointly with the H/V ambient noise spectral ratios related to Rayleigh waves ellipticity. We obtained shear-wave velocity (Vs) profiles representative of the southern and northern sectors of downtown L'Aquila. The theoretical 1-D transfer functions for the estimated Vs profiles have been compared to the available empirical transfer functions computed from aftershock data analysis, revealing a general good agreement. Then, the Vs profiles have been used as input for a deconvolution analysis aimed at deriving the ground motion at bedrock level. The deconvolution has been performed by means of EERA and STRATA codes, two tools commonly employed in the geotechnical engineering community to perform equivalent-linear site response studies. The waveform at the bedrock level has been obtained deconvolving the 2009 main shock recorded at a strong motion station installed in downtown. Finally, this deconvolved waveform has been used as seismic input for evaluating synthetic time-histories in a strong-motion target site located in the middle Aterno river valley. As a target site, we selected the strong-motion station of AQV 5 km away from downtown L'Aquila. For this site, the record of the 2009 L'Aquila main shock is available and its surface stratigraphy is adequately known making possible to propagate the deconvolved bedrock motion back to the surface, and to compare recorded and synthetic waveforms.

  19. Ceres Survey Atlas derived from Dawn Framing Camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, Th.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K.-D.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-02-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera (FC) acquired almost 900 clear filter images of Ceres with a resolution of about 400 m/pixels during the seven cycles in the Survey orbit in June 2015. We ortho-rectified 42 images from the third cycle and produced a global, high-resolution, controlled mosaic of Ceres. This global mosaic is the basis for a high-resolution Ceres atlas that consists of 3 tiles mapped at a scale of 1:2,000,000. The nomenclature used in this atlas was proposed by the Dawn team and was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The whole atlas is available to the public through the Dawn GIS web page.

  20. Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Fluorescence Imaging Probes: Beyond Classical Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Neto, Brenno A D; Carvalho, Pedro H P R; Correa, Jose R

    2015-06-16

    This Account describes the origins, features, importance, and trends of the use of fluorescent small-molecule 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BTD) derivatives as a new class of bioprobes applied to bioimaging analyses of several (live and fixed) cell types. BTDs have been successfully used as probes for a plethora of biological analyses for only a few years, and the impressive responses obtained by using this important class of heterocycle are fostering the development of new fluorescent BTDs and expanding the biological applications of such derivatives. The first use of a fluorescent small-molecule BTD derivative as a selective cellular probe dates back to 2010, and since then impressive advances have been described by us and others. The well-known limitations of classical scaffolds urged the development of new classes of bioprobes. Although great developments have been achieved by using classical scaffolds such as coumarins, BODIPYs, fluoresceins, rhodamines, cyanines, and phenoxazines, there is still much to be done, and BTDs aim to succeed where these dyes have shown their limitations. Important organelles and cell components such as nuclear DNA, mitochondria, lipid droplets, and others have already been successfully labeled by fluorescent small-molecule BTD derivatives. New technological systems that use BTDs as the fluorophores for bioimaging experiments have been described in recent scientific literature. The successful application of BTDs as selective bioprobes has led some groups to explore their potential for use in studying membrane pores or tumor cells under hypoxic conditions. Finally, BTDs have also been used as fluorescent tags to investigate the action mechanism of some antitumor compounds. The attractive photophysical data typically observed for ?-extended BTD derivatives is fostering interest in the use of this new class of bioprobes. Large Stokes shifts, large molar extinction coefficients, high quantum yields, high stability when stored in solution or as pure solids, no fading even after long periods of irradiation, bright emissions with no blinking, good signal-to-noise ratios, efficiency to transpose the cell membrane, and irradiation preferentially in the visible-light region are just some features noted by using BTDs. As the pioneering group in the use of fluorescent small-molecule BTDs for bioimaging purposes, we feel pleased to share our experience, results, advances, and personal perspectives with the readers of this Account. The readers will clearly note the huge advantages of using fluorescent BTDs over classical scaffolds, and hopefully they will be inspired and motivated to further BTD technology in the fields of molecular and cellular biology. PMID:25978615

  1. Loop Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa

    2003-01-01

    Discusses loop input, a specific type of experiential teacher training process that involves an alignment of the process and content of learning. This concept has gradually gained ground in English language teacher training since 1986 when the term was coined. (Author/VWL)

  2. Three-dimensional reconstruction of microscopic images using different order intensity derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Huan

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopic image three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction is a challenging topic in image processing and computer vision, and can be widely applied to life science, biology, and medicine. A microscopic images 3-D reconstruction method is proposed for transparent or partially transparent microscopic samples, which is based on the Taylor expansion theorem and polynomial fitting. First, the image stack of the specimen is divided into several groups in an overlapping or nonoverlapping way along the optical axis, and the first image of every group is regarded as the reference image. Then, different order intensity derivatives are calculated using all the images of every group and a polynomial fitting method. Subsequently, a new image can be generated by means of Taylor expansion theorem and the calculated different order intensity derivatives and for which the distance to the reference image is ?z along the optical axis. Finally, the microscopic specimen can be reconstructed in 3-D form using deconvolution technology and all the images including both the observed and the generated images. The experimental results show the superior performance via processing simulated and real fluorescence microscopic degraded images.

  3. High resolution VESTA LAMO atlas derived from Dawn FC images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Cris T.

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered orbit of the inner main belt asteroid 4 Vesta on July 16, 2011, and spent about one year in orbit to characterize the geology, elemental and mineralogical composition, topography, shape, and internal structure of Vesta before it departed to asteroid 1 Ceres in late 2012. One of the major goals of the mission was a global mapping of Vesta. Data: The DAWN mission was mapping Vesta from three different orbit heights during Survey orbit (3100 km altitude), HAMO (High Altitude Mapping Orbit, 700 km altitude), and LAMO (Low Altitude Mapping Orbit, 210 km altitude) [1]. The Dawn mission is equipped with a framing camera (FC) [2] which was the prime instrument during the LAMO phase. DAWN orbited Vesta during LAMO in 21 cycles between December 2011 and end of April 2012. The framing camera took about 10,000 clear filter images with a resolution of about 20 m/pixel during these cycles. The images were taken with different viewing angles and different illumination conditions. We selected about 8,000 images for the global coverage of Vesta. Data Processing: The first step of the processing chain is to ortho rectify the images to the proper scale and map projection type. This process requires detailed high-resolution information of the local topography of Vesta. The global topgraphy was calculated during the stereo processing of the HAMO images [3] and was used here. The shape model was used for the calculation of the ray intersection points while the map projection itself was done onto a sphere with a mean radius of 255 km. The next step was the mosaicking of all images to one global mosaic of Vesta, the so called basemap. Vesta map tiles: The Vesta atlas was produced in a scale of 1:200,000 and consists of 30 tiles that conform to the quadrangle scheme proposed by Greeley and Batson [4] and is used for example for mapping Mars in a scale of 1:5,000,000. A map scale of 1:200,000 guarantees a mapping at the highest available DAWN resolution in LAMO and results in an acceptable printing scale for the hardcopy map of 10 pixel/mm. The individual tiles were separately mosaicked and reprojected. Nomenclature: The DAWN team proposed to the International Astronomical Union (IAU) to use the names of vestal virgins and famous Roman women as names for the craters and to use names of places and festivals associated with vestal virgins for other feature names. This proposal was accepted by the IAU and the team could propose 50 names for geological features to the IAU which were also approved [5]. These feature names were applied to the map tiles. The entire Vesta atlas consisting of 30 map tiles will become available to the public through the Planetary Photojournal and the PDS. References: [1] Russell, C.T. and Raymond, C.A., Space Sci. Review, 163, DOI 10.1007/s11214-011-9836-2; [2] Sierks, et al., 2011, Space Sci. Rev., 163, DOI 10.1007/s11214-011-9745-4; [3] Preusker, F. et al., this session; [4] Greeley, R. and Batson, G., 1990, Planetary Mapping, Cambridge University Press; [5] http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/Page/VESTA/target

  4. MLT Dependent Plasmapause Location Derived from IMAGE EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katus, Roxanne M.; Gallagher, Dennis; Liemohn, Michael; Keesee, Amy M.

    2015-04-01

    The location of the outer edge of the plasmasphere (the plasmapause) as a function of geomagnetic storm-time is identified and investigated statistically in relation to the solar wind driver. Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) data are used to create an automated method that locates and extracts the plasmapause. The plasmapause extraction technique searches a set range of possible plasmasphere densities for a maximum gradient. The magnetic local time (MLT) dependent plasmapause results are compared to manual extraction results. The plasmapause results from 39 intense storms are examined along a normalized epoch storm timeline to determine the average plasmapause L-shell as a function of MLT and storm-time. The average extracted plasmapause L-shell follows the expected storm-time plasmapause behavior. The results show that, during the main phase, the plasmapause moves Earthward and a plasmaspheric drainage plume forms near dusk and across the dayside during strong convection. During the recovery phase the plume becomes re-entrained in corotational motion around the Earth, while the average plasmapause location moves further from the Earth. The results are also investigated in terms of the solar wind driver. We find evidence that shows that the inner magnetospheric response to Magnetic Cloud (MC) and Sheath (SH)-driven events is similar but the response is different for CIR-driven events.

  5. Calcium Imaging in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Walter, Anna; ari?, Tomo; Hescheler, Jrgen; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate cardiomyocytes (CMs) from disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is a powerful tool for the investigation of various cardiac diseases in vitro. The pathological course of various cardiac conditions, causatively heterogeneous, often converges into disturbed cellular Ca(2+) cycling. The gigantic Ca(2+) channel of the intracellular Ca(2+) store of CMs, the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2), controls Ca(2+) release and therefore plays a crucial role in Ca(2+) cycling of CMs. In the present protocol we describe ways to measure and analyze global as well as local cellular Ca(2+) release events in CMs derived from a patient carrying a CPVT-causing RyR2 mutation. PMID:26025623

  6. Detecting curvatures in digital images using filters derived from differential geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro Giraldo, Juanita

    2015-09-01

    Detection of curvature in digital images is an important theoretical and practical problem in image processing. Many important features in an image are associated with curvature and the detection of such features is reduced to detection and characterization of curvatures. Differential geometry studies many kinds of curvature operators and from these curvature operators is possible to derive powerful filters for image processing which are able to detect curvature in digital images and videos. The curvature operators are formulated in terms of partial differential operators which can be applied to images via convolution with generalized kernels derived from the the Korteweg- de Vries soliton . We present an algorithm for detection of curvature in digital images which is implemented using the Maple package ImageTools. Some experiments were performed and the results were very good. In a future research will be interesting to compare the results using the Korteweg-de Vries soliton with the results obtained using Airy derivatives. It is claimed that the resulting curvature detectors could be incorporated in standard programs for image processing.

  7. Martian spectral units derived from ISM imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, S.; Mustard, J.; Saylor, R.

    1993-01-01

    Based on results of the Viking mission, the soil layer of Mars has been thought to be fairly homogeneous and to consist of a mixture of as few as two components, a 'dark gray' basaltic material and a 'bright red' altered material. However, near-infrared reflectance spectra measured recently both telescopically and from spacecraft indicate compositional heterogeneity beyond what can be explained by just two components. In particular, data from the ISM imaging spectrometer, which observed much of the equatorial region at a spatial resolution of approximately 22 km, indicate spatial differences in the presence and abundance of Fe-containing phases, hydroxylated silicates, and H2O. The ISM data was used to define, characterize, and map soil 'units' based on their spectral properties. The spatial distribution of these 'units' were compared to morphologic, visible color, and thermal inertia features recognized in Viking data.

  8. No-reference image quality assessment based on log-derivative statistics of natural scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Chandler, Damon M.

    2013-10-01

    We propose an efficient blind/no-reference image quality assessment algorithm using a log-derivative statistical model of natural scenes. Our method, called DErivative Statistics-based QUality Evaluator (DESIQUE), extracts image quality-related statistical features at two image scales in both the spatial and frequency domains. In the spatial domain, normalized pixel values of an image are modeled in two ways: pointwise-based statistics for single pixel values and pairwise-based log-derivative statistics for the relationship of pixel pairs. In the frequency domain, log-Gabor filters are used to extract the fine scales of the image, which are also modeled by the log-derivative statistics. All of these statistics can be fitted by a generalized Gaussian distribution model, and the estimated parameters are fed into combined frameworks to estimate image quality. We train our models on the LIVE database by using optimized support vector machine learning. Experiment results tested on other databases show that the proposed algorithm not only yields a substantial improvement in predictive performance as compared to other state-of-the-art no-reference image quality assessment methods, but also maintains a high computational efficiency.

  9. Imaging and Tracking of Bone Marrow-Derived Immune and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Youbo; Bower, Andrew J.; Graf, Benedikt W.; Boppart, Marni D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived stem and immune cells play critical roles in maintaining the health, regeneration, and repair of many tissues. Given their important functions in tissue regeneration and therapy, tracking the dynamic behaviors of BM-derived cells has been a long-standing research goal of both biologists and engineers. Because of the complex cellular-level processes involved, real-time imaging technologies that have sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to visualize them are needed. In addition, in order to track cellular dynamics, special attention is needed to account for changes in the microenvironment where the cells reside, for example, tissue contraction, stretching, development, etc. In this chapter, we introduce methods for real-time imaging and longitudinal tracking of BM-derived immune and stem cells in in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environments with an integrated optical microscope. The integrated microscope combines multiple imaging functions derived from optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM), including optical coherence microscopy (OCM), micro-vasculature imaging, two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Short- and long-term tracking of the dynamic behavior of BM-derived cells involved in cutaneous wound healing and skin grafting in green fluorescent protein (GFP) BM-transplanted mice is demonstrated. Methods and algorithms for nonrigid registration of time-lapse images are introduced, which allows for long-term tracking of cell dynamics over several months. PMID:23737096

  10. A spatial-spectral approach for deriving high signal quality eigenvectors for remote sensing image transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, Derek; Bachmann, Martin; Rivard, Benoit; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Feng, Jilu

    2014-02-01

    Spectral decorrelation (transformations) methods have long been used in remote sensing. Transformation of the image data onto eigenvectors that comprise physically meaningful spectral properties (signal) can be used to reduce the dimensionality of hyperspectral images as the number of spectrally distinct signal sources composing a given hyperspectral scene is generally much less than the number of spectral bands. Determining eigenvectors dominated by signal variance as opposed to noise is a difficult task. Problems also arise in using these transformations on large images, multiple flight-line surveys, or temporal data sets as computational burden becomes significant. In this paper we present a spatial-spectral approach to deriving high signal quality eigenvectors for image transformations which possess an inherently ability to reduce the effects of noise. The approach applies a spatial and spectral subsampling to the data, which is accomplished by deriving a limited set of eigenvectors for spatially contiguous subsets. These subset eigenvectors are compiled together to form a new noise reduced data set, which is subsequently used to derive a set of global orthogonal eigenvectors. Data from two hyperspectral surveys are used to demonstrate that the approach can significantly speed up eigenvector derivation, successfully be applied to multiple flight-line surveys or multi-temporal data sets, derive a representative eigenvector set for the full image data set, and lastly, improve the separation of those eigenvectors representing signal as opposed to noise.

  11. Comprehensive Population-Averaged Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Contrast–Enhanced vMagnetic Resonance Imaging of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onxley, Jennifer D.; Yoo, David S.; Muradyan, Naira; MacFall, James R.; Brizel, David M.; Craciunescu, Oana I.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To generate a population-averaged arterial input function (PA-AIF) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in head and neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI during concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Imaging consisted of 2 baseline scans 1 week apart (B1/B2) and 1 scan after 1 week of chemoradiation therapy (Wk1). Regions of interest (ROIs) in the right and left carotid arteries were drawn on coronal images. Plasma concentration curves of all ROIs were averaged and fit to a biexponential decay function to obtain the final PA-AIF (AvgAll). Right-sided and left-sided ROI plasma concentration curves were averaged separately to obtain side-specific AIFs (AvgRight/AvgLeft). Regions of interest were divided by time point to obtain time-point-specific AIFs (AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1). The vascular transfer constant (K{sub trans}) and the fractional extravascular, extracellular space volume (V{sub e}) for primaries and nodes were calculated using the AvgAll AIF, the appropriate side-specific AIF, and the appropriate time-point-specific AIF. Median K{sub trans} and V{sub e} values derived from AvgAll were compared with those obtained from the side-specific and time-point-specific AIFs. The effect of using individual AIFs was also investigated. Results: The plasma parameters for AvgAll were a{sub 1,2} = 27.11/17.65 kg/L, m{sub 1,2} = 11.75/0.21 min{sup −1}. The coefficients of repeatability (CRs) for AvgAll versus AvgLeft were 0.04 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. For AvgAll versus AvgRight, the CRs were 0.08 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. When AvgAll was compared with AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1, the CRs were slightly higher: 0.32/0.19/0.78 min{sup −1}, respectively, for K{sub trans}; and 0.07/0.08/0.09 for V{sub e}. Use of a PA-AIF was not significantly different from use of individual AIFs. Conclusion: A PA-AIF for head and neck cancer was generated that accounts for differences in right carotid artery versus left carotid artery, day-to-day fluctuations, and early treatment-induced changes. The small CRs obtained for K{sub trans} and V{sub e} indicate that side-specific AIFs are not necessary. However, a time-point-specific AIF may improve pharmacokinetic accuracy.

  12. Assessment of brain glucose metabolism with input function determined from brain PET images by means of Bayesian ICA and MCMC methods.

    PubMed

    Berradja, Khadidja; Boughanmi, Nabil

    2012-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has the capability to produce regional or parametric images of physiological aspects in a tissue of interest. Apart from the acquired PET data, the concentration of the radiotracer supplied to the tissue through the vascularization has to be known as the input function (IF). IF can be obtained by manual or automatic blood sampling and cross calibrated with PET. These procedures are cumbersome, invasive and generate uncertainties. In the present work, we determine IF from internal artery in fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) brain images by means of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) based on Bayesian theory and Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling method (BICA, Bayesian ICA). Dynamic brain images were decomposed with BICA into image sequences of blood and tissue components. A region of interest was drawn around the internal artery in the blood image to determine BICA-IF. BICA-IF was therefore corrected for spillover of radioactivity emission from tissue, then it was normalized with three plasma samples to correct for partial volume and blood to plasma radioactivity ratio. BICA-IF was found comparable to IF determined by blood sampling, and rCMRG values in several brain structures obtained with BICA-IF and sampled IF showed a bias of 6.4% which was attributed to the difference in the time sampling of 4s for sampled IF versus 15 s for BICA-MC-IF at early times. In conclusion, BICA is a strong approach in image decomposition to extract blood curves in a noninvasive way. PMID:22884568

  13. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of cyclofenil derivatives for potential SPECT imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua; Huang, Liliang; Zhang, Yuanqing; Xu, Xiaoping; Sun, Yanhong; Shen, Yu-Mei

    2010-05-01

    To develop technetium- and rhenium-labeled nonsteroidal estrogen imaging agents for estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast tumors, two groups of rhenium and technetium cyclofenil derivatives were synthesized and characterized. The binding affinities of the rhenium complexes for ERs were determined. The tricarbonyl rhenium complex showed the highest binding affinity for ERs (81.2 for ERbeta, 16.5 for ERalpha). Tricarbonyl technetium cyclofenil complexes were obtained in high radiochemical purity and radiochemical yields. The results of studies of their octanol/water partition and in vitro stability are presented. These results demonstrate that these radiolabeled cyclofenil derivatives may be considered as potential breast cancer imaging agents. PMID:20195693

  14. Adjusting the input ultrasound image data and the atherosclerotic plaque detection in the carotid artery by the FOTOMNG system

    PubMed Central

    Li?ev, La?ezar; Tome?ek, Jan; Farana, Radim

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the third most frequent cause of death. Specifically, ischemic stroke accounts for the largest group of this kind of cases. Despite all the advances in medical therapeutic methods, no methods that would reliably reduce mortality from ischemic stroke have been found. Prevention is still the most significant way to combat stroke. When the frequent cause of ischemic stroke is atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery, its exploration can help to determine the development of the disease. These problems were very extensively discussed in October 2013 during the XVI International Neurosonology Congress in Sofia organized under the auspices of World Research Neurosonology Group, Bulgarian Neurosonology and Cerebral Hemodynamics Association. Our goal was to develop special modules for carotid artery picture processing (AVI file processing, reparation and reconstruction) and modules containing tools for automated carotid artery plaque detection; and to solve its measurement and three-dimensional modelling of the carotid artery and the plaque. New modules were implemented into the FOTOMNG system and tested on appropriate input data files, which verified their functionality and applicability. PMID:26019544

  15. In vivo fluorescence imaging of ?-amyloid plaques with push-pull dimethylaminothiophene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2015-12-14

    In vivo fluorescence imaging of ?-amyloid (A?) plaques in the brain is expected to be used as a new method for detecting Alzheimer's disease (AD). We synthesized novel push-pull dimethylaminothiophenyl (DTM) derivatives and evaluated their utility as in vivo fluorescence imaging probes targeting A? plaques. As a result, we found that DTM-2 is a promising fluorescent probe for A? plaques in the AD brains. PMID:26455736

  16. Highly sensitive image-derived indices of water-stressed plants using hyperspectral imaging in SWIR and histogram analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Zhou, Haiying; Du, Tommy; Wu, Qian; Mockler, Todd C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2015-11-01

    The optical signature of leaves is an important monitoring and predictive parameter for a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including drought. Such signatures derived from spectroscopic measurements provide vegetation indices – a quantitative method for assessing plant health. However, the commonly used metrics suffer from low sensitivity. Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants. We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800 nm to 1600 nm. Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56 nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC). The identified image-derived indices 15XX nm/14XX nm (i.e. 1529 nm/1416 nm) were superior to common vegetation indices, such as WBI, MSI, and NDWI, with significantly better sensitivity, enabling early diagnostics of plant health.

  17. Highly sensitive image-derived indices of water-stressed plants using hyperspectral imaging in SWIR and histogram analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, David M; Zhang, Hairong; Zhou, Haiying; Du, Tommy; Wu, Qian; Mockler, Todd C; Berezin, Mikhail Y

    2015-01-01

    The optical signature of leaves is an important monitoring and predictive parameter for a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including drought. Such signatures derived from spectroscopic measurements provide vegetation indices - a quantitative method for assessing plant health. However, the commonly used metrics suffer from low sensitivity. Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants. We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800 nm to 1600 nm. Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56 nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC). The identified image-derived indices 15XX nm/14XX nm (i.e. 1529 nm/1416 nm) were superior to common vegetation indices, such as WBI, MSI, and NDWI, with significantly better sensitivity, enabling early diagnostics of plant health. PMID:26531782

  18. Highly sensitive image-derived indices of water-stressed plants using hyperspectral imaging in SWIR and histogram analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Zhou, Haiying; Du, Tommy; Wu, Qian; Mockler, Todd C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2015-01-01

    The optical signature of leaves is an important monitoring and predictive parameter for a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including drought. Such signatures derived from spectroscopic measurements provide vegetation indices – a quantitative method for assessing plant health. However, the commonly used metrics suffer from low sensitivity. Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants. We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800 nm to 1600 nm. Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56 nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC). The identified image-derived indices 15XX nm/14XX nm (i.e. 1529 nm/1416 nm) were superior to common vegetation indices, such as WBI, MSI, and NDWI, with significantly better sensitivity, enabling early diagnostics of plant health. PMID:26531782

  19. Simultaneous Two-photon In Vivo Imaging of Synaptic Inputs and Postsynaptic Targets in the Mouse Retrosplenial Cortex.

    PubMed

    Łukasiewicz, Kacper; Robacha, Magdalena; Bożycki, Łukasz; Radwanska, Kasia; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    This video shows the craniotomy procedure that allows chronic imaging of neurons in the mouse retrosplenial cortex (RSC) using in vivo two-photon microscopy in Thy1-GFP transgenic mouse line. This approach creates a possibility to investigate the correlation of behavioural manipulations with changes in neuronal morphology in vivo. The cranial window implantation procedure was considered to be limited only to the easily accessible cortex regions such as the barrel field. Our approach allows visualization of neurons in the highly vascularized RSC. RSC is an important element of the brain circuit responsible for spatial memory, previously deemed to be problematic for in vivo two-photon imaging. The cranial window implantation over the RSC is combined with an injection of mCherry-expressing recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV(mCherry)) into the dorsal hippocampus. The expressed mCherry spreads out to axonal projections from the hippocampus to RSC, enabling the visualization of changes in both presynaptic axonal boutons and postsynaptic dendritic spines in the cortex. This technique allows long-term monitoring of experience-dependent structural plasticity in RSC. PMID:27022883

  20. Derivation of planetary topography using multi-image shape-from-shading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohse, V.; Heipke, C.; Kirk, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In many cases, the derivation of high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) from planetary surfaces using conventional digital image matching is a problem. The matching methods need at least one stereo pair of images with sufficient texture. However, many space missions provide only a few stereo images and planetary surfaces often possess insufficient texture. This paper describes a method for the generation of high-resolution DTMs from planetary surfaces, which has the potential to overcome the described problem. The suggested method, developed by our group, is based on shape-from-shading using an arbitrary number of digital optical images, and is termed "multi-image shape-from-shading" (MI-SFS). The paper contains an explanation of the theory of MI-SFS, followed by a presentation of current results, which were obtained using images from NASA's lunar mission Clementine, and constitute the first practical application with our method using extraterrestrial imagery. The lunar surface is reconstructed under the assumption of different kinds of reflectance models (e.g. Lommel-Seeliger and Lambert). The represented results show that the derivation of a high-resolution DTM of real digital planetary images by means of MI-SFS is feasible. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The benefits of using short interval satellite images to derive winds for tropical cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E.; Gentry, R. C.; Shenk, W. E.; Oliver, V.

    1978-01-01

    During the 1975, 1976, and 1977, NOAA's National Environmental Satellite Service and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center conducted a cooperative program to determine the optimum resolution and frequency of satellite images for deriving winds to study and forecast tropical cyclones. Rapid scan images were obtained at 7.5 minute interval from SMS-2 for hurricane Eloise and cyclone Caroline, and at 3 minute intervals from GOES-1 for tropical storms Belle, Holly, and Anita. Cloud motions were derived from these images using the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System. Winds that were derived from the movement of upper and lower tropospheric level clouds using rapid scan data were compared with the 15 and 30 minute interval data. Greater than 10 (5) times as many clouds could be tracked to obtain winds using 3 and 7.5 minute rapid scan images as when using 15 or 30 minute interval images. A few bright areas within the central dense overcast which appeared to be moving with the winds at low levels were tracked.

  2. Integration of Color and Local Derivative Pattern Features for Content-Based Image Indexing and Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipparthi, Santosh Kumar; Nagar, Shyam Krishna

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents two new feature descriptors for content based image retrieval (CBIR) application. The proposed two descriptors are named as color local derivative patterns (CLDP) and inter color local derivative pattern (ICLDP). In order to reduce the computational complexity the uniform patterns are applied to both CLDP and ICLDP. Further, uniform CLDP (CLDPu2) and uniform ICLDP (ICLDPu2) are generated respectively. The proposed descriptors are able to exploit individual (R, G and B) spectral channel information and co-relating pair (RG, GB, BR, etc.) of spectral channel information. The retrieval performances of the proposed descriptors (CLDP and ICLDP) are tested by conducting two experiments on Corel-5000 and Corel-10000 benchmark databases. The results after investigation show a significant improvement in terms of precision, average retrieval precision (ARP), recall and average retrieval rate (ARR) as compared to local binary patterns (LBP), local derivative patterns (LDP) and other state-of-the-art techniques for image retrieval.

  3. Integration of Color and Local Derivative Pattern Features for Content-Based Image Indexing and Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipparthi, Santosh Kumar; Nagar, Shyam Krishna

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents two new feature descriptors for content based image retrieval (CBIR) application. The proposed two descriptors are named as color local derivative patterns (CLDP) and inter color local derivative pattern (ICLDP). In order to reduce the computational complexity the uniform patterns are applied to both CLDP and ICLDP. Further, uniform CLDP (CLDPu2) and uniform ICLDP (ICLDPu2) are generated respectively. The proposed descriptors are able to exploit individual (R, G and B) spectral channel information and co-relating pair (RG, GB, BR, etc.) of spectral channel information. The retrieval performances of the proposed descriptors (CLDP and ICLDP) are tested by conducting two experiments on Corel-5000 and Corel-10000 benchmark databases. The results after investigation show a significant improvement in terms of precision, average retrieval precision (ARP), recall and average retrieval rate (ARR) as compared to local binary patterns (LBP), local derivative patterns (LDP) and other state-of-the-art techniques for image retrieval.

  4. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-07-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380-760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  5. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a Hemispherical Sky Imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated by spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelength 380 nm to 760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less then 20% for all sky conditions.

  6. Tri-stereo Pleiades images-derived digital surface models for tectonic geomorphology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, Matthieu; Le Roux-Mallouf, Romain; Ritz, Jean-Franois; Berthet, Tho; Peyret, Michel; Vernant, Philippe; Marchal, Anas; Cattin, Rodolphe; Mazzotti, Stphane; Poujol, Antoine

    2014-05-01

    Very high resolution digital elevation models are a key component of modern quantitative geomorphology. In parallel to high-precision but time-consuming kinematic GPS and/or total station surveys and dense coverage but expensive LiDAR campaigns, we explore the usability of affordable, flexible, wide coverage digital surface models (DSMs) derived from Pleiades tri-stereo optical images. We present two different approaches to extract DSM from a triplet of images. The first relies on the photogrammetric extraction of 3 DSMs from the 3 possible stereo couples and subsequent merge based on the best correlation score. The second takes advantage of simultaneous correlation over the 3 images to derive a point cloud. We further extract DSM from panchromatic 0.5 m resolution images and multispectral 2 m resolution images to test for correlation and noise and determine optimal correlation window size and achievable resolution. Georeferencing is also assessed by comparing raw coordinates derived from Pleiades Rational Polynomial Coefficients to ground control points. Primary images appear to be referenced within ~15 m over flat areas where parallax is minimal while derived DSMs and associated orthorectified images show a much improved referencing within ~5 m of GCPs. In order to assess the adequacy of Pleiades DSMs for tectonic geomorphology, we present examples from case studies along the Trougout normal fault (Morocco), the Hovd strike-slip fault (Mongolia), the Denali strike-slip fault (USA and Canada) and the Main Frontal Thrust (Bhutan). In addition to proposing a variety of tectonic contexts, these examples cover a wide range of climatic conditions (semi-arid, arctic and tropical), vegetation covers (bare earth, sparse Mediterranean, homogeneous arctic pine, varied tropical forest), lithological natures and related erosion rates. The capacity of derived DSMs is demonstrated to characterize geomorphic markers of active deformation such as marine and alluvial terraces, stream gullies, alluvial fans and fluvio-glacial deposits in terms of vertical (from DSMs) and horizontal (from orthorectified optical images) offsets. Values extracted from Pleiades DSMs compare well to field measurements in terms of relief and slope, which suggests effort and resources necessary for field topography could be significantly reduced, especially in poorly accessible areas.

  7. Multispectral image classification of MRI data using an empirically-derived clustering algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, K.M.; Osbourn, G.C.; Bouchard, A.M.; Sanders, J.A. |

    1998-08-01

    Multispectral image analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has been performed using an empirically-derived clustering algorithm. This algorithm groups image pixels into distinct classes which exhibit similar response in the T{sub 2} 1st and 2nd-echo, and T{sub 1} (with ad without gadolinium) MRI images. The grouping is performed in an n-dimensional mathematical space; the n-dimensional volumes bounding each class define each specific tissue type. The classification results are rendered again in real-space by colored-coding each grouped class of pixels (associated with differing tissue types). This classification method is especially well suited for class volumes with complex boundary shapes, and is also expected to robustly detect abnormal tissue classes. The classification process is demonstrated using a three dimensional data set of MRI scans of a human brain tumor.

  8. Using Geotags to Derive Rich Tag-Clouds for Image Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dhiraj; Luo, Jiebo; Yu, Jie; Lei, Phoury; Gallagher, Andrew

    Geotagging has become popular for many multimedia applications. In this chapter, we present an integrated and intuitive system for location-driven tag suggestion, in the form of tag-clouds, for geotagged photos. Potential tags from multiple sources are extracted and weighted. Sources include points of interest (POI) tags from a public Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) database, community tags from Flickr pictures, and personal tags shared through users' own, family, and friends' photo collections. To increase the effectiveness of GNIS POI tags, bags of place-name tags are first retrieved, clustered, and then re-ranked using a combined tf-idf and spatial distance criteria. The community tags from photos taken in the vicinity of the input geotagged photo are ranked according to distance and visual similarity to the input photo. Personal tags from other personally related photos inherently carry a significant weight due more to their high relevance than to both the generic place-name tags and community tags, and are ranked by weights that decay over time and distance differences. Finally, a rich set of the most relevant location-driven tags is presented to the user in the form of individual tag clouds under the three mentioned source categories. The tag clouds act as intuitive suggestions for tagging an input image. We also discuss quantitative and qualitative findings from a user study that we conducted. Evaluation has revealed the respective benefits of the three categories toward the effectiveness of the integrated tag suggestion system.

  9. Thermokarst Lake Gyre Flow Speed and Direction Derivation Using Image Matching from Sequential Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, S.; Wang, S.; Beck, R. A.; Liu, H.; Hinkel, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Thermokarst lakes on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska are closely coupled with the regional climate through energy, water and carbon budgets. These lakes exhibit striking elongated shapes perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. This has led to the hypothesis that the expansion of lakes is caused by thermomechanical processes induced by wind-driven water circulation. The predominant bimodal wind regime in the region (easterly and westerly wind) redistributes lake sediment towards the west and east shores to form protective littoral shelves while the north and south shores are preferentially eroded. Previous research on wind-driven circulation in thermokarst lakes was mainly based on in situ studies which can only collect sparse measurements and is time-consuming. Examination of satellite imagery clearly reveals the wide-spread presence of gyres in thermokarst lakes. It allows the study of gyres and other circulation patterns at both lake and regional scales. This study examines the movement (speed, direction) of a 10-km-wide gyre using a Landsat-7 and an ASTER scene taken about 40 minutes apart. These two images are matched using a robust image matching technique based on cross-correlation. Flow speed and direction for the gyre are extracted from the images and are compared with the in situ measurements collected during previous field work. This study provides insight into the evolution of thermokarst lakes and their interaction with the local climate by quantifying gyre circulation rates over entire lakes.

  10. Video image-based analysis of single human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocyte beating dynamics using digital image correlation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The functionality of a cardiomyocyte is primarily measured by analyzing the electrophysiological properties of the cell. The analysis of the beating behavior of single cardiomyocytes, especially ones derived from stem cells, is challenging but well warranted. In this study, a video-based method that is non-invasive and label-free is introduced and applied for the study of single human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Methods The beating of dissociated stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes was visualized with a microscope and the motion was video-recorded. Minimum quadratic difference, a digital image correlation method, was used for beating analysis with geometrical sectorial cell division and radial/tangential directions. The time series of the temporal displacement vector fields of a single cardiomyocyte was computed from video data. The vector field data was processed to obtain cell-specific, contraction-relaxation dynamics signals. Simulated cardiomyocyte beating was used as a reference and the current clamp of real cardiomyocytes was used to analyze the electrical functionality of the beating cardiomyocytes. Results Our results demonstrate that our sectorized image correlation method is capable of extracting single cell beating characteristics from the video data of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes that have no clear movement axis, and that the method can accurately identify beating phases and time parameters. Conclusion Our video analysis of the beating motion of single human cardiomyocytes provides a robust, non-invasive and label-free method to analyze the mechanobiological functionality of cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Thus, our method has potential for the high-throughput analysis of cardiomyocyte functions. PMID:24708714

  11. Influence of Autofluorescence Derived From Living Body on In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging Using Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Kaji, Noritada; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are thought to be a novel inorganic probe for in vivo fluorescence imaging because of their excellent fluorescence properties. Autofluorescence is generally known to be produced from various living bodies including humans, rats, and mice. However, the influence of the autofluorescence on in vivo fluorescence imaging using QDs remains poorly understood. In this article, we assessed the autofluorescence derived from a mouse body and the influence of the autofluorescence on in vivo fluorescence imaging using QDs. The dorsal and ventral autofluorescence derived from a mouse from which the hair was removed were detected under all kinds of excitation/fluorescence filter settings (blue, green, yellow, red, deep red, and NIR) using the Maestro in vivo imaging system. The degree of autofluorescence was found to be extremely high in the red filter condition, but transplanted ASCs labeled with QDs on the back of a mouse could be detected in the red filter condition. Moreover, the ASCs labeled with QDs could be traced for at least 5 days. We suggest that fluorescence imaging using QDs can be useful for the detection of transplanted cells.

  12. Pancreatic Tumor Growth Prediction with Multiplicative Growth and Image-Derived Motion.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken C L; Summers, Ronald M; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are abnormal growths of hormone-producing cells in the pancreas. Different from the brain in the skull, the pancreas in the abdomen can be largely deformed by the body posture and the surrounding organs. In consequence, both tumor growth and pancreatic motion attribute to the tumor shape difference observable from images. As images at different time points are used to personalize the tumor growth model, the prediction accuracy may be reduced if such motion is ignored. Therefore, we incorporate the image-derived pancreatic motion to tumor growth personalization. For realistic mechanical interactions, the multiplicative growth decomposition is used with a hyperelastic constitutive law to model tumor mass effect, which allows growth modeling without compromising the mechanical accuracy. With also the FDG-PET and contrast-enhanced CT images, the functional, structural, and motion data are combined for a more patient-specific model. Experiments on synthetic and clinical data show the importance of image-derived motion on estimating physiologically plausible mechanical properties and the promising performance of our framework. From six patient data sets, the recall, precision, Dice coefficient, relative volume difference, and average surface distance were 89.8 3.5%, 85.6 7.5%, 87.4 3.6%, 9.7 7.2%, and 0.6 0.2 mm, respectively. PMID:26221698

  13. In vivo imaging of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease animal model.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sungji; Ahn, Sangzin; Kim, Saeromi; Joo, Yuyoung; Chong, Young Hae; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Chang, Keun-A

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of diverse conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). To understand transplanted stem cell biology, in vivo imaging is necessary. Nanomaterial has great potential for in vivo imaging and several noninvasive methods are used, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, fluorescence imaging (FI) and near-infrared FI. However, each method has limitations for in vivo imaging. To overcome these limitations, multimodal nanoprobes have been developed. In the present study, we intravenously injected human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) that were labeled with a multimodal nanoparticle, LEO-LIVE™-Magnoxide 675 or 797 (BITERIALS, Seoul, Korea), into Tg2576 mice, an AD mouse model. After sequential in vivo tracking using Maestro Imaging System, we found fluorescence signals up to 10 days after injection. We also found strong signals in the brains extracted from hASC-transplanted Tg2576 mice up to 12 days after injection. With these results, we suggest that in vivo imaging with this multimodal nanoparticle may provide a useful tool for stem cell tracking and understanding stem cell biology in other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24297061

  14. In vivo imaging of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungji; Ahn, Sangzin; Kim, Saeromi; Joo, Yuyoung; Chong, Young Hae; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Chang, Keun-A.

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of diverse conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). To understand transplanted stem cell biology, in vivo imaging is necessary. Nanomaterial has great potential for in vivo imaging and several noninvasive methods are used, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, fluorescence imaging (FI) and near-infrared FI. However, each method has limitations for in vivo imaging. To overcome these limitations, multimodal nanoprobes have been developed. In the present study, we intravenously injected human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) that were labeled with a multimodal nanoparticle, LEO-LIVE™-Magnoxide 675 or 797 (BITERIALS, Seoul, Korea), into Tg2576 mice, an AD mouse model. After sequential in vivo tracking using Maestro Imaging System, we found fluorescence signals up to 10 days after injection. We also found strong signals in the brains extracted from hASC-transplanted Tg2576 mice up to 12 days after injection. With these results, we suggest that in vivo imaging with this multimodal nanoparticle may provide a useful tool for stem cell tracking and understanding stem cell biology in other neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Derivation of the scan time requirement for maintaining a consistent PET image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Seok-Ki

    2015-05-01

    Objectives: the image quality of PET for larger patients is relatively poor, even though the injection dose is optimized considering the NECR characteristics of the PET scanner. This poor image quality is due to the lower level of maximum NECR that can be achieved in these large patients. The aim of this study was to optimize the PET scan time to obtain a consistent PET image quality regardless of the body size, based on the relationship between the patient specific NECR (pNECR) and body weight. Methods: eighty patients (M/F=53/27, body weight: 059 ± 1 kg) underwent whole-body FDG PET scans using a Philips GEMINI GS PET/CT scanner after an injection of 0.14 mCi/kg FDG. The relationship between the scatter fraction (SF) and body weight was determined by repeated Monte Carlo simulations using a NEMA scatter phantom, the size of which varied according to the relationship between the abdominal circumference and body weight. Using this information, the pNECR was calculated from the prompt and delayed PET sinograms to obtain the prediction equation of NECR vs. body weight. The time scaling factor (FTS) for the scan duration was finally derived to make PET images with equivalent SNR levels. Results: the SF and NECR had the following nonlinear relationships with the body weight: SF=0.15 ṡ body weight0.3 and NECR = 421.36 (body weight)-0.84. The equation derived for FTS was 0.01ṡ body weight + 0.2, which means that, for example, a 120-kg person should be scanned 1.8 times longer than a 70 kg person, or the scan time for a 40-kg person can be reduced by 30%. Conclusion: the equation of the relative time demand derived in this study will be useful for maintaining consistent PET image quality in clinics.

  16. Hyaluronic acid and its derivatives in drug delivery and imaging: Recent advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tripodo, Giuseppe; Trapani, Adriana; Torre, Maria Luisa; Giammona, Gaetano; Trapani, Giuseppe; Mandracchia, Delia

    2015-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a biodegradable, biocompatible, nontoxic, and non-immunogenic glycosaminoglycan used for various biomedical applications. The interaction of HA with the CD44 receptor, whose expression is elevated on the surface of many types of tumor cells, makes this polymer a promising candidate for intracellular delivery of imaging and anticancer agents exploiting a receptor-mediated active targeting strategy. Therefore, HA and its derivatives have been most investigated for the development of several carrier systems intended for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Nonetheless, different and important delivery applications of the polysaccharide have also been described, including gene and peptide/protein drugs delivery. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the existing recent literature on the use of HA and its derivatives for drug delivery and imaging. Notable attention is given to nanotheranostic systems obtained after conjugation of HA to nanocarriers as quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and graphene. Meanwhile, attention is also paid to some challenging aspects that need to be addressed in order to allow translation of preclinical models based on HA and its derivatives for drug delivery and imaging purposes to clinical testing and further their development. PMID:26614559

  17. Characterisation of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for SPECT imaging of cerebral prion deposits.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kawasaki, Masao; Ogawa, Ayaka; Haratake, Mamoru; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ubagai, Kaori; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nishida, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by deposition of amyloid plaques containing abnormal prion protein aggregates (PrP(Sc)). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of PrP(Sc). In vitro binding assays using recombinant mouse PrP (rMoPrP) aggregates revealed that the 4-dimethylamino-substituted styrylchromone derivative (SC-NMe2) had higher in vitro binding affinity (Kd = 24.5 nM) and capacity (Bmax = 36.3 pmol/nmol protein) than three other flavonoid derivatives (flavone, chalcone, and aurone). Fluorescent imaging using brain sections from mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE)-infected mice demonstrated that SC-NMe2 clearly labelled PrP(Sc)-positive prion deposits in the mice brain. Two methoxy SC derivatives, SC-OMe and SC-(OMe)2, also showed high binding affinity for rMoPrP aggregates with Ki values of 20.8 and 26.6 nM, respectively. In vitro fluorescence and autoradiography experiments demonstrated high accumulation of [(125)I]SC-OMe and [(125)I]SC-(OMe)2 in prion deposit-rich regions of the mBSE-infected mouse brain. SPECT/computed tomography (CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [(123)I]SC-OMe showed consistent brain distribution with the presence of PrP(Sc) deposits in the mBSE-infected mice brain. In conclusion, [(123)I]SC-OMe appears a promising SPECT radioligand for monitoring prion deposit levels in the living brain. PMID:26669576

  18. Characterisation of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for SPECT imaging of cerebral prion deposits

    PubMed Central

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kawasaki, Masao; Ogawa, Ayaka; Haratake, Mamoru; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ubagai, Kaori; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nishida, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by deposition of amyloid plaques containing abnormal prion protein aggregates (PrPSc). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of PrPSc. In vitro binding assays using recombinant mouse PrP (rMoPrP) aggregates revealed that the 4-dimethylamino-substituted styrylchromone derivative (SC-NMe2) had higher in vitro binding affinity (Kd = 24.5 nM) and capacity (Bmax = 36.3 pmol/nmol protein) than three other flavonoid derivatives (flavone, chalcone, and aurone). Fluorescent imaging using brain sections from mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE)-infected mice demonstrated that SC-NMe2 clearly labelled PrPSc-positive prion deposits in the mice brain. Two methoxy SC derivatives, SC-OMe and SC-(OMe)2, also showed high binding affinity for rMoPrP aggregates with Ki values of 20.8 and 26.6 nM, respectively. In vitro fluorescence and autoradiography experiments demonstrated high accumulation of [125I]SC-OMe and [125I]SC-(OMe)2 in prion deposit-rich regions of the mBSE-infected mouse brain. SPECT/computed tomography (CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [123I]SC-OMe showed consistent brain distribution with the presence of PrPSc deposits in the mBSE-infected mice brain. In conclusion, [123I]SC-OMe appears a promising SPECT radioligand for monitoring prion deposit levels in the living brain. PMID:26669576

  19. Arterial input function of an optical tracer for dynamic contrast enhanced imaging can be determined from pulse oximetry oxygen saturation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Wright, Eric A.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B.; Pogue, Brian W.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2012-12-01

    In many cases, kinetic modeling requires that the arterial input function (AIF)—the time-dependent arterial concentration of a tracer—be characterized. A straightforward method to measure the AIF of red and near-infrared optical dyes (e.g., indocyanine green) using a pulse oximeter is presented. The method is motivated by the ubiquity of pulse oximeters used in both preclinical and clinical applications, as well as the gap in currently available technologies to measure AIFs in small animals. The method is based on quantifying the interference that is observed in the derived arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) following a bolus injection of a light-absorbing dye. In other words, the change in SaO2 can be converted into dye concentration knowing the chromophore-specific extinction coefficients, the true arterial oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration. A simple error analysis was performed to highlight potential limitations of the approach, and a validation of the method was conducted in rabbits by comparing the pulse oximetry method with the AIF acquired using a pulse dye densitometer. Considering that determining the AIF is required for performing quantitative tracer kinetics, this method provides a flexible tool for measuring the arterial dye concentration that could be used in a variety of applications.

  20. (abstract) Monitoring Seasonal State and Mapping Species in Alaskan Taiga Using Imaging Radar as Input to CO(sub 2) Flux Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, J. B.; Rignot, E.; McDonald, K.; Adams, P.; Viereck, L.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in the seasonal CO(sub 2) flux of the boreal forests may result from increased atmospheric CO(sub 2) concentrations and associated atmospheric warming. To monitor this potential change, a combination of remote sensing information and ecophysiological models are required. In this paper we address the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to provide some of the input to the ecophysiological models: forest type, freeze/thaw state which limits the growing season for conifers, and leaf on/off state which limits the growing season for deciduous species. AIRSAR data collected in March 1988 during an early thaw event and May 1991 during spring breakup are used to generate species maps and to determine the sensitivity of SAR to canopy freeze/thaw transitions. These data are also used to validate a microwave scattering model which is then used to determine the sensitivity of SAR to leaf on/off and soil freeze/thaw transitions. Finally, a CO(sub 2) flux algorithm which utilizes SAR data and an ecophysiological model to estimate CO(sub 2) flux is presented. CO(sub 2) flux maps are generated from which areal estimates of CO(sub 2) flux are derived.

  1. Monitoring seasonal state and mapping species in Alaskan taiga using imaging radar as input to CO[sub 2] flux models

    SciTech Connect

    Way, J.B.; Rignot, E.; McDonald, K.; Adams, P.; Viereck, L. Institute of Northern Forestry, Fairbanks, AK )

    1993-06-01

    Changes in the seasonal CO[sub 2] flux of the boreal forests may result from increased atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentrations and associated atmospheric warming. To monitor this potential change, a combination of remote sensing information and ecophysiological models are required. In this paper we address the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to provide some of the input to the ecophysiological models: forest type, freeze/thaw state which limits the growing season for conifers, and leaf on/off state which limits the growing season for deciduous species. AIRSAR data collected in March 1988 during an early thaw event and May 1991 during spring breakup are used to generate species maps and to determine the sensitivity of SAR to canopy freeze/thaw transitions. These data are also used to validate a microwave scattering model which is then used to determine the sensitivity of SAR to leaf on/off and soil freeze/thaw transitions. Finally, a CO[sub 2] flux algorithm which utilizes SAR data and an ecophysiological model to estimate CO[sub 2] flux is presented. CO[sub 2] flux maps are generated from which areal estimates of CO[sub 2] flux are derived. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract to the NASA.

  2. Arterial input function of an optical tracer for dynamic contrast enhanced imaging can be determined from pulse oximetry oxygen saturation measurements.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jonathan T; Wright, Eric A; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B; Pogue, Brian W; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2012-12-21

    In many cases, kinetic modeling requires that the arterial input function (AIF)--the time-dependent arterial concentration of a tracer--be characterized. A straightforward method to measure the AIF of red and near-infrared optical dyes (e.g., indocyanine green) using a pulse oximeter is presented. The method is motivated by the ubiquity of pulse oximeters used in both preclinical and clinical applications, as well as the gap in currently available technologies to measure AIFs in small animals. The method is based on quantifying the interference that is observed in the derived arterial oxygen saturation (SaO?) following a bolus injection of a light-absorbing dye. In other words, the change in SaO? can be converted into dye concentration knowing the chromophore-specific extinction coefficients, the true arterial oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration. A simple error analysis was performed to highlight potential limitations of the approach, and a validation of the method was conducted in rabbits by comparing the pulse oximetry method with the AIF acquired using a pulse dye densitometer. Considering that determining the AIF is required for performing quantitative tracer kinetics, this method provides a flexible tool for measuring the arterial dye concentration that could be used in a variety of applications. PMID:23190567

  3. A 1000-year sediment record of recurring hypoxia off the Mississippi River: The potential role of terrestrially-derived organic matter inputs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Campbell, P.L.; Osterman, L.E.; Poore, R.Z.

    2008-01-01

    A suite of inorganic and organic geochemical tracers and a low-oxygen tolerant benthic faunal index ('PEB') were measured in a 14C-dated 2+??m long gravity core collected on the Louisiana shelf adjacent to the Mississippi River delta to study potential millennium-scale low-oxygen events. Periodic down-core excursions in the PEB index throughout the core suggest recurring, natural bottom water low-oxygen events that extend back ??? 1000??14C years. Select trace element and biomarker distributions in these same sediments were examined as potential tracers of past hypoxic events and to help distinguish between marine versus terrestrial processes involved in organic carbon production. In discrete sediment horizons where the PEB index was elevated, redox-sensitive vanadium concentrations were consistently depleted, excursions in sedimentary ??13C suggest periodic, preferential terrestrial inputs, and the concentrations of two sterol biomarkers (sitosterol and ??-stigmasterol) also showed concurrent enrichments. If the PEB index successfully records ??? 1000??14C year-scale low-oxygen events, then the distribution of these geochemical tracers can be interpreted to corroborate the view that naturally occurring low-oxygen bottom water conditions have existed on the inner Louisiana continental shelf, not only in recent times, but also over at least the last 1000??14C years. These data support the general hypothesis that historic, low-oxygen bottom water conditions on the Louisiana shelf are likely tied to periods of increased fluvial discharge and associated wetland export in the absence of modern river levees. Enhanced river discharge and associated material export would both stimulate enhanced in situ organic carbon production and foster water column stratification. Such periodic elevated river flows during the last millennium can be linked to climate fluctuations and tropical storm activity. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterising the composition of waste-derived fuels using a novel image analysis tool.

    PubMed

    Peddireddy, S; Longhurst, P J; Wagland, S T

    2015-06-01

    An experimental study was completed using a previously developed and innovative image analysis approach, which has been applied here to shredded waste materials representative of waste-derived fuels. Waste components were collected from source-segregated recycling containers and shredded to <150 mm. These materials were then used to produce 3 samples of different composition. The samples were spread to represent materials on a conveyor belt, and multiple images of each sample were captured using 1010 cm and 2020 cm quadrats. The images were processed using ERDAS Imagine software to determine the area covered by each waste component. This coverage was converted into a mass using density data determined as part of this study, yielding a determined composition which was then compared with the known composition of the samples. The image analysis results indicated a strong correlation with the actual values (mean r=0.89). The area coverage of the sample (1010 cm or 2020 cm) contributes to the accuracy as the dot-grid approach used with the particle size within the samples may result in components not being sufficiently monitored. This manuscript presents initial results of the application of an adapted innovative image-based method, and critically assesses how the technique could be improved and developed in the future. PMID:25827256

  5. Development of (68)Ga-labeled multivalent nitroimidazole derivatives for hypoxia imaging.

    PubMed

    Seelam, Sudhakara Reddy; Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Yun-Sang; Hong, Mi Kyung; Kim, Young Joo; Banka, Vinay Kumar; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Jeong, Jae Min

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabeled nitroimidazole (NI) derivatives have been extensively studied for imaging hypoxia. To increase the hypoxic tissue uptake, we developed (68)Ga-labeled agents based on mono-, bis-, and trisnitroimidazole conjugates with the chelating agent 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-tris[methyl(2-carboxyethyl)phosphinic acid] (TRAP). All the three agents showed high radiolabeling yields (>96%) and were found to be stable up to 4h in prepared medium at room temperature and in human serum at 37C. The trivalent agent showed a significant increase in hypoxic to normoxic uptake ratio (p <0.005) according to the in vitro cell uptake experiments. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the presence of hypoxia in xenografted CT26 tumor tissue. The trivalent derivative ((68)Ga-3: 0.170.04, (68)Ga-4: 0.330.04, (68)Ga-5: 0.450.09, and (68)Ga-6: 0.470.05% ID/g) showed the highest uptake by tumor cells according to the biodistribution studies in CT-26 xenografted mice. All the nitroimidazole derivatives showed significantly higher uptake by tumor cells than the control agent (p <0.05) at 1h post-injection. The trivalent derivative ((68)Ga-3: 0.100.06; (68)Ga-4: 0.200.06; (68)Ga-5: 0.330.08; (68)Ga-6: 0.590.09) also showed the highest standard uptake value for tumor cells at 1h post-injection in animal PET studies using CT-26 xenografted mice. In conclusion, we successfully synthesized multivalent (68)Ga-labeled NI derivatives for imaging hypoxia. Among them, the trivalent agent showed the highest tumor uptake in biodistribution and animal PET studies. PMID:26643217

  6. Assessment of image-derived risk factors for natural course of unruptured cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Manasi; Retarekar, Rohini; Raghavan, Madhavan L; Berkowitz, Benjamin; Dickerhoff, Benjamin; Correa, Tatiana; Lin, Steve; Johnson, Kevin; Hasan, David; Ogilvy, Christopher; Rosenwasser, Robert; Torner, James; Bogason, Einar; Stapleton, Christopher J; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT The goal of this prospective longitudinal study was to test whether image-derived metrics can differentiate unruptured aneurysms that will become unstable (grow and/or rupture) from those that will remain stable. METHODS One hundred seventy-eight patients harboring 198 unruptured cerebral aneurysms for whom clinical observation and follow-up with imaging surveillance was recommended at 4 clinical centers were prospectively recruited into this study. Imaging data (predominantly CT angiography) at initial presentation was recorded. Computational geometry was used to estimate numerous metrics of aneurysm morphology that described the size and shape of the aneurysm. The nonlinear, finite element method was used to estimate uniform pressure-induced peak wall tension. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate blood flow metrics. The median follow-up period was 645 days. Longitudinal outcome data on these aneurysm patients-whether their aneurysms grew or ruptured (the unstable group) or remained unchanged (the stable group)-was documented based on follow-up at 4 years after the beginning of recruitment. RESULTS Twenty aneurysms (10.1%) grew, but none ruptured. One hundred forty-nine aneurysms (75.3%) remained stable and 29 (14.6%) were lost to follow-up. None of the metrics-including aneurysm size, nonsphericity index, peak wall tension, and low shear stress area-differentiated the stable from unstable groups with statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS The findings in this highly selected group do not support the hypothesis that image-derived metrics can predict aneurysm growth in patients who have been selected for observation and imaging surveillance. If aneurysm shape is a significant determinant of invasive versus expectant management, selection bias is a key limitation of this study. PMID:26381246

  7. Study of an image-derived SUV and a modified SUV using mouse FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiujuan; Yu, Chin-Lung; Sha, Wei; Radu, Caius; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Feng, Dagan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Standard uptake value (SUV) is calculated without consideration of the differences in plasma FDG clearance. Its variability can be affected by changes of the amount of excreted FDG by renal function. Moreover, the estimation of SUV is quite sensitive to errors in the measurements of body weight and injected dose. This study aims to develop an image-based method to obtain an image-derived SUV (iSUV) and a modified SUV (mSUV) to overcome these problems. Methods 31 tumor-planted SCID mice were scanned in microPET at ~60min post FDG injection, and then scanned in microCT. Using image-based method, the body weight and injected dose were derived from the microPET/CT images to calculate iSUV. The volumes and the total activities of FDG within the bladder and the whole-body were also obtained to calculate mSUV. For the selected targets, the iSUVs and mSUVs were compared against their corresponding SUVs. Results Compared with SUV factor (injected dose/body weight), iSUV factor had an average percentage error of ?0.7%. The linear regressions between SUV and iSUV had a slope of 0.99 with correlation coefficient of 0.95. Compared with SUV and iSUV, CV% of mSUV decreased while the tumor-to-background separation of mSUV increased. Conclusions Using this image-based method, the iSUV can replace SUV when the actual measurements were missing or unreliable. The mSUV can reduce the inter-subject variability and enhance the tumor-to-background separation in mouse FDG-PET studies. PMID:21492784

  8. Feasibility of poly(ethylene glycol) derivatives as diagnostic drug carriers for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Yamauchi, Fumio; Takahashi, Atsushi; Homma, Tsutomu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2016-03-28

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is an artificial but biocompatible hydrophilic polymer that has been widely used in clinical products. To evaluate the feasibility of using PEG derivative itself as a tumor imaging carrier via an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, we prepared indium-111-labeled PEG ((111)In-DTPA-PEG) and indocyanine green (ICG)-labeled PEG (ICG-PEG) with PEG molecular weights of 5-40kDa and investigated their in vivo biodistribution in colon26 tumor-bearing mice. Thereafter, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging studies were performed. The in vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated increased tumor uptake and a prolongation of circulation half-life as the molecular weight of PEG increased. Although the observed differences in in vivo biodistribution were dependent on the labeling method ((111)In or ICG), the tumor-to-normal tissue ratios were comparable. Because PEG-based probes with a molecular weight of 20kDa (PEG20) showed a preferable biodistribution (highest accumulation among tissues excised and relatively high tumor-to-blood ratios), an imaging study using (111)In-DTPA-PEG20 and ICG-PEG20 was performed. Colon26 tumors inoculated in the right shoulder were clearly visualized by SPECT 24h after administration. Furthermore, PA imaging using ICG-PEG20 also detected tumor regions, and the detected PA signals increased in proportion with the injected dose. These results suggest that PEG derivatives (20kDa) serve as robust diagnostic drug carriers for tumor imaging. PMID:26869546

  9. QuickFF: A program for a quick and easy derivation of force fields for metal-organic frameworks from ab initio input.

    PubMed

    Vanduyfhuys, Louis; Vandenbrande, Steven; Verstraelen, Toon; Schmid, Rochus; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique

    2015-05-15

    QuickFF is a software package to derive accurate force fields for isolated and complex molecular systems in a quick and easy manner. Apart from its general applicability, the program has been designed to generate force fields for metal-organic frameworks in an automated fashion. The force field parameters for the covalent interaction are derived from ab initio data. The mathematical expression of the covalent energy is kept simple to ensure robustness and to avoid fitting deficiencies as much as possible. The user needs to produce an equilibrium structure and a Hessian matrix for one or more building units. Afterward, a force field is generated for the system using a three-step method implemented in QuickFF. The first two steps of the methodology are designed to minimize correlations among the force field parameters. In the last step, the parameters are refined by imposing the force field parameters to reproduce the ab initio Hessian matrix in Cartesian coordinate space as accurate as possible. The method is applied on a set of 1000 organic molecules to show the easiness of the software protocol. To illustrate its application to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), QuickFF is used to determine force fields for MIL-53(Al) and MOF-5. For both materials, accurate force fields were already generated in literature but they requested a lot of manual interventions. QuickFF is a tool that can easily be used by anyone with a basic knowledge of performing ab initio calculations. As a result, accurate force fields are generated with minimal effort. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25740170

  10. Bioluminescence Reporter Gene Imaging Characterize Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Teratoma Formation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Weijun; Zhou, Manqian; Zheng, Yizhou; Fan, Yan; Han, Zhongchao; Kong, Deling; Wu, Joseph C.; Xiang, Rong; Li, Zongjin

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are capable of differentiation into virtually all cell types and hold tremendous potential as cell sources for regenerative therapies. However, teratoma formation can be the main obstacle for hES cells therapy. In order to understand the biology and physiology of hES cells teratoma formation, we investigated the angiogenic process within teratomas and characterized teratoma cells. In this study, hES cells transduced with double fusion reporter gene that consists of firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (Fluc-eGFP) were injected into hind limbs of SCID mice and performed longitudinal bioluminescence imaging on these animals. To test angiogenic contribution of teratoma from host or hES cells, human and mouse endothelial cells marker CD31 was stained respectively. To further explore the characterization of teratoma derived cells, flow cytometry analysis was carried out and GFP+/SSEA-4+ cells were isolated and subcultured. Then, we re-injected the isolated GFP+/SSEA-4+ teratoma cells into SCID mice and observed by imaging. Our results show that the reporter gene imaging is an ideal technology for monitoring long-term stem cell viability, death, and proliferation. Teratomas contained vasculatures are from hES cells and host. hESCs derived teratomas express a high level of undifferentiated marker SSEA-4 and CD56, and subcultured GFP+/SSEA-4+ cells had similar expression pattern comparing to undifferentiated hES cells, except for a very high level of CD56 and a little lower expression of undifferentiated markers, such as SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, and TRA-1-81. Moreover, the SSEA-4+ teratoma cells can form teratomas in SCID mice, and this type teratomas grow at a lower rate compared to teratomas derived from hES cells, and are more differentiated. PMID:21328457

  11. A New Highly Reactive and Low Lipophilicity Fluorine-18 Labeled Tetrazine Derivative for Pretargeted PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Keinänen, Outi; Li, Xiang-Guo; Chenna, Naveen K; Lumen, Dave; Ott, Jennifer; Molthoff, Carla F M; Sarparanta, Mirkka; Helariutta, Kerttuli; Vuorinen, Tapani; Windhorst, Albert D; Airaksinen, Anu J

    2016-01-14

    A new (18)F-labeled tetrazine derivative was developed aiming at optimal radiochemistry, fast reaction kinetics in inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition (IEDDA), and favorable pharmacokinetics for in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry. The radiolabeling of the tetrazine was achieved in high yield, purity, and specific activity under mild reaction conditions via conjugation with 5-[(18)F]fluoro-5-deoxyribose, providing a glycosylated tetrazine derivative with low lipophilicity. The (18)F-tetrazine showed fast reaction kinetics toward the most commonly used dienophiles in IEDDA reactions. It exhibited excellent chemical and enzymatic stability in mouse plasma and in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.41). Biodistribution in mice revealed favorable pharmacokinetics with major elimination via urinary excretion. The results indicate that the glycosylated (18)F-labeled tetrazine is an excellent candidate for in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry applications in pretargeted PET imaging approaches. PMID:26819667

  12. Monitoring of agricultural drought in Poland using data derived from environmental satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska-Zielinska, K.; Ciolkosz, A.; Malinska, A.; Bartold, M.

    2012-06-01

    In Poland one can observe a lack of sufficientcient amount of rainfall during plant growth season. This results in the occurrence of agricultural drought and the consequent drop in crop yields. For the early detection of drought, satellite images taken by environmental and meteorological satellites have been used. On the basis of these images various plant indices like NDVI, VCI and TCI have been determined. Analysis of changes in these indices allows preparation of maps showing the emergence and extent of drought. These vegetation indices were also used in the model of cereal yield forecast. Comparison of the results provided by the model show a high conformity with the results published by the Polish Central Statistical Office. Elaborated model estimating crop yield reduction due to drought, based on satellite-derived data allows venture of measures to mitigate results of drought and prevent the lowering yields by artificial irrigation.

  13. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kundhikanjana, W.

    2010-06-02

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces.

  14. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles derived from natural materials of mango fruit for bio-imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Roy, Arup Kumer; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung-Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials.Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04805a

  15. Partial correlation analyses of global diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics in glioblastoma multiforme: Pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Conradis, David; Rios, Camilo; Moreno-Jimenez, Sergio; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine existing correlates among diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived metrics in healthy brains and brains with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). METHODS: Case-control study using DTI data from brain magnetic resonance imaging of 34 controls (mean, 41.47; SD, ± 21.94 years; range, 21-80 years) and 27 patients with GBM (mean, SD; 48.41 ± 15.18 years; range, 18-78 years). Image postprocessing using FSL software calculated eleven tensor metrics: fractional (FA) and relative anisotropy; pure isotropic (p) and anisotropic diffusions (q), total magnitude of diffusion (L); linear (Cl), planar (Cp) and spherical tensors (Cs); mean (MD), axial (AD) and radial diffusivities (RD). Partial correlation analyses (controlling the effect of age and gender) and multivariate Mancova were performed. RESULTS: There was a normal distribution for all metrics. Comparing healthy brains vs brains with GBM, there were significant very strong bivariate correlations only depicted in GBM: [FA↔Cl (+)], [FA↔q (+)], [p↔AD (+)], [AD↔MD (+)], and [MD↔RD (+)]. Among 56 pairs of bivariate correlations, only seven were significantly different. The diagnosis variable depicted a main effect [F-value (11, 23) = 11.842, P ≤ 0.001], with partial eta squared = 0.850, meaning a large effect size; age showed a similar result. The age also had a significant influence as a covariate [F (11, 23) = 10.523, P < 0.001], with a large effect size (partial eta squared = 0.834). CONCLUSION: DTI-derived metrics depict significant differences between healthy brains and brains with GBM, with specific magnitudes and correlations. This study provides reference data and makes a contribution to decrease the underlying empiricism in the use of DTI parameters in brain imaging. PMID:26644826

  16. Enhancing Proprioceptive Input to Motoneurons Differentially Affects Expression of Neurotrophin 3 and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Rat Hoffmann-Reflex Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Skup, Małgorzata; Kasicki, Stefan; Ziemlińska, Ewelina; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita

    2013-01-01

    The importance of neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) for motor control prompted us to ask the question whether direct electrical stimulation of low-threshold muscle afferents, strengthening the proprioceptive signaling, could effectively increase the endogenous pool of this neurotrophin and its receptor TrkC in the Hoffmann-reflex (H-reflex) circuitry. The effects were compared with those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its TrkB receptor. Continuous bursts of stimuli were delivered unilaterally for seven days, 80 min daily, by means of a cuff-electrode implanted over the tibial nerve in awake rats. The H-reflex was recorded in the soleus muscle to control the strength of stimulation. Stimulation aimed at activation of Ia fibers produced a strong increase of NT-3 protein, measured with ELISA, in the lumbar L3-6 segments of the spinal cord and in the soleus muscle. This stimulation exerted much weaker effect on BDNF protein level which slightly increased only in L3-6 segments of the spinal cord. Increased protein level of NT-3 and BDNF corresponded to the changes of NT-3 mRNA and BDNF mRNA expression in L3-6 segments but not in the soleus muscle. We disclosed tissue-specificity of TrkC mRNA and TrkB mRNA responses. In the spinal cord TrkC and TrkB transcripts tended to decrease, whereas in the soleus muscle TrkB mRNA decreased and TrkC mRNA expression strongly increased, suggesting that stimulation of Ia fibers leads to sensitization of the soleus muscle to NT-3 signaling. The possibility of increasing NT-3/TrkC signaling in the neuromuscular system, with minor effects on BDNF/TrkB signaling, by means of low-threshold electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves, which in humans might be applied in non-invasive way, offers an attractive therapeutic tool. PMID:23776573

  17. An operational software tool for the analysis of coronagraph images: Determining CME parameters for input into the WSA-Enlil heliospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millward, G.; Biesecker, D.; Pizzo, V.; Koning, C. A.

    2013-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs)massive explosions of dense plasma that originate in the lower solar atmosphere and propagate outward into the solar windare the leading cause of significant space weather effects within Earth's environment. Computational models of the heliosphere such as WSA-Enlil offer the possibility of predicting whether a given CME will become geo-effective and, if so, the likely time of arrival at Earth. To be meaningful, such a forecast model is dependent upon accurately characterizing key parameters for the CME, notably its speed and direction of propagation, and its angular width. Studies by Zhao et al. (2002) and Xie et al. (2004) suggest that these key CME parameters can be deduced from geometric analysis of the elliptical "halo" forms observed in coronagraph images on spacecraft such as the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and which result from a CME whose propagation is roughly toward or away from the observer. Both studies assume that the CME presents a circular cross-section and maintains a constant angular width during its radial expansion, the so called "cone model." Development work at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) has been concerned with building and testing software tools to allow forecasters to determine these CME parameters routinely within an operational context, a key aspect of transitioning the WSA-Enlil heliospheric model into operations at the National Weather Service. We find "single viewpoint" cone analysis, while a useful start, to be highly problematic in many real-world situations. In particular, it is extremely difficult to establish objectively the correct ellipse that should be applied to a given halo form and that small changes in the exact ellipse chosen can lead to large differences in the deduced CME parameters. The inaccuracies in the technique are particularly evident for analysis of the "nearly circular" elliptical forms which result from CMEs that are propagating directly toward the observer and are therefore the most likely to be geo-effective. In working to resolve this issue we have developed a new three-dimensional (3-D) graphics-based analysis system which seeks to reduce inaccuracies by analyzing a CME using coronagraph images taken concurrently by SOHO and also by the two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft, which provide additional viewing locations well away from the Sun-Earth line. The resulting "three view" technique has led to the development of the CME Analysis Tool (CAT), an operational software system in routine use at the SWPC as the primary means to determine CME parameters for input into the WSA-Enlil model. Results from the operational WSA-Enlil system are presented: utilizing CAT to provide CME input parameters, we show that, during the first year of operations at SWPC, the WSA-Enlil model has forecasted the arrival of CMEs at Earth with an average error 7.5 h.

  18. Vector image method for the derivation of elastostatic solutions for point sources in a plane layered medium. Part 1: Derivation and simple examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fares, Nabil; Li, Victor C.

    1986-01-01

    An image method algorithm is presented for the derivation of elastostatic solutions for point sources in bonded halfspaces assuming the infinite space point source is known. Specific cases were worked out and shown to coincide with well known solutions in the literature.

  19. Imagery-derived modulation transfer function and its applications for underwater imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weilin; Weidemann, Alan D.; Gray, Deric J.; Fournier, Georges R.

    2007-09-01

    The main challenge working with underwater imagery results from both rapid decay of signals due to absorption, which leads to poor signal to noise returns, and the blurring caused by strong scattering by the water itself and constituents within, especially particulates. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of an optical system gives the detailed and precise information regarding the system behavior. Underwater imageries can be better restored with the knowledge of the system MTF or the point spread function (PSF), the Fourier transformed equivalent, extending the performance range as well as the information retrieval from underwater electro-optical system. This is critical in many civilian and military applications, including target and especially mine detection, search and rescue, and diver visibility. This effort utilizes test imageries obtained by the Laser Underwater Camera Imaging Enhancer (LUCIE) from Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC), during an April-May 2006 trial experiment in Panama City, Florida. Imaging of a standard resolution chart with various spatial frequencies were taken underwater in a controlled optical environment, at varying distances. In-water optical properties during the experiment were measured, which included the absorption and attenuation coefficients, particle size distribution, and volume scattering function. Resulting images were preprocessed to enhance signal to noise ratio by averaging multiple frames, and to remove uneven illumination at target plane. The MTF of the medium was then derived from measurement of above imageries, subtracting the effect of the camera system. PSFs converted from the measured MTF were then used to restore the blurred imageries by different deconvolution methods. The effects of polarization from source to receiver on resulting MTFs were examined and we demonstrate that matching polarizations do enhance system transfer functions. This approach also shows promise in deriving medium optical properties including absorption and attenuation.

  20. Monitoring tropical cyclone intensity using wind fields derived from short-interval satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Gentry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid scan visible images from the Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer sensor on board SMS-2 and GOES-1 were used to derive high resolution upper and lower tropospheric environmental wind fields around three western Atlantic tropical cyclones (1975-78). These wind fields were used to derive upper and lower tropospheric areal mean relative vorticity and their differences, the net relative angular momentum balance and upper tropospheric mass outflow. These kinematic parameters were shown by studies using composite rawinsonde data to be strongly related to tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. Also, the role of forced synoptic scale subsidence in tropical cyclone formation was examined. The studies showed that satellite-derived lower and upper tropospheric wind fields can be used to monitor and possibly predict tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. These kinematic analyses showed that future changes in tropical cyclone intensity are mainly related to the "spin-up" of the storms by the net horizontal transport of relative angular momentum caused by convergence of cyclonic vorticity in the lower troposphere and to a lesser extent the divergence of anticyclone vorticity in the upper troposphere.

  1. Shape and rotational elements of comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko derived by stereo-photogrammetric analysis of OSIRIS NAC image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Roatsch, Thomas; Willner, Konrad; Hviid, Stubbe; Knollenberg, Jrg; Khrt, Ekkehard; Sierks, Holger

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft is equipped with the OSIRIS imaging system which consists of a wide-angle and a narrow-angle camera (WAC and NAC). After the approach phase, Rosetta was inserted into a descent trajectory of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) in early August 2014. Until early September, OSIRIS acquired several hundred NAC images of C-G's surface at different scales (from ~5 m/pixel during approach to ~0.9 m/pixel during descent). In that one month observation period, the surface was imaged several times within different mapping sequences. With the comet's rotation period of ~12.4 h and the low spacecraft velocity (< 1 m/s), the entire NAC dataset provides multiple NAC stereo coverage, adequate for stereo-photogrammetric (SPG) analysis towards the derivation of 3D surface models. We constrained the OSIRIS NAC images with our stereo requirements (15 < stereo angles < 45, incidence angles <85, emission angles <45, differences in illumination < 10, scale better than 5 m/pixel) and extracted about 220 NAC images that provide at least triple stereo image coverage for the entire illuminated surface in about 250 independent multi-stereo image combinations. For each image combination we determined tie points by multi-image matching in order to set-up a 3D control network and a dense surface point cloud for the precise reconstruction of C-G's shape. The control point network defines the input for a stereo-photogrammetric least squares adjustment. Based on the statistical analysis of adjustments we first refined C-G's rotational state (pole orientation and rotational period) and its behavior over time. Based upon this description of the orientation of C-G's body-fixed reference frame, we derived corrections for the nominal navigation data (pointing and position) within a final stereo-photogrammetric block adjustment where the mean 3D point accuracy of more than 100 million surface points has been improved from ~10 m to the sub-meter range. We finally applied point filtering and interpolation techniques to these surface 3D points and show the resulting SPG-based 3D surface model with a lateral sampling rate of about 2 m.

  2. Generating Precise and Accurate Waveform-Derived Products From Medium-Footprint Geodetic Imaging Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofton, M. A.; Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    NASA's airborne Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is a medium-high altitude (10 km above the ground), medium-footprint (10-25 m wide) wide-swath (2 km) geodetic, imaging laser altimeter system that digitally records the shapes of both the outgoing and returning laser pulses (waveforms) for every shot. Since 1997, the system has been used to acquire data in various locations including California, Arkansas, Costa Rica, New England, Maryland, Virginia and Greenland. It has also been used to prototype future spaceborne measurements (e.g., VCL, DESDynI), develop and refine data and return waveform processing algorithms, and showcase science applications of full-waveform altimetry. Data geolocation is achieved using NASA's Variable Estimation, Geolocation and Analysis Software (VEGAS). Using this software, we solve for and apply various system biases and parameters (e.g., angular offsets between the various reference frames on the aircraft and the timing offsets between the various data inputs) to generate the position of the laser footprint on the ground relative to a global reference frame such as WGS84. Waveforms are interpreted to identify the locations of different surfaces within the footprint including the mean ground, canopy top, and several metrics related to surface (including canopy) structure. For each data set, the precision and accuracy of the data products are assessed by intercomparison, and comparison to available in-situ data such as collected using GPS or higher-resolution laser altimetry. We will review the latest data processing procedures employed in the VEGAS system and the LVIS waveform interpretation approaches. The precision and accuracy of the data products from various locations will also be presented. Implications for future spaceborne missions recommended by the National Research Council (NRC) such as DESDynI, ICESat II and LIST will be discussed.

  3. Imer-product array processor for retrieval of stored images represented by bipolar binary (+1,-1) pixels using partial input trinary pixels represented by (+1,-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor); Awwal, Abdul A. S. (Inventor); Karim, Mohammad A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An inner-product array processor is provided with thresholding of the inner product during each iteration to make more significant the inner product employed in estimating a vector to be used as the input vector for the next iteration. While stored vectors and estimated vectors are represented in bipolar binary (1,-1), only those elements of an initial partial input vector that are believed to be common with those of a stored vector are represented in bipolar binary; the remaining elements of a partial input vector are set to 0. This mode of representation, in which the known elements of a partial input vector are in bipolar binary form and the remaining elements are set equal to 0, is referred to as trinary representation. The initial inner products corresponding to the partial input vector will then be equal to the number of known elements. Inner-product thresholding is applied to accelerate convergence and to avoid convergence to a negative input product.

  4. Desorption kinetics from a surface derived from direct imaging of the adsorbate layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnther, S.; Mente?, T. O.; Nio, M. A.; Locatelli, A.; Bcklein, S.; Wintterlin, J.

    2014-05-01

    There are numerous indications that adsorbed particles on a surface do not desorb statistically, but that their spatial distribution is important. Evidence almost exclusively comes from temperature-programmed desorption, the standard method for measuring desorption rates. However, this method, as a kinetics experiment, cannot uniquely prove an atomic mechanism. Here we report a low-energy electron microscopy investigation in which a surface is microscopically imaged while simultaneously temperature-programmed desorption is recorded. The data show that during desorption of oxygen molecules from a silver single crystal surface, islands of oxygen atoms are present. By correlating the microscopy and the kinetics data, a model is derived that includes the shapes of the islands and assumes that the oxygen molecules desorb from the island edges. The model quantitatively reproduces the complex desorption kinetics, confirming that desorption is affected by islands and that the often used mean-field treatment is inappropriate.

  5. The evaluation of NIR-absorbing porphyrin derivatives as contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Abuteen, Akram; Zanganeh, Saeid; Akhigbe, Joshua; Samankumara, Lalith P; Aguirre, Andres; Biswal, Nrusingh; Braune, Marcel; Vollertsen, Anke; Röder, Beate; Brückner, Christian; Zhu, Quing

    2013-11-14

    Six free base tetrapyrrolic chromophores, three quinoline-annulated porphyrins and three morpholinobacteriochlorins, that absorb light in the near-IR range and possess, in comparison to regular porphyrins, unusually low fluorescence emission and (1)O2 quantum yields were tested with respect to their efficacy as novel molecular photo-acoustic imaging contrast agents in a tissue phantom, providing an up to ∼2.5-fold contrast enhancement over that of the benchmark contrast agent ICG. The testing protocol compares the photoacoustic signal output strength upon absorption of approximately the same light energy. Some relationships between photophysical parameters of the dyes and the resulting photoacoustic signal strength could be derived. PMID:24071709

  6. A seed expanding cluster algorithm for deriving upwelling areas on sea surface temperature images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Susana; Casca, Srgio; Mirkin, Boris

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel clustering algorithm is proposed as a version of the seeded region growing (SRG) approach for the automatic recognition of coastal upwelling from sea surface temperature (SST) images. The new algorithm, one seed expanding cluster (SEC), takes advantage of the concept of approximate clustering due to Mirkin (1996, 2013) to derive a homogeneity criterion in the format of a product rather than the conventional difference between a pixel value and the mean of values over the region of interest. It involves a boundary-oriented pixel labeling so that the cluster growing is performed by expanding its boundary iteratively. The starting point is a cluster consisting of just one seed, the pixel with the coldest temperature. The baseline version of the SEC algorithm uses Otsu's thresholding method to fine-tune the homogeneity threshold. Unfortunately, this method does not always lead to a satisfactory solution. Therefore, we introduce a self-tuning version of the algorithm in which the homogeneity threshold is locally derived from the approximation criterion over a window around the pixel under consideration. The window serves as a boundary regularizer. These two unsupervised versions of the algorithm have been applied to a set of 28 SST images of the western coast of mainland Portugal, and compared against a supervised version fine-tuned by maximizing the F-measure with respect to manually labeled ground-truth maps. The areas built by the unsupervised versions of the SEC algorithm are significantly coincident over the ground-truth regions in the cases at which the upwelling areas consist of a single continuous fragment of the SST map.

  7. Plasma distribution in Mercury's magnetosphere derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2014-04-01

    We assess the statistical spatial distribution of plasma in Mercury's magnetosphere from observations of magnetic pressure deficits and plasma characteristics by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The statistical distributions of proton flux and pressure were derived from 10 months of Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) observations obtained during the orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission. The Magnetometer-derived pressure distributions compare favorably with those deduced from the FIPS observations at locations where depressions in the magnetic field associated with the presence of enhanced plasma pressures are discernible in the Magnetometer data. The magnitudes of the magnetic pressure deficit and the plasma pressure agree on average, although the two measures of plasma pressure may deviate for individual events by as much as a factor of ~3. The FIPS distributions provide better statistics in regions where the plasma is more tenuous and reveal an enhanced plasma population near the magnetopause flanks resulting from direct entry of magnetosheath plasma into the low-latitude boundary layer of the magnetosphere. The plasma observations also exhibit a pronounced north-south asymmetry on the nightside, with markedly lower fluxes at low altitudes in the northern hemisphere than at higher altitudes in the south on the same field line. This asymmetry is consistent with particle loss to the southern hemisphere surface during bounce motion in Mercury's offset dipole magnetic field.

  8. A Quantitative Comparison of Traditional and Image-Derived Bathymetry From Landsats 5, 7, and 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulslander, D.

    2013-12-01

    Though the ocean covers 70% of the earth and is a prime driver of our climate, roughly 95% of it is unexplored. As a basic geophysical parameter, accurate and sufficiently detailed bathymetry is a key piece in understanding the oceans and coasts. Moreover, coastal bathymetry in particular can change rapidly in response to storms, sea level rise, changes in river conditions, and engineering activity. Because of the expense and time involved with traditional, though very accurate, bathymetric methods, remote sensing imagery-derived measurement is often used as a technique for in-fill or rapid response to bathymetry-changing events. While imagery-based bathymetry has been in use for many decades, the techniques and imaging platforms have both evolved and improved over the years. Landsat 8, with its added coastal band, 12-bit capability, 2-week revisit, and global coverage, is an important step forward in updating coastal morphology maps and extending them in to less well-known coastal waters. Here, we present results quantitatively comparing Landsat 5, Landsat 7, and Landsat 8 to sonar-derived bathymetry.

  9. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging derived pressure differential using control volume analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is hindered by a lack of systemic understanding of the interrelationships between pressures and flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Control volume analysis provides a fluid physics approach to quantify and relate pressure and flow information. The objective of this study was to use control volume analysis and magnetic resonance velocity imaging to non-invasively estimate pressure differentials in vitro. Method A flow phantom was constructed and water was the experimental fluid. The phantom was connected to a high-resolution differential pressure sensor and a computer controlled pump producing sinusoidal flow. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements were taken and subsequently analyzed to derive pressure differential waveforms using momentum conservation principles. Independent sensor measurements were obtained for comparison. Results Using magnetic resonance data the momentum balance in the phantom was computed. The measured differential pressure force had amplitude of 14.4 dynes (pressure gradient amplitude 0.30 Pa/cm). A 12.5% normalized root mean square deviation between derived and directly measured pressure differential was obtained. These experiments demonstrate one example of the potential utility of control volume analysis and the concepts involved in its application. Conclusions This study validates a non-invasive measurement technique for relating velocity measurements to pressure differential. These methods may be applied to clinical measurements to estimate pressure differentials in vivo which could not be obtained with current clinical sensors. PMID:21414222

  10. Plasma Distribution in Mercury's Magnetosphere Derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2014-01-01

    We assess the statistical spatial distribution of plasma in Mercury's magnetosphere from observations of magnetic pressure deficits and plasma characteristics by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The statistical distributions of proton flux and pressure were derived from 10months of Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) observations obtained during the orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission. The Magnetometer-derived pressure distributions compare favorably with those deduced from the FIPS observations at locations where depressions in the magnetic field associated with the presence of enhanced plasma pressures are discernible in the Magnetometer data. The magnitudes of the magnetic pressure deficit and the plasma pressure agree on average, although the two measures of plasma pressure may deviate for individual events by as much as a factor of approximately 3. The FIPS distributions provide better statistics in regions where the plasma is more tenuous and reveal an enhanced plasma population near the magnetopause flanks resulting from direct entry of magnetosheath plasma into the low-latitude boundary layer of the magnetosphere. The plasma observations also exhibit a pronounced north-south asymmetry on the nightside, with markedly lower fluxes at low altitudes in the northern hemisphere than at higher altitudes in the south on the same field line. This asymmetry is consistent with particle loss to the southern hemisphere surface during bounce motion in Mercury's offset dipole magnetic field.

  11. Soil moisture retrieval from SAR images as a calibration tool for soil moisture index derived from thermal inertia with MODIS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notarnicola, C.; Ventura, B.; Pettinato, S.; Santi, E.; Zebisch, M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper aims at identifying an operational methodology to derive soil moisture status from optical images by using soil moisture values derived from SAR images as a calibration tool . In the first part of the paper, an algorithm based on Bayesian techniques for the retrieval of soil moisture from C-band SAR images is presented. The algorithm is composed of two modules, one for bare soil and the other for vegetated soil which includes also the use of optical images in order to take into account the vegetation contribution. soil moisture values retrieved from images are then used as a calibration tool for a soil moisture index derived from MODIS images. In this case, the method to estimate soil moisture index from optical and thermal images is based on the calculation of the Apparent Thermal Inertia (ATI). ATI is considered as an approximate (apparent) value of the thermal inertia and is obtained from spectral measurements of the albedo and the diurnal temperature range. soil moisture estimated from SAR images and the ATI are compared in order to find a calibration curve which should cover the entire soil moisture values from saturation to residual moisture values. For the calibration experiment, three main sites were chosen which exhibit different landscape and climatic characteristics. The Basento basin is located in Southern Italy and is characterized by long period of droughts. The Scrivia valley is flat alluvial plain measuring situated close to the confluence of the Scrivia and Po rivers in Northern Italy. The Cordevole watershed, located at the foothill of Mount Sella in Northern Italy is mainly covered by grassland and it was selected because of its relatively smooth topography. The first results indicate a good correlation between ATI and the soil moisture values derived both from measurements and estimated from SAR images.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Water-Soluble Polythiophene Derivatives for Cell Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengyan; Li, Meng; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Jiangyan; Cheng, Yongqiang; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    In this work, four water-soluble polythiophene derivatives (PT, PT-DDA, PT-ADA, and PT-ADA-PPR) with different pendant moieties were synthesized via oxidative copolymerization by FeCl3. By increasing the hydrophobic ability of side chain moieties, there is a gradually blue shift for the maximum absorption wavelength and red shift for the maximum emission wavelength, a reducing trend for fluorescence quantum yields, a growing trend for Stokes shift, and an increasing trend for the mean sizes in the order of PT, PT-ADA, and PT-DDA. All the synthesized polymers show low toxicity and good photostability and accumulate in the lysosomes of A549 cells. Furthermore, the introduction of porphyrin group to PT-ADA side chain (PT-ADA-PPR) broadens the absorption and emission ranges of PT-ADA. PT-ADA-PPR could be excited at two different excitation wavelengths (488 nm and 559 nm) and exhibits two emission pathways, and dual-color fluorescence images (orange and red) of PT-ADA-PPR accumulated in A549 cells are observed. Thus, PT-ADA-PPR could be used as an excellent dual-color fluorescent and lysosome-specific imaging material.

  13. Derived Image of the Rupture Process of the Great Earthquakes Using Processing of Dense Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbert, J.; Le Pichon, A.; Sbe, O.; Vergoz, J.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the source of major earthquakes is of great interest for the scientific community because the parameters derived from have a major importance for the rapid estimation of associated effects (destruction or tsunami). The back-projection technics allow to follow the rupture process in space and in time. In the framework of these studies, we have identified the array processing as a modern tool that can provide important information concerning the geometry and the kinematics of the rupture. Thanks to the various technologies implied in the CTBT, we have brought these studies in the field of seismology, infrasound and hydroacoustic. These different approaches have resulted in either a direct visualization of the rupture thanks to the analysis of variations of azimuth with time of direct waves from the source or indirectly by obtaining the scope of radiation pattern of surface waves. This type of image is innovative because it allows provide information on geographic areas which are not instrumented. We show multiple images of PMCC processing (Progressive Multi Channel Correlation) associated with different major earthquakes as Sumatra Mw=9.3, Nias Mw=8.7, Kokoxoli Mw=7.8, Tohoku Mw=9.0 and how we can constrain the rupture of these events. These studies show the interest of the CTBT network and more precisely the dense arrays of sensors. These arrays offer the unique opportunity for a multi-technological approach of the seismic source and, perhaps, ultimately, the improvement of warning systems.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-trifluoroborate derivatives of triphenylphosphonium for myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Jenni, Silvia; Zhang, Chengcheng; Merkens, Helen; Lau, Joseph; Liu, Zhibo; Perrin, David M; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-04-01

    Four trifluoroborate derivatives of phosphonium cations 2a-d were radiolabeled with fluorine-18 ((18)F) and evaluated for imaging myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography (PET). Tracers were radiolabeled simply via (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange reaction in acidic (pH 2) aqueous solution. On average, [(18)F]2a-d were obtained in 10-17% non-decay-corrected radiochemical yield with 25.9-48.1GBq/μmol specific activity, and >96% radiochemical purity. In vitro stability study showed no decomposition of [(18)F]2a-d after being incubated in mouse plasma for up to 2h. Myocardial uptake in mice was visualized in PET images by using [(18)F]2b-d but not [(18)F]2a. [(18)F]2a-d were stable against in vivo defluorination as no significant bone uptake was observed. Despite sub-optimal heart uptake of [(18)F]2b-d, we successfully demonstrated that (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange reaction on trifluoroborates could be a promising strategy for the design of potential (18)F-labeled tracers even for intracellular targets. PMID:26922139

  15. Automatic Identification and Truncation of Boundary Outlets in Complex Imaging-Derived Biomedical Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Xiangmin; Einstein, Daniel R.; Dyedov, Volodymyr; Carson, James P.

    2009-09-01

    Fast and accurate reconstruction of imaging-derived geometries and subsequent quality mesh generation for biomedical computation are enabling technologies for both clinical and research simulations. Often, the transformation of image to mesh is the rate-limiting step, requiring arduous manual manipulations. A challenging part of this process is the introduction of computable, orthogonal boundary patches, namely the outlets, into treed structures, such as vasculature, arterial or airway trees. Herein, we present efficient and robust algorithms for automatically identifying and truncating the outlets for complex biomedical geometries. Our approach is based on a conceptual decomposition of objects into three different types of local structures, including tips, segments, and branches, where the tips determine the outlets. We define the tips by introducing a novel geometric concept called the average interior center of curvature (AICC), and identify those that are physically stable and numerically noise resistant through successive inflation and deflation tests. We compute well-defined orthogonal planes, which truncate the tips into outlets. The rims of the outlets are then connected into curves, and the outlets are then closed using Delaunay triangulation with the curves as the boundary constraints. Our approach is efficient, with near linear time complexity. We illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of our approach with a variety of complex lung and coronary artery geometries.

  16. TLC-image analysis of non-chromophoric tuberostemonine alkaloid derivatives in Stemona species.

    PubMed

    Kongkiatpaiboon, Sumet; Keeratinijakal, Vichien; Gritsanapan, Wandee

    2013-08-01

    A simple, selective, precise, and accurate thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) image analytical method was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of the major components in the root extracts of Stemona tuberosa (tuberostemonine, tuberostemonine N and neotuberostemonine)), and S. phyllantha (tuberostemonine and tuberostemonine A). The analysis was performed by TLC on silica gel 60 F254 aluminum plates using a mixture of dichloromethane: ethyl acetate: methanol: ammonium hydroxide (50:45:4:1) as mobile phase. Post-derivatization was employed by dipping the TLC plate into Dragendorff's reagent to visualize the spots. Image analysis of the scanned TLC plate was performed to detect the contents of tuberostemonine derivatives. The polynomial regression data for the calibration plots showed good linear relationships within the concentration range of 2-7 microg/spot. The method gave satisfactory precision, accuracy, selectivity and could simultaneously quantify tuberostemonine, tuberostemonine A, tuberostemonine N and neotuberostemonine. Dried powdered roots of S. tuberosa grown in Thailand contained 1.31 +/- 0.28, 1.63 +/- 0.18 and 1.24 +/- 0.27% tuberostemonine, tuberostemonine N, and neotuberostemonine (dry weight), respectively, while S. phyllantha roots contained 1.39 +/- 0.14% tuberostemonine and 0.39 +/- 0.08% tuberostemonine A (dry weight). The proposed method was simple, inexpensive, and more accessible to apply for many local authorities and small laboratories. PMID:24079167

  17. Brain imaging: Reduced sensitivity of RARE-derived techniques to susceptibility effects

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, P.; Allkemper, T.; Schuierer, G.; Peters, P.E.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the decreased sensitivity of RARE-derived pulse sequences to susceptibility effects. A variety of RARE-derived T2-weighted fast SE echo (FSE) sequences with echo trains from 6 to 16 were compared with conventional SE (CSE) sequences by means of MRI in phantoms (iron oxides), volunteers (n = 10), and patients (n = 13) with old hemorrhagic brain lesions. All experiments were performed on a 1.5 T clinical MR system (Magnetom SP 4000; Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) with constant imaging parameters. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of tubes doped with iron oxides at different concentrations and brain areas with physiological iron deposition (red nucleus, substantia nigra) were calculated for CSE and FSE pulse sequences. Areas of old brain hemorrhage were analyzed for lesion conspicuity by blinded analysis with CSE as an internal standard. CNR of iron oxide tubes (TE 90 ins, CSE 45.0 {+-} 3.5, FSE 16 echo trains 28.5 {+-} 3. 1; p {le} 0.01) and iron-containing brain areas decreased with increasing echo trains of FSE sequences. A significantly lower number of old hemorrhagic brain lesions was visible in patients scanned with FSE sequences (6 echo trains: n = 28; 16 echo trains: n = 26) than CSE (n = 40). Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity of RARE-derived techniques to susceptibility effects is significantly decreased compared with CSE. CSE sequences or GE sequences should still be preferred in patients with a history of seizures or intracranial hemorrhage. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabs.

  18. Derivatives of dibenzothiophene for PET imaging of α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yongjun; Kellar, Kenneth J.; Yasuda, Robert P.; Tran, Thao; Xiao, Yingxian; Dannals, Robert F.; Horti, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    A new series of derivatives of 3-(1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonan-4-yl)dibenzo[b,d]thiophene 5,5-dioxide with high binding affinities and selectivity for α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs) (Ki = 0.4 – 20 nM) has been synthesized for PET imaging of α7-nAChRs. Two radiolabeled members of the series [18F]7a (Ki = 0.4 nM) and [18F]7c (Ki = 1.3 nM) were synthesized. [18F]7a and [18F]7c readily entered the mouse brain and specifically labeled α7-nAChRs. The α7-nAChR selective ligand 1 (SSR180711) blocked the binding of [18F]7a in the mouse brain in a dose-dependent manner. The mouse blocking studies with non-α7-nAChR CNS drugs demonstrated that [18F]7a is highly α7-nAChR selective. In agreement with its binding affinity the binding potential of [18F]7a (BPND = 5.3 – 8.0) in control mice is superior to previous α7-nAChR PET radioligands. Thus, [18F]7a displays excellent imaging properties in mice and has been chosen for further evaluation as a potential PET radioligand for imaging of α7-nAChR in non-human primates. PMID:24050653

  19. Tumor Imaging and Targeting Potential of an Hsp70-Derived 14-Mer Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Oellinger, Rupert; Breuninger, Stephanie; Rad, Roland; Pockley, Alan G.; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously used a unique mouse monoclonal antibody cmHsp70.1 to demonstrate the selective presence of a membrane-bound form of Hsp70 (memHsp70) on a variety of leukemia cells and on single cell suspensions derived from solid tumors of different entities, but not on non-transformed cells or cells from corresponding ’healthy‘ tissue. This antibody can be used to image tumors in vivo and target them for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Tumor-specific expression of memHsp70 therefore has the potential to be exploited for theranostic purposes. Given the advantages of peptides as imaging and targeting agents, this study assessed whether a 14-mer tumor penetrating peptide (TPP; TKDNNLLGRFELSG), the sequence of which is derived from the oligomerization domain of Hsp70 which is expressed on the cell surface of tumor cells, can also be used for targeting membrane Hsp70 positive (memHsp70+) tumor cells, in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings The specificity of carboxy-fluorescein (CF-) labeled TPP (TPP) to Hsp70 was proven in an Hsp70 knockout mammary tumor cell system. TPP specifically binds to different memHsp70+ mouse and human tumor cell lines and is rapidly taken up via endosomes. Two to four-fold higher levels of CF-labeled TPP were detected in MCF7 (82% memHsp70+) and MDA-MB-231 (75% memHsp70+) cells compared to T47D cells (29% memHsp70+) that exhibit a lower Hsp70 membrane positivity. After 90 min incubation, TPP co-localized with mitochondrial membranes in memHsp70+ tumors. Although there was no evidence that any given vesicle population was specifically localized, fluorophore-labeled cmHsp70.1 antibody and TPP preferentially accumulated in the proximity of the adherent surface of cultured cells. These findings suggest a potential association between membrane Hsp70 expression and cytoskeletal elements that are involved in adherence, the establishment of intercellular synapses and/or membrane reorganization. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the specific binding and rapid internalization of TPP by tumor cells with a memHsp70+ phenotype. TPP might therefore have potential for targeting and imaging the large proportion of tumors (∼50%) that express memHsp70. PMID:25165986

  20. Exploration of peptide T7 and its derivative as integrin ?v?3-targeted imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Hao, Yumei; Long, Wei; Song, Naling; Fan, Saijun; Meng, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop potential candidates of integrin ?v?3-targeted imaging agent, which can facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of malignant solid tumors. Methods Peptides derived from tumstatin, named T7 and T7-6H, were derivatized to contain histidine in the C-terminus of their sequence and were labeled with 99mTc via nitrido and carbonyl precursors. The radiochemical purity and stability of 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H were characterized by thin-layer chromatography. The whole body biodistribution was studied in NCI-H157-bearing BALB/c nude mice. Results The 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H showed adequate in vitro stability, with a high radiochemical purity of over 90%. The dissociation constant (Kd) value of the 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H ranged from 68.5 nM to 140.8 nM in U251 and NCI-H157 cell lines. 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H showed no significant difference of biodistribution in mice. Furthermore, both T7 and T7-6H exhibited a poor bloodbrain barrier penetration and a transient accumulation in lung; the uptake in tumor tissues was significantly higher than in muscle tissue, with a ratio of 5.8. Conclusion 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H can be regarded as promising single-photon emission computed tomography probes for imaging integrin ?v?3, and need to be further studied for noninvasive detection of tumors. PMID:26109872

  1. Multi-image CAD employing features derived from ipsilateral mammographic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Walter F.; Zheng, Bin; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Wang, Xiao Hui; Maitz, Glenn S.; Gur, David

    1999-05-01

    On mammograms, certain kinds of features related to masses (e.g., location, texture, degree of spiculation, and integrated density difference) tend to be relatively invariant, or at last predictable, with respect to breast compression. Thus, ipsilateral pairs of mammograms may contain information not available from analyzing single views separately. To demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating multi-view features into CAD algorithm, `single-image' CAD was applied to each individual image in a set of 60 ipsilateral studies, after which all possible pairs of suspicious regions, consisting of one from each view, were formed. For these 402 pairs we defined and evaluated `multi-view' features such as: (1) relative position of centers of regions; (2) ratio of lengths of region projections parallel to nipple axis lines; (3) ratio of integrated contrast difference; (4) ratio of the sizes of the suspicious regions; and (5) measure of relative complexity of region boundaries. Each pair was identified as either a `true positive/true positive' (T) pair (i.e., two regions which are projections of the same actual mass), or as a falsely associated pair (F). Distributions for each feature were calculated. A Bayesian network was trained and tested to classify pairs of suspicious regions based exclusively on the multi-view features described above. Distributions for all features were significantly difference for T versus F pairs as indicated by likelihood ratios. Performance of the Bayesian network, which was measured by ROC analysis, indicates a significant ability to distinguish between T pairs and F pairs (Az equals 0.82 +/- 0.03), using information that is attributed to the multi-view content. This study is the first demonstration that there is a significant amount of spatial information that can be derived from ipsilateral pairs of mammograms.

  2. Synthesis of [18F]-labelled Maltose Derivatives as PET Tracers for Imaging Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Namavari, Mohammad; Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Hoehne, Aileen; Jouannot, Erwan; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop novel positron emission tomography (PET) agents for visualization and therapy monitoring of bacterial infections. Procedures It is known that maltose and maltodextrins are energy sources for bacteria. Hence, 18F-labelled maltose derivatives could be a valuable tool for imaging bacterial infections. We have developed methods to synthesize 4-O-(?-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-deoxy-6-[18F]fluoro-D-glucopyranoside (6-[18F]fluoromaltose) and 4-O-(?-D-glucopyranosyl)-1-deoxy-1-[18F]fluoro-D-glucopyranoside (1-[18F]fluoromaltose) as bacterial infection PET imaging agents. 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was prepared from precursor 1,2,3-tri-O-acetyl-4-O-(2?,3?,-di-O-acetyl-4?,6?-benzylidene-?-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-deoxy-6-nosyl-D-glucopranoside (5). The synthesis involved the radio-fluorination of 5 followed by acidic and basic hydrolysis to give 6-[18F]fluoromaltose. In an analogous procedure, 1-[18F]fluoromaltose was synthesized from 2,3, 6-tri-O-acetyl-4-O-(2?,3?,4?,6-tetra-O-acetyl-?-D-glucopyranosyl)-1-deoxy-1-O-triflyl-D-glucopranoside (9). Stability of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human and mouse serum at 37 C was determined. Escherichia coli uptake of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was examined. Results A reliable synthesis of 1- and 6-[18F]fluoromaltose has been accomplished with 46 and 58 % radiochemical yields, respectively (decay-corrected with 95 % radiochemical purity). 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was sufficiently stable over the time span needed for PET studies (~96 % intact compound after 1-h and ~65 % after 2-h incubation in serum). Bacterial uptake experiments indicated that E. coli transports 6-[18F]fluoromaltose. Competition assays showed that the uptake of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was completely blocked by co-incubation with 1 mM of the natural substrate maltose. Conclusion We have successfully synthesized 1- and 6-[18F]fluoromaltose via direct fluorination of appropriate protected maltose precursors. Bacterial uptake experiments in E. coli and stability studies suggest a possible application of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose as a new PET imaging agent for visualization and monitoring of bacterial infections. PMID:25277604

  3. Hyperpolarized (3)He magnetic resonance imaging-derived pulmonary pressure-volume curves.

    PubMed

    Choy, Stephen; Wheatley, Andrew; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2010-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the potential for the use of hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) surrogates of alveolar size, together with literature-based morphological parameters in a theoretical model of lung mechanics to simulate noninvasive transpulmonary pressure-volume curves. Fourteen ex-smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 8 stage II, n = 6 stage III/IV COPD) and five age-matched never-smokers, provided written, informed consent and were evaluated at baseline and 26 + or - 2 mo later (n = 15 subjects) using plethysmography, spirometry, and (3)He MRI at 3.0 T. Total lung capacity, residual volume, and literature-based morphological parameters were used with alveolar volumes derived from (3)He ADC to simulate noninvasive pressure-volume curves. The resultant anterior-posterior transpulmonary pressure gradient was significantly decreased for stage II COPD (P < 0.01) and stage III COPD subjects (P < 0.001) compared with healthy volunteers. Both COPD subgroups showed increased alveolar radius compared with healthy subjects (P < 0.01, stage II COPD; P < 0.001, stage III COPD). In addition, surface area and surface tension were significantly increased in stage III COPD compared with healthy volunteers (P < 0.01). These results suggest that (3)He MRI provides a potential noninvasive approach to evaluate lung mechanics regionally and further supports the use of ADC values as a regional noninvasive probe of pulmonary microstructure and compliance. PMID:20538846

  4. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cell Imaging Using Cadmium-Free Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Kaji, Noritada; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have received much attention for biomolecule and cell imaging applications because of their superior optical properties such as high quantum efficiency, size-tunable emission, and resistance to photobleaching process. However, QDs that are commercially available contain cadmium (Cd), a highly toxic element. Thus, the development of Cd-free and less toxic QDs is strongly desired. In this study, we developed Cd-free QDs (ZnS-coated ZnS-AgInS2 solid solution nanoparticles with a sulfo group: ZnS-ZAIS-SO3H) and investigated the ability of this material to label stem cells. ZnS-ZAIS-SO3H could be transduced into mouse adipose tissue-derived stem cells (mASCs) using octaarginine peptides (R8), known as cell-penetrating peptides. The optimal ratio of ZnS-ZAIS-SO3H:R8 was found to be 1:100 for labeling mASCs. More than 80% of mASCs labeled with 500 nM ZnS-ZAIS-SO3H were found to be alive, and the proliferation rates of labeled mASCs were maintained at the same rate as that of nonlabeled mASCs. In addition, no abnormalities in the morphology of mASCs labeled with ZnS-ZAIS-SO3H could be observed. These data suggest that ZnS-ZAIS-SO3H may be effective for the labeling of mASCs.

  5. Natural-color and color-infrared image mosaics of the Colorado River corridor in Arizona derived from the May 2009 airborne image collection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) periodically collects airborne image data for the Colorado River corridor within Arizona (fig. 1) to allow scientists to study the impacts of Glen Canyon Dam water release on the corridors natural and cultural resources. These data are collected from just above Glen Canyon Dam (in Lake Powell) down to the entrance of Lake Mead, for a total distance of 450 kilometers (km) and within a 500-meter (m) swath centered on the rivers mainstem and its seven main tributaries (fig. 1). The most recent airborne data collection in 2009 acquired image data in four wavelength bands (blue, green, red, and near infrared) at a spatial resolution of 20 centimeters (cm). The image collection used the latest model of the Leica ADS40 airborne digital sensor (the SH52), which uses a single optic for all four bands and collects and stores band radiance in 12-bits. Davis (2012) reported on the performance of the SH52 sensor and on the processing steps required to produce the nearly flawless four-band image mosaic (sectioned into map tiles) for the river corridor. The final image mosaic has a total of only 3 km of surface defects in addition to some areas of cloud shadow because of persistent inclement weather during data collection. The 2009 four-band image mosaic is perhaps the best image dataset that exists for the entire Arizona part of the Colorado River. Some analyses of these image mosaics do not require the full 12-bit dynamic range or all four bands of the calibrated image database, in which atmospheric scattering (or haze) had not been removed from the four bands. To provide scientists and the general public with image products that are more useful for visual interpretation, the 12-bit image data were converted to 8-bit natural-color and color-infrared images, which also removed atmospheric scattering within each wavelength-band image. The conversion required an evaluation of the histograms of each bands digital-number population within each map tile throughout the corridor and the determination of the digital numbers corresponding to the lower and upper one percent of the picture-element population within each map tile. Visual examination of the image tiles that were given a 1-percent stretch (whereby the lower 1- percent 12-bit digital number is assigned an 8-bit value of zero and the upper 1-percent 12-bit digital number is assigned an 8-bit value of 255) indicated that this stretch sufficiently removed atmospheric scattering, which provided improved image clarity and true natural colors for all surface materials. The lower and upper 1-percent, 12-bit digital numbers for each wavelength-band image in the image tiles exhibit erratic variations along the river corridor; the variations exhibited similar trends in both the lower and upper 1-percent digital numbers for all four wavelength-band images (figs. 25). The erratic variations are attributed to (1) daily variations in atmospheric water-vapor content due to monsoonal storms, (2) variations in channel water color due to variable sediment input from tributaries, and (3) variations in the amount of topographic shadows within each image tile, in which reflectance is dominated by atmospheric scattering. To make the surface colors of the stretched, 8-bit images consistent among adjacent image tiles, it was necessary to average both the lower and upper 1-percent digital values for each wavelength-band image over 20 river miles to subdue the erratic variations. The average lower and upper 1-percent digital numbers for each image tile (figs. 25) were used to convert the 12-bit image values to 8-bit values and the resulting 8-bit four-band images were stored as natural-color (red, green, and blue wavelength bands) and color-infrared (near-infrared, red, and green wavelength bands) images in embedded geotiff format, which can be read and used by most geographic information system (GIS) and image-processing software. The tiff world files (tfw) are provided, even though they are generally not needed for most software to read an embedded geotiff image. All image data are projected in the State Plane (SP) map projection using the central Arizona zone (202) and the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83). The map-tile scheme used to segment the corridor image mosaic followed the standard USGS quarter-quadrangle (QQ) map borders, but the high resolution (20 cm) of the images required further quarter segmentation (QQQ) of the standard QQ tiles, where the image mosaic covered a large fraction of a QQ map tile (segmentation shown in (figure 6), where QQ_1 to QQ_4 shows the number convention used to designate a quarter of a QQ tile). To minimize the size of each image tile, each image or map tile was subset to only include that part of the tile that had image data. In addition, some QQQ image tiles within a QQ tile were combined when adjacent QQQ map tiles were small. Thus, some image tiles consist of combinations of QQQ map tiles, some consist of an entire QQ map tile, and some consist of two adjoining QQ map tiles. The final image tiles number 143, which is a large number of files to list on the Internet for both the natural-color and color-infrared images. Thus, the image tiles were placed in seven file folders based on the one-half-degree geographic boundaries within the study area (fig. 7). The map tiles in each file folder were compressed to minimize folder size for more efficient downloading. The file folders are sequentially referred to as zone 1 through zone 7, proceeding down river (fig. 7). The QQ designations of the image tiles contained within each folder or zone are shown on the index map for each respective zone (figs. 814).

  6. A statistical protocol for describing global land-cover characterizations derived from remotely-sensed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosnight, Eugene Alan

    Statistical measures are evaluated and recommended for use in a protocol to describe land-cover characterizations (often with more than 100 classes), to identify classes needing further evaluation, and to support mapping the land-cover characterization classes into user-specified land-cover classes (often with fewer than 20 classes). The data sets studied are the Land-Cover Characterization database derived from AVHRR images (1992--1993) for the conterminous U.S., the USGS Land-Use Land-Cover database derived from aerial photography (1960s and 1970s), and the USFS coordinated ground-sampled Land-Cover Characterization Validation database (1993--1994). A set of overall, class-specific and class-pairs measures of association with distinct statistical properties is incorporated into the protocol. Three overall measures, Proportional Reduction in Error (PRE), Proportion of Explained Variance (PEV), and Cramer's V, quantify the relationship between land-cover characterizations and landcover classifications. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, at sample sizes less than 0.1% the population parameters are no longer contained within the interquartile range of the estimates. Standardized conditional variants of PEV and PRE are used to identify classes whose distributions of counts differ statistically from the marginal frequencies. The Chi-square, correlation coefficient, Yule's Q and deviance residuals quantify the associations between land-cover characterization and land-cover classification class-pairs. The Chi-square statistic identifies statistically independent class-pairs. The other three measures allow class-pairs to be ranked. The protocol was used to compare the three data sets for 2,523 sample plots (0.0327% of the population). The Land-Cover Characterization was slightly more closely associated with the USGS classification than was the USFS classification. The strongest associations for each Land-Cover Characterization class, in general, support the interpreted land-cover labels. A few Land-Cover Characterization classes with no, or only weak, associations with the interpreted class warrant further analysis. A comparison of the reference classifications identified potential sources of confusion. Techniques described in the remote-sensing literature for the analysis of contingency tables are designed to assess accuracy or agreement. The protocol and measures described in this dissertation provide a valuable set of tools for use by the resource scientist to efficiently and effectively handle the very large number of classes and relationships that exist in general global land-cover characterizations.

  7. Mapping and monitoring changes in vegetation communities of Jasper Ridge, CA, using spectral fractions derived from AVIRIS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabol, Donald E., Jr.; Roberts, Dar A.; Adams, John B.; Smith, Milton O.

    1993-01-01

    An important application of remote sensing is to map and monitor changes over large areas of the land surface. This is particularly significant with the current interest in monitoring vegetation communities. Most of traditional methods for mapping different types of plant communities are based upon statistical classification techniques (i.e., parallel piped, nearest-neighbor, etc.) applied to uncalibrated multispectral data. Classes from these techniques are typically difficult to interpret (particularly to a field ecologist/botanist). Also, classes derived for one image can be very different from those derived from another image of the same area, making interpretation of observed temporal changes nearly impossible. More recently, neural networks have been applied to classification. Neural network classification, based upon spectral matching, is weak in dealing with spectral mixtures (a condition prevalent in images of natural surfaces). Another approach to mapping vegetation communities is based on spectral mixture analysis, which can provide a consistent framework for image interpretation. Roberts et al. (1990) mapped vegetation using the band residuals from a simple mixing model (the same spectral endmembers applied to all image pixels). Sabol et al. (1992b) and Roberts et al. (1992) used different methods to apply the most appropriate spectral endmembers to each image pixel, thereby allowing mapping of vegetation based upon the the different endmember spectra. In this paper, we describe a new approach to classification of vegetation communities based upon the spectra fractions derived from spectral mixture analysis. This approach was applied to three 1992 AVIRIS images of Jasper Ridge, California to observe seasonal changes in surface composition.

  8. Glacier topography and elevation changes derived from Pliades sub-meter stereo images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, E.; Vincent, C.; Magnsson, E.; Gunnlaugsson, . .; Pitte, P.; Le Meur, E.; Masiokas, M.; Ruiz, L.; Plsson, F.; Belart, J. M. C.; Wagnon, P.

    2014-12-01

    In response to climate change, most glaciers are losing mass and hence contribute to sea-level rise. Repeated and accurate mapping of their surface topography is required to estimate their mass balance and to extrapolate/calibrate sparse field glaciological measurements. In this study we evaluate the potential of sub-meter stereo imagery from the recently launched Pliades satellites to derive digital elevation models (DEMs) of glaciers and their elevation changes. Our five evaluation sites, where nearly simultaneous field measurements were collected, are located in Iceland, the European Alps, the central Andes, Nepal and Antarctica. For Iceland, the Pliades DEM is also compared to a lidar DEM. The vertical biases of the Pliades DEMs are less than 1 m if ground control points (GCPs) are used, but reach up to 7 m without GCPs. Even without GCPs, vertical biases can be reduced to a few decimetres by horizontal and vertical co-registration of the DEMs to reference altimetric data on ice-free terrain. Around these biases, the vertical precision of the Pliades DEMs is 1 m and even 0.5 m on the flat glacier tongues (1? confidence level). Similar precision levels are obtained in the accumulation areas of glaciers and in Antarctica. We also demonstrate the high potential of Pliades DEMs for measuring seasonal, annual and multi-annual elevation changes with an accuracy of 1 m or better if cloud-free images are available. The negative region-wide mass balances of glaciers in the Mont-Blanc area (-1.04 0.23 m a-1 water equivalent, w.e.) are revealed by differencing Satellite pour l'Observation de la Terre 5 (SPOT 5) and Pliades DEMs acquired in August 2003 and 2012, confirming the accelerated glacial wastage in the European Alps.

  9. Reproducibility of the Structural Brain Connectome Derived from Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris; Breedlove, Jesse L.; Nesland, Travis; Paulus, Walter; Helms, Gunther; Focke, Niels K.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Disruptions of brain anatomical connectivity are believed to play a central role in several neurological and psychiatric illnesses. The structural brain connectome is typically derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which may be influenced by methodological factors related to signal processing, MRI scanners and biophysical properties of neuroanatomical regions. In this study, we evaluated how these variables affect the reproducibility of the structural connectome. Methods Twenty healthy adults underwent 3 MRI scanning sessions (twice in the same MRI scanner and a third time in a different scanner unit) within a short period of time. The scanning sessions included similar T1 weighted and DTI sequences. Deterministic or probabilistic tractography was performed to assess link weight based on the number of fibers connecting gray matter regions of interest (ROI). Link weight and graph theory network measures were calculated and reproducibility was assessed through intra-class correlation coefficients, assuming each scanning session as a rater. Results Connectome reproducibility was higher with data from the same scanner. The probabilistic approach yielded larger reproducibility, while the individual variation in the number of tracked fibers from deterministic tractography was negatively associated with reproducibility. Links connecting larger and anatomically closer ROIs demonstrated higher reproducibility. In general, graph theory measures demonstrated high reproducibility across scanning sessions. Discussion Anatomical factors and tractography approaches can influence the reproducibility of the structural connectome and should be factored in the interpretation of future studies. Our results demonstrate that connectome mapping is a largely reproducible technique, particularly as it relates to the geometry of network architecture measured by graph theory methods. PMID:26332788

  10. [F-18]-Fluoromisonidazole Quantification of Hypoxia in Human Cancer Patients using Image-derived Blood Surrogate Tissue Reference Regions

    PubMed Central

    Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; OSullivan, Janet N.; Fink, James R.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; McLaughlin, Lena J.; Muzi, John P.; Mankoff, David A.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    18F-FMISO is the most widely used PET agent for imaging hypoxia, a condition associated with resistance to tumor therapy. 18F-FMISO equilibrates in normoxic tissues, but is retained under hypoxic conditions because of reduction and binding to macromolecules. A simple tissue-to-blood ratio (TB) is suitable for quantifying hypoxia. A threshold of TB ? 1.2 is useful in discriminating the hypoxic volume (HV) of tissue; TBmax is the maximum intensity of the hypoxic region and does not invoke a threshold. Because elimination of blood sampling would simplify clinical use, we tested the validity of using imaging regions as a surrogate for blood sampling. Methods Patients underwent 20 min 18F-FMISO scans during the 90140 min interval post-injection with venous blood sampling. 223 18F-FMISO patient studies had detectable surrogate blood regions in the field-of-view. Quantitative parameters of hypoxia (TBmax, HV) derived from blood samples were compared to values using surrogate blood regions derived from heart, aorta and/or cerebellum. In a subset of brain cancer patients, parameters from blood samples and from cerebellum were compared for their ability to independently predict outcome. Results Vascular regions of heart showed the highest correlation to measured blood activity (R2 = 0.84). For brain studies, cerebellar activity was similarly correlated to blood samples. In brain cancer patients, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that image-derived reference regions had nearly identical predictive power as parameters derived from blood, thus obviating the need for venous sampling in these patients. Conclusions Simple static analysis of 18F-FMISO PET captures both the intensity (TBmax) and spatial extent (HV) of tumor hypoxia. An image-derived region to assess blood activity can be used as a surrogate for blood sampling in quantification of hypoxia. PMID:26112020

  11. The Kepler Input Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, D. W.; Brown, T. M.; Monet, D. G.; Everett, M.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Hergenrother, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    The Kepler mission will monitor 170,000 planet-search targets during the first year, and 100,000 after that. The Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) will be used to select optimum targets for the search for habitable earth-like transiting planets. The KIC will include all known catalogued stars in an area of about 177 square degrees centered at RA 19:22:40 and Dec +44:30 (l=76.3 and b=+13.5). 2MASS photometry will be supplemented with new ground-based photometry obtained in the SDSS g, r, i, and z bands plus a custom filter centered on the Mg b lines, using KeplerCam on the 48-inch telescope at the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. The photometry will be used to estimate stellar characteristics for all stars brighter than K 14.5 mag. The KIC will include effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, reddening, distance, and radius estimates for these stars. The CCD images are pipeline processed to produce instrumental magnitudes at PSI. The photometry is then archived and transformed to the SDSS system at HAO, where the astrophysical analysis of the stellar characteristics is carried out. The results are then merged with catalogued data at the USNOFS to produce the KIC. High dispersion spectroscopy with Hectochelle on the MMT will be used to supplement the information for many of the most interesting targets. The KIC will be released before launch for use by the astronomical community and will be available for queries over the internet. Support from the Kepler mission is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  13. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  14. Processing distributed inputs in coupled excitable lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Cristina M.; Torrent, M. C.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Buldu, Javier M.

    2007-11-15

    In many instances, networks of dynamical elements are subject to distributed input signals that enter the network through different nodes. In these cases, processing of the input signals may be mediated by coupling, in what constitutes an emerging property of the network. Here we study experimentally this effect in two mutually injected semiconductor lasers with optical feedback, operating in an excitable regime. The lasers are subject to different periodic input signals in their pump current, with distinct frequencies. Our results show that when the signals are harmonics of an absent fundamental, the laser array is able to process these signals and respond at the missing fundamental frequency. When the input frequencies are rigidly shifted from their harmonic values, the response frequency follows a simple law derived from a linear sum of the inputs, even though the array integrates the electrical inputs after having transduced them optically. The results are reproduced numerically with a dynamical model of the laser array.

  15. A coumarin derivative as a fluorogenic glycoproteomic probe for biological imaging.

    PubMed

    Rong, Lei; Liu, Li-Han; Chen, Si; Cheng, Han; Chen, Chang-Sheng; Li, Ze-Yong; Qin, Si-Yong; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2014-01-21

    Fluorescence imaging in living cells is typically carried out using a functionalized fluorescent dye. But it often causes strong background noise under many conditions where washing is not applicable. Here, we report on a coumarin based fluorogenic probe, which can be used as a bioorthogonal-labeling tool for glycoproteins. The results indicated that the probe was able to image glycoproteins in living cells and it may also be suitable for intracellular imaging. PMID:24281692

  16. Texture Descriptors Ensembles Enable Image-Based Classification of Maturation of Human Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Caetano dos Santos, Florentino Luciano; Skottman, Heli; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Hyttinen, Jari

    2016-01-01

    Aims A fast, non-invasive and observer-independent method to analyze the homogeneity and maturity of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is warranted to assess the suitability of hPSC-RPE cells for implantation or in vitro use. The aim of this work was to develop and validate methods to create ensembles of state-of-the-art texture descriptors and to provide a robust classification tool to separate three different maturation stages of RPE cells by using phase contrast microscopy images. The same methods were also validated on a wide variety of biological image classification problems, such as histological or virus image classification. Methods For image classification we used different texture descriptors, descriptor ensembles and preprocessing techniques. Also, three new methods were tested. The first approach was an ensemble of preprocessing methods, to create an additional set of images. The second was the region-based approach, where saliency detection and wavelet decomposition divide each image in two different regions, from which features were extracted through different descriptors. The third method was an ensemble of Binarized Statistical Image Features, based on different sizes and thresholds. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) was trained for each descriptor histogram and the set of SVMs combined by sum rule. The accuracy of the computer vision tool was verified in classifying the hPSC-RPE cell maturation level. Dataset and Results The RPE dataset contains 1862 subwindows from 195 phase contrast images. The final descriptor ensemble outperformed the most recent stand-alone texture descriptors, obtaining, for the RPE dataset, an area under ROC curve (AUC) of 86.49% with the 10-fold cross validation and 91.98% with the leave-one-image-out protocol. The generality of the three proposed approaches was ascertained with 10 more biological image datasets, obtaining an average AUC greater than 97%. Conclusions Here we showed that the developed ensembles of texture descriptors are able to classify the RPE cell maturation stage. Moreover, we proved that preprocessing and region-based decomposition improves many descriptors’ accuracy in biological dataset classification. Finally, we built the first public dataset of stem cell-derived RPE cells, which is publicly available to the scientific community for classification studies. The proposed tool is available at https://www.dei.unipd.it/node/2357 and the RPE dataset at http://www.biomeditech.fi/data/RPE_dataset/. Both are available at https://figshare.com/s/d6fb591f1beb4f8efa6f. PMID:26895509

  17. An Analysis of Whole Body Tracer Kinetics in Dynamic PET Studies With Application to Image-Based Blood Input Function Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; O’Sullivan, Finbarr

    2014-01-01

    In a positron emission tomography (PET) study, the local uptake of the tracer is dependent on vascular delivery and retention. For dynamic studies the measured uptake time-course information can be best interpreted when knowledge of the time-course of tracer in the blood is available. This is certainly true for the most established tracers such as 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 15O-Water (H2O). Since direct sampling of blood as part of PET studies is increasingly impractical, there is ongoing interest in image-extraction of blood time-course information. But analysis of PET-measured blood pool signals is complicated because they will typically involve a combination of arterial, venous and tissue information. Thus, a careful appreciation of these components is needed to interpret the available data. To facilitate this process, we propose a novel Markov chain model for representation of the circulation of a tracer atom in the body. The model represents both arterial and venous time-course patterns. Under reasonable conditions equilibration of tracer activity in arterial and venous blood is achieved by the end of the PET study—consistent with empirical measurement. Statistical inference for Markov model parameters is a challenge. A penalized nonlinear least squares process, incorporating a generalized cross-validation score, is proposed. Random effects analysis is used to adaptively specify the structure of the penalty function based on historical samples of directly measured blood data. A collection of arterially sampled data from PET studies with FDG and H2O is used to illustrate the methodology. These data analyses are highly supportive of the overall modeling approach. An adaptation of the model to the problem of extraction of arterial blood signals from imaging data is also developed and promising preliminary results for cerebral and thoracic imaging studies with FDG and H2O are obtained. PMID:24770914

  18. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  19. Input and Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Examines the connection between empirical studies of interaction involving second-language learners and the specific claims of Krashen's Input Hypothesis, as modified by Chaudron, White, and Swain. (36 references) (GLR)

  20. IB-08COMPUTATIONAL IMAGING FEATURES DERIVED FROM MRI IMAGES OF THE BRAIN CAN DISCRIMINATE IMMUNE SIGNATURE STATUS IN GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME (GBM)

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Shivali; Rao, Ganesh; Heimberger, Amy; Martinez, Juan; Rao, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine which computationally derived imaging features are correlated with immune gene-signature activity in GBM. Recently, we showed that immune-related genes are enriched within molecular subtypes of GBMs. The significance of immune system response to the tumor is becoming relevant as a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we investigated an imaging-based method for determining the immune system response to GBM. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The study was conducted on pre-surgical Contrast enhanced T1-post and T2-FLAIR MRI images from 83 GBM patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas(TCGA) database. The tumors were segmented semi-automatically (MITK toolkit). Image heterogeneity features were extracted for 3D volumes using in-house MatlabTM scripts . Features include three-dimensional statistical, transform-based and model-based features, pertaining to pixel gray-level heterogeneity measures such as energy, entropy, correlationGenetic programming-based models are used to discriminate subjects according to up- or down-regulation of six immune signatures (measured using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis): immune effector, immune suppression, immune effector process, regulation of the immune effector process, positive regulation of immune system process and negative regulation of immune system process. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves (ROC), and true positive/false positive rates (TPR/FPR) were used to assess the performance of the immune signature status classifier. RESULTS: Based on six different gene-sets associated with immune response, we found that image-derived features are capable of accurately predicting immune signature status in GBMs. ROC analysis reveals that image-features are capable of determining up- or down regulation of diverse immune signatures. The true positive rates (TPR) for each of the six immune signatures are 89%, 83%, 80%, 78%, 72% and 69% respectively (with FPR less than 20%). CONCLUSION: This study presents preliminary evidence that MRI image-derived volumetric and texture features are predictive of immune activity in GBM at the molecular level.

  1. COMETARY SCIENCE. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko surface properties as derived from CIVA panoramic images.

    PubMed

    Bibring, J-P; Langevin, Y; Carter, J; Eng, P; Gondet, B; Jorda, L; Le Moulic, S; Mottola, S; Pilorget, C; Poulet, F; Vincendon, M

    2015-07-31

    The structure and composition of cometary constituents, down to their microscopic scale, are critical witnesses of the processes and ingredients that drove the formation and evolution of planetary bodies toward their present diversity. On board Rosetta's lander Philae, the Comet Infrared and Visible Analyser (CIVA) experiment took a series of images to characterize the surface materials surrounding the lander on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Images were collected twice: just after touchdown, and after Philae finally came to rest, where it acquired a full panorama. These images reveal a fractured surface with complex structure and a variety of grain scales and albedos, possibly constituting pristine cometary material. PMID:26228154

  2. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko surface properties as derived from CIVA panoramic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibring, J.-P.; Langevin, Y.; Carter, J.; Eng, P.; Gondet, B.; Jorda, L.; Le Moulic, S.; Mottola, S.; Pilorget, C.; Poulet, F.; Vincendon, M.

    2015-07-01

    The structure and composition of cometary constituents, down to their microscopic scale, are critical witnesses of the processes and ingredients that drove the formation and evolution of planetary bodies toward their present diversity. On board Rosettas lander Philae, the Comet Infrared and Visible Analyser (CIVA) experiment took a series of images to characterize the surface materials surrounding the lander on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Images were collected twice: just after touchdown, and after Philae finally came to rest, where it acquired a full panorama. These images reveal a fractured surface with complex structure and a variety of grain scales and albedos, possibly constituting pristine cometary material.

  3. Three-dimensional image technology in forensic anthropology: Assessing the validity of biological profiles derived from CT-3D images of the skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Leon Valenzuela, Maria Julia

    This project explores the reliability of building a biological profile for an unknown individual based on three-dimensional (3D) images of the individual's skeleton. 3D imaging technology has been widely researched for medical and engineering applications, and it is increasingly being used as a tool for anthropological inquiry. While the question of whether a biological profile can be derived from 3D images of a skeleton with the same accuracy as achieved when using dry bones has been explored, bigger sample sizes, a standardized scanning protocol and more interobserver error data are needed before 3D methods can become widely and confidently used in forensic anthropology. 3D images of Computed Tomography (CT) scans were obtained from 130 innominate bones from Boston University's skeletal collection (School of Medicine). For each bone, both 3D images and original bones were assessed using the Phenice and Suchey-Brooks methods. Statistical analysis was used to determine the agreement between 3D image assessment versus traditional assessment. A pool of six individuals with varying experience in the field of forensic anthropology scored a subsample (n = 20) to explore interobserver error. While a high agreement was found for age and sex estimation for specimens scored by the author, the interobserver study shows that observers found it difficult to apply standard methods to 3D images. Higher levels of experience did not result in higher agreement between observers, as would be expected. Thus, a need for training in 3D visualization before applying anthropological methods to 3D bones is suggested. Future research should explore interobserver error using a larger sample size in order to test the hypothesis that training in 3D visualization will result in a higher agreement between scores. The need for the development of a standard scanning protocol focusing on the optimization of 3D image resolution is highlighted. Applications for this research include the possibility of digitizing skeletal collections in order to expand their use and for deriving skeletal collections from living populations and creating population-specific standards. Further research for the development of a standard scanning and processing protocol is needed before 3D methods in forensic anthropology are considered as reliable tools for generating biological profiles.

  4. OpenTein: a database of digital whole-slide images of stem cell-derived teratomas.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Joon; Komiyama, Yusuke; Suemori, Hirofumi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Nakai, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Human stem cells are promising sources for regenerative therapy. To ensure safety of future therapeutic applications, the differentiation potency of stem cells has to be tested and be widely opened to the public. The potency is generally assessed by teratoma formation comprising differentiated cells from all three germ layers, and the teratomas can be inspected through high-quality digital images. The teratoma assay, however, lacks consistency in transplantation protocols and even in interpretation, which needs community-based efforts for improving the assay quality. Here, we have developed a novel database OpenTein (Open Teratoma Investigation, http://opentein.hgc.jp/) to archive and freely distribute high-resolution whole-slide images and relevant records. OpenTein has been designed as a searchable, zoomable and annotatable web-based repository system. We have deposited 468 images of teratomas derived by our transplantation of human stem cells, and users can freely access and process such digital teratoma images. Approximately, the current version of OpenTein responds within 11.2 min for processing 2.03 gigapixel teratoma images. Our system offers valuable tools and resources in the new era of stem cell biology. PMID:26496950

  5. OpenTein: a database of digital whole-slide images of stem cell-derived teratomas

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Joon; Komiyama, Yusuke; Suemori, Hirofumi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Nakai, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Human stem cells are promising sources for regenerative therapy. To ensure safety of future therapeutic applications, the differentiation potency of stem cells has to be tested and be widely opened to the public. The potency is generally assessed by teratoma formation comprising differentiated cells from all three germ layers, and the teratomas can be inspected through high-quality digital images. The teratoma assay, however, lacks consistency in transplantation protocols and even in interpretation, which needs community-based efforts for improving the assay quality. Here, we have developed a novel database OpenTein (Open Teratoma Investigation, http://opentein.hgc.jp/) to archive and freely distribute high-resolution whole-slide images and relevant records. OpenTein has been designed as a searchable, zoomable and annotatable web-based repository system. We have deposited 468 images of teratomas derived by our transplantation of human stem cells, and users can freely access and process such digital teratoma images. Approximately, the current version of OpenTein responds within 11.2 min for processing 2.03 gigapixel teratoma images. Our system offers valuable tools and resources in the new era of stem cell biology. PMID:26496950

  6. Texture analysis on parametric maps derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jacobus FA; Lu, Yonggang; Gupta, Gaorav; Lee, Nancy Y; Stambuk, Hilda E; Mazaheri, Yousef; Deasy, Joseph O; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the merits of texture analysis on parametric maps derived from pharmacokinetic modeling with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) as imaging biomarkers for the prediction of treatment response in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). METHODS: In this retrospective study, 19 HNSCC patients underwent pre- and intra-treatment DCE-MRI scans at a 1.5T MRI scanner. All patients had chemo-radiation treatment. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed on the acquired DCE-MRI images, generating maps of volume transfer rate (Ktrans) and volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space (ve). Image texture analysis was then employed on maps of Ktrans and ve, generating two texture measures: Energy (E) and homogeneity. RESULTS: No significant changes were found for the mean and standard deviation for Ktrans and ve between pre- and intra-treatment (P > 0.09). Texture analysis revealed that the imaging biomarker E of ve was significantly higher in intra-treatment scans, relative to pretreatment scans (P < 0.04). CONCLUSION: Chemo-radiation treatment in HNSCC significantly reduces the heterogeneity of tumors. PMID:26834947

  7. Compensation for Spherical Geometric and Absorption Effects on Lower Thermospheric Emission Intensities Derived from High Earth Orbit Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W.; Germany, G. A.; Richards, P. G.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Remote sensing of the atmosphere from high earth orbit is very attractive due to the large field of view obtained and a true global perspective. This viewpoint is complicated by earth curvature effects so that slant path enhancement and absorption effects, small from low earth orbit, become dominant even at small nadir view angles. The effect is further complicated by the large range of local times and solar zenith angles in a single image leading to a modulation of the image intensity by a significant portion of the diurnal height variation of the absorbing layer. The latter effect is significant in particular for mesospheric, stratospheric and auroral emissions due to their depth in the atmosphere. As a particular case, the emissions from atomic oxygen (130.4 and 135.6 nm) and molecular nitrogen (two LBH bands, LBHS from 140 to 160 nm and LBHL from 160 to 180 nm) as viewed from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) are examined. The LBH emissions are of particular interest since LBHS has significant 02 absorption while LBHL does not, In the case of auroral emissions this differential absorption, well examined in the nadir, gives information about the height of the emission and therefore the energy of the precipitating particles. Using simulations of the viewing geometry and images from the UVI we examine these effects and obtain correction factors to adjust to the nadir case with a significant improvement of the derived characteristic energy. There is a surprisingly large effect on the images from the 02 diurnal layer height changes. An empirical compensation to the nadir case is explored based on the local nadir and local zenith angles for each portion of the image. These compensations are demonstrated as applied to the above emissions in both auroral and dayglow images and compared to models. The extension of these findings to other instruments, emissions and spectral regions is examined.

  8. Susceptibility of the wild-derived inbred CAST/Ei mouse to infection by orthopoxviruses analyzed by live bioluminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Americo, Jeffrey L.; Sood, Cindy L.; Cotter, Catherine A.; Vogel, Jodi L.; Kristie, Thomas M.; Moss, Bernard Earl, Patricia L.

    2014-01-20

    Classical inbred mice are extensively used for virus research. However, we recently found that some wild-derived inbred mouse strains are more susceptible than classical strains to monkeypox virus. Experiments described here indicated that the 50% lethal dose of vaccinia virus (VACV) and cowpox virus (CPXV) were two logs lower in wild-derived inbred CAST/Ei mice than classical inbred BALB/c mice, whereas there was little difference in the susceptibility of the mouse strains to herpes simplex virus. Live bioluminescence imaging was used to follow spread of pathogenic and attenuated VACV strains and CPXV virus from nasal passages to organs in the chest and abdomen of CAST/Ei mice. Luminescence increased first in the head and then simultaneously in the chest and abdomen in a dose-dependent manner. The spreading kinetics was more rapid with VACV than CPXV although the peak photon flux was similar. These data suggest advantages of CAST/Ei mice for orthopoxvirus studies. - Highlights: • Wild-derived inbred CAST/Ei mice are susceptible to vaccinia virus and cowpox virus. • Morbidity and mortality from orthopoxviruses are greater in CAST/Ei than BALB/c mice. • Morbidity and mortality from herpes simplex virus type 1 are similar in both mice. • Imaging shows virus spread from nose to lungs, abdominal organs and brain. • Vaccinia virus spreads more rapidly than cowpox virus.

  9. Input Decimated Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using an ensemble of classifiers instead of a single classifier has been shown to improve generalization performance in many pattern recognition problems. However, the extent of such improvement depends greatly on the amount of correlation among the errors of the base classifiers. Therefore, reducing those correlations while keeping the classifiers' performance levels high is an important area of research. In this article, we explore input decimation (ID), a method which selects feature subsets for their ability to discriminate among the classes and uses them to decouple the base classifiers. We provide a summary of the theoretical benefits of correlation reduction, along with results of our method on two underwater sonar data sets, three benchmarks from the Probenl/UCI repositories, and two synthetic data sets. The results indicate that input decimated ensembles (IDEs) outperform ensembles whose base classifiers use all the input features; randomly selected subsets of features; and features created using principal components analysis, on a wide range of domains.

  10. Accurate photometric light curves of the lensed components of Q2237+0305 derived with an optimal image subtraction technique: Evidence for microlensing in image A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, O.; Libbrecht, C.; Lee, D.-W.; Surdej, J.

    2005-06-01

    Using an optimal image subtraction technique, we have derived the V and R light curves of the four lensed QSO components of Q2237+0305 from the monitoring CCD frames obtained by the GLITP collaboration with the 2.6 m NOT telescope in 1999/2000 (Alcalde et al. 2002). We give here a detailed account of the data reduction and analysis and of the error estimates. In agreement with Wo?niak et al. (2000a,b), the good derived photometric accuracy of the GLITP data allows to discuss the possible interpretation of the light curve of component A as due to a microlensing event taking place in the deflecting galaxy. This interpretation is strengthened by the colour dependence of the early rise of the light curve of component A, as it probably corresponds to a caustics crossing by the QSO source.

  11. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope images of the reflection nebula NGC 7023 - Derivation of ultraviolet scattering properties of dust grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Adolf N.; Petersohn, Jens K.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1992-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope as part of the Astro-1 mission, was used to obtain high-resolution surface brightness distribution data in six ultraviolet wavelength bands for the bright reflection nebula NGC 7023. From the quantitative comparison of the measured surface brightness gradients ratios of nebular to stellar flux, and detail radial surface brightness profiles with corresponding data from the visible, two major conclusions results: (1) the scattering in the near- and far-ultraviolet in this nebula is more strongly forward-directed than in the visible; (2) the dust albedo in the ultraviolet for wavelengths not less than 140 nm is identical to that in the visible, with the exception of the 220 nm bump in the extinction curve. In the wavelengths region of the bump, the albedo is reduced by 25 to 30 percent in comparison with wavelengths regions both shorter and longer. This lower albedo is expected, if the bump is a pure absorption feature.

  12. Cirrus cloud characteristics derived from volume imaging lidar, high spectral resolution lidar, HIS radiometer, and satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grund, Christian J.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Eloranta, Edwin W.; Knutsen, Robert O.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Smith, William L.; Wylie, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary measurement results are presented from the Cirrus Remote Sensing Pilot Experiment which used a unique suite of instruments to simultaneously retrieve cirrus cloud visible and IR optical properties, while addressing the disparities between satellite volume averages and local point measurements. The experiment employed a ground-based high resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) and a second Fourier transform spectrometer to measure the spectral radiance in the 4-20 micron band, a correlated high spectral resolution lidar, a volume imaging lidar, a CLASS radiosonde system, the Scripps Whole Sky Imager, and multispectral VAS, HIRS, and AVHRR satellite data from polar orbiting and geostationary satellites. Data acquired during the month long experiment included continuous daytime monitoring with the Whole Sky Imager.

  13. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature. PMID:26793221

  14. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Bosc, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-Franois; Bolze, Frdric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature. PMID:26793221

  15. On the camparability of cloud fractions derived from whole sky imager and ceilometer data

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, D.

    1998-01-30

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program`s most heavily instrumented site is its central facility in Lamont, OK. With respect to cloud observations, the instrumentation included a whole sky imager, ceilometers, lidar, millimeter cloud radar, microwave profilers, and radiosondes. Data from three of these instrument--the Whole Sky Imager (WSI), Belfort Laser Ceilometer (BLC) and Micropulse Lidar (MPL)-- are used in this study primarily to investigate the utility of using ceilometers, now strategically emplaced at four additional locations along the perimeter of the site.

  16. Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital subtraction angiography in patient specific phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Garcia, Victor L.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Parametric imaging maps (PIM's) derived from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIM's. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIM's were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIM's for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In addition, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions.

  17. Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital subtraction angiography in patient specific phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Garcia, Victor L.; Bednarek, Daniel R; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Parametric imaging maps (PIMs) derived from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIMs. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIMs were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIMs for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In addition, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions. PMID:25302010

  18. DERIVATION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN A CORONAL MASS EJECTION CORE VIA MULTI-FREQUENCY RADIO IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Tun, Samuel D.; Vourlidas, A.

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field within the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2010 August 14 is derived from analysis of multi-wavelength radio imaging data. This CME's core was found to be the source of a moving type IV radio burst, whose emission is here determined to arise from the gyrosynchrotron process. The CME core's true trajectory, electron density, and line-of-sight depth are derived from stereoscopic observations, constraining these parameters in the radio emission models. We find that the CME carries a substantial amount of mildly relativistic electrons (E < 100 keV) in a strong magnetic field (B < 15 G), and that the spectra at lower heights are preferentially suppressed at lower frequencies through absorption from thermal electrons. We discuss the results in light of previous moving type IV burst studies, and outline a plan for the eventual use of radio methods for CME magnetic field diagnostics.

  19. Radiolabeled mannosylated dextran derivatives bearing an NIR-fluorophore for sentinel lymph node imaging.

    PubMed

    Morais, Maurcio; Campello, Maria P C; Xavier, Catarina; Heemskerk, Johannes; Correia, Joo D G; Lahoutte, Tony; Caveliers, Vicky; Hernot, Sophie; Santos, Isabel

    2014-11-19

    Current methods for sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping involve the use of radioactivity detection with technetium-99m sulfur colloid and/or visually guided identification using a blue dye. To overcome the kinetic variations of two individual imaging agents through the lymphatic system, we report herein on two multifunctional macromolecules, 5a and 6a, that contain a radionuclide ((99m)Tc or (68)Ga) and a near-infrared (NIR) reporter for pre- and/or intraoperative SLN mapping by nuclear and NIR optical imaging techniques. Both bimodal probes are dextran-based polymers (10 kDa) functionalized with pyrazole-diamine (Pz) or 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelating units for labeling with fac-[(99m)Tc(CO)3](+) or (68)Ga(III), respectively, mannose units for receptor targeting, and NIR fluorophore units for optical imaging. The probes allowed a clear visualization of the popliteal node by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) or positron emission tomography (PET/CT), as well as real-time optically guided excision. Biodistribution studies confirmed that both macromolecules present a significant accumulation in the popliteal node (5a: 3.87 0.63% IA/organ; 6a: 1.04 0.26% IA/organ), with minimal spread to other organs. The multifunctional nanoplatforms display a popliteal extraction efficiency >90%, highlighting their potential to be further explored as dual imaging agents. PMID:25265437

  20. Derivation of new emission factors for quantification of mass emissions when using optical gas imaging for detecting leaks.

    PubMed

    Lev-On, Miriam; Epperson, David; Siegell, Jeffrey; Ritter, Karin

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the development of new "leak/no-leak" emission factors that are suitable for estimating facilities' fugitive emissions when using an alternative work practice (AWP) that is based on optical gas imaging technology for detecting leaking piping system components. These emission factors were derived for valves, pumps, and connectors/flanges for instrument leak detection thresholds ranging from 3 to 60 g/hr using a combination of field data and Monte Carlo statistical simulation techniques. These newly derived leak/no-leak emission factors are designed to replace the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) 1995 Protocol factors, which were based on Method 21 monitoring of leaks at "uncontrolled" facilities. The emission factors published in the 1995 Protocol have not been updated since the 1970s. This derivation is based on results where the authors document the use of a Monte Carlo simulation technique to quantify the required leak detection thresholds that provide equal--or better--environmental benefits for an AWP. The use of these newly derived emission factors is demonstrated for different methods of computing fugitive emissions from a hypothetical model refinery. The resulting facility emissions calculated by using these new emission factors is compared with the existing emission estimation methods provided in the EPA 1995 Protocol. The results demonstrate that the new emission factors provide an emission estimate that is the closest to that obtained from the direct determination of total emissions by Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:17912925

  1. EFM data mapped into 2D images of tip-sample contact potential difference and capacitance second derivative.

    PubMed

    Lilliu, S; Maragliano, C; Hampton, M; Elliott, M; Stefancich, M; Chiesa, M; Dahlem, M S; Macdonald, J E

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple technique for mapping Electrostatic Force Microscopy (EFM) bias sweep data into 2D images. The method allows simultaneous probing, in the same scanning area, of the contact potential difference and the second derivative of the capacitance between tip and sample, along with the height information. The only required equipment consists of a microscope with lift-mode EFM capable of phase shift detection. We designate this approach as Scanning Probe Potential Electrostatic Force Microscopy (SPP-EFM). An open-source MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) for images acquisition, processing and analysis has been developed. The technique is tested with Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanowires for organic transistor applications. PMID:24284731

  2. EFM data mapped into 2D images of tip-sample contact potential difference and capacitance second derivative

    PubMed Central

    Lilliu, S.; Maragliano, C.; Hampton, M.; Elliott, M.; Stefancich, M.; Chiesa, M.; Dahlem, M. S.; Macdonald, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple technique for mapping Electrostatic Force Microscopy (EFM) bias sweep data into 2D images. The method allows simultaneous probing, in the same scanning area, of the contact potential difference and the second derivative of the capacitance between tip and sample, along with the height information. The only required equipment consists of a microscope with lift-mode EFM capable of phase shift detection. We designate this approach as Scanning Probe Potential Electrostatic Force Microscopy (SPP-EFM). An open-source MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) for images acquisition, processing and analysis has been developed. The technique is tested with Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanowires for organic transistor applications. PMID:24284731

  3. Homologous RBC-derived vesicles as ultrasmall carriers of iron oxide for magnetic resonance imaging of stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Microsugar; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Yao, Ming; Chien, Li-Ying; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Chen, Shin-Tai; Liu, Hon-Man; Chen, Yao-Chang; Yang, Chung-Shi; Huang, Dong-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles are very useful for cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which plays a key role in developing successful stem cell therapies. However, their low intracellular labeling efficiency, and biosafety concerns associated with their use, have limited their potential usage. In this study we develop a novel system composed of RBC-derived vesicles (RDVs) for efficient delivery of USPIO particles into human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cellular MRI in vitro and in vivo. RDVs are highly biosafe to their autologous MSCs as manifested by cell viability, differentiation, and gene microarray assays. The data demonstrate the potential of RDVs as intracellular delivery vehicles for biomedical applications.

  4. A clinically useful dosimetry method using measured effective thickness and the derived build up factor on whole body images

    SciTech Connect

    Wiseman, G.A.; Dunn, W.L.

    1995-05-01

    Dosimetry for internal radioisotope quantitation has many clinical uses including therapy dose planning. We propose a technique to simplify data acquisition, dose calculation and improve quantitation accuracy over the previously used techniques using commercially available computer software. This study utilized a measured effective thickness (ET) over each area of the body from a whole body Co-57 transmission image and the derived buildup factor (DBF) technique. Water tank phantom, Alderson phantom and the data obtained from 10 patients being imaged with In-111 pentetreotide was used to evaluate the method. The quantitation was done by using anterior and posterior images obtained from a dual head gamma camera. A transmission image was done prior to injection using a sheet source of Cobalt-57. For the patient studies whole body emission images and blood samples were obtained immediately, at 4, 24 and 48 hours following injection. The whole body emission images were used to draw the organ, tumor and background ROI and data was fit using the SAAM kinetic modeling computer program. The bone marrow residence time was estimated from the plasma residence time, and the red marrow to blood activity concentration ratio. The residence times were entered into the MIRDOSE computer program and the radiation dosimetry to each organ calculated. The tumor dose was calculated using an elliptical model with the appropriate S-factors. When compared to the actual activity the ET-DBF calculated phantom percent error was -7.5% to +8.4% for varying amounts, volume, and depth of activity. Based on the phantom studies the ET-DBF technique is more accurate than the standard conjugate view geometric mean transmission attenuation corrected technique. The ET-DBF dosimetry method can potentially be used clinically for any radioisotope to calculate normal organ dosimetry and quantitate tumor dose prior to therapy.

  5. Evaluation of a 125I-labelled benzazepinone derived voltage-gated sodium channel blocker for imaging with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Prez-Medina, Carlos; Patel, Niral; Robson, Mathew; Badar, Adam; Lythgoe, Mark F; rstad, Erik

    2012-12-21

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are a family of transmembrane proteins that mediate fast neurotransmission, and are integral to sustain physiological conditions and higher cognitive functions. Imaging of VGSCs in vivo holds promise as a tool to elucidate operational functions in the brain and to aid the treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases. To assess the suitability of 1-benzazepin-2-one derived VGSC blockers for imaging, we have prepared a (125)I-labelled analogue of BNZA and evaluated the tracer in vivo. In an automated patch-clamp assay, a diastereomeric mixture of the non-radioactive compound blocked the Na(v)1.2 and Na(v)1.7 VGSC isoforms with IC(50) values of 4.1 1.5 ?M and 0.25 0.07 ?M, respectively. [(3)H]BTX displacement studies revealed a three-fold difference in affinity between the two diastereomers. Iodo-destannylation of a tin precursor with iodine-125 afforded the two diastereomerically pure tracers, which were used to assess binding to VGSCs in vivo by comparing their tissue distributions in mice. Whilst the results point to a lack of VGSC binding in vivo, SPECT imaging revealed highly localized uptake in the interscapular region, an area typically associated with brown adipose tissue, which in addition to high metabolic stability of the iodinated tracer, demonstrate the potential of 1-benzazepin-2-ones for in vivo imaging. PMID:23117159

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of macrocyclic amino acid derivatives for tumor imaging by gallium-68 positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Dinesh; Jeong, Jae Min; Ju, Chang Hwan; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, Ji-Youn; Lee, Yun-Sang; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2010-11-01

    (68)Ga PET imaging in clinical oncology represents a notable development because the availability of (68)Ga is not dependent on a cyclotron. Furthermore, labeled amino acid derivatives have been proven to be useful for the imaging many tumor types. In the present study, we synthesized ?-aminoalanine, ?-aminohomoalanine, and lysine conjugates of macrocyclic bifunctional chelating agents, such as, NOTA (1a-c) and DOTA (2a-c). The compounds produced were found to be potential useful as (68)Ga-PET imaging agents. In particular, they showed high tumor uptakes in vitro and in vivo, and had high labeling yields and excellent stabilities. The co-ordination chemistry of NOTA-monoamide compound 1a was studied by multinuclear NMR. In vitro studies showed that the synthesized compounds were taken up by cancer cells more than controls ((68)Ga-NOTA and (68)Ga-DOTA). Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that they have high tumor to muscle and tumor to blood ratios, and small-animal PET imaging revealed high tumor uptakes as compared with other organs, and high bladder activities, indicating rapid renal excretion. These results might motivate the use of (68)Ga amino acid PET for tumor diagnosis. PMID:20926300

  7. Effects of quantum noise in 4D-CT on deformable image registration and derived ventilation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifi, Kujtim; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Feygelman, Vladimir; Budzevich, Mikalai M.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Stevens, Craig W.; van Elmpt, Wouter; Dekker, Andre; Zhang, Geoffrey G.

    2013-11-01

    Quantum noise is common in CT images and is a persistent problem in accurate ventilation imaging using 4D-CT and deformable image registration (DIR). This study focuses on the effects of noise in 4D-CT on DIR and thereby derived ventilation data. A total of six sets of 4D-CT data with landmarks delineated in different phases, called point-validated pixel-based breathing thorax models (POPI), were used in this study. The DIR algorithms, including diffeomorphic morphons (DM), diffeomorphic demons (DD), optical flow and B-spline, were used to register the inspiration phase to the expiration phase. The DIR deformation matrices (DIRDM) were used to map the landmarks. Target registration errors (TRE) were calculated as the distance errors between the delineated and the mapped landmarks. Noise of Gaussian distribution with different standard deviations (SD), from 0 to 200 Hounsfield Units (HU) in amplitude, was added to the POPI models to simulate different levels of quantum noise. Ventilation data were calculated using the ?V algorithm which calculates the volume change geometrically based on the DIRDM. The ventilation images with different added noise levels were compared using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The root mean square (RMS) values of the landmark TRE over the six POPI models for the four DIR algorithms were stable when the noise level was low (SD <150 HU) and increased with added noise when the level is higher. The most accurate DIR was DD with a mean RMS of 1.5 0.5 mm with no added noise and 1.8 0.5 mm with noise (SD = 200 HU). The DSC values between the ventilation images with and without added noise decreased with the noise level, even when the noise level was relatively low. The DIR algorithm most robust with respect to noise was DM, with mean DSC = 0.89 0.01 and 0.66 0.02 for the top 50% ventilation volumes, as compared between 0 added noise and SD = 30 and 200 HU, respectively. Although the landmark TRE were stable with low noise, the differences between ventilation images increased with noise level, even when the noise was low, indicating ventilation imaging from 4D-CT was sensitive to image noise. Therefore, high quality 4D-CT is essential for accurate ventilation images.

  8. Electrical resistivity image of the South Atlantic continental margin derived from onshore and offshore magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapinos, G.; Weckmann, U.; Jegen-Kulcsar, M.; Meqbel, N.; Neska, A.; Katjiuongua, T. T.; Hoelz, S.; Ritter, O.

    2016-01-01

    We present a deep electrical resistivity image from the passive continental margin in Namibia. The approximately 700 km long magnetotelluric profile follows the Walvis Ridge offshore, continues onshore across the Kaoko Mobile Belt and reaches onto the Congo Craton. Two-dimensional inversion reveals moderately resistive material offshore, atypically low for oceanic lithosphere, reaching depths of 15-20 km. Such moderate resistivities are consistent with seismic P wave velocity models, which suggest up to 35 km thick crust. The Neoproterozoic rocks of the Kaoko Mobile Belt are resistive, but NNW-striking major shear-zones are imaged as subvertical, conductive structures in the upper and middle crust. Since the geophysical imprint of the shear zones is intact, opening of the South Atlantic in the Cretaceous did not alter the middle crust. The transition into the cratonic region coincides with a deepening of the high-resistive material to depths of more than 60 km.

  9. Satellite-image-derived velocity field of an Antarctic ice stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, R. A.; Scambos, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    The surface velocity of a rapidly moving ice stream has been determined to high accuracy and spatial density with the use of sequential satellite imagery. Variations of ice velocity are spatially related to surface undulations, and transverse velocity variations of up to 30 percent occur. Such large variations negate the concept of plug flow and call into question earlier mass-balance calculations for this and other ice streams where sparse velocity data were used. The coregistration of images with the use of the topographic undulations of the ice stream and the measurement of feature displacement with cross-correlation of image windows provide significant improvements in the use of satellite imagery for ice-flow determination.

  10. High-resolution Vesta Low Altitude Mapping Orbit Atlas derived from Dawn Framing Camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, Th.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K.-D.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Elgner, S.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-09-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera (FC) acquired close to 10,000 clear filter images of Vesta with a resolution of about 20 m/pixel during the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) between December 2011 and April 2012. We ortho-rectified these images and produced a global high-resolution uncontrolled mosaic of Vesta. This global mosaic is the baseline for a high-resolution Vesta atlas that consists of 30 tiles mapped at a scale between 1:200,000 and 1:225,180. The nomenclature used in this atlas was proposed by the Dawn team and was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The whole atlas is available to the public through the Dawn GIS web page [http://dawn_gis.dlr.de/atlas].

  11. High-resolution Ceres Survey ATLAS derived from Dawn FC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, T.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K.-D.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft will orbit the dwarf planet Ceres in June 2015 with an altitude of about 4,400 km to characterize the geology, elemental and mineralogical composition, topography, shape, and internal structure of Ceres before it will be transferred to lower orbits. One of the major goals of the mission is a global mapping of Ceres. Data: The Dawn mission will map Ceres from three different orbital heights during Survey orbit (4,424 km altitude), HAMO (High Altitude Mapping Orbit, 1474 km altitude), and LAMO (Low Altitude Mapping Orbit, 374 km altitude) [1]. The Dawn mission is equipped with a framing camera (FC) [2]. Dawn will orbited Ceres during Survey in 7 cycles in June 2015. The framing camera will take about 700 clear filter images with a resolution of about 400 m/pixel during these cycles. The images will be taken with different viewing angles and different illumination conditions. We will select the nadir looking images with similar illumination conditions for the global mosaic of Ceres.

  12. Seismic Velocities Imaging around "AFA" Hydrothermal Area in West Java, Indonesia derived from Dense Seimometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanani Akbar, Akhmad; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Jousset, Philippe GM; Ryannugroho, Riskiray; Gassner, Alexandra; Jaya, Makky S.; Sule, Rachmat; Diningrat, Wahyuddin; Hendryana, Andri; Kusnadi, Yosep; Umar, Muksin; Indrinanto, Yudi; Erbas, Kemal

    2015-04-01

    We have deployed about 48 three component seismometers around "AFA" hydrothermal are in West Java, Indonesia from October 2012 up to October 2014 in order to detect microseismic event and to enhance our knowledge about subsurface seismic stucture. The seismometer network in this study, is the first dense seismometer array monitoring around hydrothermal area in Indonesia so far. We analyzed a huge waveform data set to distinguish microseismic, local and regional events. Then, we picked the onset of P-and S-wave arrival of microseismic events carefully visually by eye. We determined the initial microseismic event by applying Geiger's method with uniform seismic velocity model. Totally, we have been successfully determined 2,497 microseismic events around this hydrothermal area. We also improved 1D seismic velocities (Vp, Vs) and simultaneously with hypocenter adjustment as input for the tomography inversion in this study. Overall, the microseismic events are concentrated around production area activities and we also found strong cluster microseismic event in Southern part of this region which still need to be investigated in more details. Now, we are going on tomographic inversion step by using double-difference method. We are going to show more information during the meeting.

  13. 2?-(2-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4?-(2-fluoroalkoxy)-phenylthio)benzenamine Derivatives as Serotonin Transporter Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Ajit K.; Wang, Julie L.; Oya, Shunichi; Choi, Seok-Rye; Kung, Mei-Ping; Kung, Hank F.

    2008-01-01

    A novel series of ligands with substitutions at the 5-position on phenyl ring A and at the 4?-position on phenyl ring B of 2?-(2-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4?-(2-fluoro- alkoxy)phenylthio)benzenamine (4?-2-fluoroethoxy derivatives, 2831 and 4?-3-fluoro propoxy derivatives, 4042) were prepared and tested as serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agents. The new ligands displayed high binding affinities to SERT (Ki ranging from 0.07 to 1.5 nM). The corresponding 18F labeled compounds, which can be prepared readily, showed excellent brain uptake and retention after iv injection in rats. The hypothalamus region showed high uptake values between 0.74 to 2.2 % dose/g at 120 min post iv injection. Significantly, the hypothalamus to cerebellum ratios (target to non-target ratios) at 120 min were 7.8 and 7.7 for [18F]28 and [18F]40, respectively. The selective uptake and retention in the hypothalamus, which has a high concentration of SERT binding sites, demonstrated that [18F]28 and [18F]40 are promising PET (positron emission computed tomography) imaging agents for mapping SERT binding sites in the brain. PMID:18052090

  14. Synthesis of a Cu2+-Selective Probe Derived from Rhodamine and Its Application in Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunwei; Wen, Yingying; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A new fluorescent probe P based on rhodamine for Cu2+ was synthesized and characterized. The new probe P showed high selectivity to Cu2+ over other tested metal ions. With optimal conditions, the proposed probe P worked in a wide linear range of 1.0 10?6?1.0 10?5 M with a detection limit of 3.3 10?7 M Cu2+ in ethanol-water solution (9:1, v:v, 20 mM HEPES, pH 7.0). Furthermore, it has been used for imaging of Cu2+ in living cells with satisfying results. PMID:25397918

  15. In vivo imaging of VMAT2 in pancreas using a 18F epoxide derivative of tetrabenazine

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Hank F.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Zhuang, Zhi-Ping; Oya, Shunichi; Kung, Mei-Ping; Choi, Seok Rye; Poessl, Karl; Blankemeyer, Eric; Hou, Catherine; Skovronsky, Daniel; Kilbourn, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Development of imaging agents for pancreatic beta cell mass may provide tools for studying insulin-secreting beta cells and their relationship with diabetes mellitus. In this paper a new imaging agent, [18F](+)-2-oxiranyl-3-isobutyl-9-(3-fluoropropoxy)-10-methoxy-2,3,4,6,7,11b-hexahydro-1H-pyrido[2,1-a]isoquinoline [18F](+)4, which displays properties targeting vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) binding sites of beta cells in the pancreas, was evaluated as a PET (positron emission tomography) agent for estimating beta cell mass in vivo. The hydrolyzable epoxide group of (+)4 may provide a mechanism for shifting biodistribution from liver to kidney thus, reducing the background signal. Methods Both 18F and 19F labeled (+) and (?) isomers of 4 were synthesized and evaluated. Organ distribution was carried out in normal rats. Uptake of [18F](+)4 in pancreas of normal rats was measured and correlated with blocking studies using competing drugs, (+)dihydrotetrabenazine, (+)-DTBZ or 9-fluoropropyl-(+)dihydro tetrabenazine (FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2). Results In vitro binding study of VMAT2 using rat brain striatum showed a Ki value of 0.08 and 0.15 nM for the (+)4 and ()4, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution of [18F](+)4 in rats showed the highest uptake in the pancreas (2.68 %ID/g at 60 min post-injection). In vivo competition experiments with cold FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2, (3.5 mg/kg, 5 min iv pretreatment) led to a significant reduction of pancreas uptake (85 % blockade at 60 min). The inactive isomer [18F](?)4 showed significantly lower pancreas uptake (0.22 %ID/g at 30 min post-injection). Animal PET imaging studies of [18F](+)4 in normal rats demonstrated an avid pancreatic uptake in rats. Conclusion The preliminary results suggest that the epoxide, [18F](+)4, is highly selective in binding to VMAT2 and it has an excellent uptake in the pancreas of rats. The liver uptake was significantly reduced through the use of the epoxide group. Therefore, it may be potentially useful for imaging beta cell mass in the pancreas. PMID:19026944

  16. Surface bidirectional reflectance and albedo properties derived using a land cover-based approach with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; Trishchenko, Alexander P.; Latifovic, Rasim; Li, Zhanqing

    2005-01-01

    Surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) and albedo maps are derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) multiday surface reflectance composites with a 500-m spatial resolution (MODIS product MOD09A1/MYD09A1). The proposed method dubbed land cover-based fitting employs the processing of clear-sky reflectance data for similar land cover types and takes into account the magnitude of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The BRDF is derived through the fitting of pixel data sorted into small bins according to the values of angular variables and NDVI. Robust statistical processing is applied to reduce the influence of noise and outliers. This method increases the success rate of the fitting process and enables more accurate monitoring of surface temporal changes during periods of rapid spring vegetation green up and autumn leaf fall, as well as changes due to agricultural practices and snow cover variations. The approach is specifically applied over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains area. Results are compared to alternative BRDF/albedo products, such as the MOD43 albedo and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer surface products that are derived through a pixel-based fitting process. A good agreement was generally found between different data sets. For example, the average biases in the visible and near-infrared bands are usually less than 0.01 and 0.02, respectively, and correlation coefficients are typically larger than 0.80. An analysis of these differences identifies some unique advantages of the proposed method, such as the ability to capture rapidly changing surface properties and an increased performance in the case of reduced number of clear-sky observations because of frequent cloudy conditions. Results suggest that the developed land cover-based methodology is valuable for the purpose of surface BRDF and albedo mapping using MODIS observations.

  17. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Mutukula, Naresh; Edri, Reuven; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture) and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosetteshighly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM)a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientationa phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of ACTIN or NON-MUSCLE MYOSIN-II (NMII) reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling. PMID:26473351

  18. Handling Input and Output for COAMPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Patrick; Tran, Nam; Li, Yongzuo; Anantharaj, Valentine

    2007-01-01

    Two suites of software have been developed to handle the input and output of the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS), which is a regional atmospheric model developed by the Navy for simulating and predicting weather. Typically, the initial and boundary conditions for COAMPS are provided by a flat-file representation of the Navy s global model. Additional algorithms are needed for running the COAMPS software using global models. One of the present suites satisfies this need for running COAMPS using the Global Forecast System (GFS) model of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first step in running COAMPS downloading of GFS data from an Internet file-transfer-protocol (FTP) server computer of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is performed by one of the programs (SSC-00273) in this suite. The GFS data, which are in gridded binary (GRIB) format, are then changed to a COAMPS-compatible format by another program in the suite (SSC-00278). Once a forecast is complete, still another program in the suite (SSC-00274) sends the output data to a different server computer. The second suite of software (SSC- 00275) addresses the need to ingest up-to-date land-use-and-land-cover (LULC) data into COAMPS for use in specifying typical climatological values of such surface parameters as albedo, aerodynamic roughness, and ground wetness. This suite includes (1) a program to process LULC data derived from observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard NASA s Terra and Aqua satellites, (2) programs to derive new climatological parameters for the 17-land-use-category MODIS data; and (3) a modified version of a FORTRAN subroutine to be used by COAMPS. The MODIS data files are processed to reformat them into a compressed American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format used by COAMPS for efficient processing.

  19. Stress orientation on the Norwegian continental shelf derived from borehole failures observed in high-resolution borehole imaging logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudy, Martin; Kjrholt, Halvor

    2001-07-01

    Knowledge of stress orientation is crucial for the understanding of many processes in the earth's crust such as tectonic development, earthquake occurrence, and fluid transport along faults. In the case of the Norwegian continental shelf, which is a prolific area for hydrocarbon production, this knowledge also plays an important role for engineering decisions with respect to wellbore stability and reservoir management. Therefore, data on stress orientation have been collected extensively over the past few years in this region. However, nearly all data published for the Norwegian continental shelf for depths less than 6 km are based on the evaluation of four-arm caliper data, a method with intrinsic limitations. For greater depths stress orientation is derived from earthquake focal plane mechanisms. This article presents stress orientation data derived from an extensive set of image logs throughout the Norwegian continental shelf. The analysis is based on the identification of compressive and tensile failures of the borehole wall in electrical and acoustic borehole imaging logs. This method for the determination of the stress orientation is found to be highly reliable and capable of delivering detailed and accurate results, and thus is far superior to the analysis of breakouts from four-arm caliper logs. The analysis of image logs shows that the stress orientation is consistent both regionally and with depth. Strong variations in stress orientation, which are often interpreted from earlier analyses of four-arm caliper data, are not observed. This may indicate that some of the earlier four-arm caliper analyses may have been biased by the misinterpretation of drilling-induced artefacts as stress-induced breakouts. Stress-induced failures of the borehole wall are observed in only about 40% of the wells analysed in this paper. This does not support the conclusion that the horizontal stresses are isotropic. It just indicates that the stress difference in combination with the borehole conditions (downhole pressure and temperature) was insufficient to induce these failures.

  20. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of [18F]-Fluorinated Carboplatin Derivative Encapsulated in [111In]-Labeled Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamichhane, Narottam

    Platinum based chemotherapy is amongst the mainstream DNA-damaging agents used in clinical cancer therapy today. Agents such as cisplatin, carboplatin are clinically prescribed for the treatment of solid tumors either as single agents, in combination, or as part of multi-modality treatment strategy. Despite the potent anti-tumor activity of these drugs, overall effectiveness is still hampered by inadequate delivery and retention of drug in tumor and unwanted normal tissue toxicity, induced by non-selective accumulation of drug in normal cells and tissues. Utilizing molecular imaging and nanoparticle technologies, this thesis aims to contribute to better understanding of how to improve the profile of platinum based therapy. By developing a novel fluorinated derivative of carboplatin, incorporating a Flourine-18 (18F) moiety as an inherent part of the molecule, quantitative measures of drug concentration in tumors and normal tissues can be directly determined in vivo and within the intact individual environment. A potential impact of this knowledge will be helpful in predicting the overall response of individual patients to the treatment. Specifically, the aim of this project, therefore, is the development of a fluorinated carboplatin drug derivative with an inherent positron emission tomography (PET) imaging capability, so that the accumulation of the drug in the tumor and normal organs can be studied during the course of therapy . A secondary objective of this research is to develop a proof of concept for simultaneous imaging of a PET radiolabeled drug with a SPECT radiolabeled liposomal formulation, enabling thereby bi-modal imaging of drug and delivery vehicle in vivo. The approach is challenging because it involves development in PET radiochemistry, PET and SPECT imaging, drug liposomal encapsulation, and a dual-modal imaging of radiolabeled drug and radiolabeled vehicle. The principal development is the synthesis of fluorinated carboplatin 19F-FCP using 2-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid as the labeling agent to coordinate with the cisplatin aqua complex. It was then used to treat various cell lines and compared with cisplatin and carboplatin at different concentrations ranging from 0.001 microM to 100 microM for 72 hrs and 96 hrs. IC50 values calculated from cell viability indicated that 19F-FCP is a more potent drug than Carboplatin. Manual radiosynthesis and characterization of [18F]-FCP was performed using [18F]-2-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid with coordination with cisplatin aqua complex. Automated radiosynthesis of [18F]-FCP was optimized using the manual synthetic procedures and using them as macros for the radiosynthesizer. [18F]-FCP was evaluated in vivo with detailed biodistribution studies and PET imaging in normal and KB 3-1 and KB 8-5 tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. The biodistribution studies and PET imaging of [18F]-FCP showed major uptake in kidneys which attributes to the renal clearance of radiotracer. In vivo plasma and urine stability demonstrated intact [18F]-FCP. [ 111In]-Labeled Liposomes was synthesized and physiochemical properties were assessed with DLS. [111In]-Labeled Liposome was evaluated in vivo with detailed pharmacokinetic studies and SPECT imaging. The biodistribution and ROI analysis from SPECT imaging showed the spleen and liver uptake of [111In]-Labeled Liposome and subsequent clearance of activity with time. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was developed and physiochemical properties were characterized with DLS. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was used for in vivo dual tracer PET and SPECT imaging from the same nanoconstruct in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. PET imaging of [18F]-FCP in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice was performed. Naked [18F]-FCP and [18F]-FCP encapsulated [ 111In]-Labeled Liposome showed different pharmacokinetic profiles. PET imaging of [18F]-FCP showed major uptake in kidneys and bladder. However, [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome showed major uptake in RES in both PET and SPECT images. ROI analysis of SPECT image enabled by 111In corresponded with PET image enabled by 18F demonstrating the feasibility of dual tracer imaging from the single nanoconstruct. Future work involves the intensive in vitro characterization of [18F]-FCP encapsulated [ 111In]-Labeled Liposome and detailed in vivo evaluation of [ 18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome in various tumor models.

  1. Transition between scanning tunneling microscopy images of alkane derivatives on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibino, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembled monolayers of alkylated sulfides containing two alkyl chains and a sulfur atom positioned at the center of the molecules were studied on a graphite surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). STM images of the closed-packed alkyl chains that extend linearly from the sulfur atoms change reversibly between a zigzag pattern and an aligned bright spot pattern on a time scale of minutes. The observation times of the zigzag and aligned bright spot patterns indicate that the difference between the free energies of these two stable molecular configurations with respect to the graphite surface is smaller than their thermal energies in the presence of a solvent, and 10 times smaller than the theoretical free energy between parallel and perpendicular configurations of the alkyl chains on graphite under vacuum. The change in the contrast of the STM images occurred owing to the electronic effects that depend on the registry of the alkyl chains on the graphite surface, and not by the classical observation of transfer between parallel and perpendicular orientations of alkyl chains on the surface.

  2. Investigating nephrotoxicity of polymyxin derivatives by mapping renal distribution using mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anna; Goodwin, Richard J A; Swales, John G; Gallagher, Richard; Shankaran, Harish; Sathe, Abhishek; Pradeepan, Selvi; Xue, Aixiang; Keirstead, Natalie; Sasaki, Jennifer C; Andren, Per E; Gupta, Anshul

    2015-09-21

    Colistin and polymyxin B are effective treatment options for Gram-negative resistant bacteria but are used as last-line therapy due to their dose-limiting nephrotoxicity. A critical factor in developing safer polymyxin analogues is understanding accumulation of the drugs and their metabolites, which is currently limited due to the lack of effective techniques for analysis of these challenging molecules. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) allows direct detection of targets (drugs, metabolites, and endogenous compounds) from tissue sections. The presented study exemplifies the utility of MSI by measuring the distribution of polymyxin B1, colistin, and polymyxin B nonapeptide (PMBN) within dosed rat kidney tissue sections. The label-free MSI analysis revealed that the nephrotoxic compounds (polymyxin B1 and colistin) preferentially accumulated in the renal cortical region. The less nephrotoxic analogue, polymyxin B nonapeptide, was more uniformly distributed throughout the kidney. In addition, metabolites of the dosed compounds were detected by MSI. Kidney homogenates were analyzed using LC/MS/MS to determine total drug exposure and for metabolite identification. To our knowledge, this is the first time such techniques have been utilized to measure the distribution of polymyxin drugs and their metabolites. By simultaneously detecting the distribution of drug and drug metabolites, MSI offers a powerful alternative to tissue homogenization analysis and label or antibody-based imaging. PMID:26293472

  3. Statistical storm time examination of MLT-dependent plasmapause location derived from IMAGE EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katus, R. M.; Gallagher, D. L.; Liemohn, M. W.; Keesee, A. M.; Sarno-Smith, L. K.

    2015-07-01

    The location of the outer edge of the plasmasphere (the plasmapause) as a function of geomagnetic storm time is identified and investigated statistically in regard to the solar wind driver. Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) data are used to create an automated method that locates and extracts the plasmapause. The plasmapause extraction technique searches a set range of possible plasmasphere densities for a maximum gradient. The magnetic local time (MLT)-dependent plasmapause results are compared to manual extraction results. The plasmapause results from 39 intense storms are examined along a normalized epoch storm timeline to determine the average plasmapause L shell as a function of MLT and storm time. The average extracted plasmapause L shell follows the expected storm time plasmapause behavior. The results show that during the main phase, the plasmapause moves earthward and a plasmaspheric drainage plume forms near dusk and across the dayside during strong convection. During the recovery phase, the plume rejoins the corotationally driven plasma while the average plasmapause location moves farther from the Earth. The results are also examined in terms of the solar wind driver. We find evidence that shows that the different categories of solar wind drivers result in different plasmaspheric configurations. During magnetic cloud-driven events the plasmaspheric drainage plume appears at the start of the main phase. During sheath-driven events the plume forms later but typically extends further in MLT.

  4. Fluorescent labelling of DNA on superparamagnetic nanoparticles by a perylene bisimide derivative for cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Maltas, Esra; Malkondu, Sait; Uyar, Pembegul; Ozmen, Mustafa

    2015-03-01

    N,N'-Bis[tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine]-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PBI-TRIS), nonfluorescent dye was used to fluorescent labelling of DNA. For this aim, (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized to provide a suitable surface for binding of DNA. Amine functionalized nanoparticles showed a high immobilization capacity (82.70%) at 25mg of nanoparticle concentration for Calf thymus DNA. Binding capacity of PBI-TRIS to DNA-SPION was also found as 1.93?M on 25mg of nanoparticles by using UV-vis spectroscopy. Binding of PBI-TRIS to DNA onto nanoparticles was also characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The confocal images of PBI-TRIS labelled DNA-SPION and breast cells were taken at 488 and 561.7nm of excitation wavelengths. Cell image was also compared with a commercial dye, DAPI at 403.7nm of excitation wavelength. Results showed that PBI-TRIS can be used for cell staining. PMID:25579900

  5. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of the rich membrane structures of bone marrow-derived mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Zink, T.; Deng, Z.; Chen, H.; Yu, L.; Liu, F. T.; Liu, G. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) enables high-resolution and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of cultured bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Cells were immobilized by a quick centrifugation and fixation to preserve their transient cellular morphologies followed by AFM characterization in buffer. This “fix-and-look” approach preserve the structural integrity of individual cells. Well-known membrane morphologies, such as ridges and microvilli, are visualized, in consistent with prior electron microscopy observations. Additional information including the three-dimensional measurements of these characteristic features are attained from AFM topographs. Filopodia and lamellopodia, associated with cell spreading, were captured and visualized in three-dimensions. New morphologies are also revealed, such as high-density ridges and micro-craters. This investigation demonstrates that the “fix-and-look” approach followed by AFM imaging provides an effective means to characterize the membrane structure of hydrated cells with high-resolution. The quantitative imaging and measurements pave the way for systematic correlation of membrane structural features with the biological status of individual cells. PMID:18790570

  6. Physical and Chemical Properties of Cometary Dust Derived from Modeling of Mid-Infrared Imaging Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmecanic, James Richard

    1997-12-01

    Significant constraints are placed on the physical and chemical properties of cometary dust grains by analyzing mid-infrared imaging data obtained with the UCSD 'Golden Gopher' infrared camera at the 1.5-meter telescope at Mt. Lemmon Observatory. Dust grains are modeled as Mie spheres composed of either amorphous olivine (a silicate glass) or an organic residue mixture, and the results show that the optical characteristics of the two materials are quite different. The equilibrium temperatures of organic grains are much higher than for olivine grains (for the same size grains), and their respective mid-infrared emission properties are rather distinct. The results of these calculations are applied to multi-wavelength imaging of comets C/1996 B2 Hyakutake and C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp, and it is found that the observed thermal emission from these comets can be duplicated by emission from a mixture of olivine and organic grains. For Hyakutake, the best fit to the data is achieved using 1 ?m olivine grains and 7 ?m organic grains, with an olivine mass fraction of 10%. For Hale-Bopp the predominant grain radii are 1 ?m for olivine and 2.5 ?m for organics, with a much higher olivine mass fraction of 40%. Dynamical simulations are performed using these grains in order to interpret 11.7 ?m images of comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle taken over a three week period in November 1992. The nucleus of the comet is found to be in a simple rotational state (at least over short time-scales), undergoing prograde rotation with an obliquity of 45o 10o relative to its orbital plane. At perihelion, the angle between the rotation axis and the Sun is 115o 10o, so that the 'Southern' hemisphere of the comet is generally sunward. Assuming a spherical nucleus rotating with a period of 67.5 hours, three major emission regions on the surface are identified from the recurring jet pattern. The observed dust morphology is best simulated using a grain size distribution of the form f(a)~ a-? for grain radii in the range 0.6 < a < 10/ ?m with ? = 2.5 0.5, and using jets whose opening angles are between 50o and 80o.

  7. Competitive Mirror Image Phage Display Derived Peptide Modulates Amyloid Beta Aggregation and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Stephan; Klein, Antonia Nicole; Tusche, Markus; Schlosser, Christine; Elfgen, Anne; Brener, Oleksandr; Teunissen, Charlotte; Gremer, Lothar; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Kutzsche, Janine; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease is the most prominent type of dementia and currently no causative treatment is available. According to recent studies, oligomeric species of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide appear to be the most toxic Aβ assemblies. Aβ monomers, however, may be not toxic per se and may even have a neuroprotective role. Here we describe a competitive mirror image phage display procedure that allowed us to identify preferentially Aβ1–42 monomer binding and thereby stabilizing peptides, which destabilize and thereby eliminate toxic oligomer species. One of the peptides, called Mosd1 (monomer specific d-peptide 1), was characterized in more detail. Mosd1 abolished oligomers from a mixture of Aβ1–42 species, reduced Aβ1–42 toxicity in cell culture, and restored the physiological phenotype in neuronal cells stably transfected with the gene coding for human amyloid precursor protein. PMID:26840229

  8. Deriving Atmospheric Properties and Escape Rates from MAVEN's Imaging UV Spectrograph (IUVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.; IUVS Science Team

    2013-10-01

    MAVEN (Mars Volatile and Atmosphere EvolutioN) is a Mars Scout mission being readied for launch in November 2013. The key hardware and management partners are University of Colorado, Goddard Space Flight Center, University of California at Berkeley, Lockheed Martin, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. MAVEN carries a powerful suite of fields and particles instruments and a sophisticated remote sensing instrument, the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS). This presentation begins by describing IUVS' science goals, instrument design, operational approach and data analysis strategy. IUVS supports the top-level MAVEN science goals: measure the present state of the atmosphere, observe its response to varying solar stimuli, and use the information to estimate loss from Mars' atmosphere over time. The instrument operates at low spectral resolution spanning the FUV and MUV ranges in separate channels, and at high resolution around the hydrogen Lyman alpha line to measure the D/H ratio in the upper atmosphere. MAVEN carries the instrument on an Articulated Payload Platform which orients the instrument for optimal observations during four segments of its 4.5 hr elliptical orbit. During periapse passage, IUVS uses a scan mirror to obtain vertical profiles of emissions from the atmosphere and ionosphere. Around apoapse, the instrument builds up low-resolution images of the atmosphere at multiple wavelengths. In between, the instrument measures emissions from oxygen, hydrogen and deuterium in the corona. IUVS also undertakes day-long stellar occultation campaigns at 2 month intervals, to measure the state of the atmosphere at altitudes below the airglow layer and in situ sampling. All data will be pipeline-processed from line brightnesses to column abundances, local densities and global 3-D maps. The focus of the presentation is development of these automatic processing algorithms and the data products they will provide to the Mars community through the PDS Atmospheres Node. The combined results from all instruments on ion and neutral escape will bear on the central question of the history of Mars' atmosphere and climate history. This work has been supported by NASA's MAVEN mission.

  9. Integration of Image Data for Refining Building Boundaries Derived from Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, S. N.; Hetti Arachchige, N.; Schneider, D.

    2014-08-01

    Geometrically and topologically correct 3D building models are required to satisfy with new demands such as 3D cadastre, map updating, and decision making. More attention on building reconstruction has been paid using Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point cloud data. The planimetric accuracy of roof outlines, including step-edges is questionable in building models derived from only point clouds. This paper presents a new approach for the detection of accurate building boundaries by merging point clouds acquired by ALS and aerial photographs. It comprises two major parts: reconstruction of initial roof models from point clouds only, and refinement of their boundaries. A shortest closed circle (graph) analysis method is employed to generate building models in the first step. Having the advantages of high reliability, this method provides reconstruction without prior knowledge of primitive building types even when complex height jumps and various types of building roof are available. The accurate position of boundaries of the initial models is determined by the integration of the edges extracted from aerial photographs. In this process, scene constraints defined based on the initial roof models are introduced as the initial roof models are representing explicit unambiguous geometries about the scene. Experiments were conducted using the ISPRS benchmark test data. Based on test results, we show that the proposed approach can reconstruct 3D building models with higher geometrical (planimetry and vertical) and topological accuracy.

  10. Practical labeling methodology for choline-derived lipids and applications in live cell fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Caishun; Key, Jessie A; Jia, Feng; Dandapat, Arpan; Hur, Soo; Cairo, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    Lipids of the plasma membrane participate in a variety of biological processes, and methods to probe their function and cellular location are essential to understanding biochemical mechanisms. Previous reports have established that phosphocholine-containing lipids can be labeled by alkyne groups through metabolic incorporation. Herein, we have tested alkyne, azide and ketone-containing derivatives of choline as metabolic labels of choline-containing lipids in cells. We also show that 17-octadecynoic acid can be used as a complementary metabolic label for lipid acyl chains. We provide methods for the synthesis of cyanine-based dyes that are reactive with alkyne, azide and ketone metabolic labels. Using an improved method for fluorophore conjugation to azide or alkyne-modified lipids by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), we apply this methodology in cells. Lipid-labeled cell membranes were then interrogated using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, we explored the utility of this labeling strategy for use in live cell experiments. We demonstrate measurements of lipid dynamics (lateral mobility) by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR). In addition, we show that adhesion of cells to specific surfaces can be accomplished by chemically linking membrane lipids to a functionalized surface. The strategies described provide robust methods for introducing bioorthogonal labels into native lipids. PMID:24383866

  11. Two-photon fluorescent probe derived from naphthalimide for cysteine detection and imaging in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanbin; Liu, Yuwen; Liu, Wei; Liang, Shucai

    2015-02-01

    A maleimide coupling naphthalimide was reported as new two-photon fluorescent (TPF) probe for cysteine (Cys). The probe was weakly fluorescent itself due to the donor-excited photoinduced electron transfer (d-PET). After reaction with Cys, d-PET process was blocked and fluorescence enhancement of the probe was observed at 470 nm. The d-PET principle was rationalized by theoretical calculations with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Thiol-maleimide addition between the probe and Cys was confirmed by 1H NMR and mass spectrum measurements. TPF analysis demonstrated a 24.7-fold emission increase of the probe induced by Cys upon excitation at 760 nm. The two-photon action cross-section of probe-Cys adduct at 760 nm reached 42 GM compared to 1.7 GM for free probe. The probe showed high sensitivity and selectivity to Cys over other potential interferences; especially it had the capability to discriminate Cys from glutathione and homocysteine. Through TPF imaging, the probe was successfully applied in the detection of Cys in living cells.

  12. 131I-Zn-Chlorophyll derivative photosensitizer for tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ocakoglu, Kasim; Er, Ozge; Kiyak, Guven; Lambrecht, Fatma Yurt; Gunduz, Cumhur; Kayabasi, Cagla

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, the photodynamic therapy studies have gained considerable attention as an alternative method to surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy which is commonly used to fight cancer. In this study, biological potentials of a benzyloxy bearing zinc(II) pheophorbide-a (Zn-PH-A) were investigated via in vivo and in vitro experiments. Zn-PH-A was labeled with (131)I with high efficiency (95.3 ± 2.7%) and its biodistribution studies were investigated on female Albino Wistar rats. The radiolabeled photosensitizer had been intravenously injected into the tail vein, and then the animals were sacrificed at 30, 60 and 120 min post injection. The percent of radioactivity per gram of organs (%ID/g) was determined. The radiolabeled Zn-PH-A showed high uptake in ovary. In addition, photodynamic therapy studies of the photosensitizer were conducted in EMT6, murine mammary carcinoma and HeLa, human cervix carcinoma cell lines. For the photodynamic therapy studies, the cells with Zn-PH-A were exposed to red light (650 nm) at the doses of 10-30 J/cm(2). The results showed that Zn-PH-A has stronger PDT effect in EMT6 than HeLa cell. Our present work demonstrates (131)I-labeled photosensitizer as a bifunctional agent (PDT and nuclear imaging) which could be improved in future by using EMT6 growing tumor in nude mice. PMID:26226337

  13. Deriving a blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry in Sylgard-184 vascular models.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Majid Y; Holdsworth, David W; Poepping, Tamie L

    2009-01-01

    A new blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) has been developed for particle image velocimetry (PIV), which enables flow studies in vascular models (phantoms). A major difficulty in PIV that affects measurement accuracy is the refraction and distortion of light passing through the interface between the model and the fluid, due to the difference in refractive index (n) between the two materials. The problem can be eliminated by using a fluid with a refractive index matching that of the model. Such fluids are not commonly available, especially for vascular research where the fluid should also have a viscosity similar to human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid, composed of water (47.38% by weight), glycerol (36.94% by weight) and sodium iodide salt (15.68% by weight), was developed for compatibility with our silicone (Sylgard 184; n = 1.414) phantoms. The fluid exhibits a dynamic viscosity of 4.31+/-0.03 cP which lies within the range of human blood viscosity (4.4+/-0.6 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at 22.2+/-0.2 degrees C, which is a feasible room temperature, thus eliminating the need for a temperature-control system. The fluid will be used to study hemodynamics in vascular flow models fabricated from Sylgard 184. PMID:19964526

  14. In Vivo Tumor Targeting and Imaging with Engineered Trivalent Antibody Fragments Containing Collagen-Derived Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, ngel M.; Snchez-Martn, David; Sanz, Laura; Bonet, Jaume; Compte, Marta; Kremer, Leonor; Blanco, Francisco J.; Oliva, Baldomero; lvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2009-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new and effective agents for cancer targeting. In this work, a multivalent antibody is characterized in vivo in living animals. The antibody, termed trimerbody, comprises a single-chain antibody (scFv) fragment connected to the N-terminal trimerization subdomain of collagen XVIII NC1 by a flexible linker. As indicated by computer graphic modeling, the trimerbody has a tripod-shaped structure with three highly flexible scFv heads radially outward oriented. Trimerbodies are trimeric in solution and exhibited multivalent binding, which provides them with at least a 100-fold increase in functional affinity than the monovalent scFv. Our results also demonstrate the feasibility of producing functional bispecific trimerbodies, which concurrently bind two different ligands. A trimerbody specific for the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a classic tumor-associated antigen, showed efficient tumor targeting after systemic administration in mice bearing CEA-positive tumors. Importantly, a trimerbody that recognizes an angiogenesis-associated laminin epitope, showed excellent tumor localization in several cancer types, including fibrosarcomas and carcinomas. These results illustrate the potential of this new antibody format for imaging and therapeutic applications, and suggest that some laminin epitopes might be universal targets for cancer targeting. PMID:19401768

  15. Visualization of Membrane Rafts Using a Perylene Monoimide Derivative and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Margineanu, Anca; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Van der Auweraer, Mark; Ameloot, Marcel; Stefan, Alina; Beljonne, David; Engelborghs, Yves; Herrmann, Andreas; Mllen, Klaus; De Schryver, Frans C.; Hofkens, Johan

    2007-01-01

    A new membrane probe, based on the perylene imide chromophore, with excellent photophysical properties (high absorption coefficient, quantum yield (QY) ? 1, high photostability) and excited in the visible domain is proposed for the study of membrane rafts. Visualization of separation between the liquid-ordered (Lo) and the liquid-disordered (Ld) phases can be achieved in artificial membranes by fluorescence lifetime imaging due to the different decay times of the membrane probe in the two phases. Rafts on micrometer-scale in cell membranes due to cellular activation can also be observed by this method. The decay time of the dye in the Lo phase is higher than in organic solvents where its QY is 1. This allows proposing a (possible general) mechanism for the decay time increase in the Lo phase, based on the local field effects of the surrounding molecules. For other fluorophores with QY < 1, the suggested mechanism could also contribute, in addition to effects reducing the nonradiative decay pathways, to an increase of the fluorescence decay time in the Lo phase. PMID:17573424

  16. Novel insights into host-fungal pathogen interactions derived from live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Bain, Judith; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars-Peter

    2015-03-01

    The theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate Richard Feynman outlined in his 1959 lecture, "There's plenty of room at the bottom", the enormous possibility of producing and visualising things at smaller scales. The advent of advanced scanning and transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution microscopy has begun to open the door to visualise host-pathogen interactions at smaller scales, and spinning disc confocal and two-photon microscopy has improved our ability to study these events in real time in three dimensions. The aim of this review is to illustrate some of the advances in understanding host-fungal interactions that have been made in recent years in particular those relating to the interactions of live fungal pathogens with phagocytes. Dynamic imaging of host-pathogen interactions has recently revealed novel detail and unsuspected mechanistic insights, facilitating the dissection of the phagocytic process into its component parts. Here, we will highlight advances in our knowledge of host-fungal pathogen interactions, including the specific effects of fungal cell viability, cell wall composition and morphogenesis on the phagocytic process and try to define the relative contributions of neutrophils and macrophages to the clearance of fungal pathogens in vitro and the infected host. PMID:25398200

  17. Toxicological evaluation of a rotenone derivative in rodents for clinical myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Pasan; Yan, Xuxu; Lockwood, Julia; Duan, Yin; Wei, Lihui; Glenn Wells, R; Bensimon, Corinne; Mullett, Wayne M; Ruddy, Terrence

    2014-06-01

    Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a valuable clinical tool for assessing coronary blood flow deficits in patients. We recently synthesized a new iodinated compound ((123)I-CMICE-013) based on rotenone and showed that it has excellent performance as a radiotracer for myocardial perfusion imaging. Here, we describe the cellular toxicity and subacute toxicity of CMICE-013 in rats. Cultured hepatocytes displayed sensitivity to rotenone but not CMICE-013 at equimolar concentrations. Following i.v. injection of CMICE-013 for 14 days, body weight, ambulation, behavior, grooming, guarding (abdominal, muscular), pale conjunctivae, and food intake were observed. Biochemical, hematological, and histopathological changes in tissues (heart, liver, kidney, spleen, lung, and brain) and echocardiography at pre- and post-dosing were also examined. All animals responded well to the daily injections of CMICE-013 and showed no mortality or adverse reactions with respect to the parameters above. Subacute i.v. injections at high- (5 ?g/kg) and low (1 ?g/kg)-dose levels did not result in any significant changes to either biochemical or hematological parameters and no detectable changes in histopathology compared to the vehicle or untreated animals. Echocardiographic analyses, including the measurements of cardiac function and anatomy (wall thickness, left atrial size, and left ventricular mass), were not different at pre- versus post-dose measures and were not different compared to the vehicle or untreated animals. Our observations in small animals reveal that CMICE-013 induces minimal toxicity when delivered intravenously for 14 days. PMID:24395712

  18. Diurnal, Seasonal, and Interannual Variations of Cloud Properties Derived for CERES From Imager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Young, David F.; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Trepte, Qing Z.; Chen, Yan; Brown, Richard R.; Gibson, Sharon; Heck, Patrick W.

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of the radiation and cloud fields on a global basis is a key component in the effort to understand and model the interaction between clouds and radiation at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and within the atmosphere. The NASA Clouds and Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) Project, begun in 1998, is meeting this need. Broadband shortwave (SW) and longwave radiance measurements taken by the CERES scanners at resolutions between 10 and 20 km on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Terra, and Aqua satellites are matched to simultaneous retrievals of cloud height, phase, particle size, water path, and optical depth OD from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua. Besides aiding the interpretation of the broadband radiances, the CERES cloud properties are valuable for understanding cloud variations at a variety of scales. In this paper, the resulting CERES cloud data taken to date are averaged at several temporal scales to examine the temporal and spatial variability of the cloud properties on a global scale at a 1 resolution.

  19. Two-photon fluorescent probe derived from naphthalimide for cysteine detection and imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbin; Liu, Yuwen; Liu, Wei; Liang, Shucai

    2015-02-25

    A maleimide coupling naphthalimide was reported as new two-photon fluorescent (TPF) probe for cysteine (Cys). The probe was weakly fluorescent itself due to the donor-excited photoinduced electron transfer (d-PET). After reaction with Cys, d-PET process was blocked and fluorescence enhancement of the probe was observed at 470 nm. The d-PET principle was rationalized by theoretical calculations with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Thiol-maleimide addition between the probe and Cys was confirmed by (1)H NMR and mass spectrum measurements. TPF analysis demonstrated a 24.7-fold emission increase of the probe induced by Cys upon excitation at 760 nm. The two-photon action cross-section of probe-Cys adduct at 760 nm reached 42 GM compared to 1.7 GM for free probe. The probe showed high sensitivity and selectivity to Cys over other potential interferences; especially it had the capability to discriminate Cys from glutathione and homocysteine. Through TPF imaging, the probe was successfully applied in the detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:25240143

  20. Scaling, propagating and mapping uncertainty in spectroscopy-derived foliar traits from the leaf to the image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Serbin, S. P.; Kingdon, C.; Townsend, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    A major goal of remote sensing, and imaging spectroscopy in particular, is the development of generalizable algorithms to repeatedly and accurately map ecosystem properties such as canopy chemistry across space and time. Existing methods must therefore be tested across a range of measurement approaches to identify and overcome limits to the consistent retrieval of such properties from spectroscopic imagery. Here we illustrate a general approach for the estimation of key foliar biochemical and morphological traits from spectroscopic imagery derived from the AVIRIS instrument and the propagation of errors from the leaf to the image scale using partial least squares regression (PLSR) techniques. Our method involves the integration of three types of data representing different scales of observation: At the image scale, the images were normalized for atmospheric, illumination and BRDF effects. Spectra from field plot locations were extracted from the 51AVIRIS images and were averaged when the field plot was larger than a single pixel. At the plot level, the scaling was conducted using multiple replicates (1000) derived from the leaf-level uncertainty estimates to generate plot-level estimates with their associated uncertainties. Leaf-level estimates of foliar traits (%N, %C, %Fiber, %Cellulose, %Lignin, LMA) were scaled to the canopy based on relative species composition of each plot. Image spectra were iteratively split into 50/50 randomized calibration-validation datasets and multiple (500) trait-predictive PLSR models were generated, this time sampling from within the plot-level uncertainty distribution. This allowed the propagation of uncertainty from the leaf-level dependent variables to the plot level, and finally to models built using AVIRIS image spectra. Moreover, this method allows us to generate spatially explicit maps of uncertainty in our sampled traits. Both LMA and %N PLSR models had a R2 greater than 0.8, root mean square errors (RMSEs) for both variables were less than 6% of the range of data. Fiber and lignin were predicted with R2 > 0.65 and carbon and cellulose greater than 0.5. Although R2 of these variables were lower than LMA and %N, their RMSE values were beneath 9% of the range of data. The comparatively lower R2 values for %C and cellulose in particular were related to the low amount of natural variability in these constituents. Further, coefficients from the randomized set of PLSR models were applied to imagery and aggregated to obtain pixel-wise predicted means and uncertainty estimates for each foliar trait. The resulting maps of nutritional and morphological properties together with their overall uncertainties represent a first-of-its-kind data product for examining the spatio-temporal patterns of forest functioning and nutrient cycling. These data are now being used to relate foliar traits with ecosystem processes such as streamwater nutrient export and insect herbivory. In addition, the ability to assign a retrieval uncertainty enables more efficient assimilation of these data products into ecosystem models to help constrain carbon and nutrient cycling projections.

  1. Comparison of retinal thickness by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and OCT retinal image analysis software segmentation analysis derived from Stratus optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ttrai, Erika; Ranganathan, Sudarshan; Ferencz, Mria; Debuc, Delia Cabrera; Somfai, Gbor Mrk

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To compare thickness measurements between Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and time-domain OCT images analyzed with a custom-built OCT retinal image analysis software (OCTRIMA). Methods: Macular mapping (MM) by StratusOCT and MM5 and MM6 scanning protocols by an RTVue-100 FD-OCT device are performed on 11 subjects with no retinal pathology. Retinal thickness (RT) and the thickness of the ganglion cell complex (GCC) obtained with the MM6 protocol are compared for each early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS)-like region with corresponding results obtained with OCTRIMA. RT results are compared by analysis of variance with Dunnett post hoc test, while GCC results are compared by paired t-test. Results: A high correlation is obtained for the RT between OCTRIMA and MM5 and MM6 protocols. In all regions, the StratusOCT provide the lowest RT values (mean difference 43 +/- 8 ?m compared to OCTRIMA, and 42 +/- 14 ?m compared to RTVue MM6). All RTVue GCC measurements were significantly thicker (mean difference between 6 and 12 ?m) than the GCC measurements of OCTRIMA. Conclusion: High correspondence of RT measurements is obtained not only for RT but also for the segmentation of intraretinal layers between FD-OCT and StratusOCT-derived OCTRIMA analysis. However, a correction factor is required to compensate for OCT-specific differences to make measurements more comparable to any available OCT device.

  2. Comparison of retinal thickness by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and OCT retinal image analysis software segmentation analysis derived from Stratus optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Ttrai, Erika; Ranganathan, Sudarshan; Ferencz, Mria; DeBuc, Delia Cabrera; Somfai, Gbor Mrk

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare thickness measurements between Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and time-domain OCT images analyzed with a custom-built OCT retinal image analysis software (OCTRIMA). Methods: Macular mapping (MM) by StratusOCT and MM5 and MM6 scanning protocols by an RTVue-100 FD-OCT device are performed on 11 subjects with no retinal pathology. Retinal thickness (RT) and the thickness of the ganglion cell complex (GCC) obtained with the MM6 protocol are compared for each early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS)-like region with corresponding results obtained with OCTRIMA. RT results are compared by analysis of variance with Dunnett post hoc test, while GCC results are compared by paired t-test. Results: A high correlation is obtained for the RT between OCTRIMA and MM5 and MM6 protocols. In all regions, the StratusOCT provide the lowest RT values (mean difference 43 8 ?m compared to OCTRIMA, and 42 14 ?m compared to RTVue MM6). All RTVue GCC measurements were significantly thicker (mean difference between 6 and 12 ?m) than the GCC measurements of OCTRIMA. Conclusion: High correspondence of RT measurements is obtained not only for RT but also for the segmentation of intraretinal layers between FD-OCT and StratusOCT-derived OCTRIMA analysis. However, a correction factor is required to compensate for OCT-specific differences to make measurements more comparable to any available OCT device. PMID:21639572

  3. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-01

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging.

  4. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-15

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging. PMID:26436845

  5. Deriving two-dimensional ocean wave spectra and surface height maps from the Shuttel Imaging Radar (SIR-B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Directional ocean wave spectra were derived from Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B) imagery in regions where nearly simultaneous aircraft-based measurements of the wave spectra were also available as part of the NASA Shuttle Mission 41G experiments. The SIR-B response to a coherently speckled scene is used to estimate the stationary system transfer function in the 15 even terms of an eighth-order two-dimensional polynomial. Surface elevation contours are assigned to SIR-B ocean scenes Fourier filtered using a empirical model of the modulation transfer function calibrated with independent measurements of wave height. The empirical measurements of the wave height distribution are illustrated for a variety of sea states.

  6. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Serum Biomarkers for Detection of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Teratomas.

    PubMed

    Riegler, Johannes; Ebert, Antje; Qin, Xulei; Shen, Qi; Wang, Mouer; Ameen, Mohamed; Kodo, Kazuki; Ong, Sang-Ging; Lee, Won Hee; Lee, Grace; Neofytou, Evgenios; Gold, Joseph D; Connolly, Andrew J; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-02-01

    The use of cells derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for regenerative therapies confers a considerable risk for neoplastic growth and teratoma formation. Preclinical and clinical assessment of such therapies will require suitable monitoring strategies to understand and mitigate these risks. Here we generated human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), selected clones that continued to express reprogramming factors after differentiation into cardiomyocytes, and transplanted these cardiomyocytes into immunocompromised rat hearts post-myocardial infarction. We compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cardiac ultrasound, and serum biomarkers for their ability to delineate teratoma formation and growth. MRI enabled the detection of teratomas with a volume >8mm(3). A combination of three plasma biomarkers (CEA, AFP, and HCG) was able to detect teratomas with a volume >17mm(3) and with a sensitivity of more than 87%. Based on our findings, a combination of serum biomarkers with MRI screening may offer the highest sensitivity for teratoma detection and tracking. PMID:26777057

  7. Algal Accessory Pigment Detection Using AVIRIS Image-Derived Spectral Radiance Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Ambrosia, Vincent G.

    1996-01-01

    Visual and derivative analyses of AVIRIS spectral data can be used to detect algal accessory pigments in aquatic communities. This capability extends the use of remote sensing for the study of aquatic ecosystems by allowing detection of taxonomically significant pigment signatures which yield information about the type of algae present. Such information allows remote sensing-based assessment of aquatic ecosystem health, as in the detection of nuisance blooms of cyanobacteria or toxic blooms of dinoflagellates. Remote sensing of aquatic systems has traditionally focused on quantification of chlorophyll a, a photoreactive (and light-harvesting) pigment which is common to all algae as well as cyanobacteria (bluegreen algae). Due to the ubiquitousness of this pigment within algae, chl a is routinely measured to estimate algal biomass both during ground-truthing and using various airborne or satellite based sensors, including AVIRIS. Within the remote sensing and aquatic sciences communities, ongoing research has been performed to detect algal accessory pigments for assessment of algal population composition. This research is based on the fact that many algal accessory pigments are taxonomically significant, and all are spectrally unique. Aquatic scientists have been refining pigment analysis techniques, primarily high performance liquid chromatography, or HPLC, to detect specific pigments as a time-saving alternative to individual algal cell identifications and counts. Remote sensing scientists are investigating the use of pigment signatures to construct pigment libraries analogous to mineral spectral libraries used in geological remote sensing applications. The accessory pigment approach has been used successfully in remote sensing using data from the Thematic Mapper, low-altitude, multiple channel scanners, field spectroradiometers and the AVIRIS hyperspectral scanner. Due to spectral and spatial resolution capabilities, AVIRIS is the sensor of choice for such studies. We present here our results on detection of algal accessory pigments using AVIRIS data.

  8. Nuclear inputs for nucleosynthesis applications

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.; Hilaire, S.

    2009-01-28

    Although an important effort has been devoted in the last decades to measure reaction cross sections of interest in astrophysics, most nuclear astrophysics applications still require the use of theoretical predictions to estimate experimentally unknown rates. The nuclear ingredients to the reaction model should preferably be estimated from microscopic or semi-microscopic global predictions based on sound and reliable nuclear models which, in turn, can compete with more phenomenological highly-parametrized models in the reproduction of experimental data. The latest developments made in deriving the nuclear inputs of relevance in astrophysics applications are reviewed. They mainly concern nuclear structure properties, nuclear level densities, optical potentials.New developments to improve the predictions of radiative neutron capture rates are also discussed. They include the recent improvements made to the TALYS reaction code and the analysis of the pre-equilibrium contribution. The direct reaction mechanism is also discussed and new estimates on the basis of the newly-derived nuclear ingredients are compared with the compound-nucleus contribution.

  9. Photometric parameter maps of the Moon derived from LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; Denevi, B. W.; Boyd, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    Spatially resolved photometric parameter maps were computed from 21 months of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images. Due to a 60° field-of-view (FOV), the WAC achieves nearly global coverage of the Moon each month with more than 50% overlap from orbit-to-orbit. From the repeat observations at various viewing and illumination geometries, we calculated Hapke bidirectional reflectance model parameters [1] for 1°x1° "tiles" from 70°N to 70°S and 0°E to 360°E. About 66,000 WAC images acquired from February 2010 to October 2011 were converted from DN to radiance factor (I/F) though radiometric calibration, partitioned into gridded tiles, and stacked in a time series (tile-by-tile method [2]). Lighting geometries (phase, incidence, emission) were computed using the WAC digital terrain model (100 m/pixel) [3]. The Hapke parameters were obtained by model fitting against I/F within each tile. Among the 9 parameters of the Hapke model, we calculated 3 free parameters (w, b, and hs) by setting constant values for 4 parameters (Bco=0, hc=1, θ, φ=0) and interpolating 2 parameters (c, Bso). In this simplification, we ignored the Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect (CBOE) to avoid competing CBOE and Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect (SHOE). We also assumed that surface regolith porosity is uniform across the Moon. The roughness parameter (θ) was set to an averaged value from the equator (× 3°N). The Henyey-Greenstein double lobe function (H-G2) parameter (c) was given by the 'hockey stick' relation [4] (negative correlation) between b and c based on laboratory measurements. The amplitude of SHOE (Bso) was given by the correlation between w and Bso at the equator (× 3°N). Single scattering albedo (w) is strongly correlated to the photometrically normalized I/F, as expected. The c shows an inverse trend relative to b due to the 'hockey stick' relation. The parameter c is typically low for the maria (0.08×0.06) relative to the highlands (0.47×0.16). Since c controls the fraction of backward/forward scattering in H-G2, lower c for the maria indicates more forward scattering relative to the highlands. This trend is opposite to what was expected because darker particles are usually more backscattering. However, the lower albedo of the maria is due to the higher abundance of ilmenite, which is an opaque mineral that scatters all of the light by specular reflection from the its surface. If their surface facets are relatively smooth the ilmenite particles will be forward scattering. Other factors (e.g. grain shape, grain size, porosity, maturity) besides the mineralogy might also be affecting c. The angular-width of SHOE (hs) typically shows lower values (0.047×0.02) for the maria relative to the highlands (0.074×0.025). An increase in hs for the maria theoretically suggests lower porosity or a narrower grain size distribution [1], but the link between actual materials and hs is not well constrained. Further experiments using both laboratory and spacecraft observations will help to unravel the photometric properties of the surface materials of the Moon. [1] Hapke, B.: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2012. [2] Sato, H. et al.: 42nd LPSC, abstract #1974, 2011. [3] Scholten, F. et al.: JGR, 117, E00H17, 2012. [4] Hapke, B.: Icarus, 221(2), p1079-1083, 2012.

  10. Physical Conditions in the Central Parsec Derived from Mid-Infrared Imaging Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Dan; Dwek, Eli; Varosi, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Array camera images of the central 1 parsec of the Galactic Center at eight mid-infrared wavelengths between 4.8 and 20.0 microns with approximately 1 arcsec resolution are used to model the temperature, opacity and bolometric luminosity distributions of the emitting dust in the central parsec, and the extinction in the line of sight. We use the results to discriminate between two mechanisms for heating the dust: heating by radiation from a "central engine" (possibly a massive black hole associated with Sgr A*), or internal heating by luminous stars embedded in or among the dust clouds. The temperature and opacity distributions are consistent with the presence of self-luminous objects imbedded at prominent the IRS source positions. However, temperatures on the northern ann and east-west bar are highest along the inner flank of those structures surrounding the central cavity, while the dust opacity peaks further out from the central cavity. The warm inner ridge suggests heating by centrally located concentrated luminous sources, including IRS3 and IRS7. The of the model results are compared with the distributions of the various stellar populations in the central parsec. There is evidence for physical interaction between the warm emitting dust and luminous stars, including dozens of hot He1 emission line stars and B[] stars. The combined contributions of embedded stars at the IRS source positions and the luminous stars distributed throughout Sgr A West can account for the temperature enhancements and the luminosity distribution in the central parsec computed by the model.

  11. Extreme inputs/outputs for multiple input multiple output linear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, David Ora

    2005-09-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the auto spectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the auto spectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input auto spectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one will result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.

  12. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  13. Tissue Doppler Imaging-derived Diastolic Function Assessment in Children With Sickle Cell Disease and Its Relation With Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michelle; Hebson, Camden; Ehrlich, Alexandra; New, Tamara; Sachdeva, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction has been shown to occur earlier than systolic dysfunction in iron overload states in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI)-derived E/E' has emerged as a noninvasive marker of diastolic function. We sought to determine diastolic function in children with SCD and study its relation with iron overload. A retrospective review of medical records of 225 pediatric patients with SCD who received an echocardiogram between January 2008 and December 2012 was performed. Echocardiographic measures including M-mode, spectral Doppler, and TDI-derived E/E' were compared with previously published data in healthy children. The left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic dimensions were significantly higher in SCD (P<0.0001) and the shortening fraction was similar (P=0.66). E/E' ratio was significantly higher in SCD at the mitral annulus, septum, and tricuspid annulus. In 54% of subjects, the septal E/E' was >8, indicating elevated left ventricular filling pressure. However, there was no significant correlation between ferritin level and E/E' ratios. Pediatric patients with SCD have a high prevalence of elevated estimated left ventricular filling pressure, but this does not correlate with ferritin levels. PMID:26491854

  14. A new approach of the rupture process of the great earthquakes using images derived from hydroacoustic or infrasound array processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbert, J.; Le Pichon, A.; Vergoz, J.; Sbe, O.

    2012-04-01

    The study of the source of major earthquakes is of great interest for the scientific community because the parameters derived from have a major importance for the rapid estimation of associated effects (destruction or tsunami). In the framework of these studies, we have identified the array processing as a modern tool that can provide vital information on the geometry and the kinematics of the rupture. Thanks to the various technologies implied in the CTBT, we have brought these studies in the field of seismology, infrasound and hydroacoustic. These different approaches have resulted in either a direct visualization of the rupture thanks to the analysis of variations of azimuth with time of direct waves from the source or indirectly by obtaining the scope of radiation pattern of surface waves. This type of image is very innovative because it allows provide information on geographic areas which are not instrumented. We show multiple images of treatment PMCC (Progressive Multi Channel Correlation) associated with different major earthquakes as Sumatra Mw=9.3, Nias Mw=8.7, Kokoxoli Mw=7.8, Tohoku Mw=9.0 and how we can constrain the rupture of these events. These studies show the interest of the CTBT network and more precisely the dense arrays of sensors. These arrays offer the unique opportunity for a multi-technological approach of the seismic source and, perhaps, ultimately, the improvement of warning systems.

  15. Horizontal winds derived from the polar mesospheric cloud images as observed by the CIPS instrument on the AIM satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, P. P.; Yue, J.; Russell, J. M.; Lumpe, J. D.; Gong, J.; Wu, D. L.; Randall, C. E.

    2015-06-01

    A cloud pattern matching technique is applied to polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) images taken by the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size instrument (CIPS) to infer the wind velocities in the mesopause region. CIPS measurements are analyzed to detect patterns that repeat from one orbit to the next but are displaced in location; the displacement provides a measure of the wind velocity. Pattern matching is achieved by resampling the CIPS data to longitude and latitude grids with the grid-box size forced at ~5 km in both directions. The correlated patterns are searched within a geographic region referred to as a "frame" of ~500 km in longitude 400 km in latitude. The histograms of the derived velocities indicate that easterly winds prevail, with a mean zonal wind of -20 to -15 m/s. Mean meridional winds are overall small, but in late summer the histogram indicated a poleward wind of ~20-30 m/s. The variability of CIPS cloud albedo on consecutive orbits is also examined at fixed geolocations. The statistical results suggest that ~86% of pairs underwent mean cloud albedo variation of < 50% on consecutive orbits, suggesting a moderate change. It is also found that the correlation of the cloud structures between two consecutive orbits at a fixed location is generally poor. These findings suggest that cloud patterns are subject to wind advection, but the cloud patches are more extended in size than the movement that occurs. Cloud voids are found to be more likely to remain at the same geolocations.

  16. High-performance dendritic contrast agents for X-ray computed tomography imaging using potent tetraiodobenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    You, Suyeon; Jung, Hye-Youn; Lee, Chaewoon; Choe, Yun Hui; Heo, Ju Young; Gang, Gil-Tae; Byun, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Won Kon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Dong-Eog; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Yoonkyung

    2016-03-28

    The use of computed tomography (CT) for vascular imaging is critical in medical emergencies requiring urgent diagnostic decisions, such as cerebral ischemia and many cardiovascular diseases. Small-molecule iodinated contrast media are often injected intravenously as radiopaque agents during CT imaging to achieve high contrast enhancement of vascular systems. The rapid excretion rate of these agents is overcome by injecting a significantly high dose of iodine, which can have serious side effects. Here we report a simple method to prepare blood-pool contrast agents for CT based on dendrimers for the first time using tetraiodobenzene derivatives as potent radiopaque moieties. Excellent in vivo safety has been demonstrated for these small (13-22nm) unimolecular water-soluble dendritic contrast agents, which exhibit high contrast enhancement in the blood-pool and effectively extend their blood half-lives. Our method is applicable to virtually any scaffold with suitable surface groups and may fulfill the current need for safer, next-generation iodinated CT contrast agents. PMID:26812006

  17. Input-output transformation in the visuo-oculomotor loop: comparison of real-time optical imaging recordings in V1 to ocular following responses upon center-surround stimulation.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, A; Barthélemy, F V; Masson, G S; Chavane, F

    2007-11-01

    In psychophysics and physiology, it is well established that lateral interactions are crucial mechanisms to constrain response normalization and contextual modulations. To study the cortical mechanisms involved in the contextual modulation of the behavioral contrast response function, we compared in behaving monkeys the Ocular Following Response (OFR) to V1 population activity measured using Optical Imaging of Voltage-Sensitive Dyes (VSD). If contrast response functions (CRF) to a simple local stimulus are similar in V1 and in the OFR, lateral interaction leads however to quite different modulation at those two levels. At the behavioural level, contrast response function is strongly suppressed by lateral interactions, and this suppression is stronger for higher contrasts. In V1, we showed a slow dynamic of facilitation for low contrasts integration and a fast suppression operating on high contrasts. These modulatory interactions influence differently the contrast response functions, interrupting the dynamic increase of contrast sensitivity in OFR, but not in V1 response. The temporal properties of those effects lead us to hypothesize that horizontal and feedback connectivity have differential effect on low and high contrasts integration in V1. V1 provides then an input to MT whose contextual dependency is not totally determined and must be refined before affecting the behavioural OFR. PMID:18075119

  18. Fire temperature and fractional area derivations over the world trade center disaster site from imaging spectometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R.; Clark, R.; Boardman, J.

    As part of the World Trade Center disaster response, the NASA Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) was flown over the site on the 16t h and 18t h of September 2001. AVIRIS measures the solar reflected spectrum from 370 to 2500-nm at 10-nm sampling. For this flight the data were acquired at 1.5-m spatial sampling with image coverage of the entire disaster site. AVIRIS measurements are spectrally, radiometrically, spatially calibrated in the laboratory and validated in flight. Rapid examination of the World Trade Center AVIRIS data in the 2300 nm spectral region showed numerous high radiance targets indicative of burning fires. A new spectroscopic algorithm was implem n ted to simultaneously solve for thee temperature and fractional area of the fires. This algorithm uses the Planck function in conjunction with the full spectral shape measured by AVIRIS to determine the temperature and fractional area of the fire. This spectral algorithm overcomes the ambiguity between temperature and area that exists in single -spectral-b a n d temperature estimation methods. With these AVIRIS data set and new algorithm, 8 hot spot zones were identified in the September 16t h data with temperatures ranging from 700 to 1019 - K and fractional areas from 1.1 to 18-%. Analysis of the data set acquired on Septemb e r 18t h showed 7 of the hot spot zones still present with temperatures ranging from 471 to 952-K and fractional areas from 0.5 to 36-%. These imaging spectrometer derived physical parameters of fire temperature and fractional-area were found useful to the personnel making decisions on the ground. The complete set measurements, analyses, and results of this effort are reported in this paper.

  19. EU-FP7-iMars: Analysis of Mars Multi-Resolution Images using Auto-Coregistration, Data Mining and Crowd Source Techniques: an overview and a request for scientific inputs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jan-Peter; Gwinner, Klaus; van Gasselt, Stephan; Ivanov, Anton; Morley, Jeremy; Houghton, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Yershov, Vladimir; Sidirpoulos, Panagiotis; Kim, Jungrack

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the role of different planetary surface formation processes within our Solar System is one of the fundamental goals of planetary science research. There has been a revolution in planetary surface observations over the last 7 years, especially in 3D imaging of surface shape (down to resolutions of 10cm) and subsequent terrain correction of imagery from orbiting spacecraft. This has led to the ability to be able to overlay different epochs back to the mid-1970s, examine time-varying changes (such as the recent discovery of boulder movement [Orloff et al., 2011] or the sublimation of sub-surface ice revealed by meteoritic impact [Byrne et al., 2009] as well as examine geophysical phenomena, such as surface roughness on different length scales. Consequently we are seeing a dramatic improvement in our understanding of surface formation processes. Since January 2004 the ESA Mars Express has been acquiring global data, especially HRSC stereo (12.5-25m nadir images) with 87% coverage with images ?25m and more than 65% useful for stereo mapping (e.g. atmosphere sufficiently clear). It has been demonstrated [Gwinner et al., 2010] that HRSC has the highest possible planimetric accuracy of ?25m and is well co-registered with MOLA, which represents the global 3D reference frame. HRSC 3D and terrain-corrected image products therefore represent the best available 3D reference data for Mars. NASA began imaging the surface of Mars, initially from flybys in the 1960s with the first orbiter with images ?100m in the late 1970s from Viking Orbiter. The most recent orbiter to begin imaging in November 2006 is the NASA MRO which has acquired surface imagery of around 1% of the Martian surface from HiRISE (at ?20cm) and ?5% from CTX (?6m) in stereo. Unfortunately, for most of these NASA images, especially MGS, MO, VO and HiRISE their accuracy of georeferencing is often worse than the quality of Mars reference data from HRSC. This reduces their value for analysing changes in time series. Within the iMars project (http://i-Mars.eu), a fully automated large-scale processing ('Big Data') solution is being developed to generate the best possible multi-resolution DTM of Mars co-registered to HRSC (50-100m grid) products generated at DLR from CTX (6-20m grid, loc.cit.) and HiRISE (1-3m grids) on a large-scale linux cluster based at MSSL with 224 cores and 0.25 Pb of storage. The HRSC products are employed to provide a geographic reference for all current, future and historical NASA products using automated co-registration based on feature points and initial results will be shown. The metadata already available for all orbital imagery acquired to date, with poor georeferencing information, has been employed to determine the 'sweet spots' which have long time series of measurements with different spatial resolution ranges over the last ?50 years of observations and these will be shown. In 2015, as much of the entire NASA and ESA record of orbital images will be co-registered and the updated georeferencing information employed to generate a time series of terrain relief corrected orthorectified images (ORIs) back to 1977. Web-GIS using OGC protocols will be employed to allow exploration visually of changes of the surface. Data mining processing chains are being developed to search for changes in the Martian surface from 1971-2015 and the output of this data mining will be compared against the results from citizen scientists' measurements in a specialised Zooniverse implementation. Final co-registered data sets will be distributed through both European and US channels in a manner to be decided towards the end of the project. The resultant co-registered image datasets will represent the best possible capture of changes and evolutions in the Martian surface. A workshop is planned to be held during the EGU time period to try to capture scientific input on the relative priorities of different types of changes based on these 'sweet spots'. Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under iMars grant agreement n 607379. References: [1] Orloff et al. (2011) Boulder movement at high northern latitudes of Mars. J Geophys Res-Planet, 116: E11006-1-12; [2] Byrne et al. (2009) Distribution of mid-latitude ground ice on Mars from new impact craters. Science, 325: 1674-1676; [3] Gwinner, K., F. et al. (2010) Topography of Mars from global mapping by HRSC high-resolution digital terrain models and orthoimages: characteristics and performance. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 294, 506-519, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2009.11.007, 2010.

  20. Modeling and generating input processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This tutorial paper provides information relevant to the selection and generation of stochastic inputs to simulation studies. The primary area considered is multivariate but much of the philosophy at least is relevant to univariate inputs as well. 14 refs.

  1. Input in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan M., Ed.; Madden, Carolyn G., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers includes: "When Does Teacher Talk Work as Input?"; "Cultural Input in Second Language Learning"; "Skilled Variation in a Kindergarten Teacher's Use of Foreigner Talk"; "Teacher-Pupil Interaction in Second Language Development"; "Foreigner Talk in the University Classroom"; "Input and Interaction in the

  2. Intensive Input in Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimino, Andy; Ferguson, Nancy

    This paper discusses the role of input as one of the universals in second language acquisition theory. Considerations include how language instructors can best organize and present input and when certain kinds of input are more important. A self-administered program evaluation exercise using relevant theoretical and methodological contributions…

  3. Atmospheric Motion Vectors Derived via a New Nested Tracking Algorithm Developed for the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, J.; Bresky, W.; Wanzong, S.; Velden, C.

    2012-12-01

    A new Atmospheric Motion Vector (AMV) nested tracking algorithm has been developed for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) to be flown on NOAA's future GOES-R satellite. The algorithm has been designed to capture the dominant motion in each target scene from a family of local motion vectors derived for each target scene. Capturing this dominant motion is achieved through use of a two-dimensional clustering algorithm that segregates local displacements into clusters. The dominant motion is taken to be the average of the local displacements of points belonging to the largest cluster. This approach prevents excessive averaging of motion that may be occurring at multiple levels or at different scales that can lead to a slow speed bias and a poor quality AMV. A representative height is assigned to the dominant motion vector through exclusive use of cloud heights from pixels belonging to the largest cluster. This algorithm has been demonstrated to significantly improve the slow speed bias typically observed in AMVs derived from satellite imagery. Meteosat SEVERI imagery is serving as an important GOES-R ABI proxy data source for the development, testing, and validation of the GOES-R AMV algorithms given its similarities (spectral coverage, pixel resolution, and scanning rate) and performance (spectral noise, navigation/registration) to the future GOES-R ABI. The new GOES-R AMV algorithm is also being applied to the instrumentation on the current operational GOES series of satellites and is expected to replace the heritage AMV algorithm being used in NESDIS operations today. Plans at NOAA/NESDIS also include using the new GOES-R AMV algorithm to generate AMVs from the future VIIRS instrument on the NPP satellite. Details of the GOES-R ABI AMV algorithm and the validation results will be presented and discussed.

  4. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using 89Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hongguang; Sun, Chris K.; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Allegretta, Mark; Guttmann, Ronald D.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Chua, Mei-Sze; Cheng, Zhen; So, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging probes for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are highly desired to overcome current diagnostic limitations which lead to poor prognosis. The membrane protein glypican-3 (GPC3) is a potential molecular target for early HCC detection as it is over-expressed in >50% of HCCs, and is associated with early hepatocarcinogenesis. We synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) probe 89Zr-DFO-1G12 by bioconjugating and radiolabeling the anti-GPC3 monoclonal antibody (clone 1G12) with 89Zr, and evaluated its tumor-targeting capacity. In vitro, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 was specifically taken up into GPC3-positive HCC cells only, but not in the GPC3-negative prostate cancer cell line (PC3). In vivo, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 specifically accumulated in subcutaneous GPC3-positive HCC xenografts only, but not in PC3 xenografts. Importantly, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 delineated orthotopic HCC xenografts from surrounding normal liver, with tumor/liver (T/L) ratios of 6.65 1.33 for HepG2, and 4.29 0.52 for Hep3B xenografts. It also delineated orthotopic xenografts derived from three GPC3-positive HCC patient specimens, with T/L ratios of 4.21 0.64, 2.78 0.26, and 2.31 0.38 at 168 h p.i. Thus, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention. PMID:24836949

  5. Validation of plasmasphere electron density reconstructions derived from data on board CHAMP by IMAGE/RPI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Denton, R.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmaspheric electron content is, beyond the ionosphere as major source, a significant contributor to the overall TEC budget affecting GNSS signals. The plasmasphere can induce half or more of the GNSS range errors caused by atmospheric electrical charges, in particular at nighttime. At DLR Neustrelitz, Germany, GPS measurements recorded onboard the LEO satellite CHAMP were used to reconstruct the topside electron density distribution (ionosphere and plasmasphere) up to GPS altitude, applying a model-based assimilation technique. In this paper, the potential of these CHAMP topside reconstructions for analyzing space weather related changes in the geo-plasma is investigated. For this purpose, comparisons are made between the CHAMP reconstructed profiles and electron densities derived from passive radio wave observations by the IMAGE RPI instrument for years 2001 till 2005. The comparison results indicate that an improvement, compared to the electron density of a background model, can be achieved by CHAMP data assimilation. The improvement is especially visible in the L-shell region below 3, which contributes notably to the GNSS signal delays. However, for the region around the plasmapause, systematical electron density underestimations of the background model w.r.t. the IMAGE data are detected. The rather limited CHAMP data coverage and the degraded observation geometry at these high altitudes seem to be not sufficient for complete compensation of this underestimation during the assimilation procedure. The results presented in this paper demonstrate the strengths of LEO TEC data assimilation, but at the same time illustrate the necessity to improve the modeling of the plasmasphere region above 4 ER L-shell distances. Furthermore, they reveal the need of additional data to establish an appropriate data base for the modeling of the complete plasmasphere.

  6. Deriving soil function maps to assess related ecosystem services using imaging spectroscopy in the Lyss agricultural area, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diek, Sanne; de Jong, Rogier; Braun, Daniela; Böhler, Jonas; Schaepman, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Soils play an important role in the benefits offered by ecosystems services. In densely populated Switzerland soils are a scarce resource, with high pressure on services ranging from urban expansion to over-utilization. Key change drivers include erosion, soil degradation, land management change and (chemical) pollution, which should be taken into consideration. Therefore there is an emerging need for an integrated, sustainable and efficient system assessing the management of soil and land as a resource. The use of remote sensing can offer spatio-temporal and quantitative information of extended areas. In particular imaging spectroscopy has shown to perfectly complement existing sampling schemes as secondary information for digital soil mapping. Although only the upper-most layer of soil interacts with light when using reflectance spectroscopy, it still can offer valuable information that can be utilized by farmers and decision makers. Fully processed airborne imaging spectrometer data from APEX as well as land cover classification for the agricultural area in Lyss were available. Based on several spectral analysis methods we derived multiple soil properties, including soil organic matter, soil texture, and mineralogy; complemented by vegetation parameters, including leaf area index, chlorophyll content, pigment distribution, and water content. The surface variables were retrieved using a combination of index-based and physically-based retrievals. Soil properties in partly to fully vegetated areas were interpolated using regression kriging based methods. This allowed the continuous assessment of potential soil functions as well as non-contiguous maps of abundances of combined soil and vegetation parameters. Based on a simple regression model we could make a rough estimate of ecosystem services. This provided the opportunity to look at the differences between the interpolated soil function maps and the non-contiguous (but combined) vegetation and soil function maps. We demonstrate the use of interpolated soil function maps as well as non-contiguous (but combined) vegetation and soil function maps and comment on their combined usability to assess related ecosystem services.

  7. Naturally Simplified Input, Comprehension, and Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    This article examines the concept of simplification in second language (SL) learning, reviewing research on the simplified input that both naturalistic and classroom SL learners receive. Research indicates that simplified input, particularly if derived from naturally occurring interactions, does aid comprehension but has not been shown to

  8. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each stream, record or block name must be unique in its category (i.e. all streams must have different names, but a stream can have the same name as a record). Each category is an arbitrary length list which is handled by a 'manager' and there is one manager for each category.

  9. Teaching Image Formation by Extended Light Sources: The Use of a Model Derived from the History of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedes, Christos; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This research, carried out in Greece on pupils aged 12-16, focuses on the transformation of their representations concerning light emission and image formation by extended light sources. The instructive process was carried out in two stages, each one having a different, distinct target set. During the first stage, the appropriate conflict conditions were created by contrasting the subjects predictions with the results of experimental situations inspired by the History of Science, with a view to destabilizing the pupils alternative representations. During the second stage, the experimental teaching intervention was carried out; it was based on the geometrical optics model and its parameters were derived from Keplers relevant historic experiment. For the duration of this process and within the framework of didactical interactions, an effort was made to reorganize initial limited representations and restructure them at the level of the accepted scientific model. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated two weeks later, using experimental tasks which had the same cognitive yet different empirical content with respect to the tasks conducted during the intervention. The results of the study showed that the majority of the subjects accepted the model of geometrical optics, that is, the pupils were able to correctly predict and adequately justify the experimental results based on the principle of punctiform light emission. Educational and research implications are discussed.

  10. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Serum Biomarkers for Detection of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Teratomas

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, Johannes; Ebert, Antje; Qin, Xulei; Shen, Qi; Wang, Mouer; Ameen, Mohamed; Kodo, Kazuki; Ong, Sang-Ging; Lee, Won Hee; Lee, Grace; Neofytou, Evgenios; Gold, Joseph D.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The use of cells derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for regenerative therapies confers a considerable risk for neoplastic growth and teratoma formation. Preclinical and clinical assessment of such therapies will require suitable monitoring strategies to understand and mitigate these risks. Here we generated human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), selected clones that continued to express reprogramming factors after differentiation into cardiomyocytes, and transplanted these cardiomyocytes into immunocompromised rat hearts post-myocardial infarction. We compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cardiac ultrasound, and serum biomarkers for their ability to delineate teratoma formation and growth. MRI enabled the detection of teratomas with a volume >8 mm3. A combination of three plasma biomarkers (CEA, AFP, and HCG) was able to detect teratomas with a volume >17 mm3 and with a sensitivity of more than 87%. Based on our findings, a combination of serum biomarkers with MRI screening may offer the highest sensitivity for teratoma detection and tracking. PMID:26777057

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled mitiglinide derivatives as positron emission tomography tracers for ?-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Hirokazu; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Arimitsu, Kenji; Toyoda, Kentaro; Mukai, Eri; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Yu; Takagi, Mikako; Ono, Masahiro; Inagaki, Nobuya; Saji, Hideo

    2014-07-01

    Measuring changes in ?-cell mass in vivo during progression of diabetes mellitus is important for understanding the pathogenesis, facilitating early diagnosis, and developing novel therapeutics for this disease. However, a non-invasive method has not been developed. A novel series of mitiglinide derivatives (o-FMIT, m-FMIT and p-FMIT; FMITs) were synthesized and their binding affinity for the sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) of pancreatic islets were evaluated by inhibition studies. (+)-(S)-o-FMIT had the highest affinity of our synthesized FMITs (IC50=1.8?M). (+)-(S)-o-[(18)F]FMIT was obtained with radiochemical yield of 18% by radiofluorination of racemic precursor 7, hydrolysis, and optical resolution with chiral HPLC; its radiochemical purity was >99%. In biodistribution experiments using normal mice, (+)-(S)-o-[(18)F]FMIT showed 1.940.42% ID/g of pancreatic uptake at 5min p.i., and decreases in radioactivity in the liver (located close to the pancreas) was relatively rapid. Ex vivo autoradiography experiments using pancreatic sections confirmed accumulation of (+)-(S)-o-[(18)F]FMIT in pancreatic ?-cells. These results suggest that (+)-(S)-o-[(18)F]FMIT meets the basic requirements for an radiotracer, and could be a candidate positron emission tomography tracer for in vivo imaging of pancreatic ?-cells. PMID:24842616

  12. Fluorescent detection and imaging of Hg(2+) using a novel phenanthroline derivative based single- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Li, Long-Long; Liu, Ying-Kai

    2016-02-01

    A novel phenanthroline derivative, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (MSIPBI), was synthesized, and the linear absorption and fluorescent spectra of MSIPBI in different solvents were investigated. The photophysical properties in unbound and in ligand-metal complexes were evaluated by UV absorption and one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra, and the quantum yields, two-photon active cross-sections and the binding constant of dye-metal were calculated. The results indicated that MSIPBI has a large Stokes shift (more than 167nm), and the dye was selective and sensitive for the detection of Hg(2+) with a two-photon active cross-section of 55.5GM in tris-HCl buffer solution at 800nm. Furthermore, the results of the fluorescence microscopy imaging indicated that MSIPBI is an efficient fluorescent probe for the detection of Hg(2+) in living cells by one- and two-photon excitation. Moreover, the experiments of determination Hg(2+) in river water and tap water were finished. PMID:26652448

  13. In vivo imaging of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in female nude mice after simulated childbirth injury

    PubMed Central

    DAI, MIAO; XU, PEIRONG; HOU, MIN; TENG, YINCHENG; WU, QINGKAI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to track in vivo the distribution and survival of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) transplanted into female BALB/c nude mice following simulated childbirth injury, using green fluorescent protein and luciferase dual labeling, bioluminescent imaging (BLI) and histological evaluation. The results demonstrated that the dually labeled ASCs could be detected for up to eight weeks in vivo. The number of implanted cells decreased during the first three weeks, and then stabilized until the end of the experiment. According to the linear regression plot, ~27,621 implanted cells survived until eight weeks after implantation. Transplanted ASCs predominantly existed at the inoculation site of the vagina, with little or no spread to other organs. Histological analysis confirmed the survival of the engrafted ASCs. The study provided basic evidence that BLI techniques can be used to monitor ASCs in vivo in real time and in the long term. Through local administration, ASCs could survive in the long term to facilitate repair following pelvic-floor injury. PMID:25574200

  14. Comparisons of Reproducibility and Mean Values of Diffusion Tensor Imaging-Derived Indices between Unipolar and Bipolar Diffusion Pulse Sequences.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hsiao-Chien; Wu, Ming-Ting; Kao, E-Fong; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Eddy current distortion is an important issue that may influence the quantitative measurements of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The corrections of eddy current artifacts could be performed using bipolar diffusion gradients or unipolar gradients with affine registration. Whether the diffusion pulse sequence affects the quantification of DTI indices and the technique that produces more reliable DTI indices in terms of reproducibility both remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the reproducibility and mean values of DTI-derived indices between unipolar and bipolar diffusion pulse sequences based on actual human brain data. Five repeated datasets of unipolar and bipolar DTI were acquired from 10 healthy subjects at different echo times (TEs). The reproducibility and mean values of DTI indices were assessed by calculating the coefficient of variation and mean values of the 5 repeated measurements. The results revealed that the reproducibility and mean values of DTI indices were significantly affected by the pulse sequence. Unipolar DTI exhibited significantly higher reproducibility than bipolar DTI even at the same TE, and the mean values of DTI indices were significantly different between them. Therefore, we concluded that the reproducibility and mean values of DTI indices were significantly influenced by diffusion pulse sequences. PMID:25753738

  15. Modeling Recognition Memory Using the Similarity Structure of Natural Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacroix, Joyca P. W.; Murre, Jaap M. J.; Postma, Eric O.; van den Herik, H. Jaap

    2006-01-01

    The natural input memory (NAM) model is a new model for recognition memory that operates on natural visual input. A biologically informed perceptual preprocessing method takes local samples (eye fixations) from a natural image and translates these into a feature-vector representation. During recognition, the model compares incoming preprocessed

  16. Derivation of soil moisture and snow wetness from satellite SAR images over a permafrost region in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewuyi, Adeniyi Abiodun

    The empirically adopted integral equation model (EA-IEM) was implemented for soil moisture and snow wetness derivations from active microwave data under bare soil or pure snow cover and sparsely vegetated conditions in the permafrost region. Since the permafrost region consists of land mixed with snow cover, MODIS image was used as a reference to separate the original backscattering coefficient radar image into soil and snow backscattering coefficient subimages. The EA-IEM provides simplified mathematical expressions to calculate the soil and snow dielectric constants. A sensitivity analysis was performed and then the range of model parameters for snow wetness retrieval was determined. The Newton-Rhapson iteration was used to generate the calibrated surface root-mean-square (rms) height and calibrated correlation length by using the absolute difference between the retrieved volumetric soil moisture from the backscattering coefficient of RADARSAT-1 (a Canadian satellite radar sensor) and the measured volumetric soil moisture. The absolute difference is less than the threshold value set to be 106. In this study, two empirical roughness models were developed that allow for the parameterization of the soil surface roughness. The first empirical roughness model was established between the calibrated correlation length values and the backscattering coefficient observations, while the second model was implemented between the calibrated surface RMS height values and the backscattering coefficient values. Further incorporating these two empirical roughness models into the EA-IEM provides a robust way of retrieving volumetric liquid water content (LWC) over a large area. Liquid water content is then calculated from the radar backscattering coefficient without iteration. Four strategies were adopted to calibrate and validate the derived volumetric liquid water content data at two NCRS-SCAN sites: Nenana and Ward Farm in Alaska, USA. The first strategy combined the two data sets of both sites. The second strategy involved several selections of fifteen random data sets from all the data points to estimate soil moisture for the leftover data set. Finally, the third strategy used the data set of the Nenana SCAN site to predict the data set of the Ward Farm SCAN site while the fourth strategy was the vice-versa. The predicted soil moisture retrieved using in-situ soil moisture measurements from the sensor depth of 5.1 cm gave a strong correlation coefficient of approximately 90% with an root mean square error (RMSE) of 3.53 % in volume. A comparison between the predicted soil moisture and the measurements was performed for each strategy, and the RMSE was found to be 3.59 % in volume, suggesting that the first strategy performs well compared to other strategies. All these strategies indicate that the derived coefficients of the empirical roughness models in combination with the EA-IEM can be used to retrieve soil moisture under the tested range of parameters: incidence angles between 200 and 450, surface rms height from 10 to 25 mm, and correlation length from 30 to 100 mm.

  17. Nanoparticles based on quantum dots and a luminol derivative: implications for in vivo imaging of hydrogen peroxide by chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Sook; Deepagan, V G; You, Dong Gil; Jeon, Jueun; Yi, Gi-Ra; Lee, Jung Young; Lee, Doo Sung; Suh, Yung Doug; Park, Jae Hyung

    2016-03-01

    Overproduction of hydrogen peroxide is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as cancer and arthritis. To image hydrogen peroxide via chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer in the near-infrared wavelength range, we prepared quantum dots functionalized with a luminol derivative. PMID:26857551

  18. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  19. In vivo tracking of human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol in rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yan; Zhou, Xiang; Guan, Xin; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Chang-bin; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Ferumoxytol, an iron replacement product, is a new type of superparamagnetic iron oxide approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Herein, we assessed the feasibility of tracking transplanted human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol in middle cerebral artery occlusion-injured rats by 3.0 T MRI in vivo. 1 104 human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine were transplanted into the brains of rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neurologic impairment was scored at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days after transplantation. T2-weighted imaging and enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography were used to observe transplanted cells. Results of imaging tests were compared with results of Prussian blue staining. The modified neurologic impairment scores were significantly lower in rats transplanted with cells at all time points except 1 day post-transplantation compared with rats without transplantation. Regions with hypointense signals on T2-weighted and enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography images corresponded with areas stained by Prussian blue, suggesting the presence of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles within the engrafted cells. Enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography image exhibited better sensitivity and contrast in tracing ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine-labeled human adipose-derived stem cells compared with T2-weighted imaging in routine MRI. PMID:26199607

  20. Temporal and Spatial Assessment of Yearly Solar Maps Derived from Satellite Images over the UAE and Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, Y.; Marpu, P. R.; Ghedira, H.; Chiesa, M.

    2012-12-01

    The unique climate of countries located within the Arabian Peninsula, characterized by high dust concentrations, high humidity and modest cloud coverage, requires regional models to retrieve the solar irradiance components from satellite images. An artificial neural network (ANN) model has shown promising results in estimating the direct normal, diffuse horizontal and global horizontal irradiances using thermal satellite channels over the United Arab Emirates (UAE). This model is trained with six thermal channels of the SEVIRI instrument, onboard Meteosat Second Generation, along with the solar zenith angle, day number, solar time and eccentricity correction. The outputs of this model are the solar irradiance components at 15-min temporal and 3-km spatial resolutions, which are then utilized to derive the daily, monthly and yearly irradiation maps over the UAE and Qatar. The purpose of this research is to examine the temporal and spatial variations for annual irradiation maps over the UAE and Qatar, derived using the ANN approach. For the period ranging from 2008 to 2010, the year of 2009 shows the lowest annual direct normal and global horizontal irradiation, and the highest diffuse horizontal irradiation. That is due to frequent dust events which occurred during 2009. The annual direct normal irradiation maps for 2008 to 2010 show the same trend, with the higher irradiation values in the southern area of UAE and the values decreasing as the coast approaches in the northern region. For any given year, Qatar generally shows lower direct normal irradiation values than the UAE. This might be explained by higher humidity in Qatar due to its coastal climate. As for the annual diffuse horizontal irradiation maps, the lower irradiation values are observed in the southern area of UAE and along some coastal regions, with the higher values being in the middle. Qatar shows higher values in the western region, due to the increased airborne dust coming from Saudi Arabia, as opposed to the eastern coast which is along the Arabian Gulf. The annual global horizontal irradiation maps show less spatial variations. For the UAE the values consistently increase from north to south, while for Qatar lower values are observed along the eastern coast and the higher values are in the inland and southern locations. The direct normal irradiation map over the UAE and Qatar for the year 2010, which had values greater than 2008 and 2009.

  1. Coordination Polymers Derived from Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Cell Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mithun; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2016-01-01

    A new series of Mn(II) coordination polymers, namely, [{Mn(L)(H2 O)2 }?2?Nap]? (CP1), [{Mn(L)(Ibu)2 (H2 O)2 }]? (CP2), [{Mn(L)(Flr)2 (H2 O)2 }]? (CP3), [{Mn(L)(Ind)2 (H2 O)2 }?H2 O]? (CP4), [{Mn2 (L)2 (?-Flu)4 (H2 O)}?L]? (CP5), [{Mn2 (L)2 (?-Tol)4 (H2 O)2 }]? (CP6) and [{Mn2 (L)2 (?-Mef)4 (H2 O)2 }]? (CP7) (Nap=naproxen, Ibu=ibuprofen, Flr=flurbiprofen, Ind=indometacin, Flu=flufenamic acid, Tol=tolfenamic acid and Mef=mefenamic acid) derived from various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the organic linker 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (L) have been synthesized with the aim of being used for cell imaging and drug delivery. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD) studies revealed that the NSAID molecules were part of the coordination polymeric network either through coordination to the metal center (in the majority of the cases) or through hydrogen bonding. Remarkably, all the Mn(II) coordination polymers were found to be soluble in DMSO, thereby making them particularly suitable for the desired biological applications. Two of the coordination polymers (namely, CP1 and CP3) reported herein, were found to be photoluminescent both in the solid as well as in the solution state. Subsequent experiments (namely, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide), and PGE2 (prostaglandin?E2 ) assays) established their biocompatibility and anti-inflammatory response. In vitro studies by using a macrophage cell line (i.e., RAW 264.7) revealed that both CP1 and CP3 were excellent cell imaging agents. Finally, biodegradability studies under simulated physiological conditions in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at pH?7.6 showed that slow and sustained release of the corresponding NSAID was indeed possible from both CP1 and CP3. PMID:26660274

  2. Nile Red Derivative-Modified Nanostructure for Upconversion Luminescence Sensing and Intracellular Detection of Fe(3+) and MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ruoyan; Wei, Zuwu; Sun, Lining; Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jinliang; Ge, Xiaoqian; Shi, Liyi

    2016-01-13

    Iron ion (Fe(3+)) which is the physiologically most abundant and versatile transition metal in biological systems, has been closely related to many certain cancers, metabolism, and dysfunction of organs, such as the liver, heart, and pancreas. In this Research Article, a novel Nile red derivative (NRD) fluorescent probe was synthesized and, in conjunction with polymer-modified core-shell upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), demonstrated in the detection of Fe(3+) ion with high sensitivity and selectivity. The core-shell UCNPs were surface modified using a synthesized PEGylated amphiphilic polymer (C18PMH-mPEG), and the resulting mPEG modified core-shell UCNPs (mPEG-UCNPs) show good water solubility. The overall Fe(3+)-responsive upconversion luminescence nanostructure was fabricated by linking the NRD to the mPEG-UCNPs, denoted as mPEG-UCNPs-NRD. In the nanostructure, the core-shell UCNPs, NaYF4:Yb,Er,Tm@NaGdF4, serve as the energy donor while the Fe(3+)-responsive NRD as the energy acceptor, which leads to efficient luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET). The mPEG-UCNPs-NRD nanostructure shows high selectivity and sensitivity for detecting Fe(3+) in water. In addition, benefited from the good biocompatibility, the nanostructure was successfully applied for detecting Fe(3+) in living cells based on upconversion luminescence (UCL) from the UCNPs. Furthermore, the doped Gd(3+) ion in the UCNPs endows the mPEG-UCNPs-NRD nanostructure with effective T1 signal enhancement, making it a potential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. This work demonstrates a simple yet powerful strategy to combine metal ion sensing with multimodal bioimaging based on upconversion luminescence for biomedical applications. PMID:26702512

  3. Images

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Images Images: Cancer Biology Image:Cell with DNA72 DPI|300 DPIDrawing depicting DNA molecule unwinding from a chromosome inside the nucleus of a cell. NHGRI>>View All Cancer Pathology/Imaging Image:Female

  4. Learner Involvement and Comprehensible Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsui, Amy B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Studies on comprehensible input generally emphasize how input is made comprehensible to the nonnative speaker by examining native speaker speech or teacher talk in the classroom. This paper uses Hong Kong secondary school data to show that only when modification devices involve learner participation do they serve as indicators of comprehensible

  5. REL - English Bulk Data Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Richard Henry

    A bulk data input processor which is available for the Rapidly Extensible Language (REL) English versions is described. In REL English versions, statements that declare names of data items and their interrelationships normally are lines from a terminal or cards in a batch input stream. These statements provide a convenient means of declaring some

  6. Selection of weighting factors for quantification of PET radioligand binding using simplified reference tissue models with noisy input functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normandin, M. D.; Koeppe, R. A.; Morris, E. D.

    2012-02-01

    Input function noise contributes to model-predicted values and should be accounted for during parameter estimation. This problem has been examined in the context of PET data analysis using a noisy image-derived arterial input function. Huesman and Mazoyer (1987 Phys. Med. Biol 32 1569-79) incorporated the effect of error in the measured input function into the objective function and observed a subsequent improvement in the accuracy of parameters estimated from a kinetic model of cardiac blood flow. Such a treatment has not been applied to the reference region models commonly used to analyze dynamic positron emission tomography data with receptor-ligand tracers. Here, we propose a strategy for selection of weighting factors that accounts for noise in the reference region input function and test the method on two common formulations of the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM). We present a simulation study which demonstrates that the proposed weighting approach improves the accuracy of estimated binding potential at high noise levels and when the reference tissue and target regions of interest are of comparable size. In the second simulation experiment, we show that using a small, homogeneous reference tissue with our weighting technique may have advantages over input functions derived from a larger (and thus less noisy), heterogeneous region with conventional weighting. A comparative analysis of clinical [11C]flumazenil data found a small but significant increase in estimated binding potential when using the proposed weighting method, consistent with the finding of reduced negative bias in our simulation study. The weighting strategy described here accounts for noise in the reference region input function and may improve the performance of the SRTM in applications where data are noisy and the reference region is relatively small. This technique may offer similar benefits to other models using reference region inputs, particularly those derived from the SRTM.

  7. Selection of weighting factors for quantification of PET radioligand binding using simplified reference tissue models with noisy input functions.

    PubMed

    Normandin, M D; Koeppe, R A; Morris, E D

    2012-02-01

    Input function noise contributes to model-predicted values and should be accounted for during parameter estimation. This problem has been examined in the context of PET data analysis using a noisy image-derived arterial input function. Huesman and Mazoyer (1987 Phys. Med. Biol 32 1569-79) incorporated the effect of error in the measured input function into the objective function and observed a subsequent improvement in the accuracy of parameters estimated from a kinetic model of cardiac blood flow. Such a treatment has not been applied to the reference region models commonly used to analyze dynamic positron emission tomography data with receptor-ligand tracers. Here, we propose a strategy for selection of weighting factors that accounts for noise in the reference region input function and test the method on two common formulations of the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM). We present a simulation study which demonstrates that the proposed weighting approach improves the accuracy of estimated binding potential at high noise levels and when the reference tissue and target regions of interest are of comparable size. In the second simulation experiment, we show that using a small, homogeneous reference tissue with our weighting technique may have advantages over input functions derived from a larger (and thus less noisy), heterogeneous region with conventional weighting. A comparative analysis of clinical [(11)C]flumazenil data found a small but significant increase in estimated binding potential when using the proposed weighting method, consistent with the finding of reduced negative bias in our simulation study. The weighting strategy described here accounts for noise in the reference region input function and may improve the performance of the SRTM in applications where data are noisy and the reference region is relatively small. This technique may offer similar benefits to other models using reference region inputs, particularly those derived from the SRTM. PMID:22241524

  8. Sensitivity analysis for RADTRAN 4 input parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.S.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1995-02-01

    The transportation risk analysis code, RADTRAN 4, computer estimates of incident-free dose consequence and accident dose-risk. The output of the code includes a tabulation of sensitivity of the result to variation of the input parameters for the incident-free analysis. The values are calculated using closed mathematical expressions derived from the constitutive equations, which are linear. However, the equations for accident risk are not linear, in general, and a similar tabulation has not been available. Because of the importance of knowing how accident-risk estimates are affected by uncertainties in the input parameters, a direct investigation was undertaken of the variation in calculated accident dose-risk with changes in individual parameters. A limited, representative group of transportation scenarios was used, initially, to determine which of 23 accident-risk parameters affect the calculated accident dose risk significantly. Many of the parameters were observed to have minimal effect on the output, and others were judged as ``fixed`` either by regulation, convention or standards. The remaining 5 variables were selected for further study through Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). LHS yields statistical information from observations (risk calculations) resulting from multiple input-parameter sets compiled from ``random`` sampling of parameter distributions. The LHS method requires fewer observations than classical Monte Carlo methods to yield statistically significant results. This paper presents the preliminary parameter study and LHS application results together with further LHS evaluations of RADTRAN input parameters.

  9. Linear Regression in High Dimension and/or for Correlated Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, J.; Fraix-Burnet, D.

    2014-12-01

    Ordinary least square is the common way to estimate linear regression models. When inputs are correlated or when they are too numerous, regression methods using derived inputs directions or shrinkage methods can be efficient alternatives. Methods using derived inputs directions build new uncorrelated variables as linear combination of the initial inputs, whereas shrinkage methods introduce regularization and variable selection by penalizing the usual least square criterion. Both kinds of methods are presented and illustrated thanks to the R software on an astronomical dataset.

  10. Cross-sensor SAR image offsets for deriving coseismic displacements: Application to the 2001 Bhuj (India) earthquake using ERS and Envisat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Wei, S.; Jonsson, S.; Avouac, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a powerful imaging technique for measuring ground deformation, either through Interferometric SAR (InSAR) or image offset tracking. However, these methods are only applied to SAR images acquired by the same satellite, which limits the measurement capability for many earthquakes. Here we propose a novel approach that allows for calculating offsets between images acquired from the European ERS and Envisat satellites. To achieve this cross-sensor offset calculation, we first coregister pre-event (ERS) and post-event (Envisat) SAR images separately to generate averaged pre- and post-event SAR amplitude maps. We then compute the orbital offsets between these two maps in order to resample the ERS average map onto the grid of the averaged Envisat image. We finally calculate the cross-sensor image offsets based on cross-correlating selected sub-images distributed throughout the coregistered averaged SAR maps. Application to the 2001 Bhuj earthquake reveals, for the first time, its near-field coseismic displacement field right above the epicenter. We compare our measurements with the surface displacement field predicted from the published source model of Copley et al. [2011]. This model was derived from tele-seismic waveforms and limited far-field geodetic data. The comparison between the two displacement maps shows consistent displacement patterns, yet a systematic shift, which likely is due to the limited near-fault resolution of the data used in the previous model. We then perform a joint inversion using the newly derived SAR image offsets and tele-seismic waveforms. The preferred source model suggests a compact slip pattern at depths of 20-30 km with a peak slip of ~10 meters and a fairly short rise time (<3s). The large slip rate and low attenuation in the crust are likely responsible for the widely felt ground shaking despite of its compact source area. The result demonstrates that it is possible to correlate non-coherent SAR images acquired by different sensors to measure surface displacements. This approach extends further the possibility of mining the archive of SAR images for various types of earth-science studies.

  11. Eyewear-style three-dimensional endoscope derived from microstructured polymer fiber with the function of image transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, De-Peng; Wang, Li-Li; He, Zheng-Quan; Chu, Jiu-Rong; Ma, Tian

    2013-02-01

    A method of fabricating multi-core polymer image fiber is proposed. Image fiber preform is fabricated by stacking thousands of polymer fibers each with a 0.25-mm diameter orderly in a die by only one step. The preform is heated and stretched into image fiber with an outer diameter of 2 mm. Then a portable eyewear-style three-dimensional (3D) endoscope system is designed, fabricated, and characterized. This endoscopic system is composed of two graded index lenses, two pieces of 0.35-m length image guide fibers, and a pair of oculars. It shows good flexibility and portability, and can provide the depth information accordingly.

  12. Erythrocyte-derived photo-theranostic agents: hybrid nano-vesicles containing indocyanine green for near infrared imaging and therapeutic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Baharak; Bacon, Danielle; Anvari, Bahman

    2013-07-01

    Development of theranostic nano-constructs may enable diagnosis and treatment of diseases at high spatial resolution. Some key requirements for clinical translation of such constructs are that they must be non-toxic, non-immunogenic, biodegradable, with extended circulating lifetime. Cell-based structures, particularly those derived from erythrocytes, are promising candidate carrier systems to satisfy these requirements. One particular type of theranostic materials utilize light-sensitive agents that once photo-activated can provide diagnostic imaging capability, and elicit therapeutic effects. Here we demonstrate the first successful engineering of hybrid nano-scale constructs derived from membranes of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocytes that encapsulate the near infrared chromophore, indocyanine green. We show the utility of the constructs as photo-theranostic agents in fluorescence imaging and photothermal destruction of human cells. These erythrocyte-mimicking nano-structures can be derived autologously, and may have broad applications in personal nanomedicine ranging from imaging and photo-destruction of cancerous tissues to vascular abnormalities, and longitudinal evaluations of therapeutic interventions.

  13. Derivation of a MODIS-compatible enhanced vegetation index from visible infrared imaging radiometer suite spectral reflectances using vegetation isoline equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Kenta; Miura, Tomoaki; Yoshioka, Hiroki; Huete, Alfredo R.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a unique methodology that spectrally translates the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) across sensors for data continuity based on vegetation isoline equations and derived a moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS)-compatible EVI for the visible/infrared imager/radiometer suite (VIIRS) sensor. The derived equation had four coefficients that were a function of soil, canopy, and atmosphere, e.g., soil line slope, leaf area index (LAI), and aerosol optical thickness (AOT). The PROSAIL canopy reflectance and 6S atmospheric models were employed to numerically characterize the MODIS-compatible VIIRS EVI. MODIS-compatible VIIRS EVI values only differed from those of MODIS EVI by, at most, 0.002 EVI units, whereas VIIRS and MODIS EVI values differed by 0.018 EVI units. The derived coefficients were sensitive mainly to LAI and AOT for the full- and a partial-covered canopy, respectively. The MODIS-compatible EVI resulted in a reasonable level of accuracy when the coefficients were fixed at values found via optimization for model-simulated and actual sensor data (83 and 41% reduction in the root mean square error, respectively), demonstrating the potential practical utility of the derived equation. The developed methodology can be used to obtain a spectrally compatible EVI for any pair of sensors in the data continuity context.

  14. Comparison of point clouds derived from aerial image matching with data from airborne laser scanning. (Polish Title: Porwnanie wa?ciwo?ci chmury punktw wygenerowanej metod? dopasowania obrazw zdj?? lotniczych z danymi z lotniczego skanowania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, W.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the properties of point clouds derived from aerial image matching and to compare them with point clouds from airborne laser scanning. A set of aerial images acquired in years 2010-2013 over the city of Elblag were used for the analysis. Images were acquired with the use of three digital cameras: DMC II 230, DMC I and DigiCAM60 with a GSD varying from 4.5 cm to 15 cm. Eight sets of images that were used in the study were acquired at different stages of the growing season - from March to December. Two LiDAR point clouds were used for the comparison - one with a density of 1.3 p/m2 and a second with a density of 10 p/m2. Based on the input images point clouds were created with the use of the semi-global matching method. The properties of the obtained point clouds were analyzed in three ways: - by the comparison of the vertical accuracy of point clouds with reference to a terrain profile surveyed on bare ground with GPS-RTK method - by visual assessment of point cloud profiles generated both from SGM and LiDAR point clouds - by visual assessment of a digital surface model generated from a SGM point cloud with reference to a digital surface model generated from a LiDAR point cloud. The conducted studies allowed a number of observations about the quality of SGM point clouds to be formulated with respect to different factors. The main factors having influence on the quality of SGM point clouds are GSD and base/height ratio. The essential problem related to SGM point clouds are areas covered with vegetation where SGM point clouds are visibly worse in terms of both accuracy and the representation of terrain surface. It is difficult to expect that in these areas SGM point clouds could replace LiDAR point clouds. This leads to a general conclusion that SGM point clouds are less reliable, more unpredictable and are dependent on more factors than LiDAR point clouds. Nevertheless, SGM point clouds generated with appropriate parameters can have better accuracy than LiDAR point clouds and present more detailed information about the terrain surface.

  15. Characterization of membrane protein interactions in plasma membrane derived vesicles with quantitative imaging Frster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Del Piccolo, Nuala; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-08-18

    Here we describe an experimental tool, termed quantitative imaging Frster resonance energy transfer (QI-FRET), that enables the quantitative characterization of membrane protein interactions. The QI-FRET methodology allows us to acquire binding curves and calculate association constants for complex membrane proteins in the native plasma membrane environment. The method utilizes FRET detection, and thus requires that the proteins of interest are labeled with florescent proteins, either FRET donors or FRET acceptors. Since plasma membranes of cells have complex topologies precluding the acquisition of two-dimensional binding curves, the FRET measurements are performed in plasma membrane derived vesicles that bud off cells as a result of chemical or osmotic stress. The results overviewed here are acquired in vesicles produced with an osmotic vesiculation buffer developed in our laboratory, which does not utilize harsh chemicals. The concentrations of the donor-labeled and the acceptor-labeled proteins are determined, along with the FRET efficiencies, in each vesicle. The experiments utilize transient transfection, such that a wide variety of concentrations is sampled. Then, data from hundreds of vesicles are combined to yield dimerization curves. Here we discuss recent findings about the dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), membrane proteins that control cell growth and differentiation via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane. We focus on the dimerization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), a RTK that plays a critically important role in skeletal development. We study the role of different FGFR3 domains in FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand, and we show that FGFR3 extracellular domains inhibit unliganded dimerization, while contacts between the juxtamembrane domains, which connect the transmembrane domains to the kinase domains, stabilize the unliganded FGFR3 dimers. Since FGFR3 has been documented to harbor many pathogenic single amino acid mutations that cause skeletal and cranial dysplasias, as well as cancer, we also study the effects of these mutations on dimerization. First, we show that the A391E mutation, linked to Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans and to bladder cancer, significantly enhances FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand and thus induces aberrant receptor interactions. Second, we present results about the effect of three cysteine mutations that cause thanatophoric dysplasia, a lethal phenotype. Such cysteine mutations have been hypothesized previously to cause constitutive dimerization, but we find instead that they have a surprisingly modest effect on dimerization. Most of the studied pathogenic mutations also altered FGFR3 dimer structure, suggesting that both increases in dimerization propensities and changes in dimer structure contribute to the pathological phenotypes. The results acquired with the QI-FRET method further our understanding of the interactions between FGFR3 molecules and RTK molecules in general. Since RTK dimerization regulates RTK signaling, our findings advance our knowledge of RTK activity in health and disease. The utility of the QI-FRET method is not restricted to RTKs, and we thus hope that in the future the QI-FRET method will be applied to other classes of membrane proteins, such as channels and G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:26244699

  16. Aerosol and Cloud Properties at the Huygens Entry Site as Derived from the Descent Imager/Spectral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doose, L. R.; Engel, S.; Tomasko, M. G.; Dafoe, L. E.; West, R.; Lemmon, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens Probe descended through Titan s atmosphere on January 14, 2005. The Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) instrument made optical measurements which constrain the nature and vertical distribution and of the aerosols in the atmosphere.

  17. Long-term time-lapse multimodal intravital imaging of regeneration and bone-marrow-derived cell dynamics in skin

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Benedikt W.; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Adie, Steven G.; De Lisio, Michael; Valero, M. Carmen; Boppart, Marni D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for translating cell-based therapies is understanding the dynamics of cells and cell populations in complex in vivo environments. Intravital microscopy has shown great promise for directly visualizing cell behavior in vivo. However, current methods are limited to relatively short imaging times (hours), by ways to track cell and cell population dynamics over extended time-lapse periods (days to weeks to months), and by relatively few imaging contrast mechanisms that persist over extended investigations. We present technology to visualize and quantify complex, multifaceted dynamic changes in natural deformable skin over long time periods using novel multimodal imaging and a non-rigid image registration method. These are demonstrated in green fluorescent protein (GFP) bone marrow (BM) transplanted mice to study dynamic skin regeneration. This technology provides a novel perspective for studying dynamic biological processes and will enable future studies of stem, immune, and tumor cell biology in vivo. PMID:25089085

  18. Bursting neurons signal input slope.

    PubMed

    Kepecs, Adam; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Lisman, John

    2002-10-15

    Brief bursts of high-frequency action potentials represent a common firing mode of pyramidal neurons, and there are indications that they represent a special neural code. It is therefore of interest to determine whether there are particular spatial and temporal features of neuronal inputs that trigger bursts. Recent work on pyramidal cells indicates that bursts can be initiated by a specific spatial arrangement of inputs in which there is coincident proximal and distal dendritic excitation (Larkum et al., 1999). Here we have used a computational model of an important class of bursting neurons to investigate whether there are special temporal features of inputs that trigger bursts. We find that when a model pyramidal neuron receives sinusoidally or randomly varying inputs, bursts occur preferentially on the positive slope of the input signal. We further find that the number of spikes per burst can signal the magnitude of the slope in a graded manner. We show how these computations can be understood in terms of the biophysical mechanism of burst generation. There are several examples in the literature suggesting that bursts indeed occur preferentially on positive slopes (Guido et al., 1992; Gabbiani et al., 1996). Our results suggest that this selectivity could be a simple consequence of the biophysics of burst generation. Our observations also raise the possibility that neurons use a burst duration code useful for rapid information transmission. This possibility could be further examined experimentally by looking for correlations between burst duration and stimulus variables. PMID:12388612

  19. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Images of Electric Field and Conductivity derived from Incoherent Scatter Radar measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolls, M. J.; Cosgrove, R. B.; Bahcivan, H.; Hampton, D. L.; Conde, M.

    2013-12-01

    Auroral forms involve spatial scales that are small in comparison with the magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) system, and yet these forms are thought to be closely tied to the overall system response. Spatially resolved measurements of the horizontal ionospheric current can, in principle, be used to determine the field-aligned currents that are responsible for energy transfer between the ionosphere and magnetosphere, leading to heating and acceleration of the neutral gas, substorms, and other instabilities. Optical emissions allow imaging the dynamics of auroral forms in 2D, and our picture of neutral wind forcing has progressed significantly with spatially resolved optical spectrometry. However, similarly resolved images of electric fields, conductivities, and ultimately currents are not yet routinely available, although they are needed to properly characterize the magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. Multi-beam incoherent scatter radars such as the system at Poker Flat have the potential to fill this gap. However, there exists a potentially crippling trade-off between time resolution, spatial resolution, and spatial coverage, in addition to the inherent difficulty of resolving a vector field with a monostatic radar. In this work, we attempt to overcome some of these difficulties by exploring mathematical imaging and data fusion techniques, and obtain two-dimensional images of the electric field, and three-dimensional images of the conductivity. We consider applications to stable auroral arcs, substorm triggering events, and the westward-traveling surge, and assess the reliability of the images produced, with the ultimate goal being diagnosis of ionospheric current closure.

  20. Segmentation and learning in the quantitative analysis of microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Christy; Ross, Amy; Porter, Reid

    2015-02-01

    In material science and bio-medical domains the quantity and quality of microscopy images is rapidly increasing and there is a great need to automatically detect, delineate and quantify particles, grains, cells, neurons and other functional "objects" within these images. These are challenging problems for image processing because of the variability in object appearance that inevitably arises in real world image acquisition and analysis. One of the most promising (and practical) ways to address these challenges is interactive image segmentation. These algorithms are designed to incorporate input from a human operator to tailor the segmentation method to the image at hand. Interactive image segmentation is now a key tool in a wide range of applications in microscopy and elsewhere. Historically, interactive image segmentation algorithms have tailored segmentation on an image-by-image basis, and information derived from operator input is not transferred between images. But recently there has been increasing interest to use machine learning in segmentation to provide interactive tools that accumulate and learn from the operator input over longer periods of time. These new learning algorithms reduce the need for operator input over time, and can potentially provide a more dynamic balance between customization and automation for different applications. This paper reviews the state of the art in this area, provides a unified view of these algorithms, and compares the segmentation performance of various design choices.

  1. Long-term live-cell imaging of mammalian preimplantation development and derivation process of pluripotent stem cells from the embryos.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kazuo; Ueda, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Mammalian fertilization is a process in which two highly specialized haploid gametes unite and endow totipotency to the resulting diploid zygote. This is followed by cell proliferation and the onset of differentiation during the brief period leading up to implantation. In these processes, a number of cellular components and structures are regulated spatially and temporally, as seen in repeated cell division, cell cycle progression, and epigenetic reprogramming. In mammals, the numbers of oocytes and embryos that can be collected are very limited. Therefore, analyses of molecular mechanisms are hampered because of difficulties in conducting biochemical analyses on such limited material. Furthermore, immunostaining methods require cell fixation and are insufficient for understanding ontogeny, because the processes observed in fertilization and early embryonic development progress in time-dependent manners and each phenomenon is connected with others by cause-and-effect relationships. Consequently, it is important to develop an experimental system that enables molecular imaging without affecting embryonic development. To achieve the above advantages, especially retrospective and prospective analyses, we have established a live-cell imaging system that enables observations under minimally invasive conditions. Using this approach, we have succeeded in visualizing and predicting the developmental potential of embryos after various perturbations. We also succeeded in imaging embryonic stem (ES) cell derivation in natural conditions. In this review, we describe a brief history of embryonic imaging and detailed protocols. We also discuss promising aspects of imaging in the fields of developmental and stem cell biology. PMID:23495974

  2. Power regulation of kinematic control inputs for forward flying Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Kenneth; Faruque, Imraan; Sean Humbert, J.

    2014-12-01

    The choices of insect wing kinematic programs is not well understood, particularly the mechanism by which an insect selects a distortion to achieve flight control. A methodology to evaluate prospective kinematic control inputs is presented based on the reachable states when control actuation was constrained to a unit of power. The method implements a computationally-derived reduced order model of the insect's flight dynamics combined with calculation of power requirement. Four kinematic inputs are evaluated based on this criterion for a Drosophila size insect in forward flight. Stroke bias is shown to be the dominant control input using this power normalized evaluation measure.

  3. Reduction of shading-derived artifacts in skin chromophore imaging without measurements or assumptions about the shape of the subject

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenichiro; Nishidate, Izumi; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Iwata, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate skin chromophores over a wide region of curved skin surface, we propose an approach that suppresses the effect of the shading-derived error in the reflectance on the estimation of chromophore concentrations, without sacrificing the accuracy of that estimation. In our method, we use multiple regression analysis, assuming the absorbance spectrum as the response variable and the extinction coefficients of melanin, oxygenated hemoglobin, and deoxygenated hemoglobin as the predictor variables. The concentrations of melanin and total hemoglobin are determined from the multiple regression coefficients using compensation formulae (CF) based on the diffuse reflectance spectra derived from a Monte Carlo simulation. To suppress the shading-derived error, we investigated three different combinations of multiple regression coefficients for the CF. In vivo measurements with the forearm skin demonstrated that the proposed approach can reduce the estimation errors that are due to shading-derived errors in the reflectance. With the best combination of multiple regression coefficients, we estimated that the ratio of the error to the chromophore concentrations is about 10%. The proposed method does not require any measurements or assumptions about the shape of the subjects; this is an advantage over other studies related to the reduction of shading-derived errors.

  4. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  5. Wind Profiles Derived from Volume Imaging Lidar Data: Enhancements to the Algorithm and Comparisons with Insitu Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piironen, A. K.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents wind measurements made with the University of Wisconsin Volume Imaging Lidar (VIL) during Aug. 1989 as part of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE). Enhancements to the algorithm are described. Comparisons of these results to aircraft, balloon, and surface based wind measurements are presented. Observations of the spatial variance of aerosol backscatter are also compared to measurements of the convective boundary layer depth. Measurements are based on two-dimensional cross correlations between horizontal image planes showing the spatial distribution of aerosol scattering observed by the lidar at intervals of approximately 3 minutes. Each image plane covers an area of 500-1000 sq km and the winds calculated represent area averages.

  6. Combined Optical Imaging and Mammography of the Healthy Breast: Optical Contrast Derived From Breast Structure and Compression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qianqian; Carp, Stefan A.; Selb, Juliette; Boverman, Greg; Zhang, Quan; Kopans, Daniel B.; Moore, Richard H.; Miller, Eric L.; Brooks, Dana H.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report new progress in developing the instrument and software platform of a combined X-ray mammography/diffuse optical breast imaging system. Particularly, we focus on system validation using a series of balloon phantom experiments and the optical image analysis of 49 healthy patients. Using the finite-element method for forward modeling and a regularized Gauss-Newton method for parameter reconstruction, we recovered the inclusions inside the phantom and the hemoglobin images of the human breasts. An enhanced coupling coefficient estimation scheme was also incorporated to improve the accuracy and robustness of the reconstructions. The recovered average total hemoglobin concentration (HbT) and oxygen saturation (SO2) from 68 breast measurements are 16.2 ?m and 71%, respectively, where the HbT presents a linear trend with breast density. The low HbT value compared to literature is likely due to the associated mammographic compression. From the spatially co-registered optical/X-ray images, we can identify the chest-wall muscle, fatty tissue, and fibroglandular regions with an average HbT of 20.16.1 ?m for fibroglandular tissue, 15.45.0 ?m for adipose, and 22.27.3 ?m for muscle tissue. The differences between fibroglandular tissue and the corresponding adipose tissue are significant (p < 0.0001). At the same time, we recognize that the optical images are influenced, to a certain extent, by mammographical compression. The optical images from a subset of patients show composite features from both tissue structure and pressure distribution. We present mechanical simulations which further confirm this hypothesis. PMID:19116186

  7. Lab Inputs for Common Micros.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, Robert

    1984-01-01

    The game paddle inputs of Apple microcomputers provide a simple way to get laboratory measurements into the computer. Discusses these game paddles and the necessary interface software. Includes schematics for Apple built-in paddle electronics, TRS-80 game paddle I/O, Commodore circuit for user port, and bus interface for Sinclair/Timex, Commodore,

  8. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associated with hospital type and location, and variations in the rate of input price increases for various regions. We found that between 1972 and 1979 none of the regional price indexes increased at average annual rates significantly different from the national rate. For the more recent period 1977 through 1979, the increase in one Census Region was significantly below the national rate. Further analyses indicated that variations in cost-share weights for various types of hospitals produced no substantial variations in the regional price indexes relative to the national index. We consider these findings preliminary because of limitations in the availability of current, relevant, and reliable data, especially for local area wage rate increases. PMID:10309557

  9. The advanced LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chris L.; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan. T.; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V.; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J.; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z.; Martin, Rodica M.; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  10. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  11. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  12. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  13. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design. PMID:26827334

  14. Signal Prediction With Input Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin

    1999-01-01

    A novel coding technique is presented for signal prediction with applications including speech coding, system identification, and estimation of input excitation. The approach is based on the blind equalization method for speech signal processing in conjunction with the geometric subspace projection theory to formulate the basic prediction equation. The speech-coding problem is often divided into two parts, a linear prediction model and excitation input. The parameter coefficients of the linear predictor and the input excitation are solved simultaneously and recursively by a conventional recursive least-squares algorithm. The excitation input is computed by coding all possible outcomes into a binary codebook. The coefficients of the linear predictor and excitation, and the index of the codebook can then be used to represent the signal. In addition, a variable-frame concept is proposed to block the same excitation signal in sequence in order to reduce the storage size and increase the transmission rate. The results of this work can be easily extended to the problem of disturbance identification. The basic principles are outlined in this report and differences from other existing methods are discussed. Simulations are included to demonstrate the proposed method.

  15. Design, synthesis, linear and nonlinear photophysical properties and biological imaging application of a novel Λ-type pyrimidine-based thiophene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Luo, Junshan; Ye, Lili; Wang, Hui; Huang, Bei; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Jieying; Zhang, Shengyi; Tian, Yupeng

    2014-09-01

    A novel D-π-A-π-D type thiophene pyrimidine derivative, 2,2‧-thiophene-4, 6-bis (4-N,N-diethylbenzene ethenyl) pyrimidine (L), was designed, synthesized via Knoevenagel and Suzuki coupling reactions, and fully characterized. The results of X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that single crystal of L belongs to P212121 non-centrosymmetric space group, and the whole molecular skeleton exhibits a good coplanarity. Systematic photophysical properties were investigated for L. The connections between the properties and structure were explained relying on theoretical calculation. The thiophene pyrimidine derivative shows strong third-order nonlinear optical response and large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross section in high polar solvents. Finally, preliminary exploration in biological imaging also has been carried out, it shows a good biological application prospect.

  16. Teaching Image Formation by Extended Light Sources: The Use of a Model Derived from the History of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedes, Christos; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This research, carried out in Greece on pupils aged 12-16, focuses on the transformation of their representations concerning light emission and image formation by extended light sources. The instructive process was carried out in two stages, each one having a different, distinct target set. During the first stage, the appropriate conflict

  17. Characterization of conductive nanobiomaterials derived from viral assemblies by low-voltage STEM imaging and Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germn; Carreo-Fuentes, Liliana; Bahena, Daniel; Jos-Yacamn, Miguel; Palomares, Laura A.; Ramrez, Octavio T.

    2014-09-01

    New technologies require the development of novel nanomaterials that need to be fully characterized to achieve their potential. High-resolution low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has proven to be a very powerful technique in nanotechnology, but its use for the characterization of nanobiomaterials has been limited. Rotavirus VP6 self-assembles into nanotubular assemblies that possess an intrinsic affinity for Au ions. This property was exploited to produce hybrid nanobiomaterials by the in situ functionalization of recombinant VP6 nanotubes with gold nanoparticles. In this work, Raman spectroscopy and advanced analytical electron microscopy imaging with spherical aberration-corrected (Cs) STEM and nanodiffraction at low-voltage doses were employed to characterize nanobiomaterials. STEM imaging revealed the precise structure and arrangement of the protein templates, as well as the nanostructure and atomic arrangement of gold nanoparticles with high spatial sub-Angstrom resolution and avoided radiation damage. The imaging was coupled with backscattered electron imaging, ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. The hybrid nanobiomaterials that were obtained showed unique properties as bioelectronic conductive devices and showed enhanced Raman scattering by their precise arrangement into superlattices, displaying the utility of viral assemblies as functional integrative self-assembled nanomaterials for novel applications.

  18. Teaching Image Formation by Extended Light Sources: The Use of a Model Derived from the History of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedes, Christos; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This research, carried out in Greece on pupils aged 12-16, focuses on the transformation of their representations concerning light emission and image formation by extended light sources. The instructive process was carried out in two stages, each one having a different, distinct target set. During the first stage, the appropriate conflict…

  19. Validation of GOES-9 Satellite-Derived Cloud Properties over the Tropical Western Pacific Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Nordeen, Michele L.; Doeling, David R.; Chakrapani, Venkatasan; Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Real-time processing of hourly GOES-9 images in the ARM TWP region began operationally in October 2003 and is continuing. The ARM sites provide an excellent source for validating this new satellitederived cloud and radiation property dataset. Derived cloud amounts, heights, and broadband shortwave fluxes are compared with similar quantities derived from ground-based instrumentation. The results will provide guidance for estimating uncertainties in the GOES-9 products and to develop improvements in the retrieval methodologies and input.

  20. Systems and methods for reconfiguring input devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Jeff (Inventor); De Mers, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes an input device having first and second input members configured to be activated by a user. The input device is configured to generate activation signals associated with activation of the first and second input members, and each of the first and second input members are associated with an input function. A processor is coupled to the input device and configured to receive the activation signals. A memory coupled to the processor, and includes a reconfiguration module configured to store the input functions assigned to the first and second input members and, upon execution of the processor, to reconfigure the input functions assigned to the input members when the first input member is inoperable.

  1. Tropical forest phenology and metabolism: Integrated analysis of tower-mounted camera images and tower derived GPP for interpreting ecosystem scale processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Hayek, M.; Stark, S. C.; Smith, M.; Wiedemann, K.; Marostica, S.; Ferreira, M.; Woodcock, T.; Prohaska, N.; da Silva, R.; Nelson, B. W.; Huete, A. R.; Saleska, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Seasonal and interannual patterns of leaf development and metabolism are a central topic of global change ecology. However, the seasonality of leaf development in tropical forests remains poorly understood due to the relatively low variation in climate, the high biodiversity of tropical biomes and the limitations of current observation techniques. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the feasibility of using near-surface remote sensing techniques to understand the phenology of an evergreen tropical forest (Tapajos National Forest or TNF site, Santarem, Para, Brazil), and how this phenology affects the metabolism of tropical vegetation. Two continuous years (2010-2011) of daily images from a tower mounted three-channel (red, green, and near-infrared) TetraCAM ADC camera were analyzed for this study. A new approach was developed based on an automatic image classification scheme which decomposed the images into two components (leaves and bare wood) to extract seasonality of leaf development. A confusion matrix method was used to assess the accuracy of image classification. MODIS EVI composites (MOD13Q1) were also acquired and processed for the TNF site (5km*5km). The camera based phenology information was first compared with MODIS EVI, and then combined with tower based eddy covariance measurements at the same site to quantify the effect of canopy-scale phenology on ecosystem metabolism. We found that: (1) Tower-based images revealed a clear seasonal pattern in leaf phenology that was supported by confusion matrix analysis. Matrix analysis gave a 96.7% user accuracy (user accuracy represents the probability that an image pixel classification actually corresponds to that category on the ground) for the leaf component, based on 24 images in 2010 (2 images per month). The tower-based pattern matched that retrieved from satellites (camera-sensed leaf phenology vs monthly MODIS EVI (01/2010-12/2011, R2=0.57, P-value<0.01). This suggests that quality-controlled MODIS EVI accurately captures optical phenology patterns observed near the ground in tropical regions, strong evidence against the previously suggested idea that tropical MODIS data are contaminated by atmospheric artifacts. (2) In particular, seasonal patterns observed from satellite and tower were robust to changes in solar zenith angle (SZA), which had a small effect in camera and satellite-derived leaf phenology, but this effect was secondary to the overall seasonal pattern of leaf development detected. (3) We also found the image classification scheme to be able to monitor the phenology of individual tree species. These results suggest this method to be a feasible way to monitor the complex phenology of a tropical forest system. (4)Net leaf production was extracted by applying a first derivative of monthly camera detected leaf component percentage (termed 'leaf phenology' in this study). Monthly net leaf production (02/2010-12/2011) was correlated with monthly eddy covariance derived light use efficiency (R2=0.59, P-value<0.01), but with ~4 months time lag. This might be associated with leaf age dependent physiological status (recently matured leaves have higher photosynthetic capacity compared with both newly emerged and previous growing leaves), a hypothesis that we are currently investigating.

  2. Images of gravitational and magnetic phenomena derived from two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography of interacting binary stars

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Cocking, Alexander S.; Fisher, John G.; Conover, Marshall J. E-mail: asc5097@psu.edu

    2014-11-10

    We have used two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography as a tool to examine the influence of gravitational and magnetic phenomena in interacting binaries that undergo mass transfer from a magnetically active star onto a non-magnetic main-sequence star. This multitiered study of over 1300 time-resolved spectra of 13 Algol binaries involved calculations of the predicted dynamical behavior of the gravitational flow and the dynamics at the impact site, analysis of the velocity images constructed from tomography, and the influence on the tomograms of orbital inclination, systemic velocity, orbital coverage, and shadowing. The Hα tomograms revealed eight sources: chromospheric emission, a gas stream along the gravitational trajectory, a star-stream impact region, a bulge of absorption or emission around the mass-gaining star, a Keplerian accretion disk, an absorption zone associated with hotter gas, a disk-stream impact region, and a hot spot where the stream strikes the edge of a disk. We described several methods used to extract the physical properties of the emission sources directly from the velocity images, including S-wave analysis, the creation of simulated velocity tomograms from hydrodynamic simulations, and the use of synthetic spectra with tomography to sequentially extract the separate sources of emission from the velocity image. In summary, the tomography images have revealed results that cannot be explained solely by gravitational effects: chromospheric emission moving with the mass-losing star, a gas stream deflected from the gravitational trajectory, and alternating behavior between stream state and disk state. Our results demonstrate that magnetic effects cannot be ignored in these interacting binaries.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of 1H long lived states derived from parahydrogen induced polarization in a clinical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graafen, Dirk; Franzoni, María Belén; Schreiber, Laura M.; Spiess, Hans W.; Münnemann, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization is a powerful tool to overcome the low sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, applications are limited due to the short lifetime of this non equilibrium spin state caused by relaxation processes. This issue can be addressed by storing hyperpolarization in slowly decaying singlet spin states which was so far mostly demonstrated for non-proton spin pairs, e.g. 13C-13C. Protons hyperpolarized by parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) in symmetrical molecules, are very well suited for this strategy because they naturally exhibit a long-lived singlet state. The conversion of the NMR silent singlet spin state to observable magnetization can be achieved by making use of singlet-triplet level anticrossings. In this study, a low-power radiofrequency pulse sequence is used for this purpose, which allows multiple successive singlet-triplet conversions. The generated magnetization is used to record proton images in a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, after 3 min waiting time. Our results may open unprecedented opportunities to use the standard MRI nucleus 1H for e.g. metabolic imaging in the future.

  4. Entropy-based measures of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing derived from quantitative optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekera, Kenny; Jonas, Stephan; Bhattacharya, Dipankan; Khokha, Mustafa; Choma, Michael A.

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia are cellular organelles that project from different epithelial surfaces including respiratory epithelium. They generate directional fluid flow that removes harmful pathogens and particulate matter from the respiratory system. While it has been known that primary ciliary dyskinesia increases the risk of recurrent pulmonary infections, there is now heightened interest in understanding the role that cilia play in a wide-variety of respiratory diseases. Different optical imaging technologies are being investigated to visualize cilia-driven fluid flow, and quantitative image analysis is used to generate measures of ciliary performance. Here, we demonstrate the quantification of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing using spatial and temporal measures of Shannon information entropy. Using videomicroscopy, we imaged in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow generated by the epidermis of the Xenopus tropicalis embryo. Flow was seeded with either dyes or microparticles. Both spatial and temporal measures of entropy show significant levels of mixing, with maximum entropy measures of ~6.5 (out of a possible range of 0 to 8). Spatial entropy measures showed localization of mixing "hot-spots" and "cold-spots" and temporal measures showed mixing throughout.In sum, entropy-based measures of microfluidic mixing can characterize in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow and hold the potential for better characterization of ciliary dysfunction.

  5. Micro-CT image-derived metrics quantify arterial wall distensibility reduction in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2000-04-01

    We developed methods to quantify arterial structural and mechanical properties in excised rat lungs and applied them to investigate the distensibility decrease accompanying chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Lungs of control and hypertensive (three weeks 11% O2) animals were excised and a contrast agent introduced before micro-CT imaging with a special purpose scanner. For each lung, four 3D image data sets were obtained, each at a different intra-arterial contrast agent pressure. Vessel segment diameters and lengths were measured at all levels in the arterial tree hierarchy, and these data used to generate features sensitive to distensibility changes. Results indicate that measurements obtained from 3D micro-CT images can be used to quantify vessel biomechanical properties in this rat model of pulmonary hypertension and that distensibility is reduced by exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mechanical properties can be assessed in a localized fashion and quantified in a spatially-resolved way or as a single parameter describing the tree as a whole. Micro-CT is a nondestructive way to rapidly assess structural and mechanical properties of arteries in small animal organs maintained in a physiological state. Quantitative features measured by this method may provide valuable insights into the mechanisms causing the elevated pressures in pulmonary hypertension of differing etiologies and should become increasingly valuable tools in the study of complex phenotypes in small-animal models of important diseases such as hypertension.

  6. Structural response and input identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, G. D.; Callahan, J. C.; Mcelman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Three major goals were delineated: (1) to develop a general method for determining the response of a structure to combined base and acoustic random excitation: (2) to develop parametric relationships to aid in the design of plates which are subjected to random force or random base excitation: (3) to develop a method to identify the individual acoustic and base input to a structure with only a limited number of measurement channels, when both types of excitation act simultaneously.

  7. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-10-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses-based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  8. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses–based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  9. Optimal gadolinium dose level for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement of U87-derived tumors in athymic nude rats for the assessment of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Nathan; Varghai, Davood; Flask, Chris A.; Feyes, Denise K.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2009-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of varying gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) dose on Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) tracking of brain tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT) outcome. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells (derived from human malignant glioma) into the brains of six athymic nude rats. After 9, 12, and 13 days DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 9.4 T micro-MRI scanner before and after administration of 100, 150, or 200 ?L of Gd-DTPA. Results: Tumor region normalized DCE-MRI scan enhancement at peak was: 1.217 over baseline (0.018 Standard Error [SE]) at the 100 ?L dose, 1.339 (0.013 SE) at the 150 ?L dose, and 1.287 (0.014 SE) at the 200 ?L dose. DCE-MRI peak tumor enhancement at the 150 ?L dose was significantly greater than both the 100 ?L dose (p < 3.323E-08) and 200 ?L dose (p < 0.0007396). Discussion: In this preliminary study, the 150 ?L Gd-DTPA dose provided the greatest T1 weighted contrast enhancement, while minimizing negative T2* effects, in DCE-MRI scans of U87-derived tumors. Maximizing Gd-DTPA enhancement in DCE-MRI scans may assist development of a clinically robust (i.e., unambiguous) technique for PDT outcome assessment.

  10. Optical microscopy imaging for the diagnosis of the pharmacological reaction of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs).

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Tomohiko; Espulgar, Wilfred; Shimizu, Eiichi; Saito, Masato; Lee, Jong-Kook; Dou, Xiaoming; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative diagnosis of pharmacological chronotropic reactions on mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs) was successfully performed by utilizing derivative imaging analysis of videos recorded with a microscope camera at 30 Hz frame rate and 680 510 pixel resolution. The imaging analysis algorithm, developed in our lab, generated the contractile profile of the cells which was exploited for drug effect profiling. Six drugs such as isoproterenol (0.01-1 ?M), quinidine (2-200 ?M), propranolol (0.03-30 ?M), verapamil (0.01-1 ?M), sotalol (1-100 ?M), and acetylsalicylic acid (0.1-10 ?M) were administered and the quantitative medication effect was determined. Among the negative chronotropic agents administered, verapamil was found to be the most potent while sotalol was found to be the least potent at the micromolar level. Simultaneous measurement of the field potential and contractile motion in the verapamil effect test showed a coherent result. Moreover, this approach can provide insights into the contraction-relaxation conditions which are not available in the common electrophysiological approach. With these findings, it is expected that this study can aid in providing a simple and reliable in vitro mESC-CM-based screening platform for cardiovascular effect profiling of candidate drugs. PMID:26309911

  11. Human Factors Inputs to the Training Device Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smode, Alfred F.

    Guidelines are presented for achieving human factors inputs to the design of synthetic training systems. A method is developed for design and organization of training concepts and data supportive to the human factors specialist in deriving the functional specifications for the design of any complex training device. Three major sections are

  12. Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, R

    1986-12-01

    Imaging of the musculoskeletal system includes many modalities and is an area that is changing rapidly. Selection of the most accurate techniques and avoidance of duplication are vital to both good patient care and cost containment. PMID:3466135

  13. High-resolution intravital imaging reveals that blood derived macrophages but not resident microglia facilitate secondary axonal dieback in traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa A.; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Myers, Jay; Hare, Elisabeth G.; You, Jingquang; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Huang, Alex Y.; Silver, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury, functional deficits increase as axons die back from the center of the lesion and the glial scar forms. Axonal die back occurs in two phases: an initial axon intrinsic stage that occurs over the first several hours and a secondary phase which takes place over the first few weeks after injury. Here, we examine the secondary phase, which is marked by infiltration of macrophages. Using powerful time lapse multi-photon imaging, we captured images of interactions between Cx3cr1+/GFP macrophages and microglia and Thy-1YFP axons in a mouse dorsal column crush spinal cord injury model. Over the first few weeks after injury, axonal retraction bulbs within the lesion are static except when axonal fragments are lost by a blebbing mechanism in response to physical contact followed by phagocytosis by mobile Cx3Cr1+/GFP cells. Utilizing a radiation chimera model to distinguish marrow-derived cells from radio-resistant CNS resident microglia, we determined that the vast majority of accumulated cells in the lesion are derived from the blood and only these are associated with axonal damage. Interestingly, CNS-resident Cx3Cr1+/GFP microglia did not increasingly accumulate nor participate in neuronal destruction in the lesion during this time period. Additionally, we found that the blood-derived cells consisted mainly of singly labeled Ccr2+/RFP macrophages, singly labeled Cx3Cr1+/GFP macrophages and a small population of double-labeled cells. Since all axon destructive events were seen in contact with a Cx3Cr1+/GFP cell, we infer that the CCR2 single positive subset is likely not robustly involved in axonal dieback. Finally, in our model, deletion of CCR2, a chemokine receptor, did not alter the position of axons after dieback. Understanding the in vivo cellular interactions involved in secondary axonal injury may lead to clinical treatment candidates involving modulation of destructive infiltrating blood monocytes. PMID:24468477

  14. The IVS data input to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Alef, Walter; Amagai, Jun; Andersen, Per Helge; Andreeva, Tatiana; Artz, Thomas; Bachmann, Sabine; Barache, Christophe; Baudry, Alain; Bauernfeind, Erhard; Baver, Karen; Beaudoin, Christopher; Behrend, Dirk; Bellanger, Antoine; Berdnikov, Anton; Bergman, Per; Bernhart, Simone; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bianco, Giuseppe; Bielmaier, Ewald; Boboltz, David; Bhm, Johannes; Bhm, Sigrid; Boer, Armin; Bolotin, Sergei; Bougeard, Mireille; Bourda, Geraldine; Buttaccio, Salvo; Cannizzaro, Letizia; Cappallo, Roger; Carlson, Brent; Carter, Merri Sue; Charlot, Patrick; Chen, Chenyu; Chen, Maozheng; Cho, Jungho; Clark, Thomas; Collioud, Arnaud; Colomer, Francisco; Colucci, Giuseppe; Combrinck, Ludwig; Conway, John; Corey, Brian; Curtis, Ronald; Dassing, Reiner; Davis, Maria; de-Vicente, Pablo; Diakov, Alexey; Dickey, John; Diegel, Irv; Doi, Koichiro; Drewes, Hermann; Dube, Maurice; Elgered, Gunnar; Engelhardt, Gerald; Evangelista, Mark; Fan, Qingyuan; Fedotov, Leonid; Fey, Alan; Figueroa, Ricardo; Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro; Gambis, Daniel; Garcia-Espada, Susana; Gaume, Ralph; Gaylard, Michael; Geiger, Nicole; Gipson, John; Gomez, Frank; Gomez-Gonzalez, Jesus; Gordon, David; Govind, Ramesh; Gubanov, Vadim; Gulyaev, Sergei; Haas, Ruediger; Hall, David; Halsig, Sebastian; Hammargren, Roger; Hase, Hayo; Heinkelmann, Robert; Helldner, Leif; Herrera, Cristian; Himwich, Ed; Hobiger, Thomas; Holst, Christoph; Hong, Xiaoyu; Honma, Mareki; Huang, Xinyong; Hugentobler, Urs; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Iddink, Andreas; Ihde, Johannes; Ilijin, Gennadiy; Ipatov, Alexander; Ipatova, Irina; Ishihara, Misao; Ivanov, D. V.; Jacobs, Chris; Jike, Takaaki; Johansson, Karl-Ake; Johnson, Heidi; Johnston, Kenneth; Ju, Hyunhee; Karasawa, Masao; Kaufmann, Pierre; Kawabata, Ryoji; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Eiji; Kaydanovsky, Michael; Kharinov, Mikhail; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kokado, Kensuke; Kondo, Tetsuro; Korkin, Edward; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Krasna, Hana; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Kurdubov, Sergey; Kurihara, Shinobu; Kuroda, Jiro; Kwak, Younghee; La Porta, Laura; Labelle, Ruth; Lamb, Doug; Lambert, Sbastien; Langkaas, Line; Lanotte, Roberto; Lavrov, Alexey; Le Bail, Karine; Leek, Judith; Li, Bing; Li, Huihua; Li, Jinling; Liang, Shiguang; Lindqvist, Michael; Liu, Xiang; Loesler, Michael; Long, Jim; Lonsdale, Colin; Lovell, Jim; Lowe, Stephen; Lucena, Antonio; Luzum, Brian; Ma, Chopo; Ma, Jun; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Machida, Morito; MacMillan, Dan; Madzak, Matthias; Malkin, Zinovy; Manabe, Seiji; Mantovani, Franco; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Marshalov, Dmitry; Mathiassen, Geir; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; McCarthy, Dennis; Melnikov, Alexey; Michailov, Andrey; Miller, Natalia; Mitchell, Donald; Mora-Diaz, Julian Andres; Mueskens, Arno; Mukai, Yasuko; Nanni, Mauro; Natusch, Tim; Negusini, Monia; Neidhardt, Alexander; Nicolson, George; Niell, Arthur; Nikitin, Pavel; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Nishikawa, Takashi; Noll, Carey; Nozawa, Kentarou; Ogaja, Clement; Oh, Hongjong; Olofsson, Hans; Opseth, Per Erik; Orfei, Sandro; Pacione, Rosa; Pazamickas, Katherine; Petrachenko, William; Pettersson, Lars; Pino, Pedro; Plank, Lucia; Ploetz, Christian; Poirier, Michael; Poutanen, Markku; Qian, Zhihan; Quick, Jonathan; Rahimov, Ismail; Redmond, Jay; Reid, Brett; Reynolds, John; Richter, Bernd; Rioja, Maria; Romero-Wolf, Andres; Ruszczyk, Chester; Salnikov, Alexander; Sarti, Pierguido; Schatz, Raimund; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Schiavone, Francesco; Schreiber, Ulrich; Schuh, Harald; Schwarz, Walter; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Searle, Anthony; Sekido, Mamoru; Seitz, Manuela; Shao, Minghui; Shibuya, Kazuo; Shu, Fengchun; Sieber, Moritz; Skjaeveland, Asmund; Skurikhina, Elena; Smolentsev, Sergey; Smythe, Dan; Sousa, Don; Sovers, Ojars; Stanford, Laura; Stanghellini, Carlo; Steppe, Alan; Strand, Rich; Sun, Jing; Surkis, Igor; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Tanir, Emine; Tao, An; Tateyama, Claudio; Teke, Kamil; Thomas, Cynthia; Thorandt, Volkmar; Thornton, Bruce; Tierno Ros, Claudia; Titov, Oleg; Titus, Mike; Tomasi, Paolo; Tornatore, Vincenza; Trigilio, Corrado; Trofimov, Dmitriy; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Tuccari, Gino; Tzioumis, Tasso; Ujihara, Hideki; Ullrich, Dieter; Uunila, Minttu; Venturi, Tiziana; Vespe, Francesco; Vityazev, Veniamin; Volvach, Alexandr; Vytnov, Alexander; Wang, Guangli; Wang, Jinqing; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Na; Wang, Shiqiang; Wei, Wenren; Weston, Stuart; Whitney, Alan; Wojdziak, Reiner; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Yang, Wenjun; Ye, Shuhua; Yi, Sangoh; Yusup, Aili; Zapata, Octavio; Zeitlhoefler, Reinhard; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Xiuzhong; Zhao, Rongbing; Zheng, Weimin; Zhou, Ruixian; Zubko, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a primary space-geodetic technique for determining precise coordinates on the Earth, for monitoring the variable Earth rotation and orientation with highest precision, and for deriving many other parameters of the Earth system. The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS, http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The datasets published here are the results of individual Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions in the form of normal equations in SINEX 2.0 format (http://www.iers.org/IERS/EN/Organization/AnalysisCoordinator/SinexFormat/sinex.html, the SINEX 2.0 description is attached as pdf) provided by IVS as the input for the next release of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRF): ITRF2014. This is a new version of the ITRF2008 release (Bockmann et al., 2009). For each session/ file, the normal equation systems contain elements for the coordinate components of all stations having participated in the respective session as well as for the Earth orientation parameters (x-pole, y-pole, UT1 and its time derivatives plus offset to the IAU2006 precession-nutation components dX, dY (https://www.iau.org/static/resolutions/IAU2006_Resol1.pdf). The terrestrial part is free of datum. The data sets are the result of a weighted combination of the input of several IVS Analysis Centers. The IVS contribution for ITRF2014 is described in Bachmann et al (2015), Schuh and Behrend (2012) provide a general overview on the VLBI method, details on the internal data handling can be found at Behrend (2013).

  15. Cryopreservation of embryonic stem cell-derived multicellular neural aggregates labeled with micron-sized particles of iron oxide for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuanwei; Sart, Sbastien; Calixto Bejarano, Fabian; Muroski, Megan E; Strouse, Geoffrey F; Grant, Samuel C; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an effective approach to track labeled pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) for neurological disorder treatments after cell labeling with a contrast agent, such as an iron oxide derivative. Cryopreservation of pre-labeled neural cells, especially in three-dimensional (3D) structure, can provide a uniform cell population and preserve the stem cell niche for the subsequent applications. In this study, the effects of cryopreservation on PSC-derived multicellular NPC aggregates labeled with micron-sized particles of iron oxide (MPIO) were investigated. These NPC aggregates were labeled prior to cryopreservation because labeling thawed cells can be limited by inefficient intracellular uptake, variations in labeling efficiency, and increased culture time before use, minimizing their translation to clinical settings. The results indicated that intracellular MPIO incorporation was retained after cryopreservation (70-80% labeling efficiency), and MPIO labeling had little adverse effects on cell recovery, proliferation, cytotoxicity and neural lineage commitment post-cryopreservation. MRI analysis showed comparable detectability for the MPIO-labeled cells before and after cryopreservation indicated by T2 and T2* relaxation rates. Cryopreserving MPIO-labeled 3D multicellular NPC aggregates can be applied in in vivo cell tracking studies and lead to more rapid translation from preservation to clinical implementation. PMID:25905549

  16. Impact of remote sensing upon the planning, management and development of water resources. Summary of computers and computer growth trends for hydrologic modeling and the input of ERTS image data processing load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Loats, H. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of current computer usage by major water resources users was made to determine the trends of usage and costs for the principal hydrologic users/models. The laws and empirical relationships governing the growth of the data processing loads were described and applied to project the future data loads. Data loads for ERTS CCT image processing were computed and projected through the 1985 era. The analysis showns significant impact due to the utilization and processing of ERTS CCT's data.

  17. Deriving urban dynamic evolution rules from self-adaptive cellular automata with multi-temporal remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yingqing; Ai, Bin; Yao, Yao; Zhong, Fajun

    2015-06-01

    Cellular automata (CA) have proven to be very effective for simulating and predicting the spatio-temporal evolution of complex geographical phenomena. Traditional methods generally pose problems in determining the structure and parameters of CA for a large, complex region or a long-term simulation. This study presents a self-adaptive CA model integrated with an artificial immune system to discover dynamic transition rules automatically. The model's parameters are allowed to be self-modified with the application of multi-temporal remote sensing images: that is, the CA can adapt itself to the changed and complex environment. Therefore, urban dynamic evolution rules over time can be efficiently retrieved by using this integrated model. The proposed AIS-based CA model was then used to simulate the rural-urban land conversion of Guangzhou city, located in the core of China's Pearl River Delta. The initial urban land was directly classified from TM satellite image in the year 1990. Urban land in the years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2009 and 2012 was correspondingly used as the observed data to calibrate the model's parameters. With the quantitative index figure of merit (FoM) and pattern similarity, the comparison was further performed between the AIS-based model and a Logistic CA model. The results indicate that the AIS-based CA model can perform better and with higher precision in simulating urban evolution, and the simulated spatial pattern is closer to the actual development situation.

  18. Mitochondria-targeted Triphenylamine Derivatives Activatable by Two-Photon Excitation for Triggering and Imaging Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chennoufi, Rahima; Bougherara, Houcine; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Dumat, Blaise; Henry, Etienne; Subra, Frédéric; Bury-Moné, Stéphanie; Mahuteau-Betzer, Florence; Tauc, Patrick; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Deprez, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) leads to cell death by using a combination of a photosensitizer and an external light source for the production of lethal doses of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since a major limitation of PDT is the poor penetration of UV-visible light in tissues, there is a strong need for organic compounds whose activation is compatible with near-infrared excitation. Triphenylamines (TPAs) are fluorescent compounds, recently shown to efficiently trigger cell death upon visible light irradiation (458 nm), however outside the so-called optical/therapeutic window. Here, we report that TPAs target cytosolic organelles of living cells, mainly mitochondria, triggering a fast apoptosis upon two-photon excitation, thanks to their large two-photon absorption cross-sections in the 760-860 nm range. Direct ROS imaging in the cell context upon multiphoton excitation of TPA and three-color flow cytometric analysis showing phosphatidylserine externalization indicate that TPA photoactivation is primarily related to the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via ROS production, although significant differences in the time courses of cell death-related events were observed, depending on the compound. TPAs represent a new class of water-soluble organic photosensitizers compatible with direct two-photon excitation, enabling simultaneous multiphoton fluorescence imaging of cell death since a concomitant subcellular TPA re-distribution occurs in apoptotic cells. PMID:26947258

  19. Comparison of temporal and spectral scattering methods using acoustically large breast models derived from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Hesford, Andrew J.; Tillett, Jason C.; Astheimer, Jeffrey P.; Waag, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and efficient modeling of ultrasound propagation through realistic tissue models is important to many aspects of clinical ultrasound imaging. Simplified problems with known solutions are often used to study and validate numerical methods. Greater confidence in a time-domain k-space method and a frequency-domain fast multipole method is established in this paper by analyzing results for realistic models of the human breast. Models of breast tissue were produced by segmenting magnetic resonance images of ex vivo specimens into seven distinct tissue types. After confirming with histologic analysis by pathologists that the model structures mimicked in vivo breast, the tissue types were mapped to variations in sound speed and acoustic absorption. Calculations of acoustic scattering by the resulting model were performed on massively parallel supercomputer clusters using parallel implementations of the k-space method and the fast multipole method. The efficient use of these resources was confirmed by parallel efficiency and scalability studies using large-scale, realistic tissue models. Comparisons between the temporal and spectral results were performed in representative planes by Fourier transforming the temporal results. An RMS field error less than 3% throughout the model volume confirms the accuracy of the methods for modeling ultrasound propagation through human breast. PMID:25096103

  20. Mitochondria-targeted Triphenylamine Derivatives Activatable by Two-Photon Excitation for Triggering and Imaging Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chennoufi, Rahima; Bougherara, Houcine; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Dumat, Blaise; Henry, Etienne; Subra, Frédéric; Bury-Moné, Stéphanie; Mahuteau-Betzer, Florence; Tauc, Patrick; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Deprez, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) leads to cell death by using a combination of a photosensitizer and an external light source for the production of lethal doses of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since a major limitation of PDT is the poor penetration of UV-visible light in tissues, there is a strong need for organic compounds whose activation is compatible with near-infrared excitation. Triphenylamines (TPAs) are fluorescent compounds, recently shown to efficiently trigger cell death upon visible light irradiation (458 nm), however outside the so-called optical/therapeutic window. Here, we report that TPAs target cytosolic organelles of living cells, mainly mitochondria, triggering a fast apoptosis upon two-photon excitation, thanks to their large two-photon absorption cross-sections in the 760–860 nm range. Direct ROS imaging in the cell context upon multiphoton excitation of TPA and three-color flow cytometric analysis showing phosphatidylserine externalization indicate that TPA photoactivation is primarily related to the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via ROS production, although significant differences in the time courses of cell death-related events were observed, depending on the compound. TPAs represent a new class of water-soluble organic photosensitizers compatible with direct two-photon excitation, enabling simultaneous multiphoton fluorescence imaging of cell death since a concomitant subcellular TPA re-distribution occurs in apoptotic cells. PMID:26947258

  1. Evaluation of the Iron(iii) Complex of the 3,5 - Derivative of Catechol as AN Organ-Selective Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, M. Gary

    The iron (III) diethylsulfonamide derivative of catechol (Fe(III)-DESAC) is a new target selective magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent based on the second-sphere interaction mechanism. It is a highly stable tris-complex that was chemically characterized for potential use as a magnetopharmaceutical. The contrast agent was evaluated for gross toxicity and biodistribution in a Fisher 344 rat model. The agent showed no significant acute toxicity at low doses. At a higher dose, 0.15 mmol/kg, the contrast agent exhibited toxic effects in test animals. No signs of abnormal behavior or chronic toxicity was noted. Biodistribution studies revealed increased uptake by the liver parenchyma and the kidneys suggesting combined hepatobiliary and renal excretion. Its potential as a magnetopharmaceutical was evaluated using a GE Signa MRI scanner at 0.1 mmol/kg doses in phantom and an animal model. Relaxivity measurements resulted in R_1 and R_2 relaxivity values of 2.47 mM^{ -1} sec^{-1} and 3.16 mM^{-1} sec ^{-1}, respectively. T _1-weighted MR images showed 63% increase in the liver image values and 99% increase in the kidney values. This contrast enhancement was approximately 75% greater in the healthy parenchyma compared to the imbedded mammary adenocarcinoma.

  2. Some aspects of lunar and martian volcanism as examined with spectral, topographic, and morphologic data derived from spacecraft images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Mark Southwick

    Utilizing newly calibrated Mariner 10 color images, the titanium abundances of lunar mare soils on the eastern limb and farside are examined. These maria are found to have TiO2 contents in the range of less than 2 to 5%. The existence of cryptomare deposits northeast of Mare Marginis is confirmed. This leads to the prediction that no high TiO2 (greater than 8 wt%) mare basalt soils will be found in regions with thickened crust (most of the lunar farside) that are yet to be examine with spectrometers, due to the greater density of high titanium magma. Utilizing Viking Orbiter and Mariner 9 data, the martian volcanoes Biblis Patera, Ceraunius Tholus, Jovis Tholus, Ulysses Patera Uranius Patera, and Uranius Tholus are analyzed. Specifically, morphologic and topographic features indicative of the eruption style (effusive vs. explosive) that formed each edifice are examined. From new digital mosaics of these volcanoes, both effusive and explosive deposits are found. It is proposed that the initial period of activity for some martian volcanoes was dominantly explosive (driven by juvenile gases), whereas later activity was mostly effusive. In support a this hypothesis, an analysis of the martian volcano Apollinaris Patera is presented. Using digital images, thermal inertia data and a new topographic model, the chronology of Apollinaris Patera is determined to have been dominated early on by explosive activity, followed by later effusive eruption. From the topographic data, its volume is estimated to be approximately 105/cu km. The volcano may have been active for approximately 107 yrs, based on its volume and an inferred rate of eruption of 1.5 x 10-2/cu km/yr. It is proposed that at least 2 x 1016 kg of juvenile water was added to the martian atmosphere as a consequence of these eruptions. Detailed examination of a multi-temporal series of Viking Orbiter color images of the Apollinaris Patera region shows, that, for a given area on the surface, the red over violet ratio varies from 2.9 to 3.4, and the albedo ranges from 21 to 16%. These changes are interpreted to be predominately due to variations in the amount of atmospheric condensates.

  3. Image and in situ data integration to derive sawgrass density for surface flow modelling in the Everglades, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    The US Geological Survey is building models of the Florida Everglades to be used in managing south Florida surface water flows for habitat restoration and maintenance. Because of the low gradients in the Everglades, vegetation structural characteristics are very important and greatly influence surface water flow and distribution. Vegetation density is being evaluated as an index of surface resistance to flow. Digital multispectral videography (DMSV) has been captured over several sites just before field collection of vegetation data. Linear regression has been used to establish a relationship between normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values computed from the DMSV and field-collected biomass and density estimates. Spatial analysis applied to the DMSV data indicates that thematic mapper (TM) resolution is at the limit required to capture land surface heterogeneity. The TM data collected close to the time of the DMSV will be used to derive a regional sawgrass density map.

  4. Image and in situ data integration to derive sawgrass density for surface flow modelling in the Everglades, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    The US Geological Survey is building models of the Florida Everglades to be used in managing south Florida surface water flows for habitat restoration and maintenance. Because of the low gradients in the Everglades, vegetation structural characteristics are very important and greatly influence surface water flow and distribution. Vegetation density is being evaluated as an index of surface resistance to flow. Digital multispectral videography (DMSV) has been captured over several sites just before field collection of vegetation data. Linear regression has been used to establish a relationship between normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values computed from the DMSV and field-collected biomass and density estimates. Spatial analysis applied to the DMSV data indicates that thematic mapper (TM) resolution is at the limit required to capture land surface heterogeneity. The TM data collected close to the time of the DMSV will be used to derive a regional sawgrass density map.

  5. Fusion of 3D models derived from TLS and image-based techniques for CH enhanced documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastonero, P.; Donadio, E.; Chiabrando, F.; Span, A.

    2014-05-01

    Recognizing the various advantages offered by 3D new metric survey technologies in the Cultural Heritage documentation phase, this paper presents some tests of 3D model generation, using different methods, and their possible fusion. With the aim to define potentialities and problems deriving from integration or fusion of metric data acquired with different survey techniques, the elected test case is an outstanding Cultural Heritage item, presenting both widespread and specific complexities connected to the conservation of historical buildings. The site is the Staffarda Abbey, the most relevant evidence of medieval architecture in Piedmont. This application faced one of the most topical architectural issues consisting in the opportunity to study and analyze an object as a whole, from twice location of acquisition sensors, both the terrestrial and the aerial one. In particular, the work consists in the evaluation of chances deriving from a simple union or from the fusion of different 3D cloudmodels of the abbey, achieved by multi-sensor techniques. The aerial survey is based on a photogrammetric RPAS (Remotely piloted aircraft system) flight while the terrestrial acquisition have been fulfilled by laser scanning survey. Both techniques allowed to extract and process different point clouds and to generate consequent 3D continuous models which are characterized by different scale, that is to say different resolutions and diverse contents of details and precisions. Starting from these models, the proposed process, applied to a sample area of the building, aimed to test the generation of a unique 3Dmodel thorough a fusion of different sensor point clouds. Surely, the describing potential and the metric and thematic gains feasible by the final model exceeded those offered by the two detached models.

  6. Four-Dimensional Image Registration for Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Thorndyke, Brian; Li Tianfang; Wang Jing; Xing Lei

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Newly emerged four-dimensional (4D) imaging techniques such as 4D-computed tomography (CT), 4D-cone beam CT, 4D-magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D-positron emission tomography are effective tools to reveal the spatiotemporal details of patients' anatomy. To use the 4D data acquired under different conditions or using different modalities, an algorithm for registering 4D images must be in place. We developed an automated 4D-4D registration method to take advantage of 4D information. Methods and Materials: We used 4D-4D matching to find the appropriate three-dimensional anatomy in the fixed image for each phase of the moving image and spatially register them. A search algorithm was implemented to simultaneously find the best phase and spatial match of two 4D inputs. An interpolation scheme capable of deriving an image set based on temporally adjacent three-dimensional data sets was developed to deal with the situation in which the discrete temporal points of the two inputs do not coincide or correspond. Results: In a phantom study, our technique was able to reproduce the known 'ground truth' with high spatial fidelity. The technique regenerated all deliberately introduced 'missing' three-dimensional images at different phases of the input using temporal interpolation. In the registration of gated-magnetic resonance imaging and 4D-CT, the algorithm was able to select the appropriate CT phase. The technique was also able to register 4D-CT with 4D-cone beam CT and two 4D-CT scans acquired at different times. A spatial accuracy of <3 mm was achieved in 98% of voxels in all cases. Conclusion: Automated 4D-4D registration can find the best possible spatiotemporal match between two 4D data sets and is useful for image-guided radiotherapy applications.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of a radioiodinated 4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-2-pyridinone derivative as a survivin targeting SPECT probe for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Natsumi; Haratake, Mamoru; Yoshida, Sakura; Magata, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Morio

    2016-02-01

    Survivin is overexpressed in most of the cancerous tissues but not in terminally differentiated normal tissues, making it an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy of various types of cancers. In this study, we aimed to develop 4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-2-pyridinone (DCP) derivatives, as novel cancer imaging probes that target survivin. Chloro and iodo analogs of DCP (CDCP and IDCP, respectively) were successfully synthesized by using a previously unreported carbon monoxide-free procedure. IDCP exhibited a slightly higher binding affinity for recombinant human survivin (Kd=34nM) than that of CDCP (Kd=44nM). Fluorescence staining indicated that both CDCP and IDCP showed high signals in MDA-MB-231 cells with high levels of survivin expression. Significantly low fluorescent signals were observed in MCF-10A cells, which showed low levels of survivin expression. [(125)I]IDCP was synthesized for the application of IDCP to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Quantitative in vitro binding of [(125)I]IDCP in cell cultures showed results consistent to those observed after fluorescent staining. In vivo biodistribution studies in tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that the tumor uptake of [(125)I]IDCP increased gradually with time and was 0.65% injected dose per gram (% ID/g) at 180min. The maximum tumor/blood and tumor/muscle ratio at 60min were 0.87 and 2.27, respectively, indicating inadequate [(125)I]IDCP accumulation in tumors necessary for in vivo imaging. Although further structural modifications are necessary to improve pharmacokinetic properties of IDCP, this study demonstrates the feasibility of using the DCP backbone as a scaffold for the development of survivin-targeting tumor imaging probes. PMID:26733475

  8. Observation of WINDII polar hemispheric spiral patterns in wind and emission rate as a measure of energy input to the ionosphere-atmosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, G. G.; Cho, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Polar hemispheric images of the atomic oxygen O1S green line 557.7 nm thermospheric dayglow emission and winds derived from that emission provide a measure of energy input from the magnetosphere, delivered through the aurora to the ionosphere-thermosphere system. These images, provided by the WINDII (WIND Imaging Interferometer) instrument, operated on NASA's UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) from 1991 to 2003, are spatio-temporal patterns obtained during a single day, a composite of data from all orbits for that day. These images regularly reveal spiral patterns, originating in the auroral region and extending to the equator. This dayglow emission, obtained from 250 km altitude, is normally dominated by photoelectron impact on atomic oxygen, but model results indicate that the spiral enhancements are the result of the dissociative recombination of O2+, which along with other evidence suggests a relationship to TIDs (Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances); the wind observations support that interpretation. Direct observation confirming the emission ionospheric source is sought. Nighttime images show very weak emission that can only be produced by the dissociative recombination source. A clue to the dominant daytime source may be the Doppler temperature of the green line emission, which would be hot (non-thermal) for dissociative recombination. In this presentation, an earlier case study for a single day is extended to a series of days corresponding to a wide range of energy input with the objective of relating that input to the observed characteristics of these daily emission rate and wind spiral patterns.

  9. Validation of a paleo river system derived by ground based electromagnetic induction measurements with satellite based RapidEye images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Sebastian; von Hebel, Christian; Ali, Mohammed; Stadler, Anja; Herbst, Michael; Montzka, Carsten; Pätzold, Stefan; Weihermüller, Lutz; van der Kruk, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Morphological remnants of an inactive river system that has been filled by younger sediments can provide datable proxies about past climatic conditions. However, sediment composition of their infillings is a challenge for agriculture, in particular for precision agriculture. Differential crop development and yield reduction are often a consequence of lateral and vertical textural inhomogeneities. Several studies have shown that buried river systems can be traced by the use of remote sensing. However, the appearance of crop marks strongly depends on environmental conditions, and therefore, the reliance of remotely acquired data can become time and cost expensive. Soil physical properties which are related to textural differences can be mapped fast and cost-effective by the use of near surface geophysics. Especially electromagnetic induction (EMI), which measures soil apparent conductivity (ECa), has become a tool of choice to characterize large areas in high resolution. The introduction of multiple coil EMI systems as well as the quantification of respective measurements enables a reliable multilayer inversion. The aim of this study was to map a postglacial river system on agricultural fields and to mark out buried remains such as trenches and bomb craters of World War II. In summer 2012 ten fields (17 ha) were mapped with the CMD MiniExplorer, a multiple coil EMI system especially appropriate for near surface applications, after the harvest of winter wheat and sugar beet. At elevated sandy sites meander like patterns with higher conductivity were mapped. ECa measurements were verified by textural data taken from directed soil samples and vertical ECa logs. Sediment thickness was evaluated on soil cores and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) transects. Furthermore, ERT quantified ECa measurements were correlated with satellite as well as destructive derived leaf area index (LAI) measurements. In 3 of 71 LAI maps derived by multispectral RapidEye imagery crop marks were clearly visible following a dry season in spring 2011. These patterns are in coincidence with higher conductivity patterns caused by a higher amount of silt and clay. Good correlations were found for LAI measurements taken during a growing season with underlying sediments especially in the early stages of plant development. Finally, ECa measurements of two heterogeneous fields were used for a 3D layer inversion which will be further implemented into landscape models. This study shows that multiple EMI measurements can be successfully used to recover buried river systems, highlight possible sample locations and support farmers to manage their fields more precisely.

  10. Selective detection of volatile organic compounds by spectral imaging of porphyrin derivatives bound to TiO2 porous films.

    PubMed

    Roales, Javier; Pedrosa, Jos M; Castillero, Pedro; Cano, Manuel; Richardson, Tim H; Barranco, ngel; Gonzlez-Elipe, Agustn R

    2012-10-24

    In this work, the carboxylic acid derivatives of a free-base porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin, and 10 of its metal derivatives (TCPPs) have been used for optical gas sensing. For this purpose, microstructured columnar TiO(2) thin films prepared by GAPVD (glancing angle physical vapor deposition) have been used as host materials for the porphyrins as they are non-dispersive and porous, allowing their use for UV-visible spectroscopy and gas sensing. The chemical binding between the dye molecules and the TiO(2) has been studied through infrared spectroscopy, and the obtained spectral changes have been found to be compatible with chelating and/or bidentate binding modes of the carboxylate groups on the TiO(2) surface. When hosted in the film, the UV-visible spectra of the porphyrins featured a blue shift and broadening of the Soret band with respect to the solution, which has been attributed to the formation of ?-? aggregates between porphyrin molecules. The composite porphyrin/TiO(2) films obtained from each of the 11 porphyrins have been exposed to 12 different volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and their respective gas-sensitive properties have been analyzed as a function of the spectral changes in their Soret band region in the presence of the analytes. The set of composite films has shown high selectivity to the analyzed volatile compounds. For each analyte, an innovative way of showing the different responses has been developed. By means of this procedure, an imagelike recognition pattern has been obtained, which allows an easy identification of every compound. The kinetics of the exposure to several analytes showed a fast, reversible and reproducible response, with response times of a few seconds, which has been attributed to both the sensitivity of the porphyrins and the high porosity of the TiO(2) films. Also, increasing concentrations of the analytes resulted in an increase in the magnitude of the response, indicating that the sensor behavior is also concentration-dependent. PMID:22985094

  11. Power spectra of the natural input to the visual system.

    PubMed

    Pamplona, D; Triesch, J; Rothkopf, C A

    2013-05-01

    The efficient coding hypothesis posits that sensory systems are adapted to the regularities of their signal input so as to reduce redundancy in the resulting representations. It is therefore important to characterize the regularities of natural signals to gain insight into the processing of natural stimuli. While measurements of statistical regularity in vision have focused on photographic images of natural environments it has been much less investigated, how the specific imaging process embodied by the organism's eye induces statistical dependencies on the natural input to the visual system. This has allowed using the convenient assumption that natural image data are homogeneous across the visual field. Here we give up on this assumption and show how the imaging process in a human model eye influences the local statistics of the natural input to the visual system across the entire visual field. Artificial scenes with three-dimensional edge elements were generated and the influence of the imaging projection onto the back of a spherical model eye were quantified. These distributions show a strong radial influence of the imaging process on the resulting edge statistics with increasing eccentricity from the model fovea. This influence is further quantified through computation of the second order intensity statistics as a function of eccentricity from the center of projection using samples from the dead leaves image model. Using data from a naturalistic virtual environment, which allows generation of correctly projected images onto the model eye across the entire field of view, we quantified the second order dependencies as function of the position in the visual field using a new generalized parameterization of the power spectra. Finally, we compared this analysis with a commonly used natural image database, the van Hateren database, and show good agreement within the small field of view available in these photographic images. We conclude by providing a detailed quantitative analysis of the second order statistical dependencies of the natural input to the visual system across the visual field and demonstrating the importance of considering the influence of the sensory system on the statistical regularities of the input to the visual system. PMID:23458676

  12. Single Particle Dynamic Imaging and Fe3+ Sensing with Bright Carbon Dots Derived from Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingxiu; Wei, Lin; Zheng, Xuanfang; Xiao, Lehui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a convenient and green strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent and water-soluble carbon dots (Cdots) by carbonizing carbon precursors, i.e., Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles, in water solution. Without post surface modification, the as-synthesized Cdots exhibit fluorescence quantum yield (Q.Y.) as high as 34.8% and display superior colloidal stability not only in concentrated salt solutions (e.g. 2 M KCl) but also in a wide range of pH solutions. According to the FT-IR measurements, the Cdots contain many carboxyl groups, providing a versatile route for further chemical and biological functionalization. Through conjugation of Cdots with the transacting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide (a kind of cell penetration peptide (CPP)) derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is possible to directly monitor the dynamic interactions of CPP with living cell membrane at single particle level. Furthermore, these Cdots also exhibit a dosage-dependent selectivity toward Fe3+ among other metal ions, including K+, Na+, Mg2+, Hg2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Pb2+ and Al3+. We believed that the Cdots prepared by this strategy would display promising applications in various areas, including analytical chemistry, nanomedicine, biochemistry and so on. PMID:26634992

  13. Climate-related vegetation characteristics derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) leaf area index and normalized difference vegetation index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Anderson, Bruce; Barlow, Mathew; Tan, Bin; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2004-10-01

    MODIS-based leaf area index (LAI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) are used to examine detailed information regarding actual growing season and total annual production for various regions. Overall, MODIS LAI has larger variability and demonstrates more information regarding the evolution and structure of the seasonal vegetation characteristics. In contrast, the NDVI saturates around 0.7 and tends to overestimate the growing season in regions where it is already long. Next, a climatic impact index (CII) is derived to provide additional information regarding the potential sensitivity of vegetation to changes in climatic variables by accounting for the length of growing season. By normalizing the growth rate to the biome-average growth rate, this index can identify fractional loss of annual production, as opposed to the absolute loss which may be strongly weighted by the overall growth rate for different ecosystems. Our index provides a quantitative framework for assessing the importance of the length of the growing season in determining climatic vulnerability. In the last part of the paper, we use the long time series AVHRR products as a substitute for the MODIS products and test the temporal characteristics of the CII. Major drought events are well-captured by the CII, suggesting potential use as a monitoring and evaluation tool. Furthermore, the strong positive correlation between the CII and the vegetation condition index (VCI) suggests that the CII can quantitatively identify the effects of climatic variability upon vegetation activity.

  14. Single Particle Dynamic Imaging and Fe(3+) Sensing with Bright Carbon Dots Derived from Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingxiu; Wei, Lin; Zheng, Xuanfang; Xiao, Lehui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a convenient and green strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent and water-soluble carbon dots (Cdots) by carbonizing carbon precursors, i.e., Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles, in water solution. Without post surface modification, the as-synthesized Cdots exhibit fluorescence quantum yield (Q.Y.) as high as 34.8% and display superior colloidal stability not only in concentrated salt solutions (e.g. 2 M KCl) but also in a wide range of pH solutions. According to the FT-IR measurements, the Cdots contain many carboxyl groups, providing a versatile route for further chemical and biological functionalization. Through conjugation of Cdots with the transacting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide (a kind of cell penetration peptide (CPP)) derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is possible to directly monitor the dynamic interactions of CPP with living cell membrane at single particle level. Furthermore, these Cdots also exhibit a dosage-dependent selectivity toward Fe(3+) among other metal ions, including K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Hg(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Al(3+). We believed that the Cdots prepared by this strategy would display promising applications in various areas, including analytical chemistry, nanomedicine, biochemistry and so on. PMID:26634992

  15. Morphology of an ICME-event derived by Multi-point in Situ and Heliospheric Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollett, Tanja; Mstl, Christian; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Davies, Jackie A.; Vrsnak, Bojan; Farrugia, Charles J.; Amerstorfer, Ute V.

    2014-05-01

    We show the analysis of an outstanding fast interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) of 07 March 2012, which has been observed stereoscopically from both STEREO spacecraft. Assuming self-similar expansion and constant direction of motion we derive the kinematical profiles for the eastern and the western part of the roughly Earth-directed ICME. As additional constraints we use the huge advantage of in situ measurements at various locations during the ICME's propagation, namely from Venus Express, Messenger, Wind and Mars Express. We found that the eastern part of the ICME had a much higher propagation speed than its western part. Using the drag-based model, a model for the propagation of ICMEs in the inner heliosphere, we analyzed the influence of the drag on both sides of the ICME due to the surrounding solar wind conditions. These different solar wind conditions could have been the reason for the differing velocities and therefore for a distortion of the ICME front. These studies are fundamental in order to deepen the understanding of ICME evolution and to enhance existing forecasting methods.

  16. Use of paramagnetic chelated metal derivatives of polysaccharides and spin-labeled polysaccharides as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bligh, S.W.; Harding, C.T.; Sadler, P.J.; Bulman, R.A.; Bydder, G.M.; Pennock, J.M.; Kelly, J.D.; Latham, I.A.; Marriott, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Soluble and insoluble polysaccharides were derivatized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and/or spin-labeled with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO). Polysaccharides derivatized with DTPA were prepared via cyanogen bromide activation, coupling to a diamine linker, and to DTPA anhydride. Spin-labeled polysaccharides were also prepared via cyanogen bromide activation. The extent of derivatization for dextran (18 kDa) was about 120 glucose units per DTPA, and for cellulose and starch about 15-30 units per DTPA. For spin-labeled polysaccharides, the average loading ranged from 1 nitroxide per 16 glucose units for starch to 181 for dextran (82 kDa). These derivatized paramagnetic polysaccharides were shown to be more effective relaxants than the small paramagnetic molecules alone. Both soluble and insoluble polysaccharide-linker-DTPA-Gd(3) complexes were effectively cleared from the body (rats) after oral administration. After intravenous administration, the biodistribution of dextran-linker-DTPA-Gd(3) complexes differed significantly from that of GdDTPA. Reduction of the nitroxide by ascorbic acid was retarded in the polysaccharide derivatives, particularly in starch derivatized with both nitroxide and linker-DTPA-Cu(2). These agents showed contrast enhancement in the gastrointestinal tract of rabbits.

  17. Single Particle Dynamic Imaging and Fe3+ Sensing with Bright Carbon Dots Derived from Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingxiu; Wei, Lin; Zheng, Xuanfang; Xiao, Lehui

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a convenient and green strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent and water-soluble carbon dots (Cdots) by carbonizing carbon precursors, i.e., Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles, in water solution. Without post surface modification, the as-synthesized Cdots exhibit fluorescence quantum yield (Q.Y.) as high as 34.8% and display superior colloidal stability not only in concentrated salt solutions (e.g. 2 M KCl) but also in a wide range of pH solutions. According to the FT-IR measurements, the Cdots contain many carboxyl groups, providing a versatile route for further chemical and biological functionalization. Through conjugation of Cdots with the transacting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide (a kind of cell penetration peptide (CPP)) derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is possible to directly monitor the dynamic interactions of CPP with living cell membrane at single particle level. Furthermore, these Cdots also exhibit a dosage-dependent selectivity toward Fe3+ among other metal ions, including K+, Na+, Mg2+, Hg2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Pb2+ and Al3+. We believed that the Cdots prepared by this strategy would display promising applications in various areas, including analytical chemistry, nanomedicine, biochemistry and so on.

  18. Evaluation of monthly rainfall estimates derived from the special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) over the tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Wesley; Avery, Susan K.

    1995-01-01

    Estimates of monthly rainfall have been computed over the tropical Pacific using passive microwave satellite observations from the special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) for the period from July 1987 through December 1990. These monthly estimates are calibrated using data from a network of Pacific atoll rain gauges in order to account for systematic biases and are then compared with several visible and infrared satellite-based rainfall estimation techniques for the purpose of evaluating the performance of the microwave-based estimates. Although several key differences among the various techniques are observed, the general features of the monthly rainfall time series agree very well. Finally, the significant error sources contributing to uncertainties in the monthly estimates are examined and an estimate of the total error is produced. The sampling error characteristics are investigated using data from two SSM/I sensors and a detailed analysis of the characteristics of the diurnal cycle of rainfall over the oceans and its contribution to sampling errors in the monthly SSM/I estimates is made using geosynchronous satellite data. Based on the analysis of the sampling and other error sources the total error was estimated to be of the order of 30 to 50% of the monthly rainfall for estimates averaged over 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg latitude/longitude boxes, with a contribution due to diurnal variability of the order of 10%.

  19. Activatable fluorescent cys-diabody conjugated with indocyanine green derivative: consideration of fluorescent catabolite kinetics on molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kohei; Nakajima, Takahito; Ali, Towhid; Bartlett, Derek W; Wu, Anna M; Kim, Insook; Paik, Chang H; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2013-10-01

    Antibody fragments including diabodies have more desirable pharmacokinetic characteristics than whole antibodies. An activatable optical imaging probe based on a cys-diabody targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen conjugated with the near-infrared fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG), was designed such that it can only be activated when bound to the tumor, leading to high signal-to-background ratios. We employed short polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers between the ICG and the reactive functional group (Sulfo-OSu group), resulting in covalent conjugation of ICG to the cys-diabody, which led to lower dissociation of ICG from cys-diabody early after injection, reducing hepatic uptake. However, unexpectedly, high and long-term fluorescence was observed in the kidneys, liver, and blood pool more than 1 h after injection of the cys-diabody PEG-ICG conjugate. A biodistribution study using I125-labeled cys-diabody-ICG showed immediate uptake in the kidneys followed by a rapid decrease, while gastric activity increased due to released radioiodine during rapid cys-diabody-ICG catabolism in the kidneys. To avoid this catabolic pathway, it would be preferable to use antibody fragments large enough not to be filtered through glomerulus or to conjugate the fragments with fluorescent dyes that are readily excreted into urine when cleaved from the cys-diabody to achieve high tumor-specific detection. PMID:23752742

  20. Activatable fluorescent cys-diabody conjugated with indocyanine green derivative: consideration of fluorescent catabolite kinetics on molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Kohei; Nakajima, Takahito; Ali, Towhid; Bartlett, Derek W.; Wu, Anna M.; Kim, Insook; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Antibody fragments including diabodies have more desirable pharmacokinetic characteristics than whole antibodies. An activatable optical imaging probe based on a cys-diabody targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen conjugated with the near-infrared fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG), was designed such that it can only be activated when bound to the tumor, leading to high signal-to-background ratios. We employed short polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers between the ICG and the reactive functional group (Sulfo-OSu group), resulting in covalent conjugation of ICG to the cys-diabody, which led to lower dissociation of ICG from cys-diabody early after injection, reducing hepatic uptake. However, unexpectedly, high and long-term fluorescence was observed in the kidneys, liver, and blood pool more than 1h after injection of the cys-diabody PEG-ICG conjugate. A biodistribution study using I125-labeled cys-diabody-ICG showed immediate uptake in the kidneys followed by a rapid decrease, while gastric activity increased due to released radioiodine during rapid cys-diabody-ICG catabolism in the kidneys. To avoid this catabolic pathway, it would be preferable to use antibody fragments large enough not to be filtered through glomerulus or to conjugate the fragments with fluorescent dyes that are readily excreted into urine when cleaved from the cys-diabody to achieve high tumor-specific detection. PMID:23752742

  1. Hemodynamic assessment of partial mechanical circulatory support: data derived from computed tomography angiographic images and computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Karmonik, Christof; Rengier, Fabian; Meredig, Hagen; Farag, Mina Berty; Mller-Eschner, Matthias; Arif, Rawa; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Karck, Matthias; Ruhparwar, Arjang

    2015-01-01

    Partial mechanical circulatory support represents a new concept for the treatment of advanced heart failure. The Circulite Synergy Micro Pump, where the inflow cannula is connected to the left atrium and the outflow cannula to the right subclavian artery, was one of the first devices to introduce this concept to the clinic. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, hemodynamics in the aortic tree was visualized and quantified from computed tomography angiographic (CTA) images in two patients. A realistic computational model was created by integrating flow information from the native heart and from the Circulite device. Diastolic flow augmentation in the descending aorta but competing/antagonizing flow patterns in the proximal innominate artery was observed. Velocity time curves in the ascending aorta correlated well with those in the left common carotid, the left subclavian and the descending aorta but poorly with the one in the innominate. Our results demonstrate that CFD may be useful in providing a better understanding of the main flow patterns in mechanical circulatory support devices. PMID:25984458

  2. A new interpretation and validation of variance based importance measures for models with correlated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Wenrui; Lu, Zhenzhou; Li, Luyi

    2013-05-01

    In order to explore the contributions by correlated input variables to the variance of the output, a novel interpretation framework of importance measure indices is proposed for a model with correlated inputs, which includes the indices of the total correlated contribution and the total uncorrelated contribution. The proposed indices accurately describe the connotations of the contributions by the correlated input to the variance of output, and they can be viewed as the complement and correction of the interpretation about the contributions by the correlated inputs presented in "Estimation of global sensitivity indices for models with dependent variables, Computer Physics Communications, 183 (2012) 937-946". Both of them contain the independent contribution by an individual input. Taking the general form of quadratic polynomial as an illustration, the total correlated contribution and the independent contribution by an individual input are derived analytically, from which the components and their origins of both contributions of correlated input can be clarified without any ambiguity. In the special case that no square term is included in the quadratic polynomial model, the total correlated contribution by the input can be further decomposed into the variance contribution related to the correlation of the input with other inputs and the independent contribution by the input itself, and the total uncorrelated contribution can be further decomposed into the independent part by interaction between the input and others and the independent part by the input itself. Numerical examples are employed and their results demonstrate that the derived analytical expressions of the variance-based importance measure are correct, and the clarification of the correlated input contribution to model output by the analytical derivation is very important for expanding the theory and solutions of uncorrelated input to those of the correlated one.

  3. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOEpatents

    Hysinger, Christopher L.; Beaman, Joseph J.; Melgaard, David K.; Williamson, Rodney L.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows.

  4. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOEpatents

    Hysinger, C.L.; Beaman, J.J.; Melgaard, D.K.; Williamson, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows. 17 figs.

  5. Functional transformations of odor inputs in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Adam, Yoav; Livneh, Yoav; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Groysman, Maya; Luo, Liqun; Mizrahi, Adi

    2014-01-01

    Sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium to the olfactory bulb (OB) are organized as a discrete map in the glomerular layer (GL). This map is then modulated by distinct types of local neurons and transmitted to higher brain areas via mitral and tufted cells. Little is known about the functional organization of the circuits downstream of glomeruli. We used in vivo two-photon calcium imaging for large scale functional mapping of distinct neuronal populations in the mouse OB, at single cell resolution. Specifically, we imaged odor responses of mitral cells (MCs), tufted cells (TCs) and glomerular interneurons (GL-INs). Mitral cells population activity was heterogeneous and only mildly correlated with the olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) inputs, supporting the view that discrete input maps undergo significant transformations at the output level of the OB. In contrast, population activity profiles of TCs were dense, and highly correlated with the odor inputs in both space and time. Glomerular interneurons were also highly correlated with the ORN inputs, but showed higher activation thresholds suggesting that these neurons are driven by strongly activated glomeruli. Temporally, upon persistent odor exposure, TCs quickly adapted. In contrast, both MCs and GL-INs showed diverse temporal response patterns, suggesting that GL-INs could contribute to the transformations MCs undergo at slow time scales. Our data suggest that sensory odor maps are transformed by TCs and MCs in different ways forming two distinct and parallel information streams. PMID:25408637

  6. Functional transformations of odor inputs in the mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Yoav; Livneh, Yoav; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Groysman, Maya; Luo, Liqun; Mizrahi, Adi

    2014-01-01

    Sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium to the olfactory bulb (OB) are organized as a discrete map in the glomerular layer (GL). This map is then modulated by distinct types of local neurons and transmitted to higher brain areas via mitral and tufted cells. Little is known about the functional organization of the circuits downstream of glomeruli. We used in vivo two-photon calcium imaging for large scale functional mapping of distinct neuronal populations in the mouse OB, at single cell resolution. Specifically, we imaged odor responses of mitral cells (MCs), tufted cells (TCs) and glomerular interneurons (GL-INs). Mitral cells population activity was heterogeneous and only mildly correlated with the olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) inputs, supporting the view that discrete input maps undergo significant transformations at the output level of the OB. In contrast, population activity profiles of TCs were dense, and highly correlated with the odor inputs in both space and time. Glomerular interneurons were also highly correlated with the ORN inputs, but showed higher activation thresholds suggesting that these neurons are driven by strongly activated glomeruli. Temporally, upon persistent odor exposure, TCs quickly adapted. In contrast, both MCs and GL-INs showed diverse temporal response patterns, suggesting that GL-INs could contribute to the transformations MCs undergo at slow time scales. Our data suggest that sensory odor maps are transformed by TCs and MCs in different ways forming two distinct and parallel information streams. PMID:25408637

  7. Evaluation of SIR-A (Shuttle Imaging Radar) images from the Tres Marias region (Minas Gerais State, Brazil) using derived spatial features and registration with MSS-LANDSAT images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Kux, H. J. H.; Dutra, L. V.

    1984-01-01

    Two image processing experiments are described using a MSS-LANDSAT scene from the Tres Marias region and a shuttle Imaging Radar SIR-A image digitized by a vidicon scanner. In the first experiment the study area is analyzed using the original and preprocessed SIR-A image data. The following thematic classes are obtained: (1) water, (2) dense savanna vegetation, (3) sparse savanna vegetation, (4) reforestation areas and (5) bare soil areas. In the second experiment, the SIR-A image was registered together with MSS-LANDSAT bands five, six, and seven. The same five classes mentioned above are obtained. These results are compared with those obtained using solely MSS-LANDSAT data. The spatial information as well as coregistered SIR-A and MSS-LANDSAT data can increase the separability between classes, as compared to the use of raw SIR-A data solely.

  8. Effects of control inputs on the estimation of stability and control parameters of a light airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannaday, R. L.; Suit, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique was used to determine the values of stability and control derivatives from flight test data for a low-wing, single-engine, light airplane. Several input forms were used during the tests to investigate the consistency of parameter estimates as it relates to inputs. These consistencies were compared by using the ensemble variance and estimated Cramer-Rao lower bound. In addition, the relationship between inputs and parameter correlations was investigated. Results from the stabilator inputs are inconclusive but the sequence of rudder input followed by aileron input or aileron followed by rudder gave more consistent estimates than did rudder or ailerons individually. Also, square-wave inputs appeared to provide slightly improved consistency in the parameter estimates when compared to sine-wave inputs.

  9. Spatial Habitat Features Derived from Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Are Associated with Molecular Subtype and 12-Month Survival Status in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joonsang; Narang, Shivali; Martinez, Juan; Rao, Ganesh; Rao, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumors is Glioblastoma multiforme. Despite the multimodality treatment such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide: TMZ), the median survival rate of glioblastoma patient is less than 15 months. In this study, we investigated the association between measures of spatial diversity derived from spatial point pattern analysis of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data with molecular status as well as 12-month survival in glioblastoma. We obtained 27 measures of spatial proximity (diversity) via spatial point pattern analysis of multiparametric T1 post-contrast and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI data. These measures were used to predict 12-month survival status (?12 or >12 months) in 74 glioblastoma patients. Kaplan-Meier with receiver operating characteristic analyses was used to assess the relationship between derived spatial features and 12-month survival status as well as molecular subtype status in patients with glioblastoma. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that 14 spatial features were capable of stratifying overall survival in a statistically significant manner. For prediction of 12-month survival status based on these diversity indices, sensitivity and specificity were 0.86 and 0.64, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and the accuracy were 0.76 and 0.75, respectively. For prediction of molecular subtype status, proneural subtype shows highest accuracy of 0.93 among all molecular subtypes based on receiver operating characteristic analysis. We find that measures of spatial diversity from point pattern analysis of intensity habitats from T1 post-contrast and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images are associated with both tumor subtype status and 12-month survival status and may therefore be useful indicators of patient prognosis, in addition to providing potential guidance for molecularly-targeted therapies in Glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:26368923

  10. Self-consistent input-output formulation of quantum feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, M.; Hope, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    A simple method of analyzing quantum feedback circuits is presented. The classical analysis of feedback circuits can be generalized to apply to quantum systems by mapping the field operators of various outputs to other inputs via the standard input-output formalism. Unfortunately, this has led to unphysical results such as the violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for in-loop fields. This paper shows that this general approach can be redeemed by ensuring a self-consistently Hermitian Hamiltonian. The calculations are based on a noncommutative calculus of operator derivatives. A full description of several examples of quantum linear and nonlinear feedback for optical systems is presented.

  11. Self-consistent input-output formulation of quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagisawa, M.; Hope, J. J.

    2010-12-15

    A simple method of analyzing quantum feedback circuits is presented. The classical analysis of feedback circuits can be generalized to apply to quantum systems by mapping the field operators of various outputs to other inputs via the standard input-output formalism. Unfortunately, this has led to unphysical results such as the violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for in-loop fields. This paper shows that this general approach can be redeemed by ensuring a self-consistently Hermitian Hamiltonian. The calculations are based on a noncommutative calculus of operator derivatives. A full description of several examples of quantum linear and nonlinear feedback for optical systems is presented.

  12. Convergence of multisensory inputs in the Xenopus tadpole tectum

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto, Masateru; Cline, Hollis

    2010-01-01

    The integration of multisensory information takes place in the optic tectum where visual and auditory/mechanosensory inputs converge and regulate motor outputs. The circuits which integrate multisensory information are poorly understood. In an effort to identify the basic components of a multisensory integrative circuit, we determined the projections of the mechanosensory input from the periphery to the optic tectum and compared their distribution to the retinotectal inputs in Xenopus laevis tadpoles using dye-labelling methods. The peripheral ganglia of the lateral line system project to the ipsilateral hindbrain and the axons representing mechanosensory inputs along the anterior/posterior body axis are mapped along the ventrodorsal axis in the axon tract in the dorsal column of the hindbrain. Hindbrain neurons project axons to the contralateral optic tectum. The neurons from anterior and posterior hindbrain regions project axons to the dorsal and ventral tectum, respectively. While the retinotectal axons project to a superficial lamina in the tectal neuropil, the hindbrain axons project to a deep neuropil layer. Calcium imaging showed that multimodal inputs converge on tectal neurons. The layer specific projections of the hindbrain and retinal axons suggest a functional segregation of sensory inputs to proximal and distal tectal cell dendrites, respectively. PMID:19813244

  13. Assessment of urban tree growth from structure, nutrients and composition data derived from airborne lidar and imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, H.; Townsend, P. A.; Singh, A.

    2014-12-01

    Urban forests provide important ecosystem services related to climate, nutrients, runoff and aesthetics. Assessment of variations in urban forest growth is critical to urban management and planning, as well as to identify responses to climate and other environmental changes. We estimated annual relative basal area increment by tree rings from 37 plots in Madison, Wisconsin and neighboring municipalities. We related relative basal area growth to variables of vegetation traits derived from remote sensing, including structure (aboveground biomass, diameter, height, basal area, crown width and crown length) from discrete-return airborne lidar, and biochemical variables (foliar nitrogen, carbon, lignin, cellulose, fiber and LMA), spectral indices (NDVI, NDWI, PRI, NDII etc.) and species composition from AVIRIS hyperspectral imagery. Variations in tree growth was mainly correlated with tree species composition (R2 = 0.29, RMSE = 0.004) with coniferous stands having a faster growth rate than broadleaf plots. Inclusion of stand basal area improved model prediction from R2 = 0.29 to 0.35, with RMSE = 0.003. Then, we assessed the growth by functional type, we found that foliar lignin concentration and the proportion of live coniferous trees explained 57% variance in the growth of conifer stands. In contrast, broadleaf forest growth was more strongly correlated with species composition and foliar carbon (R2 = 0.59, RMSE = 0.003). Finally, we compared the relative basal area growth by species. In our study area, red pine and white pine exhibited higher growth rates than other species, while white oak plots grew slowest. There is a significant negative relationship between tree height and the relative growth in red pine stands (r = -0.95), as well as a strong negative relationship between crown width and the relative growth in white pine stands (r = -0.87). Growth declines as trees grow taller and wider may partly be the result of reduced photosynthesis and water availability. We also found that canopy cellulose content was negatively correlated with growth in white oak (r = -0.59), which could be caused by trade off of carbon allocation from shoot storage to leaves. These results demonstrate the potential of lidar and hyperspectral imagery to characterize important traits associated with biomass accumulation in urban forests.

  14. Novel fluorine-18 labeled 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin derivatives as potential PET tracers for in vivo imaging of activated caspases in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Christopher M; Hermann, Sven; Faust, Andreas; Riemann, Burkhard; Schober, Otmar; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter; Kopka, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    The programmed type I cell death, defined as apoptosis, is induced by complex regulated signaling pathways that trigger the intracellular activation of executioner caspases-3, -6 and -7. Once activated, these enzymes initiate cellular death through cleavage of proteins which are responsible for DNA repair, signaling and cell maintenance. Several radiofluorinated inhibitors of caspases-3 and -7, comprising a moderate lipophilic 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)isatin lead structure, are currently being investigated for imaging apoptosis in vivo by us and others. The purpose of this study was to increase the intrinsic hydrophilicity of the aforementioned lead structure to alter the pharmacokinetic behavior of the resulting caspase-3 and -7 targeted radiotracer. Therefore, fluorinated and non-fluorinated derivatives of 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin were synthesized and tested for their inhibitory properties against recombinant caspases-3 and -7. Fluorine-18 has been introduced by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of an alkyne precursor with 2-[(18)F]fluoroethylazide. Using dynamic micro-PET biodistribution studies in vivo the kinetic behavior of one promising PET-compatible 5-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl 7-azaisatin derivative has been compared to a previously described isatin based radiotracer. PMID:26210158

  15. Patch-Clamp Recordings and Calcium Imaging Followed by Single-Cell PCR Reveal the Developmental Profile of 13 Genes in iPSC-Derived Human Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Belinsky, Glenn S.; Rich, Matthew T.; Sirois, Carissa L.; Short, Shaina M.; Pedrosa, Erika; Lachman, Herbert M.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies are typically performed on homogenized biological samples, resulting in contamination from non-neuronal cells. To improve expression profiling of neurons we combined patch recordings with single-cell PCR. Two iPSC lines (healthy subject and 22q11.2 deletion), were differentiated into neurons. Patch electrode recordings were performed on 229 human cells from Day-13 to Day-88, followed by capture and single-cell PCR for 13 genes: ACTB, HPRT, vGLUT1, ?TUBIII, COMT, DISC1, GAD1, PAX6, DTNBP1, ERBB4, FOXP1, FOXP2, and GIRK2. Neurons derived from both iPSC lines expressed ?TUBIII, fired action potentials, and experienced spontaneous depolarizations (UP states) ~2 weeks before vGLUT1, GAD1 and GIRK2 appeared. Multisite calcium imaging revealed that these UP states were not synchronized among hESC-H9-derived neurons. The expression of FOXP1, FOXP2 and vGLUT1 was lost after 50 days in culture, in contrast to other continuously expressed genes. When gene expression was combined with electrophysiology, two subsets of genes were apparent; those irrelevant to spontaneous depolarizations (including vGLUT1, GIRK2, FOXP2 and DISC1) and those associated with spontaneous depolarizations (GAD1 and ERBB4). The results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of neuron development, it is useful to combine genetic analysis with physiological characterizations, on a cell-to-cell basis. PMID:24157591

  16. 99mTc(CO)3-Labeled Benzothiazole Derivatives Preferentially Bind Cerebrovascular Amyloid: Potential Use as Imaging Agents for Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jianhua; Cui, Mengchao; Dai, Jiapei; Liu, Boli

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder affecting the elderly that is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in blood vessel walls of the brain. A series of 99mTc(CO)3-labeled benzothiazole derivatives as potential SPECT imaging probes for cerebrovascular Aβ deposition is reported. Rhenium surrogate displayed high affinities to Aβ aggregates with Ki values ranging from 106 to 42 nM, and they strongly stained Aβ deposits in transgenic mice (Tg) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In vitro autoradiography on brain sections of Tg and AD patients confirmed that [99mTc]24 possessed sufficient affinity for Aβ plaques, and [99mTc]24 could only label Aβ deposition in blood vessels but not Aβ plaques in the parenchyma of the brain of AD patients. Moreover, [99mTc]24 possessed favorable initial uptake (1.21% ID/g) and fast blood washout (blood2 min/blood60 min=23) in normal mice. These preliminary results suggest that [99mTc]24 may be used as an Aβ imaging probe for the detection of CAA. PMID:26065726

  17. Imaging the time-integrated cerebral metabolic activity with subcellular resolution through nanometer-scale detection of biosynthetic products deriving from (13)C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Takado, Yuhei; Knott, Graham; Humbel, Bruno M; Masoodi, Mojgan; Escrig, Stphane; Meibom, Anders; Comment, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the brain but also an important source of building blocks for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Little is known about the use of glucose for biosynthesis in tissues at the cellular level. We demonstrate that local cerebral metabolic activity can be mapped in mouse brain tissue by quantitatively imaging the biosynthetic products deriving from [U-(13)C]glucose metabolism using a combination of in situ electron microscopy and secondary ion mass-spectroscopy (NanoSIMS). Images of the (13)C-label incorporated into cerebral ultrastructure with ca. 100nm resolution allowed us to determine the timescale on which the metabolic products of glucose are incorporated into different cells, their sub-compartments and organelles. These were mapped in astrocytes and neurons in the different layers of the motor cortex. We see evidence for high metabolic activity in neurons via the nucleus (13)C enrichment. We observe that in all the major cell compartments, such as e.g. nucleus and Golgi apparatus, neurons incorporate substantially higher concentrations of (13)C-label than astrocytes. PMID:26409162

  18. A (11)C-labeled 1,4-dihydroquinoline derivative as a potential PET tracer for imaging of redox status in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Toshimitsu; Okada, Maki; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2015-12-01

    A disturbance in redox balance has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. This study sought to examine the feasibility of imaging brain redox status using a (11)C-labeled dihydroquinoline derivative ([(11)C]DHQ1) for positron emission tomography (PET). The lipophilic PET tracer [(11)C]DHQ1 was rapidly oxidized to its hydrophilic form in mouse brain homogenate. The redox modulators diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin significantly reduced the initial velocity of [(11)C]DHQ1 oxidation, and apocynin also caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the initial velocity. Moreover, [(11)C]DHQ1 readily entered the brain by diffusion after administration and underwent oxidation into the hydrophilic cationic form, which then slowly decreased. By contrast, apocynin treatment inhibited the in vivo oxidation of [(11)C]DHQ1 to the hydrophilic cationic form, leading to a rapid decrease of radioactivity in the brain. Thus, the difference in the [(11)C]DHQ1 kinetics reflects the alteration in redox status caused by apocynin. In conclusion, [(11)C]DHQ1 is a potential PET tracer for imaging of redox status in the living brain. PMID:26082015

  19. In vivo degradation profile of porcine cartilage-derived extracellular matrix powder scaffolds using a non-invasive fluorescence imaging method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Joo; Lee, Soyeon; Yun, Hee-Woong; Yin, Xiang Yun; Kim, Soon Hee; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Young Jick; Kim, Moon Suk; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We present a non-invasive fluorescence method for imaging of scaffold degradation in vivo by quantifying the degradation of porcine cartilage-derived extracellular matrix powder (PCP).Three-dimensional porous scaffolds should be biocompatible and bioresorbable, with a controllable degradation and resorption rate to match tissue growth. However, in vivo scaffold degradation and tissue ingrowth processes are not yet fully understood. Unfortunately, current analysis methods require animal sacrifice and scaffold destruction for the quantification of scaffold degradation and cannot monitor the situation in real time. In this study, Cy3, a fluorescent dye, was used for visualizing PCP and a real-time degradation profile was obtained quantitatively by a non-invasive method using an imaging system in which the reduction in fluorescence intensity depended on PCP scaffold degradation. Real-time PCP scaffold degradation was confirmed through changes in the volume and morphology of the scaffold using micro-computed tomography and microscopy. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix degradation was induced by collagen degradation because of the binding between Cy3 and collagen. This non-invasive real-time monitoring system for scaffold degradation will increase our understanding of in vivo matrix and/or scaffold degradation. PMID:26679994

  20. Synthesis, 68Ga-Radiolabeling, and Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of a Depsipeptide-Derived Compound as a Potential PET/CT Infection Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B.; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Hazari, Puja P.; Mishra, Anil K.; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R.; Sathekge, Mike M.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as 67/68Ga-citrate or 18F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with 68Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by 68Gallium-radiolabeling. PET/CT using 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.32.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  1. Synthesis, 68Ga-radiolabeling, and preliminary in vivo assessment of a depsipeptide-derived compound as a potential PET/CT infection imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; Parboosing, Raveen; Hazari, Puja P; Mishra, Anil K; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R; Sathekge, Mike M

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as (67/68)Ga-citrate or (18)F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with (68)Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by (68)Gallium-radiolabeling. PET/CT using (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3-2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  2. Scene kinetics mitigation using factor analysis with derivative factors.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kurt W.; Melgaard, David Kennett; Scholand, Andrew Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Line of sight jitter in staring sensor data combined with scene information can obscure critical information for change analysis or target detection. Consequently before the data analysis, the jitter effects must be significantly reduced. Conventional principal component analysis (PCA) has been used to obtain basis vectors for background estimation; however PCA requires image frames that contain the jitter variation that is to be modeled. Since jitter is usually chaotic and asymmetric, a data set containing all the variation without the changes to be detected is typically not available. An alternative approach, Scene Kinetics Mitigation, first obtains an image of the scene. Then it computes derivatives of that image in the horizontal and vertical directions. The basis set for estimation of the background and the jitter consists of the image and its derivative factors. This approach has several advantages including: (1) only a small number of images are required to develop the model, (2) the model can estimate backgrounds with jitter different from the input training images, (3) the method is particularly effective for sub-pixel jitter, and (4) the model can be developed from images before the change detection process. In addition the scores from projecting the factors on the background provide estimates of the jitter magnitude and direction for registration of the images. In this paper we will present a discussion of the theoretical basis for this technique, provide examples of its application, and discuss its limitations.

  3. Digital image processing of vascular angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Beckenbach, E. S.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    A computer image processing technique was developed to estimate the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery. With an angiographic film of the vessel as input, the computer was programmed to estimate vessel abnormality through a series of measurements, some derived primarily from the vessel edge information and others from optical density variations within the lumen shadow. These measurements were combined into an atherosclerosis index, which was found to correlate well with both visual and chemical estimates of atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Investigating the robustness of the new Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager derived texture metrics in estimating plantation forest aboveground biomass in resource constrained areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Timothy; Mutanga, Onisimo

    2015-10-01

    The successful launch of the 30-m Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) pushbroom sensor offers a new primary data source necessary for aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation, especially in resource-limited environments. In this work, the strength and performance of Landsat-8 OLI image derived texture metrics (i.e. texture measures and texture ratios) in estimating plantation forest species AGB was investigated. It was hypothesized that the sensor's pushbroom design, coupled with the presence of refined spectral properties, enhanced radiometric resolution (i.e. from 8 bits to 12 bits) and improved signal-to-noise ratio have the potential to provide detailed spectral information necessary for significantly strengthening AGB estimation in medium-density forest canopies. The relationship between image texture metrics and measurements of forest attributes can be used to help characterize complex forests, and enhance fine vegetation biophysical properties, a difficult challenge when using spectral vegetation indices especially in closed canopies. This study examines the prospects of using Landsat-8 OLI sensor derived texture metrics for estimating AGB for three medium-density plantation forest species in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. In order to achieve this objective, three unique data pre-processing techniques were tested (analysis I: Landsat-8 OLI raw spectral-bands vs. raw texture bands; analysis II: Landsat-8 OLI raw spectral-band ratios vs. texture band ratios and analysis III: Landsat-8 OLI derived vegetation indices vs. texture band ratios). The landsat-8 OLI derived texture parameters were examined for robustness in estimating AGB using linear regression, stepwise-multiple linear regression and stochastic gradient boosting regression models. The results of this study demonstrated that all texture parameters particularly band texture ratios calculated using a 3 × 3 window size, could enhance AGB estimation when compared to simple spectral reflectance, simple band ratios and the most popular spectral vegetation indices. For instance, the use of combined texture ratios yielded the highest R2 values of 0.76 (RMSE = 9.55 t ha-1 (18.07%) and CV-RMSE of 0.18); 0.74 (RMSE = 12.81 t ha-1 (17.72%) and CV-RMSE of 0.08); 0.74 (RMSE = 12.67 t ha-1 (06.15%) and CV-RMSE of 0.06) and 0.53 (RMSE = 20.15 t ha-1 (14.40%) and CV-RMSE of 0.15) overall for Eucalyptus dunii, Eucalyptus grandis, Pinus taeda individually and all species, respectively. Overall, the findings of this study provide the necessary insight and motivation to the remote sensing community, particularly in resource constrained regions, to shift towards embracing various texture metrics obtained from the readily-available and cheap multispectral Landsat-8 OLI sensor.

  5. Repositioning Recitation Input in College English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to discuss how recitation input helps overcome the negative influences on the basis of second language acquisition theory and confirms the important role that recitation input plays in improving college students' oral and written English.

  6. Image quality assessment based on distortion identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetouani, Aladine; Beghdadi, Azeddine

    2011-01-01

    A New Global Full-Reference Image Quality System based on classification and fusion scheme is proposed. It consists of many steps. The first step is devoted to the identification of the type of degradation contained in a given image based a Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classifier using some common Image Quality Metric (IQM) as feature inputs. An IQM per degradation (IQM-D) is then used to estimate the quality of the image. For a given degradation type, the appropriate IQM-D is derived by combining the top three best IQMs using an Artificial Neural Network model. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated first in terms of good degradation identification. Then, for each distortion type the image quality estimation is evaluated in terms of good correlation with the subjective judgments using the TID 2008 image database.

  7. Input Variable Selection for Hydrologic Modeling Using Anns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganti, R.; Jain, A.

    2011-12-01

    The use of artificial neural network (ANN) models in water resources applications has grown considerably over the last couple of decades. In learning problems, where a connectionist network is trained with a finite sized training set, better generalization performance is often obtained when unneeded weights in the network are eliminated. One source of unneeded weights comes from the inclusion of input variables that provide little information about the output variables. Hence, in the ANN modeling methodology, one of the approaches that has received little attention, is the selection of appropriate model inputs. In the past, different methods have been used for identifying and eliminating these input variables. Normally, linear methods of Auto Correlation Function (ACF) and Partial Auto Correlation Function (PACF) have been adopted. For nonlinear physical systems e.g. hydrological systems, model inputs selected based on the linear correlation analysis among input and output variables cannot assure to capture the non-linearity in the system. In the present study, two of the non-linear methods have been explored for the Input Variable Selection (IVS). The linear method employing ACF and PACF is also used for comparison purposes. The first non-linear method utilizes a measure of the Mutual Information Criterion (MIC) to characterize the dependence between a potential model input and the output, which is a step wise input selection procedure. The second non-linear method is improvement over the first method which eliminates redundant inputs based on a partial measure of mutual information criterion (PMIC), which is also a step wise procedure. Further, the number of input variables to be considered for the development of ANN model was determined using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which previously used to be done by trial and error approach. The daily river flow data derived from Godavari River Basin @ Polavaram, Andhra Pradesh, India, and the daily average rainfall data of three rain gauge stations spatially distributed in Godavari River Basin have been employed to evaluate all the IVS methods for ANN hydrologic model development. Single hidden layer architecture trained using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) has been employed. A wide range of error statistics was used to evaluate the performance of all the models developed with different input selection methods in this study. It has been found that PCA helps to fix the number of input variables to be considered for the model development. The results obtained show that the ANN hydrologic model developed using the inputs based on the first non-linear method performed better than the model developed using the inputs based on the linear method. Further, the ANN hydrologic model developed using the inputs based on the second non-linear method performed the best among all the models developed on various IVS methods investigated in this study. It is recommended that PCA should first be used to determine the number of inputs to be selected and then the second non-linear method should be used to select the specific inputs for the development of ANN hydrologic model.

  8. Input calibration for negative originals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris

    1995-04-01

    One of the major challenges in the prepress environment consists of controlling the electronic color reproduction process such that a perfect match of any original can be realized. Whether this goal can be reached depends on many factors such as the dynamic range of the input device (scanner, camera), the color gamut of the output device (dye sublimation printer, ink-jet printer, offset), the color management software etc. The characterization of the color behavior of the peripheral devices is therefore very important. Photographs and positive transparents reflect the original scene pretty well; for negative originals, however, there is no obvious link to either the original scene or a particular print of the negative under consideration. In this paper, we establish a method to scan negatives and to convert the scanned data to a calibrated RGB space, which is known colorimetrically. This method is based on the reconstruction of the original exposure conditions (i.e., original scene) which generated the negative. Since the characteristics of negative film are quite diverse, a special calibration is required for each combination of scanner and film type.

  9. Textual Enhancement of Input: Issues and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Park, Eun Sung; Combs, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The input enhancement hypothesis proposed by Sharwood Smith (1991, 1993) has stimulated considerable research over the last 15 years. This article reviews the research on textual enhancement of input (TE), an area where the majority of input enhancement studies have aggregated. Methodological idiosyncrasies are the norm of this body of research.…

  10. Textual Enhancement of Input: Issues and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Park, Eun Sung; Combs, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The input enhancement hypothesis proposed by Sharwood Smith (1991, 1993) has stimulated considerable research over the last 15 years. This article reviews the research on textual enhancement of input (TE), an area where the majority of input enhancement studies have aggregated. Methodological idiosyncrasies are the norm of this body of research.

  11. Input Devices for Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Karen

    The versatility of the computer can be expanded considerably for young handicapped children by using input devices other than the typewriter-style keyboard. Input devices appropriate for young children can be classified into four categories: alternative keyboards, contact switches, speech input devices, and cursor control devices. Described are…

  12. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  13. Predicting forest structural parameters using the image texture derived from WorldView-2 multispectral imagery in a dryland forest, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Ibrahim; Karnieli, Arnon

    2011-10-01

    Estimation of forest structural parameters by field-based data collection methods is both expensive and time consuming. Satellite remote sensing is a low-cost alternative in modeling and mapping structural parameters in large forest areas. The current study investigates the potential of using WordView-2 multispectral satellite imagery for predicting forest structural parameters in a dryland plantation forest in Israel. The relationships between image texture features and the several structural parameters such as Number of Trees (NT), Basal Area (BA), Stem Volume (SV), Clark-Evans Index (CEI), Diameter Differentiation Index (DDI), Contagion Index (CI), Gini Coefficient (GC), and Standard Deviation of Diameters at Breast Heights (SDDBH) were examined using correlation analyses. These variables were obtained from 30 m 30 m square-shaped plots. The Standard Deviation of Gray Levels (SDGL) as a first order texture feature and the second order texture variables based on Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) were calculated for the pixels that corresponds to field plots. The results of the correlation analysis indicate that the forest structural parameters are significantly correlated with the image texture features. The highest correlation coefficients were calculated for the relationships between the SDDBH and the contrast of red band ( r = 0.75, p < 0.01), the BA and the entropy of blue band ( r = 0.73, p < 0.01), and the GC and the contrast of blue band ( r = 0.71, p < 0.01). Each forest structural parameter was modeled as a function of texture measures derived from the satellite image using stepwise multi linear regression analyses. The determination coefficient ( R2) and root mean square error (RMSE) values of the best fitting models, respectively, are 0.38 and 109.56 ha -1 for the NT; 0.54 and 1.79 m 2 ha -1 for the BA; 0.42 and 27.18 m 3 ha -1 for the SV; 0.23 and 0.16 for the CEI; 0.32 and 0.05 for the DDI; 0.25 and 0.06 for the CI; 0.50 and 0.05 for the GC; and 0.67 and 0.70 for the SDDBH. The leave-one-out cross-validation technique was applied for validation of the best-fitted models ( R2 > 0.50). In conclusion, cross-validated statistics confirmed that the structural parameters including the BA, SDDBH, and GC can be predicted and mapped with a reasonable accuracy using the texture features extracted from the spectral bands of WorldView-2 image.

  14. PREVIMER : Meteorological inputs and outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenel, H.; Lecornu, F.; Kerlguer, L.

    2009-09-01

    PREVIMER is a pre-operational system aiming to provide a wide range of users, from private individuals to professionals, with short-term forecasts about the coastal environment along the French coastlines bordering the English Channel, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea. Observation data and digital modelling tools first provide 48-hour (probably 96-hour by summer 2009) forecasts of sea states, currents, sea water levels and temperatures. The follow-up of an increasing number of biological parameters will, in time, complete this overview of coastal environment. Working in partnership with the French Naval Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (Service Hydrographique et Ocanographique de la Marine, SHOM), the French National Weather Service (Mto-France), the French public science and technology research institute (Institut de Recherche pour le Dveloppement, IRD), the European Institute of Marine Studies (Institut Universitaire Europen de la Mer, IUEM) and many others, IFREMER (the French public institute fo marine research) is supplying the technologies needed to ensure this pertinent information, available daily on Internet at http://www.previmer.org, and stored at the Operational Coastal Oceanographic Data Centre. Since 2006, PREVIMER publishes the results of demonstrators assigned to limited geographic areas and to specific applications. This system remains experimental. The following topics are covered : Hydrodynamic circulation, sea states, follow-up of passive tracers, conservative or non-conservative (specifically of microbiological origin), biogeochemical state, primary production. Lastly, PREVIMER provides researchers and R&D departments with modelling tools and access to the database, in which the observation data and the modelling results are stored, to undertake environmental studies on new sites. The communication will focus on meteorological inputs to and outputs from PREVIMER. It will draw the lessons from almost 3 years during which the system has been operational almost everyday and propose perspectives in terms of technical improvements and possible business models.

  15. Kinetic quantitation of cerebral PET-FDG studies without concurrent blood sampling: statistical recovery of the arterial input function.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, F; Kirrane, J; Muzi, M; O'Sullivan, J N; Spence, A M; Mankoff, D A; Krohn, K A

    2010-03-01

    Kinetic quantitation of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies via compartmental modeling usually requires the time-course of the radio-tracer concentration in the arterial blood as an arterial input function (AIF). For human and animal imaging applications, significant practical difficulties are associated with direct arterial sampling and as a result there is substantial interest in alternative methods that require no blood sampling at the time of the study. A fixed population template input function derived from prior experience with directly sampled arterial curves is one possibility. Image-based extraction, including requisite adjustment for spillover and recovery, is another approach. The present work considers a hybrid statistical approach based on a penalty formulation in which the information derived from a priori studies is combined in a Bayesian manner with information contained in the sampled image data in order to obtain an input function estimate. The absolute scaling of the input is achieved by an empirical calibration equation involving the injected dose together with the subject's weight, height and gender. The technique is illustrated in the context of (18)F -Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET studies in humans. A collection of 79 arterially sampled FDG blood curves are used as a basis for a priori characterization of input function variability, including scaling characteristics. Data from a series of 12 dynamic cerebral FDG PET studies in normal subjects are used to evaluate the performance of the penalty-based AIF estimation technique. The focus of evaluations is on quantitation of FDG kinetics over a set of 10 regional brain structures. As well as the new method, a fixed population template AIF and a direct AIF estimate based on segmentation are also considered. Kinetics analyses resulting from these three AIFs are compared with those resulting from radially sampled AIFs. The proposed penalty-based AIF extraction method is found to achieve significant improvements over the fixed template and the segmentation methods. As well as achieving acceptable kinetic parameter accuracy, the quality of fit of the region of interest (ROI) time-course data based on the extracted AIF, matches results based on arterially sampled AIFs. In comparison, significant deviation in the estimation of FDG flux and degradation in ROI data fit are found with the template and segmentation methods. The proposed AIF extraction method is recommended for practical use. PMID:19709971

  16. Partial volume correction of the microPET blood input function using ensemble learning independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kuan-Hao; Lee, Jih-Shian; Li, Jia-Hung; Yang, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ren-Shian; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2009-03-01

    Medical images usually suffer from a partial volume effect (PVE), which may degrade the accuracy of any quantitative information extracted from the images. Our aim was to recreate accurate radioactivity concentration and time-activity curves (TACs) by microPET R4 quantification using ensemble learning independent component analysis (EL-ICA). We designed a digital cardiac phantom for this simulation and in order to evaluate the ability of EL-ICA to correct the PVE, the simulated images were convoluted using a Gaussian function (FWHM = 1-4 mm). The robustness of the proposed method towards noise was investigated by adding statistical noise (SNR = 2-16). During further evaluation, another set of cardiac phantoms were generated from the reconstructed images, and Poisson noise at different levels was added to the sinogram. In real experiments, four rat microPET images and a number of arterial blood samples were obtained; these were used to estimate the metabolic rate of FDG (MRFDG). Input functions estimated using the FastICA method were used for comparison. The results showed that EL-ICA could correct PVE in both the simulated and real cases. After correcting for the PVE, the errors for MRFDG, when estimated by the EL-ICA method, were smaller than those when TACs were directly derived from the PET images and when the FastICA approach was used.

  17. Photoreceptor input and temporal summation in turtle retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Granda, A M; Maxwell, J H; Fulbrook, J E

    1986-01-01

    The relation between photoreceptor input and temporal summation in ganglion cells was investigated in the optical nerve of fresh-water turtle, Pseudemys. Action spectra derived for constant, high-criterion responses showed most cells to be maximally sensitive to 620 nm light, indicating dominant input from red-sensitive cones. At a lower criterion, sensitivity to 520 nm light greatly increased indicating an increase in rod input. Temporal summation curves for these intensity-dependent cells showed reciprocity between flash intensity and duration up to 128 msec for high-criterion summation curves. Low-criterion summation curves showed reciprocity up to the critical duration of 285 msec. Cells maximally sensitive to 620 nm light at all intensities often showed secondary sensitivity to 560 nm light, and were fitted by action spectra taken from red- and green-sensitive cones. Temporal summation curves for these cells had critical durations near 100 msec. Some cells responded best to light near 520 nm at all intensities and demonstrated little or no input from red-sensitive cones. These cells were fitted well by the action spectrum of rods and showed the longest critical durations of all at 375 msec. Chromatic input and temporal characteristics are intimately related: red-cone-dominated ganglion cells have the shortest critical durations while rod-dominated cells shows much longer ones. These findings are in keeping with psychophysical determinations of critical durations in this same animal. PMID:3617508

  18. A Web Browsing System by Eye-gaze Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kiyohiko; Owada, Kosuke; Ohi, Shoichi; Ohyama, Minoru

    We have developed an eye-gaze input system for people with severe physical disabilities, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. This system utilizes a personal computer and a home video camera to detect eye-gaze under natural light. The system detects both vertical and horizontal eye-gaze by simple image analysis, and does not require special image processing units or sensors. We also developed the platform for eye-gaze input based on our system. In this paper, we propose a new web browsing system for physically disabled computer users as an application of the platform for eye-gaze input. The proposed web browsing system uses a method of direct indicator selection. The method categorizes indicators by their function. These indicators are hierarchized relations; users can select the felicitous function by switching indicators group. This system also analyzes the location of selectable object on web page, such as hyperlink, radio button, edit box, etc. This system stores the locations of these objects, in other words, the mouse cursor skips to the object of candidate input. Therefore it enables web browsing at a faster pace.

  19. Improved Quantification of Cerebral Hemodynamics Using Individualized Time Thresholds for Assessment of Peak Enhancement Parameters Derived from Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nasel, Christian; Kalcher, Klaudius; Boubela, Roland; Moser, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Assessment of cerebral ischemia often employs dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with evaluation of various peak enhancement time parameters. All of these parameters use a single time threshold to judge the maximum tolerable peak enhancement delay that is supposed to reliably differentiate sufficient from critical perfusion. As the validity of this single threshold approach still remains unclear, in this study, (1) the definition of a threshold on an individual patient-basis, nevertheless (2) preserving the comparability of the data, was investigated. Methods The histogram of time-to-peak (TTP) values derived from DSC-MRI, the so-called TTP-distribution curve (TDC), was modeled using a double-Gaussian model in 61 patients without severe cerebrovascular disease. Particular model-based zf-scores were used to describe the arterial, parenchymal and venous bolus-transit phase as time intervals Ia,p,v. Their durations (delta Ia,p,v), were then considered as maximum TTP-delays of each phase. Results Mean-R2 for the model-fit was 0.967. Based on the generic zf-scores the proposed bolus transit phases could be differentiated. The Ip-interval reliably depicted the parenchymal bolus-transit phase with durations of 3.4 s–10.1 s (median = 4.3s), where an increase with age was noted (∼30 ms/year). Conclusion Individual threshold-adjustment seems rational since regular bolus-transit durations in brain parenchyma obtained from the TDC overlap considerably with recommended critical TTP-thresholds of 4 s–8 s. The parenchymal transit time derived from the proposed model may be utilized to individually correct TTP-thresholds, thereby potentially improving the detection of critical perfusion. PMID:25521121

  20. Synchronized amplification of local information transmission by peripheral retinal input.

    PubMed

    Jadzinsky, Pablo D; Baccus, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Sensory stimuli have varying statistics influenced by both the environment and by active sensing behaviors that rapidly and globally change the sensory input. Consequently, sensory systems often adjust their neural code to the expected statistics of their sensory input to transmit novel sensory information. Here, we show that sudden peripheral motion amplifies and accelerates information transmission in salamander ganglion cells in a 50 ms time window. Underlying this gating of information is a transient increase in adaptation to contrast, enhancing sensitivity to a broader range of stimuli. Using a model and natural images, we show that this effect coincides with an expected increase in information in bipolar cells after a global image shift. Our findings reveal the dynamic allocation of energy resources to increase neural activity at times of expected high information content, a principle of adaptation that balances the competing requirements of conserving spikes and transmitting information. PMID:26568312

  1. Longitudinal monitoring adipose-derived stem cell survival by PET imaging hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate in rat myocardial infarction model

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Hwan; Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Pandya, Darpan; Park, Noh Won; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Eom, Ki Dong; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Chan Wha; Kang, Joo Hyun; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Lee, Yong Jin

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We developed a safe, simple and appropriate stem cell labeling method with {sup 124}I-HIB. • ADSC survival can be monitored with PET in MI model via direct labeling. • Tracking of ADSC labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB was possible for 3 days in MI model using PET. • ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. • Survival of ADSC in living bodies can be longitudinally tracked with PET imaging. - Abstract: This study aims to monitor how the change of cell survival of transplanted adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) responds to myocardial infarction (MI) via the hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate ({sup 124}I-HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo. Stem cells have shown the potential to improve cardiac function after MI. However, monitoring of the fate of transplanted stem cells at target sites is still unclear. Rat ADSCs were labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB, and radiolabeled ADSCs were transplanted into the myocardium of normal and MI model. In the group of {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSC transplantation, in vivo imaging was performed using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for 9 days. Twenty-one days post-transplantation, histopathological analysis and apoptosis assay were performed. ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. In vivo tracking of the {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSCs was possible for 9 and 3 days in normal and MI model, respectively. Apoptosis of transplanted cells increased in the MI model compared than that in normal model. We developed a direct labeling agent, {sup 124}I-HIB, and first tried to longitudinally monitor transplanted stem cell to MI. This approach may provide new insights on the roles of stem cell monitoring in living bodies for stem cell therapy from pre-clinical studies to clinical trials.

  2. Semi-automated segmentation of solid and GGO nodules in lung CT images using vessel-likelihood derived from local foreground structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tomoya; Takeguchi, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Aoyagi, Kota; Yamagata, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    Reflecting global interest in lung cancer screening, considerable attention has been paid to automatic segmentation and volumetric measurement of lung nodules on CT. Ground glass opacity (GGO) nodules deserve special consideration in this context, since it has been reported that they are more likely to be malignant than solid nodules. However, due to relatively low contrast and indistinct boundaries of GGO nodules, segmentation is more difficult for GGO nodules compared with solid nodules. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a method for accurately segmenting not only solid nodules but also GGO nodules without prior information about nodule types. First, the histogram of CT values in pre-extracted lung regions is modeled by a Gaussian mixture model and a threshold value for including high-attenuation regions is computed. Second, after setting up a region of interest around the nodule seed point, foreground regions are extracted by using the threshold and quick-shift-based mode seeking. Finally, for separating vessels from the nodule, a vessel-likelihood map derived from elongatedness of foreground regions is computed, and a region growing scheme starting from the seed point is applied to the map with the aid of fast marching method. Experimental results using an anthropomorphic chest phantom showed that our method yielded generally lower volumetric measurement errors for both solid and GGO nodules compared with other methods reported in preceding studies conducted using similar technical settings. Also, our method allowed reasonable segmentation of GGO nodules in low-dose images and could be applied to clinical CT images including part-solid nodules.

  3. CARMENES. III. CARMENCITA, the input catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; López-Santiago, J.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Klutsch, A.; Montes, D.; Morales, J. C.; Mundt, R.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Carmenes Consortium

    2013-05-01

    CARMENES, the new near-infrared/optical high-resolution spectrograph for the 3.5 m Calar Alto Telescope, is expected to see its first light in early 2014. Before that, we must have chosen carefully the 300 M dwarfs to which CARMENES will look for terrestrial exoplanets with the radial-velocity method under guaranteed time. CARMENCITA, the CARMENES Cool dwarf Information and daTa Archive, our ``input catalogue'', will be the most comprehensive database of M dwarfs ever built. It already contains dozens of parameters measured by us or compiled from the literature for over 1300 bright M dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood: coordinates, spectral indices, photometry at different bandpasses, parallaxes and spectro-photometric distances, rotational and radial velocities, Hα equivalent widths, X-ray count rates and hardness ratios, close and wide multiplicity data, proper motions, Galactocentric space velocities, full references, and much more parameters. The private on-line catalogue, including preparatory science (i.e., high-resolution imaging, low- and high-resolution spectroscopy), will be eventually public as a CARMENES legacy.

  4. SU-C-BRE-05: PTV Margin Determination Based On Tumor Radiobiological Characteristics and Geometric Uncertainties Derived From Daily Cone- Beam CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Selvaraj, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine required PTV margins for ?1% loss in mean population TCP using systematic (?) and random (?) errors calculated from daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) images of head and neck patients. Methods: Daily CBCT images were acquired for 50 head and neck patients. The CBCT image sets acquired at each fraction were registered with planning CT to obtain positional errors for each patient for each fraction. Systematic and random errors were calculated from data collected for 50 patients as described in IPEM On Target report. CTV delineation uncertainty of 2mm is added quadratically to systematic error. Assuming a spherical target volume, the dose in each voxel of target volume is summed for each fraction in the treatment by shifting the dose grid to calculate mean population TCP inclusive of geometric uncertainties using a Monte Carlo method. These simulations were repeated for the set of ? and ? in each axis for different PTV margins and drop in TCP for each margin are obtained. In order to study the effect of dose-response curve on PTV margins, two different ?? of 0.048 Gy-1 and 0.218 Gy-1 representing steep and shallow dose-response curves are studied. ? were 2.5, 2.5, 2.1 mm and ? were 0.3, 0.3 0.2 mm respectively in x, y and z axis respectively. Results: PTV margins based on tumor radiobiological characteristics are 4.8, 4.8 and 4 mm in x, y and z axis assuming 25 treatment fractions for ?? 0.048 Gy-1 (steep) and 4.2,4.2 and 2.2 for ?? of 0.218 Gy-1 (shallow). While the TCP-based margins did not differ much in x and y axis, it is considerably smaller in z axis for shallow DRC. Conclusion: TCP based margins are substantially smaller than physical dose-based margin recipes. This study also demonstrates the importance of considering tumor radiobiological characteristics while deriving margins.

  5. The use of mass spectrometry imaging to predict treatment response of patient-derived xenograft models of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mascini, Nadine E; Eijkel, Gert B; ter Brugge, Petra; Jonkers, Jos; Wesseling, Jelle; Heeren, Ron M A

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been shown to be a promising technique in oncology. The effective application of MSI, however, is hampered by the complexity of the generated data. Bioinformatic approaches that reduce the complexity of these data are needed for the effective use in a (bio)medical setting. This holds especially for the analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), which consist of hundreds of small tissue cores. Here we present an approach that combines MSI on tissue microarrays with principal component linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) to predict treatment response. The feasibility of such an approach was evaluated on a set of patient-derived xenograft models of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). PCA-LDA was used to classify TNBC tumor tissues based on the proteomic information obtained with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MSI from the TMA surface. Classifiers based on two different tissue microarrays from the same tumor models showed overall classification accuracies between 59 and 77%, as determined by cross-validation. Reproducibility tests revealed that the two models were similar. A clear effect of intratumor heterogeneity of the classification scores was observed. These results demonstrate that the analysis of MALDI-MSI data by PCA-LDA is a valuable approach for the classification of treatment response and tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer. PMID:25553735

  6. Quantitative prediction of radio frequency induced local heating derived from measured magnetic field maps in magnetic resonance imaging: A phantom validation at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Liu, Jiaen; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) technique utilizes measurable radio frequency (RF) coil induced magnetic fields (B1 fields) in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to quantitatively reconstruct the local electrical properties (EP) of biological tissues. Information derived from the same data set, e.g., complex numbers of B1 distribution towards electric field calculation, can be used to estimate, on a subject-specific basis, local Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR plays a significant role in RF pulse design for high-field MRI applications, where maximum local tissue heating remains one of the most constraining limits. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of such B1-based local SAR estimation, expanding on previously proposed EPT approaches. To this end, B1 calibration was obtained in a gelatin phantom at 7 T with a multi-channel transmit coil, under a particular multi-channel B1-shim setting (B1-shim I). Using this unique set of B1 calibration, local SAR distribution was subsequently predicted for B1-shim I, as well as for another B1-shim setting (B1-shim II), considering a specific set of parameter for a heating MRI protocol consisting of RF pulses plaid at 1% duty cycle. Local SAR results, which could not be directly measured with MRI, were subsequently converted into temperature change which in turn were validated against temperature changes measured by MRI Thermometry based on the proton chemical shift.

  7. Quantitative prediction of radio frequency induced local heating derived from measured magnetic field maps in magnetic resonance imaging: A phantom validation at 7 T

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Jiaen; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2014-12-15

    Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) technique utilizes measurable radio frequency (RF) coil induced magnetic fields (B1 fields) in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to quantitatively reconstruct the local electrical properties (EP) of biological tissues. Information derived from the same data set, e.g., complex numbers of B1 distribution towards electric field calculation, can be used to estimate, on a subject-specific basis, local Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR plays a significant role in RF pulse design for high-field MRI applications, where maximum local tissue heating remains one of the most constraining limits. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of such B1-based local SAR estimation, expanding on previously proposed EPT approaches. To this end, B1 calibration was obtained in a gelatin phantom at 7 T with a multi-channel transmit coil, under a particular multi-channel B1-shim setting (B1-shim I). Using this unique set of B1 calibration, local SAR distribution was subsequently predicted for B1-shim I, as well as for another B1-shim setting (B1-shim II), considering a specific set of parameter for a heating MRI protocol consisting of RF pulses plaid at 1% duty cycle. Local SAR results, which could not be directly measured with MRI, were subsequently converted into temperature change which in turn were validated against temperature changes measured by MRI Thermometry based on the proton chemical shift.

  8. High Throughput Measurement of Ca2+ Dynamics for Drug Risk Assessment in Human Stem Cell-derived Cardiomyocytes by Kinetic Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Cerignoli, Fabio; Charlot, David; Whittaker, Ross; Ingermanson, Randy; Gehalot, Piyush; Savtchenko, Alex; Gallacher, David J.; Towart, Rob; Price, Jeffrey H.; McDonough, Patrick M.; Mercola, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Current methods to measure physiological properties of cardiomyocytes and predict fatal arrhythmias that can cause sudden death, such as Torsade de Pointes, lack either the automation and throughput needed for early-stage drug discovery and/or have poor predictive value. To increase throughput and predictive power of in vitro assays, we developed kinetic imaging cytometry (KIC) for automated cell-by-cell analyses via intracellular fluorescence Ca2+ indicators. The KIC instrument simultaneously records and analyzes intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i at 30-ms resolution from hundreds of individual cells/well of 96-well plates in seconds, providing kinetic details not previously possible with well averaging technologies such as plate readers. Analyses of human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes revealed effects of known cardiotoxic and arrhythmogenic drugs on kinetic parameters of Ca2+ dynamics, suggesting that KIC will aid in the assessment of cardiotoxic risk and in the elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms of heart disease associated with drugs treatment and/or genetic background. PMID:22926323

  9. Biological evaluation of the radioiodinated imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivative DRK092 for amyloid-? imaging in mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Jen; Bando, Kazunori; Ashino, Hiroki; Taguchi, Kazumi; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Shima, Keiji; Fujimoto, Osuke; Kitamura, Chiemi; Morimoto, Yasuaki; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Minamizawa, Takao; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto; Yamada, Kazutaka; Ji, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Non-invasive determination of amyloid-? peptide (A?) deposition has important significance for early diagnosis and medical intervention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we investigated the availability of a radioiodinated imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivative, termed (125)I-DRK092, as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ligand for in vivo detection of A? deposition. DRK092 showed high binding affinity for either synthetic human A? fibrils or brain homogenates from amyloid precursor protein transgenic (Tg) mouse (PS1-ki/JU-Tg2576) and AD patient with a dissociation constant (Kd) of one-digit nM, and excellent brain permeability (peak value of uptake: approximately 0.9% of injection dose/g rat brain). Ex vivo autoradiographic analysis showed that measurement with (125)I-DRK092 has higher sensibility for detecting A? accumulation than with (125)I-IMPY, a well-known amyloid SPECT ligand, in Tg mice. In vitro autoradiography with (125)I-DRK092 also confirmed higher accumulation of radioactivity in the cortical area, enriched with A? plaques, of Tg mouse and AD patient brains, as compared with the corresponding areas in non-Tg mouse and healthy control brains. All the data presented above lead us to draw the conclusion that radioiodinated DRK092 is a potential SPECT ligand for amyloid imaging in AD. PMID:25172571

  10. Temporal differentiation by photoreceptors reduces spatiotemporal correlation of natural visual input on the retina.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dawei; Nikonov, Sergei

    2015-09-01

    On the retina, the illuminating intensities of natural visual input at different times and spatial positions are highly correlated. Such spatiotemporal correlation is utilized by photoreceptors to reduce noise through temporal integration and spatial coupling. However, the correlation on a longer temporal and spatial scale is a source of inefficiency for visual representation. To understand how photoreceptors deal with such inefficiency, we investigated the shape of the photocurrent impulse response functions and found that they were biphasic during natural stimulation and capable to reduce the spatiotemporal correlation of natural stimuli. This is in sharp contrast to the monophasic impulse response to short light flashes. In particular, we measured the membrane current of the outer segment of rods in retinal slices stimulated with light stimuli derived from awake cats watching natural movies with eye movements. We found that beyond the classic integration time window the photocurrent responded to the temporal difference of the illumination. Due to the fact that the natural time-varying images are dominated by optical flow, the temporal differentiation not only greatly reduced the temporal correlation beyond the integration time window, but also eliminated the spatial correlation beyond a certain scale. We conclude that the photocurrent of photoreceptors efficiently represent the natural visual input. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326976

  11. Input estimation from measured structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Cross, Elizabeth; Silva, Ramon A; Farrar, Charles R; Bement, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  12. Using model order tests to determine sensory inputs in a motion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Junker, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    In the study of motion effects on tracking performance, a problem of interest is the determination of what sensory inputs a human uses in controlling his tracking task. In the approach presented here a simple canonical model (FID or a proportional, integral, derivative structure) is used to model the human's input-output time series. A study of significant changes in reduction of the output error loss functional is conducted as different permutations of parameters are considered. Since this canonical model includes parameters which are related to inputs to the human (such as the error signal, its derivatives and integration), the study of model order is equivalent to the study of which sensory inputs are being used by the tracker. The parameters are obtained which have the greatest effect on reducing the loss function significantly. In this manner the identification procedure converts the problem of testing for model order into the problem of determining sensory inputs.

  13. Modality of Input and Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sydorenko, Tetyana

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effect of input modality (video, audio, and captions, i.e., on-screen text in the same language as audio) on (a) the learning of written and aural word forms, (b) overall vocabulary gains, (c) attention to input, and (d) vocabulary learning strategies of beginning L2 learners. Twenty-six second-semester learners of Russian…

  14. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

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  15. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

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  16. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

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  17. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

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  18. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

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  19. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

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  20. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  1. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  2. Managing Input during Assistive Technology Product Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Young Mi

    2011-01-01

    Many different sources of input are available to assistive technology innovators during the course of designing products. However, there is little information on which ones may be most effective or how they may be efficiently utilized within the design process. The aim of this project was to compare how three types of input--from simulation tools,

  3. Computing Functions by Approximating the Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mayer

    2012-01-01

    In computing real-valued functions, it is ordinarily assumed that the input to the function is known, and it is the output that we need to approximate. In this work, we take the opposite approach: we show how to compute the values of some transcendental functions by approximating the input to these functions, and obtaining exact answers for their

  4. Making Input Comprehensible: Do Interactional Modifications Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Teresa; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A pilot study of a larger project on second language comprehension under two input conditions is reported. The first condition is characterized by the availability of samples of target input that have been modified a priori toward greater semantic redundancy and transparency and less complex syntax. The second condition is characterized by the

  5. Modality of Input and Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sydorenko, Tetyana

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effect of input modality (video, audio, and captions, i.e., on-screen text in the same language as audio) on (a) the learning of written and aural word forms, (b) overall vocabulary gains, (c) attention to input, and (d) vocabulary learning strategies of beginning L2 learners. Twenty-six second-semester learners of Russian

  6. EDP Applications to Musical Bibliography: Input Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Donald C.

    1972-01-01

    The application of Electronic Data Processing (EDP) has been a boon in the analysis and bibliographic control of music. However, an extra step of encoding must be undertaken for input of music. The best hope to facilitate musical input is the development of an Optical Character Recognition (OCR) music-reading machine. (29 references) (Author/NH)

  7. The Input Hypothesis: An Inside Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Theodore V.

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes and discusses Krashen's "input hypothesis" as presented in his "Principles and Practice in Second Language Acquisition." Suggests that the input hypothesis fails to account convincingly for arrested second language acquisition in an acquisition-rich environment and that it is not directly applicable to U.S. high school and university

  8. The Input Hypothesis and the Bilingual Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sole, Yolanda Russinovich

    1994-01-01

    Discusses Krashen's monitor model and input hypothesis of language acquisition, focusing on the implications of this hypothesis among Hispanic bilinguals in an English speaking-teaching-reading-problem-solving environment. The hypothesis maintains that individuals acquire more language only when they are exposed to comprehensible input that is a

  9. Rapid synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of folic acid derivatives labeled with fluorine-18 for PET imaging of folate receptor-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Al Jammaz, I; Al-Otaibi, B; Amer, S; Okarvi, S M

    2011-10-01

    In an attempt to visualize folate receptors that overexpress on many cancers, [(18)F]-fluorobenzene and pyridinecarbohydrazide-folate/methotrexate conjugates ([(18)F]-1, [(18)F]-2-folates and [(18)F]-8, [(18)F]-9-MTXs) were synthesized by the nucleophilic displacement reactions using ethyl-trimethylammonium-benzoate and pyridinecarboxylate precursors. The intermediates ethyl [(18)F]-fluorinated benzene and pyridine esters were reacted with hydrazine to produce the [(18)F]-fluorobenzene and pyridinecarbohydrazides, followed by coupling with N-hydroxysuccinimide-folate/MTX. Radiochemical yields were greater than 80% (decay corrected), with total synthesis time of less than 45 min. Radiochemical purities were always greater than 97% without high-performance liquid chromatography purification. These synthetic approaches hold considerable promise as rapid and simple method for the radiofluorination of folate derivatives with high radiochemical yield in short synthesis time. In vitro tests on KB cell line showed that significant amount of the radioconjugates were associated with cell fractions, and in vivo characterization in normal Balb/c mice revealed rapid blood clearance of these radioconjugates with excretion predominantly by the urinary and partially by the hepatobiliary systems. Biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing human KB cell line xenografts demonstrated significant tumor uptake and favorable biodistribution profile for [(18)F]-2-folate over the other conjugates. The uptake in the tumors was blocked by excess coinjection of folic acid, suggesting a receptor-mediated process. Micro-positron emission tomography images of nude mice bearing human KB cell line xenografts confirmed these observations. These results demonstrate that [(18)F]-2-folate may be useful as molecular probe for detecting and staging of folate receptor-positive cancers, such as ovarian cancer and their metastasis as well as monitoring tumor response to treatment. PMID:21982573

  10. Comparison of image derived, measured and modeled SWE in relation to snow-melt runoff for the Senator Beck basin, CO during the spring of 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenstein, S.; Deeb, E. J.; Koenig, G. G.

    2010-12-01

    Strong correlation between passive microwave derived snow ripening and the onset of snowmelt flooding was found in several very large basins in Alaska and Yukon Territory where pixel heterogeneity is limited. These studies did not investigate either the impact of subpixel heterogeneity on microwave sensor observations or the factors responsible for the lag between the onset of snowmelt and increased stream flow. To help us address these questions we compare modeled snow extent and SWE against ground-, air-, and space-based measurements. The snow model we used is part of the land surface model FASST (Fast All-season Soil Strength). In April of this year an intensive ground truth campaign was conducted in coordination with several ground-, air-,and space-based image acquisitions including hyperspectral (AVIRIS and field spectroscopy), multispectral (MODIS), laser (ground-based scanning LiDAR), active (C- and X-Band radar) and passive (SSM/I and AMSR-E) microwave systems in the Senator Beck basin. The basin is located in the San Juan mountains of Southwest Colorado. It has been used as an intense snow study area since 2004 and is characterized as sub-alpine to alpine with mixed vegetation. Part of the permanent instrumentation includes three stream gauges and two meteorological stations. Using this mixed, rich data set we begin to quantify the terrain and meteorological mechanisms responsible for the observed lag between the onset of snowmelt and increased stream flow as well as enhancing our ability to predict SWE in remote, heterogeneous regions. The next step is to test our findings in other basins.

  11. Statistical identification of effective input variables. [SCREEN

    SciTech Connect

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A statistical sensitivity analysis procedure has been developed for ranking the input data of large computer codes in the order of sensitivity-importance. The method is economical for large codes with many input variables, since it uses a relatively small number of computer runs. No prior judgemental elimination of input variables is needed. The sceening method is based on stagewise correlation and extensive regression analysis of output values calculated with selected input value combinations. The regression process deals with multivariate nonlinear functions, and statistical tests are also available for identifying input variables that contribute to threshold effects, i.e., discontinuities in the output variables. A computer code SCREEN has been developed for implementing the screening techniques. The efficiency has been demonstrated by several examples and applied to a fast reactor safety analysis code (Venus-II). However, the methods and the coding are general and not limited to such applications.

  12. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  13. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup.

    PubMed

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Hagen, Charlotte K; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  14. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and temperatures to show that the interface had voltage margin under all worst case conditions. Gate input thresholds are normally measured at the manufacturer when the device is on a chip tester. A key function of this machine was duplicated on an existing flight board with no modifications to the nets to be tested, with the exception of changes in the FPGA program.

  15. Programmable remapper for image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor); Sampsell, Jeffrey B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A video-rate coordinate remapper includes a memory for storing a plurality of transformations on look-up tables for remapping input images from one coordinate system to another. Such transformations are operator selectable. The remapper includes a collective processor by which certain input pixels of an input image are transformed to a portion of the output image in a many-to-one relationship. The remapper includes an interpolative processor by which the remaining input pixels of the input image are transformed to another portion of the output image in a one-to-many relationship. The invention includes certain specific transforms for creating output images useful for certain defects of visually impaired people. The invention also includes means for shifting input pixels and means for scrolling the output matrix.

  16. Input-shaped actuation of electromagnetic MEMS mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitterer, Jrg; Fidler, Franz; Schmid, Gerhard; Hambeck, Christian; Saint Julien-Wallsee, Ferdinand; Leeb, Walter; Schmid, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    For many applications of MEMS actuators a well-defined trajectory of the movable device component is crucial when using a simple and inexpensive open-loop controller. We have applied to quasi-statically actuated electromagnetic MEMS mirrors the control technique called "input shaping", which is widely used for systems at the macro-scale and to a lesser extent also to systems at the micro-scale. We derive the impulse response of a filter which suppresses the excitation of undesired resonant modes and present simulation and measurement results of the oscillation-free linear MEMS mirror movement. The robustness of different input shaping filter types with respect to errors in the estimation of the system parameters, i.e., resonance frequency and damping ratio, is analyzed.

  17. Feature maps driven no-reference image quality prediction of authentically distorted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiyaram, Deepti; Bovik, Alan C.

    2015-03-01

    Current blind image quality prediction models rely on benchmark databases comprised of singly and synthetically distorted images, thereby learning image features that are only adequate to predict human perceived visual quality on such inauthentic distortions. However, real world images often contain complex mixtures of multiple distortions. Rather than a) discounting the effect of these mixtures of distortions on an image's perceptual quality and considering only the dominant distortion or b) using features that are only proven to be efficient for singly distorted images, we deeply study the natural scene statistics of authentically distorted images, in different color spaces and transform domains. We propose a feature-maps-driven statistical approach which avoids any latent assumptions about the type of distortion(s) contained in an image, and focuses instead on modeling the remarkable consistencies in the scene statistics of real world images in the absence of distortions. We design a deep belief network that takes model-based statistical image features derived from a very large database of authentically distorted images as input and discovers good feature representations by generalizing over different distortion types, mixtures, and severities, which are later used to learn a regressor for quality prediction. We demonstrate the remarkable competence of our features for improving automatic perceptual quality prediction on a benchmark database and on the newly designed LIVE Authentic Image Quality Challenge Database and show that our approach of combining robust statistical features and the deep belief network dramatically outperforms the state-of-the-art.

  18. High Temporal Resolution Dynamic MRI and Arterial Input Function for Assessment of GFR in Pediatric Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yoruk, Umit; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Loening, Andreas M; Hargreaves, Brian A; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a respiratory-gated high-spatiotemporal-resolution dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI technique and a high-temporal-resolution aortic input function (HTR-AIF) estimation method for glomerular filtration rate (GFR) assessment in children. Methods A high-spatiotemporal-resolution DCE-MRI method with view-shared reconstruction was modified to incorporate respiratory-gating, and an AIF estimation method that uses a fraction of the k-space data from each respiratory period was developed (HTR-AIF). The method was validated using realistic digital phantom simulations and demonstrated on clinical subjects. The GFR estimates using HTR-AIF were compared to estimates obtained by using an AIF derived directly from the view-shared images. Results Digital phantom simulations showed that using the HTR-AIF technique gives more accurate AIF estimates (RMSE = 0.0932) compared to the existing estimation method (RMSE = 0.2059) that used view-sharing (VS). For simulated GFR > 27 ml/min, GFR estimation error was between 32% and 17% using view-shared AIF, whereas estimation error was less than 10% using HTR-AIF. In all clinical subjects, the HTR-AIF method resulted in higher GFR estimations than the view-shared method. Conclusion The HTR-AIF method improves the accuracy of both the AIF and GFR estimates derived from the respiratory-gated acquisitions, and makes GFR estimation feasible in free-breathing pediatric subjects. PMID:25946307

  19. A new synthesis for terrestrial nitrogen inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Morford, S. L.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) inputs sustain many different aspects of local soil processes, their services, and their interactions with the broader Earth system. We present a new synthesis for terrestrial N inputs that considers both rock and atmospheric sources. We review evidence for state-factor regulation over biological N fixation, deposition and rock weathering inputs from local to global scales and in transient vs. steady-state landscapes. Our framework highlights strong organism and topographic (relief) controls over all three N input pathways, with the anthropogenic factor clearly important in rising N deposition rates. In addition, the climate, parent material and time factors are shown to influence patterns of fixation and rock-weathering inputs of N in diverse soil-systems. Data reanalysis suggests that weathering of N-rich parent material could resolve several known cases of "missing N inputs" in ecosystems, and demonstrates how the inclusion of rock N sources into modern concepts can lead to a richer understanding of spatial and temporal patterns of ecosystem N availability. For example, explicit consideration of rock N inputs into classic pedogenic models (e.g., Walker and Syers model) yields a fundamentally different expectation from the standard case: weathering of N-rich parent material could enhance N availability and facilitate terrestrial succession in developmentally young sites even in the absence of N-fixing organisms. We conclude that a state-factor framework for N complements our growing understanding multiple-source controls on phosphorus and cation availability in Earth's soil; but with significant exceptions given the lack of an N fixation analogue in all other biogeochemical cycles. Rather, a state-factor analysis of N must recognize non-symmetrical feedbacks among input pathways, whereby high N inputs via deposition or rock weathering have the potential to reduce biological fixation rates within a given state-factor.

  20. Structural graph-matching approach to image understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Gary P.; Zhang, Jun

    1992-02-01

    Image understanding is a broad field of image processing where the goal is to classify the elements of a scene. In this paper we describe an approach to image understanding based on the matching of structure graphs. The structure graph of the input image is composed of `nodes' (primitives extracted from the image, e.g., regions, line segments) and `edges' (relationships between primitives in the image). The goal of our algorithm is to find the best match between this graph and a prototype graph, representing the knowledge about the expected scene. We formulate the graph matching problem as a consistent labeling problem, where the nodes of the prototype graph are considered labels. We then search for a labeling of the input structure graph that is optimal in the sense that the nodes and edges of the input graph are consistent with the labels and relationships represented in the prototype graph. A `quality of fit' measurement is derived for the matching, and a genetic algorithm is used to find the optimal solution. The advantages of this method of inexact (or fuzzy) matching include its graceful degradation (robustness) in the presence of noise and image deformation, its parallelism, and its adaptability to a variety of domains. We complete this work with the discussion of experimental results.

  1. Branch Input Resistance and Steady Attenuation for Input to One Branch of a Dendritic Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Rall, Wilfrid; Rinzel, John

    1973-01-01

    Mathematical solutions and numerical illustrations are presented for the steady-state distribution of membrane potential in an extensively branched neuron model, when steady electric current is injected into only one dendritic branch. Explicit expressions are obtained for input resistance at the branch input site and for voltage attenuation from the input site to the soma; expressions for AC steady-state input impedance and attenuation are also presented. The theoretical model assumes passive membrane properties and the equivalent cylinder constraint on branch diameters. Numerical examples illustrate how branch input resistance and steady attenuation depend upon the following: the number of dendritic trees, the orders of dendritic branching, the electrotonic length of the dendritic trees, the location of the dendritic input site, and the input resistance at the soma. The application to cat spinal motoneurons, and to other neuron types, is discussed. The effect of a large dendritic input resistance upon the amount of local membrane depolarization at the synaptic site, and upon the amount of depolarization reaching the soma, is illustrated and discussed; simple proportionality with input resistance does not hold, in general. Also, branch input resistance is shown to exceed the input resistance at the soma by an amount that is always less than the sum of core resistances along the path from the input site to the soma. PMID:4715583

  2. Quantitative assessment of multiple sclerosis lesion load using CAD and expert input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Wong, Alexis; Sangnil, Alan; Liu, Brent J.

    2008-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a frequently encountered neurological disease with a progressive but variable course affecting the central nervous system. Outline-based lesion quantification in the assessment of lesion load (LL) performed on magnetic resonance (MR) images is clinically useful and provides information about the development and change reflecting overall disease burden. Methods of LL assessment that rely on human input are tedious, have higher intra- and inter-observer variability and are more time-consuming than computerized automatic (CAD) techniques. At present it seems that methods based on human lesion identification preceded by non-interactive outlining by CAD are the best LL quantification strategies. We have developed a CAD that automatically quantifies MS lesions, displays 3-D lesion map and appends radiological findings to original images according to current DICOM standard. CAD is also capable to display and track changes and make comparison between patient's separate MRI studies to determine disease progression. The findings are exported to a separate imaging tool for review and final approval by expert. Capturing and standardized archiving of manual contours is also implemented. Similarity coefficients calculated from quantities of LL in collected exams show a good correlation of CAD-derived results vs. those incorporated as expert's reading. Combining the CAD approach with an expert interaction may impact to the diagnostic work-up of MS patients because of improved reproducibility in LL assessment and reduced time for single MR or comparative exams reading. Inclusion of CAD-generated outlines as DICOM-compliant overlays into the image data can serve as a better reference in MS progression tracking.

  3. Microchannel cross load array with dense parallel input

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2004-04-06

    An architecture or layout for microchannel arrays using T or Cross (+) loading for electrophoresis or other injection and separation chemistry that are performed in microfluidic configurations. This architecture enables a very dense layout of arrays of functionally identical shaped channels and it also solves the problem of simultaneously enabling efficient parallel shapes and biasing of the input wells, waste wells, and bias wells at the input end of the separation columns. One T load architecture uses circular holes with common rows, but not columns, which allows the flow paths for each channel to be identical in shape, using multiple mirror image pieces. Another T load architecture enables the access hole array to be formed on a biaxial, collinear grid suitable for EDM micromachining (square holes), with common rows and columns.

  4. Wireless, relative-motion computer input device

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides a system for controlling a computer display in a workspace using an input unit/output unit. A train of EM waves are sent out to flood the workspace. EM waves are reflected from the input unit/output unit. A relative distance moved information signal is created using the EM waves that are reflected from the input unit/output unit. Algorithms are used to convert the relative distance moved information signal to a display signal. The computer display is controlled in response to the display signal.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled 4-nitrobenzyl derivatives for imaging tumor hypoxia with positron emission tomography: Comparison of 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl carbonate and 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl carbamate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxing; Lau, Joseph; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Zhang, Chengcheng; Hundal-Jabal, Navjit; Colpo, Nadine; Bénard, François; Lin, Kuo-Shyan

    2016-01-15

    Two 4-nitrobenzyl derivatives, 2-fluoroethyl 4-nitrobenzyl carbonate 1 and 4-nitrobenzyl N-2-fluoroethyl carbamate 2, were radiolabeled with (18)F and evaluated for imaging tumor hypoxia with positron emission tomography. Although good tumor uptake was observed for [(18)F]1 and [(18)F]2 (>2.5%ID/g at 3-h post-injection), the tracers cleared slowly from nontarget tissues (>1.5%ID/g) and exhibited extensive defluorination in vivo (>4.0%ID/g for bone). Therefore, [(18)F]1 and [(18)F]2 are not suitable for imaging tumor hypoxia due to suboptimal tumor-to-background contrasts. PMID:26646218

  6. Micromachined dual input axis rate gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Thor Nelson

    The need for inexpensive yet reliable angular rate sensors in fields ranging from automotive to consumer electronics has motivated prolific micromachined rate gyroscope research. The vast majority of research has focused on single input axis rate gyroscopes based upon either translational resonance, such as tuning forks, or structural mode resonance, such as vibrating rings. However, this work presents a novel, contrasting approach based on angular resonance of a rotating rigid rotor suspended by torsional springs. The inherent symmetry of the circular design allows angular rate measurement about two axes simultaneously, hence the name micromachined dual-axis rate gyroscope. The underlying theory of operation, mechanical structure design optimization, electrical interface circuitry, and signal processing are described in detail. Several operational versions were fabricated using two different fully integrated surface micromachining processes as proof of concept. The heart of the dual-axis rate gyroscope is a 2 mum thick polysilicon disk or rotor suspended above the substrate by a four beam suspension. When this rotor in driven into angular oscillation about the axis perpendicular to the substrate, a rotation rate about the two axes parallel to the substrate invokes an out of plane rotor tilting motion due to Coriolis acceleration. This tilting motion is capacitively measured and on board integrated signal processing provides two output voltages proportional to angular rate input about the two axes parallel to the substrate. The design process begins with the derivation of gyroscopic dynamics. The equations suggest that tuning sense mode frequencies to the drive oscillation frequency can vastly increase mechanical sensitivity. Hence the supporting four beam suspension is designed such that electrostatic tuning can match modes despite process variations. The electrostatic tuning range is limited only by rotor collapse to the substrate when tuning-voltage induced electrostatic forces over power the beam suspension. Multivariable design optimization is used to maximize performance given process constraints. All electronics needed to sustain rotor oscillation, control oscillation amplitude, sense rotor tilting due to Coriolis acceleration, and process sense signals to produce voltage outputs are explained. A voltage controlled oscillator slaved to the structure oscillation through a phase-lock-loop is used as the master clock to produce all signals needed for signal processing and amplitude control. Thus, the micromachine serves as both a rotation sensor and a frequency reference. Final versions fabricated by Sandia National Laboratory were fully integrated and therefore required only passive components and electrical sources off-chip. Without electrostatic tuning, dual-axis rate gyroscopes achieved 0.1sp/sec/sqrt{Hz} noise level. This provided automotive grade performance of approximately 1sp/sec noise floor over a 100 Hz bandwidth. Electrical tuning decreased noise to below 0.02sp/sec/sqrt{Hz}. However, open-loop operation with nearly matched sense and drive modes can result in higher cross-axis sensitivity, scale factor drift, and phase errors. Closed-loop feedback methods which alleviate these problems as well as reduce offset drift due to quadrature error are presented as future directions.

  7. Quantum filtering for multiple input multiple output systems driven by arbitrary zero-mean jointly Gaussian input fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdin, H. I.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we treat the quantum filtering problem for multiple input multiple output (MIMO) Markovian open quantum systems coupled to multiple boson fields in an arbitrary zero-mean jointly Gaussian state, using the reference probability approach formulated by Bouten and van Handel as a quantum version of a well-known method of the same name from classical nonlinear filtering theory, and exploiting the generalized Araki-Woods representation of Gough. This includes Gaussian field states such as vacuum, squeezed vacuum, thermal, and squeezed thermal states as special cases. The contribution is a derivation of the general quantum filtering equation (or stochastic master equation as they are known in the quantum optics community) in the full MIMO setup for any zero-mean jointly Gaussian input field states, up to some mild rank assumptions on certain matrices relating to the measurement vector.

  8. Kernel principal component analysis for stochastic input model generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiang; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} KPCA is used to construct a reduced order stochastic model of permeability. {yields} A new approach is proposed to solve the pre-image problem in KPCA. {yields} Polynomial chaos is used to provide a parametric stochastic input model. {yields} Flow in porous media with channelized permeability is considered. - Abstract: Stochastic analysis of random heterogeneous media provides useful information only if realistic input models of the material property variations are used. These input models are often constructed from a set of experimental samples of the underlying random field. To this end, the Karhunen-Loeve (K-L) expansion, also known as principal component analysis (PCA), is the most popular model reduction method due to its uniform mean-square convergence. However, it only projects the samples onto an optimal linear subspace, which results in an unreasonable representation of the original data if they are non-linearly related to each other. In other words, it only preserves the first-order (mean) and second-order statistics (covariance) of a random field, which is insufficient for reproducing complex structures. This paper applies kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) to construct a reduced-order stochastic input model for the material property variation in heterogeneous media. KPCA can be considered as a nonlinear version of PCA. Through use of kernel functions, KPCA further enables the preservation of higher-order statistics of the random field, instead of just two-point statistics as in the standard Karhunen-Loeve (K-L) expansion. Thus, this method can model non-Gaussian, non-stationary random fields. In this work, we also propose a new approach to solve the pre-image problem involved in KPCA. In addition, polynomial chaos (PC) expansion is used to represent the random coefficients in KPCA which provides a parametric stochastic input model. Thus, realizations, which are statistically consistent with the experimental data, can be generated in an efficient way. We showcase the methodology by constructing a low-dimensional stochastic input model to represent channelized permeability in porous media.

  9. Adaptive input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    An input filter is frequently employed between a switching regulator and its power source. However, its presence often results in degradation of dynamic performances and stability. The detrimental interaction is between an input filter and a switching regulator and is a function of the input filter parameters and also of the supply voltage. An earlier paper presented an analysis and design procedure aimed at developing a feed-forward loop to cancel this undesirable interaction. The feed-forward design is extended here to encompass a scheme that automatically accounts for changes in the supply voltage; the result is an adaptive compensation that tracks the input voltage variations. Experimental results are presented that confirm the adaptive nature of the design.

  10. Lattice QCD input for axion cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Evan; Buchoff, Michael I.; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    One intriguing beyond-the-Standard-Model particle is the QCD axion, which could simultaneously provide a solution to the Strong C P Problem and account for some, if not all, of the dark matter density in the Universe. This particle is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of the conjectured Peccei-Quinn symmetry of the Standard Model. Its mass and interactions are suppressed by a heavy symmetry-breaking scale, fa, the value of which is roughly greater than 109 GeV (or, conversely, the axion mass, ma, is roughly less than 104 ? eV ). The density of axions in the Universe, which cannot exceed the relic dark matter density and is a quantity of great interest in axion experiments like ADMX, is a result of the early Universe interplay between cosmological evolution and the axion mass as a function of temperature. The latter quantity is proportional to the second derivative of the temperature-dependent QCD free energy with respect to the C P -violating phase, ? . However, this quantity is generically nonperturbative, and previous calculations have only employed instanton models at the high temperatures of interest (roughly 1 GeV). In this and future works, we aim to calculate the temperature-dependent axion mass at small ? from first-principle lattice calculations, with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Once calculated, this temperature-dependent axion mass is input for the classical evolution equations of the axion density of the Universe, which is required to be less than or equal to the dark matter density. Due to a variety of lattice systematic effects at the very high temperatures required, we perform a calculation of the leading small-? cumulant of the theta vacua on large volume lattices for SU(3) Yang-Mills with high statistics as a first proof of concept, before attempting a full QCD calculation in the future. From these pure glue results, the misalignment mechanism yields the axion mass bound ma?(14.6 0.1 ) ? eV when Peccei-Quinn breaking occurs after inflation.

  11. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool ADIFOR to the grid generation program. The output of ADIFOR is a new source code containing the old code plus expressions for derivatives of specified dependent variables (grid coordinates) with respect to specified independent variables (design parameters). The RAPID methodology and software provide a means of rapidly defining numerical prototypes, grids, and grid sensitivity of a class of airplane configurations. This technology and software is highly useful for CFD research for preliminary design and optimization processes.

  12. Hydrologic modeling with uncertain input parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, M.; Cerdan, O.; Ern, A.; Le Matre, O.; Sochala, P.

    2012-04-01

    Erosion risk is recognized as a major threat whose consequences affect urbanized and agricultural areas. Recent assessments of the predictive abilities of erosion models show the difficulty to correctly predict the spatial patterns of erosion and deposition. This is due to the high sensibility of the model to input parameters that contain large spatial and temporal variability. Many studies concluded that model outputs are very sensitive to input hydrological parameters, especially to the saturated hydraulic conductivity. Here, we use an erosion model coupling the Shallow Water equations with the Hairsine-Rose soil erosion which can integrate different sediment size classes. As the scale of modeling is different from the scale of observed or measured data, we use a stochastic distribution of relevant input parameters to represent the micro-scale. A first part of the study concerns the rainfall/runoff model in which the saturated hydraulic conductivity is considered as an uncertain input parameter. A second part is dedicated to the influence of soil parameters in the erosion model. For each part, we evaluate how uncertainties on the inputs impact the surface runoff or the erosion model outputs during various types of rainfall events. We test different stochastic tools to quantify the propagation of uncertainties (Monte Carlo method, Karhunen-Love expansion) and we use numerical test cases representing fields or hillslope to assess the methodology in the context of runoff and soil erosion modeling. Simulation results allow us to know where effort should be concentrated when collecting input parameters and limit output error.

  13. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A novel input filter compensation scheme for a buck regulator that eliminates the interaction between the input filter output impedance and the regulator control loop is presented. The scheme is implemented using a feedforward loop that senses the input filter state variables and uses this information to modulate the duty cycle signal. The feedforward design process presented is seen to be straightforward and the feedforward easy to implement. Extensive experimental data supported by analytical results show that significant performance improvement is achieved with the use of feedforward in the following performance categories: loop stability, audiosusceptibility, output impedance and transient response. The use of feedforward results in isolating the switching regulator from its power source thus eliminating all interaction between the regulator and equipment upstream. In addition the use of feedforward removes some of the input filter design constraints and makes the input filter design process simpler thus making it possible to optimize the input filter. The concept of feedforward compensation can also be extended to other types of switching regulators.

  14. A new synthesis for terrestrial nitrogen inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Morford, S. L.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) inputs sustain many different aspects of local soil processes, their services, and their interactions with the broader Earth system. We present a new synthesis for terrestrial N inputs that explicitly considers both rock and atmospheric sources of N. We review evidence for state-factor regulation over biological fixation, deposition, and rock-weathering inputs from local to global scales and in transient vs. steady-state landscapes. Our investigation highlights strong organism and topographic (relief) controls over all three N input pathways, with the anthropogenic factor clearly important in rising N deposition rates. In addition, the climate, parent material, and time factors are shown to influence patterns of fixation and rock-weathering inputs of N in diverse soil systems. Data reanalysis suggests that weathering of N-rich parent material could resolve several known cases of "missing N inputs" in ecosystems, and demonstrates how the inclusion of rock N sources into modern concepts can lead to a richer understanding of spatial and temporal patterns of ecosystem N availability. For example, explicit consideration of rock N inputs into classic pedogenic models (e.g., the Walker and Syers model) yields a fundamentally different expectation from the standard case: weathering of N-rich parent material could enhance N availability and facilitate terrestrial succession in developmentally young sites even in the absence of N-fixing organisms. We conclude that a state-factor framework for N complements our growing understanding multiple-source controls on phosphorus and cation availability in Earth's soil, but with significant exceptions given the lack of an N fixation analogue in all other biogeochemical cycles. Rather, non-symmetrical feedbacks among input pathways in which high N inputs via deposition or rock-weathering sources have the potential to reduce biological fixation rates mark N as fundamentally different from other nutrients. The new synthesis for terrestrial N inputs provides a novel set of research issues and opportunities in the multidisciplinary Earth system sciences, with implications for patterns of N limitation, tectonic controls over biogeochemical cycling, and carbon-nutrient-climate interactions.

  15. Measuring input synchrony in the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck neuronal model through input parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Koutsou, Achilleas; Kanev, Jacob; Christodoulou, Chris

    2013-11-01

    We present a method of estimating the input parameters and through them, the input synchrony, of a stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process when it is driven by time-dependent sinusoidal input signal and noise. By driving the neuron using sinusoidal inputs, we simulate the effects of periodic synchrony on the membrane voltage and the firing of the neuron, where the peaks of the sine wave represent volleys of synchronised input spikes. Our estimation methods allow us to measure the degree of synchrony driving the neuron in terms of the input sine wave parameters, using the output spikes of the model and the membrane potential. In particular, by estimating the frequency of the synchronous input volleys and averaging the estimates of the level of input activity at corresponding intervals of the input signal, we obtain fairly accurate estimates of the baseline and peak activity of the input, which in turn define the degrees of synchrony. The same procedure is also successfully applied in estimating the baseline and peak activity of the noise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012. PMID:23684712

  16. Revisiting hydrocarbons source appraisal in sediments exposed to multiple inputs.

    PubMed

    Massone, Carlos G; Wagener, Angela de L R; de Abreu, Henrique Monteiro; Veiga, lvaro

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this work was to test the efficiency of statistical methods as compared to the traditional diagnostic ratios to improve hydrocarbon source identification in sediments subjected to multiple inputs. Hydrocarbon determination in Guanabara Bay sediments pointed out high degradation and ubiquitous petrogenic pollution through the presence of high unresolved complex mixture. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) ratios suggested pervasive contamination derived from combustion in all sediments and failed discriminating samples despite the specificity of sources in different sampling sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) effectively distinguished the petrogenic imprint superimposed to the ubiquitous combustion contamination, since this technique reduces the influence of PAHs distribution which is common to all samples. PCA associated to multivariate linear regression (MLR) allowed a quantitative assessment of sources confirming predominance of the pervasive contaminant component superimposed to a generalized petrogenic imprint. The pervasive component derives from combustion contributions as well as from differential PAHs degradation. PMID:23806671

  17. Synthesis of novel pyrano[3,2-f]quinoline, phenanthroline derivatives and studies of their interactions with proteins: an application in mammalian cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, K C; Ponra, Sudipta; Ghosh, Tapas; Sadhukhan, Ratan; Ghosh, Utpal

    2014-01-01

    A series of tri-cyclic pyrano[3,2-f]quinoline and phenanthroline derivatives have been synthesized by a HCl-mediated 6-'endo-trig' Michael type ring closure reaction of 6-amino-5-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbut-1-ynyl)-2H-chromen-2-one in excellent yields. The process is very simple, facile and inexpensive and can provide a diverse range of substituted quinoline derivatives from simple and easily available starting materials. Moreover, the synthesized derivatives exhibit staining property to the cultured HeLa cells after fixing and can be used as fluorophores which can bind with protein molecule. PMID:24321834

  18. High dynamic range image acquisition using multiple images with different apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Tae Jang; Park, In Kyu

    2012-12-01

    The authors propose a method to obtain a high dynamic range (HDR) image from multiple images with different exposure. Unlike conventional methods that use multiple images with different shutter speeds, the proposed method takes multiple images with identical and short shutter speeds but with different apertures. Consequently, the input low dynamic range image is less affected by scene change, while it has undesirable defocus blur due to different depth of field. In order to mitigate defocus blur of input images with larger apertures, we estimate the defocus map of each input image and use it as the spatially variant point spread function to deblur the image. Then, we extract the weight maps of input images, which are used to combine them to synthesize an HDR image. Our experimental results show that the proposed algorithm produces high-quality HDR images using a small number (typically three) of input images.

  19. Cloud droplet deposition in subalpine balsam fir forests: hydrological and chemical inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, G.M.; Reiners, W.A.; Olson, R.K.

    1982-12-24

    Subalpine forests of the northern Appalachians are subject to significant desposition of water and chemicals via cloud droplet impaction. This deposition has been estimated by a method linking micrometeorological measures of turbulent transfer, a detailed representation of canopy structure, and experimentally derived capture efficiencies. Water inputs from clouds are about 46 percent, and chemical inputs range from 150 t 430 percent of the bulk precipitation.

  20. Subjective-probability-based scenarios for uncertain input parameters: Stratospheric ozone depletion, December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Hammitt, J.K.

    1990-12-01

    The paper presents and applies a method to choose sets of input conditions (scenarios) that efficiently represent knowledge about the joint probability distribution of inputs. A simple score function approximately relating inputs to a policy-relevant output--in this case, globally averaged stratospheric ozone depletion--is developed. The probability density function for the score-function value is analytically derived from a subjective joint probability density for the inputs. Scenarios are defined by selected quantiles of the score function. Using this method, scenarios can be systematically selected in terms of the approximate probability distribution function for the output of concern, and probability intervals for the joint effect of the inputs can be readily constructed.

  1. Six axis force feedback input device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, Timothy (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a low friction, low inertia, six-axis force feedback input device comprising an arm with double-jointed, tendon-driven revolute joints, a decoupled tendon-driven wrist, and a base with encoders and motors. The input device functions as a master robot manipulator of a microsurgical teleoperated robot system including a slave robot manipulator coupled to an amplifier chassis, which is coupled to a control chassis, which is coupled to a workstation with a graphical user interface. The amplifier chassis is coupled to the motors of the master robot manipulator and the control chassis is coupled to the encoders of the master robot manipulator. A force feedback can be applied to the input device and can be generated from the slave robot to enable a user to operate the slave robot via the input device without physically viewing the slave robot. Also, the force feedback can be generated from the workstation to represent fictitious forces to constrain the input device's control of the slave robot to be within imaginary predetermined boundaries.

  2. An image-processing approach to dotplots: an X-Window-based program for interactive analysis of dotplots derived from sequence and structural data.

    PubMed

    Trelles-Salazar, O; Zapata, E L; Dopazo, J; Coulson, A F; Carazo, J M

    1995-06-01

    We present an approach to the study of the relationships between biological sequences and structures applying image analysis methods to dotplots. We introduce a set of analytical tools based on different types of digital image-processing filters that are new within the context of dotplots. We have reformulated some of the usual approaches in dotplot analysis as mathematical operations on images within the framework of mathematical morphology. An X-Window-based implementation of this new approach has been developed and is available by anonymous FTP. PMID:7583699

  3. A new unit cell design with automatic input stage selection capability for increased SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, Melik; Kayahan, Huseyin; Ceylan, Omer; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents novel unit cell architecture for short wave infrared (SWIR) imaging applications. It has two input stages which are CTIA and SFD covering for both respectively low and high light levels and automatic input stage selection circuitry that chooses best input stage. A user can select 2 modes for FPA manual and automatic mode. In manual mode, user can set CTIA or SFD for all pixels according to user needs. In automatic mode, each pixel selects input stage itself according to light level. Automatic input stage selection for each pixel brings high SNR level and low noise along with highest possible dynamic range. Standard CMOS 0.18m TSMC technology is used to realize unit cell. In the architecture of unit cell, circuit level techniques are used to optimize layout size.

  4. Preliminary structural analysis of Shuttle payloads using a base drive method with synthetic inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. A. R., Jr.; Mushung, L. J.; Jacobson, C. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A transient base drive (TBD) analytical method for the support of the preliminary design analysis of Space Shuttle payloads, which could potentially reduce the cost of the payload structural analysis, is derscribed. The validity of TBD predictions depends on the ability to provide accurate synthetic base inputs. Acceleration inputs with a frequency content and magnitude which are not associated with a specific configuration or condition were synthesized. The use of frequency envelopes in the derivation of synthetic inputs can provide appropriate predictions independent of the payload modal frequencies.

  5. Temporal precision of spike response to fluctuating input in pulse-coupled networks of oscillating neurons.

    PubMed

    Teramae, Jun-nosuke; Fukai, Tomoki

    2008-12-12

    A single neuron is known to generate almost identical spike trains when the same fluctuating input is repeatedly applied. Here, we study the reliability of spike firing in a pulse-coupled network of oscillator neurons receiving fluctuating inputs. We can study the precise responses of the network as synchronization between uncoupled copies of the network by a common noisy input. To study the noise-induced synchronization between networks, we derive a self-consistent equation for the distribution of spike-time differences between the networks. Solving this equation, we elucidate how the spike precision changes as a function of the coupling strength. PMID:19113676

  6. An ICF Mix Model with Experimental Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glimm, James; Cheng, Baolian; Wilson, Douglas; Sharp, David; Lim, Hyunkyung; Melvin, Jeremy; Rana, Verinder

    2013-10-01

    A buoyancy drag type mix model is adapted to the study of mix in the deceleration phase of an ICF capsule. The time dependent Atwood number and acceleration are essential inputs to the model. A range of values for these parameters reflecting experimental data and 1D simulations are studied. The simulations are based on HYDRA, FLASH and the Stony Brook code FronTier. Physical quantities from HYDRA at deceleration time provide inputs to the other simulations. Time dependent density profiles and accelerations taken from HYDRA simulations suggest only a minor level of mix for the deceleration phase. Results from FLASH and FronTier simulations with modified input and having an Atwood number closer to experiment at the time of maximum neutron production, suggest a significant level of mixing.

  7. Visceral Sensory Inputs to the Endocrine Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Rinaman, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Interoceptive feedback signals from the body are transmitted to hypothalamic neurons that control pituitary hormone release. This review article describes the organization of central neural pathways that convey ascending visceral sensory signals to endocrine neurons in the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) of the hypothalamus in rats. A special emphasis is placed on viscerosensory inputs to corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)-containing PVN neurons that drive the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and on inputs to magnocellular PVN and SON neurons that release vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OT) from the posterior pituitary. The postnatal development of these ascending pathways also is considered. PMID:17391741

  8. Initial evaluation of virtual un-enhanced imaging derived from fast kVp-switching dual energy contrast enhanced CT for the abdomen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, M.; Mendonca, P.; Okerlund, D.; Lamb, P.; Kulkarni, N.; Pinho, D.; Sahani, D.; Bhotika, R.

    2011-03-01

    The feasibility and utility of creating virtual un-enhanced images from contrast enhanced data acquired using a fast switching dual energy CT acquisition, is explored. Utilizing projection based material decomposition data, monochromatic images are generated and a Multi-material decomposition technique is applied. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation is performed to assess the equivalence of Virtual Un-Enhanced (VUE) and True Un-enhanced (TUE) for multiple tissue types and different organs in the abdomen. Ten patient cases were analyzed where a TUE and a subsequent Contrast Enhanced (CE) acquisition were obtained using fast kVp-switching dual energy CT utilizing Gemstone Spectral Imaging. Quantitative measurements were made by placing multiple Regions of Interest on the different tissues and organs in both the TUE and the VUE images. The absolute Hounsfield Unit (HU) differences in the mean values between TUE & VUE were calculated as well as the differences of the standard deviations. Qualitative analysis was done by two radiologists for overall image quality, presence of residual contrast, appearance of pathology, appearance and contrast of normal tissues and organs in comparison to the TUE. There is a very strong correlation between the TUE and VUE images.