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Sample records for image derived input

  1. Quantitative Amyloid Imaging Using Image-Derived Arterial Input Function

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Aldea, Patricia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid PET imaging is an indispensable tool widely used in the investigation, diagnosis and monitoring of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Currently, a reference region based approach is used as the mainstream quantification technique for amyloid imaging. This approach assumes the reference region is amyloid free and has the same tracer influx and washout kinetics as the regions of interest. However, this assumption may not always be valid. The goal of this work is to evaluate an amyloid imaging quantification technique that uses arterial region of interest as the reference to avoid potential bias caused by specific binding in the reference region. 21 participants, age 58 and up, underwent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging and MR imaging including a time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) scan and a structural scan. FreeSurfer based regional analysis was performed to quantify PiB PET data. Arterial input function was estimated based on coregistered TOF MRA using a modeling based technique. Regional distribution volume (VT) was calculated using Logan graphical analysis with estimated arterial input function. Kinetic modeling was also performed using the estimated arterial input function as a way to evaluate PiB binding (DVRkinetic) without a reference region. As a comparison, Logan graphical analysis was also performed with cerebellar cortex as reference to obtain DVRREF. Excellent agreement was observed between the two distribution volume ratio measurements (r>0.89, ICC>0.80). The estimated cerebellum VT was in line with literature reported values and the variability of cerebellum VT in the control group was comparable to reported variability using arterial sampling data. This study suggests that image-based arterial input function is a viable approach to quantify amyloid imaging data, without the need of arterial sampling or a reference region. This technique can be a valuable tool for amyloid imaging, particularly in population where reference normalization may not be accurate. PMID:25849581

  2. Image-Derived Input Function for Human Brain Using High Resolution PET Imaging with [11

    E-print Network

    Pike, Victor W.

    ](R)-rolipram and [11 C]PBR28 Paolo Zanotti-Fregonara1 *, Jeih-San Liow1 , Masahiro Fujita1 , Elodie Dusch2 , Sami S of the methods required arterial blood samples to scale the image-input, and four were blood-free methods-S, Fujita M, Dusch E, Zoghbi SS, et al. (2011) Image-Derived Input Function for Human Brain Using High

  3. Image-derived input function obtained in a 3TMR-brainPET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, N. A.; Herzog, H.; Weirich, C.; Tellmann, L.; Rota Kops, E.; Hautzel, H.; Almeida, P.

    2013-02-01

    Aim: The combination of a high-resolution MR-compatible BrainPET insert operated within a 3 T MAGNETOM Trio MR scanner is an excellent tool for obtaining an image derived input function (IDIF), due to simultaneous imaging. In this work, we explore the possibility of obtaining an IDIF from volumes of interest (VOI) defined over the carotid arteries (CAs) using the MR data. Material and methods: FDG data from three patients without brain disorders were included. VOIs were drawn bilaterally over the CAs on a MPRAGE image using a 50% isocontour (MR50VOI). CA PET/MR co-registration was examined based on an individual and combined CA co-registration. After that, to estimate the IDIF, the MR50VOI average (IDIF-A), four hottest pixels per plane (IDIF-4H) and four hottest pixels in VOI (IDIF-4V) were considered. A model-based correction for residual partial volume effects involving venous blood samples was applied, from which partial volume (PV) and spillover (SP) coefficients were estimated. Additionally, a theoretical PV coefficient (PVt) was calculated based on MR50VOI. Results: The results show an excellent co-registration between the MR and PET, with an area under the curve ratio between both co-registration methods of 1.00±0.04. A good agreement between PV and PVt was found for IDIF-A, with PV of 0.39±0.06 and PVt 0.40±0.03, and for IDIF-4H, with PV of 0.47±0.05 and PVt 0.47±0.03. The SPs were 0.20±0.03 and 0.21±0.03 for IDIF-A and IDIF-4H, respectively. Conclusion: The integration of a high resolution BrainPET in an MR scanner allows to obtain an IDIF from an MR-based VOI. This must be corrected for a residual partial volume effect.

  4. Combining MRI with PET for partial volume correction improves image-derived input functions in mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Eleanor; Buonincontri, Guido; Izquierdo, David; Methner, Carmen; Hawkes, Rob C.; Ansorge, Richard E.; Krieg, Thomas; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate kinetic modelling using dynamic PET requires knowledge of the tracer concentration in plasma, known as the arterial input function (AIF). AIFs are usually determined by invasive blood sampling, but this is prohibitive in murine studies due to low total blood volumes. As a result of the low spatial resolution of PET, image-derived input functions (IDIFs) must be extracted from left ventricular blood pool (LVBP) ROIs of the mouse heart. This is challenging because of partial volume and spillover effects between the LVBP and myocardium, contaminating IDIFs with tissue signal. We have applied the geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method of partial volume correction (PVC) to 12 mice injected with 18F-FDG affected by a Myocardial Infarction (MI), of which 6 were treated with a drug which reduced infarction size [1]. We utilised high resolution MRI to assist in segmenting mouse hearts into 5 classes: LVBP, infarcted myocardium, healthy myocardium, lungs/body and background. The signal contribution from these 5 classes was convolved with the point spread function (PSF) of the Cambridge split magnet PET scanner and a non-linear fit was performed on the 5 measured signal components. The corrected IDIF was taken as the fitted LVBP component. It was found that the GTM PVC method could recover an IDIF with less contamination from spillover than an IDIF extracted from PET data alone. More realistic values of Ki were achieved using GTM IDIFs, which were shown to be significantly different (p<0.05) between the treated and untreated groups. PMID:26213413

  5. Noninvasive image derived heart input function for CMRglc measurements in small animal slow infusion FDG PET studies.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guoming; Paul, Cumming; Todica, Andrei; Hacker, Marcus; Bartenstein, Peter; Böning, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Absolute quantitation of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) can be obtained in positron emission tomography (PET) studies when serial measurements of the arterial [(18)F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) input are available. Since this is not always practical in PET studies of rodents, there has been considerable interest in defining an image-derived input function (IDIF) by placing a volume of interest (VOI) within the left ventricle of the heart. However, spill-in arising from trapping of FDG in the myocardium often leads to progressive contamination of the IDIF, which propagates to underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc. We therefore developed a novel, non-invasive method for correcting the IDIF without scaling to a blood sample. To this end, we first obtained serial arterial samples and dynamic FDG-PET data of the head and heart in a group of eight anaesthetized rats. We fitted a bi-exponential function to the serial measurements of the IDIF, and then used the linear graphical Gjedde-Patlak method to describe the accumulation in myocardium. We next estimated the magnitude of myocardial spill-in reaching the left ventricle VOI by assuming a Gaussian point-spread function, and corrected the measured IDIF for this estimated spill-in. Finally, we calculated parametric maps of CMRglc using the corrected IDIF, and for the sake of comparison, relative to serial blood sampling from the femoral artery. The uncorrected IDIF resulted in 20% underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc relative to the gold standard arterial input method. However, there was no bias with the corrected IDIF, which was robust to the variable extent of myocardial tracer uptake, such that there was a very high correlation between individual CMRglc measurements using the corrected IDIF with gold-standard arterial input results. Based on simulation, we furthermore find that electrocardiogram-gating, i.e. ECG-gating is not necessary for IDIF quantitation using our approach. PMID:23160517

  6. Noninvasive image derived heart input function for CMRglc measurements in small animal slow infusion FDG PET studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Guoming; Cumming, Paul; Todica, Andrei; Hacker, Marcus; Bartenstein, Peter; Böning, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Absolute quantitation of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) can be obtained in positron emission tomography (PET) studies when serial measurements of the arterial [18F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) input are available. Since this is not always practical in PET studies of rodents, there has been considerable interest in defining an image-derived input function (IDIF) by placing a volume of interest (VOI) within the left ventricle of the heart. However, spill-in arising from trapping of FDG in the myocardium often leads to progressive contamination of the IDIF, which propagates to underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc. We therefore developed a novel, non-invasive method for correcting the IDIF without scaling to a blood sample. To this end, we first obtained serial arterial samples and dynamic FDG-PET data of the head and heart in a group of eight anaesthetized rats. We fitted a bi-exponential function to the serial measurements of the IDIF, and then used the linear graphical Gjedde-Patlak method to describe the accumulation in myocardium. We next estimated the magnitude of myocardial spill-in reaching the left ventricle VOI by assuming a Gaussian point-spread function, and corrected the measured IDIF for this estimated spill-in. Finally, we calculated parametric maps of CMRglc using the corrected IDIF, and for the sake of comparison, relative to serial blood sampling from the femoral artery. The uncorrected IDIF resulted in 20% underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc relative to the gold standard arterial input method. However, there was no bias with the corrected IDIF, which was robust to the variable extent of myocardial tracer uptake, such that there was a very high correlation between individual CMRglc measurements using the corrected IDIF with gold-standard arterial input results. Based on simulation, we furthermore find that electrocardiogram-gating, i.e. ECG-gating is not necessary for IDIF quantitation using our approach.

  7. Cerebral blood flow with [15O]water PET studies using an image-derived input function and MR-defined carotid centerlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Edward K.; Carson, Richard E.

    2013-03-01

    Full quantitative analysis of brain PET data requires knowledge of the arterial input function into the brain. Such data are normally acquired by arterial sampling with corrections for delay and dispersion to account for the distant sampling site. Several attempts have been made to extract an image-derived input function (IDIF) directly from the internal carotid arteries that supply the brain and are often visible in brain PET images. We have devised a method of delineating the internal carotids in co-registered magnetic resonance (MR) images using the level-set method and applying the segmentations to PET images using a novel centerline approach. Centerlines of the segmented carotids were modeled as cubic splines and re-registered in PET images summed over the early portion of the scan. Using information from the anatomical center of the vessel should minimize partial volume and spillover effects. Centerline time-activity curves were taken as the mean of the values for points along the centerline interpolated from neighboring voxels. A scale factor correction was derived from calculation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using gold standard arterial blood measurements. We have applied the method to human subject data from multiple injections of [15O]water on the HRRT. The method was assessed by calculating the area under the curve (AUC) of the IDIF and the CBF, and comparing these to values computed using the gold standard arterial input curve. The average ratio of IDIF to arterial AUC (apparent recovery coefficient: aRC) across 9 subjects with multiple (n = 69) injections was 0.49 ± 0.09 at 0-30 s post tracer arrival, 0.45 ± 0.09 at 30-60 s, and 0.46 ± 0.09 at 60-90 s. Gray and white matter CBF values were 61.4 ± 11.0 and 15.6 ± 3.0 mL/min/100 g tissue using sampled blood data. Using IDIF centerlines scaled by the average aRC over each subjects’ injections, gray and white matter CBF values were 61.3 ± 13.5 and 15.5 ± 3.4 mL/min/100 g tissue. Using global average aRC values, the means were unchanged, and intersubject variability was noticeably reduced. This MR-based centerline method with local re-registration to [15O]water PET yields a consistent IDIF over multiple injections in the same subject, thus permitting the absolute quantification of CBF without arterial input function measurements.

  8. Image Derived Input Function for [18F]-FEPPA: Application to Quantify Translocator Protein (18 kDa) in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Rostom; Rusjan, Pablo M.; Mizrahi, Romina; Jacobs, Mark F.; Koshimori, Yuko; Houle, Sylvain; Ko, Ji Hyun; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2014-01-01

    In [18F]-FEPPA positron emission topography (PET) imaging, automatic blood sampling system (ABSS) is currently the gold standard to obtain the blood time activity curve (TAC) required to extract the input function (IF). Here, we compare the performance of two image-based methods of IF extraction to the ABSS gold standard method for the quantification of translocator protein (TSPO) in the human brain. The IFs were obtained from a direct delineation of the internal carotid signal (CS) and a new concept of independent component analysis (ICA). PET scans were obtained from 18 healthy volunteers. The estimated total distribution volume (VT) by CS-IF and ICA-IF were compared to the reference VT obtained by ABSS-IF in the frontal and temporal cortex, cerebellum, striatum and thalamus regions. The VT values estimated using ICA-IF were more reliable than CS-IF for all brain regions. Specifically, the slope regression in the frontal cortex with ICA-IF was r2?=?0.91 (p<0.05), and r2?=?0.71 (p<0.05) using CS-IF. PMID:25549260

  9. Input design for identification of aircraft stability and control derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, N. K.; Hall, W. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for designing inputs to identify stability and control derivatives from flight test data is presented. This approach is based on finding inputs which provide the maximum possible accuracy of derivative estimates. Two techniques of input specification are implemented for this objective - a time domain technique and a frequency domain technique. The time domain technique gives the control input time history and can be used for any allowable duration of test maneuver, including those where data lengths can only be of short duration. The frequency domain technique specifies the input frequency spectrum, and is best applied for tests where extended data lengths, much longer than the time constants of the modes of interest, are possible. These technqiues are used to design inputs to identify parameters in longitudinal and lateral linear models of conventional aircraft. The constraints of aircraft response limits, such as on structural loads, are realized indirectly through a total energy constraint on the input. Tests with simulated data and theoretical predictions show that the new approaches give input signals which can provide more accurate parameter estimates than can conventional inputs of the same total energy. Results obtained indicate that the approach has been brought to the point where it should be used on flight tests for further evaluation.

  10. Optimal linear control systems with input derivative constraints

    E-print Network

    Moore, John Barratt

    . Optimal linear control systems with input derivative constraints J. B. Moore, Ph. D., and Prof. B, for a linear, finite-dimensional, dynamical system, the state feedback law derived from a quadratic of problems in which the feedback law is realised by a linear dynamical system. The quadratic loss function

  11. Position Estimation Using Image Derivative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortari, Daniele; deDilectis, Francesco; Zanetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an image processing algorithm to process Moon and/or Earth images. The theory presented is based on the fact that Moon hard edge points are characterized by the highest values of the image derivative. Outliers are eliminated by two sequential filters. Moon center and radius are then estimated by nonlinear least-squares using circular sigmoid functions. The proposed image processing has been applied and validated using real and synthetic Moon images.

  12. Deriving intrinsic images from image sequences Computer Science Division

    E-print Network

    Deriving intrinsic images from image sequences Yair Weiss Computer Science Division UC Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720-1776 yweiss@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract Intrinsic images are a useful midlevel description of scenes proposed by Barrow and Tenenbaum [1]. An image is de- composed into two images: a reflectance

  13. Deriving intrinsic images from image sequences Computer Science Division

    E-print Network

    McAuliffe, Jon

    Deriving intrinsic images from image sequences Yair Weiss Computer Science Division UC Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720­1776 yweiss@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract Intrinsic images are a useful midlevel description of scenes proposed by Barrow and Tenenbaum [1]. An image is de­ composed into two images: a reflectance

  14. Shelf-derived iron inputs drive biological productivity in the southern Drake Passage

    E-print Network

    focused on iron because of its role as an essential element for phytoplankton growth [Martin and FitzwaterShelf-derived iron inputs drive biological productivity in the southern Drake Passage H. Dulaiova,1 transport of shelf-derived components such as iron into high-nutrient offshore regions. To trace these shelf

  15. Approach for Input Uncertainty Propagation and Robust Design in CFD Using Sensitivity Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putko, Michele M.; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, Perry A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    2002-01-01

    An implementation of the approximate statistical moment method for uncertainty propagation and robust optimization for quasi 3-D Euler CFD code is presented. Given uncertainties in statistically independent, random, normally distributed input variables, first- and second-order statistical moment procedures are performed to approximate the uncertainty in the CFD output. Efficient calculation of both first- and second-order sensitivity derivatives is required. In order to assess the validity of the approximations, these moments are compared with statistical moments generated through Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainties in the CFD input variables are also incorporated into a robust optimization procedure. For this optimization, statistical moments involving first-order sensitivity derivatives appear in the objective function and system constraints. Second-order sensitivity derivatives are used in a gradient-based search to successfully execute a robust optimization. The approximate methods used throughout the analyses are found to be valid when considering robustness about input parameter mean values.

  16. Image tube. [deriving electron beam replica of image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, K. L.; Johnson, C. B. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    An optical image is projected onto a planar surface of a photocathode that derives an electron beam replica of the image. A target electrode displaced relative to the photocathode so that it does not obstruct the optical image includes a planar surface for receiving and deriving an accurate replica of the electron beam image. The two planar surfaces are parallel. The electron beam image is focused on the target electrode by providing throughout a region that extends between the planar surfaces of the photocathode and receiving electrode, constant homogeneous dc electric and magnetic fields. The electric field extends in a direction perpendicular to the planar surfaces while the magnetic field extends along a straight line that intersects the photocathode and target electrode at an acute angle.

  17. Fractional Fourier transform based image multiplexing and encryption technique for four-color images using input images as keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Madhusudan; Shakher, Chandra; Singh, Kehar

    2010-06-01

    A digital technique for multiplexing and encryption of four RGB images has been proposed using the fractional Fourier transform (FRT). The four input RGB images are first converted into their indexed image formats and subsequently multiplexed into a single image through elementary mathematical steps prior to the encryption. The encryption algorithm uses two random phase masks in the input- and the FRT domain, respectively. These random phase masks are especially designed using the input images. As the encryption is carried out through a single channel, the technique is more compact and faster as compared to the multichannel techniques. Different fractional orders, the random masks in input-, and FRT domain are the keys for decryption as well as de-multiplexing. The algorithms to implement the proposed multiplexing-, and encryption scheme are discussed, and results of digital simulation are presented. Simulation results show that the technique is free from cross-talk. The performance of the proposed technique has also been analyzed against occlusion, noise, and attacks using partial windows of the correct random phase keys. The robustness of the technique against known-, and chosen plain-text attacks has also been explained.

  18. Effects of Ground Motion Input on the Derived Fragility Functions: Case study of 2010 Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancilar, Ufuk; Harmandar, Ebru; Çakti, Eser

    2014-05-01

    Empirical fragility functions are derived by statistical processing of the data on: i) Damaged and undamaged buildings, and ii) Ground motion intensity values at the buildings' locations. This study investigates effects of different ground motion inputs on the derived fragility functions. The previously constructed fragility curves (Hancilar et al. 2013), which rely on specific shaking intensity maps published by the USGS after the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, are compared with the fragility functions computed in the present study. Building data come from field surveys of 6,347 buildings that are grouped with respect to structural material type and number of stories. For damage assessment, the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS-98) damage grades are adopted. The simplest way to account for the variability in ground motion input could have been achieved by employing different ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and their standard variations. However, in this work, we prefer to rely on stochastically simulated ground motions of the Haiti earthquake. We employ five different source models available in the literature and calculate the resulting strong ground motion in time domain. In our simulations we also consider the local site effects by published studies on NEHRP site classes and micro-zoning maps of the city of Port-au-Prince. We estimate the regional distributions from the waveforms simulated at the same coordinates that we have damage information from. The estimated spatial distributions of peak ground accelerations and velocities, PGA and PGV respectively, are then used as input to fragility computations. The results show that changing the ground motion input causes significant variability in the resulting fragility functions.

  19. LETHA: Learning from High Quality Inputs for 3D Pose Estimation in Low Quality Images

    E-print Network

    Moreno-Noguer, Francesc

    LETHA: Learning from High Quality Inputs for 3D Pose Estimation in Low Quality Images Adrian Penate quality training data, and combining them with discriminative machine learning to deal with low- quality image with the 3D model [13]. Machine learning approaches on the other hand, annotate training imagery

  20. Use of Ra isotopes to deduce rapid transfer of sediment-derived inputs off Kerguelen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanial, V.; van Beek, P.; Lansard, B.; Souhaut, M.; Kestenare, E.; d'Ovidio, F.; Zhou, M.; Blain, S.

    2014-09-01

    The Southern Ocean is known as the largest High-Nutrient, Low-Chlorophyll (HNLC) region of the global ocean due to iron limitation. However, a large phytoplankton bloom develops annually downstream of the Kerguelen Islands, which is sustained partly by iron released from the sediments deposited onto the margins. In the framework of the KEOPS-2 project, we used radium isotopes (224Ra, T1/2 = 3.66 d; 223Ra, T1/2 = 11.4 d; 228Ra, T1/2 = 5.75 yr) to provide information on the origin of iron fertilization and on the timescales of the transfer of sediment-derived inputs (including iron and other micronutrients) towards offshore waters. Significant 223Ra and 223Ra activities were found in the near vicinity of the Kerguelen Islands, in agreement with the short half-lives of these isotopes. Significant 224Ra and 223Ra activities were also detected up to 200 km downstream of the islands and more unexpectedly in offshore waters south of the Polar Front. These observations thus clearly indicate (i) that the sediment-derived inputs are rapidly transferred towards offshore waters (on timescales in the order of several days up to several weeks) and (ii) that the Polar Front is not a physical barrier for the chemical elements released from the sediments of Kerguelen Plateau. The Ra dataset suggests that iron and other micronutrients released by the shallow sediments of the Kerguelen margins may contribute to fuel the phytoplankton bloom downstream of the islands, despite the presence of the Polar Front. However, the heterogeneous distribution of the 224Ra and 223Ra activities in surface waters suggests that this supply across the front is not a continuous process, but rather a process that is highly variable in space and time.

  1. Use of Ra isotopes to deduce rapid transfer of sediment-derived inputs off Kerguelen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanial, V.; van Beek, P.; Lansard, B.; Souhaut, M.; Kestenare, E.; d'Ovidio, F.; Zhou, M.; Blain, S.

    2015-03-01

    The Southern Ocean is known to be the largest high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region of the global ocean due to iron limitation. However, a large phytoplankton bloom develops annually downstream of the Kerguelen Islands, a bloom which is sustained partly by iron released from the sediments deposited onto the shelves. In the framework of the KEOPS-2 project, we used radium isotopes (224Ra, T1/2 = 3.66 d; 223Ra, T1/2 = 11.4 d; 228Ra, T1/2 = 5.75 yr) to provide information on the origin of iron fertilization and on the timescales of the transfer of sediment-derived inputs (including iron and other micronutrients) towards offshore waters. Significant 224Ra and 223Ra activities were found in the near vicinity of the Kerguelen Islands, in agreement with the short half-lives of these isotopes. Significant 224Ra and 223Ra activities were also detected up to 200 km downstream of the islands and more unexpectedly in offshore waters south of the polar front. These observations thus clearly indicate (i) that the sediment-derived inputs are rapidly transferred towards offshore waters (on timescales on the order of several days up to several weeks) and (ii) that the polar front is not a physical barrier for the chemical elements released from the sediments of the Kerguelen Plateau. The Ra data set suggests that iron and other micronutrients released by the shelves of the Kerguelen Islands may contribute to fueling the phytoplankton bloom downstream of the islands, despite the presence of the polar front. However, the heterogeneous distribution of the 224Ra and 223Ra activities in surface waters suggests that this supply across the front is not a continuous process but rather a process that is highly variable in space and time.

  2. Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

    2014-08-01

    Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

  3. Ground Motion Simulations for Bursa Region (Turkey) Using Input Parameters derived from the Regional Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, B.; Askan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes are among the most destructive natural disasters in Turkey and it is important to assess seismicity in different regions with the use of seismic networks. Bursa is located in Marmara Region, Northwestern Turkey and to the south of the very active North Anatolian Fault Zone. With around three million inhabitants and key industrial facilities of the country, Bursa is the fourth largest city in Turkey. Since most of the focus is on North Anatolian Fault zone, despite its significant seismicity, Bursa area has not been investigated extensively until recently. For reliable seismic hazard estimations and seismic design of structures, assessment of potential ground motions in this region is essential using both recorded and simulated data. In this study, we employ stochastic finite-fault simulation with dynamic corner frequency approach to model previous events as well to assess potential earthquakes in Bursa. To ensure simulations with reliable synthetic ground motion outputs, the input parameters must be carefully derived from regional data. In this study, using strong motion data collected at 33 stations in the region, site-specific parameters such as near-surface high frequency attenuation parameter and amplifications are obtained. Similarly, source and path parameters are adopted from previous studies that as well employ regional data. Initially, major previous events in the region are verified by comparing the records with the corresponding synthetics. Then simulations of scenario events in the region are performed. We present the results in terms of spatial distribution of peak ground motion parameters and time histories at selected locations.

  4. Background Generation at Input Screens of X-Ray Image Intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Motohisa; Kimura, Yutaro

    1985-08-01

    The background luminance due to the input screen of an X-ray image intensifier (I. I.) was investigated quantitatively as a function of several parameters by means of contrast ratios. The contrast ratio of the input screen increases as the curvature of the screen, the transparency of the photoelectric surface or the reflectance at the inner surface of the electrodes decreases. By comparing measured contrast ratios of actual I. I.s, the contribution of the background luminance at the input screen to that of the I.I. was estimated. The contrast ratio of the input screen ranges from 40 to 200, while those of the ordinary I.I. and the ordinary output screen are 14 and 26 respectively.

  5. Deriving and matching image fingerprint sequences for mobile robot localization

    E-print Network

    Deriving and matching image fingerprint sequences for mobile robot localization Pierre Lamon1 identifiers, called fingerprint sequences, for visually distinct locations by recovering statistically significant features in panoramic color images. Fingerprint sequences are expressive enough for mobile robot

  6. Regional biomass and leaf-area estimates derived from satellite imagery as inputs to spatial trace-gas flux models for arctic tundra

    SciTech Connect

    Shippert, M.M.; Walker, D.A.; Auerbach, N.A.; Lewis, B.E. )

    1994-06-01

    Reflectance spectra, leaf area index (LAI), and live biomass measurements were collected for 60 plots near Toolik Lake and Imnavait Creek, Alaska during July and August, 1993. Normalized difference vegetation indices (NDVI) were calculated from the reflectance spectra. NDVI was found to be highly correlated to both LAI and biomass. These relationships have been seen in temperate ecosystems, but have never been tested in Arctic tundra previous to this study. In addition, a clear relationship is seen between NDVI values and pH and moisture. Acidic plots have much higher NDVI values than non-acidic plots, while moist plots have high NDVI values relative to dry and wet plots. The average field NDVI measurements for major physiognomic categories were compared to average NDVI values for the same categories derived from a SPOT multispectral satellite image of the area. These values were also found to be highly correlated. However, field NDVI values were consistently about 40% higher than SPOT NDVI values. Possible explanations for this consistent trend include effects of low sun angle in the Arctic in combination with relatively high view angle of the SPOT sensor. Using the regression equations for the above relationships, biomass and LAI images were calculated from the SPOT image. The resulting images show expected trends in the LAI and biomass across the landscape. The image of biomass will be used as an input to a spatial model of methane emissions for the Alaskan Arctic. Another key input variable to the methane model will be soil moisture. Alternative image processing methods and/or radar images will be used to derive this important variable.

  7. Image processing software for providing radiometric inputs to land surface climatology models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Goetz, Scott J.; Strebel, Donald E.; Hall, Forrest G.

    1989-01-01

    During the First International Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), 80 gigabytes of image data were generated from a variety of satellite and airborne sensors in a multidisciplinary attempt to study energy and mass exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere. To make these data readily available to researchers with a range of image data handling experience and capabilities, unique image-processing software was designed to perform a variety of nonstandard image-processing manipulations and to derive a set of standard-format image products. The nonconventional features of the software include: (1) adding new layers of geographic coordinates, and solar and viewing conditions to existing data; (2) providing image polygon extraction and calibration of data to at-sensor radiances; and, (3) generating standard-format derived image products that can be easily incorporated into radiometric or climatology models. The derived image products consist of easily handled ASCII descriptor files, byte image data files, and additional per-pixel integer data files (e.g., geographic coordinates, and sun and viewing conditions). Details of the solutions to the image-processing problems, the conventions adopted for handling a variety of satellite and aircraft image data, and the applicability of the output products to quantitative modeling are presented. They should be of general interest to future experiment and data-handling design considerations.

  8. Java Library for Input and Output of Image Data and Metadata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert; Levoe, Steven

    2003-01-01

    A Java-language library supports input and output (I/O) of image data and metadata (label data) in the format of the Video Image Communication and Retrieval (VICAR) image-processing software and in several similar formats, including a subset of the Planetary Data System (PDS) image file format. The library does the following: It provides low-level, direct access layer, enabling an application subprogram to read and write specific image files, lines, or pixels, and manipulate metadata directly. Two coding/decoding subprograms ("codecs" for short) based on the Java Advanced Imaging (JAI) software provide access to VICAR and PDS images in a file-format-independent manner. The VICAR and PDS codecs enable any program that conforms to the specification of the JAI codec to use VICAR or PDS images automatically, without specific knowledge of the VICAR or PDS format. The library also includes Image I/O plugin subprograms for VICAR and PDS formats. Application programs that conform to the Image I/O specification of Java version 1.4 can utilize any image format for which such a plug-in subprogram exists, without specific knowledge of the format itself. Like the aforementioned codecs, the VICAR and PDS Image I/O plug-in subprograms support reading and writing of metadata.

  9. MRI-derived arterial input functions for PET kinetic modelling in rats

    E-print Network

    Evans, Eleanor; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Carpenter, T. Adrian

    2012-08-31

    as the arterial input function (AIF). As the gold standard method of blood sampling is inherently prohibitive in the small animal case, here we discuss how we prepare to rapidly sample MRI signals from gadolinium-doped tracer to obtain the tracer input functions...

  10. A GOES imager-derived microburst product

    E-print Network

    Pryor, Kenneth L

    2008-01-01

    A new multispectral Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager product has been developed to assess downburst potential over the western United States employing brightness temperature differences (BTD) between band 3 (upper level water vapor), band 4 (longwave infrared window), and split window band 5. Band 3 is intended to indicate mid to upper-level moisture content and advection while band 5 indicates low-level moisture content. Large BTDs between bands 3 and 5 imply a large relative humidity gradient between the mid-troposphere and the surface, a condition favorable for strong convective downdraft generation due to evaporational cooling of precipitation in the deep sub-cloud layer. In addition, small BTDs between bands 4 and 5 indicate a relatively dry surface layer with solar heating in progress. This paper will outline the development of the GOES-West imager microburst product and present case studies that feature example images, outline potential operational use and assess performa...

  11. Multifocus fusion is the process of fusing focal information from a set of input images into one all-in-

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    connectivity and fused by partition synthesis. The fused image has information from all focal planes, while a scene as if imaged through a lens with extremely narrow aperture, without the sensitivity issuesAbstract Multifocus fusion is the process of fusing focal information from a set of input images

  12. Improved factor analysis of dynamic PET images to estimate arterial input function and tissue curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Mitra, Debasis; Pan, Hui; Jagust, William; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-03-01

    Factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) is a methodology of extracting time-activity curves (TACs) for corresponding different tissue types from noisy dynamic images. The challenges of FADS include long computation time and sensitivity to the initial guess, resulting in convergence to local minima far from the true solution. We propose a method of accelerating and stabilizing FADS application to sequences of dynamic PET images by adding preliminary cluster analysis of the time activity curves for individual voxels. We treat the temporal variation of individual voxel concentrations as a set of time-series and use a partial clustering analysis to identify the types of voxel TACs that are most functionally distinct from each other. These TACs provide a good initial guess for the temporal factors for subsequent FADS processing. Applying this approach to a set of single slices of dynamic 11C-PIB images of the brain allows identification of the arterial input function and two different tissue TACs that are likely to correspond to the specific and non-specific tracer binding-tissue types. These results enable us to perform direct classification of tissues based on their pharmacokinetic properties in dynamic PET without relying on a compartment-based kinetic model, without identification of the reference region, or without using any external methods of estimating the arterial input function, as needed in some techniques.

  13. Light field creating and imaging with different order intensity derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Huan

    2014-10-01

    Microscopic image restoration and reconstruction is a challenging topic in the image processing and computer vision, which can be widely applied to life science, biology and medicine etc. A microscopic light field creating and three dimensional (3D) reconstruction method is proposed for transparent or partially transparent microscopic samples, which is based on the Taylor expansion theorem and polynomial fitting. Firstly the image stack of the specimen is divided into several groups in an overlapping or non-overlapping way along the optical axis, and the first image of every group is regarded as reference image. Then different order intensity derivatives are calculated using all the images of every group and polynomial fitting method based on the assumption that the structure of the specimen contained by the image stack in a small range along the optical axis are possessed of smooth and linear property. Subsequently, new images located any position from which to reference image the distance is ?z along the optical axis can be generated by means of Taylor expansion theorem and the calculated different order intensity derivatives. Finally, the microscopic specimen can be reconstructed in 3D form using deconvolution technology and all the images including both the observed images and the generated images. The experimental results show the effectiveness and feasibility of our method.

  14. Reducing input data via image categorization to improve the speed of copyright content management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Watanabe, Eriko

    2015-02-01

    An optical correlator has the advantage of high data transfer speed and parallel operation. However, in copyright content management systems (CCMSs), the numerous video files that need to be downloaded from the Internet and input to the optical correlator constitute a bottleneck. This paper proposes an image categorization method for CCMSs that uses the difference in the color features between animation and live-action images to remove this bottleneck and increase the speed of CCMSs. The results of experiments conducted indicate that the proposed method achieves a live-action video true rejection rate of 86.7 % and an animation video false rejection rate of 13.3 %. This indicates that the proposed method can improve the overall speed of a CCMS more than twice the original speed.

  15. Derivation of input function from FDG-PET studies in small hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsiao-Ming; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Allada, V.

    1996-10-01

    The extraction of pure arterial time-activity curves (TACs) from dynamic PET images of a small animal heart using factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) was found to be unsuccessful due to the small size of the cardiac chamber that causes extensive mixture of TACs of different structures. In this study, we used digital phantoms of the left ventricle (LV cavity size: 1-2 cm) and small monkey (LV cavity size: {approx} 2 cm) dynamic FDG PET studies to evaluate FADS for extracting the pure blood-pool TACs by adding a single blood sample (taken at a late scan time) constraint. In the digital phantom studies, spillover fractions in the extracted blood-pool TACs using FADS without a blood sample constraint (FADS(-)) and with a blood sample constraint (FADS(+)) were 3%-91% and < 3%, respectively. In the monkey studies (n = 4), FADS(+) extracted blood-pool TACs matched well with the arterialized well counter measurements (% differences of curve integration: FADS(-) < 82%; FADS(+) < 9%). The microparameters (K*{sub 1}, k*{sub 2}, k*{sub 3}, k*{sub 4}) and macroparameters (K{sub nlr}), obtained from the FADS(+) blood-pool TACs, were similar to those obtained from plasma samples in a three-compartment model fitting (% differences of K{sub nlr}: phantom studies < 5%; monkey studies < 9%). The FADS technique with a single-blood sample has the potential to extract the pure blood-pool TACs directly from dynamic PET images of a small animal without multiple blood sampling, region of interest definition or spillover correction. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Fig. 2. Results of the color segmentation. Evaluation of the initialization procedure. (a) Input image. (b) Color segmentation result Random initialization. (c) Color

    E-print Network

    Whelan, Paul F.

    -texture segmentation. #12;(a) (b) (c) Fig. 12. Segmentation results. (a) Input melanoma image. (b) Color segmentation. (c) Color-texture segmentation. #12;(a) (b) (c) Fig. 13. Segmentation results. (a) Input melanoma results. (a) Input melanoma image. (b) Color segmentation. (c) Color-texture segmentation. #12;(a) (b) (c

  17. An improved temperature index model for alpine glaciers using derived degree-day factors from climatic inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, D. G.; Havens, A. P.; Rupper, S.; Christensen, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier melt rates are strongly affected by minor perturbations in climatic systems. Quantifying changes in glacier melt rates is therefore important, particularly in areas where melt-water contributes to hydroelectric power generation, irrigation, or flood risks. Several methods currently exist for modeling glacier melt rates, but one widely used method is temperature index modeling, also called positive degree-day modeling. This model is often applied due to its simplicity and small number of input variables, but it still depends on an empirically-measured scaling constant (the degree-day factor). These degree-day factors can vary by a factor of five from one glacier to the next, complicating the applicability of the approach to new regions, or to different time periods. Previous work suggests the degree-day factor may be a function of the surface albedo, solar radiation, and near-surface air temperature. Thus, it is possible the degree-day factor itself is predictable. In this study we present a method to derive these melt factors directly from easily obtained climatic variables, thus allowing for the ready application of temperature index modeling to a much wider suite of glaciers with greater accuracy. We used a full energy-balance model to calculate possible degree-day factors over the full range of climate conditions commonly encountered with alpine glaciers. We then constructed a statistical emulator (a linear model which considers numerous interactions and polynomial effects) using select climate variables (insolation, positive degree-days, and albedo) as inputs. The statistical model is tuned using the energy-balance output as training data. The model skill will be tested against a suite of empirically-derived degree-day factors. These results would allow for the application of more accurate glacier melt models with quantified uncertainties to under-sampled glacial regions and paleoclimate reconstructions.

  18. A text input system developed by using lips image recognition based LabVIEW for the seriously disabled.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C; Shao, C L; Liang, C K; Lin, S W; Huang, T H; Hsieh, M C; Yang, C H; Luo, C H; Wuo, C M

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a text input system for the seriously disabled by using lips image recognition based on LabVIEW. This system can be divided into the software subsystem and the hardware subsystem. In the software subsystem, we adopted the technique of image processing to recognize the status of mouth-opened or mouth-closed depending the relative distance between the upper lip and the lower lip. In the hardware subsystem, parallel port built in PC is used to transmit the recognized result of mouth status to the Morse-code text input system. Integrating the software subsystem with the hardware subsystem, we implement a text input system by using lips image recognition programmed in LabVIEW language. We hope the system can help the seriously disabled to communicate with normal people more easily. PMID:17271421

  19. Star Classification for the Kepler Input Catalog: From Images to Stellar Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, T. M.; Everett, M.; Latham, D. W.; Monet, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    The Stellar Classification Project is a ground-based effort to screen stars within the Kepler field of view, to allow removal of stars with large radii (and small potential transit signals) from the target list. Important components of this process are: (1) An automated photometry pipeline estimates observed magnitudes both for target stars and for stars in several calibration fields. (2) Data from calibration fields yield extinction-corrected AB magnitudes (with g, r, i, z magnitudes transformed to the SDSS system). We merge these with 2MASS J, H, K magnitudes. (3) The Basel grid of stellar atmosphere models yields synthetic colors, which are transformed to our photometric system by calibration against observations of stars in M67. (4) We combine the r magnitude and stellar galactic latitude with a simple model of interstellar extinction to derive a relation connecting {Teff, luminosity} to distance and reddening. For models satisfying this relation, we compute a chi-squared statistic describing the match between each model and the observed colors. (5) We create a merit function based on the chi-squared statistic, and on a Bayesian prior probability distribution which gives probability as a function of Teff, luminosity, log(Z), and height above the galactic plane. The stellar parameters ascribed to a star are those of the model that maximizes this merit function. (6) Parameter estimates are merged with positional and other information from extant catalogs to yield the Kepler Input Catalog, from which targets will be chosen. Testing and validation of this procedure are underway, with encouraging initial results.

  20. Priming in permafrost soils: High vulnerability of arctic soil organic carbon to increased input of plant-derived compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Birgit; Gentsch, Norman; Capek, Petr; Diakova, Katerina; Alves, Ricardo; Barta, Jiri; Gittel, Antje; Guggenberger, Georg; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Knoltsch, Anna; Mikutta, Robert; Santruckova, Hana; Schnecker, Jörg; Shibistova, Olga; Takriti, Mounir; Urich, Tim; Watzka, Margarete; Richter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Arctic ecosystems are warming rapidly, resulting in a stimulation of both plant primary production and soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. In addition to this direct stimulation, SOM decomposition might also be indirectly affected by rising temperatures mediated by the increase in plant productivity. Higher root litter production for instance might decrease SOM decomposition by providing soil microorganisms with alternative C and N sources ("negative priming"), or might increase SOM decomposition by facilitating microbial growth and enzyme production ("positive priming"). With about 1,700 Pg of organic C stored in arctic soils, and 88% of that in horizons deeper than 30 cm, it is crucial to understand the controls on SOM decomposition in different horizons of arctic permafrost soils, and thus the vulnerability of SOM to changes in C and N availability in a future climate. We here report on the vulnerability of SOM in arctic permafrost soils to an increased input of plant-derived organic compounds, and on its variability across soil horizons and sites. We simulated an increased input of plant-derived compounds by amending soil samples with 13C-labelled cellulose or protein, and compared the mineralization of native, unlabelled soil organic C (SOC) to unamended control samples. Our experiment included 119 individual samples of arctic permafrost soils, covering four sites across the Siberian Arctic, and five soil horizons, i.e., organic topsoil, mineral topsoil, mineral subsoil and cryoturbated material (topsoil material buried in the subsoil by freeze-thaw processes) from the active layer, as well as thawed material from the upper permafrost. Our findings suggest that changes in C and N availability in Arctic soils, such as mediated by plants, have a high potential to alter the decomposition of SOM, but also point at fundamental differences between soil horizons. In the organic topsoil, SOC mineralization increased by 51% after addition of protein, but was not affected by cellulose, suggesting predominant N limitation of the microbial decomposer community, and a high vulnerability of SOM to increases in N availability. In contrast, in mineral subsoil and thawed permafrost, SOC mineralization was stimulated by both cellulose and protein (between 23 and 120%), cellulose- and protein-derived C was efficiently incorporated into the microbial biomass, and effects of both cellulose and protein were significantly correlated. These findings suggest predominant C limitation of the microbial decomposer community in deeper, mineral horizons of arctic permafrost soils, and point at a high vulnerability of SOM to increased C availability, e.g., due to higher root litter production. We estimate that on a circum-arctic scale, increases in C and N availability have the potential to stimulate SOC mineralization in the order of several Tg C per day. Together with the direct stimulation of SOC mineralization by rising temperatures, this indirect stimulation can counteract the increased CO2 fixation by plants, and thus reduce the C sink strength of arctic ecosystems or even provoke net ecosystem C losses that might induce a positive feedback to global warming.

  1. Thermal imaging for input to terrestrial and planetary thermal models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Multispectral imaging of emitted thermal radiation is used to estimate surface composition, especially of silicate minerals, but the most common use is to estimate surface temperature T. Thermal modeling requires accurate estimation of T, which for many terrestrial and nearly all planetary studies requires measuring radiance L remotely. The key difficulty is that thermal imaging is underdetermined, with 3 atmospheric parameters and n+1 surface parameters where n is the number of channels (i, j...), even if adjacency effects and anisothermal pixels are overlooked. The n unknowns are emissivities ? (i), and if T is to be estimated something about the ? spectrum must generally be known or assumed. Many different algorithms have been devised. If n=1, ? is assumed from laboratory data; if n=2, T for water is proportional to L(i) and L(j)-L(i) (split-window technique), empirically calibrated. One of the benefits of multispectral imaging is that ?(i) can be estimated pixel by pixel, such that T can be recovered with more confidence. Multispectral and hyperspectral data are commonly handled by assuming the maximum value of ?. Under some conditions, two-time imaging can be used assuming that ?(i) is unchanging. Generally, terrestrial atmospheric corrections, instrumental calibration and ? assumptions contribute roughly equally to T inaccuracy of 1-2 K for high spatial resolution data, although for low resolution, restricted atmospheric conditions, and known surface composition this figure can be improved. Peak L occurs at increasing wavenumber as T rises. Thus, T recovery for active volcanoes makes use of midwave (2000-3300 cm-1) or shortwave (3300-10,000 cm-1) rather than longwave thermal infrared (700-1250 cm-1). One complexity is atmospheric variability near active vents; another is the possibility that ? may change as lava cools and the crystallinity of the skin changes (Abtahi et al., 2002). At the other extreme Mars and the icy satellites have low T and therefore lower SNR than warmer targets. This especially is true at night, for example on Mars. Thermal inertia, a measure of the resistance of a surface to changing its T as energy is added or subtracted to it, can be estimated from day-night temperature differences. It can in principle be used to learn something about the porosity, rock/soil ratios, the presence of thin veneers of sand, or other non-compositional characteristics of a surface. Quantitative measures of T, ? and thermal inertia are needed for thermal modeling. However, calculating thermal inertia requires accounting for topography and albedo and is more challenging than just estimating T, and therefore on both Earth and Mars approximations to it are commonly used photointerpretively, just as images of T images and even derived ? are sometimes used photointerpretively also.

  2. Wh-Questions in Child L2 French: Derivational Complexity and Its Interactions with L1 Properties, Length of Exposure, Age of Exposure, and the Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prévost, Philippe; Strik, Nelleke; Tuller, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how derivational complexity interacts with first language (L1) properties, second language (L2) input, age of first exposure to the target language, and length of exposure in child L2 acquisition. We compared elicited production of "wh"-questions in French in two groups of 15 participants each, one with L1 English…

  3. One goal of examing satellite images is to derive maps of earth Digital Image Classification Has Two Components

    E-print Network

    Frank, Thomas D.

    One goal of examing satellite images is to derive maps of earth #12;Digital Image Classification Image Classification The objective of digital image classification is to partition feature space into decision regions, then to assign pixels in an image to the most likely feature category. #12;By selecting

  4. Combining MRI with PET for partial volume correction improves image-derived input functions in mice

    E-print Network

    Evans, Eleanor; Buonincontri, Guido; Izquierdo, David; Methner, Carmen; Hawkes, Rob C.; Ansorge, Richard E.; Krieg, Thomas; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2015-06-05

    Myocardial Infarction (MI), of which 6 were treated with a drug which reduced infarction size . We utilised high resolution MRI to assist in segmenting mouse hearts into 5 classes: LVBP, infarcted myocardium, healthy myocardium, lungs/body and background...

  5. Time-delayed fluorescence imaging of a porphycene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundy, Sarah L.; van der Putten, Wilhelm J.; Shearer, Andrew; Buckton, Daniel J.; Ryder, Alan G.; Ball, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Porphycenes are currently under investigation for use in Photodynamic therapy, which is a promising treatment for cancer. These materials, which display preferential uptake in cancerous cells, also exhibit high fluorescence yields, and can be used for tumour detection. Problems with steady-state fluorescence techniques such as background autofluorescence can be eliminated by the use of time-resolved techniques. Improved contrast can be obtained with time-resolved techniques because of the differing fluorescence lifetimes between autofluorescence and longer-living exogenous photosensitisers. An imaging system was constructed using a fast (200 ps) gated CCD camera and a pulsed 635 nm laser diode. A tissue phantom composed of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with thirty-six wells of varying diameter and depth (10 mm to 1 mm) was assembled to test the system. The system was used to record images of a porphycene derivative within the wells at differing concentrations in an organic solvent. A tissue imitator was placed on top of the PMMA block at varying thickness. 10-4 M zinc phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate was also placed on top of the block to mimic autofluorescence. The results indicate that the time-gated imaging system can prevent background excitation scatter and fluorescence from a shorter-lived fluorophore from distorting the fluorescence signal from a longer-lived photosensitiser.

  6. Fluorescent Nanoconjugate Derivatives with Enhanced Photostability for Single Molecule Imaging.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Daniel T; Kim, Sung Hoon; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Schroeder, Charles M

    2015-11-01

    Fluorescence-based imaging techniques critically rely on bright and photostable probes for precise detection of biological molecules. Recently, a new class of multichromophoric probes based on fluorescent dendrimer nanoconjugates (FDNs) was developed for single molecule fluorescence microscopy (SMFM). FDNs are generated by covalent conjugation of multiple fluorescent dyes onto macromolecular polymeric scaffolds and show marked increases in brightness and long-term photostability relative to their single organic dye constituents. Multichromophoric probes, however, are generally known to suffer from transient fluorescence emission intensities and long excursions into dark states. To overcome these issues, photostabilizers can be added to bulk solution, though some small molecule additives may exhibit poor aqueous solubility or biological toxicity. In this work, we develop enhanced FDN derivatives by covalently linking a redox-active photostabilizer (Trolox) directly onto FDN molecular scaffolds. In one approach, multiple organic dyes (Cy5) and Trolox molecules are randomly distributed on dendritic scaffolds in tunable stoichiometric amounts, and in a second approach, Cy5 dyes are covalently linked to Trolox in a precise 1:1 stoichiometry followed by covalent attachment of Cy5-Trolox conjugates onto dendrimers. In all cases, FDN-Trolox conjugates show increases in photostability, brightness, and reduced fluctuations in transient fluorescent intensity relative to FDN probes. Bulk and single molecule photophysical data for FDN probes are compared to single self-healing dye systems such as Cy5-Trolox, and as a proof-of-principle demonstration, we use FDN-Trolox derivatives for bulk immunofluorescence imaging. Overall, our work suggests that self-healed multichromophoric systems such as FDN-Trolox probes present a useful strategy for increasing fluorescent probe photostability. PMID:26461122

  7. Imaging spectroscopy-and lidar-derived estimates of canopy composition and structure to improve

    E-print Network

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    Imaging spectroscopy- and lidar-derived estimates of canopy composition and structure to improve imaging spectrometry and waveform lidar can be used to provide spatially comprehensive estimates of forest

  8. Classification and Visualization Based on Derived Image Features: Application to Genetic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Balliu, Brunilda; Würtz, Rolf P.; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Böhringer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Data transformations prior to analysis may be beneficial in classification tasks. In this article we investigate a set of such transformations on 2D graph-data derived from facial images and their effect on classification accuracy in a high-dimensional setting. These transformations are low-variance in the sense that each involves only a fixed small number of input features. We show that classification accuracy can be improved when penalized regression techniques are employed, as compared to a principal component analysis (PCA) pre-processing step. In our data example classification accuracy improves from 47% to 62% when switching from PCA to penalized regression. A second goal is to visualize the resulting classifiers. We develop importance plots highlighting the influence of coordinates in the original 2D space. Features used for classification are mapped to coordinates in the original images and combined into an importance measure for each pixel. These plots assist in assessing plausibility of classifiers, interpretation of classifiers, and determination of the relative importance of different features. PMID:25405460

  9. Genetic Dissection of Retinal Inputs to Brainstem Nuclei Controlling Image Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dhande, Onkar S.; Estevez, Maureen E.; Quattrochi, Lauren E.; El-Danaf, Rana N.; Nguyen, Phong L.

    2013-01-01

    When the head rotates, the image of the visual world slips across the retina. A dedicated set of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and brainstem visual nuclei termed the “accessory optic system” (AOS) generate slip-compensating eye movements that stabilize visual images on the retina and improve visual performance. Which types of RGCs project to each of the various AOS nuclei remain unresolved. Here we report a new transgenic mouse line, Hoxd10–GFP, in which the RGCs projecting to all the AOS nuclei are fluorescently labeled. Electrophysiological recordings of Hoxd10–GFP RGCs revealed that they include all three subtypes of On direction-selective RGCs (On–DSGCs), responding to upward, downward, or forward motion. Hoxd10–GFP RGCs also include one subtype of On–Off DSGCs tuned for forward motion. Retrograde circuit mapping with modified rabies viruses revealed that the On–DSGCs project to the brainstem centers involved in both horizontal and vertical retinal slip compensation. In contrast, the On–Off DSGCs labeled in Hoxd10–GFP mice projected to AOS nuclei controlling horizontal but not vertical image stabilization. Moreover, the forward tuned On–Off DSGCs appear physiologically and molecularly distinct from all previously genetically identified On–Off DSGCs. These data begin to clarify the cell types and circuits underlying image stabilization during self-motion, and they support an unexpected diversity of DSGC subtypes. PMID:24198370

  10. Comparison of a Range of Terrain Variables Derived From DEMs Based on Different Resolutions and Input Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienzle, S. W.

    2002-12-01

    It is a well-known fact that the grid cell size of a raster digital elevation model has significant effects on derived terrain variables such as slope, aspect, plan and profile curvature or the wetness index. This poster presents vital information for users of DEMs generated from 100 m regularly sampled, or similar, elevation points such as those available province-wide for Alberta, Canada. Findings are valid for flat to moderately sloped terrain present in the North American prairies and foothills regions and other locations with similar terrain. DEMs with grid cell sizes ranging from 100 to 5 m were interpolated from both 100 and 10 m regularly spaced elevation points using the ANUDEM interpolation method. Significant differences in a number of terrain variables derived from DEMs with different resolutions using cumulative distribution functions and a subsequent Kolmogorov-Smirnov test are revealed. Terrain variables based on 100 m regularly sampled elevation points (100 m DEM) are compared to a DEM based on 10 m regularly sampled elevation points which serves as a benchmark. Correlation analysis reveals that only elevation and slope have a strong positive relationship while all other terrain derivatives are not represented realistically. Relative root mean square errors quantify the quality of terrain derivatives. Major findings are summarised as follows: (a) All computed terrain variables tested (slope, aspect, plan and profile curvature, curvature and the wetness index) vary significantly with a change in grid cell size; (b) the higher the order of the derivative, the smaller the DEM resolution should be; (c) only elevation and slope show a high correlation between the 100 m DEM and the benchmark DEM; (d) the 100 m DEM can, therefore, only be used to show the general range and general spatial distribution of terrain variables, but fails - with the exception of slope - to represent spatially correctly the terrain variables at the associated scale.

  11. Detection of blood-related signal from a series of fingerprint images acquired during an input action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Ichiro; Hori, Atsushi; Kurita, Masashi

    2007-09-01

    When a finger is pressed against a flat plate and deformed, blood inside the finger moves away from the deformed area. This causes the finger to change its appearance from reddish to white. As the finger leaves the plate, the blood comes back and it looks reddish again. We have proposed to use this color change to distinguish genuine fingers from artificial ones for un-attended fingerprint identification systems. This blood-related signal may reflect the stiffness of the peripheral blood vessels and therefore it may be correlated with some health conditions such as blood pressure. In experiments, we used a fingerprint sensor based on scattered light detection. Because the spectra of the light scattered by the deformed fingers showed large changes mostly in the green portion, an LED emitting at 525 nm at peak strength was used. First, we compared series of fingerprint images acquired during a normal input action and those obtained while a rubber band occluded the blood flow. The occluded finger required a larger force to exhibit a similar change for these pixel values than the finger without the rubber band. Second, we analyzed fingerprint images recorded by six volunteers. We defined some indices based on the pixel values of the fingerprint images and the pressure applied to the fingers. The correlation coefficient of one of such indices and the average blood pressure of the participants was 0.86. Although the number of the subjects is small, this initial result is encouraging.

  12. The least-squares mixing models to generate fraction images derived from remote sensing multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimabukuro, Yosio Edemir; Smith, James A.

    1991-01-01

    Constrained-least-squares and weighted-least-squares mixing models for generating fraction images derived from remote sensing multispectral data are presented. An experiment considering three components within the pixels-eucalyptus, soil (understory), and shade-was performed. The generated fraction images for shade (shade image) derived from these two methods were compared by considering the performance and computer time. The derived shade images are related to the observed variation in forest structure, i.e., the fraction of inferred shade in the pixel is related to different eucalyptus ages.

  13. Single input state, single–mode fiber–based polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging by eigenpolarization referencing

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Norman; Villiger, Martin; Jun, Chang–Su; Bouma, Brett E.

    2015-01-01

    Fiber–based polarization sensitive OFDI is more challenging than free–space implementations. Using multiple input states, fiber–based systems provide sample birefringence information with the benefit of a flexible sample arm but come at the cost of increased system and acquisition complexity, and either reduce acquisition speed or require increased acquisition bandwidth. Here we show that with the calibration of a single polarization state, fiber–based configurations can approach the conceptual simplicity of traditional free–space configurations. We remotely control the polarization state of the light incident at the sample using the eigenpolarization states of a wave plate as a reference, and determine the Jones matrix of the output fiber. We demonstrate this method for polarization sensitive imaging of biological samples. PMID:25927775

  14. Late quaternary Mediterranean sapropels. III. Assessment of source of input and palaeotemperature as derived from biological markers

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Haven, H.L.; Baas, M.; Kroot, M.; De Leeuw, J.W.; Schenck, P.A.; Ebbing, J.

    1987-04-01

    Sources of input contributing to the organic matter of four different Mediterranean sapropels (S/sub 1/, S/sub 5/, S/sub 6/, S/sub 7/) are inferred from the relative distributions of terrigenous and marine biological markers in these Quaternary deposits. The relative terrigenous contribution does not vary significantly. Within the marine contribution there is a significant compositional variation. A contribution from dinoflagellates is relatively important in the S/sub 1/ sapropel, whereas sapropels S/sub 6/ and S/sub 7/ are characterized by a relatively large contribution from prymnesiophyte algae and planktonic cyanobacteria. The abundance of diatoms in sapropel S/sub 5/, as deduced from microscopic observations, is probably reflected by a high concentration of loliolide. Variations in sea-surface water temperatures can be deduced from the relative abundance of di- and triunsaturated C/sub 37/ ketones and from the relative abundance of esterified 27-nor-24-methylcholesta-5,22E-dien-3..beta..-ol and cholesta-5,22E-dien-3..beta..-ol. These two molecular temperature indices are consistent with the delta /sup 18/O record and with the pollen record of the sapropels investigated.

  15. Derivation of Population Distribution Using Remote Sensing and Statistical Data as an Input for Tsunami Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomarudin, R.; Strunz, G.; Post, J.; Zosseder, K.; Ludwig, R.

    2009-04-01

    Information about people distribution is a crucial component in disaster risk management. Every disaster such as flood, drought, tsunami, volcanic eruption, storm, earthquake etc. implies threats to people with respect to loss of live, injury, and suffer. The number of people affected during 1991 - 2005 is approximately 3.5 billion people (UN ESCAP note), and that means more than 50% of people on the world are affected by disasters. Therefore, the information on people distribution in the disaster or hazard zone is important in order to mitigate the impact of natural disasters. Especially for tsunami, this information will help the government to better manage the evacuation of people and to estimate the number of people affected if there is tsunami event in their area. Normally, the available information on population distribution is based statistical data related to administrative boundaries, e.g. village, municipal, district, province, or national level. This research focuses on the improvement of the spatial resolution of data on the people distribution covering the area along the west coast Sumatera, South Coast of Java, and Bali. The results are used as an input for tsunami risk assessment in the framework of the GITEWS project. A combination of the number of people at village level with land use maps is under¬taken in this research. GIS and remote sensing techniques are used to improve the spatial detail of statistical data on people distribution. The model is based on an analysis of people activities in a certain land use. To assign appropriate weighting factors, census data and potential of village (PODES) data are used. The results of this research are detailed people distribution maps (day and night time) for the Coast of Sumatera, South Coast of Java, and Coastal of Bali. The spatial improvement can be shown. Moreover, besides the spatial improvement, the results also provide information on the distribution during day and night time. To estimate the accuracy of this approach, sensitivity analyses have been performed, which show the quality of the results. Keywords: spatial improvement, people distribution, census, land use, risk assessment

  16. Linear alkylbenzenes as tracers of sewage-sludge-derived inputs of organic matter, PCBs, and PAHs to sediments at the 106-mile deep water disposal site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamoureux, E.M.; Brownawell, Bruce J.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1996-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) are sensitive source-specific tracers of sewage inputs to the marine environment. Because they are highly particle reactive and nonspecifically sorbed to organic matter, LABs are potential tracers of the transport of both sludge-derived organic matter and other low solubility hydrophobic contaminants (e.g., PCBs and PAHs); sediment trap studies at the 106-Mile Site have shown LABs to be valuable in testing models of sludge deposition to the sea floor. In this study we report on the distributions of LABs, PCBs, PAHs, and Ag in surface sediments collected within a month of the complete cessation of dumping (July, 1992) in the vicinity of the dump site. Total LAB concentrations were lower than those measured by Takada and coworkers in samples from nearby sites collected in 1989. LABs from both studies appear to be significantly depleted (6 to 25-fold) in surface sediments relative to excess Ag (another sludge tracer) when compared to sewage sludge and sediment trap compositions. Comparison of LAB sediment inventories to model predictions of sludge particle fluxes supports the contention that LABs have been lost from the bed. The use of LABs to examine the short-or long-term fate of sludge derived materials in deep-sea sediments should be questioned. The causes of this LAB depletion are unclear at this point, and we discuss several hypotheses. The concentrations of total PCBs and PAHs are both correlated with sludge tracers, suggesting that there may be a measurable contribution of sludge-derived inputs on top of other nonpoint sources of these contaminant classes. This possibility is consistent with the composition of these contaminants determined in recent and historical analyses of sewage sludge.

  17. Techniques to derive geometries for image-based Eulerian computations

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Seth; Buchholz, James; Vigmostad, Sarah; Kim, Hyunggun; Udaykumar, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The performance of three frequently used level set-based segmentation methods is examined for the purpose of defining features and boundary conditions for image-based Eulerian fluid and solid mechanics models. The focus of the evaluation is to identify an approach that produces the best geometric representation from a computational fluid/solid modeling point of view. In particular, extraction of geometries from a wide variety of imaging modalities and noise intensities, to supply to an immersed boundary approach, is targeted. Design/methodology/approach Two- and three-dimensional images, acquired from optical, X-ray CT, and ultrasound imaging modalities, are segmented with active contours, k-means, and adaptive clustering methods. Segmentation contours are converted to level sets and smoothed as necessary for use in fluid/solid simulations. Results produced by the three approaches are compared visually and with contrast ratio, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio measures. Findings While the active contours method possesses built-in smoothing and regularization and produces continuous contours, the clustering methods (k-means and adaptive clustering) produce discrete (pixelated) contours that require smoothing using speckle-reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD). Thus, for images with high contrast and low to moderate noise, active contours are generally preferable. However, adaptive clustering is found to be far superior to the other two methods for images possessing high levels of noise and global intensity variations, due to its more sophisticated use of local pixel/voxel intensity statistics. Originality/value It is often difficult to know a priori which segmentation will perform best for a given image type, particularly when geometric modeling is the ultimate goal. This work offers insight to the algorithm selection process, as well as outlining a practical framework for generating useful geometric surfaces in an Eulerian setting. PMID:25750470

  18. Application research on enhancing near-infrared micro-imaging quality by 2nd derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ma, Zhi-hong; Zhao, Liu; Wang, Bei-hong; Han, Ping; Pan, Li-gang; Wang, Ji-hua

    2013-08-01

    Near-infrared micro-imaging will not only provide the sample's spatial distribution information, but also the spectroscopic information of each pixel. In this thesis, it took the artificial sample of wheat flour and formaldehyde sodium sulfoxylate distribution given for example to research the data processing method for enhancing the quality of near-infrared micro-imaging. Near-infrared spectroscopic feature of wheat flour and formaldehyde sodium sulfoxylate being studied on, compare correlation imaging and 2nd derivative imaging were applied in the imaging processing of the near-infrared micro-image of the artificial sample. Furthermore, the two methods were combined, i.e. 2nd derivative compare correlation imaging was acquired. The result indicated that the difference of the correlation coefficients between the two substances, i.e. wheat flour and formaldehyde sodium sulfoxylate, and the reference spectrum has been increased from 0.001 in compare correlation image to 0.796 in 2nd derivative compare correlation image respectively, which enhances the imaging quality efficiently. This study will, to some extent, be of important reference significance to near-infrared micro-imaging method research of agricultural products and foods.

  19. Using Sediment Records to Reconstruct Historical Inputs Combustion-Derived Contaminants to Urban Airsheds/Watersheds: A Case Study From the Puget Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louchouarn, P. P.; Kuo, L.; Brandenberger, J.; Marcantonio, F.; Wade, T. L.; Crecelius, E.; Gobeil, C.

    2008-12-01

    Urban centers are major sources of combustion-derived particulate matter (e.g. black carbon (BC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), anhydrosugars) and volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere. Evidence is mounting that atmospheric emissions from combustion sources remain major contributors to air pollution of urban systems. For example, recent historical reconstructions of depositional fluxes for pyrogenic PAHs close to urban systems have shown an unanticipated reversal in the trends of decreasing emissions initiated during the mid-20th Century. Here we compare a series of historical reconstructions of combustion emission in urban and rural airsheds over the last century using sedimentary records. A complex suite of combustion proxies (BC, PAHs, anhydrosugars, stable lead concentrations and isotope signatures) assisted in elucidating major changes in the type of atmospheric aerosols originating from specific processes (i.e. biomass burning vs. fossil fuel combustion) or fuel sources (wood vs. coal vs. oil). In all studied locations, coal continues to be a major source of combustion-derived aerosols since the early 20th Century. Recently, however, oil and biomass combustion have become substantial additional sources of atmospheric contamination. In the Puget Sound basin, along the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S., rural locations not impacted by direct point sources of contamination have helped assess the influence of catalytic converters on concentrations of oil-derived PAH and lead inputs since the early 1970s. Although atmospheric deposition of lead has continued to drop since the introduction of catalytic converters and ban on leaded gasoline, PAH inputs have "rebounded" in the last decade. A similar steady and recent rise in PAH accumulations in urban systems has been ascribed to continued urban sprawl and increasing vehicular traffic. In the U.S., automotive emissions, whether from gasoline or diesel combustion, are becoming a major source of combustion-derived PM and BC to the atmosphere and have started to replace coal as the major source in some surficial reservoirs. This increased urban influence of gasoline and diesel combustion on BC emissions was also observed in Europe both from model estimates as well as from measured fluxes in recent lake sediments.

  20. Three-dimensional reconstruction of microscopic images using different order intensity derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Jiang, Huan

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopic image three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction is a challenging topic in image processing and computer vision, and can be widely applied to life science, biology, and medicine. A microscopic images 3-D reconstruction method is proposed for transparent or partially transparent microscopic samples, which is based on the Taylor expansion theorem and polynomial fitting. First, the image stack of the specimen is divided into several groups in an overlapping or nonoverlapping way along the optical axis, and the first image of every group is regarded as the reference image. Then, different order intensity derivatives are calculated using all the images of every group and a polynomial fitting method. Subsequently, a new image can be generated by means of Taylor expansion theorem and the calculated different order intensity derivatives and for which the distance to the reference image is ?z along the optical axis. Finally, the microscopic specimen can be reconstructed in 3-D form using deconvolution technology and all the images including both the observed and the generated images. The experimental results show the superior performance via processing simulated and real fluorescence microscopic degraded images.

  1. Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Fluorescence Imaging Probes: Beyond Classical Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Neto, Brenno A D; Carvalho, Pedro H P R; Correa, Jose R

    2015-06-16

    This Account describes the origins, features, importance, and trends of the use of fluorescent small-molecule 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BTD) derivatives as a new class of bioprobes applied to bioimaging analyses of several (live and fixed) cell types. BTDs have been successfully used as probes for a plethora of biological analyses for only a few years, and the impressive responses obtained by using this important class of heterocycle are fostering the development of new fluorescent BTDs and expanding the biological applications of such derivatives. The first use of a fluorescent small-molecule BTD derivative as a selective cellular probe dates back to 2010, and since then impressive advances have been described by us and others. The well-known limitations of classical scaffolds urged the development of new classes of bioprobes. Although great developments have been achieved by using classical scaffolds such as coumarins, BODIPYs, fluoresceins, rhodamines, cyanines, and phenoxazines, there is still much to be done, and BTDs aim to succeed where these dyes have shown their limitations. Important organelles and cell components such as nuclear DNA, mitochondria, lipid droplets, and others have already been successfully labeled by fluorescent small-molecule BTD derivatives. New technological systems that use BTDs as the fluorophores for bioimaging experiments have been described in recent scientific literature. The successful application of BTDs as selective bioprobes has led some groups to explore their potential for use in studying membrane pores or tumor cells under hypoxic conditions. Finally, BTDs have also been used as fluorescent tags to investigate the action mechanism of some antitumor compounds. The attractive photophysical data typically observed for ?-extended BTD derivatives is fostering interest in the use of this new class of bioprobes. Large Stokes shifts, large molar extinction coefficients, high quantum yields, high stability when stored in solution or as pure solids, no fading even after long periods of irradiation, bright emissions with no blinking, good signal-to-noise ratios, efficiency to transpose the cell membrane, and irradiation preferentially in the visible-light region are just some features noted by using BTDs. As the pioneering group in the use of fluorescent small-molecule BTDs for bioimaging purposes, we feel pleased to share our experience, results, advances, and personal perspectives with the readers of this Account. The readers will clearly note the huge advantages of using fluorescent BTDs over classical scaffolds, and hopefully they will be inspired and motivated to further BTD technology in the fields of molecular and cellular biology. PMID:25978615

  2. Radiolabeled benzoylcholine derivatives as possible myocardial-imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Dannals, R.F.; Burns, H.D.; Marzilli, L.G.; Trageser, T.C.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1981-04-01

    Two radioiodinated analogs of benzoylcholine were investigated as possible myocardial-imaging agents. O-((2-/sup 125/I)Iodobenzoyl)-choline and N-((2-/sup 125/I)iodobenzoyl)cholamine were prepared by nucleophilic substitution of sodium (/sup 125/I)iodide for stable iodine in O-(N,N)dimethylaminoethyl)-2-iodobenzoate and N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethyl)-2-iodobenzamide, respectively, and by methylation with methyl iodide. The in vivo distribution of each compound in mice was determined as a function of time. Favorable heart-to-blood and heart-to-lung ratios were obtained with N-((2-/sup 125/I)iodobenzoyl)cholamine.

  3. MLT Dependent Plasmapause Location Derived from IMAGE EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katus, Roxanne M.; Gallagher, Dennis; Liemohn, Michael; Keesee, Amy M.

    2015-04-01

    The location of the outer edge of the plasmasphere (the plasmapause) as a function of geomagnetic storm-time is identified and investigated statistically in relation to the solar wind driver. Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) data are used to create an automated method that locates and extracts the plasmapause. The plasmapause extraction technique searches a set range of possible plasmasphere densities for a maximum gradient. The magnetic local time (MLT) dependent plasmapause results are compared to manual extraction results. The plasmapause results from 39 intense storms are examined along a normalized epoch storm timeline to determine the average plasmapause L-shell as a function of MLT and storm-time. The average extracted plasmapause L-shell follows the expected storm-time plasmapause behavior. The results show that, during the main phase, the plasmapause moves Earthward and a plasmaspheric drainage plume forms near dusk and across the dayside during strong convection. During the recovery phase the plume becomes re-entrained in corotational motion around the Earth, while the average plasmapause location moves further from the Earth. The results are also investigated in terms of the solar wind driver. We find evidence that shows that the inner magnetospheric response to Magnetic Cloud (MC) and Sheath (SH)-driven events is similar but the response is different for CIR-driven events.

  4. No-reference image quality assessment based on log-derivative statistics of natural scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Chandler, Damon M.

    2013-10-01

    We propose an efficient blind/no-reference image quality assessment algorithm using a log-derivative statistical model of natural scenes. Our method, called DErivative Statistics-based QUality Evaluator (DESIQUE), extracts image quality-related statistical features at two image scales in both the spatial and frequency domains. In the spatial domain, normalized pixel values of an image are modeled in two ways: pointwise-based statistics for single pixel values and pairwise-based log-derivative statistics for the relationship of pixel pairs. In the frequency domain, log-Gabor filters are used to extract the fine scales of the image, which are also modeled by the log-derivative statistics. All of these statistics can be fitted by a generalized Gaussian distribution model, and the estimated parameters are fed into combined frameworks to estimate image quality. We train our models on the LIVE database by using optimized support vector machine learning. Experiment results tested on other databases show that the proposed algorithm not only yields a substantial improvement in predictive performance as compared to other state-of-the-art no-reference image quality assessment methods, but also maintains a high computational efficiency.

  5. Calcium Imaging in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Walter, Anna; Šari?, Tomo; Hescheler, Jürgen; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate cardiomyocytes (CMs) from disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is a powerful tool for the investigation of various cardiac diseases in vitro. The pathological course of various cardiac conditions, causatively heterogeneous, often converges into disturbed cellular Ca(2+) cycling. The gigantic Ca(2+) channel of the intracellular Ca(2+) store of CMs, the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2), controls Ca(2+) release and therefore plays a crucial role in Ca(2+) cycling of CMs. In the present protocol we describe ways to measure and analyze global as well as local cellular Ca(2+) release events in CMs derived from a patient carrying a CPVT-causing RyR2 mutation. PMID:26025623

  6. Martian spectral units derived from ISM imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, S.; Mustard, J.; Saylor, R.

    1993-01-01

    Based on results of the Viking mission, the soil layer of Mars has been thought to be fairly homogeneous and to consist of a mixture of as few as two components, a 'dark gray' basaltic material and a 'bright red' altered material. However, near-infrared reflectance spectra measured recently both telescopically and from spacecraft indicate compositional heterogeneity beyond what can be explained by just two components. In particular, data from the ISM imaging spectrometer, which observed much of the equatorial region at a spatial resolution of approximately 22 km, indicate spatial differences in the presence and abundance of Fe-containing phases, hydroxylated silicates, and H2O. The ISM data was used to define, characterize, and map soil 'units' based on their spectral properties. The spatial distribution of these 'units' were compared to morphologic, visible color, and thermal inertia features recognized in Viking data.

  7. Detection and characterization of local to regional groundwater inputs to rivers, lakes and oceans with electrical imaging (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Befus, K. M.; Markowski, M.; Ong, J.; Zamora, P. B.; Siringan, F. P.; Zlotnik, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    Surface water (SW) and groundwater (GW) interact at multiple levels in myriad settings and their interaction is an important hydrogeologic process that impacts ecological and biogeochemical functions. GW discharge and associated mixing with SW in these settings have been challenging to map with sufficient detail and coverage. Three examples are presented on the application of electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) for mapping GW discharge and for understanding SW-GW interactions: (1) a large regulated river, (2) several neighboring lakes, and (3) a fringing coral reef. (1) Time-lapse ERI was conducted at the Colorado River, Texas where the river stage varied by 0.7 m due to dam operations. Submerged and towed electrode cables were used to capture the subsurface mixing dynamics of SW and GW. Using temporal variability in electrical resistivity (ER) signatures, we identified a shallow well-flushed hyporheic zone, a transition zone where SW and GW mix, and a stable deep zone hosting only GW. (2) Towed ER surveys in alkaline lakes in the Nebraska Sand Hills helped distinguishing flow-through lakes, which have decreasing subsurface ER from GW inflow to outflow area, from pure GW discharge lakes, which have uniformly stratified increasing-with-depth ER profiles. (3) More than 30 km of ER profiles collected via towed surveys over a fringing coral reef in the Philippines identified areas of high ER within the reef that coincide with resistive zones in the seawater. Analysis of 222Rn of bottom waters and vertical conductivity-temperature-depth measurements show the persistence of fresh GW input into the ocean where low salinity and high 222Rn areas coincided with high ER areas. A 3D map showing sources and pathways for GW across the reef is developed. ERI is a powerful and convenient tool for mapping GW discharge and SW-GW interactions in rivers, lakes, and oceans.

  8. Imaging and Tracking of Bone Marrow-Derived Immune and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Youbo; Bower, Andrew J.; Graf, Benedikt W.; Boppart, Marni D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived stem and immune cells play critical roles in maintaining the health, regeneration, and repair of many tissues. Given their important functions in tissue regeneration and therapy, tracking the dynamic behaviors of BM-derived cells has been a long-standing research goal of both biologists and engineers. Because of the complex cellular-level processes involved, real-time imaging technologies that have sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to visualize them are needed. In addition, in order to track cellular dynamics, special attention is needed to account for changes in the microenvironment where the cells reside, for example, tissue contraction, stretching, development, etc. In this chapter, we introduce methods for real-time imaging and longitudinal tracking of BM-derived immune and stem cells in in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environments with an integrated optical microscope. The integrated microscope combines multiple imaging functions derived from optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM), including optical coherence microscopy (OCM), micro-vasculature imaging, two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF), and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Short- and long-term tracking of the dynamic behavior of BM-derived cells involved in cutaneous wound healing and skin grafting in green fluorescent protein (GFP) BM-transplanted mice is demonstrated. Methods and algorithms for nonrigid registration of time-lapse images are introduced, which allows for long-term tracking of cell dynamics over several months. PMID:23737096

  9. MR image super-resolution reconstruction using sparse representation, nonlocal similarity and sparse derivative prior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; He, Jiazhong; Zhao, Yun; Du, Minghui

    2015-03-01

    In magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, image spatial resolution is determined by various instrumental limitations and physical considerations. This paper presents a new algorithm for producing a high-resolution version of a low-resolution MR image. The proposed method consists of two consecutive steps: (1) reconstructs a high-resolution MR image from a given low-resolution observation via solving a joint sparse representation and nonlocal similarity L1-norm minimization problem; and (2) applies a sparse derivative prior based post-processing to suppress blurring effects. Extensive experiments on simulated brain MR images and two real clinical MR image datasets validate that the proposed method achieves much better results than many state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of both quantitative measures and visual perception. PMID:25638262

  10. In vivo fluorescence imaging of ?-amyloid plaques with push-pull dimethylaminothiophene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2015-12-14

    In vivo fluorescence imaging of ?-amyloid (A?) plaques in the brain is expected to be used as a new method for detecting Alzheimer's disease (AD). We synthesized novel push-pull dimethylaminothiophenyl (DTM) derivatives and evaluated their utility as in vivo fluorescence imaging probes targeting A? plaques. As a result, we found that DTM-2 is a promising fluorescent probe for A? plaques in the AD brains. PMID:26455736

  11. Highly sensitive image-derived indices of water-stressed plants using hyperspectral imaging in SWIR and histogram analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Zhou, Haiying; Du, Tommy; Wu, Qian; Mockler, Todd C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2015-01-01

    The optical signature of leaves is an important monitoring and predictive parameter for a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including drought. Such signatures derived from spectroscopic measurements provide vegetation indices – a quantitative method for assessing plant health. However, the commonly used metrics suffer from low sensitivity. Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants. We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800?nm to 1600?nm. Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56?nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC). The identified image-derived indices 15XX?nm/14XX nm (i.e. 1529?nm/1416?nm) were superior to common vegetation indices, such as WBI, MSI, and NDWI, with significantly better sensitivity, enabling early diagnostics of plant health. PMID:26531782

  12. Highly sensitive image-derived indices of water-stressed plants using hyperspectral imaging in SWIR and histogram analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Zhou, Haiying; Du, Tommy; Wu, Qian; Mockler, Todd C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2015-11-01

    The optical signature of leaves is an important monitoring and predictive parameter for a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including drought. Such signatures derived from spectroscopic measurements provide vegetation indices – a quantitative method for assessing plant health. However, the commonly used metrics suffer from low sensitivity. Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants. We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800?nm to 1600?nm. Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56?nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC). The identified image-derived indices 15XX?nm/14XX nm (i.e. 1529?nm/1416?nm) were superior to common vegetation indices, such as WBI, MSI, and NDWI, with significantly better sensitivity, enabling early diagnostics of plant health.

  13. Highly sensitive image-derived indices of water-stressed plants using hyperspectral imaging in SWIR and histogram analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, David M; Zhang, Hairong; Zhou, Haiying; Du, Tommy; Wu, Qian; Mockler, Todd C; Berezin, Mikhail Y

    2015-01-01

    The optical signature of leaves is an important monitoring and predictive parameter for a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including drought. Such signatures derived from spectroscopic measurements provide vegetation indices - a quantitative method for assessing plant health. However, the commonly used metrics suffer from low sensitivity. Relatively small changes in water content in moderately stressed plants demand high-contrast imaging to distinguish affected plants. We present a new approach in deriving sensitive indices using hyperspectral imaging in a short-wave infrared range from 800?nm to 1600?nm. Our method, based on high spectral resolution (1.56?nm) instrumentation and image processing algorithms (quantitative histogram analysis), enables us to distinguish a moderate water stress equivalent of 20% relative water content (RWC). The identified image-derived indices 15XX?nm/14XX nm (i.e. 1529?nm/1416?nm) were superior to common vegetation indices, such as WBI, MSI, and NDWI, with significantly better sensitivity, enabling early diagnostics of plant health. PMID:26531782

  14. Derivation of planetary topography using multi-image shape-from-shading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohse, V.; Heipke, C.; Kirk, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In many cases, the derivation of high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) from planetary surfaces using conventional digital image matching is a problem. The matching methods need at least one stereo pair of images with sufficient texture. However, many space missions provide only a few stereo images and planetary surfaces often possess insufficient texture. This paper describes a method for the generation of high-resolution DTMs from planetary surfaces, which has the potential to overcome the described problem. The suggested method, developed by our group, is based on shape-from-shading using an arbitrary number of digital optical images, and is termed "multi-image shape-from-shading" (MI-SFS). The paper contains an explanation of the theory of MI-SFS, followed by a presentation of current results, which were obtained using images from NASA's lunar mission Clementine, and constitute the first practical application with our method using extraterrestrial imagery. The lunar surface is reconstructed under the assumption of different kinds of reflectance models (e.g. Lommel-Seeliger and Lambert). The represented results show that the derivation of a high-resolution DTM of real digital planetary images by means of MI-SFS is feasible. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Scaling Transfer between Evapotranspiration Maps Derived from LandSat 7 and MODIS Images

    E-print Network

    Borchers, Brian

    Effect of Scaling Transfer between Evapotranspiration Maps Derived from LandSat 7 and MODIS Images distribution of evapotranspiration. Since the spatial resolution of evapotranspiration predictions depends and second to investigate the effect of up- and down-scaling procedures between evapotranspiration maps

  16. Image method for the derivation of point sources in elastostatic problems with plane interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fares, Nabil; Li, Victor C.

    1986-01-01

    An image method algorithm is presented for the derivation of point sources of elastostatics in multilayered media assuming the infinite space point source is known. Specific cases were worked out and shown to coincide with well known solutions in the literature.

  17. The benefits of using short interval satellite images to derive winds for tropical cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E.; Gentry, R. C.; Shenk, W. E.; Oliver, V.

    1978-01-01

    During the 1975, 1976, and 1977, NOAA's National Environmental Satellite Service and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center conducted a cooperative program to determine the optimum resolution and frequency of satellite images for deriving winds to study and forecast tropical cyclones. Rapid scan images were obtained at 7.5 minute interval from SMS-2 for hurricane Eloise and cyclone Caroline, and at 3 minute intervals from GOES-1 for tropical storms Belle, Holly, and Anita. Cloud motions were derived from these images using the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System. Winds that were derived from the movement of upper and lower tropospheric level clouds using rapid scan data were compared with the 15 and 30 minute interval data. Greater than 10 (5) times as many clouds could be tracked to obtain winds using 3 and 7.5 minute rapid scan images as when using 15 or 30 minute interval images. A few bright areas within the central dense overcast which appeared to be moving with the winds at low levels were tracked.

  18. Integration of Color and Local Derivative Pattern Features for Content-Based Image Indexing and Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipparthi, Santosh Kumar; Nagar, Shyam Krishna

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents two new feature descriptors for content based image retrieval (CBIR) application. The proposed two descriptors are named as color local derivative patterns (CLDP) and inter color local derivative pattern (ICLDP). In order to reduce the computational complexity the uniform patterns are applied to both CLDP and ICLDP. Further, uniform CLDP (CLDPu2) and uniform ICLDP (ICLDPu2) are generated respectively. The proposed descriptors are able to exploit individual (R, G and B) spectral channel information and co-relating pair (RG, GB, BR, etc.) of spectral channel information. The retrieval performances of the proposed descriptors (CLDP and ICLDP) are tested by conducting two experiments on Corel-5000 and Corel-10000 benchmark databases. The results after investigation show a significant improvement in terms of precision, average retrieval precision (ARP), recall and average retrieval rate (ARR) as compared to local binary patterns (LBP), local derivative patterns (LDP) and other state-of-the-art techniques for image retrieval.

  19. Integration of Color and Local Derivative Pattern Features for Content-Based Image Indexing and Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipparthi, Santosh Kumar; Nagar, Shyam Krishna

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents two new feature descriptors for content based image retrieval (CBIR) application. The proposed two descriptors are named as color local derivative patterns (CLDP) and inter color local derivative pattern (ICLDP). In order to reduce the computational complexity the uniform patterns are applied to both CLDP and ICLDP. Further, uniform CLDP (CLDPu2) and uniform ICLDP (ICLDPu2) are generated respectively. The proposed descriptors are able to exploit individual (R, G and B) spectral channel information and co-relating pair (RG, GB, BR, etc.) of spectral channel information. The retrieval performances of the proposed descriptors (CLDP and ICLDP) are tested by conducting two experiments on Corel-5000 and Corel-10000 benchmark databases. The results after investigation show a significant improvement in terms of precision, average retrieval precision (ARP), recall and average retrieval rate (ARR) as compared to local binary patterns (LBP), local derivative patterns (LDP) and other state-of-the-art techniques for image retrieval.

  20. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-07-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380-760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  1. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a Hemispherical Sky Imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated by spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelength 380 nm to 760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less then 20% for all sky conditions.

  2. Tri-stereo Pleiades images-derived digital surface models for tectonic geomorphology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, Matthieu; Le Roux-Mallouf, Romain; Ritz, Jean-François; Berthet, Théo; Peyret, Michel; Vernant, Philippe; Maréchal, Anaïs; Cattin, Rodolphe; Mazzotti, Stéphane; Poujol, Antoine

    2014-05-01

    Very high resolution digital elevation models are a key component of modern quantitative geomorphology. In parallel to high-precision but time-consuming kinematic GPS and/or total station surveys and dense coverage but expensive LiDAR campaigns, we explore the usability of affordable, flexible, wide coverage digital surface models (DSMs) derived from Pleiades tri-stereo optical images. We present two different approaches to extract DSM from a triplet of images. The first relies on the photogrammetric extraction of 3 DSMs from the 3 possible stereo couples and subsequent merge based on the best correlation score. The second takes advantage of simultaneous correlation over the 3 images to derive a point cloud. We further extract DSM from panchromatic 0.5 m resolution images and multispectral 2 m resolution images to test for correlation and noise and determine optimal correlation window size and achievable resolution. Georeferencing is also assessed by comparing raw coordinates derived from Pleiades Rational Polynomial Coefficients to ground control points. Primary images appear to be referenced within ~15 m over flat areas where parallax is minimal while derived DSMs and associated orthorectified images show a much improved referencing within ~5 m of GCPs. In order to assess the adequacy of Pleiades DSMs for tectonic geomorphology, we present examples from case studies along the Trougout normal fault (Morocco), the Hovd strike-slip fault (Mongolia), the Denali strike-slip fault (USA and Canada) and the Main Frontal Thrust (Bhutan). In addition to proposing a variety of tectonic contexts, these examples cover a wide range of climatic conditions (semi-arid, arctic and tropical), vegetation covers (bare earth, sparse Mediterranean, homogeneous arctic pine, varied tropical forest), lithological natures and related erosion rates. The capacity of derived DSMs is demonstrated to characterize geomorphic markers of active deformation such as marine and alluvial terraces, stream gullies, alluvial fans and fluvio-glacial deposits in terms of vertical (from DSMs) and horizontal (from orthorectified optical images) offsets. Values extracted from Pleiades DSMs compare well to field measurements in terms of relief and slope, which suggests effort and resources necessary for field topography could be significantly reduced, especially in poorly accessible areas.

  3. Pancreatic Tumor Growth Prediction with Multiplicative Growth and Image-Derived Motion.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken C L; Summers, Ronald M; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are abnormal growths of hormone-producing cells in the pancreas. Different from the brain in the skull, the pancreas in the abdomen can be largely deformed by the body posture and the surrounding organs. In consequence, both tumor growth and pancreatic motion attribute to the tumor shape difference observable from images. As images at different time points are used to personalize the tumor growth model, the prediction accuracy may be reduced if such motion is ignored. Therefore, we incorporate the image-derived pancreatic motion to tumor growth personalization. For realistic mechanical interactions, the multiplicative growth decomposition is used with a hyperelastic constitutive law to model tumor mass effect, which allows growth modeling without compromising the mechanical accuracy. With also the FDG-PET and contrast-enhanced CT images, the functional, structural, and motion data are combined for a more patient-specific model. Experiments on synthetic and clinical data show the importance of image-derived motion on estimating physiologically plausible mechanical properties and the promising performance of our framework. From six patient data sets, the recall, precision, Dice coefficient, relative volume difference, and average surface distance were 89.8 ± 3.5%, 85.6 ± 7.5%, 87.4 ± 3.6%, 9.7 ± 7.2%, and 0.6 ± 0.2 mm, respectively. PMID:26221698

  4. In vivo imaging of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungji; Ahn, Sangzin; Kim, Saeromi; Joo, Yuyoung; Chong, Young Hae; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Chang, Keun-A.

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of diverse conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). To understand transplanted stem cell biology, in vivo imaging is necessary. Nanomaterial has great potential for in vivo imaging and several noninvasive methods are used, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, fluorescence imaging (FI) and near-infrared FI. However, each method has limitations for in vivo imaging. To overcome these limitations, multimodal nanoprobes have been developed. In the present study, we intravenously injected human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) that were labeled with a multimodal nanoparticle, LEO-LIVE™-Magnoxide 675 or 797 (BITERIALS, Seoul, Korea), into Tg2576 mice, an AD mouse model. After sequential in vivo tracking using Maestro Imaging System, we found fluorescence signals up to 10 days after injection. We also found strong signals in the brains extracted from hASC-transplanted Tg2576 mice up to 12 days after injection. With these results, we suggest that in vivo imaging with this multimodal nanoparticle may provide a useful tool for stem cell tracking and understanding stem cell biology in other neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Thermokarst Lake Gyre Flow Speed and Direction Derivation Using Image Matching from Sequential Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, S.; Wang, S.; Beck, R. A.; Liu, H.; Hinkel, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Thermokarst lakes on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska are closely coupled with the regional climate through energy, water and carbon budgets. These lakes exhibit striking elongated shapes perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. This has led to the hypothesis that the expansion of lakes is caused by thermomechanical processes induced by wind-driven water circulation. The predominant bimodal wind regime in the region (easterly and westerly wind) redistributes lake sediment towards the west and east shores to form protective littoral shelves while the north and south shores are preferentially eroded. Previous research on wind-driven circulation in thermokarst lakes was mainly based on in situ studies which can only collect sparse measurements and is time-consuming. Examination of satellite imagery clearly reveals the wide-spread presence of gyres in thermokarst lakes. It allows the study of gyres and other circulation patterns at both lake and regional scales. This study examines the movement (speed, direction) of a 10-km-wide gyre using a Landsat-7 and an ASTER scene taken about 40 minutes apart. These two images are matched using a robust image matching technique based on cross-correlation. Flow speed and direction for the gyre are extracted from the images and are compared with the in situ measurements collected during previous field work. This study provides insight into the evolution of thermokarst lakes and their interaction with the local climate by quantifying gyre circulation rates over entire lakes.

  6. Three very high resolution optical images for land use mapping of a suburban catchment: input to distributed hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacqueminet, Christine; Kermadi, Saïda; Michel, Kristell; Jankowfsky, Sonja; Braud, Isabelle; Branger, Flora; Beal, David; Gagnage, Matthieu

    2010-05-01

    Keywords : land cover mapping, very high resolution, remote sensing processing techniques, object oriented approach, distributed hydrological model, peri-urban area Urbanization and other modifications of land use affect the hydrological cycle of suburban catchments. In order to quantify these impacts, the AVuPUR project (Assessing the Vulnerability of Peri-Urban Rivers) is currently developing a distributed hydrological model that includes anthropogenic features. The case study is the Yzeron catchment (150 km²), located close to Lyon city, France. This catchment experiences a growing of urbanization and a modification of traditional land use since the middle of the 20th century, resulting in an increase of flooding, water pollution and river banks erosion. This contribution discusses the potentials of automated data processing techniques on three different VHR images, in order to produce appropriate and detailed land cover data for the models. Of particular interest is the identification of impermeable surfaces (buildings, roads, and parking places) and permeable surfaces (forest areas, agricultural fields, gardens, trees…) within the catchment, because their infiltration capacity and their impact on runoff generation are different. Three aerial and spatial images were acquired: (1) BD Ortho IGN aerial images, 0.50 m resolution, visible bands, may 5th 2008; (2) QuickBird satellite image, 2.44 m resolution, visible and near-infrared bands, august 29th 2008; (3) Spot satellite image, 2.50 m resolution, visible and near-infrared bands, September 22nd 2008. From these images, we developed three image processing methods: (1) a pixel-based method associated to a segmentation using Matlab®, (2) a pixel-based method using ENVI®, (3) an object-based classification using Definiens®. We extracted six land cover types from the BD Ortho IGN (visible bands) and height classes from the satellite images (visible and near infrared bands). The three classified images are resampled in the same low resolution of 2.5 m and compared in order to evaluate the accuracy of different image processing methods and to determine for each cover type, the more appropriate image and/or method. This comparison provides hydrologists with a synthetic land cover map. Four parameters affect the accuracy of land cover mapping: firstly the addition of the NIR band improves vegetation classification such as the distinction between coniferous forest and broad-leaved forest. Moreover the intensity of chlorophyllian activity allows us to characterize the use of agricultural fields. Secondly, the images were taken at three dates in the agricultural calendar. This multi-date data allows the discrimination between permanently vegetalized pastures, and temporarily bare crops, a useful information for hydrologists who study surfaces hydraulic properties. Thirdly, the high resolution of the BD Ortho IGN image emphasizes the heterogeneity inside the spatial entities. Thus, in urbanised areas, high-resolution imagery allows the precise identification of objects > 5 m2 and consequently the quantification of impervious and pervious surfaces. However, the continuity of forest areas is not maintained because of the presence of small entities with sparser tree cover that were classified as herbaceous areas. Finally, image characteristics are more crucial than classification methods for the accuracy of land cover mapping. However, object based approach improves the classification of mixed pixels on the edge between different objects. It's particularly true for buildings and roads.

  7. Derivation of the scan time requirement for maintaining a consistent PET image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Seok-Ki

    2015-05-01

    Objectives: the image quality of PET for larger patients is relatively poor, even though the injection dose is optimized considering the NECR characteristics of the PET scanner. This poor image quality is due to the lower level of maximum NECR that can be achieved in these large patients. The aim of this study was to optimize the PET scan time to obtain a consistent PET image quality regardless of the body size, based on the relationship between the patient specific NECR (pNECR) and body weight. Methods: eighty patients (M/F=53/27, body weight: 059 ± 1 kg) underwent whole-body FDG PET scans using a Philips GEMINI GS PET/CT scanner after an injection of 0.14 mCi/kg FDG. The relationship between the scatter fraction (SF) and body weight was determined by repeated Monte Carlo simulations using a NEMA scatter phantom, the size of which varied according to the relationship between the abdominal circumference and body weight. Using this information, the pNECR was calculated from the prompt and delayed PET sinograms to obtain the prediction equation of NECR vs. body weight. The time scaling factor (FTS) for the scan duration was finally derived to make PET images with equivalent SNR levels. Results: the SF and NECR had the following nonlinear relationships with the body weight: SF=0.15 ? body weight0.3 and NECR = 421.36 (body weight)-0.84. The equation derived for FTS was 0.01? body weight + 0.2, which means that, for example, a 120-kg person should be scanned 1.8 times longer than a 70 kg person, or the scan time for a 40-kg person can be reduced by 30%. Conclusion: the equation of the relative time demand derived in this study will be useful for maintaining consistent PET image quality in clinics.

  8. Comprehensive Population-Averaged Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Contrast–Enhanced vMagnetic Resonance Imaging of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onxley, Jennifer D.; Yoo, David S.; Muradyan, Naira; MacFall, James R.; Brizel, David M.; Craciunescu, Oana I.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To generate a population-averaged arterial input function (PA-AIF) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in head and neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI during concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Imaging consisted of 2 baseline scans 1 week apart (B1/B2) and 1 scan after 1 week of chemoradiation therapy (Wk1). Regions of interest (ROIs) in the right and left carotid arteries were drawn on coronal images. Plasma concentration curves of all ROIs were averaged and fit to a biexponential decay function to obtain the final PA-AIF (AvgAll). Right-sided and left-sided ROI plasma concentration curves were averaged separately to obtain side-specific AIFs (AvgRight/AvgLeft). Regions of interest were divided by time point to obtain time-point-specific AIFs (AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1). The vascular transfer constant (K{sub trans}) and the fractional extravascular, extracellular space volume (V{sub e}) for primaries and nodes were calculated using the AvgAll AIF, the appropriate side-specific AIF, and the appropriate time-point-specific AIF. Median K{sub trans} and V{sub e} values derived from AvgAll were compared with those obtained from the side-specific and time-point-specific AIFs. The effect of using individual AIFs was also investigated. Results: The plasma parameters for AvgAll were a{sub 1,2} = 27.11/17.65 kg/L, m{sub 1,2} = 11.75/0.21 min{sup ?1}. The coefficients of repeatability (CRs) for AvgAll versus AvgLeft were 0.04 min{sup ?1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. For AvgAll versus AvgRight, the CRs were 0.08 min{sup ?1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. When AvgAll was compared with AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1, the CRs were slightly higher: 0.32/0.19/0.78 min{sup ?1}, respectively, for K{sub trans}; and 0.07/0.08/0.09 for V{sub e}. Use of a PA-AIF was not significantly different from use of individual AIFs. Conclusion: A PA-AIF for head and neck cancer was generated that accounts for differences in right carotid artery versus left carotid artery, day-to-day fluctuations, and early treatment-induced changes. The small CRs obtained for K{sub trans} and V{sub e} indicate that side-specific AIFs are not necessary. However, a time-point-specific AIF may improve pharmacokinetic accuracy.

  9. Hyaluronic acid and its derivatives in drug delivery and imaging: Recent advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tripodo, Giuseppe; Trapani, Adriana; Torre, Maria Luisa; Giammona, Gaetano; Trapani, Giuseppe; Mandracchia, Delia

    2015-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a biodegradable, biocompatible, nontoxic, and non-immunogenic glycosaminoglycan used for various biomedical applications. The interaction of HA with the CD44 receptor, whose expression is elevated on the surface of many types of tumor cells, makes this polymer a promising candidate for intracellular delivery of imaging and anticancer agents exploiting a receptor-mediated active targeting strategy. Therefore, HA and its derivatives have been most investigated for the development of several carrier systems intended for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Nonetheless, different and important delivery applications of the polysaccharide have also been described, including gene and peptide/protein drugs delivery. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the existing recent literature on the use of HA and its derivatives for drug delivery and imaging. Notable attention is given to nanotheranostic systems obtained after conjugation of HA to nanocarriers as quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and graphene. Meanwhile, attention is also paid to some challenging aspects that need to be addressed in order to allow translation of preclinical models based on HA and its derivatives for drug delivery and imaging purposes to clinical testing and further their development. PMID:26614559

  10. Assessment of brain glucose metabolism with input function determined from brain PET images by means of Bayesian ICA and MCMC methods.

    PubMed

    Berradja, Khadidja; Boughanmi, Nabil

    2012-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has the capability to produce regional or parametric images of physiological aspects in a tissue of interest. Apart from the acquired PET data, the concentration of the radiotracer supplied to the tissue through the vascularization has to be known as the input function (IF). IF can be obtained by manual or automatic blood sampling and cross calibrated with PET. These procedures are cumbersome, invasive and generate uncertainties. In the present work, we determine IF from internal artery in fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) brain images by means of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) based on Bayesian theory and Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling method (BICA, Bayesian ICA). Dynamic brain images were decomposed with BICA into image sequences of blood and tissue components. A region of interest was drawn around the internal artery in the blood image to determine BICA-IF. BICA-IF was therefore corrected for spillover of radioactivity emission from tissue, then it was normalized with three plasma samples to correct for partial volume and blood to plasma radioactivity ratio. BICA-IF was found comparable to IF determined by blood sampling, and rCMRG values in several brain structures obtained with BICA-IF and sampled IF showed a bias of 6.4% which was attributed to the difference in the time sampling of 4s for sampled IF versus 15 s for BICA-MC-IF at early times. In conclusion, BICA is a strong approach in image decomposition to extract blood curves in a noninvasive way. PMID:22884568

  11. Derivative-based scale invariant image feature detector with error resilience.

    PubMed

    Mainali, Pradip; Lafruit, Gauthier; Tack, Klaas; Van Gool, Luc; Lauwereins, Rudy

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel scale-invariant image feature detection algorithm (D-SIFER) using a newly proposed scale-space optimal 10th-order Gaussian derivative (GDO-10) filter, which reaches the jointly optimal Heisenberg's uncertainty of its impulse response in scale and space simultaneously (i.e., we minimize the maximum of the two moments). The D-SIFER algorithm using this filter leads to an outstanding quality of image feature detection, with a factor of three quality improvement over state-of-the-art scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) and speeded up robust features (SURF) methods that use the second-order Gaussian derivative filters. To reach low computational complexity, we also present a technique approximating the GDO-10 filters with a fixed-length implementation, which is independent of the scale. The final approximation error remains far below the noise margin, providing constant time, low cost, but nevertheless high-quality feature detection and registration capabilities. D-SIFER is validated on a real-life hyperspectral image registration application, precisely aligning up to hundreds of successive narrowband color images, despite their strong artifacts (blurring, low-light noise) typically occurring in such delicate optical system setups. PMID:24723627

  12. Characterisation of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for SPECT imaging of cerebral prion deposits

    PubMed Central

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kawasaki, Masao; Ogawa, Ayaka; Haratake, Mamoru; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ubagai, Kaori; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nishida, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by deposition of amyloid plaques containing abnormal prion protein aggregates (PrPSc). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of PrPSc. In vitro binding assays using recombinant mouse PrP (rMoPrP) aggregates revealed that the 4-dimethylamino-substituted styrylchromone derivative (SC-NMe2) had higher in vitro binding affinity (Kd?=?24.5?nM) and capacity (Bmax?=?36.3?pmol/nmol protein) than three other flavonoid derivatives (flavone, chalcone, and aurone). Fluorescent imaging using brain sections from mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE)-infected mice demonstrated that SC-NMe2 clearly labelled PrPSc-positive prion deposits in the mice brain. Two methoxy SC derivatives, SC-OMe and SC-(OMe)2, also showed high binding affinity for rMoPrP aggregates with Ki values of 20.8 and 26.6?nM, respectively. In vitro fluorescence and autoradiography experiments demonstrated high accumulation of [125I]SC-OMe and [125I]SC-(OMe)2 in prion deposit-rich regions of the mBSE-infected mouse brain. SPECT/computed tomography (CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [123I]SC-OMe showed consistent brain distribution with the presence of PrPSc deposits in the mBSE-infected mice brain. In conclusion, [123I]SC-OMe appears a promising SPECT radioligand for monitoring prion deposit levels in the living brain. PMID:26669576

  13. Characterisation of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for SPECT imaging of cerebral prion deposits.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Kawasaki, Masao; Ogawa, Ayaka; Haratake, Mamoru; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Sano, Kazunori; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Ubagai, Kaori; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nishida, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterised by deposition of amyloid plaques containing abnormal prion protein aggregates (PrP(Sc)). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of radioiodinated flavonoid derivatives for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of PrP(Sc). In vitro binding assays using recombinant mouse PrP (rMoPrP) aggregates revealed that the 4-dimethylamino-substituted styrylchromone derivative (SC-NMe2) had higher in vitro binding affinity (Kd?=?24.5?nM) and capacity (Bmax?=?36.3?pmol/nmol protein) than three other flavonoid derivatives (flavone, chalcone, and aurone). Fluorescent imaging using brain sections from mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE)-infected mice demonstrated that SC-NMe2 clearly labelled PrP(Sc)-positive prion deposits in the mice brain. Two methoxy SC derivatives, SC-OMe and SC-(OMe)2, also showed high binding affinity for rMoPrP aggregates with Ki values of 20.8 and 26.6?nM, respectively. In vitro fluorescence and autoradiography experiments demonstrated high accumulation of [(125)I]SC-OMe and [(125)I]SC-(OMe)2 in prion deposit-rich regions of the mBSE-infected mouse brain. SPECT/computed tomography (CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [(123)I]SC-OMe showed consistent brain distribution with the presence of PrP(Sc) deposits in the mBSE-infected mice brain. In conclusion, [(123)I]SC-OMe appears a promising SPECT radioligand for monitoring prion deposit levels in the living brain. PMID:26669576

  14. Development of (68)Ga-labeled multivalent nitroimidazole derivatives for hypoxia imaging.

    PubMed

    Seelam, Sudhakara Reddy; Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Yun-Sang; Hong, Mi Kyung; Kim, Young Joo; Banka, Vinay Kumar; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Jeong, Jae Min

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabeled nitroimidazole (NI) derivatives have been extensively studied for imaging hypoxia. To increase the hypoxic tissue uptake, we developed (68)Ga-labeled agents based on mono-, bis-, and trisnitroimidazole conjugates with the chelating agent 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-tris[methyl(2-carboxyethyl)phosphinic acid] (TRAP). All the three agents showed high radiolabeling yields (>96%) and were found to be stable up to 4h in prepared medium at room temperature and in human serum at 37°C. The trivalent agent showed a significant increase in hypoxic to normoxic uptake ratio (p <0.005) according to the in vitro cell uptake experiments. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the presence of hypoxia in xenografted CT26 tumor tissue. The trivalent derivative ((68)Ga-3: 0.17±0.04, (68)Ga-4: 0.33±0.04, (68)Ga-5: 0.45±0.09, and (68)Ga-6: 0.47±0.05% ID/g) showed the highest uptake by tumor cells according to the biodistribution studies in CT-26 xenografted mice. All the nitroimidazole derivatives showed significantly higher uptake by tumor cells than the control agent (p <0.05) at 1h post-injection. The trivalent derivative ((68)Ga-3: 0.10±0.06; (68)Ga-4: 0.20±0.06; (68)Ga-5: 0.33±0.08; (68)Ga-6: 0.59±0.09) also showed the highest standard uptake value for tumor cells at 1h post-injection in animal PET studies using CT-26 xenografted mice. In conclusion, we successfully synthesized multivalent (68)Ga-labeled NI derivatives for imaging hypoxia. Among them, the trivalent agent showed the highest tumor uptake in biodistribution and animal PET studies. PMID:26643217

  15. Monitoring of agricultural drought in Poland using data derived from environmental satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska-Zielinska, K.; Ciolkosz, A.; Malinska, A.; Bartold, M.

    2012-06-01

    In Poland one can observe a lack of sufficientcient amount of rainfall during plant growth season. This results in the occurrence of agricultural drought and the consequent drop in crop yields. For the early detection of drought, satellite images taken by environmental and meteorological satellites have been used. On the basis of these images various plant indices like NDVI, VCI and TCI have been determined. Analysis of changes in these indices allows preparation of maps showing the emergence and extent of drought. These vegetation indices were also used in the model of cereal yield forecast. Comparison of the results provided by the model show a high conformity with the results published by the Polish Central Statistical Office. Elaborated model estimating crop yield reduction due to drought, based on satellite-derived data allows venture of measures to mitigate results of drought and prevent the lowering yields by artificial irrigation.

  16. Hierarchy of Electronic Properties of Chemically Derived and Pristine Graphene Probed by Microwave Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kundhikanjana, W.

    2010-06-02

    Local electrical imaging using microwave impedance microscope is performed on graphene in different modalities, yielding a rich hierarchy of the local conductivity. The low-conductivity graphite oxide and its derivatives show significant electronic inhomogeneity. For the conductive chemical graphene, the residual defects lead to a systematic reduction of the microwave signals. In contrast, the signals on pristine graphene agree well with a lumped-element circuit model. The local impedance information can also be used to verify the electrical contact between overlapped graphene pieces.

  17. Second Release of the High-Resolution Enceladus Atlas derived from Cassini-ISS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, T.; Kersten, E.; Waehlisch, M.; Hoffmeister, A.; Neukum, G.; Helfenstein, P.; Porco, C.

    2009-12-01

    The first version of the high-resolution Enceladus atlas was released back in 2006 [1]. The Cassini Imaging Science Sub-system (ISS) acquired more high-resolution images (< 1 km/pixel) during four close flybys of Enceladus in 2008. We combined these images with lower-resolution coverage taken between 2007 and 2009 to improve the high-resolution global mosaic of Enceladus. The whole mosaic was finally shifted by 3.5° to the West to be consistent with IAU longitude definition. This new global mosaic is the baseline for the second release of the high-resolution Enceladus atlas that consists again of 15 tiles mapped at a scale of 1:500,000. We proposed 29 additional names for features which will be used as nomenclature in the atlas. We are awaiting validation of the new nomenclature by the IAU. The new release of the atlas will be made available to the public through CICLOPS (http://ciclops.org) and PDS (http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov). [1] Roatsch, Th. et al., High-resolution Enceladus atlas derived from Cassini-ISS images. Planetary Space Sciences 56, 109-116, 2008.

  18. Partial correlation analyses of global diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics in glioblastoma multiforme: Pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cortez-Conradis, David; Rios, Camilo; Moreno-Jimenez, Sergio; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine existing correlates among diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived metrics in healthy brains and brains with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). METHODS: Case-control study using DTI data from brain magnetic resonance imaging of 34 controls (mean, 41.47; SD, ± 21.94 years; range, 21-80 years) and 27 patients with GBM (mean, SD; 48.41 ± 15.18 years; range, 18-78 years). Image postprocessing using FSL software calculated eleven tensor metrics: fractional (FA) and relative anisotropy; pure isotropic (p) and anisotropic diffusions (q), total magnitude of diffusion (L); linear (Cl), planar (Cp) and spherical tensors (Cs); mean (MD), axial (AD) and radial diffusivities (RD). Partial correlation analyses (controlling the effect of age and gender) and multivariate Mancova were performed. RESULTS: There was a normal distribution for all metrics. Comparing healthy brains vs brains with GBM, there were significant very strong bivariate correlations only depicted in GBM: [FA?Cl (+)], [FA?q (+)], [p?AD (+)], [AD?MD (+)], and [MD?RD (+)]. Among 56 pairs of bivariate correlations, only seven were significantly different. The diagnosis variable depicted a main effect [F-value (11, 23) = 11.842, P ? 0.001], with partial eta squared = 0.850, meaning a large effect size; age showed a similar result. The age also had a significant influence as a covariate [F (11, 23) = 10.523, P < 0.001], with a large effect size (partial eta squared = 0.834). CONCLUSION: DTI-derived metrics depict significant differences between healthy brains and brains with GBM, with specific magnitudes and correlations. This study provides reference data and makes a contribution to decrease the underlying empiricism in the use of DTI parameters in brain imaging. PMID:26644826

  19. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles derived from natural materials of mango fruit for bio-imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Roy, Arup Kumer; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung-Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials.Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04805a

  20. Vector image method for the derivation of elastostatic solutions for point sources in a plane layered medium. Part 1: Derivation and simple examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fares, Nabil; Li, Victor C.

    1986-01-01

    An image method algorithm is presented for the derivation of elastostatic solutions for point sources in bonded halfspaces assuming the infinite space point source is known. Specific cases were worked out and shown to coincide with well known solutions in the literature.

  1. Sedimentation rates and trace metal input history in intertidal sediments from San Simón Bay (Ría de Vigo, NW Spain) derived from 210Pb and 137Cs chronology.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Iglesias, Paula; Quintana, Begoña; Rubio, Belén; Pérez-Arlucea, Marta

    2007-01-01

    (210)Pb and (137)Cs dating methods, accompanied by a high-resolution geochemical study, were applied to intertidal sediments containing both fine and coarse-grained particles and also, anthropogenic Pb in order to establish sedimentation rates and historical trends in heavy metal input. Sedimentation rates were established according to the "Constant Flux:Constant Sedimentation" (CF:CS) (210)Pb dating model, which was preferred rather than the "Constant Rate of Supply-Minimum Variance" (CRS-MV) model. Variations in sediment grain-size were accounted for by application of several normalization procedures. Al was selected for grain-size correction. Corrected sedimentation rates obtained from (210)Pb dating were corroborated through a second independent radionuclide tracer and by comparison of peak trace metal inputs into the environment with peaks in the sediment. The Chernobyl maximum was identified in the normalized (137)Cs activity profile. Sedimentation rates of 6.2+/-1.2 mm y(-1) and 3.1+/-0.5 mm y(-1) for the upper (two muddy layers) and 6.0+/-2.0 mm y(-1) for the lower (sandy) intertidal mud flat deposits of San Simón Bay were determined. According to the established chronology, human-induced environmental changes were detected in total metal concentrations (Cu, Pb, Zn) and in sediment grain-size and composition. PMID:17611005

  2. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of the rich membrane structures of bone marrow-derived mast cells

    E-print Network

    Liu, Gang-yu

    High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of the rich membrane structures of bone marrow in revised form 1 May 2008 Accepted 23 July 2008 PACS: 68.37 Ps 87.64 Dz Keywords: Bone marrow-derived mast t Atomic force microscopy (AFM) enables high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging of cultured bone

  3. Novel positively charged nanoparticle labeling for in vivo imaging of adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Shingo; Yoshizumi, Yasuma; Watanabe, Masaki; Saito, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Oishi, Koichi; Ono, Kenji; Sawada, Makoto; Kato, Ichiro; Onoshima, Daisuke; Obayashi, Momoko; Hayashi, Yumi; Kaji, Noritada; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Shuji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation has been expected to have various applications for regenerative medicine. However, in order to detect and trace the transplanted stem cells in the body, non-invasive and widely clinically available cell imaging technologies are required. In this paper, we focused on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technology, and investigated whether the trimethylamino dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle -03 (TMADM-03), which was newly developed by our group, could be used for labeling adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) as a contrast agent. No cytotoxicity was observed in ASCs transduced with less than 100 µg-Fe/mL of TMADM-03 after a one hour transduction time. The transduction efficiency of TMADM-03 into ASCs was about four-fold more efficient than that of the alkali-treated dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (ATDM), which is a major component of commercially available contrast agents such as ferucarbotran (Resovist), and the level of labeling was maintained for at least two weeks. In addition, the differentiation ability of ASCs labeled with TMADM-03 and their ability to produce cytokines such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), were confirmed to be maintained. The ASCs labeled with TMADM-03 were transplanted into the left kidney capsule of a mouse. The labeled ASCs could be imaged with good contrast using a 1T MR imaging system. These data suggest that TMADM-03 can therefore be utilized as a contrast agent for the MR imaging of stem cells. PMID:25365191

  4. Novel Positively Charged Nanoparticle Labeling for In Vivo Imaging of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Shingo; Yoshizumi, Yasuma; Watanabe, Masaki; Saito, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Oishi, Koichi; Ono, Kenji; Sawada, Makoto; Kato, Ichiro; Onoshima, Daisuke; Obayashi, Momoko; Hayashi, Yumi; Kaji, Noritada; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Shuji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation has been expected to have various applications for regenerative medicine. However, in order to detect and trace the transplanted stem cells in the body, non-invasive and widely clinically available cell imaging technologies are required. In this paper, we focused on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technology, and investigated whether the trimethylamino dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle -03 (TMADM-03), which was newly developed by our group, could be used for labeling adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) as a contrast agent. No cytotoxicity was observed in ASCs transduced with less than 100 µg-Fe/mL of TMADM-03 after a one hour transduction time. The transduction efficiency of TMADM-03 into ASCs was about four-fold more efficient than that of the alkali-treated dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (ATDM), which is a major component of commercially available contrast agents such as ferucarbotran (Resovist), and the level of labeling was maintained for at least two weeks. In addition, the differentiation ability of ASCs labeled with TMADM-03 and their ability to produce cytokines such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), were confirmed to be maintained. The ASCs labeled with TMADM-03 were transplanted into the left kidney capsule of a mouse. The labeled ASCs could be imaged with good contrast using a 1T MR imaging system. These data suggest that TMADM-03 can therefore be utilized as a contrast agent for the MR imaging of stem cells. PMID:25365191

  5. A complementary dual-slope ADC with high frame rate and wide input range for fast X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daehee; Cho, Minsik; Kang, Dong-Uk; Kim, Myung Soo; Kim, Hyunduk; Cho, Gyuseong

    2014-02-01

    The single-slope analog-to-digital converter (SS-ADC) is the most commonly used column-level ADC for high-speed industrial, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray image sensors because of its small chip area (the width of a pixel), its simple circuit structure, and its low power consumption. However, it generally has a long conversion time, so we propose an innovative design: a complimentary dual-slope ADC (CDS-ADC) that uses two opposite ramp signals instead of a single ramp to double the conversion speed. This CDS-ADC occupies only 15% more area than the original SS-ADC. A prototype 12-bit CDS-ADC and a 12-bit SS-ADC were fabricated using a 0.35-µm 1P 4M CMOS process. During comparison of the two, the measured maximum differential non-linearity (DNL) of the CDS-ADC was a 0.49 least significant bit (LSB), the maximum integral non-linearity (INL) was a 0.43 LSB, the effective number of bits (ENOB) was 9.18 bits, and the figure of merit (FOM) was 0.03 pJ/conversion. The total power consumption was 0.031 uW. The conversion time of the new CDS-ADC was half that of the SS-ADC. The proposed dual-slope concept can be extended to further multiply the conversion speed by using multiple pairs of dual-slope ramps.

  6. Shape and rotational elements of comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko derived by stereo-photogrammetric analysis of OSIRIS NAC image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusker, Frank; Scholten, Frank; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Roatsch, Thomas; Willner, Konrad; Hviid, Stubbe; Knollenberg, Jörg; Kührt, Ekkehard; Sierks, Holger

    2015-04-01

    The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft is equipped with the OSIRIS imaging system which consists of a wide-angle and a narrow-angle camera (WAC and NAC). After the approach phase, Rosetta was inserted into a descent trajectory of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) in early August 2014. Until early September, OSIRIS acquired several hundred NAC images of C-G's surface at different scales (from ~5 m/pixel during approach to ~0.9 m/pixel during descent). In that one month observation period, the surface was imaged several times within different mapping sequences. With the comet's rotation period of ~12.4 h and the low spacecraft velocity (< 1 m/s), the entire NAC dataset provides multiple NAC stereo coverage, adequate for stereo-photogrammetric (SPG) analysis towards the derivation of 3D surface models. We constrained the OSIRIS NAC images with our stereo requirements (15° < stereo angles < 45°, incidence angles <85°, emission angles <45°, differences in illumination < 10°, scale better than 5 m/pixel) and extracted about 220 NAC images that provide at least triple stereo image coverage for the entire illuminated surface in about 250 independent multi-stereo image combinations. For each image combination we determined tie points by multi-image matching in order to set-up a 3D control network and a dense surface point cloud for the precise reconstruction of C-G's shape. The control point network defines the input for a stereo-photogrammetric least squares adjustment. Based on the statistical analysis of adjustments we first refined C-G's rotational state (pole orientation and rotational period) and its behavior over time. Based upon this description of the orientation of C-G's body-fixed reference frame, we derived corrections for the nominal navigation data (pointing and position) within a final stereo-photogrammetric block adjustment where the mean 3D point accuracy of more than 100 million surface points has been improved from ~10 m to the sub-meter range. We finally applied point filtering and interpolation techniques to these surface 3D points and show the resulting SPG-based 3D surface model with a lateral sampling rate of about 2 m.

  7. Monitoring tropical cyclone intensity using wind fields derived from short-interval satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Gentry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid scan visible images from the Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer sensor on board SMS-2 and GOES-1 were used to derive high resolution upper and lower tropospheric environmental wind fields around three western Atlantic tropical cyclones (1975-78). These wind fields were used to derive upper and lower tropospheric areal mean relative vorticity and their differences, the net relative angular momentum balance and upper tropospheric mass outflow. These kinematic parameters were shown by studies using composite rawinsonde data to be strongly related to tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. Also, the role of forced synoptic scale subsidence in tropical cyclone formation was examined. The studies showed that satellite-derived lower and upper tropospheric wind fields can be used to monitor and possibly predict tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. These kinematic analyses showed that future changes in tropical cyclone intensity are mainly related to the "spin-up" of the storms by the net horizontal transport of relative angular momentum caused by convergence of cyclonic vorticity in the lower troposphere and to a lesser extent the divergence of anticyclone vorticity in the upper troposphere.

  8. Resolution and shutter speed measurements of an MCPII with a 270-ps whole image shutter for a point-source input

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.C.; Yates, G.J.; Zagarino, P.

    1995-07-01

    The modulation transfer function (MF) of a shuttered, 18-mm-diameter, proximity-focused microchemical-plate image intensifier (MCPII) was measured as a function of time in the shutter sequence. Electrical gate pulses were delivered to the MCPII with microstrip impedance transformers for reduced pulse dispersion and reflections. Using 30 ps FWHM, 600 nm pulses from a sync-pumped dye, argon-ion laser as a probe, the MCPII`s shutter speed for point-source (6-{mu}m-diameter) illumination and 230 ps FWHM, {minus}590 V gate pulses was measured to be between 200 and 250 ps FWHM. The MF of the MCPII was measured by analyzing the point spread function (PSF) for inputs at several different locations on the MCPII and at different times in the shuttering sequence. The best 50% MF resolution of 16.2 lp/mm was found with illumination near the edge where the gate pulse enters the MCPII and at 120 ps into the shutter sequence. The whole image (18-mm-diameter) shutter speed (off-to-off) of the MCPII was measured to be 270 ps.

  9. Desorption kinetics from a surface derived from direct imaging of the adsorbate layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, S.; Mente?, T. O.; Niño, M. A.; Locatelli, A.; Böcklein, S.; Wintterlin, J.

    2014-05-01

    There are numerous indications that adsorbed particles on a surface do not desorb statistically, but that their spatial distribution is important. Evidence almost exclusively comes from temperature-programmed desorption, the standard method for measuring desorption rates. However, this method, as a kinetics experiment, cannot uniquely prove an atomic mechanism. Here we report a low-energy electron microscopy investigation in which a surface is microscopically imaged while simultaneously temperature-programmed desorption is recorded. The data show that during desorption of oxygen molecules from a silver single crystal surface, islands of oxygen atoms are present. By correlating the microscopy and the kinetics data, a model is derived that includes the shapes of the islands and assumes that the oxygen molecules desorb from the island edges. The model quantitatively reproduces the complex desorption kinetics, confirming that desorption is affected by islands and that the often used mean-field treatment is inappropriate.

  10. A seed expanding cluster algorithm for deriving upwelling areas on sea surface temperature images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Susana; Casca, Sérgio; Mirkin, Boris

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel clustering algorithm is proposed as a version of the seeded region growing (SRG) approach for the automatic recognition of coastal upwelling from sea surface temperature (SST) images. The new algorithm, one seed expanding cluster (SEC), takes advantage of the concept of approximate clustering due to Mirkin (1996, 2013) to derive a homogeneity criterion in the format of a product rather than the conventional difference between a pixel value and the mean of values over the region of interest. It involves a boundary-oriented pixel labeling so that the cluster growing is performed by expanding its boundary iteratively. The starting point is a cluster consisting of just one seed, the pixel with the coldest temperature. The baseline version of the SEC algorithm uses Otsu's thresholding method to fine-tune the homogeneity threshold. Unfortunately, this method does not always lead to a satisfactory solution. Therefore, we introduce a self-tuning version of the algorithm in which the homogeneity threshold is locally derived from the approximation criterion over a window around the pixel under consideration. The window serves as a boundary regularizer. These two unsupervised versions of the algorithm have been applied to a set of 28 SST images of the western coast of mainland Portugal, and compared against a supervised version fine-tuned by maximizing the F-measure with respect to manually labeled ground-truth maps. The areas built by the unsupervised versions of the SEC algorithm are significantly coincident over the ground-truth regions in the cases at which the upwelling areas consist of a single continuous fragment of the SST map.

  11. A 1000-year sediment record of recurring hypoxia off the Mississippi River: The potential role of terrestrially-derived organic matter inputs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Campbell, P.L.; Osterman, L.E.; Poore, R.Z.

    2008-01-01

    A suite of inorganic and organic geochemical tracers and a low-oxygen tolerant benthic faunal index ('PEB') were measured in a 14C-dated 2+??m long gravity core collected on the Louisiana shelf adjacent to the Mississippi River delta to study potential millennium-scale low-oxygen events. Periodic down-core excursions in the PEB index throughout the core suggest recurring, natural bottom water low-oxygen events that extend back ??? 1000??14C years. Select trace element and biomarker distributions in these same sediments were examined as potential tracers of past hypoxic events and to help distinguish between marine versus terrestrial processes involved in organic carbon production. In discrete sediment horizons where the PEB index was elevated, redox-sensitive vanadium concentrations were consistently depleted, excursions in sedimentary ??13C suggest periodic, preferential terrestrial inputs, and the concentrations of two sterol biomarkers (sitosterol and ??-stigmasterol) also showed concurrent enrichments. If the PEB index successfully records ??? 1000??14C year-scale low-oxygen events, then the distribution of these geochemical tracers can be interpreted to corroborate the view that naturally occurring low-oxygen bottom water conditions have existed on the inner Louisiana continental shelf, not only in recent times, but also over at least the last 1000??14C years. These data support the general hypothesis that historic, low-oxygen bottom water conditions on the Louisiana shelf are likely tied to periods of increased fluvial discharge and associated wetland export in the absence of modern river levees. Enhanced river discharge and associated material export would both stimulate enhanced in situ organic carbon production and foster water column stratification. Such periodic elevated river flows during the last millennium can be linked to climate fluctuations and tropical storm activity. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging derived pressure differential using control volume analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is hindered by a lack of systemic understanding of the interrelationships between pressures and flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Control volume analysis provides a fluid physics approach to quantify and relate pressure and flow information. The objective of this study was to use control volume analysis and magnetic resonance velocity imaging to non-invasively estimate pressure differentials in vitro. Method A flow phantom was constructed and water was the experimental fluid. The phantom was connected to a high-resolution differential pressure sensor and a computer controlled pump producing sinusoidal flow. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements were taken and subsequently analyzed to derive pressure differential waveforms using momentum conservation principles. Independent sensor measurements were obtained for comparison. Results Using magnetic resonance data the momentum balance in the phantom was computed. The measured differential pressure force had amplitude of 14.4 dynes (pressure gradient amplitude 0.30 Pa/cm). A 12.5% normalized root mean square deviation between derived and directly measured pressure differential was obtained. These experiments demonstrate one example of the potential utility of control volume analysis and the concepts involved in its application. Conclusions This study validates a non-invasive measurement technique for relating velocity measurements to pressure differential. These methods may be applied to clinical measurements to estimate pressure differentials in vivo which could not be obtained with current clinical sensors. PMID:21414222

  13. Plasma distribution in Mercury's magnetosphere derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2014-04-01

    We assess the statistical spatial distribution of plasma in Mercury's magnetosphere from observations of magnetic pressure deficits and plasma characteristics by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The statistical distributions of proton flux and pressure were derived from 10 months of Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) observations obtained during the orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission. The Magnetometer-derived pressure distributions compare favorably with those deduced from the FIPS observations at locations where depressions in the magnetic field associated with the presence of enhanced plasma pressures are discernible in the Magnetometer data. The magnitudes of the magnetic pressure deficit and the plasma pressure agree on average, although the two measures of plasma pressure may deviate for individual events by as much as a factor of ~3. The FIPS distributions provide better statistics in regions where the plasma is more tenuous and reveal an enhanced plasma population near the magnetopause flanks resulting from direct entry of magnetosheath plasma into the low-latitude boundary layer of the magnetosphere. The plasma observations also exhibit a pronounced north-south asymmetry on the nightside, with markedly lower fluxes at low altitudes in the northern hemisphere than at higher altitudes in the south on the same field line. This asymmetry is consistent with particle loss to the southern hemisphere surface during bounce motion in Mercury's offset dipole magnetic field.

  14. A Quantitative Comparison of Traditional and Image-Derived Bathymetry From Landsats 5, 7, and 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulslander, D.

    2013-12-01

    Though the ocean covers 70% of the earth and is a prime driver of our climate, roughly 95% of it is unexplored. As a basic geophysical parameter, accurate and sufficiently detailed bathymetry is a key piece in understanding the oceans and coasts. Moreover, coastal bathymetry in particular can change rapidly in response to storms, sea level rise, changes in river conditions, and engineering activity. Because of the expense and time involved with traditional, though very accurate, bathymetric methods, remote sensing imagery-derived measurement is often used as a technique for in-fill or rapid response to bathymetry-changing events. While imagery-based bathymetry has been in use for many decades, the techniques and imaging platforms have both evolved and improved over the years. Landsat 8, with its added coastal band, 12-bit capability, 2-week revisit, and global coverage, is an important step forward in updating coastal morphology maps and extending them in to less well-known coastal waters. Here, we present results quantitatively comparing Landsat 5, Landsat 7, and Landsat 8 to sonar-derived bathymetry.

  15. Plasma Distribution in Mercury's Magnetosphere Derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2014-01-01

    We assess the statistical spatial distribution of plasma in Mercury's magnetosphere from observations of magnetic pressure deficits and plasma characteristics by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The statistical distributions of proton flux and pressure were derived from 10months of Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) observations obtained during the orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission. The Magnetometer-derived pressure distributions compare favorably with those deduced from the FIPS observations at locations where depressions in the magnetic field associated with the presence of enhanced plasma pressures are discernible in the Magnetometer data. The magnitudes of the magnetic pressure deficit and the plasma pressure agree on average, although the two measures of plasma pressure may deviate for individual events by as much as a factor of approximately 3. The FIPS distributions provide better statistics in regions where the plasma is more tenuous and reveal an enhanced plasma population near the magnetopause flanks resulting from direct entry of magnetosheath plasma into the low-latitude boundary layer of the magnetosphere. The plasma observations also exhibit a pronounced north-south asymmetry on the nightside, with markedly lower fluxes at low altitudes in the northern hemisphere than at higher altitudes in the south on the same field line. This asymmetry is consistent with particle loss to the southern hemisphere surface during bounce motion in Mercury's offset dipole magnetic field.

  16. Automatic Identification and Truncation of Boundary Outlets in Complex Imaging-Derived Biomedical Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Xiangmin; Einstein, Daniel R.; Dyedov, Volodymyr; Carson, James P.

    2009-09-01

    Fast and accurate reconstruction of imaging-derived geometries and subsequent quality mesh generation for biomedical computation are enabling technologies for both clinical and research simulations. Often, the transformation of image to mesh is the rate-limiting step, requiring arduous manual manipulations. A challenging part of this process is the introduction of computable, orthogonal boundary patches, namely the outlets, into treed structures, such as vasculature, arterial or airway trees. Herein, we present efficient and robust algorithms for automatically identifying and truncating the outlets for complex biomedical geometries. Our approach is based on a conceptual decomposition of objects into three different types of local structures, including tips, segments, and branches, where the tips determine the outlets. We define the tips by introducing a novel geometric concept called the average interior center of curvature (AICC), and identify those that are physically stable and numerically noise resistant through successive inflation and deflation tests. We compute well-defined orthogonal planes, which truncate the tips into outlets. The rims of the outlets are then connected into curves, and the outlets are then closed using Delaunay triangulation with the curves as the boundary constraints. Our approach is efficient, with near linear time complexity. We illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of our approach with a variety of complex lung and coronary artery geometries.

  17. TLC-image analysis of non-chromophoric tuberostemonine alkaloid derivatives in Stemona species.

    PubMed

    Kongkiatpaiboon, Sumet; Keeratinijakal, Vichien; Gritsanapan, Wandee

    2013-08-01

    A simple, selective, precise, and accurate thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) image analytical method was developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of the major components in the root extracts of Stemona tuberosa (tuberostemonine, tuberostemonine N and neotuberostemonine)), and S. phyllantha (tuberostemonine and tuberostemonine A). The analysis was performed by TLC on silica gel 60 F254 aluminum plates using a mixture of dichloromethane: ethyl acetate: methanol: ammonium hydroxide (50:45:4:1) as mobile phase. Post-derivatization was employed by dipping the TLC plate into Dragendorff's reagent to visualize the spots. Image analysis of the scanned TLC plate was performed to detect the contents of tuberostemonine derivatives. The polynomial regression data for the calibration plots showed good linear relationships within the concentration range of 2-7 microg/spot. The method gave satisfactory precision, accuracy, selectivity and could simultaneously quantify tuberostemonine, tuberostemonine A, tuberostemonine N and neotuberostemonine. Dried powdered roots of S. tuberosa grown in Thailand contained 1.31 +/- 0.28, 1.63 +/- 0.18 and 1.24 +/- 0.27% tuberostemonine, tuberostemonine N, and neotuberostemonine (dry weight), respectively, while S. phyllantha roots contained 1.39 +/- 0.14% tuberostemonine and 0.39 +/- 0.08% tuberostemonine A (dry weight). The proposed method was simple, inexpensive, and more accessible to apply for many local authorities and small laboratories. PMID:24079167

  18. Arterial input function of an optical tracer for dynamic contrast enhanced imaging can be determined from pulse oximetry oxygen saturation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Wright, Eric A.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B.; Pogue, Brian W.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2012-12-01

    In many cases, kinetic modeling requires that the arterial input function (AIF)—the time-dependent arterial concentration of a tracer—be characterized. A straightforward method to measure the AIF of red and near-infrared optical dyes (e.g., indocyanine green) using a pulse oximeter is presented. The method is motivated by the ubiquity of pulse oximeters used in both preclinical and clinical applications, as well as the gap in currently available technologies to measure AIFs in small animals. The method is based on quantifying the interference that is observed in the derived arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) following a bolus injection of a light-absorbing dye. In other words, the change in SaO2 can be converted into dye concentration knowing the chromophore-specific extinction coefficients, the true arterial oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration. A simple error analysis was performed to highlight potential limitations of the approach, and a validation of the method was conducted in rabbits by comparing the pulse oximetry method with the AIF acquired using a pulse dye densitometer. Considering that determining the AIF is required for performing quantitative tracer kinetics, this method provides a flexible tool for measuring the arterial dye concentration that could be used in a variety of applications.

  19. Monitoring seasonal state and mapping species in Alaskan taiga using imaging radar as input to CO[sub 2] flux models

    SciTech Connect

    Way, J.B.; Rignot, E.; McDonald, K.; Adams, P.; Viereck, L. Institute of Northern Forestry, Fairbanks, AK )

    1993-06-01

    Changes in the seasonal CO[sub 2] flux of the boreal forests may result from increased atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentrations and associated atmospheric warming. To monitor this potential change, a combination of remote sensing information and ecophysiological models are required. In this paper we address the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to provide some of the input to the ecophysiological models: forest type, freeze/thaw state which limits the growing season for conifers, and leaf on/off state which limits the growing season for deciduous species. AIRSAR data collected in March 1988 during an early thaw event and May 1991 during spring breakup are used to generate species maps and to determine the sensitivity of SAR to canopy freeze/thaw transitions. These data are also used to validate a microwave scattering model which is then used to determine the sensitivity of SAR to leaf on/off and soil freeze/thaw transitions. Finally, a CO[sub 2] flux algorithm which utilizes SAR data and an ecophysiological model to estimate CO[sub 2] flux is presented. CO[sub 2] flux maps are generated from which areal estimates of CO[sub 2] flux are derived. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract to the NASA.

  20. (abstract) Monitoring Seasonal State and Mapping Species in Alaskan Taiga Using Imaging Radar as Input to CO(sub 2) Flux Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, J. B.; Rignot, E.; McDonald, K.; Adams, P.; Viereck, L.

    1993-01-01

    Changes in the seasonal CO(sub 2) flux of the boreal forests may result from increased atmospheric CO(sub 2) concentrations and associated atmospheric warming. To monitor this potential change, a combination of remote sensing information and ecophysiological models are required. In this paper we address the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to provide some of the input to the ecophysiological models: forest type, freeze/thaw state which limits the growing season for conifers, and leaf on/off state which limits the growing season for deciduous species. AIRSAR data collected in March 1988 during an early thaw event and May 1991 during spring breakup are used to generate species maps and to determine the sensitivity of SAR to canopy freeze/thaw transitions. These data are also used to validate a microwave scattering model which is then used to determine the sensitivity of SAR to leaf on/off and soil freeze/thaw transitions. Finally, a CO(sub 2) flux algorithm which utilizes SAR data and an ecophysiological model to estimate CO(sub 2) flux is presented. CO(sub 2) flux maps are generated from which areal estimates of CO(sub 2) flux are derived.

  1. Comparison of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging Derived Carotid Plaque Stiffness With Spatially Registered MRI Determined Composition.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Joshua R; Dahl, Jeremy J; Kranz, Peter G; El Husseini, Nada; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chen, Nan-Kuei; Allen, Jason D; Ham, Katherine L; Trahey, Gregg E

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of plaque stiffness may provide important prognostic and diagnostic information to help clinicians distinguish vulnerable plaques containing soft lipid pools from more stable, stiffer plaques. In this preliminary study, we compare in vivo ultrasonic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging derived measures of carotid plaque stiffness with composition determined by spatially registered Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in five human subjects with stenosis > 50%. Ultrasound imaging was implemented on a commercial diagnostic scanner with custom pulse sequences to collect spatially registered 2D longitudinal B-mode and ARFI images. A standardized, multi-contrast weighted MRI sequence was used to obtain 3D Time of Flight (TOF), T1 weighted (T1W), T2 weighted (T2W), and Proton Density Weighted (PDW) transverse image stacks of volumetric data. The MRI data was segmented to identify lipid, calcium, and normal loose matrix components using commercially available software. 3D MRI segmented plaque models were rendered and spatially registered with 2D B-mode images to create fused ultrasound and MRI volumetric images for each subject. ARFI imaging displacements in regions of interest (ROIs) derived from MRI segmented contours of varying composition were compared. Regions of calcium and normal loose matrix components identified by MRI presented as homogeneously stiff regions of similarly low (typically ? 1 ?m) displacement in ARFI imaging. MRI identified lipid pools > 2 mm(2), found in three out of five subjects, presented as softer regions of increased displacement that were on average 1.8 times greater than the displacements in adjacent regions of loose matrix components in spatially registered ARFI images. This work provides early evidence supporting the use of ARFI imaging to noninvasively identify lipid regions in carotid artery plaques in vivo that are believed to increase the propensity of a plaque to rupture. Additionally, the results provide early training data for future studies and aid in the interpretation and possible clinical utility of ARFI imaging for identifying the elusive vulnerable plaque. PMID:25974933

  2. Exploration of peptide T7 and its derivative as integrin ?v?3-targeted imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Hao, Yumei; Long, Wei; Song, Naling; Fan, Saijun; Meng, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop potential candidates of integrin ?v?3-targeted imaging agent, which can facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of malignant solid tumors. Methods Peptides derived from tumstatin, named T7 and T7-6H, were derivatized to contain histidine in the C-terminus of their sequence and were labeled with 99mTc via nitrido and carbonyl precursors. The radiochemical purity and stability of 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H were characterized by thin-layer chromatography. The whole body biodistribution was studied in NCI-H157-bearing BALB/c nude mice. Results The 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H showed adequate in vitro stability, with a high radiochemical purity of over 90%. The dissociation constant (Kd) value of the 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H ranged from 68.5 nM to 140.8 nM in U251 and NCI-H157 cell lines. 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H showed no significant difference of biodistribution in mice. Furthermore, both T7 and T7-6H exhibited a poor blood–brain barrier penetration and a transient accumulation in lung; the uptake in tumor tissues was significantly higher than in muscle tissue, with a ratio of 5.8. Conclusion 99mTc-labeled T7 and T7-6H can be regarded as promising single-photon emission computed tomography probes for imaging integrin ?v?3, and need to be further studied for noninvasive detection of tumors. PMID:26109872

  3. Synthesis of [18F]-labelled Maltose Derivatives as PET Tracers for Imaging Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Namavari, Mohammad; Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Hoehne, Aileen; Jouannot, Erwan; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop novel positron emission tomography (PET) agents for visualization and therapy monitoring of bacterial infections. Procedures It is known that maltose and maltodextrins are energy sources for bacteria. Hence, 18F-labelled maltose derivatives could be a valuable tool for imaging bacterial infections. We have developed methods to synthesize 4-O-(?-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-deoxy-6-[18F]fluoro-D-glucopyranoside (6-[18F]fluoromaltose) and 4-O-(?-D-glucopyranosyl)-1-deoxy-1-[18F]fluoro-D-glucopyranoside (1-[18F]fluoromaltose) as bacterial infection PET imaging agents. 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was prepared from precursor 1,2,3-tri-O-acetyl-4-O-(2?,3?,-di-O-acetyl-4?,6?-benzylidene-?-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-deoxy-6-nosyl-D-glucopranoside (5). The synthesis involved the radio-fluorination of 5 followed by acidic and basic hydrolysis to give 6-[18F]fluoromaltose. In an analogous procedure, 1-[18F]fluoromaltose was synthesized from 2,3, 6-tri-O-acetyl-4-O-(2?,3?,4?,6-tetra-O-acetyl-?-D-glucopyranosyl)-1-deoxy-1-O-triflyl-D-glucopranoside (9). Stability of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human and mouse serum at 37 °C was determined. Escherichia coli uptake of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was examined. Results A reliable synthesis of 1- and 6-[18F]fluoromaltose has been accomplished with 4–6 and 5–8 % radiochemical yields, respectively (decay-corrected with 95 % radiochemical purity). 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was sufficiently stable over the time span needed for PET studies (~96 % intact compound after 1-h and ~65 % after 2-h incubation in serum). Bacterial uptake experiments indicated that E. coli transports 6-[18F]fluoromaltose. Competition assays showed that the uptake of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose was completely blocked by co-incubation with 1 mM of the natural substrate maltose. Conclusion We have successfully synthesized 1- and 6-[18F]fluoromaltose via direct fluorination of appropriate protected maltose precursors. Bacterial uptake experiments in E. coli and stability studies suggest a possible application of 6-[18F]fluoromaltose as a new PET imaging agent for visualization and monitoring of bacterial infections. PMID:25277604

  4. Mapping and monitoring changes in vegetation communities of Jasper Ridge, CA, using spectral fractions derived from AVIRIS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabol, Donald E., Jr.; Roberts, Dar A.; Adams, John B.; Smith, Milton O.

    1993-01-01

    An important application of remote sensing is to map and monitor changes over large areas of the land surface. This is particularly significant with the current interest in monitoring vegetation communities. Most of traditional methods for mapping different types of plant communities are based upon statistical classification techniques (i.e., parallel piped, nearest-neighbor, etc.) applied to uncalibrated multispectral data. Classes from these techniques are typically difficult to interpret (particularly to a field ecologist/botanist). Also, classes derived for one image can be very different from those derived from another image of the same area, making interpretation of observed temporal changes nearly impossible. More recently, neural networks have been applied to classification. Neural network classification, based upon spectral matching, is weak in dealing with spectral mixtures (a condition prevalent in images of natural surfaces). Another approach to mapping vegetation communities is based on spectral mixture analysis, which can provide a consistent framework for image interpretation. Roberts et al. (1990) mapped vegetation using the band residuals from a simple mixing model (the same spectral endmembers applied to all image pixels). Sabol et al. (1992b) and Roberts et al. (1992) used different methods to apply the most appropriate spectral endmembers to each image pixel, thereby allowing mapping of vegetation based upon the the different endmember spectra. In this paper, we describe a new approach to classification of vegetation communities based upon the spectra fractions derived from spectral mixture analysis. This approach was applied to three 1992 AVIRIS images of Jasper Ridge, California to observe seasonal changes in surface composition.

  5. Glacier topography and elevation changes derived from Pléiades sub-meter stereo images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, E.; Vincent, C.; Magnússon, E.; Gunnlaugsson, Á. Þ.; Pitte, P.; Le Meur, E.; Masiokas, M.; Ruiz, L.; Pálsson, F.; Belart, J. M. C.; Wagnon, P.

    2014-12-01

    In response to climate change, most glaciers are losing mass and hence contribute to sea-level rise. Repeated and accurate mapping of their surface topography is required to estimate their mass balance and to extrapolate/calibrate sparse field glaciological measurements. In this study we evaluate the potential of sub-meter stereo imagery from the recently launched Pléiades satellites to derive digital elevation models (DEMs) of glaciers and their elevation changes. Our five evaluation sites, where nearly simultaneous field measurements were collected, are located in Iceland, the European Alps, the central Andes, Nepal and Antarctica. For Iceland, the Pléiades DEM is also compared to a lidar DEM. The vertical biases of the Pléiades DEMs are less than 1 m if ground control points (GCPs) are used, but reach up to 7 m without GCPs. Even without GCPs, vertical biases can be reduced to a few decimetres by horizontal and vertical co-registration of the DEMs to reference altimetric data on ice-free terrain. Around these biases, the vertical precision of the Pléiades DEMs is ±1 m and even ±0.5 m on the flat glacier tongues (1? confidence level). Similar precision levels are obtained in the accumulation areas of glaciers and in Antarctica. We also demonstrate the high potential of Pléiades DEMs for measuring seasonal, annual and multi-annual elevation changes with an accuracy of 1 m or better if cloud-free images are available. The negative region-wide mass balances of glaciers in the Mont-Blanc area (-1.04 ± 0.23 m a-1 water equivalent, w.e.) are revealed by differencing Satellite pour l'Observation de la Terre 5 (SPOT 5) and Pléiades DEMs acquired in August 2003 and 2012, confirming the accelerated glacial wastage in the European Alps.

  6. Characteristics and variability of structural networks derived from diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hu; Wang, Yang; Sheng, Jinhua; Kronenberger, William G.; Mathews, Vincent P.; Hummer, Tom A.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Structural brain networks were constructed based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data of 59 young healthy male adults. The networks had 68 nodes, derived from FreeSurfer parcellation of the cortical surface. By means of streamline tractography, the edge weight was defined as the number of streamlines between two nodes normalized by their mean volume. Specifically, two weighting schemes were adopted by considering various biases from fiber tracking. The weighting schemes were tested for possible bias toward the physical size of the nodes. A novel thresholding method was proposed using the variance of number of streamlines in fiber tracking. The backbone networks were extracted and various network analyses were applied to investigate the features of the binary and weighted backbone networks. For weighted networks, a high correlation was observed between nodal strength and betweenness centrality. Despite similar small-worldness features, binary networks and weighted networks are distinctive in many aspects, such as modularity and nodal betweenness centrality. Inter-subject variability was examined for the weighted networks, along with the test–retest reliability from two repeated scans on 44 of the 59 subjects. The inter-/intra-subject variability of weighted networks was discussed in three levels — edge weights, local metrics, and global metrics. The variance of edge weights can be very large. Although local metrics show less variability than the edge weights, they still have considerable amounts of variability. Weighting scheme one, which scales the number of streamlines by their lengths, demonstrates stable intra-class correlation coefficients against thresholding for global efficiency, clustering coefficient and diversity. The intra-class correlation analysis suggests the current approach of constructing weighted network has a reasonably high reproducibility for most global metrics. PMID:22450298

  7. Reproducibility of the Structural Brain Connectome Derived from Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Leonardo; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris; Breedlove, Jesse L.; Nesland, Travis; Paulus, Walter; Helms, Gunther; Focke, Niels K.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Disruptions of brain anatomical connectivity are believed to play a central role in several neurological and psychiatric illnesses. The structural brain connectome is typically derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which may be influenced by methodological factors related to signal processing, MRI scanners and biophysical properties of neuroanatomical regions. In this study, we evaluated how these variables affect the reproducibility of the structural connectome. Methods Twenty healthy adults underwent 3 MRI scanning sessions (twice in the same MRI scanner and a third time in a different scanner unit) within a short period of time. The scanning sessions included similar T1 weighted and DTI sequences. Deterministic or probabilistic tractography was performed to assess link weight based on the number of fibers connecting gray matter regions of interest (ROI). Link weight and graph theory network measures were calculated and reproducibility was assessed through intra-class correlation coefficients, assuming each scanning session as a rater. Results Connectome reproducibility was higher with data from the same scanner. The probabilistic approach yielded larger reproducibility, while the individual variation in the number of tracked fibers from deterministic tractography was negatively associated with reproducibility. Links connecting larger and anatomically closer ROIs demonstrated higher reproducibility. In general, graph theory measures demonstrated high reproducibility across scanning sessions. Discussion Anatomical factors and tractography approaches can influence the reproducibility of the structural connectome and should be factored in the interpretation of future studies. Our results demonstrate that connectome mapping is a largely reproducible technique, particularly as it relates to the geometry of network architecture measured by graph theory methods. PMID:26332788

  8. [F-18]-Fluoromisonidazole Quantification of Hypoxia in Human Cancer Patients using Image-derived Blood Surrogate Tissue Reference Regions

    PubMed Central

    Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; O’Sullivan, Janet N.; Fink, James R.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; McLaughlin, Lena J.; Muzi, John P.; Mankoff, David A.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    18F-FMISO is the most widely used PET agent for imaging hypoxia, a condition associated with resistance to tumor therapy. 18F-FMISO equilibrates in normoxic tissues, but is retained under hypoxic conditions because of reduction and binding to macromolecules. A simple tissue-to-blood ratio (TB) is suitable for quantifying hypoxia. A threshold of TB ? 1.2 is useful in discriminating the hypoxic volume (HV) of tissue; TBmax is the maximum intensity of the hypoxic region and does not invoke a threshold. Because elimination of blood sampling would simplify clinical use, we tested the validity of using imaging regions as a surrogate for blood sampling. Methods Patients underwent 20 min 18F-FMISO scans during the 90–140 min interval post-injection with venous blood sampling. 223 18F-FMISO patient studies had detectable surrogate blood regions in the field-of-view. Quantitative parameters of hypoxia (TBmax, HV) derived from blood samples were compared to values using surrogate blood regions derived from heart, aorta and/or cerebellum. In a subset of brain cancer patients, parameters from blood samples and from cerebellum were compared for their ability to independently predict outcome. Results Vascular regions of heart showed the highest correlation to measured blood activity (R2 = 0.84). For brain studies, cerebellar activity was similarly correlated to blood samples. In brain cancer patients, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that image-derived reference regions had nearly identical predictive power as parameters derived from blood, thus obviating the need for venous sampling in these patients. Conclusions Simple static analysis of 18F-FMISO PET captures both the intensity (TBmax) and spatial extent (HV) of tumor hypoxia. An image-derived region to assess blood activity can be used as a surrogate for blood sampling in quantification of hypoxia. PMID:26112020

  9. Modeling Stokes flow in real pore geometries derived by high resolution micro CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halisch, M.; Müller, C.

    2012-04-01

    Meanwhile, numerical modeling of rock properties forms an important part of modern petrophysics. Substantially, equivalent rock models are used to describe and assess specific properties and phenomena, like fluid transport or complex electrical properties. In recent years, non-destructive computed X-ray tomography got more and more important - not only to take a quick and three dimensional look into rock samples but also to get access to in-situ sample information for highly accurate modeling purposes. Due to - by now - very high resolution of the 3D CT data sets (micron- to submicron range) also very small structures and sample features - e.g. micro porosity - can be visualized and used for numerical models of very high accuracy. Special demands even arise before numerical modeling can take place. Inappropriate filter applications (e.g. improper type of filter, wrong kernel, etc.) may lead to a significant corruption of spatial sample structure and / or even sample or void space volume. Because of these difficulties, especially small scale mineral- and pore space textures are very often lost and valuable in-situ information is erased. Segmentation of important sample features - porosity as well as rock matrix - based upon grayscale values strongly depends upon the scan quality and upon the experience of the application engineer, respectively. If the threshold for matrix-porosity separation is set too low, porosity can be quickly (and even more, due to restrictions of scanning resolution) underestimated. Contrary to this, a too high threshold over-determines porosity and small void space features as well as interfaces are changed and falsified. Image based phase separation in close combination with "conventional" analytics, as scanning electron microscopy or thin sectioning, greatly increase the reliability of this preliminary work. For segmentation and quantification purposes, a special CT imaging and processing software (Avizo Fire) has been used. By using this tool, 3D rock data can be assessed and interpreted by petrophysical means. Furthermore, pore structures can be directly segmented and hence could be used for so called image based modeling approach. The special XLabHydro module grants a finite volume solver for the direct assessment of Stokes flow (incompressible fluid, constant dynamic viscosity, stationary conditions and laminar flow) in real pore geometries. Nevertheless, also pore network extraction and numerical modeling with standard FE or lattice Boltzmann solvers is possible. By using the achieved voxel resolution as smallest node distance, fluid flow properties can be analyzed even in very small sample structures and hence with very high accuracy, especially with interaction to bigger parts of the pore network. The so derived results in combination with a direct 3D visualization within the structures offer great new insights and understanding in range of meso- and microscopic pore space phenomena.

  10. High-resolution atlas of Rhea derived from Cassini-ISS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, Th.; Kersten, E.; Wählisch, M.; Hoffmeister, A.; Matz, K.-D.; Scholten, F.; Wagner, R.; Denk, T.; Neukum, G.; Porco, C. C.

    2012-02-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) acquired 370 high-resolution images (<500 m/pixel) of Rhea during two close flybys and 9 non-targeted flybys between 2004 and 2010. We combined these images with lower-resolution Cassini images and others taken by the Voyager cameras to produce a high-resolution semi-controlled mosaic of Rhea. This global mosaic is the baseline for a high-resolution Rhea atlas. The nomenclature used in this atlas was proposed by the Cassini imaging team and approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The atlas is available to the public through the Imaging Team's website and the Planetary Data System . This atlas completes the series of the atlases of the Saturnian medium-sized satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, and Iapetus.

  11. Improved High Resolution Controlled Enceladus Atlas derived from Cassini-ISS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, T.; Kersten, E.; Hoffmeister, A.; Matz, K.-D.; Preusker, F.; Porco, C. C.

    2012-09-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) acquired 684 high-resolution images (< 1 km/pixel) of Enceladus during its tour through the Saturnian system since 2004. We have combined these images with lower-resolution Cassini images to produce a new high-resolution global controlled mosaic of this moonf Enceladus. This global mosaic is the baseline for the highresolution Enceladus atlas that consists of 15 tiles mapped at a scale of 1:500,000. The nomenclature used in this atlas was proposed by the Cassini imaging team and was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The whole atlas is available to the public through the Imaging Team's website [http://ciclops.org/maps].

  12. Natural-color and color-infrared image mosaics of the Colorado River corridor in Arizona derived from the May 2009 airborne image collection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) periodically collects airborne image data for the Colorado River corridor within Arizona (fig. 1) to allow scientists to study the impacts of Glen Canyon Dam water release on the corridor’s natural and cultural resources. These data are collected from just above Glen Canyon Dam (in Lake Powell) down to the entrance of Lake Mead, for a total distance of 450 kilometers (km) and within a 500-meter (m) swath centered on the river’s mainstem and its seven main tributaries (fig. 1). The most recent airborne data collection in 2009 acquired image data in four wavelength bands (blue, green, red, and near infrared) at a spatial resolution of 20 centimeters (cm). The image collection used the latest model of the Leica ADS40 airborne digital sensor (the SH52), which uses a single optic for all four bands and collects and stores band radiance in 12-bits. Davis (2012) reported on the performance of the SH52 sensor and on the processing steps required to produce the nearly flawless four-band image mosaic (sectioned into map tiles) for the river corridor. The final image mosaic has a total of only 3 km of surface defects in addition to some areas of cloud shadow because of persistent inclement weather during data collection. The 2009 four-band image mosaic is perhaps the best image dataset that exists for the entire Arizona part of the Colorado River. Some analyses of these image mosaics do not require the full 12-bit dynamic range or all four bands of the calibrated image database, in which atmospheric scattering (or haze) had not been removed from the four bands. To provide scientists and the general public with image products that are more useful for visual interpretation, the 12-bit image data were converted to 8-bit natural-color and color-infrared images, which also removed atmospheric scattering within each wavelength-band image. The conversion required an evaluation of the histograms of each band’s digital-number population within each map tile throughout the corridor and the determination of the digital numbers corresponding to the lower and upper one percent of the picture-element population within each map tile. Visual examination of the image tiles that were given a 1-percent stretch (whereby the lower 1- percent 12-bit digital number is assigned an 8-bit value of zero and the upper 1-percent 12-bit digital number is assigned an 8-bit value of 255) indicated that this stretch sufficiently removed atmospheric scattering, which provided improved image clarity and true natural colors for all surface materials. The lower and upper 1-percent, 12-bit digital numbers for each wavelength-band image in the image tiles exhibit erratic variations along the river corridor; the variations exhibited similar trends in both the lower and upper 1-percent digital numbers for all four wavelength-band images (figs. 2–5). The erratic variations are attributed to (1) daily variations in atmospheric water-vapor content due to monsoonal storms, (2) variations in channel water color due to variable sediment input from tributaries, and (3) variations in the amount of topographic shadows within each image tile, in which reflectance is dominated by atmospheric scattering. To make the surface colors of the stretched, 8-bit images consistent among adjacent image tiles, it was necessary to average both the lower and upper 1-percent digital values for each wavelength-band image over 20 river miles to subdue the erratic variations. The average lower and upper 1-percent digital numbers for each image tile (figs. 2–5) were used to convert the 12-bit image values to 8-bit values and the resulting 8-bit four-band images were stored as natural-color (red, green, and blue wavelength bands) and color-infrared (near-infrared, red, and green wavelength bands) images in embedded geotiff format, which can be read and used by most geographic information system (GIS) and image-processing software. The tiff world files (tfw) are provided, even though they are generally

  13. Identification and detection of oil and oil-derived substances at the surface and subsurface levels via hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. S.; Gollapalli, R. P.; Sidike, P.

    2012-04-01

    Detection and estimation of oil and oil-derived substances from an oil spill is a challenging issue. Over the last few years, several algorithms have been proposed for the detection of oil on the ocean surface. These techniques do not address the issue of detection of subsurface oil and estimate the depth of the location of oil at the subsurface level. In this paper, algorithms are developed to detect the presence of surface oil in ocean water using hyperspectral imagery. A support vector machine classifier was trained using region-of-interests (ROIs) to classify the oil/oil-derived substances under the water surface in the Gulf of Mexico. Using the pixel intensity of the identified oil based image, Beer-Lambert's law is used to calculate the depth at which the oil and/or oil-derived substance are present in the scene of investigation.

  14. Digital Image Processing "Cookbook": A method to derive bathymetric data from high spatial resolution multi-

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    are available. Software Used ArcGIS 9.2 ENVI 4.3 Microsoft Excel 2003 S-PLUS (statistical analysis software) #12;Processing Method: Overview 1) Viewing of Images Software: ENVI, ArcGIS 2) Data Conversion from DN (digital Images Software: ENVI, ArcGIS 7) Extract Linearized Spectral Values and Depth Data Software: ArcGIS 8

  15. IB-08COMPUTATIONAL IMAGING FEATURES DERIVED FROM MRI IMAGES OF THE BRAIN CAN DISCRIMINATE IMMUNE SIGNATURE STATUS IN GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME (GBM)

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Shivali; Rao, Ganesh; Heimberger, Amy; Martinez, Juan; Rao, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine which computationally derived imaging features are correlated with immune gene-signature activity in GBM. Recently, we showed that immune-related genes are enriched within molecular subtypes of GBMs. The significance of immune system response to the tumor is becoming relevant as a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we investigated an imaging-based method for determining the immune system response to GBM. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The study was conducted on pre-surgical Contrast enhanced T1-post and T2-FLAIR MRI images from 83 GBM patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas(TCGA) database. The tumors were segmented semi-automatically (MITK toolkit). Image heterogeneity features were extracted for 3D volumes using in-house MatlabTM scripts . Features include three-dimensional statistical, transform-based and model-based features, pertaining to pixel gray-level heterogeneity measures such as energy, entropy, correlationGenetic programming-based models are used to discriminate subjects according to up- or down-regulation of six immune signatures (measured using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis): immune effector, immune suppression, immune effector process, regulation of the immune effector process, positive regulation of immune system process and negative regulation of immune system process. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves (ROC), and true positive/false positive rates (TPR/FPR) were used to assess the performance of the immune signature status classifier. RESULTS: Based on six different gene-sets associated with immune response, we found that image-derived features are capable of accurately predicting immune signature status in GBMs. ROC analysis reveals that image-features are capable of determining up- or down regulation of diverse immune signatures. The true positive rates (TPR) for each of the six immune signatures are 89%, 83%, 80%, 78%, 72% and 69% respectively (with FPR less than 20%). CONCLUSION: This study presents preliminary evidence that MRI image-derived volumetric and texture features are predictive of immune activity in GBM at the molecular level.

  16. COMETARY SCIENCE. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko surface properties as derived from CIVA panoramic images.

    PubMed

    Bibring, J-P; Langevin, Y; Carter, J; Eng, P; Gondet, B; Jorda, L; Le Mouélic, S; Mottola, S; Pilorget, C; Poulet, F; Vincendon, M

    2015-07-31

    The structure and composition of cometary constituents, down to their microscopic scale, are critical witnesses of the processes and ingredients that drove the formation and evolution of planetary bodies toward their present diversity. On board Rosetta's lander Philae, the Comet Infrared and Visible Analyser (CIVA) experiment took a series of images to characterize the surface materials surrounding the lander on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Images were collected twice: just after touchdown, and after Philae finally came to rest, where it acquired a full panorama. These images reveal a fractured surface with complex structure and a variety of grain scales and albedos, possibly constituting pristine cometary material. PMID:26228154

  17. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko surface properties as derived from CIVA panoramic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibring, J.-P.; Langevin, Y.; Carter, J.; Eng, P.; Gondet, B.; Jorda, L.; Le Mouélic, S.; Mottola, S.; Pilorget, C.; Poulet, F.; Vincendon, M.

    2015-07-01

    The structure and composition of cometary constituents, down to their microscopic scale, are critical witnesses of the processes and ingredients that drove the formation and evolution of planetary bodies toward their present diversity. On board Rosetta’s lander Philae, the Comet Infrared and Visible Analyser (CIVA) experiment took a series of images to characterize the surface materials surrounding the lander on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Images were collected twice: just after touchdown, and after Philae finally came to rest, where it acquired a full panorama. These images reveal a fractured surface with complex structure and a variety of grain scales and albedos, possibly constituting pristine cometary material.

  18. Three-dimensional image technology in forensic anthropology: Assessing the validity of biological profiles derived from CT-3D images of the skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Leon Valenzuela, Maria Julia

    This project explores the reliability of building a biological profile for an unknown individual based on three-dimensional (3D) images of the individual's skeleton. 3D imaging technology has been widely researched for medical and engineering applications, and it is increasingly being used as a tool for anthropological inquiry. While the question of whether a biological profile can be derived from 3D images of a skeleton with the same accuracy as achieved when using dry bones has been explored, bigger sample sizes, a standardized scanning protocol and more interobserver error data are needed before 3D methods can become widely and confidently used in forensic anthropology. 3D images of Computed Tomography (CT) scans were obtained from 130 innominate bones from Boston University's skeletal collection (School of Medicine). For each bone, both 3D images and original bones were assessed using the Phenice and Suchey-Brooks methods. Statistical analysis was used to determine the agreement between 3D image assessment versus traditional assessment. A pool of six individuals with varying experience in the field of forensic anthropology scored a subsample (n = 20) to explore interobserver error. While a high agreement was found for age and sex estimation for specimens scored by the author, the interobserver study shows that observers found it difficult to apply standard methods to 3D images. Higher levels of experience did not result in higher agreement between observers, as would be expected. Thus, a need for training in 3D visualization before applying anthropological methods to 3D bones is suggested. Future research should explore interobserver error using a larger sample size in order to test the hypothesis that training in 3D visualization will result in a higher agreement between scores. The need for the development of a standard scanning protocol focusing on the optimization of 3D image resolution is highlighted. Applications for this research include the possibility of digitizing skeletal collections in order to expand their use and for deriving skeletal collections from living populations and creating population-specific standards. Further research for the development of a standard scanning and processing protocol is needed before 3D methods in forensic anthropology are considered as reliable tools for generating biological profiles.

  19. OpenTein: a database of digital whole-slide images of stem cell-derived teratomas

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Joon; Komiyama, Yusuke; Suemori, Hirofumi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Nakai, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Human stem cells are promising sources for regenerative therapy. To ensure safety of future therapeutic applications, the differentiation potency of stem cells has to be tested and be widely opened to the public. The potency is generally assessed by teratoma formation comprising differentiated cells from all three germ layers, and the teratomas can be inspected through high-quality digital images. The teratoma assay, however, lacks consistency in transplantation protocols and even in interpretation, which needs community-based efforts for improving the assay quality. Here, we have developed a novel database OpenTein (Open Teratoma Investigation, http://opentein.hgc.jp/) to archive and freely distribute high-resolution whole-slide images and relevant records. OpenTein has been designed as a searchable, zoomable and annotatable web-based repository system. We have deposited 468 images of teratomas derived by our transplantation of human stem cells, and users can freely access and process such digital teratoma images. Approximately, the current version of OpenTein responds within 11.2 min for processing 2.03 gigapixel teratoma images. Our system offers valuable tools and resources in the new era of stem cell biology. PMID:26496950

  20. OpenTein: a database of digital whole-slide images of stem cell-derived teratomas.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Joon; Komiyama, Yusuke; Suemori, Hirofumi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Nakai, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Human stem cells are promising sources for regenerative therapy. To ensure safety of future therapeutic applications, the differentiation potency of stem cells has to be tested and be widely opened to the public. The potency is generally assessed by teratoma formation comprising differentiated cells from all three germ layers, and the teratomas can be inspected through high-quality digital images. The teratoma assay, however, lacks consistency in transplantation protocols and even in interpretation, which needs community-based efforts for improving the assay quality. Here, we have developed a novel database OpenTein (Open Teratoma Investigation, http://opentein.hgc.jp/) to archive and freely distribute high-resolution whole-slide images and relevant records. OpenTein has been designed as a searchable, zoomable and annotatable web-based repository system. We have deposited 468 images of teratomas derived by our transplantation of human stem cells, and users can freely access and process such digital teratoma images. Approximately, the current version of OpenTein responds within 11.2 min for processing 2.03 gigapixel teratoma images. Our system offers valuable tools and resources in the new era of stem cell biology. PMID:26496950

  1. Red fluorescent luminogen from pyrrole derivatives with aggregation-enhanced emission for cell membrane imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guogang; Chen, Didi; Kong, Lingwei; Shi, Jianbing; Tong, Bin; Zhi, Junge; Feng, Xiao; Dong, Yuping

    2015-05-18

    A dye emitted red fluorescence with aggregation-enhanced emission properties was reported here. It can be utilized to specifically recognize the cell membrane of MCF-7 and 293T cell lines during bio-imaging. PMID:25896404

  2. Compensation for Spherical Geometric and Absorption Effects on Lower Thermospheric Emission Intensities Derived from High Earth Orbit Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W.; Germany, G. A.; Richards, P. G.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Spann, J. F., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Remote sensing of the atmosphere from high earth orbit is very attractive due to the large field of view obtained and a true global perspective. This viewpoint is complicated by earth curvature effects so that slant path enhancement and absorption effects, small from low earth orbit, become dominant even at small nadir view angles. The effect is further complicated by the large range of local times and solar zenith angles in a single image leading to a modulation of the image intensity by a significant portion of the diurnal height variation of the absorbing layer. The latter effect is significant in particular for mesospheric, stratospheric and auroral emissions due to their depth in the atmosphere. As a particular case, the emissions from atomic oxygen (130.4 and 135.6 nm) and molecular nitrogen (two LBH bands, LBHS from 140 to 160 nm and LBHL from 160 to 180 nm) as viewed from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) are examined. The LBH emissions are of particular interest since LBHS has significant 02 absorption while LBHL does not, In the case of auroral emissions this differential absorption, well examined in the nadir, gives information about the height of the emission and therefore the energy of the precipitating particles. Using simulations of the viewing geometry and images from the UVI we examine these effects and obtain correction factors to adjust to the nadir case with a significant improvement of the derived characteristic energy. There is a surprisingly large effect on the images from the 02 diurnal layer height changes. An empirical compensation to the nadir case is explored based on the local nadir and local zenith angles for each portion of the image. These compensations are demonstrated as applied to the above emissions in both auroral and dayglow images and compared to models. The extension of these findings to other instruments, emissions and spectral regions is examined.

  3. Sulfonamide derivative targeting carbonic anhydrase IX as a nuclear imaging probe for colorectal cancer detection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guan, Siao-Syun; Cheng, Chun-Chia; Ho, Ai-Sheng; Wang, Chia-Chi; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Liao, Tse-Zung; Chang, Jungshan; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2015-11-01

    Hypoxic microenvironment is a common situation in solid tumors. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) is one of the reliable cellular biomarkers of hypoxia. The role of CA9 in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains to be clarified. CA9 inhibitor such as sulfonamides is known to block CA9 activation and reduce tumor growth consequently. Here, we aimed to investigate the CA9 expression in serum and tumor from different stages of CRC patients and utilize sulfonamide derivative with indium-111 labeling as a probe for CRC nuclear imaging detection in vivo. The serum CA9 was correlated with the tumor CA9 levels in different stages of CRC patients. Hypoxia increased cell viability and CA9 expression in colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Sulfonamide derivative 5-(2-aminoethyl)thiophene-2-sulfonamide (ATS) could bind with CA9 in vitro under hypoxia. Moreover, tumor tissues in HCT-15-induced xenograft mice possessed higher hypoxic fluorescence signal as compared with other organs. We also found that the radioisotope signal of indium-111 labeled ATS, which was utilized for CRC detection in HCT-15-induced xenograft mice, was markedly enhanced in tumors as compared with non-ATS control. Taken together, these findings suggest that CA9 is a potential hypoxic CRC biomarker and measurement of serum CA9 can be as a potential tool for diagnosing CA9 expressions in CRC clinical practice. The radioisotope-labeled sulfonamide derivative (ATS) may be useful to apply in CRC patients for nuclear medicine imaging. PMID:26447758

  4. Direct imaging of biological sulfur dioxide derivatives in vivo using a two-photon phosphorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanying; Chen, Yu; Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Jingheng; Gasser, Gilles; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) and its derivatives sulfite and bisulfite play important roles in biological systems. However, in vivo detection of sulfite/bisulfite remains challenging. In this study, we developed a dinuclear Ir(III) complex (Ir4) as a two-photon phosphorescent probe for sulfite and bisulfite. Ir4 selectively and rapidly responded, with high sensitivity, to sulfite/bisulfite over other bio-related ions and molecules. One-photon and two-photon microscopy images revealed that Ir4 preferentially targeted mitochondria and was capable of imaging biological sulfite/bisulfite levels in vitro and in vivo. In situ sulfite generation in Caenorhabditis elegans was visualized by two-photon excitation real-time imaging. Finally, Ir4 was employed to monitor sulfite distribution in rat brain and other tissues. This study is the first report of the direct visualization of SO2 derivatives in vivo. These results provide new insights into the biological importance of SO2. PMID:26100342

  5. Technology and setup development for thermodiffusion welding of photocathode heteroepitaxial structures (HES) with glass input windows for image intensifier tubes (I2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadeev, I.; Dolgyh, A.; Korsun, P.

    2005-06-01

    In GaAs, InGaAs, InGaP-photocathodes for I2 to bond HES with input glass windows vacuum thermodiffusion welding (TDW) is used. By existing technology of TDW some problems are appeared, that connected with fragility, deformation, thermic matching of materials, also with thermic stresses in welded materials. In this report describe the methods of concrete problem-solving that attend TDW is described.

  6. Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital subtraction angiography in patient specific phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Garcia, Victor L.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Parametric imaging maps (PIM's) derived from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIM's. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIM's were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIM's for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In addition, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions.

  7. DERIVATION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN A CORONAL MASS EJECTION CORE VIA MULTI-FREQUENCY RADIO IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Tun, Samuel D.; Vourlidas, A.

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field within the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2010 August 14 is derived from analysis of multi-wavelength radio imaging data. This CME's core was found to be the source of a moving type IV radio burst, whose emission is here determined to arise from the gyrosynchrotron process. The CME core's true trajectory, electron density, and line-of-sight depth are derived from stereoscopic observations, constraining these parameters in the radio emission models. We find that the CME carries a substantial amount of mildly relativistic electrons (E < 100 keV) in a strong magnetic field (B < 15 G), and that the spectra at lower heights are preferentially suppressed at lower frequencies through absorption from thermal electrons. We discuss the results in light of previous moving type IV burst studies, and outline a plan for the eventual use of radio methods for CME magnetic field diagnostics.

  8. Design, synthesis, linear and nonlinear photophysical properties and biological imaging application of a novel ?-type pyrimidine-based thiophene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Luo, Junshan; Ye, Lili; Wang, Hui; Huang, Bei; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Jieying; Zhang, Shengyi; Tian, Yupeng

    2014-09-01

    A novel D-?-A-?-D type thiophene pyrimidine derivative, 2,2?-thiophene-4, 6-bis (4-N,N-diethylbenzene ethenyl) pyrimidine (L), was designed, synthesized via Knoevenagel and Suzuki coupling reactions, and fully characterized. The results of X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that single crystal of L belongs to P212121 non-centrosymmetric space group, and the whole molecular skeleton exhibits a good coplanarity. Systematic photophysical properties were investigated for L. The connections between the properties and structure were explained relying on theoretical calculation. The thiophene pyrimidine derivative shows strong third-order nonlinear optical response and large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross section in high polar solvents. Finally, preliminary exploration in biological imaging also has been carried out, it shows a good biological application prospect.

  9. EFM data mapped into 2D images of tip-sample contact potential difference and capacitance second derivative

    PubMed Central

    Lilliu, S.; Maragliano, C.; Hampton, M.; Elliott, M.; Stefancich, M.; Chiesa, M.; Dahlem, M. S.; Macdonald, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple technique for mapping Electrostatic Force Microscopy (EFM) bias sweep data into 2D images. The method allows simultaneous probing, in the same scanning area, of the contact potential difference and the second derivative of the capacitance between tip and sample, along with the height information. The only required equipment consists of a microscope with lift-mode EFM capable of phase shift detection. We designate this approach as Scanning Probe Potential Electrostatic Force Microscopy (SPP-EFM). An open-source MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) for images acquisition, processing and analysis has been developed. The technique is tested with Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanowires for organic transistor applications. PMID:24284731

  10. Derivation of new emission factors for quantification of mass emissions when using optical gas imaging for detecting leaks.

    PubMed

    Lev-On, Miriam; Epperson, David; Siegell, Jeffrey; Ritter, Karin

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the development of new "leak/no-leak" emission factors that are suitable for estimating facilities' fugitive emissions when using an alternative work practice (AWP) that is based on optical gas imaging technology for detecting leaking piping system components. These emission factors were derived for valves, pumps, and connectors/flanges for instrument leak detection thresholds ranging from 3 to 60 g/hr using a combination of field data and Monte Carlo statistical simulation techniques. These newly derived leak/no-leak emission factors are designed to replace the U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) 1995 Protocol factors, which were based on Method 21 monitoring of leaks at "uncontrolled" facilities. The emission factors published in the 1995 Protocol have not been updated since the 1970s. This derivation is based on results where the authors document the use of a Monte Carlo simulation technique to quantify the required leak detection thresholds that provide equal--or better--environmental benefits for an AWP. The use of these newly derived emission factors is demonstrated for different methods of computing fugitive emissions from a hypothetical model refinery. The resulting facility emissions calculated by using these new emission factors is compared with the existing emission estimation methods provided in the EPA 1995 Protocol. The results demonstrate that the new emission factors provide an emission estimate that is the closest to that obtained from the direct determination of total emissions by Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:17912925

  11. Effects of quantum noise in 4D-CT on deformable image registration and derived ventilation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifi, Kujtim; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Feygelman, Vladimir; Budzevich, Mikalai M.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Stevens, Craig W.; van Elmpt, Wouter; Dekker, Andre; Zhang, Geoffrey G.

    2013-11-01

    Quantum noise is common in CT images and is a persistent problem in accurate ventilation imaging using 4D-CT and deformable image registration (DIR). This study focuses on the effects of noise in 4D-CT on DIR and thereby derived ventilation data. A total of six sets of 4D-CT data with landmarks delineated in different phases, called point-validated pixel-based breathing thorax models (POPI), were used in this study. The DIR algorithms, including diffeomorphic morphons (DM), diffeomorphic demons (DD), optical flow and B-spline, were used to register the inspiration phase to the expiration phase. The DIR deformation matrices (DIRDM) were used to map the landmarks. Target registration errors (TRE) were calculated as the distance errors between the delineated and the mapped landmarks. Noise of Gaussian distribution with different standard deviations (SD), from 0 to 200 Hounsfield Units (HU) in amplitude, was added to the POPI models to simulate different levels of quantum noise. Ventilation data were calculated using the ?V algorithm which calculates the volume change geometrically based on the DIRDM. The ventilation images with different added noise levels were compared using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The root mean square (RMS) values of the landmark TRE over the six POPI models for the four DIR algorithms were stable when the noise level was low (SD <150 HU) and increased with added noise when the level is higher. The most accurate DIR was DD with a mean RMS of 1.5 ± 0.5 mm with no added noise and 1.8 ± 0.5 mm with noise (SD = 200 HU). The DSC values between the ventilation images with and without added noise decreased with the noise level, even when the noise level was relatively low. The DIR algorithm most robust with respect to noise was DM, with mean DSC = 0.89 ± 0.01 and 0.66 ± 0.02 for the top 50% ventilation volumes, as compared between 0 added noise and SD = 30 and 200 HU, respectively. Although the landmark TRE were stable with low noise, the differences between ventilation images increased with noise level, even when the noise was low, indicating ventilation imaging from 4D-CT was sensitive to image noise. Therefore, high quality 4D-CT is essential for accurate ventilation images.

  12. Deriving Bearing Measurements from Video Images using Haar-like Features for Vehicle-to-

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    mostly focus on providing augmented reality and warning systems for drivers using less expensive sensors and the augmentation of between vehicles moving base stations differential GPS (DGPS) with vision derived bearing Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) have the promise to provide significant improvements in land vehicle

  13. Bilinearity in Spatiotemporal Integration of Synaptic Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songting; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2014-01-01

    Neurons process information via integration of synaptic inputs from dendrites. Many experimental results demonstrate dendritic integration could be highly nonlinear, yet few theoretical analyses have been performed to obtain a precise quantitative characterization analytically. Based on asymptotic analysis of a two-compartment passive cable model, given a pair of time-dependent synaptic conductance inputs, we derive a bilinear spatiotemporal dendritic integration rule. The summed somatic potential can be well approximated by the linear summation of the two postsynaptic potentials elicited separately, plus a third additional bilinear term proportional to their product with a proportionality coefficient . The rule is valid for a pair of synaptic inputs of all types, including excitation-inhibition, excitation-excitation, and inhibition-inhibition. In addition, the rule is valid during the whole dendritic integration process for a pair of synaptic inputs with arbitrary input time differences and input locations. The coefficient is demonstrated to be nearly independent of the input strengths but is dependent on input times and input locations. This rule is then verified through simulation of a realistic pyramidal neuron model and in electrophysiological experiments of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. The rule is further generalized to describe the spatiotemporal dendritic integration of multiple excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The integration of multiple inputs can be decomposed into the sum of all possible pairwise integration, where each paired integration obeys the bilinear rule. This decomposition leads to a graph representation of dendritic integration, which can be viewed as functionally sparse. PMID:25521832

  14. Partial dependence of breast tumor malignancy on ultrasound image features derived from boosted trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Su; Li, Wenying; Chen, Yaqing; Lu, Hongtao; Chen, Wufan; Chen, Yazhu

    2010-04-01

    Various computerized features extracted from breast ultrasound images are useful in assessing the malignancy of breast tumors. However, the underlying relationship between the computerized features and tumor malignancy may not be linear in nature. We use the decision tree ensemble trained by the cost-sensitive boosting algorithm to approximate the target function for malignancy assessment and to reflect this relationship qualitatively. Partial dependence plots are employed to explore and visualize the effect of features on the output of the decision tree ensemble. In the experiments, 31 image features are extracted to quantify the sonographic characteristics of breast tumors. Patient age is used as an external feature because of its high clinical importance. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of the tree ensembles can reach 0.95 with sensitivity of 0.95 (61/64) at the associated specificity 0.74 (77/104). The partial dependence plots of the four most important features are demonstrated to show the influence of the features on malignancy, and they are in accord with the empirical observations. The results can provide visual and qualitative references on the computerized image features for physicians, and can be useful for enhancing the interpretability of computer-aided diagnosis systems for breast ultrasound.

  15. High-resolution Ceres Survey ATLAS derived from Dawn FC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, T.; Kersten, E.; Matz, K.-D.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft will orbit the dwarf planet Ceres in June 2015 with an altitude of about 4,400 km to characterize the geology, elemental and mineralogical composition, topography, shape, and internal structure of Ceres before it will be transferred to lower orbits. One of the major goals of the mission is a global mapping of Ceres. Data: The Dawn mission will map Ceres from three different orbital heights during Survey orbit (4,424 km altitude), HAMO (High Altitude Mapping Orbit, 1474 km altitude), and LAMO (Low Altitude Mapping Orbit, 374 km altitude) [1]. The Dawn mission is equipped with a framing camera (FC) [2]. Dawn will orbited Ceres during Survey in 7 cycles in June 2015. The framing camera will take about 700 clear filter images with a resolution of about 400 m/pixel during these cycles. The images will be taken with different viewing angles and different illumination conditions. We will select the nadir looking images with similar illumination conditions for the global mosaic of Ceres.

  16. 2?-(2-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4?-(2-fluoroalkoxy)-phenylthio)benzenamine Derivatives as Serotonin Transporter Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Ajit K.; Wang, Julie L.; Oya, Shunichi; Choi, Seok-Rye; Kung, Mei-Ping; Kung, Hank F.

    2008-01-01

    A novel series of ligands with substitutions at the 5-position on phenyl ring A and at the 4?-position on phenyl ring B of 2?-(2-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4?-(2-fluoro- alkoxy)phenylthio)benzenamine (4?-2-fluoroethoxy derivatives, 28–31 and 4?-3-fluoro propoxy derivatives, 40–42) were prepared and tested as serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agents. The new ligands displayed high binding affinities to SERT (Ki ranging from 0.07 to 1.5 nM). The corresponding 18F labeled compounds, which can be prepared readily, showed excellent brain uptake and retention after iv injection in rats. The hypothalamus region showed high uptake values between 0.74 to 2.2 % dose/g at 120 min post iv injection. Significantly, the hypothalamus to cerebellum ratios (target to non-target ratios) at 120 min were 7.8 and 7.7 for [18F]28 and [18F]40, respectively. The selective uptake and retention in the hypothalamus, which has a high concentration of SERT binding sites, demonstrated that [18F]28 and [18F]40 are promising PET (positron emission computed tomography) imaging agents for mapping SERT binding sites in the brain. PMID:18052090

  17. Elastic and transport properties of cellular solids derived from three-dimensional tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knackstedt, Mark A.; Arns, Christoph H.; Saadatfar, Mohammad; et al.

    2006-09-01

    We describe a three-dimensional imaging and analysis study of eight industrial cellular foam morphologies. The foam morphologies were generated by differing industrial processing methods. Tomograms are acquired on an X-ray micro-computed tomography facility at scales of approximately equal to (5mm)3 at resolutions down to 7?m. The image quality is sufficient in all cases to measure local structure and connectivity of the foamed material, and the field of view large enough to calculate a range of material properties. Phase separation into solid and porous components is straightforward.Three-dimensional structural characteristics are measured directly on the porous and solid phases of the images. A number of morphological parameters are obtained, including pore volume-to-surface-area ratio, connectivity, the pore and solid phase size distributions defined by maximal sphere openings and chord length measurements. We further calculate the pore size distribution associated with capillary pressure via simulating of mercury drainage on the digital images.The binarized microstructures are used as a basis for calculations of transport properties (fluid permeability, diffusivity and thermal conductivity) and elastic moduli. From the data, we generate property-porosity relationships for the range of foam morphologies imaged and quantitatively analyse the effects of porosity and microstructure on the resultant properties of the foams.We compare our numerical data to commonly used theoretical and empirical property-porosity relationships. For thermal conductivity, we find that the numerical results agree extremely well with an empirical expression based on experimental data of various foams. The upper Hashin-Shtrikman bound also provides an excellent prediction of the data across all densities. From simulation of the diffusivity, we can define the tortuosity of the pore space within the cellular solid. We find that different processing methods lead to strong variations in the tortuosity of the pore space of the foams. For elastic properties, our results show that for the Young modulus, E, both the differential effective medium theory and the classical correlation E/Es=(?/?s)2 give a good correlation. Assuming a constant Poisson's ratio ? leads to reasonable agreement. The best correlation for ? is given by assuming a slight variation in ? as a linear function of porosity. The permeability of the foams varies over three orders of magnitude. Correlations for permeability based on the classical Kozeny-Carman equation lead to reasonable agreement, except at the lowest porosities. Permeability estimations based on mercury porosimetry give excellent agreement for all foams.

  18. Seismic Velocities Imaging around "AFA" Hydrothermal Area in West Java, Indonesia derived from Dense Seimometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanani Akbar, Akhmad; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Jousset, Philippe GM; Ryannugroho, Riskiray; Gassner, Alexandra; Jaya, Makky S.; Sule, Rachmat; Diningrat, Wahyuddin; Hendryana, Andri; Kusnadi, Yosep; Umar, Muksin; Indrinanto, Yudi; Erbas, Kemal

    2015-04-01

    We have deployed about 48 three component seismometers around "AFA" hydrothermal are in West Java, Indonesia from October 2012 up to October 2014 in order to detect microseismic event and to enhance our knowledge about subsurface seismic stucture. The seismometer network in this study, is the first dense seismometer array monitoring around hydrothermal area in Indonesia so far. We analyzed a huge waveform data set to distinguish microseismic, local and regional events. Then, we picked the onset of P-and S-wave arrival of microseismic events carefully visually by eye. We determined the initial microseismic event by applying Geiger's method with uniform seismic velocity model. Totally, we have been successfully determined 2,497 microseismic events around this hydrothermal area. We also improved 1D seismic velocities (Vp, Vs) and simultaneously with hypocenter adjustment as input for the tomography inversion in this study. Overall, the microseismic events are concentrated around production area activities and we also found strong cluster microseismic event in Southern part of this region which still need to be investigated in more details. Now, we are going on tomographic inversion step by using double-difference method. We are going to show more information during the meeting.

  19. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Mutukula, Naresh; Edri, Reuven; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture) and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes—highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM)—a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation—a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of ACTIN or NON-MUSCLE MYOSIN-II (NMII) reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling. PMID:26473351

  20. Support Vector Classification with Input Data Uncertainty

    E-print Network

    Chandy, John A.

    system may make errors so that the ob- served text is corrupted with noise. In image classification applications, some features may rely on image processing outputs that introduce errors. Hence classificationSupport Vector Classification with Input Data Uncertainty Jinbo Bi Computer-Aided Diagnosis

  1. Input Section Item Specifications

    E-print Network

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    AC 1 M, DC 1 M, DC 50 , GND Input connector BNC Input impedance 1 M ±1.0%, approx. 20 pF 50 ±1): 400 V (DC + AC peak) (282 Vrms CATII) 50 input : 5 Vrms or less and 10 Vpeak or less DC offset range, Single(N) Trigger source CH1 to CH4, EXT ,LINE Trigger coupling CH1 to CH4: DC/AC EXT : DC HF rejection

  2. Statistical storm time examination of MLT-dependent plasmapause location derived from IMAGE EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katus, R. M.; Gallagher, D. L.; Liemohn, M. W.; Keesee, A. M.; Sarno-Smith, L. K.

    2015-07-01

    The location of the outer edge of the plasmasphere (the plasmapause) as a function of geomagnetic storm time is identified and investigated statistically in regard to the solar wind driver. Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) data are used to create an automated method that locates and extracts the plasmapause. The plasmapause extraction technique searches a set range of possible plasmasphere densities for a maximum gradient. The magnetic local time (MLT)-dependent plasmapause results are compared to manual extraction results. The plasmapause results from 39 intense storms are examined along a normalized epoch storm timeline to determine the average plasmapause L shell as a function of MLT and storm time. The average extracted plasmapause L shell follows the expected storm time plasmapause behavior. The results show that during the main phase, the plasmapause moves earthward and a plasmaspheric drainage plume forms near dusk and across the dayside during strong convection. During the recovery phase, the plume rejoins the corotationally driven plasma while the average plasmapause location moves farther from the Earth. The results are also examined in terms of the solar wind driver. We find evidence that shows that the different categories of solar wind drivers result in different plasmaspheric configurations. During magnetic cloud-driven events the plasmaspheric drainage plume appears at the start of the main phase. During sheath-driven events the plume forms later but typically extends further in MLT.

  3. Investigating Nephrotoxicity of Polymyxin Derivatives by Mapping Renal Distribution Using Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anna; Goodwin, Richard J A; Swales, John G; Gallagher, Richard; Shankaran, Harish; Sathe, Abhishek; Pradeepan, Selvi; Xue, Aixiang; Keirstead, Natalie; Sasaki, Jennifer C; Andren, Per E; Gupta, Anshul

    2015-09-21

    Colistin and polymyxin B are effective treatment options for Gram-negative resistant bacteria but are used as last-line therapy due to their dose-limiting nephrotoxicity. A critical factor in developing safer polymyxin analogues is understanding accumulation of the drugs and their metabolites, which is currently limited due to the lack of effective techniques for analysis of these challenging molecules. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) allows direct detection of targets (drugs, metabolites, and endogenous compounds) from tissue sections. The presented study exemplifies the utility of MSI by measuring the distribution of polymyxin B1, colistin, and polymyxin B nonapeptide (PMBN) within dosed rat kidney tissue sections. The label-free MSI analysis revealed that the nephrotoxic compounds (polymyxin B1 and colistin) preferentially accumulated in the renal cortical region. The less nephrotoxic analogue, polymyxin B nonapeptide, was more uniformly distributed throughout the kidney. In addition, metabolites of the dosed compounds were detected by MSI. Kidney homogenates were analyzed using LC/MS/MS to determine total drug exposure and for metabolite identification. To our knowledge, this is the first time such techniques have been utilized to measure the distribution of polymyxin drugs and their metabolites. By simultaneously detecting the distribution of drug and drug metabolites, MSI offers a powerful alternative to tissue homogenization analysis and label or antibody-based imaging. PMID:26293472

  4. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  5. Scaling, propagating and mapping uncertainty in spectroscopy-derived foliar traits from the leaf to the image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Serbin, S. P.; Kingdon, C.; Townsend, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    A major goal of remote sensing, and imaging spectroscopy in particular, is the development of generalizable algorithms to repeatedly and accurately map ecosystem properties such as canopy chemistry across space and time. Existing methods must therefore be tested across a range of measurement approaches to identify and overcome limits to the consistent retrieval of such properties from spectroscopic imagery. Here we illustrate a general approach for the estimation of key foliar biochemical and morphological traits from spectroscopic imagery derived from the AVIRIS instrument and the propagation of errors from the leaf to the image scale using partial least squares regression (PLSR) techniques. Our method involves the integration of three types of data representing different scales of observation: At the image scale, the images were normalized for atmospheric, illumination and BRDF effects. Spectra from field plot locations were extracted from the 51AVIRIS images and were averaged when the field plot was larger than a single pixel. At the plot level, the scaling was conducted using multiple replicates (1000) derived from the leaf-level uncertainty estimates to generate plot-level estimates with their associated uncertainties. Leaf-level estimates of foliar traits (%N, %C, %Fiber, %Cellulose, %Lignin, LMA) were scaled to the canopy based on relative species composition of each plot. Image spectra were iteratively split into 50/50 randomized calibration-validation datasets and multiple (500) trait-predictive PLSR models were generated, this time sampling from within the plot-level uncertainty distribution. This allowed the propagation of uncertainty from the leaf-level dependent variables to the plot level, and finally to models built using AVIRIS image spectra. Moreover, this method allows us to generate spatially explicit maps of uncertainty in our sampled traits. Both LMA and %N PLSR models had a R2 greater than 0.8, root mean square errors (RMSEs) for both variables were less than 6% of the range of data. Fiber and lignin were predicted with R2 > 0.65 and carbon and cellulose greater than 0.5. Although R2 of these variables were lower than LMA and %N, their RMSE values were beneath 9% of the range of data. The comparatively lower R2 values for %C and cellulose in particular were related to the low amount of natural variability in these constituents. Further, coefficients from the randomized set of PLSR models were applied to imagery and aggregated to obtain pixel-wise predicted means and uncertainty estimates for each foliar trait. The resulting maps of nutritional and morphological properties together with their overall uncertainties represent a first-of-its-kind data product for examining the spatio-temporal patterns of forest functioning and nutrient cycling. These data are now being used to relate foliar traits with ecosystem processes such as streamwater nutrient export and insect herbivory. In addition, the ability to assign a retrieval uncertainty enables more efficient assimilation of these data products into ecosystem models to help constrain carbon and nutrient cycling projections.

  6. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of [18F]-Fluorinated Carboplatin Derivative Encapsulated in [111In]-Labeled Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamichhane, Narottam

    Platinum based chemotherapy is amongst the mainstream DNA-damaging agents used in clinical cancer therapy today. Agents such as cisplatin, carboplatin are clinically prescribed for the treatment of solid tumors either as single agents, in combination, or as part of multi-modality treatment strategy. Despite the potent anti-tumor activity of these drugs, overall effectiveness is still hampered by inadequate delivery and retention of drug in tumor and unwanted normal tissue toxicity, induced by non-selective accumulation of drug in normal cells and tissues. Utilizing molecular imaging and nanoparticle technologies, this thesis aims to contribute to better understanding of how to improve the profile of platinum based therapy. By developing a novel fluorinated derivative of carboplatin, incorporating a Flourine-18 (18F) moiety as an inherent part of the molecule, quantitative measures of drug concentration in tumors and normal tissues can be directly determined in vivo and within the intact individual environment. A potential impact of this knowledge will be helpful in predicting the overall response of individual patients to the treatment. Specifically, the aim of this project, therefore, is the development of a fluorinated carboplatin drug derivative with an inherent positron emission tomography (PET) imaging capability, so that the accumulation of the drug in the tumor and normal organs can be studied during the course of therapy . A secondary objective of this research is to develop a proof of concept for simultaneous imaging of a PET radiolabeled drug with a SPECT radiolabeled liposomal formulation, enabling thereby bi-modal imaging of drug and delivery vehicle in vivo. The approach is challenging because it involves development in PET radiochemistry, PET and SPECT imaging, drug liposomal encapsulation, and a dual-modal imaging of radiolabeled drug and radiolabeled vehicle. The principal development is the synthesis of fluorinated carboplatin 19F-FCP using 2-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid as the labeling agent to coordinate with the cisplatin aqua complex. It was then used to treat various cell lines and compared with cisplatin and carboplatin at different concentrations ranging from 0.001 microM to 100 microM for 72 hrs and 96 hrs. IC50 values calculated from cell viability indicated that 19F-FCP is a more potent drug than Carboplatin. Manual radiosynthesis and characterization of [18F]-FCP was performed using [18F]-2-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid with coordination with cisplatin aqua complex. Automated radiosynthesis of [18F]-FCP was optimized using the manual synthetic procedures and using them as macros for the radiosynthesizer. [18F]-FCP was evaluated in vivo with detailed biodistribution studies and PET imaging in normal and KB 3-1 and KB 8-5 tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. The biodistribution studies and PET imaging of [18F]-FCP showed major uptake in kidneys which attributes to the renal clearance of radiotracer. In vivo plasma and urine stability demonstrated intact [18F]-FCP. [ 111In]-Labeled Liposomes was synthesized and physiochemical properties were assessed with DLS. [111In]-Labeled Liposome was evaluated in vivo with detailed pharmacokinetic studies and SPECT imaging. The biodistribution and ROI analysis from SPECT imaging showed the spleen and liver uptake of [111In]-Labeled Liposome and subsequent clearance of activity with time. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was developed and physiochemical properties were characterized with DLS. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was used for in vivo dual tracer PET and SPECT imaging from the same nanoconstruct in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. PET imaging of [18F]-FCP in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice was performed. Naked [18F]-FCP and [18F]-FCP encapsulated [ 111In]-Labeled Liposome showed different pharmacokinetic profiles. PET imaging of [18F]-FCP showed major uptake in kidneys and bladder. However, [18F]-FCP encapsula

  7. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-01

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ?H and ?S values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging.

  8. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-15

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ?H and ?S values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging. PMID:26436845

  9. Approach to derivation of SIR-C science requirements for calibration. [Shuttle Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Evans, Diane; Van Zyl, Jakob

    1992-01-01

    Many of the experiments proposed for the forthcoming SIR-C mission require calibrated data, for example those which emphasize (1) deriving quantitative geophysical information (e.g., surface roughness and dielectric constant), (2) monitoring daily and seasonal changes in the Earth's surface (e.g., soil moisture), (3) extending local case studies to regional and worldwide scales, and (4) using SIR-C data with other spaceborne sensors (e.g., ERS-1, JERS-1, and Radarsat). There are three different aspects to the SIR-C calibration problem: radiometric and geometric calibration, which have been previously reported, and polarimetric calibration. The study described in this paper is an attempt at determining the science requirements for polarimetric calibration for SIR-C. A model describing the effect of miscalibration is presented first, followed by an example describing how to assess the calibration requirements specific to an experiment. The effects of miscalibration on some commonly used polarimetric parameters are also discussed. It is shown that polarimetric calibration requirements are strongly application dependent. In consequence, the SIR-C investigators are advised to assess the calibration requirements of their own experiment. A set of numbers summarizing SIR-C polarimetric calibration goals concludes this paper.

  10. Integration of Image Data for Refining Building Boundaries Derived from Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, S. N.; Hetti Arachchige, N.; Schneider, D.

    2014-08-01

    Geometrically and topologically correct 3D building models are required to satisfy with new demands such as 3D cadastre, map updating, and decision making. More attention on building reconstruction has been paid using Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point cloud data. The planimetric accuracy of roof outlines, including step-edges is questionable in building models derived from only point clouds. This paper presents a new approach for the detection of accurate building boundaries by merging point clouds acquired by ALS and aerial photographs. It comprises two major parts: reconstruction of initial roof models from point clouds only, and refinement of their boundaries. A shortest closed circle (graph) analysis method is employed to generate building models in the first step. Having the advantages of high reliability, this method provides reconstruction without prior knowledge of primitive building types even when complex height jumps and various types of building roof are available. The accurate position of boundaries of the initial models is determined by the integration of the edges extracted from aerial photographs. In this process, scene constraints defined based on the initial roof models are introduced as the initial roof models are representing explicit unambiguous geometries about the scene. Experiments were conducted using the ISPRS benchmark test data. Based on test results, we show that the proposed approach can reconstruct 3D building models with higher geometrical (planimetry and vertical) and topological accuracy.

  11. Visualization of Membrane Rafts Using a Perylene Monoimide Derivative and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Margineanu, Anca; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Van der Auweraer, Mark; Ameloot, Marcel; Stefan, Alina; Beljonne, David; Engelborghs, Yves; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; De Schryver, Frans C.; Hofkens, Johan

    2007-01-01

    A new membrane probe, based on the perylene imide chromophore, with excellent photophysical properties (high absorption coefficient, quantum yield (QY) ? 1, high photostability) and excited in the visible domain is proposed for the study of membrane rafts. Visualization of separation between the liquid-ordered (Lo) and the liquid-disordered (Ld) phases can be achieved in artificial membranes by fluorescence lifetime imaging due to the different decay times of the membrane probe in the two phases. Rafts on micrometer-scale in cell membranes due to cellular activation can also be observed by this method. The decay time of the dye in the Lo phase is higher than in organic solvents where its QY is 1. This allows proposing a (possible general) mechanism for the decay time increase in the Lo phase, based on the local field effects of the surrounding molecules. For other fluorophores with QY < 1, the suggested mechanism could also contribute, in addition to effects reducing the nonradiative decay pathways, to an increase of the fluorescence decay time in the Lo phase. PMID:17573424

  12. 131I-Zn-Chlorophyll derivative photosensitizer for tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ocakoglu, Kasim; Er, Ozge; Kiyak, Guven; Lambrecht, Fatma Yurt; Gunduz, Cumhur; Kayabasi, Cagla

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, the photodynamic therapy studies have gained considerable attention as an alternative method to surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy which is commonly used to fight cancer. In this study, biological potentials of a benzyloxy bearing zinc(II) pheophorbide-a (Zn-PH-A) were investigated via in vivo and in vitro experiments. Zn-PH-A was labeled with (131)I with high efficiency (95.3 ± 2.7%) and its biodistribution studies were investigated on female Albino Wistar rats. The radiolabeled photosensitizer had been intravenously injected into the tail vein, and then the animals were sacrificed at 30, 60 and 120 min post injection. The percent of radioactivity per gram of organs (%ID/g) was determined. The radiolabeled Zn-PH-A showed high uptake in ovary. In addition, photodynamic therapy studies of the photosensitizer were conducted in EMT6, murine mammary carcinoma and HeLa, human cervix carcinoma cell lines. For the photodynamic therapy studies, the cells with Zn-PH-A were exposed to red light (650 nm) at the doses of 10-30 J/cm(2). The results showed that Zn-PH-A has stronger PDT effect in EMT6 than HeLa cell. Our present work demonstrates (131)I-labeled photosensitizer as a bifunctional agent (PDT and nuclear imaging) which could be improved in future by using EMT6 growing tumor in nude mice. PMID:26226337

  13. Toxicological evaluation of a rotenone derivative in rodents for clinical myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Pasan; Yan, Xuxu; Lockwood, Julia; Duan, Yin; Wei, Lihui; Glenn Wells, R; Bensimon, Corinne; Mullett, Wayne M; Ruddy, Terrence

    2014-06-01

    Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a valuable clinical tool for assessing coronary blood flow deficits in patients. We recently synthesized a new iodinated compound ((123)I-CMICE-013) based on rotenone and showed that it has excellent performance as a radiotracer for myocardial perfusion imaging. Here, we describe the cellular toxicity and subacute toxicity of CMICE-013 in rats. Cultured hepatocytes displayed sensitivity to rotenone but not CMICE-013 at equimolar concentrations. Following i.v. injection of CMICE-013 for 14 days, body weight, ambulation, behavior, grooming, guarding (abdominal, muscular), pale conjunctivae, and food intake were observed. Biochemical, hematological, and histopathological changes in tissues (heart, liver, kidney, spleen, lung, and brain) and echocardiography at pre- and post-dosing were also examined. All animals responded well to the daily injections of CMICE-013 and showed no mortality or adverse reactions with respect to the parameters above. Subacute i.v. injections at high- (5 ?g/kg) and low (1 ?g/kg)-dose levels did not result in any significant changes to either biochemical or hematological parameters and no detectable changes in histopathology compared to the vehicle or untreated animals. Echocardiographic analyses, including the measurements of cardiac function and anatomy (wall thickness, left atrial size, and left ventricular mass), were not different at pre- versus post-dose measures and were not different compared to the vehicle or untreated animals. Our observations in small animals reveal that CMICE-013 induces minimal toxicity when delivered intravenously for 14 days. PMID:24395712

  14. Two-photon fluorescent probe derived from naphthalimide for cysteine detection and imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbin; Liu, Yuwen; Liu, Wei; Liang, Shucai

    2015-02-25

    A maleimide coupling naphthalimide was reported as new two-photon fluorescent (TPF) probe for cysteine (Cys). The probe was weakly fluorescent itself due to the donor-excited photoinduced electron transfer (d-PET). After reaction with Cys, d-PET process was blocked and fluorescence enhancement of the probe was observed at 470 nm. The d-PET principle was rationalized by theoretical calculations with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory. Thiol-maleimide addition between the probe and Cys was confirmed by (1)H NMR and mass spectrum measurements. TPF analysis demonstrated a 24.7-fold emission increase of the probe induced by Cys upon excitation at 760 nm. The two-photon action cross-section of probe-Cys adduct at 760 nm reached 42 GM compared to 1.7 GM for free probe. The probe showed high sensitivity and selectivity to Cys over other potential interferences; especially it had the capability to discriminate Cys from glutathione and homocysteine. Through TPF imaging, the probe was successfully applied in the detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:25240143

  15. In Vivo Tumor Targeting and Imaging with Engineered Trivalent Antibody Fragments Containing Collagen-Derived Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Ángel M.; Sánchez-Martín, David; Sanz, Laura; Bonet, Jaume; Compte, Marta; Kremer, Leonor; Blanco, Francisco J.; Oliva, Baldomero; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2009-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new and effective agents for cancer targeting. In this work, a multivalent antibody is characterized in vivo in living animals. The antibody, termed “trimerbody”, comprises a single-chain antibody (scFv) fragment connected to the N-terminal trimerization subdomain of collagen XVIII NC1 by a flexible linker. As indicated by computer graphic modeling, the trimerbody has a tripod-shaped structure with three highly flexible scFv heads radially outward oriented. Trimerbodies are trimeric in solution and exhibited multivalent binding, which provides them with at least a 100-fold increase in functional affinity than the monovalent scFv. Our results also demonstrate the feasibility of producing functional bispecific trimerbodies, which concurrently bind two different ligands. A trimerbody specific for the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a classic tumor-associated antigen, showed efficient tumor targeting after systemic administration in mice bearing CEA-positive tumors. Importantly, a trimerbody that recognizes an angiogenesis-associated laminin epitope, showed excellent tumor localization in several cancer types, including fibrosarcomas and carcinomas. These results illustrate the potential of this new antibody format for imaging and therapeutic applications, and suggest that some laminin epitopes might be universal targets for cancer targeting. PMID:19401768

  16. Diurnal, Seasonal, and Interannual Variations of Cloud Properties Derived for CERES From Imager Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Young, David F.; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Trepte, Qing Z.; Chen, Yan; Brown, Richard R.; Gibson, Sharon; Heck, Patrick W.

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of the radiation and cloud fields on a global basis is a key component in the effort to understand and model the interaction between clouds and radiation at the top of the atmosphere, at the surface, and within the atmosphere. The NASA Clouds and Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) Project, begun in 1998, is meeting this need. Broadband shortwave (SW) and longwave radiance measurements taken by the CERES scanners at resolutions between 10 and 20 km on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Terra, and Aqua satellites are matched to simultaneous retrievals of cloud height, phase, particle size, water path, and optical depth OD from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua. Besides aiding the interpretation of the broadband radiances, the CERES cloud properties are valuable for understanding cloud variations at a variety of scales. In this paper, the resulting CERES cloud data taken to date are averaged at several temporal scales to examine the temporal and spatial variability of the cloud properties on a global scale at a 1 resolution.

  17. Comparison of retinal thickness by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and OCT retinal image analysis software segmentation analysis derived from Stratus optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, Erika; Ranganathan, Sudarshan; Ferencz, Mária; Debuc, Delia Cabrera; Somfai, Gábor Márk

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To compare thickness measurements between Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and time-domain OCT images analyzed with a custom-built OCT retinal image analysis software (OCTRIMA). Methods: Macular mapping (MM) by StratusOCT and MM5 and MM6 scanning protocols by an RTVue-100 FD-OCT device are performed on 11 subjects with no retinal pathology. Retinal thickness (RT) and the thickness of the ganglion cell complex (GCC) obtained with the MM6 protocol are compared for each early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS)-like region with corresponding results obtained with OCTRIMA. RT results are compared by analysis of variance with Dunnett post hoc test, while GCC results are compared by paired t-test. Results: A high correlation is obtained for the RT between OCTRIMA and MM5 and MM6 protocols. In all regions, the StratusOCT provide the lowest RT values (mean difference 43 +/- 8 ?m compared to OCTRIMA, and 42 +/- 14 ?m compared to RTVue MM6). All RTVue GCC measurements were significantly thicker (mean difference between 6 and 12 ?m) than the GCC measurements of OCTRIMA. Conclusion: High correspondence of RT measurements is obtained not only for RT but also for the segmentation of intraretinal layers between FD-OCT and StratusOCT-derived OCTRIMA analysis. However, a correction factor is required to compensate for OCT-specific differences to make measurements more comparable to any available OCT device.

  18. Photometric parameter maps of the Moon derived from LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; Denevi, B. W.; Boyd, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    Spatially resolved photometric parameter maps were computed from 21 months of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images. Due to a 60° field-of-view (FOV), the WAC achieves nearly global coverage of the Moon each month with more than 50% overlap from orbit-to-orbit. From the repeat observations at various viewing and illumination geometries, we calculated Hapke bidirectional reflectance model parameters [1] for 1°x1° "tiles" from 70°N to 70°S and 0°E to 360°E. About 66,000 WAC images acquired from February 2010 to October 2011 were converted from DN to radiance factor (I/F) though radiometric calibration, partitioned into gridded tiles, and stacked in a time series (tile-by-tile method [2]). Lighting geometries (phase, incidence, emission) were computed using the WAC digital terrain model (100 m/pixel) [3]. The Hapke parameters were obtained by model fitting against I/F within each tile. Among the 9 parameters of the Hapke model, we calculated 3 free parameters (w, b, and hs) by setting constant values for 4 parameters (Bco=0, hc=1, ?, ?=0) and interpolating 2 parameters (c, Bso). In this simplification, we ignored the Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect (CBOE) to avoid competing CBOE and Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect (SHOE). We also assumed that surface regolith porosity is uniform across the Moon. The roughness parameter (?) was set to an averaged value from the equator (× 3°N). The Henyey-Greenstein double lobe function (H-G2) parameter (c) was given by the 'hockey stick' relation [4] (negative correlation) between b and c based on laboratory measurements. The amplitude of SHOE (Bso) was given by the correlation between w and Bso at the equator (× 3°N). Single scattering albedo (w) is strongly correlated to the photometrically normalized I/F, as expected. The c shows an inverse trend relative to b due to the 'hockey stick' relation. The parameter c is typically low for the maria (0.08×0.06) relative to the highlands (0.47×0.16). Since c controls the fraction of backward/forward scattering in H-G2, lower c for the maria indicates more forward scattering relative to the highlands. This trend is opposite to what was expected because darker particles are usually more backscattering. However, the lower albedo of the maria is due to the higher abundance of ilmenite, which is an opaque mineral that scatters all of the light by specular reflection from the its surface. If their surface facets are relatively smooth the ilmenite particles will be forward scattering. Other factors (e.g. grain shape, grain size, porosity, maturity) besides the mineralogy might also be affecting c. The angular-width of SHOE (hs) typically shows lower values (0.047×0.02) for the maria relative to the highlands (0.074×0.025). An increase in hs for the maria theoretically suggests lower porosity or a narrower grain size distribution [1], but the link between actual materials and hs is not well constrained. Further experiments using both laboratory and spacecraft observations will help to unravel the photometric properties of the surface materials of the Moon. [1] Hapke, B.: Cambridge Univ. Press, 2012. [2] Sato, H. et al.: 42nd LPSC, abstract #1974, 2011. [3] Scholten, F. et al.: JGR, 117, E00H17, 2012. [4] Hapke, B.: Icarus, 221(2), p1079-1083, 2012.

  19. Algal Accessory Pigment Detection Using AVIRIS Image-Derived Spectral Radiance Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Ambrosia, Vincent G.

    1996-01-01

    Visual and derivative analyses of AVIRIS spectral data can be used to detect algal accessory pigments in aquatic communities. This capability extends the use of remote sensing for the study of aquatic ecosystems by allowing detection of taxonomically significant pigment signatures which yield information about the type of algae present. Such information allows remote sensing-based assessment of aquatic ecosystem health, as in the detection of nuisance blooms of cyanobacteria or toxic blooms of dinoflagellates. Remote sensing of aquatic systems has traditionally focused on quantification of chlorophyll a, a photoreactive (and light-harvesting) pigment which is common to all algae as well as cyanobacteria (bluegreen algae). Due to the ubiquitousness of this pigment within algae, chl a is routinely measured to estimate algal biomass both during ground-truthing and using various airborne or satellite based sensors, including AVIRIS. Within the remote sensing and aquatic sciences communities, ongoing research has been performed to detect algal accessory pigments for assessment of algal population composition. This research is based on the fact that many algal accessory pigments are taxonomically significant, and all are spectrally unique. Aquatic scientists have been refining pigment analysis techniques, primarily high performance liquid chromatography, or HPLC, to detect specific pigments as a time-saving alternative to individual algal cell identifications and counts. Remote sensing scientists are investigating the use of pigment signatures to construct pigment libraries analogous to mineral spectral libraries used in geological remote sensing applications. The accessory pigment approach has been used successfully in remote sensing using data from the Thematic Mapper, low-altitude, multiple channel scanners, field spectroradiometers and the AVIRIS hyperspectral scanner. Due to spectral and spatial resolution capabilities, AVIRIS is the sensor of choice for such studies. We present here our results on detection of algal accessory pigments using AVIRIS data.

  20. Derivation of lowland riparian wetland deposit architecture using geophysical image analysis and interface detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Uhlemann, S.; Sorensen, J. P. R.; Roberts, C.; Newell, A. J.; Ward, W. O. C.; Binley, A.; Williams, P. J.; Gooddy, D. C.; Old, G.; Bai, L.

    2014-07-01

    For groundwater-surface water interactions to be understood in complex wetland settings, the architecture of the underlying deposits requires investigation at a spatial resolution sufficient to characterize significant hydraulic pathways. Discrete intrusive sampling using conventional approaches provides insufficient sample density and can be difficult to deploy on soft ground. Here a noninvasive geophysical imaging approach combining three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and the novel application of gradient and isosurface-based edge detectors is considered as a means of illuminating wetland deposit architecture. The performance of three edge detectors were compared and evaluated against ground truth data, using a lowland riparian wetland demonstration site. Isosurface-based methods correlated well with intrusive data and were useful for defining the geometries of key geological interfaces (i.e., peat/gravels and gravels/Chalk). The use of gradient detectors approach was unsuccessful, indicating that the assumption that the steepest resistivity gradient coincides with the associated geological interface can be incorrect. These findings are relevant to the application of this approach in settings with a broadly layered geology with strata of contrasting resistivities. In addition, ERT revealed substantial structures in the gravels related to the depositional environment (i.e., braided fluvial system) and a complex distribution of low-permeability putty Chalk at the bedrock surface—with implications for preferential flow and variable exchange between river and groundwater systems. These results demonstrate that a combined approach using ERT and edge detectors can provide valuable information to support targeted monitoring and inform hydrological modeling of wetlands.

  1. Physical Conditions in the Central Parsec Derived from Mid-Infrared Imaging Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Dan; Dwek, Eli; Varosi, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Array camera images of the central 1 parsec of the Galactic Center at eight mid-infrared wavelengths between 4.8 and 20.0 microns with approximately 1 arcsec resolution are used to model the temperature, opacity and bolometric luminosity distributions of the emitting dust in the central parsec, and the extinction in the line of sight. We use the results to discriminate between two mechanisms for heating the dust: heating by radiation from a "central engine" (possibly a massive black hole associated with Sgr A*), or internal heating by luminous stars embedded in or among the dust clouds. The temperature and opacity distributions are consistent with the presence of self-luminous objects imbedded at prominent the IRS source positions. However, temperatures on the northern ann and east-west bar are highest along the inner flank of those structures surrounding the central cavity, while the dust opacity peaks further out from the central cavity. The warm inner ridge suggests heating by centrally located concentrated luminous sources, including IRS3 and IRS7. The of the model results are compared with the distributions of the various stellar populations in the central parsec. There is evidence for physical interaction between the warm emitting dust and luminous stars, including dozens of hot He1 emission line stars and B[] stars. The combined contributions of embedded stars at the IRS source positions and the luminous stars distributed throughout Sgr A West can account for the temperature enhancements and the luminosity distribution in the central parsec computed by the model.

  2. Chitosan derivatives cross-linked with iodinated 2,5-dimethoxy-2,5-dihydrofuran for non-invasive imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Paulomi; Das, Manisit; Rameshbabu, Arun Prabhu; Das, Dipankar; Datta, Sayanti; Pal, Sagar; Panda, Asit Baran; Dhara, Santanu

    2014-10-22

    Radiopaque polymer derivatives were successfully prepared through surface diffusion mediated cross-linking of chitosan with iodinated 2,5-dimethoxy-2,5-dihydrofuran. The incorporation of iodine in 2,5-dimethoxy-2,5-dihydrofuran was validated by (1)H NMR and mass spectroscopy. The cross-linking of the glucosamine moieties of chitosan with the iodinated product was confirmed by (13)C NMR and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Radiography analysis proved inherent opacity of the iodinated fibrous sheets and microspheres that were comparable to the X-ray visibility of aluminum hollow rings of equivalent thickness and commercially available radiopaque tape, respectively. Microscopic studies evidenced retention of the fiber/microsphere morphology after the iodination/cross-linking reactions. The effects of iodination/cross-linking on the mechanical and biodegradation properties of fibers were studied by nanoindentation and enzymatic assay, respectively. In vitro and in vivo studies established the nontoxic, biodegradable nature of radiopaque derivatives. Iodinated fiber mesh implanted in a rabbit model was significantly X-ray opaque compared to the uncross-linked fiber mesh and medical grade surgical swabs. Further, opacity of the iodinated mesh was evident even after 60 days, though the intensity was reduced, which indicates the biodegradable nature of the iodinated polymer. The opacity of the iodinated sutures was also established in the computed tomography images. Finally, the sufficient in vivo contrast property of the radiopaque microspheres in the gastrointestinal tract indicates its possible role in clinical diagnostics. PMID:25265599

  3. Tissue Doppler Imaging-derived Diastolic Function Assessment in Children With Sickle Cell Disease and Its Relation With Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michelle; Hebson, Camden; Ehrlich, Alexandra; New, Tamara; Sachdeva, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction has been shown to occur earlier than systolic dysfunction in iron overload states in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI)-derived E/E' has emerged as a noninvasive marker of diastolic function. We sought to determine diastolic function in children with SCD and study its relation with iron overload. A retrospective review of medical records of 225 pediatric patients with SCD who received an echocardiogram between January 2008 and December 2012 was performed. Echocardiographic measures including M-mode, spectral Doppler, and TDI-derived E/E' were compared with previously published data in healthy children. The left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic dimensions were significantly higher in SCD (P<0.0001) and the shortening fraction was similar (P=0.66). E/E' ratio was significantly higher in SCD at the mitral annulus, septum, and tricuspid annulus. In 54% of subjects, the septal E/E' was >8, indicating elevated left ventricular filling pressure. However, there was no significant correlation between ferritin level and E/E' ratios. Pediatric patients with SCD have a high prevalence of elevated estimated left ventricular filling pressure, but this does not correlate with ferritin levels. PMID:26491854

  4. Horizontal winds derived from the polar mesospheric cloud images as observed by the CIPS instrument on the AIM satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, P. P.; Yue, J.; Russell, J. M.; Lumpe, J. D.; Gong, J.; Wu, D. L.; Randall, C. E.

    2015-06-01

    A cloud pattern matching technique is applied to polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) images taken by the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size instrument (CIPS) to infer the wind velocities in the mesopause region. CIPS measurements are analyzed to detect patterns that repeat from one orbit to the next but are displaced in location; the displacement provides a measure of the wind velocity. Pattern matching is achieved by resampling the CIPS data to longitude and latitude grids with the grid-box size forced at ~5 km in both directions. The correlated patterns are searched within a geographic region referred to as a "frame" of ~500 km in longitude × 400 km in latitude. The histograms of the derived velocities indicate that easterly winds prevail, with a mean zonal wind of -20 to -15 m/s. Mean meridional winds are overall small, but in late summer the histogram indicated a poleward wind of ~20-30 m/s. The variability of CIPS cloud albedo on consecutive orbits is also examined at fixed geolocations. The statistical results suggest that ~86% of pairs underwent mean cloud albedo variation of < 50% on consecutive orbits, suggesting a moderate change. It is also found that the correlation of the cloud structures between two consecutive orbits at a fixed location is generally poor. These findings suggest that cloud patterns are subject to wind advection, but the cloud patches are more extended in size than the movement that occurs. Cloud voids are found to be more likely to remain at the same geolocations.

  5. Imaging the complex Farallon subduction system with USArray derived joint inversion of body waves and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, R. W.; Allen, R. M.; Pollitz, F. F.; Hung, S.

    2012-12-01

    The 150 million year history of subduction of the Farallon plate is being well elucidated by the passage of USArray. In this study, we use body wave relative delay times to generate independent P, SV, and SH relative velocity models for the USArray footprint. In addition, we use Rayleigh wave phase velocities derived from teleseismic earthquakes and ambient seismic noise to constrain the lithospheric structure where body waves have limited crossing ray information to form the SV-joint velocity model. The model volume contains a complex series of high velocities mostly along a planar front representing the remnants of the Farallon plate system. This feature has significant lateral and radial extent; beginning off the western coast of the US and terminating east of the model resolution, which goes to the Mississippi river. The bottom of the slab is well imaged through the mantle transition zone to at least 1000km. However, low velocity anomalies within this plane show the slab is far from a continuous sheet. Low velocities break up the slab into several major provinces, relating to different ages of orogens and an episode of flat slab subduction. Additionally, high velocities are often imaged well above the trace of the top of the slab with similar anomaly amplitude and dip as the main slab. While many of these anomalies have been interpreted as mantle drips, the similarity to the slab suggests a possible subduction origin for the features. However, the relatively shallow depths of these features require some mechanism of differentiation to develop neutral buoyancy. The prevalence of these high velocities, such as the Siletzia Curtain, Isabella Anomaly, Nevada Anomaly, and a newly imaged feature under southwest Texas, suggests a differentiation mechanism is fairly common among plates subducting under North America allowing for the observation of widespread shallow high velocity anomalies.

  6. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  7. Validation of plasmasphere electron density reconstructions derived from data on board CHAMP by IMAGE/RPI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Denton, R.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmaspheric electron content is, beyond the ionosphere as major source, a significant contributor to the overall TEC budget affecting GNSS signals. The plasmasphere can induce half or more of the GNSS range errors caused by atmospheric electrical charges, in particular at nighttime. At DLR Neustrelitz, Germany, GPS measurements recorded onboard the LEO satellite CHAMP were used to reconstruct the topside electron density distribution (ionosphere and plasmasphere) up to GPS altitude, applying a model-based assimilation technique. In this paper, the potential of these CHAMP topside reconstructions for analyzing space weather related changes in the geo-plasma is investigated. For this purpose, comparisons are made between the CHAMP reconstructed profiles and electron densities derived from passive radio wave observations by the IMAGE RPI instrument for years 2001 till 2005. The comparison results indicate that an improvement, compared to the electron density of a background model, can be achieved by CHAMP data assimilation. The improvement is especially visible in the L-shell region below 3, which contributes notably to the GNSS signal delays. However, for the region around the plasmapause, systematical electron density underestimations of the background model w.r.t. the IMAGE data are detected. The rather limited CHAMP data coverage and the degraded observation geometry at these high altitudes seem to be not sufficient for complete compensation of this underestimation during the assimilation procedure. The results presented in this paper demonstrate the strengths of LEO TEC data assimilation, but at the same time illustrate the necessity to improve the modeling of the plasmasphere region above 4 ER L-shell distances. Furthermore, they reveal the need of additional data to establish an appropriate data base for the modeling of the complete plasmasphere.

  8. Deriving soil function maps to assess related ecosystem services using imaging spectroscopy in the Lyss agricultural area, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diek, Sanne; de Jong, Rogier; Braun, Daniela; Böhler, Jonas; Schaepman, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Soils play an important role in the benefits offered by ecosystems services. In densely populated Switzerland soils are a scarce resource, with high pressure on services ranging from urban expansion to over-utilization. Key change drivers include erosion, soil degradation, land management change and (chemical) pollution, which should be taken into consideration. Therefore there is an emerging need for an integrated, sustainable and efficient system assessing the management of soil and land as a resource. The use of remote sensing can offer spatio-temporal and quantitative information of extended areas. In particular imaging spectroscopy has shown to perfectly complement existing sampling schemes as secondary information for digital soil mapping. Although only the upper-most layer of soil interacts with light when using reflectance spectroscopy, it still can offer valuable information that can be utilized by farmers and decision makers. Fully processed airborne imaging spectrometer data from APEX as well as land cover classification for the agricultural area in Lyss were available. Based on several spectral analysis methods we derived multiple soil properties, including soil organic matter, soil texture, and mineralogy; complemented by vegetation parameters, including leaf area index, chlorophyll content, pigment distribution, and water content. The surface variables were retrieved using a combination of index-based and physically-based retrievals. Soil properties in partly to fully vegetated areas were interpolated using regression kriging based methods. This allowed the continuous assessment of potential soil functions as well as non-contiguous maps of abundances of combined soil and vegetation parameters. Based on a simple regression model we could make a rough estimate of ecosystem services. This provided the opportunity to look at the differences between the interpolated soil function maps and the non-contiguous (but combined) vegetation and soil function maps. We demonstrate the use of interpolated soil function maps as well as non-contiguous (but combined) vegetation and soil function maps and comment on their combined usability to assess related ecosystem services.

  9. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using 89Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hongguang; Sun, Chris K.; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Allegretta, Mark; Guttmann, Ronald D.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Chua, Mei-Sze; Cheng, Zhen; So, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging probes for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are highly desired to overcome current diagnostic limitations which lead to poor prognosis. The membrane protein glypican-3 (GPC3) is a potential molecular target for early HCC detection as it is over-expressed in >50% of HCCs, and is associated with early hepatocarcinogenesis. We synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) probe 89Zr-DFO-1G12 by bioconjugating and radiolabeling the anti-GPC3 monoclonal antibody (clone 1G12) with 89Zr, and evaluated its tumor-targeting capacity. In vitro, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 was specifically taken up into GPC3-positive HCC cells only, but not in the GPC3-negative prostate cancer cell line (PC3). In vivo, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 specifically accumulated in subcutaneous GPC3-positive HCC xenografts only, but not in PC3 xenografts. Importantly, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 delineated orthotopic HCC xenografts from surrounding normal liver, with tumor/liver (T/L) ratios of 6.65 ± 1.33 for HepG2, and 4.29 ± 0.52 for Hep3B xenografts. It also delineated orthotopic xenografts derived from three GPC3-positive HCC patient specimens, with T/L ratios of 4.21 ± 0.64, 2.78 ± 0.26, and 2.31 ± 0.38 at 168 h p.i. Thus, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention. PMID:24836949

  10. Input Decimated Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using an ensemble of classifiers instead of a single classifier has been shown to improve generalization performance in many pattern recognition problems. However, the extent of such improvement depends greatly on the amount of correlation among the errors of the base classifiers. Therefore, reducing those correlations while keeping the classifiers' performance levels high is an important area of research. In this article, we explore input decimation (ID), a method which selects feature subsets for their ability to discriminate among the classes and uses them to decouple the base classifiers. We provide a summary of the theoretical benefits of correlation reduction, along with results of our method on two underwater sonar data sets, three benchmarks from the Probenl/UCI repositories, and two synthetic data sets. The results indicate that input decimated ensembles (IDEs) outperform ensembles whose base classifiers use all the input features; randomly selected subsets of features; and features created using principal components analysis, on a wide range of domains.

  11. Using Concept Maps to Assess the Effect of Graphing Calculators Use on Students' Concept Images of the Derivative at a Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serhan, Derar

    2009-01-01

    This study used concept maps to investigate the effect of using graphing calculators on students' understanding of the derivative at a point. The study looked for differences between the concept images that are held by students' who are using graphing calculators and the students who are not using them. Seventy one students enrolled in two…

  12. Teaching Image Formation by Extended Light Sources: The Use of a Model Derived from the History of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedes, Christos; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This research, carried out in Greece on pupils aged 12-16, focuses on the transformation of their representations concerning light emission and image formation by extended light sources. The instructive process was carried out in two stages, each one having a different, distinct target set. During the first stage, the appropriate conflict conditions were created by contrasting the subjects’ predictions with the results of experimental situations inspired by the History of Science, with a view to destabilizing the pupils’ alternative representations. During the second stage, the experimental teaching intervention was carried out; it was based on the geometrical optics model and its parameters were derived from Kepler’s relevant historic experiment. For the duration of this process and within the framework of didactical interactions, an effort was made to reorganize initial limited representations and restructure them at the level of the accepted scientific model. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated two weeks later, using experimental tasks which had the same cognitive yet different empirical content with respect to the tasks conducted during the intervention. The results of the study showed that the majority of the subjects accepted the model of geometrical optics, that is, the pupils were able to correctly predict and adequately justify the experimental results based on the principle of punctiform light emission. Educational and research implications are discussed.

  13. Fluorescent detection and imaging of Hg(2+) using a novel phenanthroline derivative based single- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Li, Long-Long; Liu, Ying-Kai

    2016-02-01

    A novel phenanthroline derivative, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (MSIPBI), was synthesized, and the linear absorption and fluorescent spectra of MSIPBI in different solvents were investigated. The photophysical properties in unbound and in ligand-metal complexes were evaluated by UV absorption and one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra, and the quantum yields, two-photon active cross-sections and the binding constant of dye-metal were calculated. The results indicated that MSIPBI has a large Stokes shift (more than 167nm), and the dye was selective and sensitive for the detection of Hg(2+) with a two-photon active cross-section of 55.5GM in tris-HCl buffer solution at 800nm. Furthermore, the results of the fluorescence microscopy imaging indicated that MSIPBI is an efficient fluorescent probe for the detection of Hg(2+) in living cells by one- and two-photon excitation. Moreover, the experiments of determination Hg(2+) in river water and tap water were finished. PMID:26652448

  14. Comparisons of Reproducibility and Mean Values of Diffusion Tensor Imaging-Derived Indices between Unipolar and Bipolar Diffusion Pulse Sequences.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hsiao-Chien; Wu, Ming-Ting; Kao, E-Fong; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Chung

    2015-11-01

    Eddy current distortion is an important issue that may influence the quantitative measurements of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The corrections of eddy current artifacts could be performed using bipolar diffusion gradients or unipolar gradients with affine registration. Whether the diffusion pulse sequence affects the quantification of DTI indices and the technique that produces more reliable DTI indices in terms of reproducibility both remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the reproducibility and mean values of DTI-derived indices between unipolar and bipolar diffusion pulse sequences based on actual human brain data. Five repeated datasets of unipolar and bipolar DTI were acquired from 10 healthy subjects at different echo times (TEs). The reproducibility and mean values of DTI indices were assessed by calculating the coefficient of variation and mean values of the 5 repeated measurements. The results revealed that the reproducibility and mean values of DTI indices were significantly affected by the pulse sequence. Unipolar DTI exhibited significantly higher reproducibility than bipolar DTI even at the same TE, and the mean values of DTI indices were significantly different between them. Therefore, we concluded that the reproducibility and mean values of DTI indices were significantly influenced by diffusion pulse sequences. PMID:25753738

  15. In vivo tracking of human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol in rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yan; Zhou, Xiang; Guan, Xin; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Chang-bin; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Ferumoxytol, an iron replacement product, is a new type of superparamagnetic iron oxide approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Herein, we assessed the feasibility of tracking transplanted human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol in middle cerebral artery occlusion-injured rats by 3.0 T MRI in vivo. 1 × 104 human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine were transplanted into the brains of rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neurologic impairment was scored at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days after transplantation. T2-weighted imaging and enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography were used to observe transplanted cells. Results of imaging tests were compared with results of Prussian blue staining. The modified neurologic impairment scores were significantly lower in rats transplanted with cells at all time points except 1 day post-transplantation compared with rats without transplantation. Regions with hypointense signals on T2-weighted and enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography images corresponded with areas stained by Prussian blue, suggesting the presence of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles within the engrafted cells. Enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography image exhibited better sensitivity and contrast in tracing ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine-labeled human adipose-derived stem cells compared with T2-weighted imaging in routine MRI. PMID:26199607

  16. CISNET: Common Input Generators

    Cancer.gov

    For purposes of generating common parameters for the larger CISNET simulation models, a series of smaller, focused models was created in collaboration between the CISNET consortium members and NCI. These parameter generators are "mini models" in themselves in that they involve input data, processing guided by assumptions, and produce results.

  17. Fig.1: Brain image: (a) 4x SENSE reconstruction; (b) noise reduction in [1] using a T2 weighted reference image; (c) using the wavelet-derived reference image. (d) unaccelerated image.

    E-print Network

    a b Fig.1: Brain image: (a) 4x SENSE reconstruction; (b) noise reduction in [1] using a T2 weighted Phantom images: (a) 4x SENSE reconstruction; (b) noise reduction using wavelet reference. a b Fig. 3: Short-axis cardiac TrueFISP images: (a) 4x SENSE reconstruction; (b) noise reduction using wavelet

  18. Temporal and Spatial Assessment of Yearly Solar Maps Derived from Satellite Images over the UAE and Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, Y.; Marpu, P. R.; Ghedira, H.; Chiesa, M.

    2012-12-01

    The unique climate of countries located within the Arabian Peninsula, characterized by high dust concentrations, high humidity and modest cloud coverage, requires regional models to retrieve the solar irradiance components from satellite images. An artificial neural network (ANN) model has shown promising results in estimating the direct normal, diffuse horizontal and global horizontal irradiances using thermal satellite channels over the United Arab Emirates (UAE). This model is trained with six thermal channels of the SEVIRI instrument, onboard Meteosat Second Generation, along with the solar zenith angle, day number, solar time and eccentricity correction. The outputs of this model are the solar irradiance components at 15-min temporal and 3-km spatial resolutions, which are then utilized to derive the daily, monthly and yearly irradiation maps over the UAE and Qatar. The purpose of this research is to examine the temporal and spatial variations for annual irradiation maps over the UAE and Qatar, derived using the ANN approach. For the period ranging from 2008 to 2010, the year of 2009 shows the lowest annual direct normal and global horizontal irradiation, and the highest diffuse horizontal irradiation. That is due to frequent dust events which occurred during 2009. The annual direct normal irradiation maps for 2008 to 2010 show the same trend, with the higher irradiation values in the southern area of UAE and the values decreasing as the coast approaches in the northern region. For any given year, Qatar generally shows lower direct normal irradiation values than the UAE. This might be explained by higher humidity in Qatar due to its coastal climate. As for the annual diffuse horizontal irradiation maps, the lower irradiation values are observed in the southern area of UAE and along some coastal regions, with the higher values being in the middle. Qatar shows higher values in the western region, due to the increased airborne dust coming from Saudi Arabia, as opposed to the eastern coast which is along the Arabian Gulf. The annual global horizontal irradiation maps show less spatial variations. For the UAE the values consistently increase from north to south, while for Qatar lower values are observed along the eastern coast and the higher values are in the inland and southern locations. The direct normal irradiation map over the UAE and Qatar for the year 2010, which had values greater than 2008 and 2009.

  19. Baseline tissue Doppler imaging-derived echocardiographic parameters and left ventricle reverse remodelling following cardiac resynchronization therapy introduction

    PubMed Central

    Wili?ski, Jerzy; Czarnecka, Danuta; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kloch-Bade?ek, Ma?gorzata; Jastrz?bski, Marek; Bacior, Bogumi?a; Sondej, Tomasz; Kusiak, Aleksander

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to assess the relation of baseline mechanical dyssynchrony with the left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) decrease following cardiac resynchronization (CRT) therapy introduction. Material and methods Sixty consecutive patients (aged 66.3 ± 8.7 years; 57 men) with chronic heart failure (71.7% of ischaemic and 28.3% of non-ischaemic origin) and current indications for CRT were assessed before and 3 months after biventricular heart stimulator implantation. Longitudinal movements of twelve segments of the left ventricle (LV) (6 basal and 6 midlevel) and two segments of the right ventricle (RV) were analysed using tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) techniques with time from onset of Q wave in ECG to peak systolic velocity in colour-coded TDI (TTDI), time to peak strain (Tstrain) and time to peak strain rate (Tstrain rate). Minimal and maximal time differences within LV and between LV and RV walls were calculated. Results In the study group LVEF and 6-min walk test distance increased, while NYHA class, NT-proBNP level, left ventricular end-diastolic volume and LVESV decreased. Significant correlations between the magnitude of LVESV reduction with maximal time differences between Tstrain of 12 LV segments (r=0.34, p = 0.017) and time differences between TTDI basal LV-RV segments (r = –0.29, p=0.041) were found. Conclusions Only a few TDI-derived parameters such as maximal time differences between Tstrain of 12 LV segments and TTDI difference of LV-RV basal segments can be useful to predict the magnitude of left ventricle reverse remodelling after CRT introduction. PMID:22291826

  20. Extreme inputs/outputs for multiple input multiple output linear systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, David Ora

    2005-09-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the auto spectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the auto spectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input auto spectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one will result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.

  1. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore »result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  2. Cross-sensor SAR image offsets for deriving coseismic displacements: Application to the 2001 Bhuj (India) earthquake using ERS and Envisat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Wei, S.; Jonsson, S.; Avouac, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a powerful imaging technique for measuring ground deformation, either through Interferometric SAR (InSAR) or image offset tracking. However, these methods are only applied to SAR images acquired by the same satellite, which limits the measurement capability for many earthquakes. Here we propose a novel approach that allows for calculating offsets between images acquired from the European ERS and Envisat satellites. To achieve this cross-sensor offset calculation, we first coregister pre-event (ERS) and post-event (Envisat) SAR images separately to generate averaged pre- and post-event SAR amplitude maps. We then compute the orbital offsets between these two maps in order to resample the ERS average map onto the grid of the averaged Envisat image. We finally calculate the cross-sensor image offsets based on cross-correlating selected sub-images distributed throughout the coregistered averaged SAR maps. Application to the 2001 Bhuj earthquake reveals, for the first time, its near-field coseismic displacement field right above the epicenter. We compare our measurements with the surface displacement field predicted from the published source model of Copley et al. [2011]. This model was derived from tele-seismic waveforms and limited far-field geodetic data. The comparison between the two displacement maps shows consistent displacement patterns, yet a systematic shift, which likely is due to the limited near-fault resolution of the data used in the previous model. We then perform a joint inversion using the newly derived SAR image offsets and tele-seismic waveforms. The preferred source model suggests a compact slip pattern at depths of 20-30 km with a peak slip of ~10 meters and a fairly short rise time (<3s). The large slip rate and low attenuation in the crust are likely responsible for the widely felt ground shaking despite of its compact source area. The result demonstrates that it is possible to correlate non-coherent SAR images acquired by different sensors to measure surface displacements. This approach extends further the possibility of mining the archive of SAR images for various types of earth-science studies.

  3. EU-FP7-iMars: Analysis of Mars Multi-Resolution Images using Auto-Coregistration, Data Mining and Crowd Source Techniques: an overview and a request for scientific inputs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jan-Peter; Gwinner, Klaus; van Gasselt, Stephan; Ivanov, Anton; Morley, Jeremy; Houghton, Robert; Bamford, Steven; Yershov, Vladimir; Sidirpoulos, Panagiotis; Kim, Jungrack

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the role of different planetary surface formation processes within our Solar System is one of the fundamental goals of planetary science research. There has been a revolution in planetary surface observations over the last 7 years, especially in 3D imaging of surface shape (down to resolutions of 10cm) and subsequent terrain correction of imagery from orbiting spacecraft. This has led to the ability to be able to overlay different epochs back to the mid-1970s, examine time-varying changes (such as the recent discovery of boulder movement [Orloff et al., 2011] or the sublimation of sub-surface ice revealed by meteoritic impact [Byrne et al., 2009] as well as examine geophysical phenomena, such as surface roughness on different length scales. Consequently we are seeing a dramatic improvement in our understanding of surface formation processes. Since January 2004 the ESA Mars Express has been acquiring global data, especially HRSC stereo (12.5-25m nadir images) with 87% coverage with images ?25m and more than 65% useful for stereo mapping (e.g. atmosphere sufficiently clear). It has been demonstrated [Gwinner et al., 2010] that HRSC has the highest possible planimetric accuracy of ?25m and is well co-registered with MOLA, which represents the global 3D reference frame. HRSC 3D and terrain-corrected image products therefore represent the best available 3D reference data for Mars. NASA began imaging the surface of Mars, initially from flybys in the 1960s with the first orbiter with images ?100m in the late 1970s from Viking Orbiter. The most recent orbiter to begin imaging in November 2006 is the NASA MRO which has acquired surface imagery of around 1% of the Martian surface from HiRISE (at ?20cm) and ?5% from CTX (?6m) in stereo. Unfortunately, for most of these NASA images, especially MGS, MO, VO and HiRISE their accuracy of georeferencing is often worse than the quality of Mars reference data from HRSC. This reduces their value for analysing changes in time series. Within the iMars project (http://i-Mars.eu), a fully automated large-scale processing ('Big Data') solution is being developed to generate the best possible multi-resolution DTM of Mars co-registered to HRSC (50-100m grid) products generated at DLR from CTX (6-20m grid, loc.cit.) and HiRISE (1-3m grids) on a large-scale linux cluster based at MSSL with 224 cores and 0.25 Pb of storage. The HRSC products are employed to provide a geographic reference for all current, future and historical NASA products using automated co-registration based on feature points and initial results will be shown. The metadata already available for all orbital imagery acquired to date, with poor georeferencing information, has been employed to determine the 'sweet spots' which have long time series of measurements with different spatial resolution ranges over the last ?50 years of observations and these will be shown. In 2015, as much of the entire NASA and ESA record of orbital images will be co-registered and the updated georeferencing information employed to generate a time series of terrain relief corrected orthorectified images (ORIs) back to 1977. Web-GIS using OGC protocols will be employed to allow exploration visually of changes of the surface. Data mining processing chains are being developed to search for changes in the Martian surface from 1971-2015 and the output of this data mining will be compared against the results from citizen scientists' measurements in a specialised Zooniverse implementation. Final co-registered data sets will be distributed through both European and US channels in a manner to be decided towards the end of the project. The resultant co-registered image datasets will represent the best possible capture of changes and evolutions in the Martian surface. A workshop is planned to be held during the EGU time period to try to capture scientific input on the relative priorities of different types of changes based on these 'sweet spots'. Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European

  4. Images

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Images Images:  Cancer Biology Image: Cell with DNA 72 DPI | 300 DPIDrawing depicting DNA molecule unwinding from a chromosome inside the nucleus of a cell. NHGRI >> View All Cancer Pathology/Imaging Image: Female

  5. Reliability of MRI-derived cortical and subcortical morphometric measures: Effects of pulse sequence, voxel geometry, and parallel imaging

    E-print Network

    Corkin, Suzanne

    of Technology, USA b Athinoula A. Martinos Imaging Center at the McGovern Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA c MGH/MIT/HMS Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, USA d Departments of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA e Departments of Psychiatry

  6. Segmentation and learning in the quantitative analysis of microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Christy; Ross, Amy; Porter, Reid

    2015-02-01

    In material science and bio-medical domains the quantity and quality of microscopy images is rapidly increasing and there is a great need to automatically detect, delineate and quantify particles, grains, cells, neurons and other functional "objects" within these images. These are challenging problems for image processing because of the variability in object appearance that inevitably arises in real world image acquisition and analysis. One of the most promising (and practical) ways to address these challenges is interactive image segmentation. These algorithms are designed to incorporate input from a human operator to tailor the segmentation method to the image at hand. Interactive image segmentation is now a key tool in a wide range of applications in microscopy and elsewhere. Historically, interactive image segmentation algorithms have tailored segmentation on an image-by-image basis, and information derived from operator input is not transferred between images. But recently there has been increasing interest to use machine learning in segmentation to provide interactive tools that accumulate and learn from the operator input over longer periods of time. These new learning algorithms reduce the need for operator input over time, and can potentially provide a more dynamic balance between customization and automation for different applications. This paper reviews the state of the art in this area, provides a unified view of these algorithms, and compares the segmentation performance of various design choices.

  7. Selection of weighting factors for quantification of PET radioligand binding using simplified reference tissue models with noisy input functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normandin, M. D.; Koeppe, R. A.; Morris, E. D.

    2012-02-01

    Input function noise contributes to model-predicted values and should be accounted for during parameter estimation. This problem has been examined in the context of PET data analysis using a noisy image-derived arterial input function. Huesman and Mazoyer (1987 Phys. Med. Biol 32 1569-79) incorporated the effect of error in the measured input function into the objective function and observed a subsequent improvement in the accuracy of parameters estimated from a kinetic model of cardiac blood flow. Such a treatment has not been applied to the reference region models commonly used to analyze dynamic positron emission tomography data with receptor-ligand tracers. Here, we propose a strategy for selection of weighting factors that accounts for noise in the reference region input function and test the method on two common formulations of the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM). We present a simulation study which demonstrates that the proposed weighting approach improves the accuracy of estimated binding potential at high noise levels and when the reference tissue and target regions of interest are of comparable size. In the second simulation experiment, we show that using a small, homogeneous reference tissue with our weighting technique may have advantages over input functions derived from a larger (and thus less noisy), heterogeneous region with conventional weighting. A comparative analysis of clinical [11C]flumazenil data found a small but significant increase in estimated binding potential when using the proposed weighting method, consistent with the finding of reduced negative bias in our simulation study. The weighting strategy described here accounts for noise in the reference region input function and may improve the performance of the SRTM in applications where data are noisy and the reference region is relatively small. This technique may offer similar benefits to other models using reference region inputs, particularly those derived from the SRTM.

  8. Modeling and generating input processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This tutorial paper provides information relevant to the selection and generation of stochastic inputs to simulation studies. The primary area considered is multivariate but much of the philosophy at least is relevant to univariate inputs as well. 14 refs.

  9. Arctic science input wanted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Arctic Research and Policy Act (Eos, June 26, 1984, p. 412) was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan this past July. One of its objectives is to develop a 5-year research plan for the Arctic. A request for input to this plan is being issued this week to nearly 500 people in science, engineering, and industry.To promote Arctic research and to recommend research policy in the Arctic, the new law establishes a five-member Arctic Research Commission, to be appointed by the President, and establishes an Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, to be composed of representatives from nearly a dozen agencies having interests in the region. The commission will make policy recommendations, and the interagency committee will implement those recommendations. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has been designated as the lead agency of the interagency committee.

  10. Long-term time-lapse multimodal intravital imaging of regeneration and bone-marrow-derived cell dynamics in skin

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Benedikt W.; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Adie, Steven G.; De Lisio, Michael; Valero, M. Carmen; Boppart, Marni D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for translating cell-based therapies is understanding the dynamics of cells and cell populations in complex in vivo environments. Intravital microscopy has shown great promise for directly visualizing cell behavior in vivo. However, current methods are limited to relatively short imaging times (hours), by ways to track cell and cell population dynamics over extended time-lapse periods (days to weeks to months), and by relatively few imaging contrast mechanisms that persist over extended investigations. We present technology to visualize and quantify complex, multifaceted dynamic changes in natural deformable skin over long time periods using novel multimodal imaging and a non-rigid image registration method. These are demonstrated in green fluorescent protein (GFP) bone marrow (BM) transplanted mice to study dynamic skin regeneration. This technology provides a novel perspective for studying dynamic biological processes and will enable future studies of stem, immune, and tumor cell biology in vivo. PMID:25089085

  11. Validation of GOES-9 Satellite-Derived Cloud Properties over the Tropical Western Pacific Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Nordeen, Michele L.; Doeling, David R.; Chakrapani, Venkatasan; Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Real-time processing of hourly GOES-9 images in the ARM TWP region began operationally in October 2003 and is continuing. The ARM sites provide an excellent source for validating this new satellitederived cloud and radiation property dataset. Derived cloud amounts, heights, and broadband shortwave fluxes are compared with similar quantities derived from ground-based instrumentation. The results will provide guidance for estimating uncertainties in the GOES-9 products and to develop improvements in the retrieval methodologies and input.

  12. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  13. Reduction of shading-derived artifacts in skin chromophore imaging without measurements or assumptions about the shape of the subject

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kenichiro; Nishidate, Izumi; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Iwata, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate skin chromophores over a wide region of curved skin surface, we propose an approach that suppresses the effect of the shading-derived error in the reflectance on the estimation of chromophore concentrations, without sacrificing the accuracy of that estimation. In our method, we use multiple regression analysis, assuming the absorbance spectrum as the response variable and the extinction coefficients of melanin, oxygenated hemoglobin, and deoxygenated hemoglobin as the predictor variables. The concentrations of melanin and total hemoglobin are determined from the multiple regression coefficients using compensation formulae (CF) based on the diffuse reflectance spectra derived from a Monte Carlo simulation. To suppress the shading-derived error, we investigated three different combinations of multiple regression coefficients for the CF. In vivo measurements with the forearm skin demonstrated that the proposed approach can reduce the estimation errors that are due to shading-derived errors in the reflectance. With the best combination of multiple regression coefficients, we estimated that the ratio of the error to the chromophore concentrations is about 10%. The proposed method does not require any measurements or assumptions about the shape of the subjects; this is an advantage over other studies related to the reduction of shading-derived errors.

  14. Eulerian Opinion Dynamics with Bounded Confidence and Exogenous Input

    E-print Network

    Mirtabatabaei, Anahita; Bullo, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The formation of opinions in a large population is governed by endogenous (human interactions) and exogenous (media influence) factors. In the analysis of opinion evolution in a large population, decision making rules can be approximated with non-Bayesian "rule of thumb" methods. This paper focuses on an Eulerian bounded-confidence model of opinion dynamics with a potential time-varying input. First, we prove some properties of this system's dynamics with time-varying input. Second, we derive a simple sufficient condition for opinion consensus, and prove the convergence of the population's distribution with no input to a sum of Dirac Delta functions. Finally, we define an input's attraction range, and for a normally distributed input and uniformly distributed initial population, we conjecture that the length of attraction range is an increasing affine function of population's confidence bound and input's variance.

  15. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  16. Teaching Image Formation by Extended Light Sources: The Use of a Model Derived from the History of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedes, Christos; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This research, carried out in Greece on pupils aged 12-16, focuses on the transformation of their representations concerning light emission and image formation by extended light sources. The instructive process was carried out in two stages, each one having a different, distinct target set. During the first stage, the appropriate conflict…

  17. Characterization of conductive nanobiomaterials derived from viral assemblies by low-voltage STEM imaging and Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Carreño-Fuentes, Liliana; Bahena, Daniel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Palomares, Laura A.; Ramírez, Octavio T.

    2014-09-01

    New technologies require the development of novel nanomaterials that need to be fully characterized to achieve their potential. High-resolution low-voltage scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has proven to be a very powerful technique in nanotechnology, but its use for the characterization of nanobiomaterials has been limited. Rotavirus VP6 self-assembles into nanotubular assemblies that possess an intrinsic affinity for Au ions. This property was exploited to produce hybrid nanobiomaterials by the in situ functionalization of recombinant VP6 nanotubes with gold nanoparticles. In this work, Raman spectroscopy and advanced analytical electron microscopy imaging with spherical aberration-corrected (Cs) STEM and nanodiffraction at low-voltage doses were employed to characterize nanobiomaterials. STEM imaging revealed the precise structure and arrangement of the protein templates, as well as the nanostructure and atomic arrangement of gold nanoparticles with high spatial sub-Angstrom resolution and avoided radiation damage. The imaging was coupled with backscattered electron imaging, ultra-high resolution scanning electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. The hybrid nanobiomaterials that were obtained showed unique properties as bioelectronic conductive devices and showed enhanced Raman scattering by their precise arrangement into superlattices, displaying the utility of viral assemblies as functional integrative self-assembled nanomaterials for novel applications.

  18. Tropical forest phenology and metabolism: Integrated analysis of tower-mounted camera images and tower derived GPP for interpreting ecosystem scale processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Hayek, M.; Stark, S. C.; Smith, M.; Wiedemann, K.; Marostica, S.; Ferreira, M.; Woodcock, T.; Prohaska, N.; da Silva, R.; Nelson, B. W.; Huete, A. R.; Saleska, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Seasonal and interannual patterns of leaf development and metabolism are a central topic of global change ecology. However, the seasonality of leaf development in tropical forests remains poorly understood due to the relatively low variation in climate, the high biodiversity of tropical biomes and the limitations of current observation techniques. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the feasibility of using near-surface remote sensing techniques to understand the phenology of an evergreen tropical forest (Tapajos National Forest or TNF site, Santarem, Para, Brazil), and how this phenology affects the metabolism of tropical vegetation. Two continuous years (2010-2011) of daily images from a tower mounted three-channel (red, green, and near-infrared) TetraCAM ADC camera were analyzed for this study. A new approach was developed based on an automatic image classification scheme which decomposed the images into two components (leaves and bare wood) to extract seasonality of leaf development. A confusion matrix method was used to assess the accuracy of image classification. MODIS EVI composites (MOD13Q1) were also acquired and processed for the TNF site (5km*5km). The camera based phenology information was first compared with MODIS EVI, and then combined with tower based eddy covariance measurements at the same site to quantify the effect of canopy-scale phenology on ecosystem metabolism. We found that: (1) Tower-based images revealed a clear seasonal pattern in leaf phenology that was supported by confusion matrix analysis. Matrix analysis gave a 96.7% user accuracy (user accuracy represents the probability that an image pixel classification actually corresponds to that category on the ground) for the leaf component, based on 24 images in 2010 (2 images per month). The tower-based pattern matched that retrieved from satellites (camera-sensed leaf phenology vs monthly MODIS EVI (01/2010-12/2011, R2=0.57, P-value<0.01). This suggests that quality-controlled MODIS EVI accurately captures optical phenology patterns observed near the ground in tropical regions, strong evidence against the previously suggested idea that tropical MODIS data are contaminated by atmospheric artifacts. (2) In particular, seasonal patterns observed from satellite and tower were robust to changes in solar zenith angle (SZA), which had a small effect in camera and satellite-derived leaf phenology, but this effect was secondary to the overall seasonal pattern of leaf development detected. (3) We also found the image classification scheme to be able to monitor the phenology of individual tree species. These results suggest this method to be a feasible way to monitor the complex phenology of a tropical forest system. (4)Net leaf production was extracted by applying a first derivative of monthly camera detected leaf component percentage (termed 'leaf phenology' in this study). Monthly net leaf production (02/2010-12/2011) was correlated with monthly eddy covariance derived light use efficiency (R2=0.59, P-value<0.01), but with ~4 months time lag. This might be associated with leaf age dependent physiological status (recently matured leaves have higher photosynthetic capacity compared with both newly emerged and previous growing leaves), a hypothesis that we are currently investigating.

  19. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each stream, record or block name must be unique in its category (i.e. all streams must have different names, but a stream can have the same name as a record). Each category is an arbitrary length list which is handled by a 'manager' and there is one manager for each category.

  20. Optical-Input, Optical-Output Morphological Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jeffrey W.; Chao, Tien Hsin; Cheng, Li Jen; Psaltis, Demetri

    1992-01-01

    Some advantages of optical and electronic processing combined. Proposed optical-input/optical-output morphological processor is optoelectronic assembly performing some binary operations on picture elements of binary input image, yielding processed binary output image. Number of such processors cascaded to form more complicated image-processing system. Use of optics as connection medium makes rate of processing faster than in all-electronic system designed to perform same overall processing functions. At the same time, use of electronics as processing medium provides flexibility of reconfiguration not available in all-optical system.

  1. Images of gravitational and magnetic phenomena derived from two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography of interacting binary stars

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Cocking, Alexander S.; Fisher, John G.; Conover, Marshall J. E-mail: asc5097@psu.edu

    2014-11-10

    We have used two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography as a tool to examine the influence of gravitational and magnetic phenomena in interacting binaries that undergo mass transfer from a magnetically active star onto a non-magnetic main-sequence star. This multitiered study of over 1300 time-resolved spectra of 13 Algol binaries involved calculations of the predicted dynamical behavior of the gravitational flow and the dynamics at the impact site, analysis of the velocity images constructed from tomography, and the influence on the tomograms of orbital inclination, systemic velocity, orbital coverage, and shadowing. The H? tomograms revealed eight sources: chromospheric emission, a gas stream along the gravitational trajectory, a star-stream impact region, a bulge of absorption or emission around the mass-gaining star, a Keplerian accretion disk, an absorption zone associated with hotter gas, a disk-stream impact region, and a hot spot where the stream strikes the edge of a disk. We described several methods used to extract the physical properties of the emission sources directly from the velocity images, including S-wave analysis, the creation of simulated velocity tomograms from hydrodynamic simulations, and the use of synthetic spectra with tomography to sequentially extract the separate sources of emission from the velocity image. In summary, the tomography images have revealed results that cannot be explained solely by gravitational effects: chromospheric emission moving with the mass-losing star, a gas stream deflected from the gravitational trajectory, and alternating behavior between stream state and disk state. Our results demonstrate that magnetic effects cannot be ignored in these interacting binaries.

  2. Micro-CT image-derived metrics quantify arterial wall distensibility reduction in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2000-04-01

    We developed methods to quantify arterial structural and mechanical properties in excised rat lungs and applied them to investigate the distensibility decrease accompanying chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Lungs of control and hypertensive (three weeks 11% O2) animals were excised and a contrast agent introduced before micro-CT imaging with a special purpose scanner. For each lung, four 3D image data sets were obtained, each at a different intra-arterial contrast agent pressure. Vessel segment diameters and lengths were measured at all levels in the arterial tree hierarchy, and these data used to generate features sensitive to distensibility changes. Results indicate that measurements obtained from 3D micro-CT images can be used to quantify vessel biomechanical properties in this rat model of pulmonary hypertension and that distensibility is reduced by exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mechanical properties can be assessed in a localized fashion and quantified in a spatially-resolved way or as a single parameter describing the tree as a whole. Micro-CT is a nondestructive way to rapidly assess structural and mechanical properties of arteries in small animal organs maintained in a physiological state. Quantitative features measured by this method may provide valuable insights into the mechanisms causing the elevated pressures in pulmonary hypertension of differing etiologies and should become increasingly valuable tools in the study of complex phenotypes in small-animal models of important diseases such as hypertension.

  3. Entropy-based measures of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing derived from quantitative optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekera, Kenny; Jonas, Stephan; Bhattacharya, Dipankan; Khokha, Mustafa; Choma, Michael A.

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia are cellular organelles that project from different epithelial surfaces including respiratory epithelium. They generate directional fluid flow that removes harmful pathogens and particulate matter from the respiratory system. While it has been known that primary ciliary dyskinesia increases the risk of recurrent pulmonary infections, there is now heightened interest in understanding the role that cilia play in a wide-variety of respiratory diseases. Different optical imaging technologies are being investigated to visualize cilia-driven fluid flow, and quantitative image analysis is used to generate measures of ciliary performance. Here, we demonstrate the quantification of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing using spatial and temporal measures of Shannon information entropy. Using videomicroscopy, we imaged in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow generated by the epidermis of the Xenopus tropicalis embryo. Flow was seeded with either dyes or microparticles. Both spatial and temporal measures of entropy show significant levels of mixing, with maximum entropy measures of ~6.5 (out of a possible range of 0 to 8). Spatial entropy measures showed localization of mixing "hot-spots" and "cold-spots" and temporal measures showed mixing throughout.In sum, entropy-based measures of microfluidic mixing can characterize in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow and hold the potential for better characterization of ciliary dysfunction.

  4. Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Heterocyclic Phenylethenyl and Pyridinylethenyl Derivatives as Tau-Imaging Agents That Selectively Detect Neurofibrillary Tangles in Alzheimer's Disease Brains.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kenji; Ono, Masahiro; Kitada, Ayane; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Masashi; Iikuni, Shimpei; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Yoko; Ihara, Masafumi; Saji, Hideo

    2015-09-24

    In order to explore novel tau-imaging agents that can selectively detect neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, we designed and synthesized a series of heterocyclic phenylethenyl and (3-pyridinyl)ethenyl derivatives with or without a dimethyl amino group. In in vitro autoradiography using AD brain sections, all radioiodinated ligands with a dimethyl amino group bound to A? deposits in the sections. In contrast, the ligands without a dimethyl amino group showed different patterns of radioactivity accumulation in the sections depending on the kind of heterocycle contained in their molecules. Particularly, a phenylethenyl benzimidazole derivative ([(125)I]64) showed marked radioactivity accumulation in the temporal lobe which corresponded with the distribution of tau deposits. [(125)I]64 also showed the most favorable pharmacokinetics in normal mouse brains (3.69 and 0.06% ID/g at 2 and 60 min postinjection, respectively) among all ligands in this study. Taken together, these results suggest that [(123)I]64 may be a new candidate tau-imaging agent. PMID:26327138

  5. Optical microscopy imaging for the diagnosis of the pharmacological reaction of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs).

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Tomohiko; Espulgar, Wilfred; Shimizu, Eiichi; Saito, Masato; Lee, Jong-Kook; Dou, Xiaoming; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative diagnosis of pharmacological chronotropic reactions on mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs) was successfully performed by utilizing derivative imaging analysis of videos recorded with a microscope camera at 30 Hz frame rate and 680 × 510 pixel resolution. The imaging analysis algorithm, developed in our lab, generated the contractile profile of the cells which was exploited for drug effect profiling. Six drugs such as isoproterenol (0.01-1 ?M), quinidine (2-200 ?M), propranolol (0.03-30 ?M), verapamil (0.01-1 ?M), sotalol (1-100 ?M), and acetylsalicylic acid (0.1-10 ?M) were administered and the quantitative medication effect was determined. Among the negative chronotropic agents administered, verapamil was found to be the most potent while sotalol was found to be the least potent at the micromolar level. Simultaneous measurement of the field potential and contractile motion in the verapamil effect test showed a coherent result. Moreover, this approach can provide insights into the contraction-relaxation conditions which are not available in the common electrophysiological approach. With these findings, it is expected that this study can aid in providing a simple and reliable in vitro mESC-CM-based screening platform for cardiovascular effect profiling of candidate drugs. PMID:26309911

  6. Four-Dimensional Image Registration for Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Thorndyke, Brian; Li Tianfang; Wang Jing; Xing Lei

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Newly emerged four-dimensional (4D) imaging techniques such as 4D-computed tomography (CT), 4D-cone beam CT, 4D-magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D-positron emission tomography are effective tools to reveal the spatiotemporal details of patients' anatomy. To use the 4D data acquired under different conditions or using different modalities, an algorithm for registering 4D images must be in place. We developed an automated 4D-4D registration method to take advantage of 4D information. Methods and Materials: We used 4D-4D matching to find the appropriate three-dimensional anatomy in the fixed image for each phase of the moving image and spatially register them. A search algorithm was implemented to simultaneously find the best phase and spatial match of two 4D inputs. An interpolation scheme capable of deriving an image set based on temporally adjacent three-dimensional data sets was developed to deal with the situation in which the discrete temporal points of the two inputs do not coincide or correspond. Results: In a phantom study, our technique was able to reproduce the known 'ground truth' with high spatial fidelity. The technique regenerated all deliberately introduced 'missing' three-dimensional images at different phases of the input using temporal interpolation. In the registration of gated-magnetic resonance imaging and 4D-CT, the algorithm was able to select the appropriate CT phase. The technique was also able to register 4D-CT with 4D-cone beam CT and two 4D-CT scans acquired at different times. A spatial accuracy of <3 mm was achieved in 98% of voxels in all cases. Conclusion: Automated 4D-4D registration can find the best possible spatiotemporal match between two 4D data sets and is useful for image-guided radiotherapy applications.

  7. Deriving urban dynamic evolution rules from self-adaptive cellular automata with multi-temporal remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yingqing; Ai, Bin; Yao, Yao; Zhong, Fajun

    2015-06-01

    Cellular automata (CA) have proven to be very effective for simulating and predicting the spatio-temporal evolution of complex geographical phenomena. Traditional methods generally pose problems in determining the structure and parameters of CA for a large, complex region or a long-term simulation. This study presents a self-adaptive CA model integrated with an artificial immune system to discover dynamic transition rules automatically. The model's parameters are allowed to be self-modified with the application of multi-temporal remote sensing images: that is, the CA can adapt itself to the changed and complex environment. Therefore, urban dynamic evolution rules over time can be efficiently retrieved by using this integrated model. The proposed AIS-based CA model was then used to simulate the rural-urban land conversion of Guangzhou city, located in the core of China's Pearl River Delta. The initial urban land was directly classified from TM satellite image in the year 1990. Urban land in the years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2009 and 2012 was correspondingly used as the observed data to calibrate the model's parameters. With the quantitative index figure of merit (FoM) and pattern similarity, the comparison was further performed between the AIS-based model and a Logistic CA model. The results indicate that the AIS-based CA model can perform better and with higher precision in simulating urban evolution, and the simulated spatial pattern is closer to the actual development situation.

  8. Live-cell imaging of phosphatidic acid dynamics in pollen tubes visualized by Spo20p-derived biosensor.

    PubMed

    Potocký, Martin; Pleskot, Roman; Pejchar, P?emysl; Vitale, Nicolas; Kost, Benedikt; Zárský, Viktor

    2014-07-01

    Although phosphatidic acid (PA) is structurally the simplest membrane phospholipid, it has been implicated in the regulation of many cellular events, including cytoskeletal dynamics, membrane trafficking and stress responses. Plant PA shows rapid turnover but the information about its spatio-temporal distribution in plant cells is missing. Here we demonstrate the use of a lipid biosensor that enables us to monitor PA dynamics in plant cells. The biosensor consists of a PA-binding domain of yeast SNARE Spo20p fused to fluorescent proteins. Live-cell imaging of PA dynamics in transiently transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen tubes was performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. In growing pollen tubes, PA shows distinct annulus-like fluorescence pattern in the plasma membrane behind the extreme tip. Coexpression studies with markers for other plasmalemma signaling lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and diacylglycerol revealed limited colocalization at the shoulders of the apex. PA distribution and concentrations show distinct responses to various lipid signaling inhibitors. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis suggests high PA turnover in the plasma membrane. Our data show that a biosensor based on the Spo20p-PA binding domain is suitable for live-cell imaging of PA also in plant cells. In tobacco pollen tubes, distinct subapical PA maximum corroborates its involvement in the regulation of endocytosis and actin dynamics. PMID:24750036

  9. Comparison of temporal and spectral scattering methods using acoustically large breast models derived from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Hesford, Andrew J.; Tillett, Jason C.; Astheimer, Jeffrey P.; Waag, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and efficient modeling of ultrasound propagation through realistic tissue models is important to many aspects of clinical ultrasound imaging. Simplified problems with known solutions are often used to study and validate numerical methods. Greater confidence in a time-domain k-space method and a frequency-domain fast multipole method is established in this paper by analyzing results for realistic models of the human breast. Models of breast tissue were produced by segmenting magnetic resonance images of ex vivo specimens into seven distinct tissue types. After confirming with histologic analysis by pathologists that the model structures mimicked in vivo breast, the tissue types were mapped to variations in sound speed and acoustic absorption. Calculations of acoustic scattering by the resulting model were performed on massively parallel supercomputer clusters using parallel implementations of the k-space method and the fast multipole method. The efficient use of these resources was confirmed by parallel efficiency and scalability studies using large-scale, realistic tissue models. Comparisons between the temporal and spectral results were performed in representative planes by Fourier transforming the temporal results. An RMS field error less than 3% throughout the model volume confirms the accuracy of the methods for modeling ultrasound propagation through human breast. PMID:25096103

  10. Fusion of 3D models derived from TLS and image-based techniques for CH enhanced documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastonero, P.; Donadio, E.; Chiabrando, F.; Spanò, A.

    2014-05-01

    Recognizing the various advantages offered by 3D new metric survey technologies in the Cultural Heritage documentation phase, this paper presents some tests of 3D model generation, using different methods, and their possible fusion. With the aim to define potentialities and problems deriving from integration or fusion of metric data acquired with different survey techniques, the elected test case is an outstanding Cultural Heritage item, presenting both widespread and specific complexities connected to the conservation of historical buildings. The site is the Staffarda Abbey, the most relevant evidence of medieval architecture in Piedmont. This application faced one of the most topical architectural issues consisting in the opportunity to study and analyze an object as a whole, from twice location of acquisition sensors, both the terrestrial and the aerial one. In particular, the work consists in the evaluation of chances deriving from a simple union or from the fusion of different 3D cloudmodels of the abbey, achieved by multi-sensor techniques. The aerial survey is based on a photogrammetric RPAS (Remotely piloted aircraft system) flight while the terrestrial acquisition have been fulfilled by laser scanning survey. Both techniques allowed to extract and process different point clouds and to generate consequent 3D continuous models which are characterized by different scale, that is to say different resolutions and diverse contents of details and precisions. Starting from these models, the proposed process, applied to a sample area of the building, aimed to test the generation of a unique 3Dmodel thorough a fusion of different sensor point clouds. Surely, the describing potential and the metric and thematic gains feasible by the final model exceeded those offered by the two detached models.

  11. Power regulation of kinematic control inputs for forward flying Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Kenneth; Faruque, Imraan; Sean Humbert, J.

    2014-12-01

    The choices of insect wing kinematic programs is not well understood, particularly the mechanism by which an insect selects a distortion to achieve flight control. A methodology to evaluate prospective kinematic control inputs is presented based on the reachable states when control actuation was constrained to a unit of power. The method implements a computationally-derived reduced order model of the insect's flight dynamics combined with calculation of power requirement. Four kinematic inputs are evaluated based on this criterion for a Drosophila size insect in forward flight. Stroke bias is shown to be the dominant control input using this power normalized evaluation measure.

  12. Selective detection of volatile organic compounds by spectral imaging of porphyrin derivatives bound to TiO2 porous films.

    PubMed

    Roales, Javier; Pedrosa, José M; Castillero, Pedro; Cano, Manuel; Richardson, Tim H; Barranco, Ángel; González-Elipe, Agustín R

    2012-10-24

    In this work, the carboxylic acid derivatives of a free-base porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin, and 10 of its metal derivatives (TCPPs) have been used for optical gas sensing. For this purpose, microstructured columnar TiO(2) thin films prepared by GAPVD (glancing angle physical vapor deposition) have been used as host materials for the porphyrins as they are non-dispersive and porous, allowing their use for UV-visible spectroscopy and gas sensing. The chemical binding between the dye molecules and the TiO(2) has been studied through infrared spectroscopy, and the obtained spectral changes have been found to be compatible with chelating and/or bidentate binding modes of the carboxylate groups on the TiO(2) surface. When hosted in the film, the UV-visible spectra of the porphyrins featured a blue shift and broadening of the Soret band with respect to the solution, which has been attributed to the formation of ?-? aggregates between porphyrin molecules. The composite porphyrin/TiO(2) films obtained from each of the 11 porphyrins have been exposed to 12 different volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and their respective gas-sensitive properties have been analyzed as a function of the spectral changes in their Soret band region in the presence of the analytes. The set of composite films has shown high selectivity to the analyzed volatile compounds. For each analyte, an innovative way of showing the different responses has been developed. By means of this procedure, an imagelike recognition pattern has been obtained, which allows an easy identification of every compound. The kinetics of the exposure to several analytes showed a fast, reversible and reproducible response, with response times of a few seconds, which has been attributed to both the sensitivity of the porphyrins and the high porosity of the TiO(2) films. Also, increasing concentrations of the analytes resulted in an increase in the magnitude of the response, indicating that the sensor behavior is also concentration-dependent. PMID:22985094

  13. Validation of a paleo river system derived by ground based electromagnetic induction measurements with satellite based RapidEye images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Sebastian; von Hebel, Christian; Ali, Mohammed; Stadler, Anja; Herbst, Michael; Montzka, Carsten; Pätzold, Stefan; Weihermüller, Lutz; van der Kruk, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Morphological remnants of an inactive river system that has been filled by younger sediments can provide datable proxies about past climatic conditions. However, sediment composition of their infillings is a challenge for agriculture, in particular for precision agriculture. Differential crop development and yield reduction are often a consequence of lateral and vertical textural inhomogeneities. Several studies have shown that buried river systems can be traced by the use of remote sensing. However, the appearance of crop marks strongly depends on environmental conditions, and therefore, the reliance of remotely acquired data can become time and cost expensive. Soil physical properties which are related to textural differences can be mapped fast and cost-effective by the use of near surface geophysics. Especially electromagnetic induction (EMI), which measures soil apparent conductivity (ECa), has become a tool of choice to characterize large areas in high resolution. The introduction of multiple coil EMI systems as well as the quantification of respective measurements enables a reliable multilayer inversion. The aim of this study was to map a postglacial river system on agricultural fields and to mark out buried remains such as trenches and bomb craters of World War II. In summer 2012 ten fields (17 ha) were mapped with the CMD MiniExplorer, a multiple coil EMI system especially appropriate for near surface applications, after the harvest of winter wheat and sugar beet. At elevated sandy sites meander like patterns with higher conductivity were mapped. ECa measurements were verified by textural data taken from directed soil samples and vertical ECa logs. Sediment thickness was evaluated on soil cores and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) transects. Furthermore, ERT quantified ECa measurements were correlated with satellite as well as destructive derived leaf area index (LAI) measurements. In 3 of 71 LAI maps derived by multispectral RapidEye imagery crop marks were clearly visible following a dry season in spring 2011. These patterns are in coincidence with higher conductivity patterns caused by a higher amount of silt and clay. Good correlations were found for LAI measurements taken during a growing season with underlying sediments especially in the early stages of plant development. Finally, ECa measurements of two heterogeneous fields were used for a 3D layer inversion which will be further implemented into landscape models. This study shows that multiple EMI measurements can be successfully used to recover buried river systems, highlight possible sample locations and support farmers to manage their fields more precisely.

  14. Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, R

    1986-12-01

    Imaging of the musculoskeletal system includes many modalities and is an area that is changing rapidly. Selection of the most accurate techniques and avoidance of duplication are vital to both good patient care and cost containment. PMID:3466135

  15. Code Completion From Abbreviated Input

    E-print Network

    Miller, Robert C.

    Abbreviation Completion is a novel technique to improve the efficiency of code-writing by supporting code completion of multiple keywords based on non-predefined abbreviated input - a different approach from conventional ...

  16. Climate-related vegetation characteristics derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) leaf area index and normalized difference vegetation index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Anderson, Bruce; Barlow, Mathew; Tan, Bin; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2004-10-01

    MODIS-based leaf area index (LAI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) are used to examine detailed information regarding actual growing season and total annual production for various regions. Overall, MODIS LAI has larger variability and demonstrates more information regarding the evolution and structure of the seasonal vegetation characteristics. In contrast, the NDVI saturates around 0.7 and tends to overestimate the growing season in regions where it is already long. Next, a climatic impact index (CII) is derived to provide additional information regarding the potential sensitivity of vegetation to changes in climatic variables by accounting for the length of growing season. By normalizing the growth rate to the biome-average growth rate, this index can identify fractional loss of annual production, as opposed to the absolute loss which may be strongly weighted by the overall growth rate for different ecosystems. Our index provides a quantitative framework for assessing the importance of the length of the growing season in determining climatic vulnerability. In the last part of the paper, we use the long time series AVHRR products as a substitute for the MODIS products and test the temporal characteristics of the CII. Major drought events are well-captured by the CII, suggesting potential use as a monitoring and evaluation tool. Furthermore, the strong positive correlation between the CII and the vegetation condition index (VCI) suggests that the CII can quantitatively identify the effects of climatic variability upon vegetation activity.

  17. Single Particle Dynamic Imaging and Fe(3+) Sensing with Bright Carbon Dots Derived from Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingxiu; Wei, Lin; Zheng, Xuanfang; Xiao, Lehui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a convenient and green strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent and water-soluble carbon dots (Cdots) by carbonizing carbon precursors, i.e., Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles, in water solution. Without post surface modification, the as-synthesized Cdots exhibit fluorescence quantum yield (Q.Y.) as high as 34.8% and display superior colloidal stability not only in concentrated salt solutions (e.g. 2 M KCl) but also in a wide range of pH solutions. According to the FT-IR measurements, the Cdots contain many carboxyl groups, providing a versatile route for further chemical and biological functionalization. Through conjugation of Cdots with the transacting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide (a kind of cell penetration peptide (CPP)) derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is possible to directly monitor the dynamic interactions of CPP with living cell membrane at single particle level. Furthermore, these Cdots also exhibit a dosage-dependent selectivity toward Fe(3+) among other metal ions, including K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Hg(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Al(3+). We believed that the Cdots prepared by this strategy would display promising applications in various areas, including analytical chemistry, nanomedicine, biochemistry and so on. PMID:26634992

  18. Single Particle Dynamic Imaging and Fe3+ Sensing with Bright Carbon Dots Derived from Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingxiu; Wei, Lin; Zheng, Xuanfang; Xiao, Lehui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a convenient and green strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent and water-soluble carbon dots (Cdots) by carbonizing carbon precursors, i.e., Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles, in water solution. Without post surface modification, the as-synthesized Cdots exhibit fluorescence quantum yield (Q.Y.) as high as 34.8% and display superior colloidal stability not only in concentrated salt solutions (e.g. 2 M KCl) but also in a wide range of pH solutions. According to the FT-IR measurements, the Cdots contain many carboxyl groups, providing a versatile route for further chemical and biological functionalization. Through conjugation of Cdots with the transacting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide (a kind of cell penetration peptide (CPP)) derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is possible to directly monitor the dynamic interactions of CPP with living cell membrane at single particle level. Furthermore, these Cdots also exhibit a dosage-dependent selectivity toward Fe3+ among other metal ions, including K+, Na+, Mg2+, Hg2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Pb2+ and Al3+. We believed that the Cdots prepared by this strategy would display promising applications in various areas, including analytical chemistry, nanomedicine, biochemistry and so on. PMID:26634992

  19. Use of paramagnetic chelated metal derivatives of polysaccharides and spin-labeled polysaccharides as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bligh, S.W.; Harding, C.T.; Sadler, P.J.; Bulman, R.A.; Bydder, G.M.; Pennock, J.M.; Kelly, J.D.; Latham, I.A.; Marriott, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Soluble and insoluble polysaccharides were derivatized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and/or spin-labeled with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO). Polysaccharides derivatized with DTPA were prepared via cyanogen bromide activation, coupling to a diamine linker, and to DTPA anhydride. Spin-labeled polysaccharides were also prepared via cyanogen bromide activation. The extent of derivatization for dextran (18 kDa) was about 120 glucose units per DTPA, and for cellulose and starch about 15-30 units per DTPA. For spin-labeled polysaccharides, the average loading ranged from 1 nitroxide per 16 glucose units for starch to 181 for dextran (82 kDa). These derivatized paramagnetic polysaccharides were shown to be more effective relaxants than the small paramagnetic molecules alone. Both soluble and insoluble polysaccharide-linker-DTPA-Gd(3) complexes were effectively cleared from the body (rats) after oral administration. After intravenous administration, the biodistribution of dextran-linker-DTPA-Gd(3) complexes differed significantly from that of GdDTPA. Reduction of the nitroxide by ascorbic acid was retarded in the polysaccharide derivatives, particularly in starch derivatized with both nitroxide and linker-DTPA-Cu(2). These agents showed contrast enhancement in the gastrointestinal tract of rabbits.

  20. Activatable fluorescent cys-diabody conjugated with indocyanine green derivative: consideration of fluorescent catabolite kinetics on molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Kohei; Nakajima, Takahito; Ali, Towhid; Bartlett, Derek W.; Wu, Anna M.; Kim, Insook; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Antibody fragments including diabodies have more desirable pharmacokinetic characteristics than whole antibodies. An activatable optical imaging probe based on a cys-diabody targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen conjugated with the near-infrared fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG), was designed such that it can only be activated when bound to the tumor, leading to high signal-to-background ratios. We employed short polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers between the ICG and the reactive functional group (Sulfo-OSu group), resulting in covalent conjugation of ICG to the cys-diabody, which led to lower dissociation of ICG from cys-diabody early after injection, reducing hepatic uptake. However, unexpectedly, high and long-term fluorescence was observed in the kidneys, liver, and blood pool more than 1 h after injection of the cys-diabody PEG-ICG conjugate. A biodistribution study using I125-labeled cys-diabody-ICG showed immediate uptake in the kidneys followed by a rapid decrease, while gastric activity increased due to released radioiodine during rapid cys-diabody-ICG catabolism in the kidneys. To avoid this catabolic pathway, it would be preferable to use antibody fragments large enough not to be filtered through glomerulus or to conjugate the fragments with fluorescent dyes that are readily excreted into urine when cleaved from the cys-diabody to achieve high tumor-specific detection. PMID:23752742

  1. Last developments of the EUMETSAT Atmospheric Motion Vector product derived from MSG images for assimilation in NWP models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borde, Regis; Bertil Gustafsson, Jörgen; de Smet, Arthur; Dew, Greg

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) are one of the most important products derived from all geostationary satellites, because they constitute a very important part of the observation data provided to Numerical Weather Prediction models. The Height Assignment (HA) is currently the most difficult task in the AMV extraction scheme. Several sources of error can be introduced at the height assignment step, but one of the main difficulties is to clearly identify the pixels that lead the tracking process in the tracer box, in order to select them for the HA calculation. A good pixel selection process should ensure to keep a direct link between the feature really tracked and the calculation of the height. The most common method sorts the coldest pixels in the target box and uses them to calculate the AMV height. However, recent work showed that some of the coldest pixels can have very small and/or negative contribution to the cross correlation process. Following these findings, it is then proposed to use individual pixel contribution to the cross correlation coefficient information in the pixel selection process, in order to get a closer link between the tracked feature tracked and the HA. This method has been tested on a parallel chain at EUMETSAT for two separated periods of one month. This presentation summarizes the main results of these operational tests, which show some improvements of the new scheme on the AMV product for both the VIS0.8, HRV and IR10.8 channels, increasing the total amount of good AMVs (Quality Index QI>80) and also the amount of good AMV/radiosonde collocations. Speed biases and RMS against radiosonde observations are generally a bit larger, especially the known slow bias observed at high levels for IR10.8 AMVs, but are calculated on a bigger amount of data.

  2. Evaluation of SIR-A (Shuttle Imaging Radar) images from the Tres Marias region (Minas Gerais State, Brazil) using derived spatial features and registration with MSS-LANDSAT images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (principal investigator); Kux, H. J. H.; Dutra, L. V.

    1984-01-01

    Two image processing experiments are described using a MSS-LANDSAT scene from the Tres Marias region and a shuttle Imaging Radar SIR-A image digitized by a vidicon scanner. In the first experiment the study area is analyzed using the original and preprocessed SIR-A image data. The following thematic classes are obtained: (1) water, (2) dense savanna vegetation, (3) sparse savanna vegetation, (4) reforestation areas and (5) bare soil areas. In the second experiment, the SIR-A image was registered together with MSS-LANDSAT bands five, six, and seven. The same five classes mentioned above are obtained. These results are compared with those obtained using solely MSS-LANDSAT data. The spatial information as well as coregistered SIR-A and MSS-LANDSAT data can increase the separability between classes, as compared to the use of raw SIR-A data solely.

  3. Patch-Clamp Recordings and Calcium Imaging Followed by Single-Cell PCR Reveal the Developmental Profile of 13 Genes in iPSC-Derived Human Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Belinsky, Glenn S.; Rich, Matthew T.; Sirois, Carissa L.; Short, Shaina M.; Pedrosa, Erika; Lachman, Herbert M.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies are typically performed on homogenized biological samples, resulting in contamination from non-neuronal cells. To improve expression profiling of neurons we combined patch recordings with single-cell PCR. Two iPSC lines (healthy subject and 22q11.2 deletion), were differentiated into neurons. Patch electrode recordings were performed on 229 human cells from Day-13 to Day-88, followed by capture and single-cell PCR for 13 genes: ACTB, HPRT, vGLUT1, ?TUBIII, COMT, DISC1, GAD1, PAX6, DTNBP1, ERBB4, FOXP1, FOXP2, and GIRK2. Neurons derived from both iPSC lines expressed ?TUBIII, fired action potentials, and experienced spontaneous depolarizations (UP states) ~2 weeks before vGLUT1, GAD1 and GIRK2 appeared. Multisite calcium imaging revealed that these UP states were not synchronized among hESC-H9-derived neurons. The expression of FOXP1, FOXP2 and vGLUT1 was lost after 50 days in culture, in contrast to other continuously expressed genes. When gene expression was combined with electrophysiology, two subsets of genes were apparent; those irrelevant to spontaneous depolarizations (including vGLUT1, GIRK2, FOXP2 and DISC1) and those associated with spontaneous depolarizations (GAD1 and ERBB4). The results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of neuron development, it is useful to combine genetic analysis with physiological characterizations, on a cell-to-cell basis. PMID:24157591

  4. Novel fluorine-18 labeled 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin derivatives as potential PET tracers for in vivo imaging of activated caspases in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Christopher M; Hermann, Sven; Faust, Andreas; Riemann, Burkhard; Schober, Otmar; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter; Kopka, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    The programmed type I cell death, defined as apoptosis, is induced by complex regulated signaling pathways that trigger the intracellular activation of executioner caspases-3, -6 and -7. Once activated, these enzymes initiate cellular death through cleavage of proteins which are responsible for DNA repair, signaling and cell maintenance. Several radiofluorinated inhibitors of caspases-3 and -7, comprising a moderate lipophilic 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)isatin lead structure, are currently being investigated for imaging apoptosis in vivo by us and others. The purpose of this study was to increase the intrinsic hydrophilicity of the aforementioned lead structure to alter the pharmacokinetic behavior of the resulting caspase-3 and -7 targeted radiotracer. Therefore, fluorinated and non-fluorinated derivatives of 5-(1-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl)-7-azaisatin were synthesized and tested for their inhibitory properties against recombinant caspases-3 and -7. Fluorine-18 has been introduced by copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) of an alkyne precursor with 2-[(18)F]fluoroethylazide. Using dynamic micro-PET biodistribution studies in vivo the kinetic behavior of one promising PET-compatible 5-pyrrolidinylsulfonyl 7-azaisatin derivative has been compared to a previously described isatin based radiotracer. PMID:26210158

  5. In vivo degradation profile of porcine cartilage-derived extracellular matrix powder scaffolds using a non-invasive fluorescence imaging method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Joo; Lee, Soyeon; Yun, Hee-Woong; Yin, Xiang Yun; Kim, Soon Hee; Choi, Byung Hyune; Kim, Young Jick; Kim, Moon Suk; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We present a non-invasive fluorescence method for imaging of scaffold degradation in vivo by quantifying the degradation of porcine cartilage-derived extracellular matrix powder (PCP).Three-dimensional porous scaffolds should be biocompatible and bioresorbable, with a controllable degradation and resorption rate to match tissue growth. However, in vivo scaffold degradation and tissue ingrowth processes are not yet fully understood. Unfortunately, current analysis methods require animal sacrifice and scaffold destruction for the quantification of scaffold degradation and cannot monitor the situation in real time. In this study, Cy3, a fluorescent dye, was used for visualizing PCP and a real-time degradation profile was obtained quantitatively by a non-invasive method using an imaging system in which the reduction in fluorescence intensity depended on PCP scaffold degradation. Real-time PCP scaffold degradation was confirmed through changes in the volume and morphology of the scaffold using micro-computed tomography and microscopy. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix degradation was induced by collagen degradation because of the binding between Cy3 and collagen. This non-invasive real-time monitoring system for scaffold degradation will increase our understanding of in vivo matrix and/or scaffold degradation. PMID:26679994

  6. A (11)C-labeled 1,4-dihydroquinoline derivative as a potential PET tracer for imaging of redox status in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Toshimitsu; Okada, Maki; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2015-12-01

    A disturbance in redox balance has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. This study sought to examine the feasibility of imaging brain redox status using a (11)C-labeled dihydroquinoline derivative ([(11)C]DHQ1) for positron emission tomography (PET). The lipophilic PET tracer [(11)C]DHQ1 was rapidly oxidized to its hydrophilic form in mouse brain homogenate. The redox modulators diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin significantly reduced the initial velocity of [(11)C]DHQ1 oxidation, and apocynin also caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the initial velocity. Moreover, [(11)C]DHQ1 readily entered the brain by diffusion after administration and underwent oxidation into the hydrophilic cationic form, which then slowly decreased. By contrast, apocynin treatment inhibited the in vivo oxidation of [(11)C]DHQ1 to the hydrophilic cationic form, leading to a rapid decrease of radioactivity in the brain. Thus, the difference in the [(11)C]DHQ1 kinetics reflects the alteration in redox status caused by apocynin. In conclusion, [(11)C]DHQ1 is a potential PET tracer for imaging of redox status in the living brain. PMID:26082015

  7. 99mTc(CO)3-Labeled Benzothiazole Derivatives Preferentially Bind Cerebrovascular Amyloid: Potential Use as Imaging Agents for Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jianhua; Cui, Mengchao; Dai, Jiapei; Liu, Boli

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder affecting the elderly that is characterized by amyloid-? (A?) deposition in blood vessel walls of the brain. A series of 99mTc(CO)3-labeled benzothiazole derivatives as potential SPECT imaging probes for cerebrovascular A? deposition is reported. Rhenium surrogate displayed high affinities to A? aggregates with Ki values ranging from 106 to 42 nM, and they strongly stained A? deposits in transgenic mice (Tg) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In vitro autoradiography on brain sections of Tg and AD patients confirmed that [99mTc]24 possessed sufficient affinity for A? plaques, and [99mTc]24 could only label A? deposition in blood vessels but not A? plaques in the parenchyma of the brain of AD patients. Moreover, [99mTc]24 possessed favorable initial uptake (1.21% ID/g) and fast blood washout (blood2 min/blood60 min=23) in normal mice. These preliminary results suggest that [99mTc]24 may be used as an A? imaging probe for the detection of CAA. PMID:26065726

  8. Imaging the time-integrated cerebral metabolic activity with subcellular resolution through nanometer-scale detection of biosynthetic products deriving from (13)C-glucose.

    PubMed

    Takado, Yuhei; Knott, Graham; Humbel, Bruno M; Masoodi, Mojgan; Escrig, Stéphane; Meibom, Anders; Comment, Arnaud

    2015-11-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the brain but also an important source of building blocks for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Little is known about the use of glucose for biosynthesis in tissues at the cellular level. We demonstrate that local cerebral metabolic activity can be mapped in mouse brain tissue by quantitatively imaging the biosynthetic products deriving from [U-(13)C]glucose metabolism using a combination of in situ electron microscopy and secondary ion mass-spectroscopy (NanoSIMS). Images of the (13)C-label incorporated into cerebral ultrastructure with ca. 100nm resolution allowed us to determine the timescale on which the metabolic products of glucose are incorporated into different cells, their sub-compartments and organelles. These were mapped in astrocytes and neurons in the different layers of the motor cortex. We see evidence for high metabolic activity in neurons via the nucleus (13)C enrichment. We observe that in all the major cell compartments, such as e.g. nucleus and Golgi apparatus, neurons incorporate substantially higher concentrations of (13)C-label than astrocytes. PMID:26409162

  9. Synthesis, 68Ga-Radiolabeling, and Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of a Depsipeptide-Derived Compound as a Potential PET/CT Infection Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B.; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Hazari, Puja P.; Mishra, Anil K.; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R.; Sathekge, Mike M.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as 67/68Ga-citrate or 18F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with 68Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by 68Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3–2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  10. Synthesis, 68Ga-radiolabeling, and preliminary in vivo assessment of a depsipeptide-derived compound as a potential PET/CT infection imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; Parboosing, Raveen; Hazari, Puja P; Mishra, Anil K; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R; Sathekge, Mike M

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as (67/68)Ga-citrate or (18)F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with (68)Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by (68)Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3-2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  11. Digital image processing of vascular angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Beckenbach, E. S.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    A computer image processing technique was developed to estimate the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery. With an angiographic film of the vessel as input, the computer was programmed to estimate vessel abnormality through a series of measurements, some derived primarily from the vessel edge information and others from optical density variations within the lumen shadow. These measurements were combined into an atherosclerosis index, which was found to correlate well with both visual and chemical estimates of atherosclerotic disease.

  12. Automated registration of 3D-range with 2D-color images: an overview

    E-print Network

    Stamos, Ioannis

    Stamos)) Input: Range ImagesInput: Range Images 3D Line Extraction3D Line Extraction Input: 2D ImagesInput: 2D Images 2D Line Extraction2D Line Extraction 3D Line Clustering3D Line Clustering 2D Feature2D Feature Line Extraction3D Line Extraction Input: 2D ImagesInput: 2D Images 2D Line Extraction2D Line Extraction

  13. Investigating the robustness of the new Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager derived texture metrics in estimating plantation forest aboveground biomass in resource constrained areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Timothy; Mutanga, Onisimo

    2015-10-01

    The successful launch of the 30-m Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) pushbroom sensor offers a new primary data source necessary for aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation, especially in resource-limited environments. In this work, the strength and performance of Landsat-8 OLI image derived texture metrics (i.e. texture measures and texture ratios) in estimating plantation forest species AGB was investigated. It was hypothesized that the sensor's pushbroom design, coupled with the presence of refined spectral properties, enhanced radiometric resolution (i.e. from 8 bits to 12 bits) and improved signal-to-noise ratio have the potential to provide detailed spectral information necessary for significantly strengthening AGB estimation in medium-density forest canopies. The relationship between image texture metrics and measurements of forest attributes can be used to help characterize complex forests, and enhance fine vegetation biophysical properties, a difficult challenge when using spectral vegetation indices especially in closed canopies. This study examines the prospects of using Landsat-8 OLI sensor derived texture metrics for estimating AGB for three medium-density plantation forest species in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. In order to achieve this objective, three unique data pre-processing techniques were tested (analysis I: Landsat-8 OLI raw spectral-bands vs. raw texture bands; analysis II: Landsat-8 OLI raw spectral-band ratios vs. texture band ratios and analysis III: Landsat-8 OLI derived vegetation indices vs. texture band ratios). The landsat-8 OLI derived texture parameters were examined for robustness in estimating AGB using linear regression, stepwise-multiple linear regression and stochastic gradient boosting regression models. The results of this study demonstrated that all texture parameters particularly band texture ratios calculated using a 3 × 3 window size, could enhance AGB estimation when compared to simple spectral reflectance, simple band ratios and the most popular spectral vegetation indices. For instance, the use of combined texture ratios yielded the highest R2 values of 0.76 (RMSE = 9.55 t ha-1 (18.07%) and CV-RMSE of 0.18); 0.74 (RMSE = 12.81 t ha-1 (17.72%) and CV-RMSE of 0.08); 0.74 (RMSE = 12.67 t ha-1 (06.15%) and CV-RMSE of 0.06) and 0.53 (RMSE = 20.15 t ha-1 (14.40%) and CV-RMSE of 0.15) overall for Eucalyptus dunii, Eucalyptus grandis, Pinus taeda individually and all species, respectively. Overall, the findings of this study provide the necessary insight and motivation to the remote sensing community, particularly in resource constrained regions, to shift towards embracing various texture metrics obtained from the readily-available and cheap multispectral Landsat-8 OLI sensor.

  14. [Imaging].

    PubMed

    Chevrot, A; Drapé, J L; Godefroy, D; Dupont, A M; Pessis, E; Sarazin, L; Minoui, A

    1997-01-01

    The panoply of imaging techniques useful in podology is essentially limited to X-rays. Standard "standing" and "lying" X-rays furnish most of the required information. Arthrography is sometimes performed, in particular for trauma or tumour of the ankle. CT scan and MRI make a decisive contribution in difficult cases, notably in fractures and in small fractures without displacement. The two latter techniques are useful in tendon, ligament and muscular disorders, where echography is also informative. Rigorous analysis of radiographies and a good knowledge of foot disorders make these imaging techniques efficacious. PMID:9035538

  15. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-10-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses-based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  16. Systems and methods for reconfiguring input devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Jeff (Inventor); De Mers, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes an input device having first and second input members configured to be activated by a user. The input device is configured to generate activation signals associated with activation of the first and second input members, and each of the first and second input members are associated with an input function. A processor is coupled to the input device and configured to receive the activation signals. A memory coupled to the processor, and includes a reconfiguration module configured to store the input functions assigned to the first and second input members and, upon execution of the processor, to reconfigure the input functions assigned to the input members when the first input member is inoperable.

  17. Global image analysis to determine suitability for text-based image personalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hengzhou; Bala, Raja; Fan, Zhigang; Bouman, Charles A.; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-03-01

    Lately, image personalization is becoming an interesting topic. Images with variable elements such as text usually appear much more appealing to the recipients. In this paper, we describe a method to pre-analyze the image and automatically suggest to the user the most suitable regions within an image for text-based personalization. The method is based on input gathered from experiments conducted with professional designers. It has been observed that regions that are spatially smooth and regions with existing text (e.g. signage, banners, etc.) are the best candidates for personalization. This gives rise to two sets of corresponding algorithms: one for identifying smooth areas, and one for locating text regions. Furthermore, based on the smooth and text regions found in the image, we derive an overall metric to rate the image in terms of its suitability for personalization (SFP).

  18. Forest Floor Decomposition Following Hurricane Litter Inputs in

    E-print Network

    Ostertag, Rebecca

    Forest Floor Decomposition Following Hurricane Litter Inputs in Several Puerto Rican Forests, Puerto Rico 00928, USA ABSTRACT Hurricanes affect ecosystem processes by altering resource availability processes are not well understood. We examined mass and nutrient in- puts of hurricane-derived litter in six

  19. Signal Prediction With Input Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin

    1999-01-01

    A novel coding technique is presented for signal prediction with applications including speech coding, system identification, and estimation of input excitation. The approach is based on the blind equalization method for speech signal processing in conjunction with the geometric subspace projection theory to formulate the basic prediction equation. The speech-coding problem is often divided into two parts, a linear prediction model and excitation input. The parameter coefficients of the linear predictor and the input excitation are solved simultaneously and recursively by a conventional recursive least-squares algorithm. The excitation input is computed by coding all possible outcomes into a binary codebook. The coefficients of the linear predictor and excitation, and the index of the codebook can then be used to represent the signal. In addition, a variable-frame concept is proposed to block the same excitation signal in sequence in order to reduce the storage size and increase the transmission rate. The results of this work can be easily extended to the problem of disturbance identification. The basic principles are outlined in this report and differences from other existing methods are discussed. Simulations are included to demonstrate the proposed method.

  20. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  1. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  2. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  3. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associated with hospital type and location, and variations in the rate of input price increases for various regions. We found that between 1972 and 1979 none of the regional price indexes increased at average annual rates significantly different from the national rate. For the more recent period 1977 through 1979, the increase in one Census Region was significantly below the national rate. Further analyses indicated that variations in cost-share weights for various types of hospitals produced no substantial variations in the regional price indexes relative to the national index. We consider these findings preliminary because of limitations in the availability of current, relevant, and reliable data, especially for local area wage rate increases. PMID:10309557

  4. Improved Quantification of Cerebral Hemodynamics Using Individualized Time Thresholds for Assessment of Peak Enhancement Parameters Derived from Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nasel, Christian; Kalcher, Klaudius; Boubela, Roland; Moser, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Assessment of cerebral ischemia often employs dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with evaluation of various peak enhancement time parameters. All of these parameters use a single time threshold to judge the maximum tolerable peak enhancement delay that is supposed to reliably differentiate sufficient from critical perfusion. As the validity of this single threshold approach still remains unclear, in this study, (1) the definition of a threshold on an individual patient-basis, nevertheless (2) preserving the comparability of the data, was investigated. Methods The histogram of time-to-peak (TTP) values derived from DSC-MRI, the so-called TTP-distribution curve (TDC), was modeled using a double-Gaussian model in 61 patients without severe cerebrovascular disease. Particular model-based zf-scores were used to describe the arterial, parenchymal and venous bolus-transit phase as time intervals Ia,p,v. Their durations (delta Ia,p,v), were then considered as maximum TTP-delays of each phase. Results Mean-R2 for the model-fit was 0.967. Based on the generic zf-scores the proposed bolus transit phases could be differentiated. The Ip-interval reliably depicted the parenchymal bolus-transit phase with durations of 3.4 s–10.1 s (median?=?4.3s), where an increase with age was noted (?30 ms/year). Conclusion Individual threshold-adjustment seems rational since regular bolus-transit durations in brain parenchyma obtained from the TDC overlap considerably with recommended critical TTP-thresholds of 4 s–8 s. The parenchymal transit time derived from the proposed model may be utilized to individually correct TTP-thresholds, thereby potentially improving the detection of critical perfusion. PMID:25521121

  5. Longitudinal monitoring adipose-derived stem cell survival by PET imaging hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate in rat myocardial infarction model

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Hwan; Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Pandya, Darpan; Park, Noh Won; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Eom, Ki Dong; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Chan Wha; Kang, Joo Hyun; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Lee, Yong Jin

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We developed a safe, simple and appropriate stem cell labeling method with {sup 124}I-HIB. • ADSC survival can be monitored with PET in MI model via direct labeling. • Tracking of ADSC labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB was possible for 3 days in MI model using PET. • ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. • Survival of ADSC in living bodies can be longitudinally tracked with PET imaging. - Abstract: This study aims to monitor how the change of cell survival of transplanted adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) responds to myocardial infarction (MI) via the hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate ({sup 124}I-HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo. Stem cells have shown the potential to improve cardiac function after MI. However, monitoring of the fate of transplanted stem cells at target sites is still unclear. Rat ADSCs were labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB, and radiolabeled ADSCs were transplanted into the myocardium of normal and MI model. In the group of {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSC transplantation, in vivo imaging was performed using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for 9 days. Twenty-one days post-transplantation, histopathological analysis and apoptosis assay were performed. ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. In vivo tracking of the {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSCs was possible for 9 and 3 days in normal and MI model, respectively. Apoptosis of transplanted cells increased in the MI model compared than that in normal model. We developed a direct labeling agent, {sup 124}I-HIB, and first tried to longitudinally monitor transplanted stem cell to MI. This approach may provide new insights on the roles of stem cell monitoring in living bodies for stem cell therapy from pre-clinical studies to clinical trials.

  6. Semi-automated segmentation of solid and GGO nodules in lung CT images using vessel-likelihood derived from local foreground structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tomoya; Takeguchi, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Aoyagi, Kota; Yamagata, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    Reflecting global interest in lung cancer screening, considerable attention has been paid to automatic segmentation and volumetric measurement of lung nodules on CT. Ground glass opacity (GGO) nodules deserve special consideration in this context, since it has been reported that they are more likely to be malignant than solid nodules. However, due to relatively low contrast and indistinct boundaries of GGO nodules, segmentation is more difficult for GGO nodules compared with solid nodules. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a method for accurately segmenting not only solid nodules but also GGO nodules without prior information about nodule types. First, the histogram of CT values in pre-extracted lung regions is modeled by a Gaussian mixture model and a threshold value for including high-attenuation regions is computed. Second, after setting up a region of interest around the nodule seed point, foreground regions are extracted by using the threshold and quick-shift-based mode seeking. Finally, for separating vessels from the nodule, a vessel-likelihood map derived from elongatedness of foreground regions is computed, and a region growing scheme starting from the seed point is applied to the map with the aid of fast marching method. Experimental results using an anthropomorphic chest phantom showed that our method yielded generally lower volumetric measurement errors for both solid and GGO nodules compared with other methods reported in preceding studies conducted using similar technical settings. Also, our method allowed reasonable segmentation of GGO nodules in low-dose images and could be applied to clinical CT images including part-solid nodules.

  7. SU-C-BRE-05: PTV Margin Determination Based On Tumor Radiobiological Characteristics and Geometric Uncertainties Derived From Daily Cone- Beam CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Selvaraj, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine required PTV margins for ?1% loss in mean population TCP using systematic (?) and random (?) errors calculated from daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) images of head and neck patients. Methods: Daily CBCT images were acquired for 50 head and neck patients. The CBCT image sets acquired at each fraction were registered with planning CT to obtain positional errors for each patient for each fraction. Systematic and random errors were calculated from data collected for 50 patients as described in IPEM On Target report. CTV delineation uncertainty of 2mm is added quadratically to systematic error. Assuming a spherical target volume, the dose in each voxel of target volume is summed for each fraction in the treatment by shifting the dose grid to calculate mean population TCP inclusive of geometric uncertainties using a Monte Carlo method. These simulations were repeated for the set of ? and ? in each axis for different PTV margins and drop in TCP for each margin are obtained. In order to study the effect of dose-response curve on PTV margins, two different ?? of 0.048 Gy-1 and 0.218 Gy-1 representing steep and shallow dose-response curves are studied. ? were 2.5, 2.5, 2.1 mm and ? were 0.3, 0.3 0.2 mm respectively in x, y and z axis respectively. Results: PTV margins based on tumor radiobiological characteristics are 4.8, 4.8 and 4 mm in x, y and z axis assuming 25 treatment fractions for ?? 0.048 Gy-1 (steep) and 4.2,4.2 and 2.2 for ?? of 0.218 Gy-1 (shallow). While the TCP-based margins did not differ much in x and y axis, it is considerably smaller in z axis for shallow DRC. Conclusion: TCP based margins are substantially smaller than physical dose-based margin recipes. This study also demonstrates the importance of considering tumor radiobiological characteristics while deriving margins.

  8. Quantitative prediction of radio frequency induced local heating derived from measured magnetic field maps in magnetic resonance imaging: A phantom validation at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Liu, Jiaen; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2014-12-01

    Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) technique utilizes measurable radio frequency (RF) coil induced magnetic fields (B1 fields) in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to quantitatively reconstruct the local electrical properties (EP) of biological tissues. Information derived from the same data set, e.g., complex numbers of B1 distribution towards electric field calculation, can be used to estimate, on a subject-specific basis, local Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR plays a significant role in RF pulse design for high-field MRI applications, where maximum local tissue heating remains one of the most constraining limits. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of such B1-based local SAR estimation, expanding on previously proposed EPT approaches. To this end, B1 calibration was obtained in a gelatin phantom at 7 T with a multi-channel transmit coil, under a particular multi-channel B1-shim setting (B1-shim I). Using this unique set of B1 calibration, local SAR distribution was subsequently predicted for B1-shim I, as well as for another B1-shim setting (B1-shim II), considering a specific set of parameter for a heating MRI protocol consisting of RF pulses plaid at 1% duty cycle. Local SAR results, which could not be directly measured with MRI, were subsequently converted into temperature change which in turn were validated against temperature changes measured by MRI Thermometry based on the proton chemical shift.

  9. High Throughput Measurement of Ca2+ Dynamics for Drug Risk Assessment in Human Stem Cell-derived Cardiomyocytes by Kinetic Image Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Cerignoli, Fabio; Charlot, David; Whittaker, Ross; Ingermanson, Randy; Gehalot, Piyush; Savtchenko, Alex; Gallacher, David J.; Towart, Rob; Price, Jeffrey H.; McDonough, Patrick M.; Mercola, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Current methods to measure physiological properties of cardiomyocytes and predict fatal arrhythmias that can cause sudden death, such as Torsade de Pointes, lack either the automation and throughput needed for early-stage drug discovery and/or have poor predictive value. To increase throughput and predictive power of in vitro assays, we developed kinetic imaging cytometry (KIC) for automated cell-by-cell analyses via intracellular fluorescence Ca2+ indicators. The KIC instrument simultaneously records and analyzes intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i at 30-ms resolution from hundreds of individual cells/well of 96-well plates in seconds, providing kinetic details not previously possible with well averaging technologies such as plate readers. Analyses of human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes revealed effects of known cardiotoxic and arrhythmogenic drugs on kinetic parameters of Ca2+ dynamics, suggesting that KIC will aid in the assessment of cardiotoxic risk and in the elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms of heart disease associated with drugs treatment and/or genetic background. PMID:22926323

  10. Quantitative prediction of radio frequency induced local heating derived from measured magnetic field maps in magnetic resonance imaging: A phantom validation at 7?T

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Jiaen; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Schmitter, Sebastian; He, Bin

    2014-12-15

    Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) technique utilizes measurable radio frequency (RF) coil induced magnetic fields (B1 fields) in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system to quantitatively reconstruct the local electrical properties (EP) of biological tissues. Information derived from the same data set, e.g., complex numbers of B1 distribution towards electric field calculation, can be used to estimate, on a subject-specific basis, local Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR plays a significant role in RF pulse design for high-field MRI applications, where maximum local tissue heating remains one of the most constraining limits. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of such B1-based local SAR estimation, expanding on previously proposed EPT approaches. To this end, B1 calibration was obtained in a gelatin phantom at 7?T with a multi-channel transmit coil, under a particular multi-channel B1-shim setting (B1-shim I). Using this unique set of B1 calibration, local SAR distribution was subsequently predicted for B1-shim I, as well as for another B1-shim setting (B1-shim II), considering a specific set of parameter for a heating MRI protocol consisting of RF pulses plaid at 1% duty cycle. Local SAR results, which could not be directly measured with MRI, were subsequently converted into temperature change which in turn were validated against temperature changes measured by MRI Thermometry based on the proton chemical shift.

  11. Biological evaluation of the radioiodinated imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivative DRK092 for amyloid-? imaging in mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Jen; Bando, Kazunori; Ashino, Hiroki; Taguchi, Kazumi; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Shima, Keiji; Fujimoto, Osuke; Kitamura, Chiemi; Morimoto, Yasuaki; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Minamizawa, Takao; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto; Yamada, Kazutaka; Ji, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Non-invasive determination of amyloid-? peptide (A?) deposition has important significance for early diagnosis and medical intervention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we investigated the availability of a radioiodinated imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivative, termed (125)I-DRK092, as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ligand for in vivo detection of A? deposition. DRK092 showed high binding affinity for either synthetic human A? fibrils or brain homogenates from amyloid precursor protein transgenic (Tg) mouse (PS1-ki/JU-Tg2576) and AD patient with a dissociation constant (Kd) of one-digit nM, and excellent brain permeability (peak value of uptake: approximately 0.9% of injection dose/g rat brain). Ex vivo autoradiographic analysis showed that measurement with (125)I-DRK092 has higher sensibility for detecting A? accumulation than with (125)I-IMPY, a well-known amyloid SPECT ligand, in Tg mice. In vitro autoradiography with (125)I-DRK092 also confirmed higher accumulation of radioactivity in the cortical area, enriched with A? plaques, of Tg mouse and AD patient brains, as compared with the corresponding areas in non-Tg mouse and healthy control brains. All the data presented above lead us to draw the conclusion that radioiodinated DRK092 is a potential SPECT ligand for amyloid imaging in AD. PMID:25172571

  12. Effects of control inputs on the estimation of stability and control parameters of a light airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannaday, R. L.; Suit, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique was used to determine the values of stability and control derivatives from flight test data for a low-wing, single-engine, light airplane. Several input forms were used during the tests to investigate the consistency of parameter estimates as it relates to inputs. These consistencies were compared by using the ensemble variance and estimated Cramer-Rao lower bound. In addition, the relationship between inputs and parameter correlations was investigated. Results from the stabilator inputs are inconclusive but the sequence of rudder input followed by aileron input or aileron followed by rudder gave more consistent estimates than did rudder or ailerons individually. Also, square-wave inputs appeared to provide slightly improved consistency in the parameter estimates when compared to sine-wave inputs.

  13. Naval threat countermeasure simulator and the IR_CRUISE_missiles models for the generation of infrared (IR) videos of maritime targets and background for input into advanced imaging IR seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taczak, Thomas M.; Dries, John W.; Gover, Robert E.; Snapp, Mary Ann; Williams, Elmer F.; Cahill, Colin P.

    2002-07-01

    A new hardware-in-the-loop modeling technique was developed at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for the evaluation of IR countermeasures against advanced IR imaging anti-ship cruise missiles. The research efforts involved the creation of tools to generate accurate IR imagery and synthesize video to inject in to real-world threat simulators. A validation study was conducted to verify the accuracy and limitations of the techniques that were developed.

  14. Impact of remote sensing upon the planning, management and development of water resources. Summary of computers and computer growth trends for hydrologic modeling and the input of ERTS image data processing load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Loats, H. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of current computer usage by major water resources users was made to determine the trends of usage and costs for the principal hydrologic users/models. The laws and empirical relationships governing the growth of the data processing loads were described and applied to project the future data loads. Data loads for ERTS CCT image processing were computed and projected through the 1985 era. The analysis showns significant impact due to the utilization and processing of ERTS CCT's data.

  15. In Acute Stroke, Can CT Perfusion-Derived Cerebral Blood Volume Maps Substitute for Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in Identifying the Ischemic Core?

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Morais, Livia T.; Wu, Ona; Schwamm, Lee H.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; González, R. Gilberto; Yoo, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In the treatment of patients with suspected acute ischemic stroke, increasing evidence suggests the importance of measuring the volume of the irreversibly injured “ischemic core.” The gold standard method for doing this in the clinical setting is diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), but many authors suggest that maps of regional cerebral blood volume (CBV) derived from computed tomography perfusion imaging (CTP) can substitute for DWI. We sought to determine whether DWI and CTP-derived CBV maps are equivalent in measuring core volume. Methods 58 patients with suspected stroke underwent CTP and DWI within 6 hours of symptom onset. We measured low-CBV lesion volumes using three methods: “objective absolute,” i.e. the volume of tissue with CBV below each of six published absolute thresholds (0.9–2.5 mL/100 g), “objective relative,” whose six thresholds (51%-60%) were fractions of mean contralateral CBV, and “subjective,” in which two radiologists (R1, R2) outlined lesions subjectively. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of each method, threshold, and radiologist in detecting infarction, and the degree to which each over- or underestimated the DWI core volume. Additionally, in the subset of 32 patients for whom follow-up CT or MRI was available, we measured the proportion of CBV- or DWI-defined core lesions that exceeded the follow-up infarct volume, and the maximum amount by which this occurred. Results DWI was positive in 72% (42/58) of patients. CBV maps’ sensitivity/specificity in identifying DWI-positive patients were 100%/0% for both objective methods with all thresholds, 43%/94% for R1, and 83%/44% for R2. Mean core overestimation was 156–699 mL for objective absolute thresholds, and 127–200 mL for objective relative thresholds. For R1 and R2, respectively, mean±SD subjective overestimation were -11±26 mL and -11±23 mL, but subjective volumes differed from DWI volumes by up to 117 and 124 mL in individual patients. Inter-rater agreement regarding the presence of infarction on CBV maps was poor (kappa = 0.21). Core lesions defined by the six objective absolute CBV thresholds exceeded follow-up infarct volumes for 81%-100% of patients, by up to 430–1002 mL. Core estimates produced by objective relative thresholds exceeded follow-up volumes in 91% of patients, by up to 210-280 mL. Subjective lesions defined by R1 and R2 exceeded follow-up volumes in 18% and 26% of cases, by up to 71 and 15 mL, respectively. Only 1 of 23 DWI lesions (4%) exceeded final infarct volume, by 3 mL. Conclusion CTP-derived CBV maps cannot reliably substitute for DWI in measuring core volume, or even establish which patients have DWI lesions. PMID:26193486

  16. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: MR Imaging-derived First-Pass Bolus Kinetic Parameters Are Biomarkers for Pulmonary Hemodynamics, Cardiac Function, and Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Skrok, Jan; Shehata, Monda L.; Mathai, Stephen; Girgis, Reda E.; Zaiman, Ari; Mudd, James O.; Boyce, Danielle; Lechtzin, Noah; Lima, João A. C.; Bluemke, David A.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare contrast material–enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–derived right-to-left ventricle pulmonary transit time (PTT), left ventricular (LV) full width at half maximum (FWHM), and LV time to peak (TTP) between patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and healthy volunteers and to correlate these measurements with survival markers in patients with PAH. Materials and Methods: This HIPAA-compliant study received institutional review board approval. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Forty-three patients (32 with PAH [29 women; median age, 55.4 years], 11 with scleroderma but not PAH [seven women; median age, 58.9 years]) underwent right-sided heart catheterization and 3-T CE cardiac MR imaging. Eighteen age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (12 women; median age, 51.7 years) underwent only CE MR imaging. A short-axis saturation-recovery gradient-echo section was acquired in the basal third of both ventricles, and right-to-left-ventricle PTT, LV FWHM, and LV TTP were calculated. Statistical analysis included Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, Spearman correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression analysis, and Lin correlation coefficient analysis. Results: Patients had significantly longer PTT (median, 8.2 seconds; 25th–75th percentile, 6.9–9.9 seconds), FWHM (median, 8.2 seconds; 25th–75th percentile, 5.7–11.4 seconds), and TTP (median, 4.8 seconds; 25th–75th percentile, 3.9–6.5 seconds) than did control subjects (median, 6.4 seconds; 25th–75th percentile, 5.7–7.1 seconds; median, 5.2 seconds; 25th–75th percentile, 4.1–6.1 seconds; median, 3.2 seconds; 25th–75th percentile, 2.8–3.8 seconds, respectively; P < .01 for each) and subjects with scleroderma but not PAH (median, 6.5 seconds; 25th–75th percentile, 5.6–7.0 seconds; median, 5.0 seconds; 25th–75th percentile, 4.0–7.3 seconds; median, 3.6 seconds; 25th–75th percentile, 2.7–4.0 seconds, respectively; P < .02 for each). PTT, LV FWHM, and LV TTP correlated with pulmonary vascular resistance index (P < .01), right ventricular stroke volume index (P ? .01), and pulmonary artery capacitance (P ? .02). In multiple linear regression models, PTT, FWHM, and TTP were associated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure and cardiac index. Conclusion: CE MR-derived PTT, LV FWHM, and LV TTP are noninvasive compound markers of pulmonary hemodynamics and cardiac function in patients with PAH. Their predictive value for patient outcome warrants further investigation. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental materialhttp://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.12111001/-/DC1 PMID:22509050

  17. A hyperspectral image analysis workbench for environmental science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J.H.; Zawada, D.G.; Simunich, K.L.; Slater, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    A significant challenge to the information sciences is to provide more powerful and accessible means to exploit the enormous wealth of data available from high-resolution imaging spectrometry, or hyperspectral'' imagery, for analysis, for mapping purposes, and for input to environmental modeling applications. As an initial response to this challenge, Argonne's Advanced Computer Applications Center has developed a workstation-based prototype software workbench which employs Al techniques and other advanced approaches to deduce surface characteristics and extract features from the hyperspectral images. Among its current capabilities, the prototype system can classify pixels by abstract surface type. The classification process employs neural network analysis of inputs which include pixel spectra and a variety of processed image metrics, including image texture spectra'' derived from fractal signatures computed for subimage tiles at each wavelength.

  18. A hyperspectral image analysis workbench for environmental science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J.H.; Zawada, D.G.; Simunich, K.L.; Slater, J.C.

    1992-10-01

    A significant challenge to the information sciences is to provide more powerful and accessible means to exploit the enormous wealth of data available from high-resolution imaging spectrometry, or ``hyperspectral`` imagery, for analysis, for mapping purposes, and for input to environmental modeling applications. As an initial response to this challenge, Argonne`s Advanced Computer Applications Center has developed a workstation-based prototype software workbench which employs Al techniques and other advanced approaches to deduce surface characteristics and extract features from the hyperspectral images. Among its current capabilities, the prototype system can classify pixels by abstract surface type. The classification process employs neural network analysis of inputs which include pixel spectra and a variety of processed image metrics, including image ``texture spectra`` derived from fractal signatures computed for subimage tiles at each wavelength.

  19. Power input measurements in Lorentz

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    1 Power input measurements in Lorentz force-driven turbulent flow Barbara E. Brawn & Daniel P of Maryland College Park #12;2 Goals u FP = · measure local velocity in a flow driven by known Lorentz forces s , D ip o le J (x ) (a m p s ) B (x ) (g a u s s ) F L (x ) (N e w t o n s ) Lorentz Force #12

  20. Functional transformations of odor inputs in the mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Yoav; Livneh, Yoav; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Groysman, Maya; Luo, Liqun; Mizrahi, Adi

    2014-01-01

    Sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium to the olfactory bulb (OB) are organized as a discrete map in the glomerular layer (GL). This map is then modulated by distinct types of local neurons and transmitted to higher brain areas via mitral and tufted cells. Little is known about the functional organization of the circuits downstream of glomeruli. We used in vivo two-photon calcium imaging for large scale functional mapping of distinct neuronal populations in the mouse OB, at single cell resolution. Specifically, we imaged odor responses of mitral cells (MCs), tufted cells (TCs) and glomerular interneurons (GL-INs). Mitral cells population activity was heterogeneous and only mildly correlated with the olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) inputs, supporting the view that discrete input maps undergo significant transformations at the output level of the OB. In contrast, population activity profiles of TCs were dense, and highly correlated with the odor inputs in both space and time. Glomerular interneurons were also highly correlated with the ORN inputs, but showed higher activation thresholds suggesting that these neurons are driven by strongly activated glomeruli. Temporally, upon persistent odor exposure, TCs quickly adapted. In contrast, both MCs and GL-INs showed diverse temporal response patterns, suggesting that GL-INs could contribute to the transformations MCs undergo at slow time scales. Our data suggest that sensory odor maps are transformed by TCs and MCs in different ways forming two distinct and parallel information streams. PMID:25408637

  1. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup.

    PubMed

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Hagen, Charlotte K; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  2. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  3. Partial volume correction of the microPET blood input function using ensemble learning independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kuan-Hao; Lee, Jih-Shian; Li, Jia-Hung; Yang, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ren-Shian; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2009-03-01

    Medical images usually suffer from a partial volume effect (PVE), which may degrade the accuracy of any quantitative information extracted from the images. Our aim was to recreate accurate radioactivity concentration and time-activity curves (TACs) by microPET R4 quantification using ensemble learning independent component analysis (EL-ICA). We designed a digital cardiac phantom for this simulation and in order to evaluate the ability of EL-ICA to correct the PVE, the simulated images were convoluted using a Gaussian function (FWHM = 1-4 mm). The robustness of the proposed method towards noise was investigated by adding statistical noise (SNR = 2-16). During further evaluation, another set of cardiac phantoms were generated from the reconstructed images, and Poisson noise at different levels was added to the sinogram. In real experiments, four rat microPET images and a number of arterial blood samples were obtained; these were used to estimate the metabolic rate of FDG (MRFDG). Input functions estimated using the FastICA method were used for comparison. The results showed that EL-ICA could correct PVE in both the simulated and real cases. After correcting for the PVE, the errors for MRFDG, when estimated by the EL-ICA method, were smaller than those when TACs were directly derived from the PET images and when the FastICA approach was used.

  4. Convergence of multisensory inputs in the Xenopus tadpole tectum

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto, Masateru; Cline, Hollis

    2010-01-01

    The integration of multisensory information takes place in the optic tectum where visual and auditory/mechanosensory inputs converge and regulate motor outputs. The circuits which integrate multisensory information are poorly understood. In an effort to identify the basic components of a multisensory integrative circuit, we determined the projections of the mechanosensory input from the periphery to the optic tectum and compared their distribution to the retinotectal inputs in Xenopus laevis tadpoles using dye-labelling methods. The peripheral ganglia of the lateral line system project to the ipsilateral hindbrain and the axons representing mechanosensory inputs along the anterior/posterior body axis are mapped along the ventrodorsal axis in the axon tract in the dorsal column of the hindbrain. Hindbrain neurons project axons to the contralateral optic tectum. The neurons from anterior and posterior hindbrain regions project axons to the dorsal and ventral tectum, respectively. While the retinotectal axons project to a superficial lamina in the tectal neuropil, the hindbrain axons project to a deep neuropil layer. Calcium imaging showed that multimodal inputs converge on tectal neurons. The layer specific projections of the hindbrain and retinal axons suggest a functional segregation of sensory inputs to proximal and distal tectal cell dendrites, respectively. PMID:19813244

  5. Self-consistent input-output formulation of quantum feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagisawa, M.; Hope, J. J.

    2010-12-15

    A simple method of analyzing quantum feedback circuits is presented. The classical analysis of feedback circuits can be generalized to apply to quantum systems by mapping the field operators of various outputs to other inputs via the standard input-output formalism. Unfortunately, this has led to unphysical results such as the violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for in-loop fields. This paper shows that this general approach can be redeemed by ensuring a self-consistently Hermitian Hamiltonian. The calculations are based on a noncommutative calculus of operator derivatives. A full description of several examples of quantum linear and nonlinear feedback for optical systems is presented.

  6. Kinetic quantitation of cerebral PET-FDG studies without concurrent blood sampling: statistical recovery of the arterial input function.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, F; Kirrane, J; Muzi, M; O'Sullivan, J N; Spence, A M; Mankoff, D A; Krohn, K A

    2010-03-01

    Kinetic quantitation of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies via compartmental modeling usually requires the time-course of the radio-tracer concentration in the arterial blood as an arterial input function (AIF). For human and animal imaging applications, significant practical difficulties are associated with direct arterial sampling and as a result there is substantial interest in alternative methods that require no blood sampling at the time of the study. A fixed population template input function derived from prior experience with directly sampled arterial curves is one possibility. Image-based extraction, including requisite adjustment for spillover and recovery, is another approach. The present work considers a hybrid statistical approach based on a penalty formulation in which the information derived from a priori studies is combined in a Bayesian manner with information contained in the sampled image data in order to obtain an input function estimate. The absolute scaling of the input is achieved by an empirical calibration equation involving the injected dose together with the subject's weight, height and gender. The technique is illustrated in the context of (18)F -Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET studies in humans. A collection of 79 arterially sampled FDG blood curves are used as a basis for a priori characterization of input function variability, including scaling characteristics. Data from a series of 12 dynamic cerebral FDG PET studies in normal subjects are used to evaluate the performance of the penalty-based AIF estimation technique. The focus of evaluations is on quantitation of FDG kinetics over a set of 10 regional brain structures. As well as the new method, a fixed population template AIF and a direct AIF estimate based on segmentation are also considered. Kinetics analyses resulting from these three AIFs are compared with those resulting from radially sampled AIFs. The proposed penalty-based AIF extraction method is found to achieve significant improvements over the fixed template and the segmentation methods. As well as achieving acceptable kinetic parameter accuracy, the quality of fit of the region of interest (ROI) time-course data based on the extracted AIF, matches results based on arterially sampled AIFs. In comparison, significant deviation in the estimation of FDG flux and degradation in ROI data fit are found with the template and segmentation methods. The proposed AIF extraction method is recommended for practical use. PMID:19709971

  7. Feature maps driven no-reference image quality prediction of authentically distorted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiyaram, Deepti; Bovik, Alan C.

    2015-03-01

    Current blind image quality prediction models rely on benchmark databases comprised of singly and synthetically distorted images, thereby learning image features that are only adequate to predict human perceived visual quality on such inauthentic distortions. However, real world images often contain complex mixtures of multiple distortions. Rather than a) discounting the effect of these mixtures of distortions on an image's perceptual quality and considering only the dominant distortion or b) using features that are only proven to be efficient for singly distorted images, we deeply study the natural scene statistics of authentically distorted images, in different color spaces and transform domains. We propose a feature-maps-driven statistical approach which avoids any latent assumptions about the type of distortion(s) contained in an image, and focuses instead on modeling the remarkable consistencies in the scene statistics of real world images in the absence of distortions. We design a deep belief network that takes model-based statistical image features derived from a very large database of authentically distorted images as input and discovers good feature representations by generalizing over different distortion types, mixtures, and severities, which are later used to learn a regressor for quality prediction. We demonstrate the remarkable competence of our features for improving automatic perceptual quality prediction on a benchmark database and on the newly designed LIVE Authentic Image Quality Challenge Database and show that our approach of combining robust statistical features and the deep belief network dramatically outperforms the state-of-the-art.

  8. On the Variability of Wind Power Input to the Oceans with a Focus on the Subpolar North Atlantic

    E-print Network

    Wunsch, Carl

    On the Variability of Wind Power Input to the Oceans with a Focus on the Subpolar North Atlantic of power inputs from winds and buoyancy exchange is complex in part because it depends upon knowing a great determined mainly by the wind field itself. The input of buoyancy- derived power has been generally regarded

  9. Programmable remapper for image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (inventor); Sampsell, Jeffrey B. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A video-rate coordinate remapper includes a memory for storing a plurality of transformations on look-up tables for remapping input images from one coordinate system to another. Such transformations are operator selectable. The remapper includes a collective processor by which certain input pixels of an input image are transformed to a portion of the output image in a many-to-one relationship. The remapper includes an interpolative processor by which the remaining input pixels of the input image are transformed to another portion of the output image in a one-to-many relationship. The invention includes certain specific transforms for creating output images useful for certain defects of visually impaired people. The invention also includes means for shifting input pixels and means for scrolling the output matrix.

  10. Characterization of the input noise sources of a dc SQUID Paolo Falferi and Michele Bonaldi

    E-print Network

    1 Characterization of the input noise sources of a dc SQUID Paolo Falferi and Michele Bonaldi in a dc SQUID by Tesche and Clarke, we derive the expressions of the current and voltage input noise spectral densities in a dc SQUID current amplifier operated in a flux locked mode. The expected current

  11. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  12. 77 FR 54902 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Input From Hawaii's Boat-based Anglers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ...Collection; Comment Request; Input From Hawaii's Boat-based Anglers AGENCY: National...National Data Standards. The State of Hawaii is developing a comprehensive data collection...fishing catch and effort derived from Hawaii's private boaters--a required...

  13. Capacity of Power Constrained Memoryless AWGN Channels with Fixed Input Constellations

    E-print Network

    Kavcic, Aleksandar

    Capacity of Power Constrained Memoryless AWGN Channels with Fixed Input Constellations #3; Nedeljko constellation constraint and 2) a maximum power constraint. We also consider nearly optimal codes derived from

  14. Multispectral Joint Image Restoration via Optimizing a Scale Map.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoyong; Yan, Qiong; Xu, Li; Ma, Lizhuang; Jia, Jiaya

    2015-12-01

    Color, infrared and flash images captured in different fields can be employed to effectively eliminate noise and other visual artifacts. We propose a two-image restoration framework considering input images from different fields, for example, one noisy color image and one dark-flashed near-infrared image. The major issue in such a framework is to handle all structure divergence and find commonly usable edges and smooth transitions for visually plausible image reconstruction. We introduce a novel scale map as a competent representation to explicitly model derivative-level confidence and propose new functions and a numerical solver to effectively infer it following our important structural observations. Multispectral shadow detection is also used to make our system more robust. Our method is general and shows a principled way to solve multispectral restoration problems. PMID:26539855

  15. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOEpatents

    Hysinger, C.L.; Beaman, J.J.; Melgaard, D.K.; Williamson, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows. 17 figs.

  16. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOEpatents

    Hysinger, Christopher L. (Austin, TX); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NE); Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NE)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows.

  17. Flight Test Validation of Optimal Input Design and Comparison to Conventional Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1997-01-01

    A technique for designing optimal inputs for aerodynamic parameter estimation was flight tested on the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV). Model parameter accuracies calculated from flight test data were compared on an equal basis for optimal input designs and conventional inputs at the same flight condition. In spite of errors in the a priori input design models and distortions of the input form by the feedback control system, the optimal inputs increased estimated parameter accuracies compared to conventional 3-2-1-1 and doublet inputs. In addition, the tests using optimal input designs demonstrated enhanced design flexibility, allowing the optimal input design technique to use a larger input amplitude to achieve further increases in estimated parameter accuracy without departing from the desired flight test condition. This work validated the analysis used to develop the optimal input designs, and demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the optimal input design technique.

  18. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program § 3430.607 Stakeholder input. CSREES shall...g., public meetings, request for input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal...

  19. Preshaping Command Inputs to Reduce System Vibration

    E-print Network

    Singer, Neil

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented for generating shaped command inputs which significantly reduce or eliminate endpoint vibration. Desired system inputs are altered so that the system completes the requested move without residual ...

  20. A Web Browsing System by Eye-gaze Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kiyohiko; Owada, Kosuke; Ohi, Shoichi; Ohyama, Minoru

    We have developed an eye-gaze input system for people with severe physical disabilities, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. This system utilizes a personal computer and a home video camera to detect eye-gaze under natural light. The system detects both vertical and horizontal eye-gaze by simple image analysis, and does not require special image processing units or sensors. We also developed the platform for eye-gaze input based on our system. In this paper, we propose a new web browsing system for physically disabled computer users as an application of the platform for eye-gaze input. The proposed web browsing system uses a method of direct indicator selection. The method categorizes indicators by their function. These indicators are hierarchized relations; users can select the felicitous function by switching indicators group. This system also analyzes the location of selectable object on web page, such as hyperlink, radio button, edit box, etc. This system stores the locations of these objects, in other words, the mouse cursor skips to the object of candidate input. Therefore it enables web browsing at a faster pace.

  1. Photoreceptor input and temporal summation in turtle retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Granda, A M; Maxwell, J H; Fulbrook, J E

    1986-01-01

    The relation between photoreceptor input and temporal summation in ganglion cells was investigated in the optical nerve of fresh-water turtle, Pseudemys. Action spectra derived for constant, high-criterion responses showed most cells to be maximally sensitive to 620 nm light, indicating dominant input from red-sensitive cones. At a lower criterion, sensitivity to 520 nm light greatly increased indicating an increase in rod input. Temporal summation curves for these intensity-dependent cells showed reciprocity between flash intensity and duration up to 128 msec for high-criterion summation curves. Low-criterion summation curves showed reciprocity up to the critical duration of 285 msec. Cells maximally sensitive to 620 nm light at all intensities often showed secondary sensitivity to 560 nm light, and were fitted by action spectra taken from red- and green-sensitive cones. Temporal summation curves for these cells had critical durations near 100 msec. Some cells responded best to light near 520 nm at all intensities and demonstrated little or no input from red-sensitive cones. These cells were fitted well by the action spectrum of rods and showed the longest critical durations of all at 375 msec. Chromatic input and temporal characteristics are intimately related: red-cone-dominated ganglion cells have the shortest critical durations while rod-dominated cells shows much longer ones. These findings are in keeping with psychophysical determinations of critical durations in this same animal. PMID:3617508

  2. Textual Enhancement of Input: Issues and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Park, Eun Sung; Combs, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The input enhancement hypothesis proposed by Sharwood Smith (1991, 1993) has stimulated considerable research over the last 15 years. This article reviews the research on textual enhancement of input (TE), an area where the majority of input enhancement studies have aggregated. Methodological idiosyncrasies are the norm of this body of research.…

  3. Input Locality and Hardness Amplification Andrej Bogdanov

    E-print Network

    Bogdanov, Andrej

    Input Locality and Hardness Amplification Andrej Bogdanov Alon Rosen Abstract We establish new hardness amplification results for one-way functions in which each input bit influences only a small number is injective then it is equally hard to invert f on a (1 - )-fraction of inputs. · If f is regular

  4. An image-processing approach to dotplots: an X-Window-based program for interactive analysis of dotplots derived from sequence and structural data.

    PubMed

    Trelles-Salazar, O; Zapata, E L; Dopazo, J; Coulson, A F; Carazo, J M

    1995-06-01

    We present an approach to the study of the relationships between biological sequences and structures applying image analysis methods to dotplots. We introduce a set of analytical tools based on different types of digital image-processing filters that are new within the context of dotplots. We have reformulated some of the usual approaches in dotplot analysis as mathematical operations on images within the framework of mathematical morphology. An X-Window-based implementation of this new approach has been developed and is available by anonymous FTP. PMID:7583699

  5. Turn customer input into innovation.

    PubMed

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis. PMID:12964470

  6. Quantitative assessment of multiple sclerosis lesion load using CAD and expert input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Wong, Alexis; Sangnil, Alan; Liu, Brent J.

    2008-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a frequently encountered neurological disease with a progressive but variable course affecting the central nervous system. Outline-based lesion quantification in the assessment of lesion load (LL) performed on magnetic resonance (MR) images is clinically useful and provides information about the development and change reflecting overall disease burden. Methods of LL assessment that rely on human input are tedious, have higher intra- and inter-observer variability and are more time-consuming than computerized automatic (CAD) techniques. At present it seems that methods based on human lesion identification preceded by non-interactive outlining by CAD are the best LL quantification strategies. We have developed a CAD that automatically quantifies MS lesions, displays 3-D lesion map and appends radiological findings to original images according to current DICOM standard. CAD is also capable to display and track changes and make comparison between patient's separate MRI studies to determine disease progression. The findings are exported to a separate imaging tool for review and final approval by expert. Capturing and standardized archiving of manual contours is also implemented. Similarity coefficients calculated from quantities of LL in collected exams show a good correlation of CAD-derived results vs. those incorporated as expert's reading. Combining the CAD approach with an expert interaction may impact to the diagnostic work-up of MS patients because of improved reproducibility in LL assessment and reduced time for single MR or comparative exams reading. Inclusion of CAD-generated outlines as DICOM-compliant overlays into the image data can serve as a better reference in MS progression tracking.

  7. Shallow sea-floor reflectance and water depth derived by unmixing multispectral imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwirth, P.N.; Lee, T.J.; Burne, R.V. Michigan Environmental Research Inst., Ann Arbor )

    1993-03-01

    A major problem for mapping shallow water zones by the analysis of remotely sensed data is that contrast effects due to water depth obscure and distort the special nature of the substrate. This paper outlines a new method which unmixes the exponential influence of depth in each pixel by employing a mathematical constraint. This leaves a multispectral residual which represents relative substrate reflectance. Input to the process are the raw multispectral data and water attenuation coefficients derived by the co-analysis of known bathymetry and remotely sensed data. Outputs are substrate-reflectance images corresponding to the input bands and a greyscale depth image. The method has been applied in the analysis of Landsat TM data at Hamelin Pool in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Algorithm derived substrate reflectance images for Landsat TM bands 1, 2, and 3 combined in color represent the optimum enhancement for mapping or classifying substrate types. As a result, this color image successfully delineated features, which were obscured in the raw data, such as the distributions of sea-grasses, microbial mats, and sandy area. 19 refs.

  8. The Effect of Input Knowledge on Creativity Simon Colton, Alison Pease, Graeme Ritchie

    E-print Network

    Ritchie, Graeme

    The Effect of Input Knowledge on Creativity Simon Colton, Alison Pease, Graeme Ritchie Division creativity in humans. We can derive some commonalities between these programs in order to build further creative programs. Key to this is the derivation of certain measures which assess how creative a program is

  9. A comparison of rat SPECT images obtained using 99mTc derived from 99Mo produced by an electron accelerator with that from a reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galea, R.; Wells, R. G.; Ross, C. K.; Lockwood, J.; Moore, K.; Harvey, J. T.; Isensee, G. H.

    2013-05-01

    Recent shortages of molybdenum-99 (99Mo) have led to an examination of alternate production methods that could contribute to a more robust supply. An electron accelerator and the photoneutron reaction were used to produce 99Mo from which technetium-99m (99mTc) is extracted. SPECT images of rat anatomy obtained using the accelerator-produced 99mTc with those obtained using 99mTc from a commercial generator were compared. Disks of 100Mo were irradiated with x-rays produced by a 35 MeV electron beam to generate about 1110 MBq (30 mCi) of 99Mo per disk. After target dissolution, a NorthStar ARSII unit was used to separate the 99mTc, which was subsequently used to tag pharmaceuticals suitable for cardiac and bone imaging. SPECT images were acquired for three rats and compared to images for the same three rats obtained using 99mTc from a standard reactor 99Mo generator. The efficiency of 99Mo-99mTc separation was typically greater than 90%. This study demonstrated the delivery of 99mTc from the end of beam to the end user of approximately 30 h. Images obtained using the heart and bone scanning agents using reactor and linac-produced 99mTc were comparable. High-power electron accelerators are an attractive option for producing 99Mo on a national scale.

  10. A comparison of rat SPECT images obtained using (99m)Tc derived from 99Mo produced by an electron accelerator with that from a reactor.

    PubMed

    Galea, R; Wells, R G; Ross, C K; Lockwood, J; Moore, K; Harvey, J T; Isensee, G H

    2013-05-01

    Recent shortages of molybdenum-99 ((99)Mo) have led to an examination of alternate production methods that could contribute to a more robust supply. An electron accelerator and the photoneutron reaction were used to produce (99)Mo from which technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) is extracted. SPECT images of rat anatomy obtained using the accelerator-produced (99m)Tc with those obtained using (99m)Tc from a commercial generator were compared. Disks of (100)Mo were irradiated with x-rays produced by a 35 MeV electron beam to generate about 1110 MBq (30 mCi) of (99)Mo per disk. After target dissolution, a NorthStar ARSII unit was used to separate the (99m)Tc, which was subsequently used to tag pharmaceuticals suitable for cardiac and bone imaging. SPECT images were acquired for three rats and compared to images for the same three rats obtained using (99m)Tc from a standard reactor (99)Mo generator. The efficiency of (99)Mo-(99m)Tc separation was typically greater than 90%. This study demonstrated the delivery of (99m)Tc from the end of beam to the end user of approximately 30 h. Images obtained using the heart and bone scanning agents using reactor and linac-produced (99m)Tc were comparable. High-power electron accelerators are an attractive option for producing (99)Mo on a national scale. PMID:23552053

  11. Software for device-independent graphical input

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlin, G.

    1982-01-01

    A three-level model and a graphics software structure based on the model that was developed with the goal of making graphical applications independent of the input devices are described. The software structure makes graphical applications independent of the input devices in a manner similar to the way the SIGGRAPH CORE proposal makes them independent of the output devices. A second goal was to provide a convenient means for application programmers to specify the user-input language for their applications. The software consists of an input handler and a table-driven parser. The input handler manages a CORE-like event queue, changing input events into terminal symbols and making their terminal symbols available to the parser in a uniform manner. It also removes most device dependencies. The parser is table driven from a Backus-Naur form (BNF) grammer that specifies the user-input language. The lower level grammar rules remove the remaining device dependencies from the input, and the higher level grammar rules specify legal sentences in the user-input language. Implementation of this software is on a table-top minicomputer. Experience with retrofitting existing applications indicates that one can find a grammar that removes essentially all the device dependencies from the application proper.

  12. Image enhancement by non-linear extrapolation in frequency space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H. (Inventor); Greenspan, Hayit K. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An input image is enhanced to include spatial frequency components having frequencies higher than those in an input image. To this end, an edge map is generated from the input image using a high band pass filtering technique. An enhancing map is subsequently generated from the edge map, with the enhanced map having spatial frequencies exceeding an initial maximum spatial frequency of the input image. The enhanced map is generated by applying a non-linear operator to the edge map in a manner which preserves the phase transitions of the edges of the input image. The enhanced map is added to the input image to achieve a resulting image having spatial frequencies greater than those in the input image. Simplicity of computations and ease of implementation allow for image sharpening after enlargement and for real-time applications such as videophones, advanced definition television, zooming, and restoration of old motion pictures.

  13. Random Lens Imaging

    E-print Network

    Fergus, Rob

    2006-09-02

    We call a random lens one for which the function relating the input light ray to the output sensor location is pseudo-random. Imaging systems with random lensescan expand the space of possible camera designs, allowing new ...

  14. Derivation of formulas for root-mean-square errors in location, orientation, and shape in triangulation solution of an elongated object in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. A. T.

    1974-01-01

    Formulas are derived for the root-mean-square (rms) displacement, slope, and curvature errors in an azimuth-elevation image trace of an elongated object in space, as functions of the number and spacing of the input data points and the rms elevation error in the individual input data points from a single observation station. Also, formulas are derived for the total rms displacement, slope, and curvature error vectors in the triangulation solution of an elongated object in space due to the rms displacement, slope, and curvature errors, respectively, in the azimuth-elevation image traces from different observation stations. The total rms displacement, slope, and curvature error vectors provide useful measure numbers for determining the relative merits of two or more different triangulation procedures applicable to elongated objects in space.

  15. Image compression system and method having optimized quantization tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakar, Viresh (Inventor); Livny, Miron (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A digital image compression preprocessor for use in a discrete cosine transform-based digital image compression device is provided. The preprocessor includes a gathering mechanism for determining discrete cosine transform statistics from input digital image data. A computing mechanism is operatively coupled to the gathering mechanism to calculate a image distortion array and a rate of image compression array based upon the discrete cosine transform statistics for each possible quantization value. A dynamic programming mechanism is operatively coupled to the computing mechanism to optimize the rate of image compression array against the image distortion array such that a rate-distortion-optimal quantization table is derived. In addition, a discrete cosine transform-based digital image compression device and a discrete cosine transform-based digital image compression and decompression system are provided. Also, a method for generating a rate-distortion-optimal quantization table, using discrete cosine transform-based digital image compression, and operating a discrete cosine transform-based digital image compression and decompression system are provided.

  16. Input-shaped actuation of electromagnetic MEMS mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitterer, Jörg; Fidler, Franz; Schmid, Gerhard; Hambeck, Christian; Saint Julien-Wallsee, Ferdinand; Leeb, Walter; Schmid, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    For many applications of MEMS actuators a well-defined trajectory of the movable device component is crucial when using a simple and inexpensive open-loop controller. We have applied to quasi-statically actuated electromagnetic MEMS mirrors the control technique called "input shaping", which is widely used for systems at the macro-scale and to a lesser extent also to systems at the micro-scale. We derive the impulse response of a filter which suppresses the excitation of undesired resonant modes and present simulation and measurement results of the oscillation-free linear MEMS mirror movement. The robustness of different input shaping filter types with respect to errors in the estimation of the system parameters, i.e., resonance frequency and damping ratio, is analyzed.

  17. Microchannel cross load array with dense parallel input

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2004-04-06

    An architecture or layout for microchannel arrays using T or Cross (+) loading for electrophoresis or other injection and separation chemistry that are performed in microfluidic configurations. This architecture enables a very dense layout of arrays of functionally identical shaped channels and it also solves the problem of simultaneously enabling efficient parallel shapes and biasing of the input wells, waste wells, and bias wells at the input end of the separation columns. One T load architecture uses circular holes with common rows, but not columns, which allows the flow paths for each channel to be identical in shape, using multiple mirror image pieces. Another T load architecture enables the access hole array to be formed on a biaxial, collinear grid suitable for EDM micromachining (square holes), with common rows and columns.

  18. Nickel(ii) complexes of N-CH2CF3 cyclam derivatives as contrast agents for (19)F magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Blahut, Jan; Hermann, Petr; Gálisová, Andrea; Herynek, Vít; Císa?ová, Ivana; Tošner, Zden?k; Kotek, Jan

    2015-12-22

    Kinetically inert Ni(ii) complexes of N(1),N(8)-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)cyclams with hydrogen atoms or phosphonic acid groups in the N(4),N(11)-positions show significant (19)F NMR relaxation rate enhancement useful for 19-fluorine MRI imaging. PMID:26646503

  19. NeuroMorph: a toolset for the morphometric analysis and visualization of 3D models derived from electron microscopy image stacks.

    PubMed

    Jorstad, Anne; Nigro, Biagio; Cali, Corrado; Wawrzyniak, Marta; Fua, Pascal; Knott, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Serialelectron microscopy imaging is crucial for exploring the structure of cells and tissues. The development of block face scanning electron microscopy methods and their ability to capture large image stacks, some with near isotropic voxels, is proving particularly useful for the exploration of brain tissue. This has led to the creation of numerous algorithms and software for segmenting out different features from the image stacks. However, there are few tools available to view these results and make detailed morphometric analyses on all, or part, of these 3D models. We have addressed this issue by constructing a collection of software tools, called NeuroMorph, with which users can view the segmentation results, in conjunction with the original image stack, manipulate these objects in 3D, and make measurements of any region. This approach to collecting morphometric data provides a faster means of analysing the geometry of structures, such as dendritic spines and axonal boutons. This bridges the gap that currently exists between rapid reconstruction techniques, offered by computer vision research, and the need to collect measurements of shape and form from segmented structures that is currently done using manual segmentation methods. PMID:25240318

  20. CREATING INPUT TABLES FROM WAPDEG FOR RIP

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    1998-08-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to create tables for input into RIP ver. 5.18 (Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems) from WAPDEG ver. 3.06 (Waste Package Degradation) output. This calculation details the creation of the RIP input tables for TSPA-VA REV.00.

  1. Contemporary Mathematics Nonlinear Input-Output Equilibrium

    E-print Network

    Polyak, Roman A.

    of economic activities, planning production, economic prognoses, international trade just to mention a c 0000 bounds for both methods under various assumptions on the input data. 1. Introduction The input-output (IO to the World economy. The main contributor to IO theory and, in particular, to the practical aspects of IO

  2. SATURATION COMPENSATING INPUT SHAPERS FOR REDUCING VIBRATION

    E-print Network

    Singhose, William

    SATURATION COMPENSATING INPUT SHAPERS FOR REDUCING VIBRATION Raynald Eloundou, William Singhose Input shaping can be used to eliminate or greatly reduce residual vibration of flexible mechanical and damping ratios. When the actuator saturates, the dynamics become nonlinear. As the nonlinearity increases

  3. Statistical identification of effective input variables. [SCREEN

    SciTech Connect

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A statistical sensitivity analysis procedure has been developed for ranking the input data of large computer codes in the order of sensitivity-importance. The method is economical for large codes with many input variables, since it uses a relatively small number of computer runs. No prior judgemental elimination of input variables is needed. The sceening method is based on stagewise correlation and extensive regression analysis of output values calculated with selected input value combinations. The regression process deals with multivariate nonlinear functions, and statistical tests are also available for identifying input variables that contribute to threshold effects, i.e., discontinuities in the output variables. A computer code SCREEN has been developed for implementing the screening techniques. The efficiency has been demonstrated by several examples and applied to a fast reactor safety analysis code (Venus-II). However, the methods and the coding are general and not limited to such applications.

  4. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and temperatures to show that the interface had voltage margin under all worst case conditions. Gate input thresholds are normally measured at the manufacturer when the device is on a chip tester. A key function of this machine was duplicated on an existing flight board with no modifications to the nets to be tested, with the exception of changes in the FPGA program.

  5. Validation of Land Surface Temperature Products Derived from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Using Ground-based and Heritage Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillevic, Pierre C.; Hulley, Glynn Collis; Hulley, Glynn C.; Privette, Jeffrey L.; Hook, Simon J.; Olioso, Albert; Goettsche, Frank M.; Radocinski, Robert; Roman, Miguel O.; Yu, Yunyue; Csiszar, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Thermal infrared satellite observations of the Earth's surface are widely used to retrieve Land Surface Temperature (LST) and monitor LST changes around the world. Since January 2012, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) has provided daily observations of LST with a spatial resolution of 750 m at nadir. Comparison of the standard VIIRS LST product with the equivalent daily standard product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection-5 and with ground-based measurements over vegetated and inland water surfaces showed good agreement. Analysis indicated the accuracy and precision of the VIIRS product over these cover types was 0.2 K and 2.0 K respectively provided the analyses included appropriate compensation for any spatial heterogeneity in LST within the validation site. However, comparisons between in situ LST and the VIIRS and MODIS LST.

  6. Relationship between sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) click structure and size derived from videocamera images of a depredating whale (sperm whale prey acquisition).

    PubMed

    Mathias, Delphine; Thode, Aaron; Straley, Jan; Folkert, Kendall

    2009-05-01

    Sperm whales have learned to depredate black cod (Anoplopoma fimbria) from longline deployments in the Gulf of Alaska. On May 31, 2006, simultaneous acoustic and visual recordings were made of a depredation attempt by a sperm whale at 108 m depth. Because the whale was oriented perpendicularly to the camera as it contacted the longline at a known distance from the camera, the distance from the nose to the hinge of the jaw could be estimated. Allometric relationships obtained from whaling data and skeleton measurements could then be used to estimate both the spermaceti organ length and total length of the animal. An acoustic estimate of animal length was obtained by measuring the inter-pulse interval (IPI) of clicks detected from the animal and using empirical formulas to convert this interval into a length estimate. Two distinct IPIs were extracted from the clicks, one yielding a length estimate that matches the visually-derived length to within experimental error. However, acoustic estimates of spermaceti organ size, derived from standard sound production theories, are inconsistent with the visual estimates, and the derived size of the junk is smaller than that of the spermaceti organ, in contradiction with known anatomical relationships. PMID:19425683

  7. On the application of text input metrics to handwritten text input

    E-print Network

    that for him or her, feels natural. #12;The User Experience In Human Computer Interaction (HCI), it is common errors that do occur to be easy to spot and easy to fix. In QWERTY keyboard text input, the optimum evaluation of recognition improvement or input accuracy. Text Input Methods Users spend a significant amount

  8. Branch Input Resistance and Steady Attenuation for Input to One Branch of a Dendritic Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Rall, Wilfrid; Rinzel, John

    1973-01-01

    Mathematical solutions and numerical illustrations are presented for the steady-state distribution of membrane potential in an extensively branched neuron model, when steady electric current is injected into only one dendritic branch. Explicit expressions are obtained for input resistance at the branch input site and for voltage attenuation from the input site to the soma; expressions for AC steady-state input impedance and attenuation are also presented. The theoretical model assumes passive membrane properties and the equivalent cylinder constraint on branch diameters. Numerical examples illustrate how branch input resistance and steady attenuation depend upon the following: the number of dendritic trees, the orders of dendritic branching, the electrotonic length of the dendritic trees, the location of the dendritic input site, and the input resistance at the soma. The application to cat spinal motoneurons, and to other neuron types, is discussed. The effect of a large dendritic input resistance upon the amount of local membrane depolarization at the synaptic site, and upon the amount of depolarization reaching the soma, is illustrated and discussed; simple proportionality with input resistance does not hold, in general. Also, branch input resistance is shown to exceed the input resistance at the soma by an amount that is always less than the sum of core resistances along the path from the input site to the soma. PMID:4715583

  9. Operational life prediction on gating image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu-hui; Shen, Zhi-guo; Li, Zhong-li

    2009-07-01

    Operational life is one of the important parameters to evaluate second and super second generation image intensifiers. It can be used not only to monitor manufacturing technique in product line, then the technology on photocathode processing, MCP degassing and MCP producing can be adjusted promptly, but also to eliminate the image intensifiers which have hidden risk on operational life as early as possible. Recently gating image intensifiers are used widely, method to estimate the operational life of gating image intensifier related to its practical operate mode and working condition need to be established urgently. The least square method to analyze the operational life test data in product line was introduced in this paper. Now the data can be analyzed with convenient statistic analyze function on Excel. Using "worksheet function" and "chart wizard" and "data analysis" on Excel to do the least square method calculation, spreadsheets are established to do complex data calculation with worksheet functions. Based on them, formulas to monitor the technology parameters were derived, and the conclusion that the operational life was only related to the decrease slope of photocathode exponential fit curve was made. The decrease slope of photocathode sensitivity exponential fit curve and the decrease percent of the exponential fit photocathode sensitivity can be used to evaluate the qualification of the operational life rapidly. The mathematic models for operational life prediction on image intensifier and gating image intensifier are established respectively based on the acceptable values of the decrease percent of the exponential fit photocathode sensitivity and the expecting signal to noise ratio. The equations predicting the operational life related to duty cycle and input light level on gating image intensifier were derived, and the relationship between them were discussed too. The theory foundation were made herein, so the user can select proper gating image intensifier type just considering the practical using condition and make the best design and application project. The paper gave guidance on data analyzing in product line and using gating image intensifier.

  10. N-doped carbon dots derived from bovine serum albumin and formic acid with one- and two-photon fluorescence for live cell nuclear imaging.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingqian; Li, Xintong; Wu, Hao; Wang, Beibei; Wu, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dots with both one- and two-photon fluorescence have drawn great attention for biomedical imaging. Herein, nitrogen-doped carbon dots were facilely developed by one-pot hydrothermal method using bovine serum albumin and formic acid as carbon sources. They are highly water-soluble with strong fluorescence when excited with ultraviolet or near infrared light. The carbon dots have a diameter of ?8.32nm and can emit strong two-photon induced fluorescence upon excitation at 750nm with a femtosecond laser. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis revealed that the carbon dots contained three components, C, N and O, corresponding to the peak at 285, 398 and 532eV, respectively. The Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis revealed that there are carboxyl and carboxylic groups on the surface, which allowed further linking of functional molecules. pH stability study demonstrated that the carbon dots are able to be used in a wide range of pH values. The fluorescence mechanism is also discussed in this study. Importantly, these carbon dots are biocompatible and highly photostable, which can be directly applied for both one- and two-photon living cell imaging. After proper surface functionalization with TAT peptide, they can be used as fluorescent probes for live cell nuclear-targeted imaging. PMID:26381697

  11. Derivative chameleons

    SciTech Connect

    Noller, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    We consider generalized chameleon models where the conformal coupling between matter and gravitational geometries is not only a function of the chameleon field ?, but also of its derivatives via higher order co-ordinate invariants (such as ?{sub ?}??{sup ?}?,??,...). Specifically we consider the first such non-trivial conformal factor A(?,?{sub ?}??{sup ?}?). The associated phenomenology is investigated and we show that such theories have a new generic mass-altering mechanism, potentially assisting the generation of a sufficiently large chameleon mass in dense environments. The most general effective potential is derived for such derivative chameleon setups and explicit examples are given. Interestingly this points us to the existence of a purely derivative chameleon protected by a shift symmetry for ? ? ?+c. We also discuss potential ghost-like instabilities associated with mass-lifting mechanisms and find another, mass-lowering and instability-free, branch of solutions. This suggests that, barring fine-tuning, stable derivative models are in fact typically anti-chameleons that suppress the field's mass in dense environments. Furthermore we investigate modifications to the thin-shell regime and prove a no-go theorem for chameleon effects in non-conformal geometries of the disformal type.

  12. Derivative Chameleons

    E-print Network

    Johannes Noller

    2012-03-29

    We consider generalized chameleon models where the conformal coupling between matter and gravitational geometries is not only a function of the chameleon field \\phi, but also of its derivatives via higher order co-ordinate invariants. Specifically we consider the first such non-trivial conformal factor A(\\phi,X), where X is the canonical kinetic term for \\phi. The associated phenomenology is investigated and we show that such theories have a new generic mass-altering mechanism, potentially assisting the generation of a sufficiently large chameleon mass in dense environments. The most general effective potential is derived for such derivative chameleon setups and explicit examples are given. Interestingly this points us to the existence of a purely derivative chameleon protected by a shift symmetry for \\phi. We also discuss potential ghost-like instabilities associated with mass-lifting mechanisms and find another, mass-lowering and instability-free, branch of solutions. This suggests that, barring fine-tuning, stable derivative models are in fact typically anti-chameleons that suppress the field's mass in dense environments. Furthermore we investigate modifications to the thin-shell regime and prove a no-go theorem for chameleon effects in non-conformal geometries of the disformal type.

  13. Derivative chameleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noller, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    We consider generalized chameleon models where the conformal coupling between matter and gravitational geometries is not only a function of the chameleon field phi, but also of its derivatives via higher order co-ordinate invariants (such as ??phi??phi,squphi,...). Specifically we consider the first such non-trivial conformal factor A(phi,??phi??phi). The associated phenomenology is investigated and we show that such theories have a new generic mass-altering mechanism, potentially assisting the generation of a sufficiently large chameleon mass in dense environments. The most general effective potential is derived for such derivative chameleon setups and explicit examples are given. Interestingly this points us to the existence of a purely derivative chameleon protected by a shift symmetry for phi ? phi+c. We also discuss potential ghost-like instabilities associated with mass-lifting mechanisms and find another, mass-lowering and instability-free, branch of solutions. This suggests that, barring fine-tuning, stable derivative models are in fact typically anti-chameleons that suppress the field's mass in dense environments. Furthermore we investigate modifications to the thin-shell regime and prove a no-go theorem for chameleon effects in non-conformal geometries of the disformal type.

  14. Wireless, relative-motion computer input device

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides a system for controlling a computer display in a workspace using an input unit/output unit. A train of EM waves are sent out to flood the workspace. EM waves are reflected from the input unit/output unit. A relative distance moved information signal is created using the EM waves that are reflected from the input unit/output unit. Algorithms are used to convert the relative distance moved information signal to a display signal. The computer display is controlled in response to the display signal.

  15. Deriving the Intrahepatic Arteriovenous Shunt Rate from CT Images and Biochemical Data Instead of from Arterial Perfusion Scintigraphy in Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Toshiro Seki, Hiroshi; Shiina, Makoto

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate a method for predicting the intrahepatic arteriovenous shunt rate from computed tomography (CT) images and biochemical data, instead of from arterial perfusion scintigraphy, because adverse exacerbated systemic effects may be induced in cases where a high shunt rate exists. CT and arterial perfusion scintigraphy were performed in patients with liver metastases from gastric or colorectal cancer. Biochemical data and tumor marker levels of 33 enrolled patients were measured. The results were statistically verified by multiple regression analysis. The total metastatic hepatic tumor volume (V{sub metastasized}), residual hepatic parenchyma volume (V{sub residual}; calculated from CT images), and biochemical data were treated as independent variables; the intrahepatic arteriovenous (IHAV) shunt rate (calculated from scintigraphy) was treated as a dependent variable. The IHAV shunt rate was 15.1 {+-} 11.9%. Based on the correlation matrixes, the best correlation coefficient of 0.84 was established between the IHAV shunt rate and V{sub metastasized} (p < 0.01). In the multiple regression analysis with the IHAV shunt rate as the dependent variable, the coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) was 0.75, which was significant at the 0.1% level with two significant independent variables (V{sub metastasized} and V{sub residual}). The standardized regression coefficients ({beta}) of V{sub metastasized} and V{sub residual} were significant at the 0.1 and 5% levels, respectively. Based on this result, we can obtain a predicted value of IHAV shunt rate (p < 0.001) using CT images. When a high shunt rate was predicted, beneficial and consistent clinical monitoring can be initiated in, for example, hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  16. The computational complexity of matching an input fingerprint against every entry in a large-scale fingerprint

    E-print Network

    Ross, Arun Abraham

    1 Abstract The computational complexity of matching an input fingerprint against every entry in a large-scale fingerprint database can be prohibitive. In fingerprint indexing, a small set of candidate fingerprints is selected from the database and only images in this set are compared against the input probe

  17. Generation of RTL verification input stimulus 

    E-print Network

    Selvarathinam, Anand Manivannan

    2001-01-01

    intervention. Simulation is widely used for verifying RTL designs despite its limitation. For a given coverage metric, the verification input vectors are generated to attain a higher level of coverage. Many verification coverage measures were proposed...

  18. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...forums (e.g., public meetings, requests for input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal...

  19. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...forums (e.g., public meetings, requests for input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal...

  20. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...forums (e.g., public meetings, requests for input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal...

  1. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...forums (e.g., public meetings, request for input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal...

  2. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...forums (e.g., public meetings, request for input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal...

  3. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...forums (e.g., public meetings, requests for input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal...

  4. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...forums (e.g., public meetings, request for input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal...

  5. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA...forums (e.g., public meetings, request for input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal...

  6. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program... (e.g., public meetings, request for input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in...

  7. Autotuning Algorithmic Choice for Input Sensitivity

    E-print Network

    Ding, Yufei

    2014-06-23

    Empirical autotuning is increasingly being used in many domains to achieve optimized performance in a variety of different execution environments. A daunting challenge faced by such autotuners is input sensitivity, where ...

  8. Estimation theoretical image restoration

    E-print Network

    Dolne, Jean J

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, we have developed an extensive study to evaluate image restoration from a single image, colored or monochromatic. Using a mixture of Gaussian and Poisson noise process, we derived an objective function to ...

  9. Evaluation of entropy and JM-distance criterions as features selection methods using spectral and spatial features derived from LANDSAT images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (principal investigator); Dutra, L. V.; Mascarenhas, N. D. A.; Mitsuo, Fernando Augusta, II

    1984-01-01

    A study area near Ribeirao Preto in Sao Paulo state was selected, with predominance in sugar cane. Eight features were extracted from the 4 original bands of LANDSAT image, using low-pass and high-pass filtering to obtain spatial features. There were 5 training sites in order to acquire the necessary parameters. Two groups of four channels were selected from 12 channels using JM-distance and entropy criterions. The number of selected channels was defined by physical restrictions of the image analyzer and computacional costs. The evaluation was performed by extracting the confusion matrix for training and tests areas, with a maximum likelihood classifier, and by defining performance indexes based on those matrixes for each group of channels. Results show that in spatial features and supervised classification, the entropy criterion is better in the sense that allows a more accurate and generalized definition of class signature. On the other hand, JM-distance criterion strongly reduces the misclassification within training areas.

  10. Lattice QCD input for axion cosmology

    E-print Network

    Evan Berkowitz; Michael I. Buchoff; Enrico Rinaldi

    2015-05-27

    One intriguing BSM particle is the QCD axion, which could simultaneously provide a solution to the Strong CP problem and account for some, if not all, of the dark matter density in the universe. This particle is a pNGB of the conjectured Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry of the Standard Model. Its mass and interactions are suppressed by a heavy symmetry breaking scale, $f_a$, whose value is roughly greater than $10^{9}$ GeV (or, conversely, the axion mass, $m_a$, is roughly less than $10^4\\ \\mu \\text{eV}$). The density of axions in the universe, which cannot exceed the relic dark matter density and is a quantity of great interest in axion experiments like ADMX, is a result of the early-universe interplay between cosmological evolution and the axion mass as a function of temperature. The latter quantity is proportional to the second derivative of the QCD free energy with respect to the CP-violating phase, $\\theta$. However, this quantity is generically non-perturbative and previous calculations have only employed instanton models at the high temperatures of interest (roughly 1 GeV). In this and future works, we aim to calculate the temperature-dependent axion mass at small $\\theta$ from first-principle lattice calculations, with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Once calculated, this temperature-dependent axion mass is input for the classical evolution equations of the axion density of the universe. Due to a variety of lattice systematic effects at the very high temperatures required, we perform a calculation of the leading small-$\\theta$ cumulant of the theta vacua on large volume lattices for SU(3) Yang-Mills with high statistics as a first proof of concept, before attempting a full QCD calculation in the future. From these pure glue results, the misalignment mechanism yields the axion mass bound $m_a \\geq (14.6\\pm0.1) \\ \\mu \\text{eV}$ when PQ-breaking occurs after inflation.

  11. Lattice QCD input for axion cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Evan; Buchoff, Michael I.; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    One intriguing beyond-the-Standard-Model particle is the QCD axion, which could simultaneously provide a solution to the Strong C P Problem and account for some, if not all, of the dark matter density in the Universe. This particle is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of the conjectured Peccei-Quinn symmetry of the Standard Model. Its mass and interactions are suppressed by a heavy symmetry-breaking scale, fa, the value of which is roughly greater than 109 GeV (or, conversely, the axion mass, ma, is roughly less than 104 ? eV ). The density of axions in the Universe, which cannot exceed the relic dark matter density and is a quantity of great interest in axion experiments like ADMX, is a result of the early Universe interplay between cosmological evolution and the axion mass as a function of temperature. The latter quantity is proportional to the second derivative of the temperature-dependent QCD free energy with respect to the C P -violating phase, ? . However, this quantity is generically nonperturbative, and previous calculations have only employed instanton models at the high temperatures of interest (roughly 1 GeV). In this and future works, we aim to calculate the temperature-dependent axion mass at small ? from first-principle lattice calculations, with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Once calculated, this temperature-dependent axion mass is input for the classical evolution equations of the axion density of the Universe, which is required to be less than or equal to the dark matter density. Due to a variety of lattice systematic effects at the very high temperatures required, we perform a calculation of the leading small-? cumulant of the theta vacua on large volume lattices for SU(3) Yang-Mills with high statistics as a first proof of concept, before attempting a full QCD calculation in the future. From these pure glue results, the misalignment mechanism yields the axion mass bound ma?(14.6 ±0.1 ) ? eV when Peccei-Quinn breaking occurs after inflation.

  12. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool ADIFOR to the grid generation program. The output of ADIFOR is a new source code containing the old code plus expressions for derivatives of specified dependent variables (grid coordinates) with respect to specified independent variables (design parameters). The RAPID methodology and software provide a means of rapidly defining numerical prototypes, grids, and grid sensitivity of a class of airplane configurations. This technology and software is highly useful for CFD research for preliminary design and optimization processes.

  13. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A novel input filter compensation scheme for a buck regulator that eliminates the interaction between the input filter output impedance and the regulator control loop is presented. The scheme is implemented using a feedforward loop that senses the input filter state variables and uses this information to modulate the duty cycle signal. The feedforward design process presented is seen to be straightforward and the feedforward easy to implement. Extensive experimental data supported by analytical results show that significant performance improvement is achieved with the use of feedforward in the following performance categories: loop stability, audiosusceptibility, output impedance and transient response. The use of feedforward results in isolating the switching regulator from its power source thus eliminating all interaction between the regulator and equipment upstream. In addition the use of feedforward removes some of the input filter design constraints and makes the input filter design process simpler thus making it possible to optimize the input filter. The concept of feedforward compensation can also be extended to other types of switching regulators.

  14. Hydrologic modeling with uncertain input parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, M.; Cerdan, O.; Ern, A.; Le Maître, O.; Sochala, P.

    2012-04-01

    Erosion risk is recognized as a major threat whose consequences affect urbanized and agricultural areas. Recent assessments of the predictive abilities of erosion models show the difficulty to correctly predict the spatial patterns of erosion and deposition. This is due to the high sensibility of the model to input parameters that contain large spatial and temporal variability. Many studies concluded that model outputs are very sensitive to input hydrological parameters, especially to the saturated hydraulic conductivity. Here, we use an erosion model coupling the Shallow Water equations with the Hairsine-Rose soil erosion which can integrate different sediment size classes. As the scale of modeling is different from the scale of observed or measured data, we use a stochastic distribution of relevant input parameters to represent the micro-scale. A first part of the study concerns the rainfall/runoff model in which the saturated hydraulic conductivity is considered as an uncertain input parameter. A second part is dedicated to the influence of soil parameters in the erosion model. For each part, we evaluate how uncertainties on the inputs impact the surface runoff or the erosion model outputs during various types of rainfall events. We test different stochastic tools to quantify the propagation of uncertainties (Monte Carlo method, Karhunen-Loève expansion…) and we use numerical test cases representing fields or hillslope to assess the methodology in the context of runoff and soil erosion modeling. Simulation results allow us to know where effort should be concentrated when collecting input parameters and limit output error.

  15. New synthesis of phenyl-isothiocyanate C-functionalised cyclams. Bioconjugation and (64)Cu phenotypic PET imaging studies of multiple myeloma with the te2a derivative.

    PubMed

    Halime, Zakaria; Frindel, Mathieu; Camus, Nathalie; Orain, Pierre-Yves; Lacombe, Marie; Chérel, Michel; Gestin, Jean-François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Tripier, Raphaël

    2015-12-14

    Azamacrocyclic bifunctional chelating agents (BCAs) are essential for the development of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine and we wish to prove that their bioconjugation by a function present on a carbon atom of the macrocyclic skeleton is a solution of choice to maintain their in vivo inertness. Based on our very recent methodology using a bisaminal template and selective N-alkylation approach, a new synthesis of conjugable C-functionalised teta, te2a and cb-te2a has been developed. These chelators have indeed a growing interest in nuclear medicine for positron emission tomography (PET) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) where they show in several cases better complexation properties than dota or dota-like macrocycles, especially with (64)Cu or (67)Cu radioisotopes. Chelators are bearing an isothiocyanate grafting function introduced by C-alkylation to avoid as much as possible a critical decrease of their chelating properties. The synthesis is very efficient and yields the targeted ligands, teta-Ph-NCS, te2a-Ph-NCS and cb-te2a-Ph-NCS without fastidious work-up and could be easily extended to other cyclam based-BCAs. The newly synthetised te2a-Ph-NCS has been conjugated to an anti mCD138 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to evaluate its in vivo behavior and potentiality as BCA and to explore a first attempt of PET-phenotypic imaging in multiple myeloma (MM). Mass spectrometry analysis of the immunoconjugate showed that up to 4 chelates were conjugated per 9E7.4 mAb. The radiolabeling yield and specific activity post-purification of the bioconjugate 9E7.4-CSN-Ph-te2a were 95 ± 2.8% and 188 ± 27 MBq mg(-1) respectively and the immunoreactivity of (64)Cu-9E7.4-CSN-Ph-te2a was 81 ± 7%. Animal experiments were carried out on 5T33-Luc(+) tumor bearing mice, either in subcutaneous or orthotopic. To achieve PET imaging, mice were injected with (64)Cu-9E7.4-CNS-Ph-te2a and acquisitions were conducted 2 and 20 h post-injection (PI). A millimetric bone uptake was localised in a sacroiliac of a MM orthotopic tumor. Nonspecific uptakes were observed at 2 h PI but, unlike for the tumor, a significant decrease was observed at 20 h PI which improves the contrast of the images. PMID:26419637

  16. Measuring input synchrony in the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck neuronal model through input parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Koutsou, Achilleas; Kanev, Jacob; Christodoulou, Chris

    2013-11-01

    We present a method of estimating the input parameters and through them, the input synchrony, of a stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process when it is driven by time-dependent sinusoidal input signal and noise. By driving the neuron using sinusoidal inputs, we simulate the effects of periodic synchrony on the membrane voltage and the firing of the neuron, where the peaks of the sine wave represent volleys of synchronised input spikes. Our estimation methods allow us to measure the degree of synchrony driving the neuron in terms of the input sine wave parameters, using the output spikes of the model and the membrane potential. In particular, by estimating the frequency of the synchronous input volleys and averaging the estimates of the level of input activity at corresponding intervals of the input signal, we obtain fairly accurate estimates of the baseline and peak activity of the input, which in turn define the degrees of synchrony. The same procedure is also successfully applied in estimating the baseline and peak activity of the noise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012. PMID:23684712

  17. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the partial derivative machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. In this paper, we report on an initial study of expert understanding of partial derivatives across three disciplines: physics, engineering, and mathematics. We report on the central research question of how disciplinary experts understand partial derivatives, and how their concept images of partial derivatives differ, with a focus on experimentally measured quantities. Using the partial derivative machine (PDM), we probed expert understanding of partial derivatives in an experimental context without a known functional form. In particular, we investigated which representations were cued by the experts' interactions with the PDM. Whereas the physicists and engineers were quick to use measurements to find a numeric approximation for a derivative, the mathematicians repeatedly returned to speculation as to the functional form; although they were comfortable drawing qualitative conclusions about the system from measurements, they were reluctant to approximate the derivative through measurement. On a theoretical front, we found ways in which existing frameworks for the concept of derivative could be expanded to include numerical approximation.

  18. Discrimination between glioblastoma multiforme and solitary metastasis using morphological features derived from the p:q tensor decomposition of diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Jones, Timothy L; Barrick, Thomas R; Howe, Franklyn A

    2014-09-01

    The management and treatment of high-grade glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and solitary metastasis (MET) are very different and influence the prognosis and subsequent clinical outcomes. In the case of a solitary MET, diagnosis using conventional radiology can be equivocal. Currently, a definitive diagnosis is based on histopathological analysis on a biopsy sample. Here, we present a computerised decision support framework for discrimination between GBM and solitary MET using MRI, which includes: (i) a semi-automatic segmentation method based on diffusion tensor imaging; (ii) two-dimensional morphological feature extraction and selection; and (iii) a pattern recognition module for automated tumour classification. Ground truth was provided by histopathological analysis from pre-treatment stereotactic biopsy or at surgical resection. Our two-dimensional morphological analysis outperforms previous methods with high cross-validation accuracy of 97.9% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.975 using a neural networks-based classifier. PMID:25066520

  19. A new synthesis for terrestrial nitrogen inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Morford, S. L.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) inputs sustain many different aspects of local soil processes, their services, and their interactions with the broader Earth system. We present a new synthesis for terrestrial N inputs that explicitly considers both rock and atmospheric sources of N. We review evidence for state-factor regulation over biological fixation, deposition, and rock-weathering inputs from local to global scales and in transient vs. steady-state landscapes. Our investigation highlights strong organism and topographic (relief) controls over all three N input pathways, with the anthropogenic factor clearly important in rising N deposition rates. In addition, the climate, parent material, and time factors are shown to influence patterns of fixation and rock-weathering inputs of N in diverse soil systems. Data reanalysis suggests that weathering of N-rich parent material could resolve several known cases of "missing N inputs" in ecosystems, and demonstrates how the inclusion of rock N sources into modern concepts can lead to a richer understanding of spatial and temporal patterns of ecosystem N availability. For example, explicit consideration of rock N inputs into classic pedogenic models (e.g., the Walker and Syers model) yields a fundamentally different expectation from the standard case: weathering of N-rich parent material could enhance N availability and facilitate terrestrial succession in developmentally young sites even in the absence of N-fixing organisms. We conclude that a state-factor framework for N complements our growing understanding multiple-source controls on phosphorus and cation availability in Earth's soil, but with significant exceptions given the lack of an N fixation analogue in all other biogeochemical cycles. Rather, non-symmetrical feedbacks among input pathways in which high N inputs via deposition or rock-weathering sources have the potential to reduce biological fixation rates mark N as fundamentally different from other nutrients. The new synthesis for terrestrial N inputs provides a novel set of research issues and opportunities in the multidisciplinary Earth system sciences, with implications for patterns of N limitation, tectonic controls over biogeochemical cycling, and carbon-nutrient-climate interactions.

  20. OPTIMAL LINEAR IMAGE COMBINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Barnaby; Rhodes, Jason; Hirata, Christopher E-mail: jason.d.rhodes@jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-11-01

    A simple, yet general, formalism for the optimized linear combination of astrophysical images is constructed and demonstrated. The formalism allows the user to combine multiple undersampled images to provide oversampled output at high precision. The proposed method is general and may be used for any configuration of input pixels and point spread function; it also provides the noise covariance in the output image along with a powerful metric for describing undesired distortion to the image convolution kernel. The method explicitly provides knowledge and control of the inevitable compromise between noise and fidelity in the output image. We present a first prototype implementation of the method, outlining the steps taken to generate an efficient algorithm. This implementation is then put to practical use in reconstructing fully sampled output images using simulated, undersampled input exposures that are designed to mimic the proposed Wide-field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST). We examine results using randomly rotated and dithered input images, while also assessing better-known 'ideal' dither patterns: comparing results, we illustrate the use of the method as a survey design tool. Finally, we use the method to test the robustness of linear image combination when subjected to practical realities such as missing input pixels and focal plane plate scale variations.

  1. Optimal Linear Image Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Barnaby; Hirata, Christopher; Rhodes, Jason

    2011-11-01

    A simple, yet general, formalism for the optimized linear combination of astrophysical images is constructed and demonstrated. The formalism allows the user to combine multiple undersampled images to provide oversampled output at high precision. The proposed method is general and may be used for any configuration of input pixels and point spread function; it also provides the noise covariance in the output image along with a powerful metric for describing undesired distortion to the image convolution kernel. The method explicitly provides knowledge and control of the inevitable compromise between noise and fidelity in the output image. We present a first prototype implementation of the method, outlining the steps taken to generate an efficient algorithm. This implementation is then put to practical use in reconstructing fully sampled output images using simulated, undersampled input exposures that are designed to mimic the proposed Wide-field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST). We examine results using randomly rotated and dithered input images, while also assessing better-known "ideal" dither patterns: comparing results, we illustrate the use of the method as a survey design tool. Finally, we use the method to test the robustness of linear image combination when subjected to practical realities such as missing input pixels and focal plane plate scale variations.

  2. Level 2 processing for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: derivation and validation of temperature and trace gas volume mixing ratios from calibrated dynamics mode spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Dick, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Giez, A.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Jurkat, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Kaufmann, S.; Kleinert, A.; Krämer, M.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olchewski, F.; Preusse, P.; Rolf, C.; Schillings, J.; Suminska-Ebersoldt, O.; Tan, V.; Thomas, N.; Voigt, C.; Zahn, A.; Zöger, M.; Riese, M.

    2015-06-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an airborne infrared limb imager combining a two-dimensional infrared detector with a Fourier transform spectrometer. It was operated aboard the new German Gulfstream G550 High Altitude LOng Range (HALO) research aircraft during the Transport And Composition in the upper Troposphere/lowermost Stratosphere (TACTS) and Earth System Model Validation (ESMVAL) campaigns in summer 2012. This paper describes the retrieval of temperature and trace gas (H2O, O3, HNO3) volume mixing ratios from GLORIA dynamics mode spectra that are spectrally sampled every 0.625 cm-1. A total of 26 integrated spectral windows are employed in a joint fit to retrieve seven targets using consecutively a fast and an accurate tabulated radiative transfer model. Typical diagnostic quantities are provided including effects of uncertainties in the calibration and horizontal resolution along the line of sight. Simultaneous in situ observations by the Basic Halo Measurement and Sensor System (BAHAMAS), the Fast In-situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH), an ozone detector named Fairo, and the Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (AIMS) allow a validation of retrieved values for three flights in the upper troposphere/lowermost stratosphere region spanning polar and sub-tropical latitudes. A high correlation is achieved between the remote sensing and the in situ trace gas data, and discrepancies can to a large extent be attributed to differences in the probed air masses caused by different sampling characteristics of the instruments. This 1-D processing of GLORIA dynamics mode spectra provides the basis for future tomographic inversions from circular and linear flight paths to better understand selected dynamical processes of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere.

  3. Level 2 processing for the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer GLORIA: derivation and validation of temperature and trace gas volume mixing ratios from calibrated dynamics mode spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Dick, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Giez, A.; Guggenmoser, T.; Höpfner, M.; Jurkat, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Kaufmann, S.; Kleinert, A.; Krämer, M.; Latzko, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Olchewski, F.; Preusse, P.; Rolf, C.; Schillings, J.; Suminska-Ebersoldt, O.; Tan, V.; Thomas, N.; Voigt, C.; Zahn, A.; Zöger, M.; Riese, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is an airborne infrared limb-imager combining a two-dimensional infrared detector with a Fourier transform spectrometer. It was operated aboard the new German Gulfstream G550 research aircraft HALO during the Transport And Composition in the upper Troposphere/lowermost Stratosphere (TACTS) and Earth System Model Validation (ESMVAL) campaigns in summer 2012. This paper describes the retrieval of temperature and trace gas (H2O, O3, HNO3) volume mixing ratios from GLORIA dynamics mode spectra. 26 integrated spectral windows are employed in a joint fit to retrieve seven targets using consecutively a fast and an accurate tabulated radiative transfer model. Typical diagnostic quantities are provided including effects of uncertainties in the calibration and horizontal resolution along the line-of-sight. Simultaneous in-situ observations by the BAsic HALO Measurement And Sensor System (BAHAMAS), the Fast In-Situ Stratospheric Hygrometer (FISH), FAIRO, and the Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (AIMS) allow a validation of retrieved values for three flights in the upper troposphere/lowermost stratosphere region spanning polar and sub-tropical latitudes. A high correlation is achieved between the remote sensing and the in-situ trace gas data, and discrepancies can to a large fraction be attributed to differences in the probed air masses caused by different sampling characteristics of the instruments. This 1-D processing of GLORIA dynamics mode spectra provides the basis for future tomographic inversions from circular and linear flight paths to better understand selected dynamical processes of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere.

  4. An input adaptive, pursuit tracking model of the human opertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Developed and evaluated is a simple model of the input adaptive behavior of the human operator (HO) in a pursuit tracking task in which the plant controlled consists of a pure gain. If it is assumed that the HO is approximately an optimal predictor using only position and velocity information, then there is a simple method of computing the values of the model parameters in terms of the autocorrelation function of the input signal. Experimental evidence indicates that the ability of the HO to use velocity information decreases with increasing signal velocity indicating that a biased estimator of the velocity weighting should be used. A suitable approximation is derived which has rapid convergence and low variance. The model thus derived is compared to actual subject transfer functions and is found to be in close agreement. In addition to tracking random processes the model can adapt to and track deterministic signals, such as sine waves, up to approximately the frequency at which human operators begin to track precognitively.

  5. Lanczos Image Resampling Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-09-30

    This software abstracts a simple computational kernel from SWarp, an astrometric image resampling code. The input is a grayscale PGM image file (8-bit or 16-bit integer) and the output is a higher-resolution grayscale image file (8-bit or 16-bit integer, or 32-bit floating point). The user selects a scaling factor to be applied and a convolution kernel type to be used during resampling (using 1, 16, 36, 64 input pixels to generate each output pixel). Themore »resampling is performed using the OpenGL API and can run on a PC with GPU (graphics processing unit) hardware.« less

  6. Cumulative input function method for linear compartmental models and spectral analysis in PET

    PubMed Central

    Simoncic, Urban; Jeraj, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Compartmental modeling and spectral analysis are often used for tracer kinetic modeling in positron emission tomography (PET). The concentrations in kinetic equations are usually considered to be instantaneous, whereas PET data are inherently integrated over time, which leads to uncertainties in the results. A new formalism for kinetic analysis that uses cumulative tracer concentrations and avoids approximating the image-derived input function and PET measurements with midframe instantanous values was developed. We assessed the improvements of the new formalism over the midframe approximation methods for three commonly used radiopharmaceuticals: [11C]raclopride, 2?-deoxy-2?-[18F]fluoro--glucose (FDG), and 3?-deoxy-3?-[18F]fluoro-thymidine (FLT). We found that improvements are case dependent and often not negligible. Improvements for determination of binding potential for [11C]raclopride ranged from 5% to 25%. Improvements in estimation accuracy of FDG and FLT microparameters ranged up to 25%. On the other hand, estimation of macroparameter Ki=K1k3/(k2+k3) for FDG or FLT did not show significant benefit with the new method; only modest improvement up to 2% was observed. Assessment of the benefits of using new method is far from being exhaustive, but possibly significant improvement was demonstrated. Therefore, we consider the proposed algorithm a necessary component of any kinetic analysis software. PMID:20808319

  7. Dependence of image quality on image operator and noise for optical diffusion tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jenghwa; Graber, Harry L.; Barbour, Randall L.

    1998-04-01

    By applying linear perturbation theory to the radiation transport equation, the inverse problem of optical diffusion tomography can be reduced to a set of linear equations, W(mu) equals R, where W is the weight function, (mu) are the cross- section perturbations to be imaged, and R is the detector readings perturbations. We have studied the dependence of image quality on added systematic error and/or random noise in W and R. Tomographic data were collected from cylindrical phantoms, with and without added inclusions, using Monte Carlo methods. Image reconstruction was accomplished using a constrained conjugate gradient descent method. Result show that accurate images containing few artifacts are obtained when W is derived from a reference states whose optical thickness matches that of the unknown teste medium. Comparable image quality was also obtained for unmatched W, but the location of the target becomes more inaccurate as the mismatch increases. Results of the noise study show that image quality is much more sensitive to noise in W than in R, and the impact of noise increase with the number of iterations. Images reconstructed after pure noise was substituted for R consistently contain large peaks clustered about the cylinder axis, which was an initially unexpected structure. In other words, random input produces a non- random output. This finding suggests that algorithms sensitive to the evolution of this feature could be developed to suppress noise effects.

  8. Lineaments derived from analysis of linear features mapped from Landsat images of the Four Corners region of the Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, Daniel H.

    1982-01-01

    Linear features are relatively short, distinct, non-cultural linear elements mappable on Landsat multispectral scanner images (MSS). Most linear features are related to local topographic features, such as cliffs, slope breaks, narrow ridges, and stream valley segments that are interpreted as reflecting directed aspects of local geologic structure including faults, zones of fracturing (joints), and the strike of tilted beds. 6,050 linear features were mapped on computer-enhanced Landsat MSS images of 11 Landsat scenes covering an area from the Rio Grande rift zone on the east to the Grand Canyon on the west and from the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, on the north to the Mogollon Rim on the south. Computer-aided statistical analysis of the linear feature data revealed 5 statistically important trend intervals: 1.) N. 10W.-N.16E., 2.) N.35-72E., 3.) N.33-59W., 4.) N. 74-83W., and 5.) N.89-9-W. and N. 89-90E. Subsequent analysis of the distribution of the linear features indicated that only the first three trend intervals are of regional geologic significance. Computer-generated maps of the linear features in each important trend interval were prepared, as well as contour maps showing the relative concentrations of linear features in each trend interval. These maps were then analyzed for patterns suggestive of possible regional tectonic lines. 20 possible tectonic lines, or lineaments, were interpreted from the maps. One lineament is defined by an obvious change in overall linear feature concentrations along a northwest-trending line cutting across northeastern Arizona. Linear features are abundant northeast of the line and relatively scarce to the southwest. The remaining 19 lineaments represent the axes of clusters of parallel linear features elongated in the direction of the linear feature trends. Most of these lineaments mark previously known structural zones controlled by linear features in the Precambrian basement or show newly recognized relationships to geological and/or geophysical patterns that suggest probable influence by buried basement features. The remaining few lineaments are not strongly correlative with geological or geophysical patterns, but on the basis of existing data they cannot be dismissed as being possible expressions of basement features.

  9. Noise facilitates transcriptional control under dynamic inputs.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Ryan A; Tay, Sava?

    2015-01-29

    Cells must respond sensitively to time-varying inputs in complex signaling environments. To understand how signaling networks process dynamic inputs into gene expression outputs and the role of noise in cellular information processing, we studied the immune pathway NF-?B under periodic cytokine inputs using microfluidic single-cell measurements and stochastic modeling. We find that NF-?B dynamics in fibroblasts synchronize with oscillating TNF signal and become entrained, leading to significantly increased NF-?B oscillation amplitude and mRNA output compared to non-entrained response. Simulations show that intrinsic biochemical noise in individual cells improves NF-?B oscillation and entrainment, whereas cell-to-cell variability in NF-?B natural frequency creates population robustness, together enabling entrainment over a wider range of dynamic inputs. This wide range is confirmed by experiments where entrained cells were measured under all input periods. These results indicate that synergy between oscillation and noise allows cells to achieve efficient gene expression in dynamically changing signaling environments. PMID:25635454

  10. An evaluation of the variability of tumor-shape definition derived by experienced observers from CT images of supraglottic carcinomas (ACRIN protocol 6658)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jay S. . E-mail: jcooper@maimonidesmed.org; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Toledano, Alicia Y.; Beldon, Clifford; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.; Amdur, Robert; Sailer, Scott; Loevner, Laurie A.; Kousouboris, Phil; Ang, K. Kian; Cormack, Jean; Sicks, JoRean M.S.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is considered essential for sophisticated, image-guided radiation therapy; however, relatively little information has been reported that measures our ability to identify the precise shape of targets accurately. We decided to assess the manner in which eight 'experts' interpreted the size and shape of tumors based on 'real-life' contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scans. Methods and Materials: Four neuroradiologists and four radiation oncologists (the authors) with considerable experience and presumed expertise in treating head-and-neck tumors independently contoured, slice-by-slice, his/her interpretation of the precise gross tumor volume (GTV) on each of 20 sets of CT scans taken from 20 patients who previously were enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 91-11. Results: The average proportion of overlap (i.e., the degree of agreement) was 0.532 (95% confidence interval 0.457 to 0.606). There was a slight tendency for the proportion of overlap to increase with increasing average GTV. Conclusions: Our work suggests that estimation of tumor shape currently is imprecise, even for experienced physicians. In consequence, there appears to be a practical limit to the current trend of smaller fields and tighter margins.

  11. In vivo selective imaging and inhibition of leukemia stem-like cells using the fluorescent carbocyanine derivative, DiOC5(3).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Beibei; Shimada, Yasuhito; Kuroyanagi, Junya; Ariyoshi, Michiko; Nomoto, Tsuyoshi; Shintou, Taichi; Umemoto, Noriko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshio

    2015-06-01

    Elimination of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) is necessary for the destruction of malignant cell populations. Owing to the very small number of LSCs in leukemia cells, xenotransplantation studies are difficult in terms of functionally and pathophysiologically replicating clinical conditions of cell culture experiments. There is currently a limited number of lead compounds that target LSCs. Using the LSC-xenograft zebrafish screening method we previously developed, we found that the fluorescent compound 3,3'-dipentyloxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC5(3)) selectively marked LSCs and suppressed their proliferation in vivo and in vitro. DiOC5(3) had no obvious toxicity to human umbilical cord blood CD34+ progenitor cells and normal zebrafish. It accumulated in mitochondria through organic anion transporter polypeptides that are overexpressed in the plasma membrane of LSCs, and induced apoptosis via ROS overproduction. DiOC5(3) also inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-?B through the downregulation of LSC-selective pathways, as indicated from DNA microarray analysis. In summary, DiOC5(3) is a new type of anti-LSC compound available for diagnostic imaging and therapeutics that has the advantage of being a single fluorescent chemical. PMID:25818410

  12. Desert Dust Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, using Particle Properties Derived from Space-based Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Fiebig, Marcus; Schladitz, Alexander; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the SAhara Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the sub-orbital aerosol measurements into the satellite's larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days for which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 to 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR's ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (a) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (b) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow, and (c) show an air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometers away.

  13. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized tomographic imaging system is examined which employs video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data. By hooking the video recorder to a digital computer through a suitable interface, such a system permits very rapid construction of tomograms.

  14. Comparison of CT-derived Ventilation Maps with Deposition Patterns of Inhaled Microspheres in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Krueger, Melissa; Glenny, Robb W.; Corley, Richard A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Computer models for inhalation toxicology and drug-aerosol delivery studies rely on ventilation pattern inputs for predictions of particle deposition and vapor uptake. However, changes in lung mechanics due to disease can impact airflow dynamics and model results. It has been demonstrated that non-invasive, in vivo, 4DCT imaging (3D imaging at multiple time points in the breathing cycle) can be used to map heterogeneities in ventilation patterns under healthy and disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to validate ventilation patterns measured from CT imaging by exposing the same rats to an aerosol of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) and examining particle deposition patterns using cryomicrotome imaging. Materials and Methods: Six male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with elastase to a single lobe to induce a heterogeneous disease. After four weeks, rats were imaged over the breathing cycle by CT then immediately exposed to an aerosol of ~1µm FMS for ~5 minutes. After the exposure, the lungs were excised and prepared for cryomicrotome imaging, where a 3D image of FMS deposition was acquired using serial sectioning. Cryomicrotome images were spatially registered to match the live CT images to facilitate direct quantitative comparisons of FMS signal intensity with the CT-based ventilation maps. Results: Comparisons of fractional ventilation in contiguous, non-overlapping, 3D regions between CT-based ventilation maps and FMS images showed strong correlations in fractional ventilation (r=0.888, p<0.0001). Conclusion: We conclude that ventilation maps derived from CT imaging are predictive of the 1µm aerosol deposition used in ventilation-perfusion heterogeneity inhalation studies.

  15. An in situ approach to detect tree root ecology: linking ground-penetrating radar imaging to isotope-derived water acquisition zones

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Marney E; Anglaaere, Luke C N

    2013-01-01

    Tree root distribution and activity are determinants of belowground competition. However, studying root response to environmental and management conditions remains logistically challenging. Methodologically, nondestructive in situ tree root ecology analysis has lagged. In this study, we tested a nondestructive approach to determine tree coarse root architecture and function of a perennial tree crop, Theobroma cacao L., at two edaphically contrasting sites (sandstone and phyllite–granite derived soils) in Ghana, West Africa. We detected coarse root vertical distribution using ground-penetrating radar and root activity via soil water acquisition using isotopic matching of ?18O plant and soil signatures. Coarse roots were detected to a depth of 50 cm, however, intraspecifc coarse root vertical distribution was modified by edaphic conditions. Soil ?18O isotopic signature declined with depth, providing conditions for plant–soil ?18O isotopic matching. This pattern held only under sandstone conditions where water acquisition zones were identifiably narrow in the 10–20 cm depth but broader under phyllite–granite conditions, presumably due to resource patchiness. Detected coarse root count by depth and measured fine root density were strongly correlated as were detected coarse root count and identified water acquisition zones, thus validating root detection capability of ground-penetrating radar, but exclusively on sandstone soils. This approach was able to characterize trends between intraspecific root architecture and edaphic-dependent resource availability, however, limited by site conditions. This study successfully demonstrates a new approach for in situ root studies that moves beyond invasive point sampling to nondestructive detection of root architecture and function. We discuss the transfer of such an approach to answer root ecology questions in various tree-based landscapes. PMID:23762519

  16. Inner heliospheric evolution of a 'STEALTH' CME derived from multi-view imaging and multipoint in situ observations. I. Propagation to 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.; Savani, N. P.; Koval, A.; Szabo, A.; Jian, L. K.

    2013-12-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main driver of space weather. Therefore, a precise forecasting of their likely geo-effectiveness relies on an accurate tracking of their morphological and kinematical evolution throughout the interplanetary medium. However, single viewpoint observations require many assumptions to model the development of the features of CMEs. The most common hypotheses were those of radial propagation and self-similar expansion. The use of different viewpoints shows that, at least for some cases, those assumptions are no longer valid. From radial propagation, typical attributes that can now be confirmed to exist are over-expansion and/or rotation along the propagation axis. Understanding the 3D development and evolution of the CME features will help to establish the connection between remote and in situ observations, and hence help forecast space weather. We present an analysis of the morphological and kinematical evolution of a STEREO-B-directed CME on 2009 August 25-27. By means of a comprehensive analysis of remote imaging observations provided by the SOHO, STEREO, and SDO missions, and in situ measurements recorded by Wind, ACE, and MESSENGER, we prove in this paper that the event exhibits signatures of deflection, which are usually associated with changes in the direction of propagation and/or also with rotation. The interaction with other magnetic obstacles could act as a catalyst of deflection or rotation effects. We also propose a method to investigate the change of the CME tilt from the analysis of height-time direct measurements. If this method is validated in further work, it may have important implications for space weather studies because it will allow for inference of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME's orientation.

  17. Synthesis, radiolabelling and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel fluorinated ABP688 derivative for the PET imaging of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    Sephton, Selena Milicevic; Dennler, Patrick; Leutwiler, Dominique S; Mu, Linjing; Wanger-Baumann, Cindy A; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2012-01-01

    (E)-3-(Pyridin-2-ylethynyl)cyclohex-2-enone O-(2-(3-18F-fluoropropoxy)ethyl) oxime ([18F]-PSS223) was evaluated in vitro and in vivo to establish its potential as a PET tracer for imaging metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5). [18F]-PSS223 was obtained in 20% decay corrected radiochemical yield whereas the non-radioactive PSS223 was accomplished in 70% chemical yield in a SN2 reaction of common intermediate mesylate 8 with potassium fluoride. The in vitro binding affinity of [18F]-PSS223 was measured directly in a Scatchard assay to give Kd = 3.34 ± 2.05 nM. [18F]-PSS223 was stable in PBS and rat plasma but was significantly metabolized by rat liver microsomal enzymes, but to a lesser extent by human liver microsomes. Within 60 min, 90% and 20% of [18F]-PSS223 was metabolized by rat and human microsome enzymes, respectively. In vitro autoradiography on horizontal rat brain slices showed heterogeneous distribution of [18F]-PSS223 with the highest accumulation in brain regions where mGluR5 is highly expressed (hippocampus, striatum and cortex). Autoradiography in vitro under blockade conditions with ABP688 confirmed the high specificity of [18F]-PSS223 for mGluR5. Under the same blocking conditions but using the mGluR1 antagonist, JNJ16259685, no blockade was observed demonstrating the selectivity of [18F]-PSS223 for mGluR5 over mGluR1. Despite favourable in vitro properties of [18F]-PSS223, a clear-cut visualization of mGluR5-rich brain regions in vivo in rats was not possible mainly due to a fast clearance from the brain and low metabolic stability of [18F]-PSS223. PMID:23133799

  18. Image-based evaluation of contraction-relaxation kinetics of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: Correlation and complementarity with extracellular electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tomohiro; Kunihiro, Takeshi; Ando, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Matsui, Eriko; Yada, Hiroaki; Kanda, Yasunari; Kurokawa, Junko; Furukawa, Tetsushi

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we used high-speed video microscopy with motion vector analysis to investigate the contractile characteristics of hiPS-CM monolayer, in addition to further characterizing the motion with extracellular field potential (FP), traction force and the Ca(2+) transient. Results of our traction force microscopy demonstrated that the force development of hiPS-CMs correlated well with the cellular deformation detected by the video microscopy with motion vector analysis. In the presence of verapamil and isoproterenol, contractile motion of hiPS-CMs showed alteration in accordance with the changes in fluorescence peak of the Ca(2+) transient, i.e., upstroke, decay, amplitude and full-width at half-maximum. Simultaneously recorded hiPS-CM motion and FP showed that there was a linear correlation between changes in the motion and field potential duration in response to verapamil (30-150nM), isoproterenol (0.1-10?M) and E-4031 (10-50nM). In addition, tetrodotoxin (3-30?M)-induced delay of sodium current was corresponded with the delay of the contraction onset of hiPS-CMs. These results indicate that the electrophysiological and functional behaviors of hiPS-CMs are quantitatively reflected in the contractile motion detected by this image-based technique. In the presence of 100nM E-4031, the occurrence of early after-depolarization-like negative deflection in FP was also detected in the hiPS-CM motion as a characteristic two-step relaxation pattern. These findings offer insights into the interpretation of the motion kinetics of the hiPS-CMs, and are relevant for understanding electrical and mechanical relationship in hiPS-CMs. PMID:25257913

  19. Apple Image Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A software system design is proposed and demonstrated with pilot-project software. The system permits the Apple II microcomputer to be used for personalized computer-assisted instruction in the digital image processing of LANDSAT images. The programs provide data input, menu selection, graphic and hard-copy displays, and both general and detailed instructions. The pilot-project results are considered to be successful indicators of the capabilities and limits of microcomputers for digital image processing education.

  20. Evaluation Strategies for Image Understanding

    E-print Network

    Yanai, Keiji

    to image word to regions Output Input grass cat tiger rock [ICCV01] Word to image tiger grass grass grass tiger [ECCV02] Words to regions #12;6 Segmentation & Image features sun sky waves sea Each regions-Shift Normalized cuts [UCB 00] [UCB 02] [Rutger Univ. 02] #12;8 GRASS TIGER CAT FOREST predicted words CAT HORSE

  1. Segmentation Of Multitemporal Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbrands, Jan J.; Backer, Eric

    1983-10-01

    This paper describes a procedure developed for the automated segmentation of multiple side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) images, i.e. the detection of the boundaries of agricultural fields. The segmentation procedure is based on a split-and-merge algorithm which may process up to three input images simultaneously. The input images must be in registration. A registration method is proposed which uses coarse structural descriptions of the input images as represented by attributed quartic picture trees (QPT).

  2. An update of input instructions to TEMOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The theory and operation of a FORTRAN 4 computer code, designated as TEMOD, used to calcuate tubular thermoelectric generator performance is described in WANL-TME-1906. The original version of TEMOD was developed in 1969. A description is given of additions to the mathematical model and an update of the input instructions to the code. Although the basic mathematical model described in WANL-TME-1906 has remained unchanged, a substantial number of input/output options were added to allow completion of module performance parametrics as required in support of the compact thermoelectric converter system technology program.

  3. HumVI: Human Viewable Image creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Phil; Sandford, Cato; More, Anupreeta, Buddelmeijerr, Hugo

    2015-11-01

    HumVI creates a composite color image from sets of input FITS files, following the Lupton et al (2004, ascl:1511.013) composition algorithm. Written in Python, it takes three FITS files as input and returns a color composite, color-saturated png image with an arcsinh stretch. HumVI reads the zero points out of the FITS headers and uses them to put all the images on the same flux scale; photometrically calibrated images produce the best results.

  4. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  5. Dual isotope simultaneous imaging to evaluate the effects of intracoronary bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on perfusion and metabolism in canines with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    HAO, LINJUN; HAO, JIN; FANG, WEI; HAN, CHUNLEI; ZHANG, KAIXIU; WANG, XUEMEI

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been performed for over a decade. In the present study, cardiac perfusion, metabolism and function in dogs with AMI treated by intracoronary injection of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated by dual isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) of single positron emission computed tomography (SPECT). Dogs (n=12, 20–30 kg) were randomly assigned to two groups: A graft study (n=6) and control group (n=6). Bone marrow mesenchymal aspirate was collected 3 weeks before surgical procedure. Stem cells were induced by 5-azacytidine for differentiation into myocytes. The dog AMI model was produced by blocking the blood stream at 1/3 of the distinct left anterior descending coronary artery for 90 min. For dogs in the grafting group, MSCs were transplanted by intracoronary injection, and for the control group, 0.9% NaCl was injected instead. At 1 and 10 weeks after MSCs were grafted, respectively, SPECT DISA was performed for each dog in the two groups with 99mTc-SPECT MIBI (925 MBq) and 18F-FDG (222 MBq) for evaluation of myocardial perfusion and metabolism. After the dogs were sacrificed, heart tissue was stained by myocyte-specific antibodies for newborn vessels, troponin T and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Following induction by 5-azacytidine, the morphological features with colony formation, microfilament, as well as atrial granules and positive stainings of ?-actinin, myosin and troponin I demonstrated strongly that the MSCs differentiated into myocytes. The number of viable myocardial segments was 10 in the grafting group, which was significantly greater compared with the control group. The ejection fraction of the infarcted left ventricle (LVEF,%) increased from 53.80±9.58 to 70.00±7.52 (change, 16.20±2.93) at 1 and 10 weeks after MSCs engraftment, whilst in the control group, LVEF was 50.50±8.02 and 56.50±7.24 (change, 5.50±2.69), respectively. The LVEF difference was statistically significant (P<0.05) between the graft and control groups. Furthermore, immunostaining of all the myocyte-specific antibodies (for newly born vessels, troponin T and BrdU) was positive. In conclusion, direct intracoronary injection of bone marrow MSCs into injured myocardium in the experimental dog AMI model can significantly improve cardiac function with new vessel formation and myocyte-specific biomarker expression, and in particular, the present study further shows that DISA SPECT can be used for the assessment of stem cell transplantation in the heart. PMID:26171146

  6. [68Ga]FSC-(RGD)3 a trimeric RGD peptide for imaging ?v?3 integrin expression based on a novel siderophore derived chelating scaffold—synthesis and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Knetsch, Peter A.; Zhai, Chuangyan; Rangger, Christine; Blatzer, Michael; Haas, Hubertus; Kaeopookum, Piriya; Haubner, Roland; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Over the last years Gallium-68 (68Ga) has received tremendous attention for labeling of radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET). 68Ga labeling of biomolecules is currently based on bifunctional chelators containing aminocarboxylates (mainly DOTA and NOTA). We have recently shown that cyclic peptide siderophores have very good complexing properties for 68Ga resulting in high specific activities and excellent metabolic stabilities, in particular triacetylfusarinine-C (TAFC). We postulated, that, starting from its deacetylated form (Fusarinine-C (FSC)) trimeric bioconjugates are directly accessible to develop novel targeting peptide based 68Ga labeled radiopharmaceuticals. As proof of principle we report on the synthesis and 68Ga-radiolabeling of a trimeric FSC-RGD conjugate, [68Ga]FSC-(RGD)3, targeting ?v?3 integrin, which is highly expressed during tumor-induced angiogenesis. Synthesis of the RGD peptide was carried out applying solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS), followed by the coupling to the siderophore [Fe]FSC via in situ activation using HATU/HOAt and DIPEA. Subsequent demetalation allowed radiolabeling of FSC-(RGD)3 with 68Ga. The radiolabeling procedure was optimized regarding peptide amount, reaction time, temperature as well buffer systems. For in vitro evaluation partition coefficient, protein binding, serum stability, ?v?3 integrin binding affinity, and tumor cell uptake were determined. For in vitro tests as well as for the biodistribution studies ?v?3 positive human melanoma M21 and ?v?3 negative M21-L cells were used. [68Ga]FSC-(RGD)3 was prepared with high radiochemical yield (> 98%). Distribution coefficient was ? 3.6 revealing a hydrophilic character, and an IC50 value of 1.8 ± 0.6 nM was determined indicating a high binding affinity for ?v?3 integrin. [68Ga]FSC-(RGD)3 was stable in PBS (pH 7.4), FeCl3- and DTPA-solution as well as in fresh human serum at 37 °C for 2 hours. Biodistribution assay confirmed the receptor specific uptake found in vitro. Uptake in the ?v?3 positive tumor was 4.3% ID/g 60 min p.i. which was 3-fold higher than the monomeric [68Ga]NODAGA-RGD. Tumor to blood ratio of approx. 8 and tumor to muscle ratio of approx. 7 were observed. [68Ga]FSC-(RGD)3 serves as an example for the feasibility of a novel class of bifunctional chelators based on cyclic peptide siderophores and shows excellent targeting properties for ?v?3 integrin in vivo for imaging tumor-induced neovascularization. PMID:25459110

  7. [(68)Ga]FSC-(RGD)3 a trimeric RGD peptide for imaging ?v?3 integrin expression based on a novel siderophore derived chelating scaffold-synthesis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, Peter A; Zhai, Chuangyan; Rangger, Christine; Blatzer, Michael; Haas, Hubertus; Kaeopookum, Piriya; Haubner, Roland; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2015-02-01

    Over the last years Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) has received tremendous attention for labeling of radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET). (68)Ga labeling of biomolecules is currently based on bifunctional chelators containing aminocarboxylates (mainly DOTA and NOTA). We have recently shown that cyclic peptide siderophores have very good complexing properties for (68)Ga resulting in high specific activities and excellent metabolic stabilities, in particular triacetylfusarinine-C (TAFC). We postulated, that, starting from its deacetylated form (Fusarinine-C (FSC)) trimeric bioconjugates are directly accessible to develop novel targeting peptide based (68)Ga labeled radiopharmaceuticals. As proof of principle we report on the synthesis and (68)Ga-radiolabeling of a trimeric FSC-RGD conjugate, [(68)Ga]FSC-(RGD)3, targeting ?v?3 integrin, which is highly expressed during tumor-induced angiogenesis. Synthesis of the RGD peptide was carried out applying solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS), followed by the coupling to the siderophore [Fe]FSC via in situ activation using HATU/HOAt and DIPEA. Subsequent demetalation allowed radiolabeling of FSC-(RGD)3 with (68)Ga. The radiolabeling procedure was optimized regarding peptide amount, reaction time, temperature as well buffer systems. For in vitro evaluation partition coefficient, protein binding, serum stability, ?v?3 integrin binding affinity, and tumor cell uptake were determined. For in vitro tests as well as for the biodistribution studies ?v?3 positive human melanoma M21 and ?v?3 negative M21-L cells were used. [(68)Ga]FSC-(RGD)3 was prepared with high radiochemical yield (>98%). Distribution coefficient was -3.6 revealing a hydrophilic character, and an IC50 value of 1.8±0.6 nM was determined indicating a high binding affinity for ?v?3 integrin. [(68)Ga]FSC-(RGD)3 was stable in PBS (pH7.4), FeCl3- and DTPA-solution as well as in fresh human serum at 37°C for 2hours. Biodistribution assay confirmed the receptor specific uptake found in vitro. Uptake in the ?v?3 positive tumor was 4.3% ID/g 60min p.i. which was 3-fold higher than the monomeric [(68)Ga]NODAGA-RGD. Tumor to blood ratio of approx. 8 and tumor to muscle ratio of approx. 7 were observed. [(68)Ga]FSC-(RGD)3 serves as an example for the feasibility of a novel class of bifunctional chelators based on cyclic peptide siderophores and shows excellent targeting properties for ?v?3 integrin in vivo for imaging tumor-induced neovascularization. PMID:25459110

  8. Motion-gated acquisition for in vivo optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Gioux, Sylvain; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Hutteman, Merlijn; Frangioni, John V

    2009-01-01

    Wide-field continuous wave fluorescence imaging, fluorescence lifetime imaging, frequency domain photon migration, and spatially modulated imaging have the potential to provide quantitative measurements in vivo. However, most of these techniques have not yet been successfully translated to the clinic due to challenging environmental constraints. In many circumstances, cardiac and respiratory motion greatly impair image quality and/or quantitative processing. To address this fundamental problem, we have developed a low-cost, field-programmable gate array-based, hardware-only gating device that delivers a phase-locked acquisition window of arbitrary delay and width that is derived from an unlimited number of pseudo-periodic and nonperiodic input signals. All device features can be controlled manually or via USB serial commands. The working range of the device spans the extremes of mouse electrocardiogram (1000 beats per minute) to human respiration (4 breaths per minute), with timing resolution input signal period. We demonstrate the performance of the gating device, including dramatic improvements in quantitative measurements, in vitro using a motion simulator and in vivo using near-infrared fluorescence angiography of beating pig heart. This gating device should help to enable the clinical translation of promising new optical imaging technologies. PMID:20059276

  9. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: evaluation with phantom and patient data.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Nelson, Linda D; Small, Gary W; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  10. Automated Movement Correction for Dynamic PET/CT Images: Evaluation with Phantom and Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.; Nelson, Linda D.; Small, Gary W.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum?=?5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum?=?5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  11. Visual stimulation switches the polarity of excitatory input to starburst amacrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Vlasits, Anna L.; Bos, Rémi; Morrie, Ryan D.; Fortuny, Cécile; Flannery, John G.; Feller, Marla B.; Rivlin-Etzion, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Summary Direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) are tuned to motion in one direction. Starburst amacrine cells (SACs) are thought to mediate this direction selectivity through precise anatomical wiring to DSGCs. Nevertheless, we previously found that visual adaptation can reverse DSGCs’ directional tuning, overcoming the circuit anatomy. Here we explore the role of SACs in the generation and adaptation of direction selectivity. First, using pharmaco-genetics and two-photon calcium imaging, we validate that SACs are necessary for direction selectivity. Next, we demonstrate that exposure to an adaptive stimulus dramatically alters SACs’ synaptic inputs. Specifically, after visual adaptation, On-SACs lose their excitatory input during light onset but gain an excitatory input during light offset. Our data suggest that visual stimulation alters the interactions between rod and cone-mediated inputs that converge on the terminals of On cone BCs. These results demonstrate how the sensory environment can modify computations performed by anatomically-defined neuronal circuits. PMID:25155960

  12. Modular use of peripheral input channels tunes motion-detecting circuitry.

    PubMed

    Silies, Marion; Gohl, Daryl M; Fisher, Yvette E; Freifeld, Limor; Clark, Damon A; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2013-07-10

    In the visual system, peripheral processing circuits are often tuned to specific stimulus features. How this selectivity arises and how these circuits are organized to inform specific visual behaviors is incompletely understood. Using forward genetics and quantitative behavioral studies, we uncover an input channel to motion detecting circuitry in Drosophila. The second-order neuron L3 acts combinatorially with two previously known inputs, L1 and L2, to inform circuits specialized to detect moving light and dark edges. In vivo calcium imaging of L3, combined with neuronal silencing experiments, suggests a neural mechanism to achieve selectivity for moving dark edges. We further demonstrate that different innate behaviors, turning and forward movement, can be independently modulated by visual motion. These two behaviors make use of different combinations of input channels. Such modular use of input channels to achieve feature extraction and behavioral specialization likely represents a general principle in sensory systems. PMID:23849199

  13. Energy input-output analysis of herbaceous energy and short-rotation woody crop systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    Energy input-output analyses, expressed in terms of energy-profit ratios, were derived for the production of a biocrude fuel oil from switchgrass and silver maple. Each energy analysis was concerned with determining the amount of direct and embodied energy associated with crop production, transport, processing, and conversion. Direct energy inputs include energy derived from gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and/or LP-gas. Embodied energy inputs are the amount of energy allocated to the machinery, chemicals, and equipment needed to perform the various operations associated with producing, transporting, processing, and converting bioenergy crops to a useful energy source. Energy-profit ratios varied from 1.96 to 2.48 for switchgrass and were 1.46 to 1.97 when short-rotation woody crops were the feedstock.

  14. Effective feature selection for image steganalysis using extreme learning machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guorui; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Xinpeng

    2014-11-01

    Image steganography delivers secret data by slight modifications of the cover. To detect these data, steganalysis tries to create some features to embody the discrepancy between the cover and steganographic images. Therefore, the urgent problem is how to design an effective classification architecture for given feature vectors extracted from the images. We propose an approach to automatically select effective features based on the well-known JPEG steganographic methods. This approach, referred to as extreme learning machine revisited feature selection (ELM-RFS), can tune input weights in terms of the importance of input features. This idea is derived from cross-validation learning and one-dimensional (1-D) search. While updating input weights, we seek the energy decreasing direction using the leave-one-out (LOO) selection. Furthermore, we optimize the 1-D energy function instead of directly discarding the least significant feature. Since recent Liu features can gain considerable low detection errors compared to a previous JPEG steganalysis, the experimental results demonstrate that the new approach results in less classification error than other classifiers such as SVM, Kodovsky ensemble classifier, direct ELM-LOO learning, kernel ELM, and conventional ELM in Liu features. Furthermore, ELM-RFS achieves a similar performance with a deep Boltzmann machine using less training time.

  15. Next Generation of SiFAlin-Based TATE Derivatives for PET Imaging of SSTR-Positive Tumors: Influence of Molecular Design on In Vitro SSTR Binding and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Litau, S; Niedermoser, S; Vogler, N; Roscher, M; Schirrmacher, R; Fricker, G; Wängler, B; Wängler, C

    2015-12-16

    The Silicon-Fluoride-Acceptor (SiFA)-(18)F-labeling strategy has been shown before to enable the straightforward and efficient (18)F-labeling of complex biologically active substances such as proteins and peptides. Especially in the case of peptides, the radiolabeling proceeds kit-like in short reaction times and without the need of complex product workup. SiFA-derivatized, (18)F-labeled Tyr(3)-octreotate (TATE) derivatives demonstrated, besides strong somatostatin receptor (SSTR) binding, favorable in vivo pharmacokinetics as well as excellent tumor visualization by PET imaging. In this study, we intended to determine the influence of the underlying molecular design and used molecular scaffolds of SiFAlin-TATE derivatives on SSTR binding as well as on the in vivo pharmacokinetics of the resulting (18)F-labeled peptides. For this purpose, new SiFAlin-(Asp)n-PEG1-TATE analogs (where n = 1-4) were synthesized, efficiently radiolabeled with (18)F in a kit-like manner and obtained in radiochemical yields of 70-80%, radiochemical purities of ?97%, and nonoptimized specific activities of 20.1-45.2 GBq/?mol within 20-25 min starting from 0.7-1.5 GBq of (18)F. In the following, the radiotracer's lipophilicities and stabilities in human serum were determined. Furthermore, the SSTR-specific binding affinities were evaluated by a competitive displacement assay on SSTR-positive AR42J cells. The obtained in vitro results support the assumption that aspartic acids are able to considerably increase the radiotracer's hydrophilicity and that their number does not affect the SSTR binding potential of the TATE derivatives. The most promising tracer (18)F-SiFAlin-Asp3-PEG1-TATE [(18)F]6 (LogD = -1.23 ± 0.03, IC50 = 20.7 ± 2.5 nM) was further evaluated in vivo in AR42J tumor-bearing nude mice via PET/CT imaging against the clinical gold standard (68)Ga-DOTATATE as well as the previously developed SiFAlin-TATE derivative [(18)F]3. The results of these evaluations showed that [(18)F]6-although showing very similar chemical and in vitro properties to [(18)F]3-exhibits not only a slowed renal clearance compared to [(18)F]3, but also a higher absolute tumor uptake compared to (68)Ga-DOTATATE, and furthermore enables excellent tumor visualization with high image resolution. These results emphasize the importance of systematic study of the influence of molecular design and applied structure elements of peptidic radiotracers, as these may considerably influence in vivo pharmacokinetics while not affecting other parameters such as radiochemistry, lipophilicity, serum stability, or receptor binding potential. PMID:26420336

  16. Data-Driven Affective Filtering for Images and Videos.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng; Ni, Bingbing; Xu, Mengdi; Wang, Meng; Gao, Qingwei; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a novel system is developed for synthesizing user-specified emotions onto arbitrary input images or videos. Other than defining the visual affective model based on empirical knowledge, a data-driven learning framework is proposed to extract the emotion-related knowledge from a set of emotion-annotated images. In a divide-and-conquer manner, the images are clustered into several emotion-specific scene subgroups for model learning. The visual affection is modeled with Gaussian mixture models based on color features of local image patches. For the purpose of affective filtering, the feature distribution of the target is aligned to the statistical model constructed from the emotion-specific scene subgroup, through a piecewise linear transformation. The transformation is derived through a learning algorithm, which is developed with the incorporation of a regularization term enforcing spatial smoothness, edge preservation, and temporal smoothness for the derived image or video transformation. Optimization of the objective function is sought via standard nonlinear method. Intensive experimental results and user studies demonstrate that the proposed affective filtering framework can yield effective and natural effects for images and videos. PMID:25675469

  17. Investigation of Effects of Varying Model Inputs on Mercury Deposition Estimates in the Southwest US

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 4.7.1 was used to simulate mercury wet and dry deposition for a domain covering the continental United States (US). The simulations used MM5-derived meteorological input fields and the US Environmental Protection Agency (E...

  18. NUTRIENT AND PARTICULATE INPUTS INTO THE MAR MENOR LAGOON (SE SPAIN) FROM AN INTENSIVE

    E-print Network

    Murcia, Universidad de

    NUTRIENT AND PARTICULATE INPUTS INTO THE MAR MENOR LAGOON (SE SPAIN) FROM AN INTENSIVE AGRICULTURAL is a Mediterranean coastal lagoon of high conservation interest, but highly threatened by non-point pollution derived on the trophic state of the lagoon. Discharge variation during the study period was closely related

  19. A Practical Approach for Analysis of Input and Output Impedances of Feedback Amplifiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovitz, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of the analysis of feedback amplifiers for electrical engineering students at the undergraduate level. Special attention is given to derivation of the input and output impedances. In order to make the procedure clear and suitable for classroom presentation an alternative proof of…

  20. Chandrasekhar equations for infinite dimensional systems. Part 2: Unbounded input and output case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kazufumi; Powers, Robert K.

    1987-01-01

    A set of equations known as Chandrasekhar equations arising in the linear quadratic optimal control problem is considered. In this paper, we consider the linear time-invariant system defined in Hilbert spaces involving unbounded input and output operators. For a general class of such systems, the Chandrasekhar equations are derived and the existence, uniqueness, and regularity of the results of their solutions established.

  1. Multiple Input Microcantilever Sensor with Capacitive Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L., Jr.; Brown, G.M.; Bryan, W.L.; Clonts, L.G.; DePriest, J.C.; Emergy, M.S.; Ericson, M.N.; Hu, Z.; Jones, R.L.; Moore, M.R.; Oden, P.I.; Rochelle, J.M.; Smith, S.F.; Threatt, T.D.; Thundat, T.; Turner, G.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Wintenberg, A.L.

    1999-03-11

    A surface-micromachined MEMS process has been used to demonstrate multiple-input chemical sensing using selectively coated cantilever arrays. Combined hydrogen and mercury-vapor detection was achieved with a palm-sized, self-powered module with spread-spectrum telemetry reporting.

  2. Random Oracles and Auxiliary Input Dominique Unruh

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    --lazy sampling--does not apply directly. We present a theorem and a variant of the lazy sampling technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2 Lazy sampling with auxiliary input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 This is the full version of a paper appearing at CRYPTO 2007 Part of this work was done while

  3. Adaptive Random Testing with Combinatorial Input Domain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Random testing (RT) is a fundamental testing technique to assess software reliability, by simply selecting test cases in a random manner from the whole input domain. As an enhancement of RT, adaptive random testing (ART) has better failure-detection capability and has been widely applied in different scenarios, such as numerical programs, some object-oriented programs, and mobile applications. However, not much work has been done on the effectiveness of ART for the programs with combinatorial input domain (i.e., the set of categorical data). To extend the ideas to the testing for combinatorial input domain, we have adopted different similarity measures that are widely used for categorical data in data mining and have proposed two similarity measures based on interaction coverage. Then, we propose a new version named ART-CID as an extension of ART in combinatorial input domain, which selects an element from categorical data as the next test case such that it has the lowest similarity against already generated test cases. Experimental results show that ART-CID generally performs better than RT, with respect to different evaluation metrics. PMID:24772036

  4. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain.

  5. List of Appendices Appendix A Scoping Input

    E-print Network

    Section 7 Consultation of the Endangered Species Act Correspondence with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service database of DOE/NREL contacts compiled as part of previous National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA. The following input was received during the Scoping period: · U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Letter

  6. Instrumentation for measuring energy inputs to implements

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, F.D.; Wilhelm, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    A microcomputer-based instrumentation system for monitoring tractor operating parameters and energy inputs to implements was developed and mounted on a 75-power-takeoff-KW tractor. The instrumentation system, including sensors and data handling equipment, is discussed. 10 refs.

  7. DO MODEL UNCERTAINTY WITH CORRELATED INPUTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of correlation among the input parameters and variables on the output uncertainty of the Streeter-Phelps water quality model is examined. hree uncertainty analysis techniques are used: sensitivity analysis, first-order error analysis, and Monte Carlo simulation. odifie...

  8. Input and Intake in Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliardi, Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents an approach for a productive way forward in the study of language acquisition, sealing the rift between claims of an innate linguistic hypothesis space and powerful domain general statistical inference. This approach breaks language acquisition into its component parts, distinguishing the input in the environment from…

  9. Treatments of Precipitation Inputs to Hydrologic Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrological models are used to assess many water resources problems from agricultural use and water quality to engineering issues. The success of these models are dependent on correct parameterization; the most sensitive being the rainfall input time series. These records can come from land-based ...

  10. Prototyping Tangible Input Devices with Digital Fabrication

    E-print Network

    Hartmann, Björn

    in this last sector are typically experts in PCB design and design for 3D printing. "Iconic Lion at the Steps of these types of hardware to assist designers in prototyping tangible input devices, with an eye towards. These types of sensors can be used, for example, to enable back-of-phone interactions that don't occlude

  11. Input-Based Incremental Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcroft, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This fascinating presentation of current research undoes numerous myths about how we most effectively learn new words in a second language. In clear, reader-friendly text, the author details the successful approach of IBI vocabulary instruction, which emphasizes the presentation of target vocabulary as input early on and the incremental (gradual)…

  12. Soil Organic Carbon Input from Urban Turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrass is a major vegetation type in the urban and suburban environment. Management practices such as species selection, irrigation, and mowing may affect carbon input and storage in these systems. Research was conducted to determine the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) changes, soil carbon sequ...

  13. Input to Priorities Panel August 7, 2012

    E-print Network

    Input to Priorities Panel August 7, 2012 Jeff Freidberg MIT 1 #12;The Emperor of Fusion has · Comparison (1 GW overnight cost) · Coal $ 3B · Gas $ 1B · Nuclear $ 4B · Wind $ 2B · Solar-T $ 3B · ITER $25B

  14. Selecting training inputs via greedy rank covering

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, A.L.; Santen, J.P.H. van

    1996-12-31

    We present a general method for selecting a small set of training inputs, the observations of which will suffice to estimate the parameters of a given linear model. We exemplify the algorithm in terms of predicting segmental duration of phonetic-segment feature vectors in a text-to-speech synthesizer, but the algorithm will work for any linear model and its associated domain.

  15. Gravity Transform for Input Conditioning in

    E-print Network

    Paiva, António R. C.

    Gravity Transform for Input Conditioning in Brain Machine Interfaces António R. C. Paiva, José C. Motivation 2. Methods i. Gravity Transform ii. Modeling and output sensitivity analysis 3. Data Analysis #12;3 Outline 1. Motivation 2. Methods i. Gravity Transform ii. Modeling and output sensitivity analysis 3. Data

  16. Multichannel analyzers at high rates of input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, S. J.; Strauss, M. G.

    1969-01-01

    Multichannel analyzer, used with a gating system incorporating pole-zero compensation, pile-up rejection, and baseline-restoration, achieves good resolution at high rates of input. It improves resolution, reduces tailing and rate-contributed continuum, and eliminates spectral shift.

  17. A parallel implementation of the dual-input Max-Tree algorithm for attribute ltering

    E-print Network

    Wilkinson, Michael H.F.

    -Find type of labelling which allows for ecient merging of the trees. Tests on several 3D datasets using for each thread, that correspond to dierent segments of the input image. The algorithm uses a Union multi-core comput- ers showed a speed-up of 4.14 to 4.21 on 4 threads running on the same number

  18. Support Routines for In Situ Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Pariser, Oleg; Yeates, Matthew C.; Lee, Hyun H.; Lorre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    This software consists of a set of application programs that support ground-based image processing for in situ missions. These programs represent a collection of utility routines that perform miscellaneous functions in the context of the ground data system. Each one fulfills some specific need as determined via operational experience. The most unique aspect to these programs is that they are integrated into the large, in situ image processing system via the PIG (Planetary Image Geometry) library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image meta-data fields and updating them properly. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. This suite of programs consists of: (1)marscahv: Generates a linearized, epi-polar aligned image given a stereo pair of images. These images are optimized for 1-D stereo correlations, (2) marscheckcm: Compares the camera model in an image label with one derived via kinematics modeling on the ground, (3) marschkovl: Checks the overlaps between a list of images in order to determine which might be stereo pairs. This is useful for non-traditional stereo images like long-baseline or those from an articulating arm camera, (4) marscoordtrans: Translates mosaic coordinates from one form into another, (5) marsdispcompare: Checks a Left Right stereo disparity image against a Right Left disparity image to ensure they are consistent with each other, (6) marsdispwarp: Takes one image of a stereo pair and warps it through a disparity map to create a synthetic opposite- eye image. For example, a right eye image could be transformed to look like it was taken from the left eye via this program, (7) marsfidfinder: Finds fiducial markers in an image by projecting their approximate location and then using correlation to locate the markers to subpixel accuracy. These fiducial markets are small targets attached to the spacecraft surface. This helps verify, or improve, the pointing of in situ cameras, (8) marsinvrange: Inverse of marsrange . given a range file, re-computes an XYZ file that closely matches the original. . marsproj: Projects an XYZ coordinate through the camera model, and reports the line/sample coordinates of the point in the image, (9) marsprojfid: Given the output of marsfidfinder, projects the XYZ locations and compares them to the found locations, creating a report showing the fiducial errors in each image. marsrad: Radiometrically corrects an image, (10) marsrelabel: Updates coordinate system or camera model labels in an image, (11) marstiexyz: Given a stereo pair, allows the user to interactively pick a point in each image and reports the XYZ value corresponding to that pair of locations. marsunmosaic: Extracts a single frame from a mosaic, which will be created such that it could have been an input to the original mosaic. Useful for creating simulated input frames using different camera models than the original mosaic used, and (12) merinverter: Uses an inverse lookup table to convert 8-bit telemetered data to its 12-bit original form. Can be used in other missions despite the name.

  19. Clouds of Venus. Input to VIRA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, Nikolay; Zasova, Ludmila

    2012-07-01

    Venus is completely covered by a thick clod deck. Its' total optical depth in the visible is equal to 30+/-10. Original VIRA model based on the measurements from Pioneer Venus descent probes and orbiter described mainly cloud particle sizes, properties and their vertical distribution. Later measurements from Venera-15 and Venus Express permitted more detailed studies of horizontal and vertical variations. Imaging of Venus in the UV range shows variety of cloud features that include mottled and streaky clouds in the low latitudes, bright mid-latitude belt and ``polar cap'' with imbedded oval polar dipole. Despite this non-uniform picture the location of the upper boundary of the clouds, derived from the observation of the absorption bands in the reflected IR spectrum, demonstrates a smooth systematic behavior with the latitudinal trends symmetric with respect to equator. In low and middle latitudes the cloud top is located at 72+/-1 km. It decreases poleward of +/-50 degrees and reaches 63--69 km in polar regions. This depression coincides with the eye of the planetary vortex. The effective average particle size radius is equal to (1.3+/-0.5) micron at latitudes of 0--70, with a peak value some 50% larger in the polar regions. Cloud top can experience fast variations of about metricconverterProductID1 km1 km in tens of hours, while larger long-term variations of several kilometers have been observed only at high latitudes. UV markings correlate with the cloud altimetry, however the difference between adjacent UV dark and bright regions never exceeds few hundred meters. Ultraviolet dark spiral arms, which are often seen at about --70 degress, correspond to higher altitudes or to the regions with strong latitudinal gradient of the cloud top altitude. In contrast to the relatively uniform upper cloud boundary, strong variations of the brightness temperature at specific near infrared wavelengths, especially in low latitudes, are related to variations of the cloud thickness in the middle and low cloud decks consistent with significant convective activity at these levels. The morphology of the holes tends from highly variable orientations of features with aspect ratios of nearly one at low latitudes, to very large aspect ratios and zonally oriented features at higher latitudes.

  20. Transurethral light delivery for prostate photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has broad clinical potential to enhance prostate cancer detection and treatment, yet it is challenged by the lack of minimally invasive, deeply penetrating light delivery methods that provide sufficient visualization of targets (e.g., tumors, contrast agents, brachytherapy seeds). We constructed a side-firing fiber prototype for transurethral photoacoustic imaging of prostates with a dual-array (linear and curvilinear) transrectal ultrasound probe. A method to calculate the surface area and, thereby, estimate the laser fluence at this fiber tip was derived, validated, applied to various design parameters, and used as an input to three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. Brachytherapy seeds implanted in phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo canine prostates at radial distances of 5 to 30 mm from the urethra were imaged with the fiber prototype transmitting 1064 nm wavelength light with 2 to 8 mJ pulse energy. Prebeamformed images were displayed in real time at a rate of 3 to 5 frames per second to guide fiber placement and beamformed offline. A conventional delay-and-sum beamformer provided decreasing seed contrast (23 to 9 dB) with increasing urethra-to-target distance, while the short-lag spatial coherence beamformer provided improved and relatively constant seed contrast (28 to 32 dB) regardless of distance, thus improving multitarget visualization in single and combined curvilinear images acquired with the fiber rotating and the probe fixed. The proposed light delivery and beamforming methods promise to improve key prostate cancer detection and treatment strategies.

  1. Macroscopic singlet oxygen model incorporating photobleaching as an input parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-03-01

    A macroscopic singlet oxygen model for photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used extensively to calculate the reacted singlet oxygen concentration for various photosensitizers. The four photophysical parameters (?, ?, ?, ?) and threshold singlet oxygen dose ([1O2]r,sh) can be found for various drugs and drug-light intervals using a fitting algorithm. The input parameters for this model include the fluence, photosensitizer concentration, optical properties, and necrosis radius. An additional input variable of photobleaching was implemented in this study to optimize the results. Photobleaching was measured by using the pre-PDT and post-PDT sensitizer concentrations. Using the RIF model of murine fibrosarcoma, mice were treated with a linear source with fluence rates from 12 - 150 mW/cm and total fluences from 24 - 135 J/cm. The two main drugs investigated were benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) and 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH). Previously published photophysical parameters were fine-tuned and verified using photobleaching as the additional fitting parameter. Furthermore, photobleaching can be used as an indicator of the robustness of the model for the particular mouse experiment by comparing the experimental and model-calculated photobleaching ratio.

  2. Engineering input/output nodes in prokaryotic regulatory circuits.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Aitor; Carreño, Carlos A; Martínez-García, Esteban; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2010-09-01

    A large number of prokaryotic regulatory elements have been interfaced artificially with biological circuits that execute specific expression programs. Engineering such circuits involves the association of input/output components that perform discrete signal-transfer steps in an autonomous fashion while connected to the rest of the network with a defined topology. Each of these nodes includes a signal-recognition component for the detection of the relevant physicochemical or biological stimulus, a molecular device able to translate the signal-sensing event into a defined output and a genetic module capable of understanding such an output as an input for the next component of the circuit. The final outcome of the process can be recorded by means of a reporter product. This review addresses three such aspects of forward engineering of signal-responding genetic parts. We first recap natural and non-natural regulatory assets for designing gene expression in response to predetermined signals - chemical or otherwise. These include transcriptional regulators developed by in vitro evolution (or designed from scratch), and synthetic riboswitches derived from in vitro selection of aptamers. Then we examine recent progress on reporter genes, whose expression allows the quantification and parametrization of signal-responding circuits in their entirety. Finally, we critically examine recent work on other reporters that confer bacteria with gross organoleptic properties (e.g. distinct odour) and the interfacing of signal-sensing devices with determinants of community behaviour. PMID:20618867

  3. Macroscopic singlet oxygen model incorporating photobleaching as an input parameter

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    A macroscopic singlet oxygen model for photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used extensively to calculate the reacted singlet oxygen concentration for various photosensitizers. The four photophysical parameters (?, ?, ?, ?) and threshold singlet oxygen dose ([1O2]r,sh) can be found for various drugs and drug-light intervals using a fitting algorithm. The input parameters for this model include the fluence, photosensitizer concentration, optical properties, and necrosis radius. An additional input variable of photobleaching was implemented in this study to optimize the results. Photobleaching was measured by using the pre-PDT and post-PDT sensitizer concentrations. Using the RIF model of murine fibrosarcoma, mice were treated with a linear source with fluence rates from 12 – 150 mW/cm and total fluences from 24 – 135 J/cm. The two main drugs investigated were benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) and 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH). Previously published photophysical parameters were fine-tuned and verified using photobleaching as the additional fitting parameter. Furthermore, photobleaching can be used as an indicator of the robustness of the model for the particular mouse experiment by comparing the experimental and model-calculated photobleaching ratio. PMID:25914795

  4. Optimum employment of satellite indirect soundings as numerical model input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. H.; Derber, J. C.; Koehler, T. L.; Schmidt, B. D.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of satellite-derived temperature soundings that would significantly affect their use as input for numerical weather prediction models were examined. Independent evaluations of satellite soundings were emphasized to better define error characteristics. Results of a Nimbus-6 sounding study reveal an underestimation of the strength of synoptic scale troughs and ridges, and associated gradients in isobaric height and temperature fields. The most significant errors occurred near the Earth's surface and the tropopause. Soundings from the TIROS-N and NOAA-6 satellites were also evaluated. Results again showed an underestimation of upper level trough amplitudes leading to weaker thermal gradient depictions in satellite-only fields. These errors show a definite correlation to the synoptic flow patterns. In a satellite-only analysis used to initialize a numerical model forecast, it was found that these synoptically correlated errors were retained in the forecast sequence.

  5. Ecosystem Services Derived from Headwater Catchments

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used data from the USEPA’s wadeable streams assessment (WSA), US Forest Service’s forest inventory and analysis (FIA), and select USFS experimental forests (EF) to investigate potential ecosystems services derived from headwater catchments. C, N, and P inputs to these catchmen...

  6. Zonal organization of the mouse flocculus: physiology, input, and output.

    PubMed

    Schonewille, Martijn; Luo, Chongde; Ruigrok, Tom J H; Voogd, Jan; Schmolesky, Matthew T; Rutteman, Mandy; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Jeu, Marcel T G; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2006-08-01

    The zones of the flocculus have been mapped in many species with a noticeable exception, the mouse. Here, the functional map of the mouse was constructed via extracellular recordings followed by tracer injections of biotinylated-dextran-amine and immunohistochemistry for heat-shock protein-25. Zones were identified based on the Purkinje cell complex spike modulation occurring in response to optokinetic stimulation. In zones 1 and 3 Purkinje cells responded best to rotation about a horizontal axis oriented at 135 degrees ipsilateral azimuth, whereas in zones 2 and 4 they responded best to rotation about the vertical axis. The tracing experiments showed that Purkinje cells of zone 1 projected to the parvicellular part of lateral cerebellar nucleus and superior vestibular nucleus, while Purkinje cells of zone 3 projected to group Y and the superior vestibular nucleus. Purkinje cells of zones 2 and 4 projected to the magnocellular and parvicellular parts of the medial vestibular nucleus, while some also innervated the lateral vestibular nucleus or nucleus prepositus hypoglossi. The climbing fiber inputs to Purkinje cells in zones 1 and 3 were derived from neurons in the ventrolateral outgrowth of the contralateral inferior olive, whereas those in zones 2 and 4 were derived from the contralateral caudal dorsal cap. Purkinje cells in zones 1 and 2, but not in zones 3 and 4, were positively labeled for heat-shock protein-25. The present study illustrates that Purkinje cells in the murine flocculus are organized in discrete zones with specific functions, specific input - output relations, and a specific histochemical signature. PMID:16739198

  7. Multimodal interfaces with voice and gesture input

    SciTech Connect

    Milota, A.D.; Blattner, M.M.

    1995-07-20

    The modalities of speech and gesture have different strengths and weaknesses, but combined they create synergy where each modality corrects the weaknesses of the other. We believe that a multimodal system such a one interwining speech and gesture must start from a different foundation than ones which are based solely on pen input. In order to provide a basis for the design of a speech and gesture system, we have examined the research in other disciplines such as anthropology and linguistics. The result of this investigation was a taxonomy that gave us material for the incorporation of gestures whose meanings are largely transparent to the users. This study describes the taxonomy and gives examples of applications to pen input systems.

  8. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: ? Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes ? UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles ? Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position,more »and point-tracking ? Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO ? Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object ? Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.« less

  9. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: ? Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes ? UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles ? Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position, and point-tracking ? Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO ? Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object ? Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.

  10. EPIC: E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Beardsley, Adam P.; Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.

    2015-11-01

    E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator (EPIC), a highly parallelized Object Oriented Python package, implements the Modular Optimal Frequency Fourier (MOFF) imaging technique. It also includes visibility-based imaging using the software holography technique and a simulator for generating electric fields from a sky model. EPIC can accept dual-polarization inputs and produce images of all four instrumental cross-polarizations.

  11. Sensory synergy as environmental input integration

    PubMed Central

    Alnajjar, Fady; Itkonen, Matti; Berenz, Vincent; Tournier, Maxime; Nagai, Chikara; Shimoda, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    The development of a method to feed proper environmental inputs back to the central nervous system (CNS) remains one of the challenges in achieving natural movement when part of the body is replaced with an artificial device. Muscle synergies are widely accepted as a biologically plausible interpretation of the neural dynamics between the CNS and the muscular system. Yet the sensorineural dynamics of environmental feedback to the CNS has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we address this issue by exploring the concept of sensory synergy. In contrast to muscle synergy, we hypothesize that sensory synergy plays an essential role in integrating the overall environmental inputs to provide low-dimensional information to the CNS. We assume that sensor synergy and muscle synergy communicate using these low-dimensional signals. To examine our hypothesis, we conducted posture control experiments involving lateral disturbance with nine healthy participants. Proprioceptive information represented by the changes on muscle lengths were estimated by using the musculoskeletal model analysis software SIMM. Changes on muscles lengths were then used to compute sensory synergies. The experimental results indicate that the environmental inputs were translated into the two dimensional signals and used to move the upper limb to the desired position immediately after the lateral disturbance. Participants who showed high skill in posture control were found to be likely to have a strong correlation between sensory and muscle signaling as well as high coordination between the utilized sensory synergies. These results suggest the importance of integrating environmental inputs into suitable low-dimensional signals before providing them to the CNS. This mechanism should be essential when designing the prosthesis' sensory system to make the controller simpler. PMID:25628523

  12. Molecular structure input on the web.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A molecule editor, that is program for input and editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. This review focuses on a special type of molecule editors, namely those that are used for molecule structure input on the web. Scientific computing is now moving more and more in the direction of web services and cloud computing, with servers scattered all around the Internet. Thus a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, and a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential.The review covers a history of web-based structure input, starting with simple text entry boxes and early molecule editors based on clickable maps, before moving to the current situation dominated by Java applets. One typical example - the popular JME Molecule Editor - will be described in more detail. Modern Ajax server-side molecule editors are also presented. And finally, the possible future direction of web-based molecule editing, based on technologies like JavaScript and Flash, is discussed. PMID:20298528

  13. Minimizing structural vibrations with Input Shaping (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhose, Bill; Singer, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A new method for commanding machines to move with increased dynamic performance was developed. This method is an enhanced version of input shaping, a patented vibration suppression algorithm. This technique intercepts a command input to a system command that moves the mechanical system with increased performance and reduced residual vibration. This document describes many advanced methods for generating highly optimized shaping sequences which are tuned to particular systems. The shaping sequence is important because it determines the trade off between move/settle time of the system and the insensitivity of the input shaping algorithm to variations or uncertainties in the machine which can be controlled. For example, a system with a 5 Hz resonance that takes 1 second to settle can be improved to settle instantaneously using a 0.2 shaping sequence (thus improving settle time by a factor of 5). This system could vary by plus or minus 15% in its natural frequency and still have no apparent vibration. However, the same system shaped with a 0.3 second shaping sequence could tolerate plus or minus 40% or more variation in natural frequency. This document describes how to generate sequences that maximize performance, sequences that maximize insensitivity, and sequences that trade off between the two. Several software tools are documented and included.

  14. A Lightness Scale from Image Intensity Distributions

    E-print Network

    Richards, W.A.

    1981-08-01

    A lightness scale is derived from a theoretical estimate of the probability distribution of image intensities for natural scenes. The derived image intensity distribution considers three factors: reflectance, surface ...

  15. Variation in freshwater input to the Eastern US coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Yoon, Y.; Beighley, E., II; Hughes, R.; Kimbro, D.

    2014-12-01

    Phragmites is one of the most invasive plants in North American wetlands. Although its spread in coastal marshes has been linked by independent studies to urbanization, eutrophication, and salinity change, there is good evidence that these factors may interactively determine invasion success and in turn, the ecosystem services provided by marshes. We hypothesize that the invasion of Phragmites is linked to changes in freshwater inputs due to climate and/or land use change. El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), originating in the sea surface temperature anomalies (warm or cold) in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, is a notable and prominent signal in inter-annual climatic variation. Recent studies shows that the probability of strong El Nino events may increase in the future. In this study, we will investigate the teleconnections between freshwater inputs to the coastal zone along the eastern U.S. and ENSO indices, and attempt to explore the predictability of temporal and spatial variation of freshwater inputs based on ENSO conditions. To quantify changes in freshwater input in this region, hydrologic modeling, remote sensing and field measurements are combined. The Hillslope River Routing (HRR) model is used to simulate hourly streamflow from all watersheds from southern Florida to northern Maine draining into the Atlantic Ocean. The modeling effort utilizes satellite precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Product 3B42v7: 2001-current with a 3-hr temporal resolution and 0.25 degree spatial resolution), land surface temperature and vegetation measures (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS, products: 2001-current with a monthly temporal resolution and 0.05 degree spatial resolution). To account for land cover change, annual MODIS land cover data and time varying population statics are merged to estimate annual land cover characteristics for each sub-catchment within the study region. Static datasets for soils and ground elevations are used. Daily U.S. Geological Survey streamflow data from major river outlets along the coastline are used for model validation. Annual streamflow is characterized in terms of volume of export to the ocean: as total flow, storm flow and baseflow and used to explore longitudinal discharge patterns along the coastline.

  16. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (4D ML-EM) reconstructions gave more accurate reconstructions than did standard frame-by-frame static 3D ML-EM reconstructions. The SPECT/P results showed that 4D ML-EM reconstruction gave higher and more accurate estimates of K1 than did 3D ML-EM, yielding anywhere from a 44% underestimation to 24% overestimation for the three patients. The SPECT/D results showed that 4D ML-EM reconstruction gave an overestimation of 28% and 3D ML-EM gave an underestimation of 1% for K1. For the patient study the 4D ML-EM reconstruction provided continuous images as a function of time of the concentration in both ventricular cavities and myocardium during the 2 min infusion. It is demonstrated that a 2 min infusion with a two-headed SPECT system rotating 180° every 54 s can produce measurements of blood pool and myocardial TACs, though the SPECT simulation studies showed that one must sample at least every 30 s to capture a 1 min infusion input function. PMID:22170801

  17. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winant, Celeste D.; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (4D ML-EM) reconstructions gave more accurate reconstructions than did standard frame-by-frame static 3D ML-EM reconstructions. The SPECT/P results showed that 4D ML-EM reconstruction gave higher and more accurate estimates of K1 than did 3D ML-EM, yielding anywhere from a 44% underestimation to 24% overestimation for the three patients. The SPECT/D results showed that 4D ML-EM reconstruction gave an overestimation of 28% and 3D ML-EM gave an underestimation of 1% for K1. For the patient study the 4D ML-EM reconstruction provided continuous images as a function of time of the concentration in both ventricular cavities and myocardium during the 2 min infusion. It is demonstrated that a 2 min infusion with a two-headed SPECT system rotating 180° every 54 s can produce measurements of blood pool and myocardial TACs, though the SPECT simulation studies showed that one must sample at least every 30 s to capture a 1 min infusion input function.

  18. Oblique Aerial Images and Their Use in Cultural Heritage Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhle, J.

    2013-07-01

    Oblique images enable three-dimensional (3d) modelling of objects with vertical dimensions. Such imagery is nowadays systematically taken of cities and may easily become available. The documentation of cultural heritage can take advantage of these sources of information. Two new oblique camera systems are presented and characteristics of such images are summarized. A first example uses images of a new multi-camera system for the derivation of orthoimages, façade plots with photo texture, 3d scatter plots, and dynamic 3d models of a historic church. The applied methodology is based on automatically derived point clouds of high density. Each point will be supplemented with colour and other attributes. The problems experienced in these processes and the solutions to these problems are presented. The applied tools are a combination of professional tools, free software, and of own software developments. Special attention is given to the quality of input images. Investigations are carried out on edges in the images. The combination of oblique and nadir images enables new possibilities in the processing. The use of the near-infrared channel besides the red, green, and blue channel of the applied multispectral imagery is also of advantage. Vegetation close to the object of interest can easily be removed. A second example describes the modelling of a monument by means of a non-metric camera and a standard software package. The presented results regard achieved geometric accuracy and image quality. It is concluded that the use of oblique aerial images together with image-based processing methods yield new possibilities of economic and accurate documentation of tall monuments.

  19. Probabilistic Density Function Method for Stochastic ODEs of Power Systems with Uncertain Power Input

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Barajas-Solano, David A.; Constantinescu, Emil; Abhyankar, S.; Ghosh, Donetta L.; Smith, Barry; Huang, Zhenyu; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2015-09-22

    Wind and solar power generators are commonly described by a system of stochastic ordinary differential equations (SODEs) where random input parameters represent uncertainty in wind and solar energy. The existing methods for SODEs are mostly limited to delta-correlated random parameters (white noise). Here we use the Probability Density Function (PDF) method for deriving a closed-form deterministic partial differential equation (PDE) for the joint probability density function of the SODEs describing a power generator with time-correlated power input. The resulting PDE is solved numerically. A good agreement with Monte Carlo Simulations shows accuracy of the PDF method.

  20. High Throughput Measurement of Ca++ Dynamics in Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes by Kinetic Image Cytometery: A Cardiac Risk Assessment Characterization Using a Large Panel of Cardioactive and Inactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua Rong; Whittaker, Ross; Price, Jeffrey H; Vega, Raquel; Pfeiffer, Emily R; Cerignoli, Fabio; Towart, Rob; Gallacher, David J

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs) are emerging as a powerful in vitro model for cardiac safety assessment which may allow for better identification of compounds with poor arrhythmogenic liability profiles early in the drug discovery process. Here, we describe our examination of the Kinetic Image Cytometer (KIC) system's ability to predict adverse compound effects using hiPS-CMs and a library of 53 compounds, the majority of which are known to be cardioactive compounds, and several negative controls. The KIC provides a high throughput method for analyzing intracellular calcium transients. In the cardiomyocyte, intracellular calcium transients integrate the electrochemical signals of the action potential (AP) with the molecular signaling pathways regulating contraction. Drug-induced alterations in the shape and duration of AP result in changes to the shape and duration of the intracellular calcium transient. By examining calcium transient dynamics in hiPS-CMs, KIC can be used as a phenotypic screen to assess compound effects across multiple ion channel types (MITs), detecting MITs, calcium handling and signaling effects. The results of this blinded study indicate that using hiPS-CMs, KIC is able to accurately detect drug-induced changes in Ca(2+) transient dynamics (ie, duration and beat rate) and therefore, may be useful in predicting drug-induced arrhythmogenic liabilities in early de-risking within the drug discovery phase. PMID:26358003

  1. Investigating the validity of the networked imaging sensor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Melvin

    2015-05-01

    The Networked Imaging Sensor (NIS) model takes as input target acquisition probability as a function of time for individuals or individual imaging sensors, and outputs target acquisition probability for a collection of imaging sensors and individuals. System target acquisition takes place the moment the first sensor or individual acquires the target. The derivation of the NIS model implies it is applicable to multiple moving sensors and targets. The principal assumption of the NIS model is independence of events that give rise to input target acquisition probabilities. For investigating the validity of the NIS model, we consider a collection of single images where neither the sensor nor target is moving. This paper investigates the ability of the NIS model to predict system target acquisition performance when multiple observers view first and second Gen thermal imagery, field-of-view imagery that has either zero or one stationary target in a laboratory environment when observers have a maximum of 12, 17 or unlimited seconds to acquire the target. Modeled and measured target acquisition performance are in good agreement.

  2. A Kernel Adaptive Algorithm for Quaternion-Valued Inputs.

    PubMed

    Paul, Thomas K; Ogunfunmi, Tokunbo

    2015-10-01

    The use of quaternion data can provide benefit in applications like robotics and image recognition, and particularly for performing transforms in 3-D space. Here, we describe a kernel adaptive algorithm for quaternions. A least mean square (LMS)-based method was used, resulting in the derivation of the quaternion kernel LMS (Quat-KLMS) algorithm. Deriving this algorithm required describing the idea of a quaternion reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS), as well as kernel functions suitable with quaternions. A modified HR calculus for Hilbert spaces was used to find the gradient of cost functions defined on a quaternion RKHS. In addition, the use of widely linear (or augmented) filtering is proposed to improve performance. The benefit of the Quat-KLMS and widely linear forms in learning nonlinear transformations of quaternion data are illustrated with simulations. PMID:25594982

  3. Towards a theory of a solution space for the biplane imaging geometry problem

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vikas; Xu Jinhui; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Xu Guang; Chen Zhenming; Gopal, Anant

    2006-10-15

    Biplane angiographic imaging is a primary method for visual and quantitative assessment of the vasculature. In order to reliably reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) position, orientation, and shape of the vessel structure, a key problem is to determine the rotation matrix R and the translation vector t which relate the two coordinate systems. This so-called Imaging Geometry Determination problem is well studied in the medical imaging and computer vision communities and a number of interesting approaches have been reported. Each such technique determines a solution which yields 3D vasculature reconstructions with errors comparable to other techniques. From the literature, we see that different techniques with different optimization strategies yield reconstructions with equivalent errors. We have investigated this behavior, and it appears that the error in the input data leads to this equivalence effectively yielding what we call the solution space of feasible geometries, i.e., geometries which could be solutions given the error or uncertainty in the input image data. In this paper, we lay the theoretical framework for this concept of a solution space of feasible geometries using simple schematic constructions, deriving the underlying mathematical relationships, presenting implementation details, and discussing implications and applications of the proposed idea. Because the solution space of feasible geometries encompasses equivalent solutions given the input error, the solution space approach can be used to evaluate the precision of calculated geometries or 3D data based on known or estimated uncertainties in the input image data. We also use the solution space approach to calculate an imaging geometry, i.e., a solution.

  4. How the type of input function affects the dynamic response of conducting polymer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingcan; Alici, Gursel; Mutlu, Rahim; Li, Weihua

    2014-10-01

    There has been a growing interest in smart actuators typified by conducting polymer actuators, especially in their (i) fabrication, modeling and control with minimum external data and (ii) applications in bio-inspired devices, robotics and mechatronics. Their control is a challenging research problem due to the complex and nonlinear properties of these actuators, which cannot be predicted accurately. Based on an input-shaping technique, we propose a new method to improve the conducting polymer actuators’ command-following ability, while minimizing their electric power consumption. We applied four input functions with smooth characteristics to a trilayer conducting polymer actuator to experimentally evaluate its command-following ability under an open-loop control strategy and a simulated feedback control strategy, and, more importantly, to quantify how the type of input function affects the dynamic response of this class of actuators. We have found that the four smooth inputs consume less electrical power than sharp inputs such as a step input with discontinuous higher-order derivatives. We also obtained an improved transient response performance from the smooth inputs, especially under the simulated feedback control strategy, which we have proposed previously [X Xiang, R Mutlu, G Alici, and W Li, 2014 “Control of conducting polymer actuators without physical feedback: simulated feedback control approach with particle swarm optimization’, Journal of Smart Materials and Structure, 23]. The idea of using a smooth input command, which results in lower power consumption and better control performance, can be extended to other smart actuators. Consuming less electrical energy or power will have a direct effect on enhancing the operational life of these actuators.

  5. Learning structure of sensory inputs with synaptic plasticity leads to interference

    PubMed Central

    Chrol-Cannon, Joseph; Jin, Yaochu

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is often explored as a form of unsupervised adaptation in cortical microcircuits to learn the structure of complex sensory inputs and thereby improve performance of classification and prediction. The question of whether the specific structure of the input patterns is encoded in the structure of neural networks has been largely neglected. Existing studies that have analyzed input-specific structural adaptation have used simplified, synthetic inputs in contrast to complex and noisy patterns found in real-world sensory data. In this work, input-specific structural changes are analyzed for three empirically derived models of plasticity applied to three temporal sensory classification tasks that include complex, real-world visual and auditory data. Two forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and the Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM) plasticity rule are used to adapt the recurrent network structure during the training process before performance is tested on the pattern recognition tasks. It is shown that synaptic adaptation is highly sensitive to specific classes of input pattern. However, plasticity does not improve the performance on sensory pattern recognition tasks, partly due to synaptic interference between consecutively presented input samples. The changes in synaptic strength produced by one stimulus are reversed by the presentation of another, thus largely preventing input-specific synaptic changes from being retained in the structure of the network. To solve the problem of interference, we suggest that models of plasticity be extended to restrict neural activity and synaptic modification to a subset of the neural circuit, which is increasingly found to be the case in experimental neuroscience. PMID:26300769

  6. Example of input-output analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The thirty sectors included in the ECASTAR energy input-output model were listed. Five of these belong to energy producing sectors, fifteen to manufacturing industries, two to residential and commercial sectors, and eight to service industries. The model is capable of tracing impacts of an action in three dimensions: dollars, BTU's of energy, and labor. Four conservation actions considered were listed and then discussed separately, dealing with the following areas: increase in fuel efficiency, reduction in fuel used by the transportation and warehousing group, manufacturing of smaller automobiles, and a communications/transportation trade-off.

  7. Nuclear Physics input for explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    2009-01-28

    This manuscript discusses recent progress in our understanding of the nucleosynthesis of medium and heavy elements in supernovae. Recent hydrodynamical models of core-collapse supernovae show that at early times large amounts of proton rich matter is ejected under strong neutrino fluxes. This matter constitutes the site of the vp-process where antineutrino absorption reactions catalyze the nucleosynthesis of nuclei with A>64. At later times, the ejected matter becomes neutron-rich and might be the site for the r-process. The sensitivity of the r-process to the nuclear physics input is discussed.

  8. 6-Bromocholesterol derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.J.

    1984-02-07

    Novel 6-bromo derivatives of cholesterol have the formula 3-(R-O-),6-BR,17-((H3C-)2-HC-H2C-H2C-H2C-HC(-CH3)-)-ESTR-5-ENE Such compounds are prepared from the known 6-iodocholesterol by treatment with cuprous bromide. These compounds, labelled with radioisotopes of Br-82 or Br-77, are localized in the adrenal, mammary and ovary tissue of female mammals and in the adrenal or prostate tissue of males when administered to such individuals. This provides a method for imaging adrenal, ovary or prostate tissue which is superior to use of the prior art 6-iodo-cholesterol.

  9. Joint Group Sparse PCA for Compressed Hyperspectral Imaging.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zohaib; Shafait, Faisal; Mian, Ajmal

    2015-12-01

    A sparse principal component analysis (PCA) seeks a sparse linear combination of input features (variables), so that the derived features still explain most of the variations in the data. A group sparse PCA introduces structural constraints on the features in seeking such a linear combination. Collectively, the derived principal components may still require measuring all the input features. We present a joint group sparse PCA (JGSPCA) algorithm, which forces the basic coefficients corresponding to a group of features to be jointly sparse. Joint sparsity ensures that the complete basis involves only a sparse set of input features, whereas the group sparsity ensures that the structural integrity of the features is maximally preserved. We evaluate the JGSPCA algorithm on the problems of compressed hyperspectral imaging and face recognition. Compressed sensing results show that the proposed method consistently outperforms sparse PCA and group sparse PCA in reconstructing the hyperspectral scenes of natural and man-made objects. The efficacy of the proposed compressed sensing method is further demonstrated in band selection for face recognition. PMID:26316126

  10. [Aortic input impedance in ventricular septal defect].

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Ichihashi, K; Kuramatsu, T; Shiraishi, H; Yano, S; Yanagisawa, M; Yaginuma, Y

    1991-01-01

    Aortic input impedance and hydraulic power were measured in patients with ventricular septal defect (VSD). Aortic input impedance consists of the characteristic impedance (index of aortic distensibility) and the terminal impedance (index of peripheral resistance) which represent the left ventricular hydraulic load. The external left ventricular hydraulic power consists of steady power which transmits blood to the peripheral vasculature and pulsatile power which is converted into heat energy. The ratio of pulsatile to total power indicates the efficiency of the arterial system. The present study was carried out on 6 patients with VSD whose Qp/Qs was greater than 2.0 (VSD group) and 10 age-matched controls who had a history of Kawasaki disease without coronary complications at the time of cardiac catheterization (control group). Descending aortic pressure and flow velocity were measured simultaneously at the level of the 10th thoracic vertebra using a multisensor-catheter. Impedance data were calculated from Fourier analysis of these findings. Characteristic impedance did not differ between the 2 groups. Terminal impedance was higher in the VSD group with the increasing peripheral resistance and vascular afterload. The pulsatile component of external hydraulic power was similar in both groups, however, the steady component was lower in the VSD group indicating a higher ratio of pulsatile to total power in the VSD group. In conclusion, vascular afterload was increased and the efficiency of the arterial system was reduced in patients with VSD having large shunts. PMID:1843517

  11. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  12. On the Predictive Properties of Performance Models Derived through Input-Output

    E-print Network

    Menascé, Daniel A.

    Mahmoud Awad and Daniel A. Menasc´e Computer Science Department, George Mason University Fairfax, VA 22030 Publishing Switzerland 2014 #12;90 M. Awad and D.A. Menasc´e The issue we address in this paper

  13. Inferring electric fields and currents from ground magnetometer data - A test with theoretically derived inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, R. A.; Kamide, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced techniques considered by Kamide et al. (1981) seem to have the potential for providing observation-based high time resolution pictures of the global ionospheric current and electric field patterns for interesting events. However, a reliance on the proposed magnetogram-inversion schemes for the deduction of global ionospheric current and electric field patterns requires proof that reliable results are obtained. 'Theoretical' tests of the accuracy of the magnetogram inversion schemes have, therefore, been considered. The present investigation is concerned with a test, involving the developed KRM algorithm and the Rice Convection Model (RCM). The test was successful in the sense that there was overall agreement between electric fields and currents calculated by the RCM and KRM schemes.

  14. Amygdala Inputs to the Prefrontal Cortex Elicit Heterosynaptic Suppression of Hippocampal Inputs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whereas cooperative communication between the hippocampus (HP) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critical for cognitive functions, an antagonistic relationship may exist between the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and PFC during emotional processing. As PFC neurons integrate information from converging excitatory BLA and HP inputs, we explored whether the ability of BLA inputs to evoke feedforward inhibition in the PFC affects converging HP synaptic inputs using in vivo intracellular recordings in anesthetized rats. BLA train stimulation decreased HP synaptic responses in the PFC in vivo. This effect was dependent on the timing of HP-evoked responses and the strength of BLA activation. BLA train stimulation also produced heterosynaptic suppression of responses from the amygdalo-piriform cortex, an associative temporal cortical structure. Heterosynaptic suppression was unidirectional as HP trains failed to modify BLA synaptic responses. These findings provide a mechanism by which BLA activation could decrease PFC neural activity and transiently attenuate the HP influence on PFC function. PMID:25339749

  15. Exploring Spatial Overlap of High-Uptake Regions Derived From Dual Tracer Positron Emission Tomography–Computer Tomography Imaging Using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-Fluorodeoxythymidine in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Li, Chengqiang; Hu, Man; Lu, Jie; Shi, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Sun, Xindong; Fu, Zheng; Yu, Jinming; Meng, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Interest is growing in radiotherapy to nonuniformly boost radioresistant regions within nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using molecular imaging techniques. The complexity of tumor behavior is beyond the ability of any single radiotracer to reveal. We hold dual tracer positron emission tomography–computer tomography (PET/CT) imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluorodeoxythymidine (FLT) for NSCLC patients to offer an integrated overlook of tumor biological behaviors quantitatively and localizationally, which may help biological target volume delineation and subvolume boost. Pathological confirmed that NSCLC patients were eligible. FDG and FLT PET/CT were performed for each patient before anticancer treatment and coregistrated for analysis. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) were calculated automatically. Metabolic volumes (MVs) were delineated by a fixed 50% of SUVmax in FDG PET/CT and proliferative volumes (PVs) were delineated by 50% to 90% of SUVmax with 10% interval in FLT PET/CT. Overlap ratio (OR) were determined as overlapped volume between MV and PV divided PV. Conventional contrast-enhanced CT-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with and without additional PET/CT-guided subtarget boost were made for each of the 5 typical NSCLC patients. Dosimetric parameters derived from dose–volume histogram, tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of lung, esophagus, heart, and spinal cord were calculated and compared. Thirty-one patients were prospectively included and 23 were selected for analysis. Totally, 23 primary diseases, 41 metastatic lymph nodes, and 15 metastatic lesions were positive in dual PET/CTs and included for analysis. Median ORs increased from 58.61% to 93.12% under thresholds of 50% of SUVmax in FDG PET/CT and increased thresholds from 50% to 90% of SUVmax in FLT PET/CT. Based on conventional IMRT, additional boost to union of high FDG (determined by 50% SUVmax) and FLT (determined by 80% SUVmax) uptake subtargets exhibited higher TCP without significant elevated NTCP of lung, esophagus, spinal cord, and heart. Dual tracer PET/CT of FDG and FLT is suggested for NSCLC patients to guide tumor target delineation in clinical practice. FDG PET/CT is necessary whereas FLT PET/CT may be optional when guiding tumor target delineation clinically. Additional information from randomized trials is required to validate. PMID:25929896

  16. Use of Ferritin Expression, Regulated by Neural Cell-Specific Promoters in Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells, to Monitor Differentiation with Magnetic Resonance Imaging In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Cuiping; Mu, Shuhua; Jiang, Xiaogang; Li, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Shizhen; Zhao, Zhenfu; Zhou, Guangqian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a method for monitoring the neural differentiation of stem cells using ferritin transgene expression, under the control of a neural-differentiation-inducible promoter, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) were transduced with a lentivirus containing the human ferritin heavy chain 1 (FTH1) gene coupled to one of three neural cell-specific promoters: human synapsin 1 promoter (SYN1p, for neurons), human glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter (GFAPp, for astrocytes), and human myelin basic protein promoter (MBPp, for oligodendrocytes). Three groups of neural-differentiation-inducible ferritin-expressing (NDIFE) hADMSCs were established: SYN1p-FTH1, GFAPp-FTH1, and MBPp-FTH1. The proliferation rate of the NDIFE hADMSCs was evaluated using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Ferritin expression was assessed with western blotting and immunofluorescent staining before and after the induction of differentiation in NDIFE hADMSCs. The intracellular iron content was measured with Prussian blue iron staining and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. R2 relaxation rates were measured with MRI in vitro. The proliferation rates of control and NDIFE hADMSCs did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). SYN1p-FTH1, GFAPp-FTH1, and MBPp-FTH1 hADMSCs expressed specific markers of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, after neural differentiation. Neural differentiation increased ferritin expression twofold, the intracellular iron content threefold, and the R2 relaxation rate two- to threefold in NDIFE hADMSCs, resulting in notable hypointensity in T2-weighted images (P < 0.05). These results were cross-validated. Thus, a link between neural differentiation and MRI signals (R2 relaxation rate) was established in hADMSCs. The use of MRI and neural-differentiation-inducible ferritin expression is a viable method for monitoring the neural differentiation of hADMSCs. PMID:26176961

  17. Seismic transmission operator reciprocity - I: a direct derivation showing the role of elastic impedance operator symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    The properties of the overburden transmission response in seismic depth imaging are of interest for the analysis of reflectivity illumination or blurring. An elastic transmission-operator reciprocity is derived here by a direct method exploiting a symmetry of the elastic impedance operator at the input and output levels. This impedance-operator symmetry is obtained in a companion paper by assuming the existence and completeness of the lateral modes of the elastic wave equation. The transmission operator, or wave propagator, is a surface-to-surface displacement-to-displacement operator and an appendix here explains heuristically why it does not immediately display its reciprocity property in the way that force-to-displacement Green functions do. Instead, the transmission operator must be augmented by some version of the impedance operator at the input and output levels. We may view this augmentation as re-establishing the connection to force-to-displacement reciprocity or as a separate reciprocity relation for displacements which have been normalized by input and output impedances. Similar statements apply to reflection operators for the region between the two levels. The main transmission-operator reciprocity is an exact property, but a second and approximate symmetry exists when waves that are evanescent in depth are neglected.

  18. Thermal neutron image intensifier tube provides brightly visible radiographic pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, H.; Kraska, I.; Niklas, W.; Schmidt, A.

    1967-01-01

    Vacuum-type neutron image intensifier tube improves image detection in thermal neutron radiographic inspection. This system converts images to an electron image, and with electron acceleration and demagnification between the input target and output screen, produces a bright image viewed through a closed circuit television system.

  19. On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation

    E-print Network

    Zhai, Xiaoming

    The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using available observations, focusing on the role of the synoptically ...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065.210 Section 1065.210 ...§ 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments...engine operation. We recommend that you use sensors, transducers, and...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065.210 Section 1065.210 ...§ 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments...engine operation. We recommend that you use sensors, transducers, and...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065.210 Section 1065.210 ...§ 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments...engine operation. We recommend that you use sensors, transducers, and...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065.210 Section 1065.210 ...§ 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments...engine operation. We recommend that you use sensors, transducers, and...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065.210 Section 1065.210 ...§ 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments...engine operation. We recommend that you use sensors, transducers, and...

  5. INGEN: A COBRA-NC input generator user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, C.L.; Dodge, R.E.

    1986-12-01

    The INGEN (INput GENerator) computer program has been developed as a preprocessor to simplify input generation for the COBRA-NC computer program. INGEN uses several empirical correlations and geometric assumptions to simplify the data input requirements for the COBRA-NC computer code. The simplified input scheme is obtained at the expense of much flexibility provided by COBRA-NC. For more complex problems requiring additional flexibility however, INGEN may be used to provide a skeletal input file to which the more detailed input may be added. This report describes the input requirements for INGEN and describes the algorithms and correlations used to generate the COBRA-NC input. 9 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Shaping Inputs to Reduce Vibration: A Vector Diagram Approach

    E-print Network

    Singhose, William

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes a method for limiting vibration in flexible systems by shaping the system inputs. Unlike most previous attempts at input shaping, this method does not require an extensive system model or lengthy ...

  7. Toward an inventory of nitrogen input to the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate accounting of nitrogen inputs is increasingly necessary for policy decisions related to aquatic nutrient pollution. Here we synthesize available data to provide the first integrated estimates of the amount and uncertainty of nitrogen inputs to the United States. Abou...

  8. Auto Draw from Excel Input Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Goullioud, Renaud; Cox, Brian; Grimes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The design process often involves the use of Excel files during project development. To facilitate communications of the information in the Excel files, drawings are often generated. During the design process, the Excel files are updated often to reflect new input. The problem is that the drawings often lag the updates, often leading to confusion of the current state of the design. The use of this program allows visualization of complex data in a format that is more easily understandable than pages of numbers. Because the graphical output can be updated automatically, the manual labor of diagram drawing can be eliminated. The more frequent update of system diagrams can reduce confusion and reduce errors and is likely to uncover symmetric problems earlier in the design cycle, thus reducing rework and redesign.

  9. Standardized input for Hanford environmental impact statements

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1981-05-01

    Models and computer programs for simulating the environmental behavior of radionuclides in the environment and the resulting radiation dose to humans have been developed over the years by the Environmental Analysis Section staff, Ecological Sciences Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Methodologies have evolved for calculating raidation doses from many exposure pathways for any type of release mechanism. Depending on the situation or process being simulated, different sets of computer programs, assumptions, and modeling techniques must be used. This report is a compilation of recommended computer programs and necessary input information for use in calculating doses to members of the general public for environmental impact statements prepared for DOE activities to be conducted on or near the Hanford Reservation.

  10. Observer-based state estimation and unknown input reconstruction for nonlinear complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junqi; Zhu, Fanglai; Yu, Kaijiang; Bu, Xuhui

    2015-03-01

    This paper considers the issues of both state estimation and unknown information reconstruction for a class of uncertain complex dynamical networks subject to unknown inputs. First, a robust adaptive sliding mode observer which can be used to estimate the states of complex networks through available measurement outputs is developed by employing both adaptive technique and sliding mode control approach. Second, a high-gain second-order sliding mode observer is considered to exactly estimate the derivatives of the output vectors in a finite time. Third, by using the estimates of the states and output derivatives, a kind of algebraic unknown input reconstruction method is proposed. Finally, some numerical simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  11. Use of chaotic and random vibrations to generate high frequency test inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D. L.; Paez, T. L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper and a companion paper show the traditional limits on amplitude and frequency that can be generated in a laboratory test on a vibration exciter can be substantially extended. This is accomplished by attaching a device to the shaker that permits controlled metal to metal impacts that generate high frequency, high acceleration environment on a test surface. A companion paper (Reference 1) shows that a sinusoidal or random shaker input can be used to generate a random vibration environment on the test surface. This paper derives the three response components that occur on the test surface due to an impact on the bottom surface and the base driven response from the shaker input. These response components are used to generate impulse response functions and frequency response functions which are used in the companion paper to derive power spectral density functions for the overall response. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  12. SU-E-J-19: Accuracy of Dual-Energy CT-Derived Relative Electron Density for Proton Therapy Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, J; Duan, X; Kruse, J; Herman, M; Bues, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the suitability of dual-energy CT (DECT) to calculate relative electron density (RED) of tissues for accurate proton therapy dose calculation. Methods: DECT images of RED tissue surrogates were acquired at 80 and 140 kVp. Samples (RED=0.19?2.41) were imaged in a water-equivalent phantom in a variety of configurations. REDs were calculated using the DECT numbers and inputs of the high and low energy spectral weightings. DECT-derived RED was compared between geometric configurations and for variations in the spectral inputs to assess the sensitivity of RED accuracy versus expected values. Results: RED accuracy was dependent on accurate spectral input influenced by phantom thickness and radius from the phantom center. Material samples located at the center of the phantom generally showed the best agreement to reference RED values, but only when attenuation of the surrounding phantom thickness was accounted for in the calculation spectra. Calculated RED changed by up to 10% for some materials when the sample was located at an 11 cm radius from the phantom center. Calculated REDs under the best conditions still differed from reference values by up to 5% in bone and 14% in lung. Conclusion: DECT has previously been used to differentiate tissue types based on RED and Z for binary tissue-type segmentation. To improve upon the current standard of empirical conversion of CT number to RED for treatment planning dose calculation, DECT methods must be able to calculate RED to better than 3% accuracy throughout the image. The DECT method is sensitive to the accuracy of spectral inputs used for calculation, as well as to spatial position in the anatomy. Effort to address adjustments to the spectral calculation inputs based on position and phantom attenuation will be required before DECT-determined RED can achieve a consistent level of accuracy for application in dose calculation.

  13. Input File Creation for the Molecular Dynamics Program LAMMPS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-30

    The program creates an input data file for the molecular dynamics program LAMMPS. The input file created is a liquid mixture between two walls explicitly composed of particles. The liquid molecules are modeled as a bead-spring molecule. The input data file specifies the position and topology of the starting state. The data structure of input allows for dynamic bond creation (cross-linking) within the LAMMPS code.

  14. Atmospheric nutrient inputs to the northern levantine basin from a long-term observation: sources and comparison with riverine inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koçak, M.; Kubilay, N.; Tu?rul, S.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosol and rainwater samples have been collected at a rural site located on the coastline of the Eastern Mediterranean, Erdemli, Turkey between January 1999 and December 2007. Riverine sampling was carried out at five Rivers (Ceyhan, Seyhan, Göksu, Berdan and Lamas) draining into the Northeastern Levantine Basin (NLB) between March 2002 and July 2007. Samples have been analyzed for macronutrients of phosphate, silicate, nitrate and ammonium (PO43-, Sidiss, NO3- and NH4+). Phosphate and silicate in aerosol and rainwater showed higher and larger variations during the transitional period when air flows predominantly originate from North Africa and Middle East/Arabian Peninsula. Deficiency of alkaline material have been found to be the main reason of the acidic rain events whilst high pH values (>7) have been associated with high Sidiss concentrations due to sporadic dust events. In general, lowest nitrate and ammonium concentrations in aerosol and rainwater have been associated with air flow from the Mediterranean Sea. Comparison of atmospheric with riverine fluxes demonstrated that DIN and PO43- fluxes to NLB have been dominated by atmosphere (~90% and ~60% respectively) whereas the input of Si was mainly derived from riverine runoff (~90%). N/P ratios in the atmospheric deposition (233); riverine discharge (28) revealed that NLB receives excessive amounts of DIN and this unbalanced P and N inputs may provoke even more phosphorus deficiency. Observed molar Si/N ratio suggested Si limitation relative to nitrogen might cause a switch from diatom dominated communities to non-siliceous populations particularly at coastal NLB.

  15. Long-term atmospheric nutrient inputs to the Eastern Mediterranean: sources, solubility and comparison with riverine inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koçak, M.; Kubilay, N.; Tu?rul, S.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2010-07-01

    Aerosol and rain samples were collected at a rural site located on the coastline of the Eastern Mediterranean, Erdemli, Turkey between January 1999 and December 2007. Riverine sampling was carried out at five Rivers (Ceyhan, Seyhan, Göksu, Berdan and Lamas) draining into the Northeastern Levantine Basin (NLB) between March 2002 and July 2007. Samples were analyzed for macronutrients of phosphate, silicate, nitrate and ammonium (PO43-, Sidiss, NO3- and NH4+). Phosphate and silicate in aerosol and rainwater showed higher and larger variation during the transitional period (March-May, September) when air flows predominantly originate from North Africa and Middle East/Arabian Peninsula. Deficiency of alkaline material were found to be the main reason of the acidic rain events whilst high pH values (>7) were associated with high Sidiss concentrations due to sporadic dust events. In general, lowest nitrate and ammonium concentrations in aerosol and rainwater were associated with air flow from the Mediterranean Sea. Unlike NO3- and NH4+ (Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen, DIN), there were statistical differences for PO43- and Sidiss solubilities in sea-water and pure-water. Solubilities of PO43- and Sidiss were found to be related with air mass back trajectories and pH. Comparison of atmospheric with riverine fluxes demonstrated that DIN and PO43- fluxes to NLB were dominated by atmosphere (~90% and ~60% respectively) whereas the input of Si was mainly derived from riverine runoff (~90%). N/P ratios (atmosphere ~233; riverine ~28) revealed that NLB receives excessive amounts of DIN and this unbalanced P and N inputs may provoke even more phosphorus deficiency. Molar Si/N ratios (atmosphere + riverine) suggested Si limitation which might cause a switch from diatom dominated phytoplankton communities to non-siliceous populations in NLB.

  16. Exergetic Assessment for Resources Input and Environmental Emissions by Chinese Industry during 1997–2006

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Peng, Beihua; Liu, Mingchu

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the resources use and environmental impact of the Chinese industry during 1997–2006. For the purpose of this analysis the thermodynamic concept of exergy has been employed both to quantify and aggregate the resources input and the environmental emissions arising from the sector. The resources input and environmental emissions show an increasing trend in this period. Compared with 47568.7?PJ in 1997, resources input in 2006 increased by 75.4% and reached 83437.9?PJ, of which 82.5% came from nonrenewable resources, mainly from coal and other energy minerals. Furthermore, the total exergy of environmental emissions was estimated to be 3499.3?PJ in 2006, 1.7 times of that in 1997, of which 93.4% was from GHG emissions and only 6.6% from “three wastes” emissions. A rapid increment of the nonrenewable resources input and GHG emissions over 2002–2006 can be found, owing to the excessive expansion of resource- and energy-intensive subsectors. Exergy intensities in terms of resource input intensity and environmental emission intensity time-series are also calculated, and the trends are influenced by the macroeconomic situation evidently, particularly by the investment-derived economic development in recent years. Corresponding policy implications to guide a more sustainable industry system are addressed. PMID:22973176

  17. Performance of a nonblocking space-division packet switch with correlated input traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, San-Qi

    1992-01-01

    This work studies the performance of a nonblocking space-division packet switch in a correlated input traffic environment. In constructing the input traffic model, the author considers that each input is a time division multiaccess (TDM) link connecting to multiple sources. Every source on a link supports one call at a time. Each call experiences the alternation of ON and OFF periods, and generates packets periodically while in ON period. The stochastic property of each call does not have to be identical. Packets from each individual call are destined to the same output. The output address of each call is assumed to be uniformly assigned at random. The author derives both upper and lower bounds of the maximum throughput at system saturation. His study indicates that, if the source access rate is substantially lower than the link transmission rate, the effect of input traffic correlation on the output contentions can generally be ignored. Also, the analysis of each input queue becomes separable from the rest of the switch. The same study is carried out with nonuniform call address assignment.

  18. Exergetic assessment for resources input and environmental emissions by Chinese industry during 1997-2006.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Peng, Beihua; Liu, Mingchu

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the resources use and environmental impact of the Chinese industry during 1997-2006. For the purpose of this analysis the thermodynamic concept of exergy has been employed both to quantify and aggregate the resources input and the environmental emissions arising from the sector. The resources input and environmental emissions show an increasing trend in this period. Compared with 47568.7?PJ in 1997, resources input in 2006 increased by 75.4% and reached 83437.9?PJ, of which 82.5% came from nonrenewable resources, mainly from coal and other energy minerals. Furthermore, the total exergy of environmental emissions was estimated to be 3499.3?PJ in 2006, 1.7 times of that in 1997, of which 93.4% was from GHG emissions and only 6.6% from "three wastes" emissions. A rapid increment of the nonrenewable resources input and GHG emissions over 2002-2006 can be found, owing to the excessive expansion of resource- and energy-intensive subsectors. Exergy intensities in terms of resource input intensity and environmental emission intensity time-series are also calculated, and the trends are influenced by the macroeconomic situation evidently, particularly by the investment-derived economic development in recent years. Corresponding policy implications to guide a more sustainable industry system are addressed. PMID:22973176

  19. 36 CFR 1193.41 - Input, control, and mechanical functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Input, control, and mechanical functions. 1193.41 Section 1193.41 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... Accessibility and Usability § 1193.41 Input, control, and mechanical functions. Input, control, and...

  20. 36 CFR 1193.41 - Input, control, and mechanical functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Input, control, and mechanical functions. 1193.41 Section 1193.41 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... Accessibility and Usability § 1193.41 Input, control, and mechanical functions. Input, control, and...

  1. On integral-input-to-state stabilization Daniel Liberzon

    E-print Network

    Sontag, Eduardo

    to be necessary and sufficient for the existence of an input-to-state stabilizing state feed- back control law generated via backstepping [6, 7]. In addition, input-to- state stabilizing control laws possess desirable). This paper is concerned with the problem of designing integral-input-to-state stabilizing control laws. We in

  2. Analysis of Stochastic Response of Neural Networks with Stochastic Input

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-10-10

    Software permits the user to extend capability of his/her neural network to include probablistic characteristics of input parameter. User inputs topology and weights associated with neural network along with distributional characteristics of input parameters. Network response is provided via a cumulative density function of network response variable.

  3. Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs

    E-print Network

    Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs Andrew P. Mullhaupt #3 if and only if A is triangular and AA #3; + BB #3; = I n , where I n is the identity matrix. Input normal and A is a matrix fraction, A = M 1 N , where M and N are triangular matrices of low bandwidth. For single input

  4. Comparison of Linear Microinstability Calculations of Varying Input Realism

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt

    2003-09-08

    The effect of varying ''input realism'' or varying completeness of the input data for linear microinstability calculations, in particular on the critical value of the ion temperature gradient for the ion temperature gradient mode, is investigated using gyrokinetic and gyrofluid approaches. The calculations show that varying input realism can have a substantial quantitative effect on the results.

  5. PH-315 A. La Rosa INPUT and OUTPUT IMPEDANCE

    E-print Network

    PH-315 A. La Rosa INPUT and OUTPUT IMPEDANCE I. PURPOSE To familiarize with the concept of input and output impedance of a circuit. Evaluate the benefits of using of transistors to design "stiffer-follower circuit II.B.1 Calculation of the effective (load) input impedance Zin in the emitter- follower circuit II

  6. Identification of an extended Hammerstein system with input hysteresis nonlinearity

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jiandong

    Identification of an extended Hammerstein system with input hysteresis nonlinearity for control of an extended Hammerstein system. A point-slope-based hysteresis model is used to describe the input hysteresis. The basic idea is to separate the ascent and descent paths of the input hysteresis nonlinearity subject

  7. Delay decomposition at a single server queue with constant service time and multiple inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, C.; Schilling, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Two network consisting of single server queues, each with a constant service time, are considered. The external inputs to each network are assumed to follow some general probability distribution. Several interesting equivalencies that exist between the two networks considered are derived. This leads to the introduction of an important concept in delay decomposition. It is shown that the waiting time experienced by a customer can be decomposed into two basic components called self-delay and interference delay.

  8. Derived crop management data for the LandCarbon Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Gail; Liu, Shu-Guang; Oeding, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The LandCarbon project is assessing potential carbon pools and greenhouse gas fluxes under various scenarios and land management regimes to provide information to support the formulation of policies governing climate change mitigation, adaptation and land management strategies. The project is unique in that spatially explicit maps of annual land cover and land-use change are created at the 250-meter pixel resolution. The project uses vast amounts of data as input to the models, including satellite, climate, land cover, soil, and land management data. Management data have been obtained from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and USDA Economic Research Service (ERS) that provides information regarding crop type, crop harvesting, manure, fertilizer, tillage, and cover crop (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2011a, b, c). The LandCarbon team queried the USDA databases to pull historic crop-related management data relative to the needs of the project. The data obtained was in table form with the County or State Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) and the year as the primary and secondary keys. Future projections were generated for the A1B, A2, B1, and B2 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) scenarios using the historic data values along with coefficients generated by the project. The PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) Integrated Model to Assess the Global Environment (IMAGE) modeling framework (Integrated Model to Assess the Global Environment, 2006) was used to develop coefficients for each IPCC SRES scenario, which were applied to the historic management data to produce future land management practice projections. The LandCarbon project developed algorithms for deriving gridded data, using these tabular management data products as input. The derived gridded crop type, crop harvesting, manure, fertilizer, tillage, and cover crop products are used as input to the LandCarbon models to represent the historic and the future scenario management data. The overall algorithm to generate each of the gridded management products is based on the land cover and the derived crop type. For each year in the land cover dataset, the algorithm loops through each 250-meter pixel in the ecoregion. If the current pixel in the land cover dataset is an agriculture pixel, then the crop type is determined. Once the crop type is derived, then the crop harvest, manure, fertilizer, tillage, and cover crop values are derived independently for that crop type. The following is the overall algorithm used for the set of derived grids. The specific algorithm to generate each management dataset is discussed in the respective section for that dataset, along with special data handling and a description of the output product.

  9. imaging essentials images defined,

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yi

    imaging essentials images defined, editing strategies explained Please sign-in & take a handout (on corner of table...) imaging made easy with Beth Beighlie The Harvard Medical School is accredited, or distributing health care related goods, products or services. intro to digital images · digital images defined

  10. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  11. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  12. Surface bidirectional reflectance and albedo properties derived using a land coverbased approach with Moderate Resolution

    E-print Network

    Zeng, Ning

    with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer observations Yi Luo Noetix Research, Inc., Ottawa, Ontario Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) multiday surface reflectance composites with a 500-m spatial resolution properties derived using a land cover­based approach with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

  13. Fluctuation-dissipation theory of input-output interindustrial relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Souma, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the fluctuation-dissipation theory is invoked to shed light on input-output interindustrial relations at a macroscopic level by its application to indices of industrial production (IIP) data for Japan. Statistical noise arising from finiteness of the time series data is carefully removed by making use of the random matrix theory in an eigenvalue analysis of the correlation matrix; as a result, two dominant eigenmodes are detected. Our previous study successfully used these two modes to demonstrate the existence of intrinsic business cycles. Here a correlation matrix constructed from the two modes describes genuine interindustrial correlations in a statistically meaningful way. Furthermore, it enables us to quantitatively discuss the relationship between shipments of final demand goods and production of intermediate goods in a linear response framework. We also investigate distinctive external stimuli for the Japanese economy exerted by the current global economic crisis. These stimuli are derived from residuals of moving-average fluctuations of the IIP remaining after subtracting the long-period components arising from inherent business cycles. The observation reveals that the fluctuation-dissipation theory is applicable to an economic system that is supposed to be far from physical equilibrium.

  14. Greenland Freshwater Input to the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaird, N.; Straneo, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is losing mass at an unprecedented rate. The associated increased freshwater flux directly contributes to sea level rise, but also has dynamical implications for the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and global climate. The freshwater buoyancy forcing from marine terminating outlet glaciers is distributed throughout the depth of coastal fjords. When coupled with strong fjord stratification, this buoyancy forcing can drive significant water mass transformation (WMT) of subsurface waters in the fjord. The WMT differs substantially from a simple freshwater input to the surface ocean. This often overlooked small-scale overturning has potentially important consequences for the influence of GrIS freshwater on large scale ocean circulation and needs to be accounted for in studies of GrIS impact on the ocean. From ship-based and moored hydrographic measurements in East Greenland (2008 to 2013) we describe the character and temporal variability of meltwater driven WMT. While melting always adds freshwater to the ocean, the corresponding WMT causes a seasonally variable vertical redistribution of heat and salt. Observations show that the seasonal cycle of the WMT lags surface air temperatures by several months. We discuss how the WMT and its timing might impact the boundary current system in East Greenland, and implications for its representation in numerical models and impact on North Atlantic deep convection.

  15. Contrasting behaviour of anthropogenic gadolinium and natural rare earth elements in estuaries and the gadolinium input into the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulaks?z, Serkan; Bau, Michael

    2007-08-01

    All major rivers in northwestern Germany that flow into the North Sea, including the Weser River, display rare earth element (REE) patterns with large positive gadolinium (Gd) anomalies that indicate the presence of anthropogenic Gd derived from contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging. This microcontaminant cannot be removed by common sewage treatment technology and enters rivers and lakes with the discharge from waste water treatment plants. As elsewhere, a large fraction of the natural dissolved REE in the Weser River are associated with colloids. These colloids aggregate during mixing of freshwater and seawater in the low-salinity part of the Weser Estuary and the dissolved REE are partially removed from the river water together with the colloids. In marked contrast to the natural REE, the anthropogenic Gd behaves conservatively during this estuarine mixing and transits through the Weser Estuary almost unaffected. This indicates that the speciation of anthropogenic Gd is different from that of natural Gd and suggests a long environmental half-life of the anthropogenic Gd complexes used as contrast agents. The amount of anthropogenic Gd introduced into seawater via rivers is significant and produces anthropogenic positive Gd anomalies in coastal seawater. This is observed in the southwestern North Sea, off the coast of the East Frisian Islands, where anthropogenic Gd is mostly derived from the rivers Rhine and Thames. Its long environmental half-life and conservative estuarine behaviour suggest that anthropogenic Gd might be utilized as a pseudo-natural far-field tracer for truly dissolved riverine REE input into seawater and for discharge from waste water treatment plants and for sewage in river, ground and drinking water. The widespread distribution of anthropogenic Gd is an example of how the increasing use of "exotic" (ultra)trace elements in high-tech processes will in the future significantly hamper studies of the distribution and geochemical behaviour of such elements in natural systems.

  16. A manual for microcomputer image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, P.M. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Ranken, D.M.; George, J.S. )

    1989-12-01

    This manual is intended to serve three basic purposes: as a primer in microcomputer image analysis theory and techniques, as a guide to the use of IMAGE{copyright}, a public domain microcomputer program for image analysis, and as a stimulus to encourage programmers to develop microcomputer software suited for scientific use. Topics discussed include the principals of image processing and analysis, use of standard video for input and display, spatial measurement techniques, and the future of microcomputer image analysis. A complete reference guide that lists the commands for IMAGE is provided. IMAGE includes capabilities for digitization, input and output of images, hardware display lookup table control, editing, edge detection, histogram calculation, measurement along lines and curves, measurement of areas, examination of intensity values, output of analytical results, conversion between raster and vector formats, and region movement and rescaling. The control structure of IMAGE emphasizes efficiency, precision of measurement, and scientific utility. 18 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Input visualization for the Cyclus nuclear fuel cycle simulator: CYClus Input Control

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, R.; Schneider, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses and demonstrates the methods used for the graphical user interface for the Cyclus fuel cycle simulator being developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Cyclus Input Control (CYCIC) is currently being designed with nuclear engineers in mind, but future updates to the program will be made to allow even non-technical users to quickly and efficiently simulate fuel cycles to answer the questions important to them. (authors)

  18. Elevation Derivatives for Mojave Desert Tortoise Habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Gass, Leila

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the methods used to derive various elevation-derivative grids that were inputted to the Mojave Desert Tortoise Habitat model (L. Gass and others, unpub. data). These grids, which capture information on surface roughness and topographic characteristics, are a subset of the environmental datasets evaluated for the tortoise habitat model. This habitat model is of major importance to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which is charged with management of this threatened population, including relocating displaced tortoises to areas identified as suitable habitat.

  19. Studies of auroral X-ray imaging from high altitude spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, D. L.; Mizera, P. F.; Rice, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a study of techniques for imaging the aurora from a high altitude satellite at X-ray wavelengths are summarized. The X-ray observations allow the straightforward derivation of the primary auroral X-ray spectrum and can be made at all local times, day and night. Five candidate imaging systems are identified: X-ray telescope, multiple pinhole camera, coded aperture, rastered collimator, and imaging collimator. Examples of each are specified, subject to common weight and size limits which allow them to be intercompared. The imaging ability of each system is tested using a wide variety of sample spectra which are based on previous satellite observations. The study shows that the pinhole camera and coded aperture are both good auroral imaging systems. The two collimated detectors are significantly less sensitive. The X-ray telescope provides better image quality than the other systems in almost all cases, but a limitation to energies below about 4 keV prevents this system from providing the spectra data essential to deriving electron spectra, energy input to the atmosphere, and atmospheric densities and conductivities. The orbit selection requires a tradeoff between spatial resolution and duty cycle.

  20. Heart imaging method

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale (Richland, WA); Gribble, R. Parks (Richland, WA); Busse, Lawrence J. (Littleton, CO)

    1991-01-01

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.