Science.gov

Sample records for image details places

  1. INTERIOR DETAIL, EASTERN HEMICYCLE, SALOON. WILLIAM HAMILTON PLACED BRONZE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL, EASTERN HEMICYCLE, SALOON. WILLIAM HAMILTON PLACED BRONZE AND MARBLE SCULPTURE IN SOME OF THE HEMICYCLE NICHES. ONE OF THE NICHES HOUSED A ?CANNON STOVE? FOR HEATING THE ROOM IN THE COLDER MONTHS - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Adaptive infrared-image details enhancement technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shi-yong; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa; Chen, Qian

    2014-11-01

    In order to surmount the infrared-image object differentiation difficulty caused by the blurred image edge, a kind of adaptive filter based infrared-image nonlinear edge enhancement technology was proposed in this paper. This technology integrates image nonlinear edge-sharpening and Multi-scale analyze method. The approach of Gauss pyramid structure can enhance detail information by using non-linear algorithms in different scales. The enhanced detail information is then added back to the original image iteratively. While saving the image edge information it can filter image noise and edge distortion caused by edge-sharpening and improve image's clarity and SNR obviously. Gray scale grads was defined based on gray linear increment, image edge enhancement arithmetic can be real time realized, and has been applied in high performance thermal imager. As it is shown in experiments, this algorithm has practicality and potential application value in the field of infrared images contrast enhancement

  3. Where do imaging clinical trials take place?

    Cancer.gov

    Imaging clinical trials take place in doctor's offices, cancer centers, other medical centers, community hospitals and clinics, and veterans' and military hospitals in cities and towns across the United States and in other countries. Imaging clinical

  4. Most Detailed Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This new Hubble image -- one among the largest ever produced with the Earth-orbiting observatory -- shows the most detailed view so far of the entire Crab Nebula ever made. The Crab is arguably the single most interesting object, as well as one of the most studied, in all of astronomy. The image is the largest image ever taken with Hubble's WFPC2 workhorse camera.

    The Crab Nebula is one of the most intricately structured and highly dynamical objects ever observed. The new Hubble image of the Crab was assembled from 24 individual exposures taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and is the highest resolution image of the entire Crab Nebula ever made.

  5. Active place recognition using image signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelson, Sean P.

    1992-11-01

    For reliable navigation, a mobile robot needs to be able to recognize where it is in the world. We previously described an efficient and effective image-based representation of perceptual information for place recognition. Each place is associated with a set of stored image signatures, each a matrix of numbers derived by evaluating some measurement functions over large blocks of pixels. One difficulty, though, is the large number of inherently ambiguous signatures which bloats the database and makes recognition more difficult. Furthermore, since small differences in orientation can produce very different images, reliable recognition requires many images. These problems can be ameliorated by using active methods to select the best signatures to use for the recognition. Two criteria for good images are distinctiveness (is the scene distinguishable from others?) and stability (how much do small viewpoint motions change image recognizability?). We formulate several heuristic distinctiveness metrics which are good predictors of real image distinctiveness. These functions are then used to direct the motion of the camera to find locally distinctive views for use in recognition. This method also produces some modicum of stability, since it uses a form of local optimization. We present the results of applying this method with a camera mounted on a pan-tilt platform.

  6. HUBBLE CAPTURES DETAILED IMAGE OF URANUS' ATMOSPHERE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope has peered deep into Uranus' atmosphere to see clear and hazy layers created by a mixture of gases. Using infrared filters, Hubble captured detailed features of three layers of Uranus' atmosphere. Hubble's images are different from the ones taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew by Uranus 10 years ago. Those images - not taken in infrared light - showed a greenish-blue disk with very little detail. The infrared image allows astronomers to probe the structure of Uranus' atmosphere, which consists of mostly hydrogen with traces of methane. The red around the planet's edge represents a very thin haze at a high altitude. The haze is so thin that it can only be seen by looking at the edges of the disk, and is similar to looking at the edge of a soap bubble. The yellow near the bottom of Uranus is another hazy layer. The deepest layer, the blue near the top of Uranus, shows a clearer atmosphere. Image processing has been used to brighten the rings around Uranus so that astronomers can study their structure. In reality, the rings are as dark as black lava or charcoal. This false color picture was assembled from several exposures taken July 3, 1995 by the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2. CREDIT: Erich Karkoschka (University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Lab) and NASA

  7. Hubble Captures Detailed Image of Uranus' Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope has peered deep into Uranus' atmosphere to see clear and hazy layers created by a mixture of gases. Using infrared filters, Hubble captured detailed features of three layers of Uranus' atmosphere.

    Hubble's images are different from the ones taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew by Uranus 10 years ago. Those images - not taken in infrared light - showed a greenish-blue disk with very little detail.

    The infrared image allows astronomers to probe the structure of Uranus' atmosphere, which consists of mostly hydrogen with traces of methane. The red around the planet's edge represents a very thin haze at a high altitude. The haze is so thin that it can only be seen by looking at the edges of the disk, and is similar to looking at the edge of a soap bubble. The yellow near the bottom of Uranus is another hazy layer. The deepest layer, the blue near the top of Uranus, shows a clearer atmosphere.

    Image processing has been used to brighten the rings around Uranus so that astronomers can study their structure. In reality, the rings are as dark as black lava or charcoal.

    This false color picture was assembled from several exposures taken July 3, 1995 by the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  8. Place-Identity in a School Setting: Effects of the Place Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcouyeux, Aurore; Fleury-Bahi, Ghozlane

    2011-01-01

    Studies on place identity show positive relationships between the evaluation of a place and mechanisms involved in place identification. However, individuals also identify with places of low social prestige (places that bear a negative social image). Few authors investigate the nature of place identity processes in this case. The goal of this…

  9. Al-26 imaging details from COMPTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, R.; Knodlseder, J.; Bennett, K.; Bloemen, H.; Dupraz, C.; Hermsen, W.; Lichti, G. G.; Morris, D.; Oberlack, U.; Ryan, J.

    1995-05-01

    The Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) map of 1.809 MeV emission from Galactic Al-26 is now based on 2 1/2 years of data. Different imaging analysis approaches are discussed: Likelihood maps from point source scans are utilized for searches of emission regions; astrophysical source models are fitted to the measurement with the maximum likelihood method; deconvolved images are produced with the maximum entropy algorithm. Simulations and statistical analysis with the bootstrap method demonstrate that the intensity irregularity and asymmetry along the Galactic plane is significant, although weaker individual features are insignificant by themselves. The comparison of classical Al-26 source tracer distributions shows that none of these models represents the COMPTEL data well. The measured 1.809 MeV feature from the Vela region, positionally consistent with the Vela supernova remnant, shows an indication for extended emission.

  10. Research on the Hotel Image Based on the Detail Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ban; Shenghua, Zheng; He, Yi

    Detail service management, initially developed as marketing programs to enhance customer loyalty, has now become an important part of customer relation strategy. This paper analyzes the critical factors of detail service and its influence on the hotel image. We establish the theoretical model of influencing factors on hotel image and propose corresponding hypotheses. We use applying statistical method to test and verify the above-mentioned hypotheses. This paper provides a foundation for further study of detail service design and planning issues.

  11. EXTRACTION OF DETAILED IMAGE REGIONS FOR CONTENT-BASED IMAGE RETRIEVAL

    E-print Network

    Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.

    EXTRACTION OF DETAILED IMAGE REGIONS FOR CONTENT-BASED IMAGE RETRIEVAL D.Androutsost, K. N@acs.ryerson.ca ABSTRACT We present a technique for coarsely extracting the regions of natural color images which contain to be able to extract, a priori, certain spatial image information. In this paper we present a technique

  12. Detailed images of asteroid 25143 Itokawa from Hayabusa.

    PubMed

    Saito, J; Miyamoto, H; Nakamura, R; Ishiguro, M; Michikami, T; Nakamura, A M; Demura, H; Sasaki, S; Hirata, N; Honda, C; Yamamoto, A; Yokota, Y; Fuse, T; Yoshida, F; Tholen, D J; Gaskell, R W; Hashimoto, T; Kubota, T; Higuchi, Y; Nakamura, T; Smith, P; Hiraoka, K; Honda, T; Kobayashi, S; Furuya, M; Matsumoto, N; Nemoto, E; Yukishita, A; Kitazato, K; Dermawan, B; Sogame, A; Terazono, J; Shinohara, C; Akiyama, H

    2006-06-01

    Rendezvous of the Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa with the near-Earth asteroid 25143 Itokawa took place during the interval September through November 2005. The onboard camera imaged the solid surface of this tiny asteroid (535 meters by 294 meters by 209 meters) with a spatial resolution of 70 centimeters per pixel, revealing diverse surface morphologies. Unlike previously explored asteroids, the surface of Itokawa reveals both rough and smooth terrains. Craters generally show unclear morphologies. Numerous boulders on Itokawa's surface suggest a rubble-pile structure. PMID:16741110

  13. Image signatures for place recognition and map construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelson, Sean P.; McDermott, Drew V.

    1992-04-01

    For reliable navigation, a mobile robot needs to be able to recognize where it is in the world. We describe an efficient and effective image-based representation of perceptual information for place recognition. Each place is associated with a set of stored image signatures, each a matrix of numbers derived by evaluating some measurement function over large blocks of pixels. Measurements are chosen to be characteristic of a location yet reasonably invariant over different viewing conditions. Signature matching can be done quickly by element wise comparison. Additional stability can be gotten by matching signatures at offsets or across scales. Signatures can be stored in a k-d tree so that retrieval of similar signatures is fast. We can also use several types of measurements in tandem to enhance recognition accuracy. We present preliminary experimental results which show up to 90% recognition accuracy. When used together with prior position information, we suggest that this performance is good enough to support reliable place recognition from a series of images.

  14. Maia X-ray fluorescence imaging: Capturing detail in complex natural samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, C. G.; Siddons, D. P.; Kirkham, R.; Li, Z. Y.; de Jonge, M. D.; Paterson, D. J.; Kuczewski, A.; Howard, D. L.; Dunn, P. A.; Falkenberg, G.; Boesenberg, U.; De Geronimo, G.; Fisher, L. A.; Halfpenny, A.; Lintern, M. J.; Lombi, E.; Dyl, K. A.; Jensen, M.; Moorhead, G. F.; Cleverley, J. S.; Hough, R. M.; Godel, B.; Barnes, S. J.; James, S. A.; Spiers, K. M.; Alfeld, M.; Wellenreuther, G.; Vukmanovic, Z.; Borg, S.

    2014-04-01

    Motivated by the challenge of capturing complex hierarchical chemical detail in natural material from a wide range of applications, the Maia detector array and integrated realtime processor have been developed to acquire X-ray fluorescence images using X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XFM). Maia has been deployed initially at the XFM beamline at the Australian Synchrotron and more recently, demonstrating improvements in energy resolution, at the P06 beamline at Petra III in Germany. Maia captures fine detail in element images beyond 100 M pixels. It combines a large solid-angle annular energy-dispersive 384 detector array, stage encoder and flux counter inputs and dedicated FPGA-based real-time event processor with embedded spectral deconvolution. This enables high definition imaging and enhanced trace element sensitivity to capture complex trace element textures and place them in a detailed spatial context. Maia hardware and software methods provide per pixel correction for dwell, beam flux variation, dead-time and pileup, as well as off-line parallel processing for enhanced throughput. Methods have been developed for real-time display of deconvoluted SXRF element images, depth mapping of rare particles and the acquisition of 3D datasets for fluorescence tomography and XANES imaging using a spectral deconvolution method that tracks beam energy variation.

  15. Place Pulse : measuring the collaborative image of the city

    E-print Network

    Salesses, Mark Philip

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents Place Pulse, a tool capable of conducting large crowdsourced visual preference surveys. The data collected with Place Pulse was used to create quantitative measures of the perceptions people hold of ...

  16. Cloud Imagers Offer New Details on Earth's Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    A stunning red sunset or purple sunrise is an aesthetic treat with a scientific explanation: The colors are a direct result of the absorption or reflectance of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols, minute particles (either solid or liquid) in the Earth s atmosphere that occur both naturally and because of human activity. At the beginning or end of the day, the Sun s rays travel farther through the atmosphere to reach an observer s eyes and more green and yellow light is scattered, making the Sun appear red. Sunset and sunrise are especially colorful when the concentration of atmospheric particles is high. This ability of aerosols to absorb and reflect sunlight is not just pretty; it also determines the amount of radiation and heat that reaches the Earth s surface, and can profoundly affect climate. In the atmosphere, aerosols are also important as nuclei for the condensation of water droplets and ice crystals. Clouds with fewer aerosols cannot form as many water droplets (called cloud particles), and consequently, do not scatter light well. In this case, more sunlight reaches the Earth s surface. When aerosol levels in clouds are high, however, more nucleation points can form small liquid water droplets. These smaller cloud particles can reflect up to 90 percent of visible radiation to space, keeping the heat from ever reaching Earth s surface. The tendency for these particles to absorb or reflect the Sun s energy - called extinction by astronomers - depends on a number of factors, including chemical composition and the humidity and temperature in the surrounding air; because cloud particles are so small, they are affected quickly by minute changes in the atmosphere. Because of this sensitivity, atmospheric scientists study cloud particles to anticipate patterns and shifts in climate. Until recently, NASA s study of atmospheric aerosols and cloud particles has been focused primarily on satellite images, which, while granting large-scale atmospheric analysis, limited scientists ability to acquire detailed information about individual particles. Now, experiments with specialized equipment can be flown on standard jets, making it possible for researchers to monitor and more accurately anticipate changes in Earth s atmosphere and weather patterns.

  17. The image of place in American popular music, 1970-1990 

    E-print Network

    Seiler, Leslie Carl

    1997-01-01

    Popular music is examined from two geographical perspectives, the image of place as represented in the titles of popular songs and the changing geography of the popular music industry. Examining the trend in place reference in popular song titles...

  18. Hundred metre virtual telescope captures unique detailed colour image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    A team of French astronomers has captured one of the sharpest colour images ever made. They observed the star T Leporis, which appears, on the sky, as small as a two-storey house on the Moon [1]. The image was taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), emulating a virtual telescope about 100 metres across and reveals a spherical molecular shell around an aged star. ESO PR Photo 06a/09 The star T Leporis as seen with VLTI ESO PR Photo 06b/09 The star T Leporis to scale ESO PR Photo 06c/09 A virtual 100-metre telescope ESO PR Photo 06d/09 The orbit of Theta1 Orionis C ESO PR Video 06a/09 Zoom-in onto T Leporis "This is one of the first images made using near-infrared interferometry," says lead author Jean-Baptiste Le Bouquin. Interferometry is a technique that combines the light from several telescopes, resulting in a vision as sharp as that of a giant telescope with a diameter equal to the largest separation between the telescopes used. Achieving this requires the VLTI system components to be positioned to an accuracy of a fraction of a micrometre over about 100 metres and maintained so throughout the observations -- a formidable technical challenge. When doing interferometry, astronomers must often content themselves with fringes, the characteristic pattern of dark and bright lines produced when two beams of light combine, from which they can model the physical properties of the object studied. But, if an object is observed on several runs with different combinations and configurations of telescopes, it is possible to put these results together to reconstruct an image of the object. This is what has now been done with ESO's VLTI, using the 1.8-metre Auxiliary Telescopes. "We were able to construct an amazing image, and reveal the onion-like structure of the atmosphere of a giant star at a late stage of its life for the first time," says Antoine Mérand, member of the team. "Numerical models and indirect data have allowed us to imagine the appearance of the star before, but it is quite astounding that we can now see it, and in colour." Although it is only 15 by 15 pixel across, the reconstructed image shows an extreme close-up of a star 100 times larger than the Sun, a diameter corresponding roughly to the distance between the Earth and the Sun. This star is, in turn, surrounded by a sphere of molecular gas, which is about three times as large again. T Leporis, in the constellation of Lepus (the Hare), is located 500 light-years away. It belongs to the family of Mira stars, well known to amateur astronomers. These are giant variable stars that have almost extinguished their nuclear fuel and are losing mass. They are nearing the end of their lives as stars, and will soon die, becoming white dwarfs. The Sun will become a Mira star in a few billion years, engulfing the Earth in the dust and gas expelled in its final throes. Mira stars are among the biggest factories of molecules and dust in the Universe, and T Leporis is no exception. It pulsates with a period of 380 days and loses the equivalent of the Earth's mass every year. Since the molecules and dust are formed in the layers of atmosphere surrounding the central star, astronomers would like to be able to see these layers. But this is no easy task, given that the stars themselves are so far away -- despite their huge intrinsic size, their apparent radius on the sky can be just half a millionth that of the Sun. "T Leporis looks so small from the Earth that only an interferometric facility, such as the VLTI at Paranal, can take an image of it. VLTI can resolve stars 15 times smaller than those resolved by the Hubble Space Telescope," says Le Bouquin. To create this image with the VLTI astronomers had to observe the star for several consecutive nights, using all the four movable 1.8-metre VLT Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs). The ATs were combined in different groups of three, and were also moved to different positions, creating more new interferometric configurations, so that astronomers could emulate a virtual telescope

  19. Detailed Decomposition of Galaxy Images. II. Beyond Axisymmetric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chien Y.; Ho, Luis C.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2010-06-01

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) fitting algorithm (GALFIT, ver. 3) with new capabilities to study the structural components of galaxies and other astronomical objects in digital images. Our technique improves on previous 2D fitting algorithms by allowing for irregular, curved, logarithmic and power-law spirals, ring, and truncated shapes in otherwise traditional parametric functions like the Sérsic, Moffat, King, Ferrer, etc., profiles. One can mix and match these new shape features freely, with or without constraints, and apply them to an arbitrary number of model components of numerous profile types, so as to produce realistic-looking galaxy model images. Yet, despite the potential for extreme complexity, the meaning of the key parameters like the Sérsic index, effective radius, or luminosity remains intuitive and essentially unchanged. The new features have an interesting potential for use to quantify the degree of asymmetry of galaxies, to quantify low surface brightness tidal features beneath and beyond luminous galaxies, to allow more realistic decompositions of galaxy subcomponents in the presence of strong rings and spiral arms, and to enable ways to gauge the uncertainties when decomposing galaxy subcomponents. We illustrate these new features by way of several case studies that display various levels of complexity.

  20. Detailed study of B037 based on HST images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun

    2011-05-01

    B037 is of interest because it is both the most luminous and the most highly reddened cluster known in M31. Deep observations and high spatial resolution images with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) first showed that this cluster is crossed by a dust lane. Photometric data in the F606W and F814W filters obtained in this paper indicate that colors of (F606W — F814W) in the dust lane are redder ˜ 0.4 mag than ones in the other regions of B037. The HST images show that this dust lane seems to be contained in B037, instead of in the M31 disk or the Milky Way. As far as we know, the formation of dust requires gas with a rather high metallicity. However, B037 has a low metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.07 ± 0.20. So, it seems improbable that the observed dust lane is physically associated with B037. It is clear that the origin of this dust lane is worthy of future study. In addition, based on these images, we present the precise variation of ellipticity and position angle, and of surface brightness profile, and determine the structural parameters of B037 by fitting a single-mass isotropic King model. In the F606W filter, we derive the best-fitting scale radius r0 = 0.56 ± 0.02? (= 2.16 ± 0.08 pc), a tidal radius rt = 8.6 ± 0.4? (= 33.1 ± 1.5 pc), and a concentration index c = log(rt/r0) = 1.19±0.02. In the F814W filter, we derive r0 = 0.56 ± 0.01? (= 2.16 ± 0.04 pc), rt = 8.9 ± 0.3? (= 34.3 ± 1.2 pc), and c = log(rt/r0) = 1.20 ± 0.01. The extinction-corrected central surface brightness is ?0 = 13.53 ± 0.03 mag arcsec-2 in the F606W filter, and 12.85 ± 0.03 mag arcsec-2 in the F814W filter. We also calculate the half-light radius at rh = 1.05 ± 0.03? (= 4.04 ± 0.12 pc) in the F606W filter and rh = 1.07 ± 0.01? (= 4.12 ± 0.04 pc) in the F814W filter. In addition, we derived the complete magnitudes of B037 in the V and I bands by transforming the magnitudes from the ACS system to the standard system, which are in good agreement with previous ground-based broadband photometry studies.

  1. Study on infrared image detail enhancement algorithm based on adaptive lateral inhibition network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaosheng; Liu, Qin; Li, Pengfei; Liu, Jinsong; Xiang, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at traditional lateral inhibition network enhancement algorithm's disadvantages such as poor anti-noise performance and complicated calculation, this paper proposed a novel infrared image detail enhancement algorithm based on adaptive lateral inhibition network. The algorithm can not only reduce noise by adaptively changing lateral inhibition coefficients adaptively according to image scene, but also produce strong contrast between sharp edge and even part. Compared with traditional lateral inhibition network algorithm, the experimental results show that the image details are obviously highlighted, and the image's contrast increases by 1.25 times and the information entropy increases by 1.15 times.

  2. Display and detail enhancement for high-dynamic-range infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Chen, Qian; Liu, Ning; Ren, Jianle; Sui, Xiubao

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic range reduction and detail enhancement are two important issues for effectively displaying high-dynamic-range images acquired by thermal camera systems. They must be performed in such a way that the high dynamic range image signal output from sensors is compressed in a pleasing manner for display on lower dynamic range monitors without reducing the perceptibility of small details. In this paper, a new method of display and detail enhancement for high dynamic range infrared images is presented. This method effectively maps the raw acquired infrared image to 8-bit domain based on the same architecture of bilateral filter and dynamic range partitioning approach. It includes three main steps: First, a bilateral filter is applied to separate the input image into the base component and detail component. Second, refine the base and detail layer using an adaptive Gaussian filter to avoid unwanted artifacts. Then the base layer is projected to the display range and the detail layer is enhanced using an adaptive gain control approach. Finally, the two parts are recombined and quantized to 8-bit domain. The strength of the proposed method lies in its ability to avoid unwanted artifacts and adaptability in different scenarios. Its great performance is validated by the experimental results tested with two real infrared imagers.

  3. Investigating the visual inspection subjectivity on the contrast-detail evaluation in digital mammography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Medeiros, Regina B.; Schiabel, Homero

    2014-03-01

    A major difficulty in the interpretation of mammographic images is the low contrast and, in the case of early detection of breast cancer, the reduced size of the features of malignancy on findings such as microcalcifications. Furthermore, image assessment is subject to significant reliance of the capacity of observation of the expert that will perform it, compromising the final diagnosis accuracy. Thinking about this aspect, this study evaluated the subjectivity of visual inspection to assess the contrast-detail in mammographic images. For this, we compared the human readings of images generated with the CDMAM phantom performed by four observers, enabling to determining a threshold of contrast visibility in each diameter disks present in the phantom. These thresholds were compared graphically and by statistical measures allowing us to build a strategy for use of contrast and detail (dimensions) as parameters of quality in mammography.

  4. Impacts of Filtration on Contrast-Detail Detectability of an X-ray Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Rong, John; Wu, Xizeng; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impacts of added filtration on the contrast-detail detectability of a digital X-ray imaging system for small animal studies. A digital X-ray imaging system specifically designed for small animal studies was used. This system is equipped with a micro X-ray source with a tungsten target and a beryllium window filtration and a CCD-based digital detector. Molybdenum filters of 0 mm, 0.02 mm, and 0.05 mm in thickness were added. The corresponding X-ray spectra and contrast-detail detectabilities were measured using two phantoms of different thicknesses simulating breast tissue under different exposures. The added Mo filters reduced the low-energy as well as the high-energy photons, hence providing a narrowband for imaging quality improvement. In the experiments with a 1.15 cm phantom, the optimal image detectability was observed using 22 kVp and the 0.05 mm Mo filter. With the 2.15 cm phantom, the best detectability was obtained with 22 kVp and the 0.02 mm Mo filter. Our experiments showed that appropriate filtrations could reduce certain low- and high-energy components of X-ray spectra which have limited contributions to image contrast. At the same time, such filtration could improve the contrast-detail detectability, particularly at relatively low kVp and high filtration. Therefore, optimal image quality can be obtained with the same absorbed radiation dose by the subjects when appropriate filtration is used. PMID:23165063

  5. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Iacono, Maria Ida; Neufeld, Esra; Akinnagbe, Esther; Bower, Kelsey; Wolf, Johanna; Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Sharma, Deepika; Lloyd, Bryn; Wilm, Bertram J; Wyss, Michael; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Jakab, Andras; Makris, Nikos; Cohen, Ethan D; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1-2 mm and with 10-50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named "MIDA". The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i) structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) data to image the vasculature, and iii) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25901747

  6. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Maria Ida; Neufeld, Esra; Akinnagbe, Esther; Bower, Kelsey; Wolf, Johanna; Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Sharma, Deepika; Lloyd, Bryn; Wilm, Bertram J.; Wyss, Michael; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Jakab, Andras; Makris, Nikos; Cohen, Ethan D.; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang; Angelone, Leonardo M.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1–2 mm and with 10–50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named “MIDA”. The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i) structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) data to image the vasculature, and iii) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25901747

  7. A novel material detection algorithm based on 2D GMM-based power density function and image detail addition scheme in dual energy X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Pourghassem, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Material detection is a vital need in dual energy X-ray luggage inspection systems at security of airport and strategic places. In this paper, a novel material detection algorithm based on statistical trainable models using 2-Dimensional power density function (PDF) of three material categories in dual energy X-ray images is proposed. In this algorithm, the PDF of each material category as a statistical model is estimated from transmission measurement values of low and high energy X-ray images by Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM). Material label of each pixel of object is determined based on dependency probability of its transmission measurement values in the low and high energy to PDF of three material categories (metallic, organic and mixed materials). The performance of material detection algorithm is improved by a maximum voting scheme in a neighborhood of image as a post-processing stage. Using two background removing and denoising stages, high and low energy X-ray images are enhanced as a pre-processing procedure. For improving the discrimination capability of the proposed material detection algorithm, the details of the low and high energy X-ray images are added to constructed color image which includes three colors (orange, blue and green) for representing the organic, metallic and mixed materials. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on real images that had been captured from a commercial dual energy X-ray luggage inspection system. The obtained results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and operative in detection of the metallic, organic and mixed materials with acceptable accuracy. PMID:22635176

  8. Recursive, in-place algorithm for the hexagonal orthogonal oriented quadrature image pyramid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1989-01-01

    Pyramid image transforms have proven useful in image coding and pattern recognition. The hexagonal orthogonal oriented quadrature image pyramid (HOP), transforms an image into a set of orthogonal, oriented, odd and even bandpass subimages. It operates on a hexagonal input lattice and employs seven kernels, each of which occupies a neighborhood consisting of a point and a hexagon of six nearest neighbors. The kernels consist of one lowpass and six bandpass kernels that are orthogonal, self-similar, and localized in space, spatial frequency, orientation, and phase. The kernels are first applied to the image samples to create the first level of the pyramid, then to the lowpass coefficients to create the next level. The resulting pyramid is a compact, efficient image code. Here, a recursive, in-place algorithm for computation of the HOP transform is described. The transform may be regarded as a depth-first traversal of a tree structure. It is shown that the algorithm requires a number of operations that is on the order of the number of pixels.

  9. Noise removal and real-time detail enhancement of high-dynamic-range infrared images with time consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Frederic; Schockaert, Cedric; Mirbach, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a noise removal and image detail enhancement method that accounts for the limitations on human's perception to effectively visualize high-dynamic-range (HDR) infrared (IR) images. In order to represent real world scenes, IR images use to be represented by a HDR that generally exceeds the working range of common display devices (8 bits). Therefore, an effective HDR mapping without losing the perceptibility of details is needed. To do so, we introduce the use of two guided filters (GF) to generate an accurate base and detail image component. A plausibility mask is also generated from the combination of the linear coefficients that result from each GF; an indicator of the spatial detail that enables to identify those regions that are prominent to present noise in the detail image component. Finally, we filter the working range of the HDR along time to avoid global brightness fluctuations in the final 8 bit data representation, which results from combining both detail and base image components using a local adaptive gamma correction (LAGC). The last has been designed according to the human vision characteristics. The experimental evaluation shows that the proposed approach significantly enhances image details in addition to improving the contrast of the entire image. Finally, the high performance of the proposed approach makes it suitable for real word applications.

  10. Processing of Uav Based Range Imaging Data to Generate Detailed Elevation Models of Complex Natural Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, T. K.; Eisenbeiss, H.

    2012-07-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are more and more used in civil areas like geomatics. Autonomous navigated platforms have a great flexibility in flying and manoeuvring in complex environments to collect remote sensing data. In contrast to standard technologies such as aerial manned platforms (airplanes and helicopters) UAVs are able to fly closer to the object and in small-scale areas of high-risk situations such as landslides, volcano and earthquake areas and floodplains. Thus, UAVs are sometimes the only practical alternative in areas where access is difficult and where no manned aircraft is available or even no flight permission is given. Furthermore, compared to terrestrial platforms, UAVs are not limited to specific view directions and could overcome occlusions from trees, houses and terrain structures. Equipped with image sensors and/or laser scanners they are able to provide elevation models, rectified images, textured 3D-models and maps. In this paper we will describe a UAV platform, which can carry a range imaging (RIM) camera including power supply and data storage for the detailed mapping and monitoring of complex structures, such as alpine riverbed areas. The UAV platform NEO from Swiss UAV was equipped with the RIM camera CamCube 2.0 by PMD Technologies GmbH to capture the surface structures. Its navigation system includes an autopilot. To validate the UAV-trajectory a 360° prism was installed and tracked by a total station. Within the paper a workflow for the processing of UAV-RIM data is proposed, which is based on the processing of differential GNSS data in combination with the acquired range images. Subsequently, the obtained results for the trajectory are compared and verified with a track of a UAV (Falcon 8, Ascending Technologies) carried out with a total station simultaneously to the GNSS data acquisition. The results showed that the UAV's position using differential GNSS could be determined in the centimetre to the decimetre level. The RIM data indicated a high noise level in the measured distance image, due to the vibrations caused by the flight system. Multi-image processing reduced the noise level of the distance image. The produced elevation models from a test area show the high potential of the proposed method for complex structures such as riverbeds.

  11. Detailed analysis of substorm observations using SuperDARN, UVI, ground-based magnetometers, and all-sky imagers

    E-print Network

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Detailed analysis of substorm observations using SuperDARN, UVI, ground-based magnetometers Imager (UVI), CANOPUS magnetometers, the Alaska chain magnetometers, the Poker Flat meridian plasma flows, auroral luminosity, and magnetometer perturbations are investigated. It is found

  12. Multiparameter double hole contrast detail phantom: Ability to detect image displacement due to off position anode stem

    SciTech Connect

    Pauzi, Nur Farahana; Majid, Zafri Azran Abdul; Sapuan, Abdul Halim; Junet, Laila Kalidah; Azemin, Mohd Zulfaezal Che

    2015-04-24

    Contrast Detail phantom is a quality control tool to analyze the performance of imaging devices. Currently, its function is solely to evaluate the contrast detail characteristic of imaging system. It consists of drilled hole which gives effect to the penetration of x-ray beam divergence to pass through the base of each hole. This effect will lead to false appearance of image from its original location but it does not being visualized in the radiograph. In this study, a new design of Contrast Detail phantom’s hole which consists of double hole construction has been developed. It can detect the image displacement which is due to off position of anode stem from its original location. The double hole differs from previous milled hole, whereby it consists of combination of different hole diameters. Small hole diameter (3 mm) is positioned on top of larger hole diameter (10 mm). The thickness of double hole acrylic blocks is 13 mm. Result revealed that Multiparameter Double Hole Contrast Detail phantom can visualize the shifted flaw image quality produced by x-ray machine due to improper position of the anode stem which is attached to rotor and stator. The effective focal spot of x-ray beam also has been shifted from the center of collimator as a result of off-position anode stem. As a conclusion, the new design of double hole Contrast Detail phantom able to measure those parameters in a well manner.

  13. Enceladus South Polar Terrain Geology: New Details From Cassini ISS High Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Denk, T.; Giese, B.; Ingersoll, A.; Johnson, T. V.; McEwen, A. S.; Neukum, G.; Perry, J.; Porco, C. C.; Roatsch, T.; Thomas, P. C.; Turtle, E. P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft executed a close flyby of Enceladus on August 11 (altitude: 50km); two more are planned for October 9 (altitude: 25 km), and October 31 (altitude: 196 km). High resolution (as fine as 7m/pixel) images of known geologically active features in the South Polar Terrain (SPT) have been returned to investigate how plume eruptions, tectonism, and seismicity alter the surface and to reveal how the SPT has evolved over time. We examined six known eruption sites (Spitale and Porco 2007, Nature 449, 695-697) along Cairo, Baghdad, and Damascus Sulci, as well as inactive portions of the "tiger stripes" and bright fractured terrain in adjacent areas. We also obtained contiguous ISS broadband multi-spectral mosaics of the entire SPT region to refine our geological and digital terrain maps and to search for volcanically and tectonically driven temporal changes. The highest-resolution images show ice blocks up to tens of meters in size that are widely but non-uniformly distributed over a variety of terrain units. The upraised flanks and valley walls of active tiger stripes are mantled in places by smooth fluffy-looking deposits, most likely accumulations of coarse-grained plume fallout. With increasing lateral distance from the stripes, the smooth upraised flank deposits grade into rounded, platy-textured, elongate hills and a conspicuous system of quasi-parallel knobby ridges and grooves that have spacings and dimensions comparable to the tiger stripe flanks themselves. Peculiar narrow lenticular ridges, perhaps emplaced by extrusion or as icy pyroclastic deposits, rise from tens to hundreds of meters along the medial fissures of some tiger stripes. On regional scales, the ends of the tiger stripes are bounded by a complex network of fractured terrain, within which can be found numerous transform faults that lie at high angles relative to the trends of the tiger stripes. Observed offsets along these transforms and an absence of lateral symmetry of the displaced terrains suggest that tiger stripes are not exact analogs to classic terrestrial oceanic rifts. Instead, any possible tectonic divergence is more likely a result of the superposition of many regionally and temporally distributed spreading centers.

  14. Integration of Point Clouds Originated from Laser Scaner and Photogrammetric Images for Visualization of Complex Details of Historical Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuntas, C.

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) models of historical buildings are created for documentation and virtual realization of them. Laser scanning and photogrammetry are extensively used to perform for these aims. The selection of the method that will be used in threedimensional modelling study depends on the scale and shape of the object, and also applicability of the method. Laser scanners are high cost instruments. However, the cameras are low cost instruments. The off-the-shelf cameras are used for taking the photogrammetric images. The camera is imaging the object details by carrying on hand while the laser scanner makes ground based measurement. Laser scanner collect high density spatial data in a short time from the measurement area. On the other hand, image based 3D (IB3D) measurement uses images to create 3D point cloud data. The image matching and the creation of the point cloud can be done automatically. Historical buildings include more complex details. Thus, all details cannot be measured by terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) due to the blocking the details with each others. Especially, the artefacts which have complex shapes cannot be measured in full details. They cause occlusion on the point cloud model. However it is possible to record photogrammetric images and creation IB3D point cloud for these areas. Thus the occlusion free 3D model is created by the integration of point clouds originated from the TLS and photogrammetric images. In this study, usability of laser scanning in conjunction with image based modelling for creation occlusion free three-dimensional point cloud model of historical building was evaluated. The IB3D point cloud was created in the areas that could not been measured by TLS. Then laser scanning and IB3D point clouds were integrated in the common coordinate system. The registration point clouds were performed with the iterative closest point (ICP) and georeferencing methods. Accuracy of the registration was evaluated by convergency and its standard deviations for the ICP and residuals on the control points for the georeferencing method.

  15. Large-scale aerial images capture details of invasive plant populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Satellite and aerial remote sensing have been successfully used to measure invasive weed infestations over very large areas, but have limited resolution. Ground-based methods have provided detailed measurements of invasive weeds, but can measure only limited areas. Here we test a novel approach th...

  16. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. Aptina Imaging ­ Senior Color Imaging Engineer Group: Camera Systems Group Title: Senior Color Imaging Engineer Location: San Jose, California Description

  17. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. Imaging Scientist ­ Aptina Imaging Aptina is a global provider of CMOS imaging solutions with a growing portfolio of products that can be found in all

  18. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. Senior Color Imaging Scientist ­ Aptina Imaging Aptina is a global provider of CMOS imaging solutions with a growing portfolio of products that can

  19. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. Senior Imaging Engineer ­ Aptina Imaging Aptina is a global provider of CMOS imaging solutions with a growing portfolio of products that can be found in all

  20. Non-destructive speckle imaging of subsurface detail in paper-based cultural materials.

    PubMed

    Miles, Elaine; Roberts, Ann

    2009-07-20

    We have used Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) to investigate the statistical properties of dynamic speckle reflected from an obscuring scattering surface in order to reveal drawings that are hidden beneath. Here we explore the limitations of this method used with various algorithms when applied to a selection of paper samples. These samples consist of a sketch executed in an assortment of media laid on a base surface that are then hidden beneath a subsequent top layer. The ability to resolve gray scale images was examined as well as the contrast surface temperature relationship. A book with glued pages was investigated in order to demonstrate the technique's applicability to the non-destructive examination of cultural materials. While being shown as a useful tool in revealing obscured drawings the scattering properties of the surface layer present a limitation in its general applicability. PMID:19654632

  1. Image quality assessment in digital mammography: part II. NPWE as a validated alternative for contrast detail analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, P.; Marshall, N. W.; Bosmans, H.; Bochud, F. O.; Verdun, F. R.

    2011-07-01

    Assessment of image quality for digital x-ray mammography systems used in European screening programs relies mainly on contrast-detail CDMAM phantom scoring and requires the acquisition and analysis of many images in order to reduce variability in threshold detectability. Part II of this study proposes an alternative method based on the detectability index (d') calculated for a non-prewhitened model observer with an eye filter (NPWE). The detectability index was calculated from the normalized noise power spectrum and image contrast, both measured from an image of a 5 cm poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom containing a 0.2 mm thick aluminium square, and the pre-sampling modulation transfer function. This was performed as a function of air kerma at the detector for 11 different digital mammography systems. These calculated d' values were compared against threshold gold thickness (T) results measured with the CDMAM test object and against derived theoretical relationships. A simple relationship was found between T and d', as a function of detector air kerma; a linear relationship was found between d' and contrast-to-noise ratio. The values of threshold thickness used to specify acceptable performance in the European Guidelines for 0.10 and 0.25 mm diameter discs were equivalent to threshold calculated detectability indices of 1.05 and 6.30, respectively. The NPWE method is a validated alternative to CDMAM scoring for use in the image quality specification, quality control and optimization of digital x-ray systems for screening mammography.

  2. Detailed rupture imaging of the 25 April 2015 Nepal earthquake using teleseismic P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenyuan; Shearer, Peter M.

    2015-07-01

    We analyze the rupture process of the 25 April 2015 Nepal earthquake with globally recorded teleseismic P waves. The rupture propagated east-southeast from the hypocenter for about 160 km with a duration of ˜55 s. Backprojection of both high-frequency (HF, 0.2 to 3 Hz) and low-frequency (LF, 0.05 to 0.2 Hz) P waves suggest a multistage rupture process. From the low-frequency images, we resolve an initial slow downdip (northward) rupture near the nucleation area for the first 20 s (Stage 1), followed by two faster updip ruptures (20 to 40 s for Stage 2 and 40 to 55 s for Stage 3), which released most of the radiated energy northeast of Kathmandu. The centroid rupture power from LF backprojection agrees well with the Global Centroid Moment Tensor solution. The spatial resolution of the backprojection images is validated by applying similar analysis to nearby aftershocks. The overall rupture pattern agrees well with the aftershock distribution. A multiple-asperity model could explain the observed multistage rupture and aftershock distribution.

  3. Final Results from Mexnext-I: Analysis of detailed aerodynamic measurements on a 4.5 m diameter rotor placed in the large German Dutch Wind Tunnel DNW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, J. G.; Boorsma, K.; Munduate, X.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the final results from the first phase of IEA Task 29 'Mexnext'. Mexnext was a joint project in which 20 parties from 11 different countries cooperated. The main aim of Mexnext was to analyse the wind tunnel measurements which have been taken in the EU project 'MEXICO'. In the MEXICO project 10 institutes from 6 countries cooperated in doing experiments on an instrumented, 3 bladed wind turbine of 4.5 m diameter placed in the 9.5 by 9.5 m2 open section of the Large Low-speed Facility (LLF) of DNW in the Netherlands. Pressure distributions on the blades were obtained from 148 Kulite pressure sensors, distributed over 5 sections at 25, 35, 60, 82 and 92 % radial position respectively. Blade loads were monitored through two strain-gauge bridges at each blade root. Most interesting however are the extensive PIV flow field measurements, which have been taken simultaneously with the pressure and load measurements. As a result of the international collaboration within this task a very thorough analysis of the data could be carried out and a large number of codes were validated not only in terms of loads but also in terms of underlying flow field. The paper will present several results from Mexnext-I, i.e. validation results and conclusion on modelling deficiencies and directions for model improvement. The future plans of the Mexnext consortium are also briefly discussed. Amongst these are Mexnext-II, a project in which also aerodynamic measurements other than MEXICO are included, and 'New MEXICO' in which additional measurement on the MEXICO model are performed.

  4. Image quality assessment in digital mammography: part II. NPWE as a validated alternative for contrast detail analysis.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Marshall, N W; Bosmans, H; Bochud, F O; Verdun, F R

    2011-07-21

    Assessment of image quality for digital x-ray mammography systems used in European screening programs relies mainly on contrast-detail CDMAM phantom scoring and requires the acquisition and analysis of many images in order to reduce variability in threshold detectability. Part II of this study proposes an alternative method based on the detectability index (d') calculated for a non-prewhitened model observer with an eye filter (NPWE). The detectability index was calculated from the normalized noise power spectrum and image contrast, both measured from an image of a 5 cm poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom containing a 0.2 mm thick aluminium square, and the pre-sampling modulation transfer function. This was performed as a function of air kerma at the detector for 11 different digital mammography systems. These calculated d' values were compared against threshold gold thickness (T) results measured with the CDMAM test object and against derived theoretical relationships. A simple relationship was found between T and d', as a function of detector air kerma; a linear relationship was found between d' and contrast-to-noise ratio. The values of threshold thickness used to specify acceptable performance in the European Guidelines for 0.10 and 0.25 mm diameter discs were equivalent to threshold calculated detectability indices of 1.05 and 6.30, respectively. The NPWE method is a validated alternative to CDMAM scoring for use in the image quality specification, quality control and optimization of digital x-ray systems for screening mammography. PMID:21701050

  5. A detailed three-step protocol for live imaging of intracellular traffic in polarized primary porcine RPE monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Toops, Kimberly A.; Tan, Li Xuan; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) performs numerous functions that are indispensable for photoreceptor health and vision. This monolayer of cells is also a major site of insult in inherited and age-related macular degenerations. In vitro models of primary RPE such as human fetal and adult RPE cultures have been invaluable for dissecting disease pathways at the cellular and molecular level. However, numerous studies show that it takes over four weeks for human RPE cell monolayers to become fully polarized after plating on semipermeable membrane supports. Poor persistence of transgene expression over this time period critically limits the applicability of human RPE cultures for live imaging studies required to follow dynamic processes like intracellular trafficking and organelle transport that occur over timescales of milliseconds. Here, we provide a detailed three-step protocol for live imaging of polarized primary RPE using high-speed spinning disk confocal microscopy. Step 1: establish porcine RPE monolayers that undergo differentiation within one week after plating on semipermeable membrane supports; step 2: transfect or transduce RPE using either of two different protocols that result in prolonged transgene expression; and step 3: perform multicolor high-speed live imaging of organelle transport in polarized RPE monolayers. Porcine RPE cells and photoreceptor outer segments were isolated from freshly harvested eyes and plated on collagen-coated Transwell® filters to generate polarized monolayers. After seven days, RPE monolayers were highly pigmented, had TER values ? 200 ?.cm2 and cleared outer segments within 5 hours after phagocytosis. These cells expressed RPE65, localized ZO-1 to the tight junction, Na+,K+-ATPase to the apical membrane and acetylated tubulin to the primary cilium. There was an inverse relationship between initial plating density and the time to differentiation. We used nucleofection to express fluorescently tagged genes in RPE cells prior to plating on filters or baculovirus fusion constructs to transfect polarized monolayers. Both these methods resulted in transfection efficiencies over 40% and transgene expression lasted up to 8 days after plating. These filters were imaged by high-speed spinning disk microscopy to follow tubulovesicular trafficking of lysosomes and actin dynamics in the RPE. Four-dimensional image analysis performed using commercially available software was used to analyze live imaging data. In conclusion, this 3-step protocol describes a powerful method to investigate organelle trafficking and function in real time in the RPE that can be used for answering fundamental questions of RPE cell biology and pathobiology. PMID:24861273

  6. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. Research Intern - Kodak Alaris Please see this job@cis.rit.edu Job Purpose: Conduct research and advanced development in the areas of video processing and image

  7. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. Imaging Staff Engineer - Motorola Mobility (A Google company) Basic Qualifications - Years of Experience: 3+years Scope of Responsibility

  8. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. United Technologies Research Center - Principal for navigation, multimodal sensor data fusion, and decision making processes from the navigational information

  9. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    issues to management. Develop a close working relationship with the customer s development team and use more details on the external postings listed here. CUSTOMER PROGRAM MANAGER ­ CAMERA - NVIDIA The Tegra and video images for mobile cameras. The Camera CPM will manage all aspects of customer mobile camera

  10. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    and ceramics. We create and make keystone components that enable high-technology systems for consumerCenter for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. INTERN- Summer Optics/ Psychophysics Job ID: 165780

  11. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. Member of the Technical Staff - Systems & Technology challenging research problems, developing concepts for new projects and programs, and creating impactful

  12. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    technology leadership within the NA organization. Create and maintain color technology competencies in termsCenter for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. Color Technology Scientist (Automotive Coatings) Our

  13. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    , source and evaluate new technology for UTC; create and leverage internal and external partnerships 5Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here. United Technologies Research Center - Principal

  14. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    more details on the external postings listed here. Assoc Research Scientist - COS Center for Imaging on satisfactory results, as determined by Human Resources. RIT promotes and values diversity, pluralism not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, age, marital status, gender, religion, sexual orientations

  15. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    's degree in a technical field (optical engineering, electrical engineering, biomedical engineering more details on the external postings listed here. Engineer to Develop Systems for Vision Testing of advanced optical systems for imaging the retina and measuring visual function on a cellular scale. The main

  16. Functional hyperspectral imaging captures subtle details of cell metabolism in olfactory neurosphere cells, disease-specific models of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Gosnell, Martin E; Anwer, Ayad G; Cassano, Juan C; Sue, Carolyn M; Goldys, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging uses spectral and spatial image information for target detection and classification. In this work hyperspectral autofluorescence imaging was applied to patient olfactory neurosphere-derived cells, a cell model of a human metabolic disease MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like syndrome). By using an endogenous source of contrast subtle metabolic variations have been detected between living cells in their full morphological context which made it possible to distinguish healthy from diseased cells before and after therapy. Cellular maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant cell subpopulations, in particular a subpopulation with compromised mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results demonstrate that multispectral spectral imaging provides a new non-invasive method to investigate neurodegenerative and other disease models, and it paves the way for novel cellular characterisation in health, disease and during treatment, with proper account of intrinsic cellular heterogeneity. PMID:26431992

  17. High-resolution single-molecule recognition imaging of the molecular details of ricin-aptamer interaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular details of DNA aptamer-ricin interactions were investigated. The toxic protein ricin molecules were immobilized on Au(111) surface using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester to specifically react with lysine residues located on the ricin B chains. A single ricin molecule was visualized in ...

  18. Impact of more detailed categorization of shrinkage or progression ratio at initial imaging response after sorafenib treatment in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Yoshiyuki; Takami, Yuko; Tateishi, Masaki; Ryu, Tomoki; Mikagi, Kazuhiro; Saitsu, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Background Sorafenib therapy improves survival in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients without an objective response. The present study investigated whether the initial imaging response might be a prognostic indicator after administration of sorafenib therapy in HCC patients. Patients and methods This retrospective study reviewed unresectable HCC patients undergoing sorafenib therapy. Patients evaluated without complete response, partial response (PR), or progressive disease (PD) at the initial imaging response evaluation by modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors were divided into three groups according to more detailed categorization of the shrinkage/progression ratio in initial imaging response. A comparison of progression-free and overall survival among these groups was performed. Results Of the 43 non-PR non-PD patients with target lesions, ten (23.3%) exhibited mild response (MR; ?30% to ?5%), 14 (32.6%) exhibited no change (NC; ?5% to +5%), and 19 (44.2%) exhibited mild-PD (MPD; +5% to +20%). There was no statistical difference in progression-free or overall survival between MR and NC patients. The median progression-free survivals in NC+MR and mild-PD patients were 15.0 and 5.3 months, respectively (P<0.01), and the median survival times were 31.9 and 17.1 months, respectively (P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, etiology (hepatitis C virus) and initial imaging response (MR+NC) was identified as an independently good prognostic factor. Conclusion More detailed categorization of shrinkage or progression at the initial imaging response evaluation may be a useful marker for predicting sorafenib treatment outcomes in HCC patients. If the initial imaging response is not progression but stability, sorafenib may have a survival benefit. PMID:26586953

  19. Computed tomography:the details.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  20. Resolving the surface details on Venus in the balloon- or lander-borne images with a computer modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekonomov, A. P.

    2015-04-01

    Due to the presence of opaque clouds at high altitudes, it is difficult to survey the surface of Venus in the optical spectral range. At the same time, in the under-cloud layer, there are transparency windows at the wavelengths ? = 1.08, 0.85, and 0.65 ?m. At these wavelengths, the gaseous absorption (in the whole atmosphere rather than only in the under-cloud layer) is weaker, and the atmospheric transparency is mainly determined by the scattering on molecules. The paper presents the results of the Monte-Carlo computer modeling of the imaging of the surface from a balloon or a lander. It has been shown that the imaging from the lower boundary of the clouds is possible.

  1. Evaluation of lunar rocks and soils for resource utilization: Detailed image analysis of raw materials and beneficiated products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Chambers, John G.; Patchen, Allan; Jerde, Eric A.; Mckay, David S.; Graf, John; Oder, Robin R.

    1993-01-01

    The rocks and soils of the Moon will be the raw materials for fuels and construction needs at a lunar base. This includes sources of materials for the generation of hydrogen, oxygen, metals, and other potential construction materials. For most of the bulk material needs, the regolith, and its less than 1 cm fraction, the soil, will suffice. But for specific mineral resources, it may be necessary to concentrate minerals from rocks or soils, and it is not always obvious which is the more appropriate feedstock. Besides an appreciation of site geology, the mineralogy and petrography of local rocks and soils is important for consideration of the resources which can provide feedstocks of ilmenite, glass, agglutinates, anorthite, etc. In such studies, it is very time-consuming and practically impossible to correlate particle counts (the traditional method of characterizing lunar soil petrography) with accurate modal analyses and with mineral associations in multi-mineralic grains. But x ray digital imaging, using x rays characteristic of each element, makes all this possible and much more (e.g., size and shape analysis). An application of beneficiation image analysis, in use in our lab (Oxford Instr. EDS and Cameca SX-50 EMP), was demonstrated to study mineral liberation from lunar rocks and soils. Results of x ray image analysis are presented.

  2. Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Pennington; Mohamed Ibrahim; Roger Turpening; Sean Trisch; Josh Richardson; Carol Asiala; Walid Mabrouk

    2008-09-30

    Crosswell seismic surveys were conducted at two fields in northern Michigan. One of these, Springdale, included two monitor wells that are located external to the reef, and the other, Coldspring, employed two production wells within the reef. The Springdale wells extended to much greater depths than the reef, and imaging was conducted from above and from beneath the reef. The resulting seismic images provide the best views of pinnacle Niagaran reefs obtained to date. The tops of the reservoirs can be clearly distinguished, and their lateral extent or dipping edges can be observed along the profile. Reflecting events internal to the reef are evident; some of them are fairly continuous across the reef and others are discontinuous. Inversion of the seismic data indicates which events represent zones of higher porosity and which are lower porosity or even anhydrite plugged. The full stacked image includes angles that are beyond critical for many of the interfaces, and some reflections are visible only for a small range of angles, presumably near their critical angle. Stacking these angles in provides an opportunity for these events to be seen on the stacked image, where otherwise they would have been unrecognized. For inversion, however, the complexity associated with phase changes beyond critical can lead to poor results, and elastic inversion of partial angle stacks may be best conducted with restrictions to angles less than critical. Strong apparent attenuation of signals occurs when seismic ray paths pass through the upper part of the Springdale reservoir; this may be due to intrinsic attenuation and/or scattering of events due to the locally strongly varying gas saturation and extremely low fluid pressures. Signal-to-noise limitations become evident far from the source well in the Coldspring study, probably because the raw data were strongly affected by tube-wave noise generated by flow through the perforation of the receiver well. The seismic images obtained, and interpretations of them, as assisted by Amplitude-versus-Angle studies and accompanying inversion, provide additional insight into the internal geometry of these two reefs and provide data that should be useful for reservoir management.

  3. Detailed in situ laser calibration of the infrared imaging video bolometer for the JT-60U tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Parchamy, H.; Peterson, B. J.; Konoshima, S.; Hayashi, H.; Seo, D. C.; Ashikawa, N

    2006-10-15

    The infrared imaging video bolometer (IRVB) in JT-60U includes a single graphite-coated gold foil with an effective area of 9x7 cm{sup 2} and a thickness of 2.5 {mu}m. The thermal images of the foil resulting from the plasma radiation are provided by an IR camera. The calibration technique of the IRVB gives confidence in the absolute levels of the measured values of the plasma radiation. The in situ calibration is carried out in order to obtain local foil properties such as the thermal diffusivity {kappa} and the product of the thermal conductivity k and the thickness t{sub f} of the foil. These quantities are necessary for solving the two-dimensional heat diffusion equation of the foil which is used in the experiments. These parameters are determined by comparing the measured temperature profiles (for kt{sub f}) and their decays (for {kappa}) with the corresponding results of a finite element model using the measured HeNe laser power profile as a known radiation power source. The infrared camera (Indigo/Omega) is calibrated by fitting the temperature rise of a heated plate to the resulting camera data using the Stefan-Boltzmann law.

  4. Upper Yosemite Falls Detail

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, a detailed view Upper Yosemite Falls may be seen from the Yosemite Falls Trail. Upper Yosemite Falls has a total plunge of 1,430 ft (440 m). Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  5. Is there a place for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of cardiovascular involvement in rheumatic diseases?

    PubMed

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2011-12-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a noninvasive, nonradiating imaging technique, which provides novel information for the evaluation of cardiovascular diseases. Until now it has been successfully used for the evaluation of congenital and acquired heart diseases, cardiac tumors-mass, iron overload, and myocardial fibrosis detection. Recently, its diagnostic capabilities have been extended to the evaluation of myocardial inflammation and myocardial perfusion. Currently, it is considered the gold standard for the evaluation of volumes, mass, ejection fraction of atriums and ventricles, quantification of iron overload in different organs, detection and follow-up of myocardial inflammation, myocardial infarction and its complications, evaluation of the aorta, detection of anomalous coronary arteries, and ectatic or aneurysmatic coronary arteries. All the above applications and mainly the CMR ability to detect myocardial inflammation, perfusion defects, fibrosis, coronary and great arteries aneurysms make it a valuable tool for cardiovascular system assessment, commonly affected during the course of rheumatic diseases. The technique has been already successfully used in the evaluation of vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus, myositis, and scleroderma. However, further studies are needed to evaluate its usefulness as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of cardiovascular involvement in rheumatic patients. PMID:21641017

  6. 15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 (PIER 5) AND NO. 66 (PIER 6), DWG. 83, CH BY AF, ECL, APPROVED BY O.F. LACKEY, MAY 18, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  7. Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH(i)-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker D.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded with ammonia in the fuel stream. We have performed numerical simulations with detailed chemistry as well as laser-induced fluorescence imaging measurements for a range of ammonia injection rates. For comparison with the experimental data, synthetic LIF images are calculated based on the numerical data accounting for temperature and fluorescence quenching effects. We demonstrate good agreement between measurements and computations. The LIF corrections inferred from the simulation are then used to calculate absolute NO mole fractions from the measured signal.The NO formation in both doped and undoped flames occurs in the flame sheet. In the undoped flame, four different mechanisms including thermal and prompt NO appear to contribute to NO formation. As the NH3 seeding level increases, fuel-NO becomes the dominant mechanism and N2 shifts from being a net reactant to being a net product. Nitric oxide in the undoped flame as well as in the core region of the doped flames are underpredicted by the model; we attribute this mainly to inaccuracies in the NO recycling chemistry on the fuel-rich side of the flame sheet.

  8. Space Place Prime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Austin J.; Novati, Alexander; Fisher, Diane K.; Leon, Nancy J.; Netting, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Space Place Prime is public engagement and education software for use on iPad. It targets a multi-generational audience with news, images, videos, and educational articles from the Space Place Web site and other NASA sources. New content is downloaded daily (or whenever the user accesses the app) via the wireless connection. In addition to the Space Place Web site, several NASA RSS feeds are tapped to provide new content. Content is retained for the previous several days, or some number of editions of each feed. All content is controlled on the server side, so features about the latest news, or changes to any content, can be made without updating the app in the Apple Store. It gathers many popular NASA features into one app. The interface is a boundless, slidable- in-any-direction grid of images, unique for each feature, and iconized as image, video, or article. A tap opens the feature. An alternate list mode presents menus of images, videos, and articles separately. Favorites can be tagged for permanent archive. Face - book, Twitter, and e-mail connections make any feature shareable.

  9. 17. A closeup detail, looking east from the northeast corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. A close-up detail, looking east from the northeast corner of the roadbed. This image shows the concrete commemorative inscription which is let into the inside of the eastern balustrade at the north end of the bridge. The name of one of the county commissioners has been chiselled out of the inscription. The parting fault between the parapet and its coping is evident. - Vigo County Bridge No. 139, Spanning Sugar Creek at Seventy-fourth Place, Terre Haute, Vigo County, IN

  10. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any processor includes a sophisticated Image Signal Processor (ISP) used for processing still and video images-class image quality for high-end mobile camera platforms. RESPONSIBILITIES: Adjust ISP settings

  11. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any, computational imaging, and imaging for information. The Senior Camera Systems Engineer will help validating image processing algorithms and facilitating communications between technology groups and management

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals detailed spatial and temporal distribution of iron-based nanoparticles transported through water-saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Laure; Herrling, Maria Pia; Guthausen, Gisela; Horn, Harald; Delay, Markus

    2015-11-01

    The application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) such as iron-based ENP in environmental systems or in the human body inevitably raises the question of their mobility. This also includes aspects of product optimization and assessment of their environmental fate. Therefore, the key aim was to investigate the mobility of iron-based ENP in water-saturated porous media. Laboratory-scale transport experiments were conducted using columns packed with quartz sand as model solid phase. Different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were selected to study the influence of primary particle size (dP=20nm and 80nm) and surface functionalization (plain, -COOH and -NH2 groups) on particle mobility. In particular, the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the transport and retention behaviour of SPION was investigated. In our approach, a combination of conventional breakthrough curve (BTC) analysis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively and non-destructively visualize the SPION inside the column was applied. Particle surface properties (surface functionalization and resulting zeta potential) had a major influence while their primary particle size turned out to be less relevant. In particular, the mobility of SPION was significantly increased in the presence of NOM due to the sorption of NOM onto the particle surface resulting in a more negative zeta potential. MRI provided detailed spatially resolved information complementary to the quantitative BTC results. The approach can be transferred to other porous systems and contributes to a better understanding of particle transport in environmental porous media and porous media in technical applications. PMID:26335945

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals detailed spatial and temporal distribution of iron-based nanoparticles transported through water-saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuny, Laure; Herrling, Maria Pia; Guthausen, Gisela; Horn, Harald; Delay, Markus

    2015-11-01

    The application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) such as iron-based ENP in environmental systems or in the human body inevitably raises the question of their mobility. This also includes aspects of product optimization and assessment of their environmental fate. Therefore, the key aim was to investigate the mobility of iron-based ENP in water-saturated porous media. Laboratory-scale transport experiments were conducted using columns packed with quartz sand as model solid phase. Different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were selected to study the influence of primary particle size (dP = 20 nm and 80 nm) and surface functionalization (plain, -COOH and -NH2 groups) on particle mobility. In particular, the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the transport and retention behaviour of SPION was investigated. In our approach, a combination of conventional breakthrough curve (BTC) analysis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively and non-destructively visualize the SPION inside the column was applied. Particle surface properties (surface functionalization and resulting zeta potential) had a major influence while their primary particle size turned out to be less relevant. In particular, the mobility of SPION was significantly increased in the presence of NOM due to the sorption of NOM onto the particle surface resulting in a more negative zeta potential. MRI provided detailed spatially resolved information complementary to the quantitative BTC results. The approach can be transferred to other porous systems and contributes to a better understanding of particle transport in environmental porous media and porous media in technical applications.

  14. Large landslides associated with a diapiric fold in Canelles Reservoir (Spanish Pyrenees): Detailed geological-geomorphological mapping, trenching and electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco; Linares, Rogelio; Roqué, Carles; Zarroca, Mario; Carbonel, Domingo; Rosell, Joan; Gutiérrez, Mateo

    2015-07-01

    Detailed geomorphological-geological mapping in Canelles Reservoir, the Spanish Pyrenees, reveals the presence of several large landslides overlooked in previous cartographic works. One of the slope movements, designated as the Canelles landslide, corresponds to a 40 × 106 m3 translational landslide reactivated in 2006 by a severe decline in the reservoir water level. The geomorphic features mapped in the upper part of the Canelles landslide, including surface ruptures corroborated by electrical resistivity imaging and trenching, indicate multiple displacement episodes previous to the 2006 human-induced event. Consistently, the stratigraphic and structural relationships observed in a trench record at least two displacement events older and larger in magnitude than the 2006 reactivation. The oldest recorded event occurred in the 6th to 7th Centuries and the second in 1262-1679 yr AD. This latter episode might be correlative to the 1373 Ribagorza earthquake (Mw 6.2), which caused the reactivation of a landslide and the consequent destruction of a village in the adjacent valley. The available data indicate that over more than one millennium the kinematics of the landslide has been characterised by discrete small-displacement episodes. These data, together with the available literature on rapid rockslides, do not concur with the acceleration predicted by modelling in a previous investigation, which foresees a speed of 16 m s- 1 despite the low average dip of the sliding surface (9-10°). This case study illustrates that the trenching technique may provide valuable practical information on the past behaviour of landslides, covering a much broader time span than instrumental and historical records.

  15. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    the requirements of this job: Experience with image processing. Knowledge of color science principles instruction sets Familiarity with image file type formats such as PDF, TIFF, or JPEG. Linux-based scripting

  16. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any research. Contact Information Address: Visiting Scientists Program University of Colorado 440 UCB Boulder. Restricted: NO RESTRICTIONS #12;Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS

  17. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any in Washington DC. I was not given much information about the nature of the work other than it involves image's an ongoing need for interns. Salary would be around $20 per hour. Apparently more information

  18. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Medical Imaging (CAMI): Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA Project Key Idea: We are looking for people the subtle signs of disease are not salient in the image. Apparently, there is some global/statistical signal literature. It could give rise to changes in the practice of radiology that improved performance. It could

  19. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    , Redmond Microsoft Research, Redmond, has several openings for summer internships in computer vision vision and graphics internships at MSR's Redmond campus for summer 2013. #12; more details on the external postings listed here. Computer Vision Internships - Microsoft Research

  20. Detail of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This color photo of Neptune's large satellite Triton was obtained on Aug. 24 1989 at a range of 530,000 kilometers (330,000 miles). The resolution is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), sufficient to begin to show topographic detail. The image was made from pictures taken through the green, violet and ultraviolet filters. In this technique, regions that are highly reflective in the ultraviolet appear blue in color. In reality, there is no part of Triton that would appear blue to the eye. The bright southern hemisphere of Triton, which fills most of this frame, is generally pink in tone as is the even brighter equatorial band. The darker regions north of the equator also tend to be pink or reddish in color. JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

  1. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    more details on the external postings listed here. Software Engineer ­ Systems & Technology Research processing, computer vision, machine learning, control systems, social media processing, and other scientific valuable skillsets beyond just engineering - teaming and communications skills can be as important as our

  2. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    more details on the external postings listed here. Color Scientist ­ Northtec, LLC Bristol, PA materials and mass to determine that product meets internal and external specifications. · Ensure. · Qualifications · BS degree required, Chemistry, Biology or Biochemistry or color science preferred · 2-3 years

  3. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Engineer (Intern) Apple is currently seeking enthusiastic Physics, Optics, Material Science/Engineering more details on the external postings listed here. "I'm an engineering manager at Apple, leading the optical group for display and touch. HR gave me your email address to hopefully forward the following

  4. Moon over Half Dome Detail

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, the Moon may be seen in detail rising over Half Dome. Half Dome is a granite dome, rising about 4,737 ft (1,444 m) above the surrounding valley. It is part of the Sierra Nevada batholith and is one of Yosemite National Park's most famous features....

  5. GRAPES -Detail Quick Links

    E-print Network

    Turc, Catalin

    GRAPES - Detail Quick Links Funding Opportunities - https Fellowships, Mer... https://grad.ucla.edu/asis/grapes/detail.asp?recordno=148 1 of 1 10/21/2014 1:49 PM #12;GRAPES - Detail Quick Links Funding Opportunities - https

  6. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any. Excellent group of engineers to work with, new technologies being developed there. Please email your resume to me for consideration: Laurie1harper@msn.com or call me at 510 523 4904 for more information. Color

  7. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    of information and communications technology (ICT) products across a wide range of focused industry verticalsCenter for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any. For more information, please visit www.hcltech.com. HCL America HCL America was established in 1989

  8. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Environment In hp, we invent new technologies and innovative information products. Change markets. Create information appliances, and we're chasing down broader alternative technologies and basic researchCenter for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any

  9. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    and post docs to perform research in the areas of Video Processing, Computer Vision and Machine Learning a solid mathematics background with a focus on one or more of computer vision, pattern recognition, image Matlab and C/C++ libraries such as OpenCV. Real-time programming skills are a plus. Requirements: · A Ph

  10. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any to get in touch with your group to see if you might want to circulate a few job openings directly through careers@rebellionphotonics.com). http://www.indeed.com/jobs

  11. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    in order to create and execute test plans focused on qualifying camera technology. The successful candidateCenter for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any has a strong aptitude for learning new technologies, gaining in-depth knowledge of how new systems

  12. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any in our display design team. The successful candidate is expected lead new display technology evaluation performance, cost and schedule, and creating test techniques and processes. Specific Knowledge

  13. Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any more details on the external postings listed here.

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Center for Imaging Science Job Opportunities www.cis.rit.edu/jobs The CIS office does not have any technologies to meet the needs of our feature visual effects and animation motion-pictures. Basic Requirements: Ability to create color transforms utilizing a broad knowledge of color science fundamentals Experience

  14. Places for Pedagogies, Pedagogies for Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhn, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Working with an understanding of assemblage as the ad hoc groupings of vibrant materials and elements, this article argues that conceptualizing place as an assemblage opens possibilities for bridging the gap between subjects and objects that continue to structure pedagogy. Considering "place" as an assemblage of humans and their multiple "others"…

  15. Putting Place Value in Its Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the concept of "moving one place to the left." A recent investigation by Thompson and Bramald explored the relationship between young children's understanding of place value and their ability to add two-digit numbers. The study took the form of a series of one-to-one interviews with a sample of 144 children…

  16. A DETAILED GRAVITATIONAL LENS MODEL BASED ON SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY AND KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF A HERSCHEL-ATLAS SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY AT z = 4.243 {sup ,} {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Bussmann, R. S.; Gurwell, M. A.; Fu Hai; Cooray, A.; Smith, D. J. B.; Bonfield, D.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Fritz, J.; Baker, A. J.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Dariush, A.; Coppin, K.; Dannerbauer, H.; De Zotti, G.; Hopwood, R.; and others

    2012-09-10

    We present high-spatial resolution imaging obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 880 {mu}m and the Keck adaptive optics (AO) system at the K{sub S}-band of a gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) at z = 4.243 discovered in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. The SMA data (angular resolution Almost-Equal-To 0.''6) resolve the dust emission into multiple lensed images, while the Keck AO K{sub S}-band data (angular resolution Almost-Equal-To 0.''1) resolve the lens into a pair of galaxies separated by 0.''3. We present an optical spectrum of the foreground lens obtained with the Gemini-South telescope that provides a lens redshift of z{sub lens} = 0.595 {+-} 0.005. We develop and apply a new lens modeling technique in the visibility plane that shows that the SMG is magnified by a factor of {mu} = 4.1 {+-} 0.2 and has an intrinsic infrared (IR) luminosity of L{sub IR} = (2.1 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. We measure a half-light radius of the background source of r{sub s} = 4.4 {+-} 0.5 kpc which implies an IR luminosity surface density of {Sigma}{sub IR} (3.4 {+-} 0.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun} kpc{sup -2}, a value that is typical of z > 2 SMGs but significantly lower than IR luminous galaxies at z {approx} 0. The two lens galaxies are compact (r{sub lens} Almost-Equal-To 0.9 kpc) early-types with Einstein radii of {theta}{sub E1} 0.57 {+-} 0.01 and {theta}{sub E2} = 0.40 {+-} 0.01 that imply masses of M{sub lens1} = (7.4 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and M{sub lens2} = (3.7 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. The two lensing galaxies are likely about to undergo a dissipationless merger, and the mass and size of the resultant system should be similar to other early-type galaxies at z {approx} 0.6. This work highlights the importance of high spatial resolution imaging in developing models of strongly lensed galaxies discovered by Herschel.

  17. Place and Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannatella, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Do places matter educationally? When Edward Casey remarks: "The world is, minimally and forever, a place-world", we might take this statement as presupposing without argument that places exist as a given, that we know what a place is, a point that Aristotle would have never taken for granted and in fact neither does Casey. I find Casey's remark…

  18. GRAPES -Detail Quick Links

    E-print Network

    Turc, Catalin

    GRAPES - Detail Quick Links Funding Opportunities - https a New Search - search.asp GRAPES - National Science Foundation (NSF), Alan T. Waterman Award https://grad.ucla.edu/asis/grapes/detail.asp?recordno=179 1 of 1 9/11/2014 2:19 PM #12;GRAPES - Detail Quick Links Funding Opportunities - https

  19. Polarimetric imaging of the Galactic center at 12.4 microns - The detailed magnetic field structure in the northern arm and the east-west bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitken, David K.; Smith, Craig H.; Gezari, Daniel; Mccaughrean, Mark; Roche, Patrick F.

    1991-01-01

    Recent closely sampled imaging polarimetry of the central 0.5 pc of the Galaxy at 12.4 microns with a 58 x 62 array camera system is presented. The results clearly show that the magnetic field is a property of the diffuse material of the large-scale structures in Sgr A (the northern arm and east-west bar) rather than the embedded sources. The magnetic field is independent of the changes of density and temperature in the compact source environments. The magnetic field direction in much of the east-west bar is complex, and its polarization is probably the result of the superposition of differently oriented filaments. The abrupt decrease of polarization southwest of IRS 1 observed previously is confirmed and shown to reverse sign. This is due either to a rapid change of magnetic field direction close to the dynamical center, or to the superposition of nearly orthogonal fields. The field direction changes smoothly across IRS 1, and no discontinuity of motion here is found.

  20. It's time for a crisper image of the Face of the Earth: Landsat and climate time series for massive land cover & climate change mapping at detailed resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, Xavier; Miquel, Ninyerola; Oscar, González-Guerrero; Cristina, Cea; Pere, Serra; Alaitz, Zabala; Lluís, Pesquer; Ivette, Serral; Joan, Masó; Cristina, Domingo; Maria, Serra Josep; Jordi, Cristóbal; Chris, Hain; Martha, Anderson; Juanjo, Vidal

    2014-05-01

    Combining climate dynamics and land cover at a relative coarse resolution allows a very interesting approach to global studies, because in many cases these studies are based on a quite high temporal resolution, but they may be limited in large areas like the Mediterranean. However, the current availability of long time series of Landsat imagery and spatially detailed surface climate models allow thinking on global databases improving the results of mapping in areas with a complex history of landscape dynamics, characterized by fragmentation, or areas where relief creates intricate climate patterns that can be hardly monitored or modeled at coarse spatial resolutions. DinaCliVe (supported by the Spanish Government and ERDF, and by the Catalan Government, under grants CGL2012-33927 and SGR2009-1511) is the name of the project that aims analyzing land cover and land use dynamics as well as vegetation stress, with a particular emphasis on droughts, and the role that climate variation may have had in such phenomena. To meet this objective is proposed to design a massive database from long time series of Landsat land cover products (grouped in quinquennia) and monthly climate records (in situ climate data) for the Iberian Peninsula (582,000 km2). The whole area encompasses 47 Landsat WRS2 scenes (Landsat 4 to 8 missions, from path 197 to 202 and from rows 30 to 34), and 52 Landsat WRS1 scenes (for the previous Landsat missions, 212 to 221 and 30 to 34). Therefore, a mean of 49.5 Landsat scenes, 8 quinquennia per scene and a about 6 dates per quinquennium , from 1975 to present, produces around 2376 sets resulting in 30 m x 30 m spatial resolution maps. Each set is composed by highly coherent geometric and radiometric multispectral and multitemporal (to account for phenology) imagery as well as vegetation and wetness indexes, and several derived topographic information (about 10 Tbyte of data). Furthermore, on the basis on a previous work: the Digital Climatic Atlas of the Iberian Peninsula, spatio-temporal surface climate data has been generated with a monthly resolution (from January 1950 to December 2010) through a multiple regression model and residuals spatial interpolation using geographic variables (altitude, latitude and continentality) and solar radiation (only in the case of temperatures). This database includes precipitation, mean minimum and mean maximum air temperature and mean air temperature, improving the previous one by using the ASTER GDEM at 30 m spatial resolution, by deepening to a monthly resolution and by increasing the number of meteorological stations used, representing a total amount of 0.7 Tbyte of data. An initial validation shows accuracies higher than 85 % for land cover maps and an RMS of 1.2 ºC, 1.6 ºC and 22 mm for mean and extreme temperatures, and for precipitation, respectively. This amount of new detailed data for the Iberian Peninsula framework will be used to study the spatial direction, velocity and acceleration of the tendencies related to climate change, land cover and tree line dynamics. A global analysis using all these datasets will try to discriminate the climatic signal when interpreted together with anthropogenic driving forces. Ultimately, getting ready for massive database computation and analysis will improve predictions for global models that will require of the growing high-resolution information available.

  1. Imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH): Details of passive-source seismic deployment and preliminary 3-D velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Denlinger, R. P.; Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Vidale, J. E.; Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Schultz, A.

    2014-12-01

    The imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) experiment aims to delineate the extent of the magmatic system beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH) in Washington State. The experiment involves active- and passive-source seismology, magnetotellurics, and geochemistry/petrology. Seventy passive-source broadband seismometers were deployed in a 100-km-diameter array centered on MSH, with an average spacing of 10 km, and a planned duration of two years. The deployment over two weeks in June 2014 involved a group of 18 people split into 6 teams. Approximately half of the seismic stations have aircell batteries and/or pole-mounted solar panels in order to maintain power through deep snow at higher elevations during the winter months. Data will be retrieved 2-4 times a year throughout the duration of the experiment. The first service run performed in mid-July 2014 had a 98.4% data recovery. This is one of the largest wide-aperture two-dimensional arrays covering a volcano anywhere. The active-source portion of the experiment successfully set off 23 shots in late-July 2014. These were recorded clearly at permanent stations run by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network up to 200 km away, and are expected to be well-recorded on many of the 70 broadband seismometers in addition to the 2500 Reftek "Texans" deployed temporarily for this purpose. For the 2-4 weeks of broadband data collected in July, local earthquakes down to magnitude 0 are recorded across the array, with clear P- and S- arrivals. Earthquakes of this size occur daily within 50 km of MSH. We are keeping a careful catalog of all activity in the region for the duration of the iMUSH experiment. We will pick P- and S-wave travel times at the 70 broadband stations from local earthquakes and active shots, for available data from between June and October 2014. We will also use a tomographic code (Preston et al, 2003, Science) to invert the travel times to obtain preliminary earthquake location and 3-D velocity structure.

  2. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  3. Wesbrook Place Neighbourhood Plan

    E-print Network

    2005 Amended December 2011 #12;#12;Wesbrook Place Neighbourhood Plan University of B.C. ii Amended Plan University of B.C. iii Amended December 2011 2.5.4 Transit 2.5.5 Traffic Calming 3.0 DESIGN Place Neighbourhood Plan University of B.C. v Amended December 2011 #12;Wesbrook Place Neighbourhood

  4. Place and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, David

    2013-01-01

    David Orr's classic article links education to living in the outdoors and studying all disciplines through the unifying lens of place. Pedagogy of place counters abstraction, it is the natural world embodying principles of learning that involve direct observation, investigation, experimentation, and manual skills. Place is the laboratory providing…

  5. Detailed Building Reconstruction With Shape Templates

    E-print Network

    Schindler, Konrad

    Detailed Building Reconstruction With Shape Templates Konrad Schindler 1 and Joachim Bauer 2 1, Austria bauer@vrvis.at Abstract: We present a model-based method for detailed automatic building reconstruction from images. The method starts with recovering a coarse building model consisting of the main

  6. CISNET: Detail Documents

    Cancer.gov

    The detail documents pick up where the overview documents leave off. They provide a more fine-grained view of specific aspects of the model. While there is only one overview document of each type, there may be multiple detail documents of the same type in a single model profile.

  7. GRAPES -Detail Quick Links

    E-print Network

    Turc, Catalin

    GRAPES - Detail Quick Links GRAPES Introduction - https://grad.ucla.edu/grpinst.htm Fellowship the "Back Button" to return to the search results page or try a New Search - search.asp GRAPES - Fannie and John Hertz Foundation Graduate Fellowship https://grad.ucla.edu/asis/grapes/detail.asp?recordno=108 1

  8. GRAPES -Detail Quick Links

    E-print Network

    Turc, Catalin

    GRAPES - Detail Quick Links GRAPES Introduction - https://grad.ucla.edu/grpinst.htm Fellowship" to return to the search results page or try a New Search - search.asp GRAPES - American-Scandinavian Foundation Awards for Study In Sca... https://grad.ucla.edu/asis/grapes/detail.asp?recordno=83 1 of 1 9

  9. GRAPES -Detail Quick Links

    E-print Network

    Turc, Catalin

    GRAPES - Detail Quick Links Funding Opportunities - https to the search results page or try a New Search - search.asp GRAPES - Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans https://grad.ucla.edu/asis/grapes/detail.asp?recordno=138 1 of 1 9/11/2014 2:23 PM #12;

  10. GRAPES -Detail Quick Links

    E-print Network

    Turc, Catalin

    GRAPES - Detail Quick Links Funding Opportunities - https to the search results page or try a New Search - search.asp GRAPES - Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gilliam Fellowship for A... https://grad.ucla.edu/asis/grapes/detail.asp?recordno=679 1 of 1 9/11/2014 2:28 PM #12;

  11. Supporting Information Experimental Details

    E-print Network

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    with a thermal Schottky field emission gun and operates at 300 kV. Images are acquired with a 4096x4096 pixel CCD (Gatan; pixel resolution for images in Figure 1 (zoom-in images) and Figure 3 is 0.5 nm). The as with a thin layer (8 nm) of silicon monoxide via thermal evaporation in order to change the hydrophobic nature

  12. Detailed balance and entanglement

    E-print Network

    Rocco Duvenhage; Machiel Snyman

    2015-03-27

    We study a connection between quantum detailed balance, which is a concept of importance in statistical mechanics, and entanglement. We also explore how this connection fits into thermofield dynamics.

  13. The value of place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-03-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate environment is clear, and we are presented with examples of how they strive to make connections between the content and what they are familiar with—namely their surroundings. "Place" is identified as a term with complex meanings and interpretations, even in the scope of place-based science education, and understanding how the term is used in any given scenario is essential to understanding the implications of place-based education. Is place used as a location, locale or a sense of place? To understand "place" is to acknowledge that for the individual, it is highly situational, cultural and personal. It is just such attributes that make place-based education appealing, and potentially powerful, pedagogically on one hand, yet complex for implementation on the other. The argument is posed that place is particularly important in the context of education about the environment, which in its simplest manifestation, connects formal science curriculum to resources that are local and tangible to students. The incorporation of place in such a framework seeks to bridge the gap between formal school science subjects and students' lived experiences, yet acknowledges the tensions that can arise between accommodating place meanings and the desire to acculturate students into the language of the scientific community. The disconnect between guiding policy frameworks and the reality of the Next Generation Science Standards is addressed opening an avenue for further discussion of the importance of socio-cultural frameworks of science learning in an ever increasing era of accountability.

  14. Images

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Images Images:  Cancer Biology Image: Cell with DNA 72 DPI | 300 DPIDrawing depicting DNA molecule unwinding from a chromosome inside the nucleus of a cell. NHGRI >> View All Cancer Pathology/Imaging Image: Female

  15. The Case for Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2012-01-01

    Bookstores, record stores, libraries, Facebook: these places--both physical and virtual--demonstrate an established and essential purpose as centers of community, expertise, convenience, immediacy, and respect. Yet as digital, mobile, and social shifts continue to transform culture and interactions, these spaces and places transform, too.…

  16. Teaching Bodies in Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Stephanie; Woglom, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context: This piece draws on literature in justice-oriented teacher education, feminist pedagogy, and postmodern notions of bodies and place to make sense of data generated from a three-year study of an undergraduate teacher education course. A feminist lens was used to engage a body- and place-focused pedagogy that aimed to engage…

  17. Understanding Place Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Linda L.; Tomayko, Ming C.

    2011-01-01

    Developing an understanding of place value and the base-ten number system is considered a fundamental goal of the early primary grades. For years, teachers have anecdotally reported that students struggle with place-value concepts. Among the common errors cited are misreading such numbers as 26 and 62 by seeing them as identical in meaning,…

  18. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    This is a knock-in of Cre into the Nkx3.1 locus, placing it under the transcriptional control of the Nkx3.1 promoter, and creating a null allele. Cre recombinase activity is detected in nearly all prostate epithelial cells (luminal and basal) starting from before birth.

  19. Personal Details Date of birth Year

    E-print Network

    Judd, Martin

    Stage One Personal Details Surname Title First name Date of birth Year Current age Place of birth Select Day Month Continue #12;Stage Two Personal Qualities Please limit your answers to no more than 100 Personal Qualities What was your role in achieving this result? Continue #12;Stage Two Personal Qualities

  20. Detail One Half of Wood Truss, Detail One Quarter Plan ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail One Half of Wood Truss, Detail One Quarter Plan of Floor Beams & Bottom Truss Cord, Detail at A Plan, Detail at B Plan - Covered Bridge, Spanning Darby Creek, North Lewisburg, Champaign County, OH

  1. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  2. Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & CrossBracing Joint Details; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & Cross-Bracing Joint Details; Cross Bracing Center Joint Detail; Chord & Diagonal Joint Detail - Vermont Covered Bridge, Highland Park, spanning Kokomo Creek at West end of Deffenbaugh Street (moved to), Kokomo, Howard County, IN

  3. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Cryoarchived Strains   Strain Number: 01XE8  Common Strain Name: P190 BCR-ABL  Strain Nomenclature: B6;CBA-Tg(BCR/ABL)623Hkp/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B1 , D Sample MTA for this strain Strain

  4. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XBL  Common Strain Name: Myf6-ires-cre knock-in  Strain Nomenclature: B6;129-Myf6tm2(cre)Mrc/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): C1 , D Sample MTA for this strain Animal

  5. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Cryoarchived Strains   Strain Number: 01X67  Common Strain Name: CAG-LSL-EGFR-WT  Strain Nomenclature: STOCK Col1a1tm1(CAG-EGFR)Char/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B3 , D Sample MTA for this

  6. Introduction Detailed model

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Background Definition of problem Different models Meso-scale Population Analysis Comparison Conclusions SidIntroduction Detailed model Population model Comparison and conclusion Modeling the Neocortex with Meso-scale Models and Population Models Sid Visser January 14, 2010 Sid Visser Modeling the Neocortex

  7. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XJA  Common Strain Name: PML (conventional k/o) - C57BL/6  Strain Nomenclature: B6.129S7-Pmltm1Ppp>/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B3 , C1 Sample MTA for this strain Animal

  8. Detail of pahoehoe lobe

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A detail of a pahoehoe lobe at the top of a tumulus. The upper crust that is lifted up during the formation of a tumulus is typically quite vesicular (has lots of bubbled trapped in it). Roza Formation, Columbia River Basalt Group. Southwest of Quincy, WA. Tumuli are structures usually associated w...

  9. Supporting Information Experimental details

    E-print Network

    Skeldon, Anne C.

    Supporting Information Experimental details The Ferrocene powder was vacuum-organisation properties of ferrocene in the ampule were studied at various maximum temperatures (TM C) and densities a uniform spherical iron-rich core. As the core grows, more iron and carbon accumulate flowing round

  10. GRAPES -Detail Quick Links

    E-print Network

    Turc, Catalin

    GRAPES - Detail Quick Links GRAPES Introduction - https://grad.ucla.edu/grpinst.htm Fellowship Click the "Back Button" to return to the search results page or try a New Search - search.asp GRAPES - Department of Defense (DOD), National Defense Science an... https://grad.ucla.edu/asis/grapes

  11. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XBU  Common Strain Name: p16INKa4a L   Strain Nomenclature: B6.129(Cg)-Cdkn2atm2.1Nesh/Nci/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B3 Sample MTA for this strain Animal Health

  12. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01X62  Common Strain Name: Arf floxed  Strain Nomenclature: B6.129-Cdkn2atm4Cjs/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B1 Sample MTA for this strain Animal Health Report in

  13. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XD8  Common Strain Name: Fabp1-Cre  Strain Nomenclature: FVB/N-Tg(Fabp1-Cre)1Jig/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): B1 , D Sample MTA for this strain Animal Health Report

  14. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Available Strain Details Order Form for Live Mice   Strain Number: 01XB2  Common Strain Name: Ink4a/Arf null (FVB)  Strain Nomenclature: FVB.129-Cdkn2atm1Rdp/Nci  Release Category (Required for MTA form): C3 Sample MTA for this strain Animal Health

  15. A sense of place

    E-print Network

    Brown, Blain, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    1981-01-01

    The thesis argues that a sense of place is one of the most fundamentally important quality of architecture and cities and attempts to show that legibility and latency are the aspects of the environment which contribute ...

  16. Place of exchange

    E-print Network

    Hollander, Adi

    2015-01-01

    The thesis is written as a theoretical presentation of the research I conducted at MIT between 2013 and 2015. I will discuss what I consider to be an important aspect of my artistic practice; creating places of exchange, ...

  17. Artist Place Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrino, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Art history can be a little dry at times, but the author is always trying to incorporate new ways of teaching it. In this article, she describes a project in which students were to create a place setting out of clay that had to be unified through a famous artist's style. This place setting had to consist of at least five pieces (dinner plate, cup…

  18. Illilouette Falls Detail

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Illilouettea Falls, a tributary of the Merced River can be seen just upstream of Happy Isles and the USGS Benchmark Streamgage in Yosemite National Park. The Merced River is a 145 mile (233 km) long tributary of the San Joaquin River. It drains a large section of the Sierra Nevad...

  19. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    A luciferase knockin mouse (p16(LUC)), which faithfully reports expression of p16(INK4a), a tumor suppressor and aging biomarker. In 14 of 14 tested tumor models, expression of p16(LUC) was focally activated by early neoplastic events, enabling visualization of tumors with sensitivity exceeding other imaging modalities.

  20. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    Widespread Cre expression including the female germline. High levels of recombination in the virgin and lactating mammary gland, salivary gland, seminal vesicle, skin and cells of the immune system. Little expression in the lung, kidney, liver and brain. Females from this line display impaired mammary development and are unable to nurse successfully, so if used in the colony pups must be fostered. Refer to PMID 21255551 for details.

  1. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    The doxycycline-dependent transcriptional repressor, tTA, was placed under control of the bovine keratin 5 (K5, KRT5) promoter. When tested on a tetO-LacZ transgenic background, doxycycline suppressed expression of beta-galactosidase in a tissue-specific manner. Reduced beta-galactosidase activity was detected in skin (basal layer of the epidermis and hair follicles), tongue, forestomach, and trachea. No reduction was seen in tissues that do not express endogenous keratin 5 (liver, spleen, muscle, heart, intestine).

  2. Mouse Repository Strain Details

    Cancer.gov

    A Cre-inducible luciferase transgene was targeted into the Rosa26 locus and is driven by a CMV-based promoter. This allele when used in combination with Cre-regulated oncogenes or tumor suppressors can allow for noninvasive detection of tumors in mice. This allele permits serial imaging of mice, thus increasing the utility of mouse tumor models as a system to test therapeutics.

  3. Details of meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 18, discusses the details of meiosis, beginning with the structure and number of chiasmata, i.e., the cytological term for two homologous chromosomes forming a bivalent which begin to repel each other until they are held together only at the point of crossing-over. The synaptonemal complex which consists of two lateral elements which contain protein and RNA is also discussed. The chapter concludes with a description of meiosis in polyploids, human meiosis, and the behavior of X and Y chromosomes. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  4. LF460 detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This is the final technical report documenting the detail design of the LF460, and advanced turbotip lift fan intended for application with the YJ97-GE-100 turbojet jet generator to a V/STOL transport research aircraft. Primary objective of the design was to achieve a low noise level while maintaining the high thrust/weight ratio capability of a high pressure ratio lift fan. Report covers design requirements and summarizes activities and final results in the areas of aerodynamic and mechanical design, component and system performance, acoustic features and final noise predictions.

  5. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  6. Finding Place in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Chris

    2011-01-01

    As a society, we are less and less comfortable in our localities. We have embraced the idea of a globalized placelessness, where everything, everywhere, resonates with a sameness. What do we lose, educationally and in society at large, when we reduce our inhabited places to those components that provide material wealth alone? If students and…

  7. Art for Public Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    In response to a challenge by a school administrator for "some sort of mural" in the high school where she teaches art, the author of this article created a course called Art for Public Places. She wanted to create a course that would promote a sense of community among students in the class and ownership in their school environment. Also, she…

  8. Creativity: Does Place Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Finbarr

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that creativity has the greatest potential to flourish if a learning environment is embedded within a community that emphasises a deep sense of place. Yet in a globalised world, rootedness is often regarded as antithetical to creativity. But far from representing dead artefacts that are anti-modern and non-economic, culture and…

  9. Teaching With Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Ronald M., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Designed for social studies educators, this theme issue presents 11 articles about historic places that feature a variety of ideas for elementary and secondary lesson plans, curricula, and program development. The articles are: (1) "Where did History Happen?" (Beth M. Boland); (2) "Creating a Partnership" (Carol D. Shull); (3) "Heritage Education:…

  10. The Value of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate…

  11. Conoco details energy outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-22

    This paper reports that the U.S., government should adopt policies that encourage U.S. petroleum companies to diversify crude oil sources around the world, says Conoco Inc. That's the key them underlying Conoco's latest world energy outlook through 2000. In its 1989 outlook, Conoco called on the U.S. government to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain to exploration and development and provide a tax credit of $5/bbl of oil equivalent (BOE) for production from U.S. frontier areas as keys to reducing U.S. oil import dependence. Although Conoco included opening the ANWR Coastal Plain and more of the U.S. offshore among U.S. policy recommendations in its current outlook, the company placed the greatest emphasis on incentives for worldwide exploration.

  12. double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Help's Quarters, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  13. Detail of Bridalveil Fall from Tunnel View

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen in detail from Tunnel View in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  14. Detail of Ganymede's Uruk Sulcus Region as Viewed by Galileo and Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    View of the region of Ganymede's Uruk Sulcus placed on a lower resolution Voyager view taken 17 years earlier. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from almost overhead in the Galileo view. The finest details that can be discerned in the Galileo picture are about 80 meters across. The four boxes outlined in white show the extent of Galileo's initial look at this area. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  15. 11. Detail, west parapet, showing typical expansion joint between the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail, west parapet, showing typical expansion joint between the two-span, poured-in-place parapet sections; view to southwest. - Fordway Bridge, Spanning Concord River at Pollard Street, Billerica, Middlesex County, MA

  16. INTERIOR DETAIL, WINDOW OPENING ONTO THE SERVICE STAIR FROM DINING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL, WINDOW OPENING ONTO THE SERVICE STAIR FROM DINING ROOM PASSAGE. OPENINGS LIKE THESE ARE PRESENT IN A NUMBER OF PLACES, ?BORROWING LIGHT? FOR OTHERWISE DARK INTERIOR SPACES - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. 20. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF BOTTOM DOOR, THIRD BAY Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF BOTTOM DOOR, THIRD BAY Showing splayed head jambs dadoes, interior casing design. - U.S. Military Academy, Ice House, Mills Road at Howze Place, West Point, Orange County, NY

  18. 5. EAST ELEVATION (OFFICE BLOCK), DETAIL SHOWING DECORATIVE PILASTERS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST ELEVATION (OFFICE BLOCK), DETAIL SHOWING DECORATIVE PILASTERS AND STYLIZED EGG-AND-DART DECORATION AROUND WINDOWS OF UPPER FLOORS - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad & Ferry Terminal, Hudson Place, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  19. Finding Your Place in Art History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Lauren Parmelee

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art history project used with fifth-grade students where they selected a famous painting as a background for a self-portrait. Explains how the students used Adobe Photoshop to place a digital photograph of themselves into a scanned image of the artwork. (CMK)

  20. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK in the more generalised RASP project (DEFRA and the Environment Agency), and in line with the expressed needs of the ABI (Association of British Insurers) and National Flood Forum. The detailed data produced will also support improved flood risk assessment for the provision of affordable insurance.

  1. 17. DETAIL OF INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR WALL CONSTRUCTION, VIEW TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL OF INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR WALL CONSTRUCTION, VIEW TOWARD NORTHEAST CORNER, THIRD BAY Showing insulated exterior wall at right; asphalt felt on interior separation wall at left; sill beam, stud, and concrete foundation detailing of interior wall. - U.S. Military Academy, Ice House, Mills Road at Howze Place, West Point, Orange County, NY

  2. CMOS Imaging Device for Optical Imaging of Biological Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishido, Sanshiro; Oguro, Yasuhiro; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    In this paper, we propose a CMOS image sensor device placed on the brain surface or cerebral sulcus (Fig. 1). The device has a photo detector array where a single optical detector is usually used. The proposed imaging device enables the analysis which reflects a surface blood pattern in the observed area. It is also possible to improve effective sensitivity by image processing and to simplify the measurement system by the CMOS sensor device with on-chip light source. We describe the design details and characterization of proposed device. We also demonstrate detection of hemoglobin oxygenation level with external light source, imaging capability of biological activities, and image processing for sensitivity improvement is also realized.

  3. Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon framing, including full two-story studs notched to carry girts supporting second story floor joists (210mm lens) - Scandia Hotel, 225 First Street, Eureka, Humboldt County, CA

  4. Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of Sixth Street Bridge. Looking northeast - Sixth Street Bridge, Spanning 101 Freeway at Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards northeast of the pinion and bull gears of the winding machinery. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 6. Detail of front entry on E elevation. Detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of front entry on E elevation. Detail of round, terra cotta medallions on E elevation indicating date of building. - Central of Georgia Railway, Red (Administration) Building, 233 West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  7. Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, R

    1986-12-01

    Imaging of the musculoskeletal system includes many modalities and is an area that is changing rapidly. Selection of the most accurate techniques and avoidance of duplication are vital to both good patient care and cost containment. PMID:3466135

  8. [Imaging].

    PubMed

    Chevrot, A; Drapé, J L; Godefroy, D; Dupont, A M; Pessis, E; Sarazin, L; Minoui, A

    1997-01-01

    The panoply of imaging techniques useful in podology is essentially limited to X-rays. Standard "standing" and "lying" X-rays furnish most of the required information. Arthrography is sometimes performed, in particular for trauma or tumour of the ankle. CT scan and MRI make a decisive contribution in difficult cases, notably in fractures and in small fractures without displacement. The two latter techniques are useful in tendon, ligament and muscular disorders, where echography is also informative. Rigorous analysis of radiographies and a good knowledge of foot disorders make these imaging techniques efficacious. PMID:9035538

  9. Detailed Astrometric Analysis of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ROSSI, GUSTAVO B.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I.; Assafin, M.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Pluto is the main representant of the transneptunian objects (TNO's), presenting some peculiarities such as an atmosphere and a satellite system with 5 known moons: Charon, discovered in 1978, Nix and Hydra, in 2006, P4 in 2011 and P5 in 2012. Until the arrival of the New Horizons spacecraft to this system (july 2015), stellar occultations are the most efficient method, from the ground, to know physical and dinamical properties of this system. In 2010, it was evident a drift in declinations (about 20 mas/year) comparing to the ephemerides. This fact motivated us to remake the reductions and analysis of a great set of our observations at OPD/LNA, in a total of 15 years. The ephemerides and occultations results was then compared with the astrometric and photometric reductions of CCD images of Pluto (around 6500 images). Two corrections were used for a refinement of the data set: diferential chromatic refraction and photocenter. The first is due to the mean color of background stars beeing redder than the color of Pluto, resulting in a slightly different path of light through the atmosphere (that may cause a difference in position of 0.1”). It became more evident because Pluto is crossing the region of the galactic plane. The photocenter correction is based on two gaussians curves overlapped, with different hights and non-coincident centers, corresponding to Pluto and Charon (since they have less than 1” of angular separation). The objective is to separate these two gaussian curves from the observed one and find the right position of Pluto. The method is strongly dependent of the hight of each of the gaussian curves, related to the respective albedos of charon and Pluto. A detailed analysis of the astrometric results, as well a comparison with occultation results was made. Since Pluto has an orbital period of 248,9 years and our interval of observation is about 15 years, we have around 12% of its observed orbit and also, our observations were made when Pluto was near its periapsis. With the corrections made, the ephemeris, when recalculated, shall not present sistematic drifts near the temporal interval in wich contains our observational data, allowing the determination of local adjustments at the Pluto orbit.

  10. A woman's rightful place?

    PubMed

    1993-04-01

    Rural development projects in sub-Saharan Africa tend not to succeed because they do not consider women's role and their significance, even though women constitute 70% of agricultural workers, 80% of food producers, 100% of people who prepare meals, and 60-90% do food marketing. Development specialists ignore women because they are not involved in political activities and in decision making. As long as women and women's contributions are not considered, rural development projects will remain inefficient and development will not take place. Thus, projects must include women as agents and beneficiaries of development in key sectors of the economy. Rural development specialists must also consider the effect male labor emigration has on rural women. For example, drought has forced many men to leave their villages, leaving a work force consisting of 95% women to fight desertification. All too often, women have no or limited land ownership rights, thereby keeping them from improving the land, e.g., planting perennial fruit crops. They also tend to be hired hands rather than food producers. They cannot obtain bank loans because they do not own land, and because they are often illiterate (over 90% female illiteracy in 28 African countries), they can neither understand nor complete bank loan forms. Rural development projects further alienate women by aiming training programs to men or by using male agricultural extension agents. Women react to this alienation by rejecting projects that do not benefit them and follow more profitable activities which sometimes interfere with projects. Thus, rural development programs need to invest in women to ensure viable and efficient sustainable development. PMID:12344988

  11. Color constancy technology based on detail description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huinan; Cao, Jianzhong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Zuofeng

    2015-07-01

    Color constancy is an important problem in machine vision and image processing fields. We propose a new method in this paper that is based on detail information description to estimate the chromaticity of the light source and restore the real color property of captured images. The main idea of the proposed approach is that according to human vision characteristics use the interest information in an image to estimate the lighting condition of real scene. To approve the proposed method, two well-known algorithms are selected and their contrast results are also presented. It is shown in this paper that the proposed approach performs better than other traditional methods for color constancy most of the time.

  12. Place Value: A Vertical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bove, Sandra P.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses children's place-value understanding, including initial learning interference, vertical number lines, and planned discourse. Describes a learning activity that can guide children from a concrete to a symbolic understanding of place value. (11 references) (MKR)

  13. PhD Project Title: Feto-placental flow modelling from detailed vascular structural image analysis Project Supervisors: Dr E Johnstone, Dr P Brownbill (Institute of Human Development), Prof OE

    E-print Network

    Sidorov, Nikita

    affect fetal growth and development. We have used microCT technology to provide a unique detailed Project Supervisors: Dr E Johnstone, Dr P Brownbill (Institute of Human Development), Prof OE Jensen maternal blood bathes placental villi, tree-like structures containing fetal capillaries. Abnormalities

  14. 10. CYLINDER DETAILS: DETAIL OF STEEL FOR CYLINDER NO. 59, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CYLINDER DETAILS: DETAIL OF STEEL FOR CYLINDER NO. 59, PIER NO. 6, DWG. 86, 3/4" = 1', MADE BY A.F., CHECKED BY E.C.L., APPROVED BY O.F. LACKEY, JUNE 2, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 6, South of Pratt Street between Concord Street & Jones Falls outlet, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  15. 24. INTERIOR DETAIL FROM THE SOUTH END OF THE DELIVERY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. INTERIOR DETAIL FROM THE SOUTH END OF THE DELIVERY (RECEIVING LEVEL. THE DETAIL SHOWS THE WINDING DRUM AND REVERSING CLUTCH FOR THE TRAMWAY ORE CAR, AND AN ORE CHUTE IN THE FLOOR) FOREGROUND BOTTOM LEFT OF THE IMAGE). - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  16. VITA: Andreas Burkert Personal Details

    E-print Network

    Kersting, Roland

    /12/1959 Place of birth: Gangkofen, Bavaria, Germany Sex: Male Marital Status: Married, 1 child Work Address Library · Editor: Astrophysics Series: "Astrophysik Aktuell", Elsevier Education: School education: 1965

  17. vanced undergraduates. Because its level of tech-nical detail places it between most other text-

    E-print Network

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    -55581-422-0. 2007. Extremophiles are organisms that thrive under envi- ronmental conditions that are considered reviewing different aspects of the extremophile liter- ature. These chapters are grouped into sections as a greater body of research relative to other types of extremophiles. Each section appropriately begins

  18. 13. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ROADWAY. DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ROADWAY. DETAIL VIEW OF THE PIERS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES ON THE COLORADO STREET BRIDGE. THIS VIEW SHOWS A PORTION OF THE BRIDGE ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ROADWAY. EACH FIXTURE ALSO ORIGINALLY HAD FOUR ADDITIONAL GLOBES, WHICH EXTENDED FROM THE COLUMN BELOW THE MAIN GLOBE. THE 'REFUGE' SEATING AREAS ARE ORIGINAL, WHILE THE RAILING IS A LATER ADDITION. - Colorado Street Bridge, Spanning Arroyo Seco at Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. See Detail Map 1 See Detail Map 2

    E-print Network

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    E CARTER CR EEK PW WOODCREEK DR CAVITT AV WACO ST E N O RTH AV APPOM ATTOX DR EMERALD W LEONARD RD Y NAG LE ST INLOW BLVD M AYW O OD DR ASPEN ST BO YETT ST PATRICIA ST CHURCH AV CULPEPPER LISA O R LN E29THST TANG LEW O O D DR BRIAR OAKS DR BRIARCREST DR CARTER CREEK PW Detail Map 1 Detail Map 2

  20. Cardiac Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Although not available to all patients with narrowed arteries, balloon angioplasty has expanded dramatically since its introduction with an estimated further growth to 562,000 procedures in the U.S. alone by 1992. Growth has fueled demand for higher quality imaging systems that allow the cardiologist to be more accurate and increase the chances of a successful procedure. A major advance is the Digital Cardiac Imaging (DCI) System designed by Philips Medical Systems International, Best, The Netherlands and marketed in the U.S. by Philips Medical Systems North America Company. The key benefit is significantly improved real-time imaging and the ability to employ image enhancement techniques to bring out added details. Using a cordless control unit, the cardiologist can manipulate images to make immediate assessment, compare live x-ray and roadmap images by placing them side-by-side on monitor screens, or compare pre-procedure and post procedure conditions. The Philips DCI improves the cardiologist's precision by expanding the information available to him.

  1. A Place for Everything, and Everything in Its Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, John

    2008-01-01

    Sixteen papers on the general theme of the "place" of psychology, particularly in higher education, arose from the author's paper "Psychology in its place." Several themes emerge from the disparate contributions. The author discusses two papers which directly comment on his original one, the papers of John Newland and Tom Dickins. Psychology in…

  2. Healthy Places: Exploring the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, Howard

    2003-01-01

    “Sense of place” is a widely discussed concept in fields as diverse as geography, environmental psychology, and art, but it has little traction in the field of public health. The health impact of place includes physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and aesthetic outcomes. In this article, the author introduces sense of place as a public health construct. While many recommendations for “good places” are available, few are based on empirical evidence, and thus they are incompatible with current public health practice. Evidence-based recommendations for healthy place making could have important public health implications. Four aspects of the built environment, at different spatial scales—nature contact, buildings, public spaces, and urban form—are identified as offering promising opportunities for public health research, and potential research agendas for each are discussed. PMID:12948962

  3. PLACES : experiencing and making a place in Athens

    E-print Network

    Gryboyianni, Christina

    1987-01-01

    PLACE is a concept that addresses fundamental aspects of human existence; the external bonds of man with the world. It rests upon shared ways of life and knowledge which enable its physical expression into coherent and ...

  4. 18. Construction technique, detail, bridges along elevated right ofway of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Construction technique, detail, bridges along elevated right- of-way of Shaker Rapid Transit through east side city of Cleveland. 'Showing use of Pyrobar to decrease load of bridge (East 81st Street); the Pyrobar is shown placed on wet concrete. Workmen at left are finishing laying concrete over pyrobar.' 1915 - Shaker Heights Rapid Transit Line, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. 19. DETAIL OF INTERIOR WALL CONSTRUCTION, VIEW TOWARD SOUTH, THIRD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL OF INTERIOR WALL CONSTRUCTION, VIEW TOWARD SOUTH, THIRD BAY Showing asphalt felt applied to both sides of interior wall studs beneath wood cladding. Back-nailing of felt indicates sequence of felt and cladding installation. - U.S. Military Academy, Ice House, Mills Road at Howze Place, West Point, Orange County, NY

  6. 18. DETAIL OF EXTERIOR WALL CONSTRUCTION, VIEW TOWARD EAST, THIRD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL OF EXTERIOR WALL CONSTRUCTION, VIEW TOWARD EAST, THIRD BAY Showing furring strips, kraft faced cellulose fiber insulation, and asphalt felt applied to interior of exterior wall studs. - U.S. Military Academy, Ice House, Mills Road at Howze Place, West Point, Orange County, NY

  7. Exterior direct detail view of revised entry handicap ramp at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior direct detail view of revised entry handicap ramp at east side of Building 7 (including 3-story trash dump tower), looking north - North Beach Place, 431 Bay Street, 530 Francisco Street, 431 Bay Street, 530 Francisco Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. 36. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden ELEVATIONS OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR WILLIAM C. PRATT - CAMDEN PLACE - DRIVE FRONT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  9. 35. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of detail of ink and wash rendering by N. G. Starkwether in collection of Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Pratt, Camden ELEVATIONS OF ITALIAN VILLA FOR WILLIAM C. PRATT - CAMDEN PLACE - RIVER FRONT - Camden, Rappahannock River, Port Royal, Caroline County, VA

  10. 16. DETAIL OF END OF SWING SPAN (LEFT) AND SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF END OF SWING SPAN (LEFT) AND SOUTH END OF NORTH STATIONARY SPAN REVEALING IRON SKID AND SWING BALANCE SUPPORT WHEEL. NOTE CHAIN USED TO HOLD BRIDGE IN PLACE - Maurice River Pratt Through-Truss Swing Bridge, Spanning Maurice River, Mauricetown, Cumberland County, NJ

  11. 11. DETAILS: CONCRETE SHEET PILING, CORNERS #4 & #6, DWG. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAILS: CONCRETE SHEET PILING, CORNERS #4 & #6, DWG. NO. 11, 1-1/2" = 1 FT., FEB. 12, 1908, MADE BY E.C.L., APPROVED BY O.F. LACKEY - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  12. 16. STRUCTURAL DETAILS: CHANNEL, BIT & CLEAT, ANCHOR BOLTS & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. STRUCTURAL DETAILS: CHANNEL, BIT & CLEAT, ANCHOR BOLTS & PLATES FOR PIERS 4, 5, AND 6, DWG. NO. 97, 1-1/2" = 1', MADE BY A.F., JUNE 13, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  13. 22. Detail view of sign suspended from portal strut (this ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Detail view of sign suspended from portal strut (this sign was located at the same place at both ends of Moody Bridge). Bottom: General elevation view to southeast showing northern abutment with solid rock foundation. - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  14. 8. Detail, 1897 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map, Carlin, Nevada, in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail, 1897 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map, Carlin, Nevada, in collection of Nevada Historical Society, Reno; credit Nevada Historical Society. Former Library in Engine Stores Building is now vacant Oil House is now in place, shown as corrugated iron cladding on frame. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  15. UNSW Prep Program 17-19 Stream Details 2015

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    (Communication & Journalism), Media (PR & Advertising), International Studies: a WAM of 75 with a credit in all The Learning Centre FACULTY OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES Stream Details Students will be offered a place in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences degree programs subject to meeting the minimum WAM requirements below

  16. Art deco railing detail on SE side. Partial segment in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Art deco railing detail on SE side. Partial segment in left foreground is same as center segment in photo WA-141-5. - Raging River Bridge No. 234A, Preston-Fall City Road & Southeast Forty-fourth Place, Fall City, King County, WA

  17. 15. Detail looking west from the bridge roadbed, showing the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail looking west from the bridge roadbed, showing the face of the west parapet and demonstrating the ghosts of the form work. The coping was cast independent of the balusters. - Vigo County Bridge No. 139, Spanning Sugar Creek at Seventy-fourth Place, Terre Haute, Vigo County, IN

  18. John Dewey and a Pedagogy of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayanandhan, Stephanie Raill

    2009-01-01

    If asked to define the idea of "place" one might struggle. Yet people across time and cultures readily share examples of important places or safe places or "foreign" places with one another and offer heartfelt descriptions in literature and art of childhood places, favorite places, strange places. Akinbola Akinwumi, paraphrasing Yi-Fu Tuan,…

  19. Place memory retention in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Daniela; Kahsai, Lily; Kramer, Elizabeth F; Knutson, Patrick; Zars, Troy

    2015-09-01

    Some memories last longer than others, with some lasting a lifetime. Using several approaches memory phases have been identified. How are these different phases encoded, and do these different phases have similar temporal properties across learning situations? Place memory in Drosophila using the heat-box provides an excellent opportunity to examine the commonalities of genetically-defined memory phases across learning contexts. Here we determine optimal conditions to test place memories that last up to three hours. An aversive temperature of 41°C was identified as critical for establishing a long-lasting place memory. Interestingly, adding an intermittent-training protocol only slightly increased place memory when intermediate aversive temperatures were used, and slightly extended the stability of a memory. Genetic analysis of this memory identified four genes as critical for place memory within minutes of training. The role of the rutabaga type I adenylyl cyclase was confirmed, and the latheo Orc3 origin of recognition complex component, the novel gene encoded by pastrel, and the small GTPase rac were all identified as essential for normal place memory. Examination of the dopamine and ecdysone receptor (DopEcR) did not reveal a function for this gene in place memory. When compared to the role of these genes in other memory types, these results suggest that there are genes that have both common and specific roles in memory formation across learning contexts. Importantly, contrasting the timing for the function of these four genes, plus a previously described role of the radish gene, in place memory with the temporal requirement of these genes in classical olfactory conditioning reveals variability in the timing of genetically-defined memory phases depending on the type of learning. PMID:26143995

  20. Oxide formation: reaction details studied,

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Oxide formation: reaction details studied, reported in brief Sir -- Nineteen years ago, I published-nitrosohydroxylamines undergo an alternative decomposition under very similar reaction conditions to liberate nitrous oxide, N2O (refs 4,5). Moreover, this alternative reaction involves highly electrophilic intermediates analogous

  1. Fashion BA (Hons) Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Fashion BA (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 3 years (BA) / 4 years (BA Hons - available in UK) Delivery type: Day Intake date: September Fees: 54000 AED per year Overview Our Fashion Design programme confidently prepares students for a career within the fashion industry. As well as learning

  2. Practical tips for imaging ascidian embryos.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takefumi; McDougall, Alex; Yasuo, Hitoyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Decades of studies on ascidian embryogenesis have culminated in deciphering the first gene regulatory "blueprint" for the generation of all major larval tissue types in chordates. However, the current gene regulatory network (GRN) is not well integrated with the morphogenetic and cellular processes that are also taking place during embryogenesis. Describing these processes represents a major on-going challenge, aided by recent advances in imaging and fluorescent protein (FP) technologies. In this report, we describe the application of these technologies to the developmental biology of ascidians and provide a detailed practical guide on the preparation of ascidian embryos for imaging. PMID:23611302

  3. Visual Place Recognition with Repetitive Structures.

    PubMed

    Torii, Akihiko; Sivic, Josef; Okutomi, Masatoshi; Pajdla, Tomas

    2015-11-01

    Repeated structures such as building facades, fences or road markings often represent a significant challenge for place recognition. Repeated structures are notoriously hard for establishing correspondences using multi-view geometry. They violate the feature independence assumed in the bag-of-visual-words representation which often leads to over-counting evidence and significant degradation of retrieval performance. In this work we show that repeated structures are not a nuisance but, when appropriately represented, they form an important distinguishing feature for many places. We describe a representation of repeated structures suitable for scalable retrieval and geometric verification. The retrieval is based on robust detection of repeated image structures and a suitable modification of weights in the bag-of-visual-word model. We also demonstrate that the explicit detection of repeated patterns is beneficial for robust visual word matching for geometric verification. Place recognition results are shown on datasets of street-level imagery from Pittsburgh and San Francisco demonstrating significant gains in recognition performance compared to the standard bag-of-visual-words baseline as well as the more recently proposed burstiness weighting and Fisher vector encoding. PMID:26440272

  4. Place-based praxis: exploring place-based education and the philosophy of place

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Samuel Carey

    2012-06-29

    This thesis interweaves two strands of inquiry, one educational, the other philosophical. The educational inquiry is seeded by the need to understand both embodiment and learning within experiences of place in education. ...

  5. DETAIL CODE REQUEST Student Business Services

    E-print Network

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    DETAIL CODE REQUEST Student Business Services Date of Request: Effective Date: New Detail Code (Select type Below) Change Existing Detail Code (Enter detail code ) DETAIL CODE TYPE Field Trip Field Course Fall Spring Summer (Check All Terms Fee is to be Charged) Suggested Detail Code Description (30

  6. A Novel Approach for Detail-Enhanced Exposure Fusion Using Guided Filter

    PubMed Central

    Bhooshan, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel detail-enhancing exposure fusion approach using nonlinear translation-variant filter (NTF). With the captured Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) images under different exposure settings, first the fine details are extracted based on guided filter. Next, the base layers (i.e., images obtained from NTF) across all input images are fused using multiresolution pyramid. Exposure, contrast, and saturation measures are considered to generate a mask that guides the fusion process of the base layers. Finally, the fused base layer is combined with the extracted fine details to obtain detail-enhanced fused image. The goal is to preserve details in both very dark and extremely bright regions without High Dynamic Range Image (HDRI) representation and tone mapping step. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the proposed method is also suitable for the multifocus image fusion without introducing artifacts. PMID:24683353

  7. A novel approach for detail-enhanced exposure fusion using guided filter.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harbinder; Kumar, Vinay; Bhooshan, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel detail-enhancing exposure fusion approach using nonlinear translation-variant filter (NTF). With the captured Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) images under different exposure settings, first the fine details are extracted based on guided filter. Next, the base layers (i.e., images obtained from NTF) across all input images are fused using multiresolution pyramid. Exposure, contrast, and saturation measures are considered to generate a mask that guides the fusion process of the base layers. Finally, the fused base layer is combined with the extracted fine details to obtain detail-enhanced fused image. The goal is to preserve details in both very dark and extremely bright regions without High Dynamic Range Image (HDRI) representation and tone mapping step. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the proposed method is also suitable for the multifocus image fusion without introducing artifacts. PMID:24683353

  8. Reading Place: Learning from the Savage Inequalities at Erasmus Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickar, Maryann

    2006-01-01

    Through his detailed descriptions of schools across America, Kozol (1991) demonstrated the symbolic impact of the physical space of schools with disturbing examples of institutionalized racism made visible. Thus, Savage Inequalities also initiated a critical pedagogy of place by questioning the relationship of racial identity to the quality and…

  9. Place-Based Education at Island Community School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Aimee; Howley, Marged; Camper, Christi; Perko, Heike

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study of Island Community School provides a detailed description of how one school incorporated place-based, environmentally conscious education over the course of more than a decade. The study explored the conditions that supported and constrained this approach in an isolated rural community. Data came primarily from…

  10. Putting molecules in their place

    PubMed Central

    Cinquin, Bertrand P.; Do, Myan; McDermott, Gerry; Walters, Alison D.; Myllys, Markko; Smith, Elizabeth A.; Cohen-Fix, Orna; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Each class of microscope is limited to imaging specific aspects of cell structure and/or molecular organization. However, imaging the specimen by complementary microscopies and correlating the data can overcome this limitation. Whilst not a new approach, the field of correlative imaging is currently benefitting from the emergence of new microscope techniques. Here we describe the correlation of cryogenic fluorescence tomography (CFT) with soft x-ray tomography (SXT). This amalgamation of techniques integrates 3-D molecular localization data (CFT) with a high-resolution, 3-D cell reconstruction of the cell (SXT). Cells are imaged in both modalities in a near-native, cryopreserved state. Here we describe the current state of the art in correlative CFT-SXT, and discuss the future outlook for this method. PMID:23966233

  11. "Changing Places" in Changed Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showalter, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Thirty years ago, every American academic going on a research trip or a sabbatical to England carried a copy of David Lodge's comic classic, "Changing Places" (1975), which told a tale of two 40-year-old professors of English literature and two embattled campuses in the eventful spring of 1969. An ineffectual British academic, Philip Swallow, from…

  12. A Place on the Shelf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Devon

    2007-01-01

    If we read to discover new worlds, we also read to find ourselves. For gays and lesbians, this act of discovery can be problematic: literature has so often excluded them. In the last decades, as gays and lesbians have grown increasingly vocal in the effort to secure their rightful place in society, a broad range of fiction has emerged that…

  13. The Mushroom Place. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlichter, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The final installment of a series of articles on the "Mushroom Place" learning center program, which involves creative thinking activities for young, gifted students, describes "Doing It the Hard Way," a performance task which involves the actual construction of objects from a selected set of materials in the absence of the usual project tools.…

  14. Sense of Place in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnow, Pat, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This journal issue contains interviews, essays, short stories, and poetry focusing on sense of place in Appalachia. In interviews, author Wilma Dykeman discussed past and recent novels set in Appalachia with interviewer Sandra L. Ballard; and novelist Lee Smith spoke with interviewer Pat Arnow about how Appalachia has shaped her writing. Essays…

  15. Let's Sleep at Your Place

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-05-19

    Broadcast Transcript: Sure, Mongolia still has its yurts, its nomads, its fermented yak's milk but it also has a reality TV show: ?????? ????? which means Let's Sleep at Your Place. The host is Tengis, a friendly and sincere young man in glasses...

  16. Aircraft empennage structural detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Brown, Rhonda; Hall, Melissa; Harvey, Robert; Singer, Michael; Tella, Gustavo

    1993-01-01

    This project involved the detailed design of the aft fuselage and empennage structure, vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilizer, and elevator for the Triton primary flight trainer. The main design goals under consideration were to illustrate the integration of the control systems devices used in the tail surfaces and their necessary structural supports as well as the elevator trim, navigational lighting system, electrical systems, tail-located ground tie, and fuselage/cabin interface structure. Accommodations for maintenance, lubrication, adjustment, and repairability were devised. Weight, fabrication, and (sub)assembly goals were addressed. All designs were in accordance with the FAR Part 23 stipulations for a normal category aircraft.

  17. Detailed mechanism of benzene oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed quantitative mechanism for the oxidation of benzene in both argon and nitrogen diluted systems is presented. Computed ignition delay time for argon diluted mixtures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results for a wide range of initial conditions. An experimental temperature versus time profile for a nitrogen diluted oxidation was accurately matched and several concentration profiles were matched qualitatively. Application of sensitivity analysis has given approximate rate constant expressions for the two dominant heat release reactions, the oxidation of C6H5 and C5H5 radicals by molecular oxygen.

  18. Thirty Meter Telescope Detailed Science Case: 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, Warren; TMT International Science Development Teams; Science Advisory Committee, TMT

    2015-12-01

    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA). Cover image: artist's rendition of the TMT International Observatory on Mauna Kea opening in the late evening before beginning operations.

  19. Detailed Clinical Models: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Goossen-Baremans, Anneke; van der Zel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Due to the increasing use of electronic patient records and other health care information technology, we see an increase in requests to utilize these data. A highly level of standardization is required during the gathering of these data in the clinical context in order to use it for analyses. Detailed Clinical Models (DCM) have been created toward this purpose and several initiatives have been implemented in various parts of the world to create standardized models. This paper presents a review of DCM. Methods Two types of analyses are presented; one comparing DCM against health care information architectures and a second bottom up approach from concept analysis to representation. In addition core parts of the draft ISO standard 13972 on DCM are used such as clinician involvement, data element specification, modeling, meta information, and repository and governance. Results Six initiatives were selected: Intermountain Healthcare, 13606/OpenEHR Archetypes, Clinical Templates, Clinical Contents Models, Health Level 7 templates, and Dutch Detailed Clinical Models. Each model selected was reviewed for their overall development, involvement of clinicians, use of data types, code bindings, expressing semantics, modeling, meta information, use of repository and governance. Conclusions Using both a top down and bottom up approach to comparison reveals many commonalties and differences between initiatives. Important differences include the use of or lack of a reference model and expressiveness of models. Applying clinical data element standards facilitates the use of conceptual DCM models in different technical representations. PMID:21818440

  20. Detail of north side of Test Stand 'A' base, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of north side of Test Stand 'A' base, showing tanks for distilled water (left), fuel (center), and gaseous nitrogen (right). Other tanks present for tests were removed before this image was taken. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. Detailed Reconstruction of 3D Plant Root Shape Ying Zheng

    E-print Network

    Tomasi, Carlo

    Detailed Reconstruction of 3D Plant Root Shape Ying Zheng Steve Gu Herbert Edelsbrunner § Carlo Tomasi ¶ Philip Benfey Abstract We study the 3D reconstruction of plant roots from multi- ple 2D images been tested on more than 40 plant roots and results are promising in terms of reconstruction quality

  2. 17. DETAIL OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL OF THE REMAINS OF BLAST FURNACE No. 2 LOOKING EAST. THE BUSTLE PIPE IS VISIBLE ACROSS THE CENTER OF THE IMAGE. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  3. 47. DETAIL OF ORIGINAL VANE ASSEMBLY AND TWO WHEEL SECTIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. DETAIL OF ORIGINAL VANE ASSEMBLY AND TWO WHEEL SECTIONS FROM ELI WINDMILLS, THE VANE SHEET BEARING STENCILED PAINTED INSCRIPTION, 'KREGEL WINDMILL CO. ELI NEBRASKA CITY, NEB.' VISIBLE IN THE IMAGE ARE BOTH SIDES OF THE WHEEL SECTIONS, SHOWING THE METHOD OF BLADE MOUNTING FOR ELI WINDMILLS. - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  4. 4. Credit BG. Detail view of pair of Clayton steam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Credit BG. Detail view of pair of Clayton steam generators. Left part of image shows front, right part shows back. Generators were removed from 4280/E-81 for shipment to a new owner. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Steam Generator Plant, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. A generalized detailed balance relation

    E-print Network

    David Ruelle

    2015-10-28

    Given a system $M$ in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio $r=\\pi_\\tau(K\\to J)/\\pi_\\tau(J\\to K)$ of the transition probabilities $M:J\\to K$ and $M:K\\to J$ in time $\\tau$. We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with $M$ and the transition $J\\to K$ occurs through different channels $\\alpha$ involving different reactions with the bath. We find that $r=\\sum p^\\alpha r^\\alpha$, where $p^\\alpha$ is the probability that channel $\\alpha$ occurs, and $r^\\alpha$ depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel $\\alpha$.

  6. A generalized detailed balance relation

    E-print Network

    Ruelle, David

    2015-01-01

    Given a system $M$ in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio $r=\\pi_\\tau(K\\to J)/\\pi_\\tau(J\\to K)$ of the transition probabilities $M:J\\to K$ and $M:K\\to J$ in time $\\tau$. We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with $M$ and the transition $J\\to K$ occurs through different channels $\\alpha$ involving different reactions with the bath. We find that $r=\\sum p^\\alpha r^\\alpha$, where $p^\\alpha$ is the probability that channel $\\alpha$ occurs, and $r^\\alpha$ depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel $\\alpha$.

  7. Morphological details in bloodstain particles.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L

    2015-01-01

    During the commission of crimes blood can be transferred to the clothing of the offender or on other crime related objects. Bloodstain particles are sub-millimetre sized flakes that are lost from dried bloodstains. The nature of these red particles is easily confirmed using spectroscopic methods. In casework, bloodstain particles showing highly detailed morphological features were observed. These provided a rationale for a series of experiments described in this work. It was found that the "largest" particles are shed from blood deposited on polyester and polyamide woven fabrics. No particles are lost from the stains made on absorbent fabrics and from those made on knitted fabrics. The morphological features observed in bloodstain particles can provide important information on the substrates from which they were lost. PMID:25437904

  8. Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place

    E-print Network

    Pearce, Margaret Wickens; Louis, Renee Pualani

    2008-11-01

    AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURE AND RESEARCH JOURNAL 32:3 (2008) 107–126 107 Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place MARGARET WICKENS PEARCE AND RENEE PUALANI LOUIS INTRODUCTION Indigenous communities have successfully used Western geospatial technolo- gies (GT) (for... and defended in the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples adopted by the UN General Assembly on 13 September 2007. The declaration notes Indigenous peoples’ shared histories Margaret Wickens Pearce is Citizen Potawatomi and an assistant professor...

  9. Course Details Computer Organization Performance Engineering 9859

    E-print Network

    Peters, Dennis

    Details Computer Organization Performance Outline Objective Review basic computer architecture topicsCourse Details Computer Organization Performance Engineering 9859 CoE Fundamentals -- Computer Computer Organization Performance Course Details Classes Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9 ­ 10 EN-4033 Course

  10. Fine Details of the Icy Surface of Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dramatic view of fine details in ice hills and valleys in an unnamed region on Jupiter's moon Ganymede. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the left. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are only 11 meters across (similar to the size of an average house) some 2000 times better than previous images of this region. The bright areas in the left hand version are the sides of hills facing the sun; the dark areas are shadows. In the right hand version the processing has been changed to bring out details in the shadowed regions that are illuminated by the bright hillsides. The brightness of some of the hillsides is so high that the picture elements 'spill over' down the columns of the picture. The image was taken on June 28, 1996 from a distance of about 1000 kilometers. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  11. Race and Place in the Adaptation of Mariel Exiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skop, Emily H.

    2001-01-01

    The influx of lower class Cuban emigres during the 1980 Mariel Boatlift complicates the success story image of previous waves of Cuban exiles. Argues that place of incorporation should be a necessary ingredient in illuminating diverse adjustment experiences among immigrants and refugees to the United States. Concludes by discussing the Cuban…

  12. A Place Pedagogy for "Global Contemporaneity"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret J.

    2010-01-01

    Around the globe people are confronted daily with intransigent problems of space and place. Educators have historically called for place-based or place-conscious education to introduce pedagogies that will address such questions as how to develop sustainable communities and places. These calls for place-conscious education have included liberal…

  13. Musculoskeletal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Douglas G.

    1986-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a significant portion of primary care medicine. Increase in the public awareness of physical fitness has led to an increase in both the incidence and appreciation of musculoskeletal disorders. This discussion considers the investigation of disorders involving the shoulder, wrist, foot, knee and pelvis. Emphasis is placed on new imaging techniques and their place in the investigation of these problems, as well as on their relationship to the more traditional modalities. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:21267198

  14. Visual long-term memory has a massive storage capacity for object details

    E-print Network

    Oliva, Aude

    Visual long-term memory has a massive storage capacity for object details Timothy F. Brady*, Talia, which suggests that as information passes from sensory memory to short-term memory and to long-term of the image details (1). Seconds later, short-term memory enables you to report only sparse details from

  15. Image Steganalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramouli, Rajarathnam; Memon, Nasir

    The past few years have seen an increasing interest in using images as cover media for steganographic communication. There have been a multitude of public-domain tools available for image-based steganography. Given this fact, detection of covert communications that utilize images has become an important issue. There have been several techniques for detecting stegoimages developed in the past few years. In this chapter, we review some fundamental notions related to steganography using image media, including security and capacity. We also describe in detail two steganalysis techniques that are representative of the different approaches that have been taken.

  16. Detailed spectroscopy of 193Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HerzáÅ, A.; Juutinen, S.; Auranen, K.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hauschild, K.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Nieminen, P.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.

    2015-10-01

    An experiment aiming to study shape coexistence in 193Bi has been performed. Due to its transitional character, it has an exceptionally large number of structures identified close to the yrast line. Many new states have been found, significantly extending the previously known level scheme of 193Bi, including several new rotational bands. The ? i13 /2 band was extended to I?=45 /2+ . The I?=31 /2+ member of the ? i13 /2 band was found to de-excite also to a long-lived isomeric state. This isomeric state is located at 2350 keV and has a spin and parity of 29 /2+ . The half-life of the isomeric state was measured to be 85(3) ? s and it decays via the emission of an 84 keV E 2 transition. A level structure feeding this isomeric state was constructed. A low-energy, 49 keV transition has been identified to depopulate the (29 /2- ) isomeric state, which places it at an energy 2405 keV in the level scheme. This is the first time such a decay has been observed in the neutron-deficient Bi isotopes. A superdeformed band almost identical to that present in the neighboring isotope 191Bi, based on the 1/2[651] Nilsson orbital, has also been identified.

  17. Mapping Indigenous Depth of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Margaret Wickens; Louis, Renee Pualani

    2008-01-01

    Indigenous communities have successfully used Western geospatial technologies (GT) (for example, digital maps, satellite images, geographic information systems (GIS), and global positioning systems (GPS)) since the 1970s to protect tribal resources, document territorial sovereignty, create tribal utility databases, and manage watersheds. The use…

  18. Tapping the Power of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockette, Tim

    2010-01-01

    In American popular culture, the word "rural" invokes images of sunny farms and little red schoolhouses--while "urban" means drugs, poverty, and crime. But those who know the reality of both worlds will say that rural schools face many of the same challenges as their urban counterparts. The problems of rural schools are often invisible to the…

  19. Detailed Seismic Reflection Images of the Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, K. D.; Fulthorpe, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    New high-resolution seismic reflection profiles across the Central American volcanic arc (CAVA) reveal an asymmetric deformation pattern with large-scale folding and uplift of basinal strata in the forearc contrasted by intrusive bodies, normal faults, and possible strikes-slip faults in the backarc. Since Miocene times the CAVA has migrated seaward, apparently impinging on the Sandino forearc basin and creating or modifying the low-lying Nicaragua depression, which contains the backarc and much of the arc. However the structural nature of the depression and its possible relationship to forearc sliver movement is poorly known. In November-December 2004 we recorded a large, high-resolution, seismic reflection dataset largely on the Pacific shelf (forearc) area of Central America, extending from NW Costa Rica to the SE edge of El Salvador's territorial waters. We seized an opportunity to study the nature of the CAVA by recording data into the Gulf of Fonseca, a large embayment at the intersection of Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador. With 3 GI airguns and a 2100 m streamer we recorded data with typical penetration of 2-3 seconds in the Sandino basin and frequency content of ~10-250 Hz (at shallow levels). Penetration was limited over the arc summit with high velocity volcanic rocks encountered at depths as shallow as a few hundred meters. To the NE the edge of the Nicaragua depression occurs abruptly; our data show a well-developed sedimentary basin 1.5-3 km thick separated by numerous steeply-dipping faults. The broadband signal and good penetration of this dataset will help us determine the chronology of arc development in this position and the styles of deformation in the forearc, arc, and backarc areas. In turn, this will help us understand the regional tectonic and stratigraphic development of this margin due to the profound affects of the arc.

  20. Donkey's milk detailed lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Daniela; Bertino, Enrico; Monti, Giovanna; Baro, Cristina; Fabris, Claudio; Lezo, Antonela; Medana, Claudio; Baiocchi, Claudio; Mussap, Michele; Galvano, Fabio; Conti, Amedeo

    2010-01-01

    Donkey's milk (DM) has recently aroused scientific interest, above all among paediatric allergologists. A deeper knowledge of both proteins and fats in donkey's milk is necessary to evaluate the immunological, physiological and nutritional properties. By using the most refined techniques for fatty acids analysis, the paper offers a detailed comparative analysis of the lipid fractions of DM as well as of human and cow milk, also indicating the distribution of fatty-acid moieties among sn-1/3 and sn-2 positions of the glycerol backbone. In DM the position of fatty acids on glycerol backbone, above all of long chain saturated fatty acids, is very similar to that of human milk: this fact, in conjunction with the relatively high contents of medium-chain triglycerides, makes the lipids in DM, through quantitatively reduced, highly bioavailable. The high PUFA n-3 content of donkey's milk, and especially its low n-6/n-3 ratio, acquires particular interest in subjects affected by cow's milk protein allergy. Whole DM might also constitute the basis for formulas suitable for subjects in the first year of life. PMID:20036900

  1. Four-Dimensional Image Registration for Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Thorndyke, Brian; Li Tianfang; Wang Jing; Xing Lei

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Newly emerged four-dimensional (4D) imaging techniques such as 4D-computed tomography (CT), 4D-cone beam CT, 4D-magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D-positron emission tomography are effective tools to reveal the spatiotemporal details of patients' anatomy. To use the 4D data acquired under different conditions or using different modalities, an algorithm for registering 4D images must be in place. We developed an automated 4D-4D registration method to take advantage of 4D information. Methods and Materials: We used 4D-4D matching to find the appropriate three-dimensional anatomy in the fixed image for each phase of the moving image and spatially register them. A search algorithm was implemented to simultaneously find the best phase and spatial match of two 4D inputs. An interpolation scheme capable of deriving an image set based on temporally adjacent three-dimensional data sets was developed to deal with the situation in which the discrete temporal points of the two inputs do not coincide or correspond. Results: In a phantom study, our technique was able to reproduce the known 'ground truth' with high spatial fidelity. The technique regenerated all deliberately introduced 'missing' three-dimensional images at different phases of the input using temporal interpolation. In the registration of gated-magnetic resonance imaging and 4D-CT, the algorithm was able to select the appropriate CT phase. The technique was also able to register 4D-CT with 4D-cone beam CT and two 4D-CT scans acquired at different times. A spatial accuracy of <3 mm was achieved in 98% of voxels in all cases. Conclusion: Automated 4D-4D registration can find the best possible spatiotemporal match between two 4D data sets and is useful for image-guided radiotherapy applications.

  2. An anthropologist in unexpected places

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Johan Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Much contemporary anthropology has turned away from exclusive focus on so-called “primitive” tribes in far-away places. The study of urban people has become more prominent, and some researchers have also turned their gaze towards marginalized minorities in their communities. Philippe Bourgois is an example of this. He is well known for studying crack dealers in East Harlem, New York ( In Search of Respect) and homeless heroin addicts in San Francisco (Righteous Dopefiend). Kula Kula was lucky enough to catch him in his office, and had a chat via skype. PMID:25436019

  3. PLACE OF NUTRITION IN YOGA

    PubMed Central

    Desai, B.P.

    1990-01-01

    Nutrition plays a very vital role in our life. Yoga and Ayurveda had laid down the foundations of dietetics. The valuable guidelines regarding various food articles and diet for Yoga Sadhaka, to achieve maximum benefits, are given in traditional yoga texts like Hatha Pradipika and Gheranda Samhitha. Now is the time to evaluate the place of nutrition in Yoga and to study how the dietetic principles in yoga will help to eradicate the national problem of Mal-nutrition and poverty which is the pressing need of the moment. PMID:22557690

  4. The Finer Details: Climate Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    If you want to know whether you will need sunscreen or an umbrella for tomorrow's picnic, you can simply read the local weather report. However, if you are calculating the impact of gas combustion on global temperatures, or anticipating next year's rainfall levels to set water conservation policy, you must conduct a more comprehensive investigation. Such complex matters require long-range modeling techniques that predict broad trends in climate development rather than day-to-day details. Climate models are built from equations that calculate the progression of weather-related conditions over time. Based on the laws of physics, climate model equations have been developed to predict a number of environmental factors, for example: 1. Amount of solar radiation that hits the Earth. 2. Varying proportions of gases that make up the air. 3. Temperature at the Earth's surface. 4. Circulation of ocean and wind currents. 5. Development of cloud cover. Numerical modeling of the climate can improve our understanding of both the past and, the future. A model can confirm the accuracy of environmental measurements taken. in, the past and can even fill in gaps in those records. In addition, by quantifying the relationship between different aspects of climate, scientists can estimate how a future change in one aspect may alter the rest of the world. For example, could an increase in the temperature of the Pacific Ocean somehow set off a drought on the other side of the world? A computer simulation could lead to an answer for this and other questions. Quantifying the chaotic, nonlinear activities that shape our climate is no easy matter. You cannot run these simulations on your desktop computer and expect results by the time you have finished checking your morning e-mail. Efficient and accurate climate modeling requires powerful computers that can process billions of mathematical calculations in a single second. The NCCS exists to provide this degree of vast computing capability.

  5. Detailed investigation of spacecraft glow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karipides, Daniel Paul

    The phenomenon of spacecraft glow is simulated in detail, using a three-step procedure. The goals of the study are defined. Characteristics of the glow phenomenon are described. The experimental behavior of glow observed around several orbital vehicles and in ground-based laboratory experiments is described. Emissions from electrically-excited nitrogen dioxide is identified as the source of the glow. Examples of typical glow spectra are presented. An overview of the atmospheric characteristics at relevant altitudes is included. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique is described and resolution difficulties in simulating rare species and events are noted. Common approaches to overcoming resolution problems are outlined. The DSMC overlay technique is described along with its benefits and limitations. Specific attention is given to the accurate inclusion of rare chemical events. The set of surface events to be simulated is defined and is described in differential form. A Runge-Kutta method is employed to solve the resulting differential equations. Modifications to the method to account for satellite rotation are described. A steady-state analysis of the system of equations is performed. The flux of emitted, excited nitrogen dioxide is calculated. An analytical model is used to calculate the brightness of glow based on this emitted flux. Results from each stage of the solution procedure are analyzed. The flow field results are found to be typical of rarefied, hypersonic flow. The extreme non-equilibrium behavior of the flow is captured. The importance of chemical production at the lower altitudes is shown. A dependence of the surface concentrations on both the total and relative incident fluxes is observed. Critical surface events are identified via a sensitivity study. Comparison of the variation of glow brightness with experimental results is favorable. The trend is for the simulated results to overpredict the brightness. The agreement is poorer at the upper altitudes, due to greater uncertainties in the initial conditions. The importance of the ambient density of nitric oxide is shown.

  6. Software For Drawing Design Details Concurrently

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, Dewey C., III

    1990-01-01

    Software system containing five computer-aided-design programs enables more than one designer to work on same part or assembly at same time. Reduces time necessary to produce design by implementing concept of parallel or concurrent detailing, in which all detail drawings documenting three-dimensional model of part or assembly produced simultaneously, rather than sequentially. Keeps various detail drawings consistent with each other and with overall design by distributing changes in each detail to all other affected details.

  7. An automated digital imaging system for environmental monitoring applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogle, Rian; Velasco, Miguel; Vogel, John

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the affordability and availability of high-resolution digital cameras, data loggers, embedded computers, and radio/cellular modems have advanced the development of sophisticated automated systems for remote imaging. Researchers have successfully placed and operated automated digital cameras in remote locations and in extremes of temperature and humidity, ranging from the islands of the South Pacific to the Mojave Desert and the Grand Canyon. With the integration of environmental sensors, these automated systems are able to respond to local conditions and modify their imaging regimes as needed. In this report we describe in detail the design of one type of automated imaging system developed by our group. It is easily replicated, low-cost, highly robust, and is a stand-alone automated camera designed to be placed in remote locations, without wireless connectivity.

  8. 2-D Drift Velocities from the IMAGE EUV Plasmaspheric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D.; Adrian, M.

    2007-01-01

    The IMAGE Mission extreme ultraviolet imager (EUY) observes He+ plasmaspheric ions throughout the inner magnetosphere. Limited by ionizing radiation and viewing close to the Sun, images of the He+ distribution are available every 10 minutes for many hours as the spacecraft passes through apogee in its highly elliptical orbit. As a consistent constituent at about 15%, He+ is an excellent surrogate for monitoring all of the processes that control the dynamics of plasmaspheric plasma. In particular, the motion ofHe+ transverse to the ambient magnetic field is a direct indication of convective electric fields. The analysis of boundary motions has already achieved new insights into the electrodynamic coupling processes taking place between energetic magnetospheric plasmas and the ionosphere. Yet to be fulfilled, however, is the original promise that global EUY images of the plasmasphere might yield two-dimensional pictures of meso-scale to macro-scale electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. This work details the technique and initial application of an IMAGE EUY analysis that appears capable of following thermal plasma motion on a global basis.

  9. There's no place like home.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2009-01-01

    The notion of home in assisted living is intrinsically connected to aging-and dying-in place. Yet little is known about what makes a house a home, an interactive environment imprinted with individual choices, styles, relationships, and histories. This article presents meanings of home, from playground to prison, and theories of home and well-being. Intended to provoke thoughtful discussion about the meaning of home for assisted living residents and staff, the article includes the Experience of Home Scale that could be used for quality improvement purposes. Implications for assisted living nursing practice with regard to person-environment interactions that constitute home (for better or worse) are discussed. PMID:19345853

  10. A Great Place to Watch the Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In this time of year when Mars is most likely to be covered by global dust storms, NASA's Spirit rover has been experiencing relative calm. In fact, the martian winds have been quite beneficial, clearing dust from the rover's solar panels and increasing the solar energy available for driving to new places and conducting scientific experiments.

    Another thing the martian wind has done is send hundreds of dust devils spinning across the surface of the planet. From Spirit's high perch approximately 90 meters (295 feet) above the surrounding plains, as shown in this image taken from the summit of 'Husband Hill,' three dust devils are clearly visible in the plains of Gusev Crater. Planetary Scientist Ron Greeley of Arizona State University, Tempe, describes the whirling vortices of wind and dust as 'vacuum cleaners' that were first seen in images from the Viking Orbiter in 1985, though their existence was predicted as early as 1964.

    The most prominent dust devil in this image, visible on the left side of the 360-degree panorama, is one of the closest seen by Spirit. It is about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) away from the rover, about 90 meters (295 feet) in diameter at its widest point, and 275 meters (902 feet) tall. Its flux is about 1 kilogram per second, meaning it is picking up about 2 pounds of sediment each second and moving it around.

    The smaller dust devil just to the right of the largest one is 2.5 to 3 kilometers (1.6 to 1.9 miles) away and is churning up about 0.5 kilograms (1 pound) per second. Both are north of the rover's position and are moving in an east-southeast direction. On the right side of the mosaic shown here is a third dust devil.

    Greeley has calculated that if the number and frequency of dust devils Spirit has encountered are similarly spaced throughout Gusev Crater, the crater probably experiences about 90,000 dust devils per martian day, or sol. Collectively, the whirlwinds lift and redeposit an estimated 4.5 million kilograms (9.9 million U.S. pounds) of sediment per sol.

    Spirit took this mosaic of images with its navigation camera on sol 581 (Aug. 22). Straight ahead, just east of the rover, is the summit of 'Husband Hill.' The 360-degree field of view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

  11. Prevalence of Infective Ova of Toxocara Species in Public Places

    PubMed Central

    Borg, O. A.; Woodruff, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Out of a total of 800 soil samples from public places all over Britain ova of Toxocara species were found in 24·4%. Ova from 20 samples were incubated and active embryos developed in all; these were fed to eight mice and active larvae were later recovered from the livers of six. Some children living near these parks had become infected with toxocara. Clearly more control of pollution of public places by dogs and cats is needed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:4758452

  12. Predicting contrast detail performance from objective measurements in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Kenneth C.; Alsager, Abdulaziz; Dance, David R.; Oduko, Jennifer M.; Gundogdu, Ozcan; Spyrou, Nicholas M.

    2009-02-01

    European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify minimum and achievable standards of image quality in terms of threshold contrast, based on readings of images of the CDMAM test object by human observers. However the methodology is time-consuming and has large inter- and intra-observer error. To overcome these problems a software program is available to automatically read CDMAM images. An alternative approach would be to predict threshold contrast from measurements of DQE and MTF using a model of the imaging process. A simple signal-matched noise-integration model has been used to predict the contrast detail response of five different types of commercial digital mammography system (Siemens Inspiration, GE Senographe DS, and three types of Konica Minolta computerised radiography system). Measurements were made of the MTF and DQE of each detector and the noise equivalent apertures calculated. For each system sets of 16 images of the CDMAM test object were acquired at a range of dose levels and contrast-detail plots obtained using human observers and automated reading. The theoretically and experimentally determined threshold contrasts were compared. An encouragingly good level of agreement was found between the experimental data and theoretical predictions.

  13. Category-selective neural substrates for person- and place-related concepts.

    PubMed

    Fairhall, Scott L; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    The influence of object-category on the representation of semantic knowledge remains unresolved. We present a functional magnetic resonance imaging study that investigates whether there are distinct neural substrates for semantic knowledge of kinds of people (e.g., lawyer, nurse etc.) and places (e.g., bank, prison etc.). Access to semantic details about kinds of people produced selective responses in the precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex, left anterior temporal lobe, posterior middle temporal gyrus and the temporoparietal junction. Corresponding place-selective responses were present in the parahippocampal gyrus and retrosplenial complex. Category selectivity was found to be less pronounced when conceptual information was accessed about kinds of people compared to unique people (e.g., Obama). We attribute this to the greater importance of cross-categorical semantic knowledge in the conceptual representation of kinds. Together, these results show the importance of object-category in non-perceptual semantic representations and indicate the manner in which these systems may interact to create full conceptual representations. PMID:23831433

  14. Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic effect, has come a long way over the last decade. Possessing many attractive characteristics such as the use of non-ionizing electromagnetic waves, good resolution/contrast, portable instrumention, as well as the ability to quantitate the signal to a certain extent, photoacoustic techniques have been applied for the imaging of cancer, wound healing, disorders in the brain, gene expression, among others. As a promising structural, functional and molecular imaging modality for a wide range of biomedical applications, photoacoustic imaging systems can be briefly categorized into two types: photoacoustic tomography (PAT, the focus of this chapter) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). We will first briefly describe the endogenous (e.g. hemoglobin and melanin) and exogenous contrast agents (e.g. indocyanine green, various gold nanoparticles, single-walled carbon nanotubes, quantum dots, and fluorescent proteins) for photoacoustic imaging. Next, we will discuss in detail the applications of non-targeted photoacoustic imaging. Recently, molecular photoacoustic (MPA) imaging has gained significant interest and a few proof-of-principle studies have been reported. We will summarize the current state-of-the-art of MPA imaging, including the imaging of gene expression and combination of photoacoustic imaging with other imaging modalities. Lastly, we will point out the obstacles facing photoacoustic imaging. Although photoacoustic imaging will likely continue to be a highly vibrant research field for the years to come, the key question of whether MPA imaging could provide significant advantages over non-targeted photoacoustic imaging remains to be demonstrated in the future. PMID:21880823

  15. Detail view of the interior of the flight deck looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the interior of the flight deck looking forward showing the overhead control panels. Note that the flight deck windows have protective covers over them in this view. This images can be digitally stitched with image HAER No. TX-116-A-19 to expand the view to include the Commander and Pilot positions during ascent and reentry and landing. This view was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  16. Specificity and detail in autobiographical memory: Same or different constructs?

    PubMed

    Kyung, Yoonhee; Yanes-Lukin, Paula; Roberts, John E

    2016-02-01

    Research on autobiographical memory has focused on whether memories are coded as specific (i.e., describe a single event that happened at a particular time and place). Although some theory and research suggests that the amount of detail in autobiographical memories reflects a similar underlying construct as memory specificity, past research has not investigated whether these variables converge. Therefore, the present study compared the proportion of specific memories and the amount of detail embedded in memory responses to cue words. Results demonstrated that memory detail and proportion of specific memories were not correlated with each other and showed different patterns of association with other conceptually relevant variables. When responses to neutral cue words were examined in multiple linear and logistic regression analyses, the proportion of specific memories uniquely predicted less depressive symptoms, low emotional avoidance, lower emotion reactivity, better executive control and lower rumination, whereas the amount of memory detail uniquely predicted the presence of depression diagnosis, as well as greater depressive symptoms, subjective stress, emotion reactivity and rumination. Findings suggest that the ability to retrieve specific memories and the tendency to retrieve detailed personal memories reflect different constructs that have different implications in the development of emotional distress. PMID:25685980

  17. 33 CFR 116.20 - Detailed investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...116.25. As part of the investigation, the District Commander will...termed the “Detailed Investigation Report”, which will...alteration is recommended, what type. (b) The District Commander...forward the completed Detailed Investigation Report to the...

  18. 33 CFR 116.20 - Detailed investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...116.25. As part of the investigation, the District Commander will...termed the “Detailed Investigation Report”, which will...alteration is recommended, what type. (b) The District Commander...forward the completed Detailed Investigation Report to the...

  19. Beyond bolts : architectural details, construction, meaning

    E-print Network

    Weber, Peter Dominic

    1991-01-01

    An architectural Detail is a small piece of the whole, yet it has the power to characterize and define the entire building. Details tell us what a building is; they are fundamental to the life and personality of a space. ...

  20. The astrophysics of crowded places.

    PubMed

    Davies, Melvyn

    2002-12-15

    Today the Sun is in a relatively uncrowded place. The distance between it and the nearest other star is relatively large (about 200,000 times the Earth-Sun distance!). This is beneficial to life on Earth; a close encounter with another star is extremely unlikely. Such encounters would either remove the Earth from its orbit around the Sun or leave it on an eccentric orbit similar to a comet's. But the Sun was not formed in isolation. It was born within a more-crowded cluster of perhaps a few hundred stars. As the surrounding gas evaporated away, the cluster itself evaporated too, dispersing its stars into the Galaxy. Virtually all stars in the Galaxy share this history, and here I will describe the role of 'clusterness' in a star's life. Stars are often formed in larger stellar clusters (known as open and globular clusters), some of which are still around today. I will focus on stars in globular clusters and describe how the interactions between stars in these clusters may explain the zoo of stellar exotica which have recently been observed with instruments such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the X-ray telescopes XMM-Newton and Chandra. In recent years, myriad planets orbiting stars other than the Sun--the so-called 'extrasolar' planets--have been discovered. I will describe how a crowded environment will affect such planetary systems and may in fact explain some of their mysterious properties. PMID:12626265

  1. A Detailed Look at Stefan Arvidsson’s Aryan Idols

    E-print Network

    Carlson, Maria

    2008-02-29

    steppes who overran matrifocal, peaceful pre-Indo-European populations in Europe (as first described by Bachofen). In Arvidsson’s view, both theories are rooted in a reactionary world view: 7 Arvidsson points out, but does not develop in detail, the fact... original homeland. The Urheimat was first located in India, but later scholars relocated it to Iran; it then traveled to northern Europe, and finally it settled on the southern Russian steppes. During the Urheimat’s wanderings, new, conflicting images...

  2. Detail view of the port side of the payload bay ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the port side of the payload bay of the Orbiter Discovery. This view shows Remote Manipulator System, Canadarm, sensors in the center of the image and a close-up view of a small segment of the orbiter's radiator panel. This photograph was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. Detail view of the underside of a elevon on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the underside of a elevon on the port side wing of the Orbiter Discovery. Note the wear and replacement patterns of the High-temperature Reusable Surface Insulation tiles. This image was taken inside of the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  4. Trading places: Uganda's risky businessmen.

    PubMed

    Sebunya, C

    1998-02-01

    The World Bank is concerned that more than 300 prominent businesspeople in Uganda are infected with HIV. A recent study conducted by 5 local and foreign researchers found high levels of sexual behavior with casual partners among a sample of 51 urban and rural businessmen in the country. Each man kept a log of his business travels and a diary detailing his sexual behavior over the course of 26 weeks. Data on 2147 trips were collected, of which 2047 were return trips and 49 involved an overnight stay. A total of 1337 sexual contacts was made during the study period, giving each participant an average of 2.3 sex contacts per week. No significant difference was observed between urban and rural dwellers. Only 14 men, however, were responsible for 82% of the casual contacts. Each of these men had 11 or more partners in 16 weeks and would have 20-40 partners per year if their reported behavior is typical of them. These findings confirm that Uganda's business community is at particular risk of contracting and spreading HIV. PMID:12293286

  5. Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications Author-water, subsurface imaging. Summary Ecologists, ecohydrologists, and biogeochemists need detailed insights currently provide opportunities for subsurface imaging with sufficient detail to locate small (5 cm diameter

  6. Detailed Globes Enhance Education and Recreation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Orbis World Globes creates inflatable globes-Earthballs-in many sizes that depict Earth as it is seen from space, complete with atmospheric cloud cover. Orbis designs and produces the most visually authentic replicas of Earth ever created, and NASA took notice of Orbis globes and employed a 16-inch diameter EarthBall for an educational film it made aboard the STS-45 shuttle mission. Orbis later collaborated with NASA to create two 16-foot diameter world globes for display at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City, using more detailed satellite imagery. The satellite image now printed on all Orbis globes displays 1-kilometer resolution and is 21,600 by 43,200 pixels in size, and Orbis globes are otherwise meteorologically accurate, though the cloud cover has been slightly reduced in order for most of the landforms to be visible. Orbis also developed the exclusive NightGlow Cities feature, enabling EarthBalls to display the world's cities as they appear as the Earth revolves from daylight into night. Orbis inflatable globes are available in sizes from 1 to 100 feet in diameter, with the most common being the standard 16-inch and 1-meter diameter EarthBalls. Applications include educational uses from preschools to universities, games, and for a variety of display purposes at conferences, trade shows, festivals, concerts, and parades. A 16-foot diameter Orbis globe was exhibited at the United Nations' World Urban Forum, in Vancouver, Canada; the Space 2006 conference, in San Jose, California; and the X-Prize Cup Personal Spaceflight Exposition in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

  7. Placing Innovation: A Geographic Information Systems

    E-print Network

    Placing Innovation: A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Approach to Identifying Emergent-4710 #12;Placing Innovation: A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Approach to Identifying Emergent program include: · Business Reporting System, a unique online survey of ATP project participants

  8. Grounding for a computational model of place

    E-print Network

    Hockenberry, Matthew Curtis

    2006-01-01

    Places are spatial locations that have been given meaning by human experience. The sense of a place is it's support for experiences and the emotional responses associated with them. This sense provides direction and focus ...

  9. Chemical Agents: Facts about Sheltering in Place

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Emergency Response Guide Reaching At-Risk Populations Chemical Agents: Facts About Sheltering in Place Format: Select ... What “sheltering in place” means Some kinds of chemical accidents or attacks may make going outdoors dangerous. ...

  10. Inbetween place: the emergence of the essence 

    E-print Network

    Laiprakobsup, Narongpon

    2009-05-15

    The study aims to develop the theory of inbetween place. The inbetweens have been important elements in architectural design as transitional and reconciling realms. Architecture of place and its theories has been dominated ...

  11. Research Facility Climate change and environmental stresses placed by humans on plants,

    E-print Network

    Lennard, William N.

    Research Facility Climate change and environmental stresses placed by humans on plants, animals: Biomes, Earth Science, Imaging, Insects, Microbiology, Plants and Algae, Plant Productivity and Transgenic Plants · Will lead to significant contributions in the areas of sustainable agriculture

  12. The Occipital Place Area Is Causally and Selectively Involved in Scene Perception

    E-print Network

    Dilks, Daniel D.

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging has revealed a set of regions selectively engaged in visual scene processing: the parahippocampal place area (PPA), the retrosplenial complex (RSC), and a region around the transverse ...

  13. Literacy, Place and the Digital World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Observing that place may be understood in a range of sometimes conflicting ways, the paper picks up on recent work within literacy studies on notions of place-making and locational disadvantage to argue for increasingly sophisticated and reflexive uses of place in the field, as a counterpoint to both increasing educational standardisation and…

  14. Anthropological Studies of Native American Place Names.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Thomas F.

    1997-01-01

    Traces development of Native American place name studies from Boas (1880s) to the present. Argues that place names convey information about physical environments but also reveal how people perceive, conceptualize, and utilize their environment. Suggests the utility of place names as a framework for cultural analysis and describes recent…

  15. Sense of Place in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudryavtsev, Alex; Stedman, Richard C.; Krasny, Marianne E.

    2012-01-01

    Although environmental education research has embraced the idea of sense of place, it has rarely taken into account environmental psychology-based sense of place literature whose theory and empirical studies can enhance related studies in the education context. This article contributes to research on sense of place in environmental education from…

  16. Hi-C: A Detailed View of the Sun - Duration: 11 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 10-second movie includes imagery collected from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument flying on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and Hi-C. Hi-Câ??s resolution is five times more detaile...

  17. Detailed interrogation of trypanosome cell biology via differential organelle staining and

    E-print Network

    Schnaufer, Achim

    Detailed interrogation of trypanosome cell biology via differential organelle staining of trypanosome cell biology via differential organelle staining and automated image analysis Richard J Wheeler DNA-containing organelles, the kinetoplast (mitochondrial DNA) and nucleus, which provide useful

  18. Detail view of the flight deck looking aft. The aft ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the flight deck looking aft. The aft viewing windows are uncovered in this view and look out towards the payload bay. The overhead viewing windows have exterior covers in place in this view. The aft flight deck contains displays and controls for executing maneuvers for rendezvous, docking, payload deployment and retrieval, payload monitoring and the remote manipulator arm controls. Payload bay doors are also operated from this location. This view was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. Detail view of the port side of the aft fuselage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the port side of the aft fuselage of the Orbiter Discovery in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center with a lifting frame attached to the aft attach points of the orbiter. In this view, the Orbiter Maneuvering/Reaction Control Systems pod is in place. Also note the darker-colored trapezoidal aft fuselage access door and the T-0 umbilical panel to its right in the view. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  20. Architecture and urbanism in Henri IV's Paris : the Place Royale, Place Dauphine, and Hôpital St. Louis

    E-print Network

    Ballon, Hilary Meg

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the extensive building program which Henri IV undertook in Paris from 1600 to 1610. Focusing on the place Royale (now called the place des Vosges) , the place Dauphine, rue Dauphine, and Pont ...

  1. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  2. Robust Place Recognition for 3D Range Data based on Point Features Bastian Steder Giorgio Grisetti Wolfram Burgard

    E-print Network

    Teschner, Matthias

    to existing techniques. Index Terms-- Place recognition, SLAM, loop closing, point clouds, range images, rangeRobust Place Recognition for 3D Range Data based on Point Features Bastian Steder Giorgio Grisetti based on range images. Our algorithm matches a given 3D scan against a database using point features

  3. Simulating plant motion with levels of detail 

    E-print Network

    Flannery, Rebecca Lynn

    2013-02-22

    UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2003 Group: Engineering & Physics I SIMULATING PLANT MOTION WITH LEVELS OF DETAIL A Senior Honors Thesis by REBECCA LYNN FLANNERY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A... & Physics I ABSTRACT Simulating Plant Motion With Levels of Detail. (April 2003) Rebecca Lynn Flannery Department of Computer Science Texas A&M University Fellows Advisor: Dr. John Keyser Department of Computer Science Levels of detail...

  4. Detailed visual memory capacity is present early in life.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Katrina; Furlong, Sarah; Landau, Barbara; Park, Soojin

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that adults can remember 2,500 images with great accuracy and fidelity (Brady et al., 2008). However, little is known about the extent of visual memory capacity early in life. Such detailed visual memory may be surprising, given the importance of generalization in domains such as word and concept learning (Jenkins et al., 2014). We adapted the method of Brady et al. to test the fidelity of children's visual memory. Twenty-four 4-5 year-olds and twenty-four 6-7 year-olds were first shown 116 images of everyday objects (e.g., apple, ball), each presented for 3s. Children were then tested for recognition of familiar vs. new items. Three conditions varied the test pairings. In the Novel Category condition, familiar items were paired with categorically distinct items (e.g., a doll and a telephone). In Different Exemplar, familiar items were paired with items from the same category (e.g., two backpacks). In Different State, familiar items were paired with the same item in a different state (e.g., a closed container and the same container with an open lid). Children performed far above chance (50%) in all conditions: (4's: 95% Novel Category, 94% Different Exemplar, 86% Different State; 6's: 98%, 91%, 88%, respectively). For both ages, accuracy was lower for the Different State than the Novel Category condition. A subset of children (n = 10) were tested 18-21 days later and still performed above chance on the recognition test. The data show that children retain a great degree of visual detail from a large set of images; they can recall a specific category member and its particular state. This occurs spontaneously, as children were never instructed to remember the pictures. These results suggest that the ability to encode a high level of detail across a large number of images is well developed early in life. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326353

  5. Multimode plenoptic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Todor; Lumsdaine, Andrew

    2015-02-01

    The plenoptic function was originally defined as a complete record of the 3D structure of radiance in a scene and its dependence on a number of different parameters including position, angle, wavelength, polarization, etc. Recently-developed plenoptic cameras typically capture only the geometric aspects of the plenoptic function. Using this information, computational photography can render images with an infinite variety of features such as focus, depth of field, and parallax. Less attention has been paid to other, nonspatial, parameters of the plenoptic function that could also be captured. In this paper, we develop the microlens-based image sensor (aka the Lippmann sensor) as a generalized plenoptic capture device, able to capture additional information based on filters/modifiers placed on different microlenses. Multimodal capture can comprise many different parameters such as high-dynamic range, multispectral, and so on. For this paper we explore two particular examples in detail: polarization capture based on interleaved polarization filters, and capture with extended depth of field based on microlenses with different focal lengths.

  6. Image transfer protocol in progressively increasing resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percival, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); White, Richard L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method of transferring digital image data over a communication link transforms and orders the data so that, as data is received by a receiving station, a low detail version of the image is immediately generated with later transmissions of data providing progressively greater detail in this image. User instructions are accepted, limiting the ultimate resolution of the image or suspending enhancement of the image except in certain user defined regions. When a low detail image is requested followed by a request for a high detailed version of the same image, the originally transmitted data of the low resolution image is not discarded or retransmitted but used with later data to improve the originally transmitted image. Only a single copy of the transformed image need be retained by the transmitting device in order to satisfy requests for different amounts of image detail.

  7. Review the allocated accounting details Review the allocated accounting details Quick Reference Guide 1

    E-print Network

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    ePro Review the allocated accounting details Review the allocated accounting details Quick when the requestor wants to review what details where allocated for the Accounting details of the requisition. During the create requisition process, the "Modify Line/Shipping/Accounting" button on the Review

  8. VAICo: visual analysis for image comparison.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Johanna; Gröller, M Eduard; Bruckner, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Scientists, engineers, and analysts are confronted with ever larger and more complex sets of data, whose analysis poses special challenges. In many situations it is necessary to compare two or more datasets. Hence there is a need for comparative visualization tools to help analyze differences or similarities among datasets. In this paper an approach for comparative visualization for sets of images is presented. Well-established techniques for comparing images frequently place them side-by-side. A major drawback of such approaches is that they do not scale well. Other image comparison methods encode differences in images by abstract parameters like color. In this case information about the underlying image data gets lost. This paper introduces a new method for visualizing differences and similarities in large sets of images which preserves contextual information, but also allows the detailed analysis of subtle variations. Our approach identifies local changes and applies cluster analysis techniques to embed them in a hierarchy. The results of this process are then presented in an interactive web application which allows users to rapidly explore the space of differences and drill-down on particular features. We demonstrate the flexibility of our approach by applying it to multiple distinct domains. PMID:24051775

  9. Understanding brains: details, intuition, and big data.

    PubMed

    Marder, Eve

    2015-05-01

    Understanding how the brain works requires a delicate balance between the appreciation of the importance of a multitude of biological details and the ability to see beyond those details to general principles. As technological innovations vastly increase the amount of data we collect, the importance of intuition into how to analyze and treat these data may, paradoxically, become more important. PMID:25965068

  10. 18 CFR 401.122 - Supplementary details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Supplementary details. 401.122 Section 401.122 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Provisions § 401.122 Supplementary details....

  11. Understanding Brains: Details, Intuition, and Big Data

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Eve

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how the brain works requires a delicate balance between the appreciation of the importance of a multitude of biological details and the ability to see beyond those details to general principles. As technological innovations vastly increase the amount of data we collect, the importance of intuition into how to analyze and treat these data may, paradoxically, become more important. PMID:25965068

  12. Horava-Lifshitz gravity with detailed balance

    E-print Network

    Daniele Vernieri; Thomas P. Sotiriou

    2012-12-18

    Horava-Lifshitz gravity with "detailed balance" but without the projectability assumption is discussed. It is shown that detailed balance is quite efficient in limiting the proliferation of couplings in Horava-Lifshitz gravity, and that its implementation without the projectability assumption leads to a theory with sensible dynamics. However, the (bare) cosmological constant is restricted to be large and negative.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a contrast ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ...

  14. Advanced radiographic imaging techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, J. B.; Brown, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of the nature and operational constraints of conventional X-radiographic and neutron imaging methods, providing a foundation for a discussion of advanced radiographic imaging systems. Two types of solid-state image amplifiers designed to image X rays are described. Operational theory, panel construction, and performance characteristics are discussed. A closed-circuit television system for imaging neutrons is then described and the system design, operational theory, and performance characteristics are outlined. Emphasis is placed on a description of the advantages of these imaging systems over conventional methods.

  15. Historical Consideration of Place: Inviting Multiple Histories and Narratives in Place-Based Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Miyoun

    2010-01-01

    Drawing upon van Eijck and Roth's notion of "place as chronotope," this review paper discusses historical consideration of place as it assists us to conceptualize place in its collective, political, and dialogical nature. In a place, we are positioned amidst of the multiplicity of histories and narratives within ever shifting various contexts of…

  16. Sense of Place in the Practice and Assessment of Place-Based Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semken, Steven; Freeman, Carol Butler

    2008-01-01

    We teach earth, ecological, and environmental sciences in and about "places" imbued with meaning by human experience. Scientific understanding is but one of the many types of meanings that can accrue to a given place. People develop emotional attachments to meaningful places. The "sense of place," encompassing the meanings and attachments that…

  17. The WorkPlace distributed processing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Henderson, Scott

    1993-01-01

    Real time control problems require robust, high performance solutions. Distributed computing can offer high performance through parallelism and robustness through redundancy. Unfortunately, implementing distributed systems with these characteristics places a significant burden on the applications programmers. Goddard Code 522 has developed WorkPlace to alleviate this burden. WorkPlace is a small, portable, embeddable network interface which automates message routing, failure detection, and re-configuration in response to failures in distributed systems. This paper describes the design and use of WorkPlace, and its application in the construction of a distributed blackboard system.

  18. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places ''hot spots'', or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  19. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places hot spots, or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  20. Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Steeples, Don W.

    2004-12-09

    This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could make SSR surveying considerably more efficient and less expensive, particularly when geophone intervals of 25 cm or less are required. The most recent research analyzed the difference in seismic response of the geophones with variable geophone spike length and geophones attached to various steel media. Experiments investigated the azimuthal dependence of the quality of data relative to the orientation of the rigidly attached geophones. Other experiments designed to test the hypothesis that the data are being amplified in much the same way that an organ pipe amplifies sound have so far proved inconclusive. Taken together, the positive results show that SSR imaging within a few meters of the earth's surface is possible if the geology is suitable, that SSR imaging can complement GPR imaging, and that SSR imaging could be made significantly more cost effective, at least in areas where the topography and the geology are favorable. Increased knowledge of the Earth's shallow subsurface through non-intrusive techniques is of potential benefit to management of DOE facilities. Among the most significant problems facing hydrologists today is the delineation of preferential permeability paths in sufficient detail to make a quantitative analysis possible. Aquifer systems dominated by fracture flow have a reputation of being particularly difficult to characterize and model. At chemically contaminated sites, including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and others at Department of Defense (DOD) installations worldwide, establishing the spatial extent of the contamination, along with the fate of the contaminants and their transport-flow directions, is essential to the development of effective cleanup strategies. Detailed characterization of the shallow subsurface is important not only in environmental, groundwater, and geotechnical engineering applications, but also in neotectonics, mining geology, and the analysis of petroleum reservoir analogs. Near-surface seismology is in the vanguard of non-intrusive approaches to increase knowledge of the shallow subsurface; our

  1. Microbial Cell Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is finding increasing application in a variety of fields including microbiology. Until the emergence of AFM, techniques for ivnestigating processes in single microbes were limited. From a biologist's perspective, the fact that AFM can be used to generate high-resolution images in buffers or media is its most appealing feature as live-cell imaging can be pursued. Imaging living cells by AFM allows dynamic biological events to be studied, at the nanoscale, in real time. Few areas of biological research have as much to gain as microbiology from the application of AFM. Whereas the scale of microbes places them near the limit of resolution for light microscopy. AFM is well suited for the study of structures on the order of a micron or less. Although electron microscopy techniques have been the standard for high-resolution imaging of microbes, AFM is quickly gaining favor for several reasons. First, fixatives that impair biological activity are not required. Second, AFM is capable of detecting forces in the pN range, and precise control of the force applied to the cantilever can be maintained. This combination facilitates the evaluation of physical characteristics of microbes. Third, rather than yielding the composite, statistical average of cell populations, as is the case with many biochemical assays, the behavior of single cells can be monitored. Despite the potential of AFM in microbiology, there are several limitations that must be considered. For example, the time required to record an image allows for the study of gross events such as cell division or membrane degradation from an antibiotic but precludes the evaluation of biological reactions and events that happen in just fractions of a second. Additionally, the AFM is a topographical tool and is restricted to imaging surfaces. Therefore, it cannot be used to look inside cells as with opticla and transmission electron microscopes. other practical considerations are the limitation on the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  2. 25. 'HANGAR SHEDS TRUSSES DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'HANGAR SHEDS - TRUSSES - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Sections and details of trusses, ironwork, and joints, as modified to show ridge joint detail. As built. This blueline also shows the fire suppression system, added in orange pencil for 'Project 13: Bldgs. T-30, T-50, T-70, T-90' at a later, unspecified date. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/84, revision B, dated August 24, 1942. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. 4. TROJAN MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM NORTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. TROJAN MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM NORTH, c. 1912. SHOWS TIMBER FRAMING UNDER CONSTRUCTION FOR EAST AND WEST CRUDE ORE BINS AT PREVIOUS LOCATION OF CRUSHER HOUSE, AND SNOW SHED PRESENT OVER SOUTH CRUDE ORE BIN WITH PHASE CHANGE IN SNOW SHED CONSTRUCTION INDICATED AT EAST END OF EAST CRUDE ORE BIN. THIS PHOTOGRAPH IS THE FIRST IMAGE OF THE MACHINE SHOP, UPPER LEFT CORNER. CREDIT JW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  4. Management Documentation: Indicators & Good Practice at Cultural Heritage Places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppich, R.; Garcia Grinda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation for cultural heritage places usually refers to describing the physical attributes, surrounding context, condition or environment; most of the time with images, graphics, maps or digital 3D models in their various forms with supporting textural information. Just as important as this type of information is the documentation of managerial attributes. How do managers of cultural heritage places collect information related to financial or economic well-being? How are data collected over time measured, and what are significant indicators for improvement? What quality of indicator is good enough? Good management of cultural heritage places is essential for conservation longevity, preservation of values and enjoyment by the public. But how is management documented? The paper will describe the research methodology, selection and description of attributes or indicators related to good management practice. It will describe the criteria for indicator selection and why they are important, how and when they are collected, by whom, and the difficulties in obtaining this information. As importantly it will describe how this type of documentation directly contributes to improving conservation practice. Good practice summaries will be presented that highlight this type of documentation including Pamplona and Ávila, Spain and Valletta, Malta. Conclusions are drawn with preliminary recommendations for improvement of this important aspect of documentation. Documentation of this nature is not typical and presents a unique challenge to collect, measure and communicate easily. However, it is an essential category that is often ignored yet absolutely essential in order to conserve cultural heritage places.

  5. Facebook Application for Place Recommendation . . 40002

    E-print Network

    Runapongsa, Kanda

    Facebook Application for Place Recommendation 1 , 2 1,2 . . 40002 E-mail: 1,2 pjiranuwatt. This article proposes a Facebook application that recommends places based on the number of check is gathered via Facebook API requests. The experimental results of the developed Facebook application show

  6. Section 2--Psychology in Its Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, John

    2008-01-01

    In 1996, Graham Richards published "Putting Psychology in its Place: An introduction from a critical historical perspective." Here, I seek to consider what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education, and not just from a historical perspective. This raises issues about several contexts in which…

  7. Urban Environmental Education and Sense of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudryavtsev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Urban environmental educators are trying to connect students to the urban environment and nature, and thus develop a certain sense of place. To do so, educators involve students in environmental stewardship, monitoring, activism, and outdoor recreation in cities. At the same time, sense of place has been linked to pro-environmental behaviors and…

  8. A Quiet Place for Student Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    As electronic gadgets predominate a student's life, there comes a need for silence. A quiet place free of electromagnetic spectrum waves, dirty and stray electricity, and the endless chirps, whistles, beeps, and customized signaling. A quiet place can offer solitude for meditation, inspiration, and spiritual awareness. Student involvement in the…

  9. Education and Place: A Review Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nespor, Jan

    2008-01-01

    In this review essay, Jan Nespor uses three recent contributions to place-based education, Paul Theobald's "Teaching the Commons," C.A. Bowers's "Revitalizing the Commons," and David Gruenewald and Gregory Smith's edited volume "Place-Based Education in the Global Age," to examine some fundamental conceptual and practical issues in the area. One…

  10. How to Cope with Sheltering in Place

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your own or a relative’s home, school, or work. Sheltering in place may be required because of an emergency such ... things to keep yourself calm while sheltering in place. Relax your body often by doing things that work for you—take deep breaths, stretch, meditate or ...

  11. Coloring in the Emotional Language of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haigh, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Making educational places more inviting to learners is a key aspect of Invitational Theory. This paper introduces a simple technique for sensitizing learners and instructors to how their environment affects their feelings and ability to learn. It describes a learning exercise that may be used to assess, evaluate and transform places, to promote…

  12. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Meeting place. 1703.301 Section 1703.301 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings...

  13. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Meeting place. 1703.301 Section 1703.301 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings...

  14. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Meeting place. 1703.301 Section 1703.301 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings...

  15. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Meeting place. 1703.301 Section 1703.301 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings...

  16. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Meeting place. 1703.301 Section 1703.301 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings...

  17. Creating Anaglyphys Detailed Instructions, using Photoshop

    E-print Network

    Mecham, Robert

    using Vuescan software: Input Menu Scan Mode: Transparency Media Type: Image Bits per pixel: 16 bit Gray rectangle for both so they will have the same pixel size. Or scan both negatives one above the other in Photoshop. Convert from grayscale to RGB by selecting * Image>Mode>RGB color Change Saturation * Crank up

  18. Estimating Detailed Spectral Envelopes Using Articulatory Clustering 

    E-print Network

    Shiga, Yoshinori; King, Simon

    This paper presents an articulatory-acoustic mapping where detailed spectral envelopes are estimated. During the estimation, the harmonics of a range of F0 values are derived from the spectra of multiple voiced speech ...

  19. Global detailed geoid computation and model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Vincent, S.

    1974-01-01

    Comparisons and analyses were carried out through the use of detailed gravimetric geoids which we have computed by combining models with a set of 26,000 1 deg x 1 deg mean free air gravity anomalies. The accuracy of the detailed gravimetric geoid computed using the most recent Goddard earth model (GEM-6) in conjunction with the set of 1 deg x 1 deg mean free air gravity anomalies is assessed at + or - 2 meters on the continents of North America, Europe, and Australia, 2 to 5 meters in the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic areas, and 5 to 10 meters in other areas where surface gravity data are sparse. The R.M.S. differences between this detailed geoid and the detailed geoids computed using the other satellite gravity fields in conjuction with same set of surface data range from 3 to 7 meters.

  20. POSITIVE EMOTIONS ENHANCE RECALL OF PERIPHERAL DETAILS

    PubMed Central

    Talarico, Jennifer M.; Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Emotional arousal and negative affect enhance recall of central aspects of an event. However, the role of discrete emotions in selective memory processing is understudied. Undergraduates were asked to recall and rate autobiographical memories of eight emotional events. Details of each memory were rated as central or peripheral to the event. Significance of the event, vividness, reliving and other aspects of remembering were also rated for each event. Positive affect enhanced recall of peripheral details. Furthermore, the impairment of peripheral recall was greatest in memories of anger, not of fear. Reliving the experience at retrieval was negatively correlated with recall of peripheral details for some emotions (e.g., anger) but not others (e.g., fear), irrespective of similarities in affect and intensity. Within individuals, recall of peripheral details was correlated with less belief in the memory’s accuracy and more likelihood to recall the memory from one’s own eyes (i.e., a field perspective). PMID:21359127

  1. Principle of Detailed Balance in Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the detailed balance on chemical kinetics on the chemical monomolecular triangle reactions are illustrated. A simple experiment that illustrates oscillations, limit cycles, bifurcations and noise are illustrated along with the oscillating reactions.

  2. Tel: 91 124 618 1234 BOOKING DETAILS

    E-print Network

    Giri, Ranjit K.

    : Time: Departure Date: Flight: Time: GUEST DETAILS: Title: Company: Address: State/Country: Zip/Postal Hyatt Regency Gurgaon New Delhi NCR NH8, Sector 83 Gurgaon 122 004, India American Express Diners Club

  3. St Catherine's College Oxford Personal Details

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    gift to be allocated to: Area of Greatest Need Academic Excellence Student Support & Access Brasenose students. HOW YOUR GIFT CAN HELP Area of Greatest Need ­GiftsofallsizesSt Catherine's College Oxford Personal Details Title: Surname: Forename(s): Address: Postcode

  4. Finding similar places using the observation-to-generalization place model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a novel observation-to-generalization place model is proposed. It is shown how this model can be used to formally define the problem of finding geographically similar places. The observation-to-generalization model differentiates between observations of phenomena in the environment at a specific location and time, and generalizations about places that are inferred from these observations. A suite of operations is defined to find similar places based on the invariance of generalized place properties, and it is demonstrated how these functions can be applied to the problem of finding similar places based on the topics that people write about in place descriptions. One use for similar-place search is for exploratory research that will enable investigators to perform case-control studies on place data.

  5. Picturing the Wheatbelt: exploring and expressing place identity through photography.

    PubMed

    Sonn, Christopher C; Quayle, Amy F; Kasat, Pilar

    2015-03-01

    Community arts and cultural development is a process that builds on and responds to the aspirations and needs of communities through creative means. It is participatory and inclusive, and uses multiple modes of representation to produce local knowledge. 'Voices' used photography and photo elicitation as the medium for exploring and expressing sense of place among Aboriginal and non-Indigenous children, young people and adults in four rural towns. An analysis of data generated by the project shows the diverse images that people chose to capture and the different meanings they afforded to their pictures. These meanings reflected individual and collective constructions of place, based on positive experiences and emotions tied to the natural environment and features of the built environment. We discuss community arts and cultural development practice with reference to creative visual methodologies and suggest that it is an approach that can contribute to community psychology's empowerment agenda. PMID:25325930

  6. MImm travel details rev. 6/10/15 Transportation to and from Marine Immersion -details

    E-print Network

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    MImm travel details ­ rev. 6/10/15 Transportation to and from Marine Immersion - details The Shoals here is specific to Marine Immersion, and supplements the general instructions for SML. BOAT TIMES: We

  7. Agency or Contractor Staff Details form revised July 2013 Alesco Details Form

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    Agency or Contractor Staff Details form ­ revised July 2013 Alesco Details Form Agency Staff, extending or varying agency staff/ independent contractor (or externally seconded staff) /DBA Supervisors records on the Human Resource Database (ALESCO). Agency staff/ independent contractors /DBA Supervisors

  8. Climate change: the importance of place.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jeremy J; Malilay, Josephine N; Parkinson, Alan J

    2008-11-01

    Climate change-related risks are place-specific and path-dependent. Accordingly, location is an important determinant of hazardous exposure, and certain places will bear more risk than others. This article reviews the major environmental exposures associated with risky places in the U.S., including coastal regions, islands, the desert Southwest, vectorborne and zoonotic disease border regions, cities, and the U.S. Arctic (Alaska), with emphasis on exposures and vulnerable populations of concern. In addition to these hotspots, this study considers the ways in which the concept of place--the sense of human relationship with particular environments--will play a key role in motivating, developing, and deploying an effective public health response. In considering the importance of place, we highlight the concepts of community resilience and risk management, key aspects of a robust response to climate change in public health and other sectors. PMID:18929973

  9. Large format CID x-ray image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Joseph; Alam, Zulfiquar; Borman, Claudia; Czebiniak, Steven; Ziegler, H.

    1998-04-01

    A large format CID imager module capitalizes on CID large well capacity and radiation resistance to image dental x- rays. The model, which consists of the imager, conversion phosphor and ancillary electronics, is encapsulated in a 40 X 28 X 5 mm3 robust package that is lightproof, moisture-proof and meets FDA and RFI/EMI standards. Data exposure and readout is simple. The imager normally exists in an active reset mode until x-ray application automatically places the imager into a charge integration mode. Readout begins immediately upon completion of the x- ray exposure or manual application of an external trigger source. The imager returns to the reset mode once the data read out is complete. Pixels are arranged in an SVGA compatible 800H X 600V format. Each pixel is square and 38.5 microns/side. The imager is coated using a propriety phosphor deposition process that result in a limiting resolution of 9 LP/mm from an x-ray illumination source. Better than 2,000:1 dynamic range and shot-noise limited operation is achieved. Direct x-ray detection and attendant noise is minimized via the phosphor and epitaxial layer that lies beneath the pixel array. The imager/module architecture and electro-optical performance are described in detail here in.

  10. Nested Images Qiang Tong

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Nested Images Qiang Tong , Song-Hai Zhang Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, Cardiff, United Kingdom Abstract A nested image is a form of artistic expression in which one of the figure to be nested, and then finds a place in the outer figure to embed it, together with a suitable

  11. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, kK.; Elliott, J.; Bettencourt, B.; Slawski, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in- place penetration test is practical.

  12. A New Device to Place Elastic Separators

    PubMed Central

    Saklecha, Bhuwan; Agarwal, Chetan O; Mhaske, Arun; Patil, Harshal

    2015-01-01

    Separation of teeth is an important and integral aspect of orthodontic treatment. Elastomeric separators are the most common devices used today which require special instrument to place them. The purpose of this study was to design a separator placing instrument of dental probe/explorer which can be used as an alternative to the special instrument required. The materials required were two dental probes/explorers, a light wire plier and elastomeric separators. The modified instrument made is easy to fabricate, inexpensive and can partially or completely replace the special separator placing plier. PMID:26674925

  13. Detailed analysis of the silicon surface under low-energy oxygen bombardment at atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takashi; Kotaka, Yasutoshi; Itani, Tsukasa; Yamazaki, Kazutoshi; Kataoka, Yuji

    2012-08-01

    A detailed analysis of the amorphous-SiO2/crystalline-Si(011) interface formed by low-energy oxygen bombardment is performed by high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The atomic level analyses indicated a few nanometers of displaced Si atoms layer immediately below the synthetic SiO2 layer. A comparison between intensities of the high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) STEM image and the simultaneously acquired high-angle bright-field (HABF) STEM image shows that both intensities decreased at the existing layer of displaced Si atoms, and the relationship between these intensities cannot be explained by conventional image formation mechanisms. From detailed investigations using STEM imaging simulations, the HAADF STEM and HABF STEM images, which were simulated based on a realistic model, revealed the random distribution of a crystalline material and amorphous material at the interface; and this result agrees well with experimental results.

  14. Hyatt Place Chicago South/University Medical Center Hyatt Place Chicago South/University Medical Center

    E-print Network

    He, Chuan

    Hyatt Place Chicago South/University Medical Center South Hyatt Place Chicago South/University Medical Center 5225 S. Harper Avenue Chicago, IL 60615 Phone: 773-752-5300 Fax: 773-752-5400 Sales Contact

  15. Video display during laparoscopy – where should it be placed?

    PubMed Central

    Pawe?czak, Dariusz; Piotrowski, Piotr; Trzeciak, Piotr W.; J?drzejczyk, Adam; Pasieka, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction During laparoscopy, the monitor is usually placed near the operating table, at eye level, which significantly affects hand-eye coordination. First, it is impossible for the surgeon to simultaneously observe the operative field and hand movement. Second, the axis of view of the endoscope rarely matches the natural axis of the surgeon's sight: it resembles a direct view into the operative field. Finally, as the arms of the tools act as levers with a fulcrum at the site of the skin incision, the action of the tool handles is a mirror image of the movement of the tool tips seen on the monitor. Studies have shown that a neutral position with the head flexed at 15–45° is the most ergonomically suitable. Aim To evaluate whether the level of monitor placement exerts an influence on laparoscopic performance. Material and methods A group of 52 students of medicine were asked to pass a thread through 9 holes of different sizes, placed at different levels and angles, using a self-made laparoscopic simulator. Each student performed the task four times in two monitor positions: at eye level, and placed on a simulator. The order of monitor placement was randomized. Results The task was performed more quickly when the monitor was placed on the simulator and the sight was forced downwards. Lower placement was also found to be more beneficial for students with experience in laparoscopy. Conclusions New technologies which place the display on the patient, thus improving the ergonomics of the operation, should be developed. PMID:25960798

  16. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  17. SUV Tracks On Mars? The 'Devil' is in the Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs) on Mars? Imagine the MOC imaging team's surprise on the morning of April 27, 1998, as the latest images came in from the 'Red Planet.'

    A picture taken by the camera on Mars Global Surveyor just one day earlier showed several thin, dark lines that--at first glance--looked like pathways blazed by off-road sport utility vehicles. Who's been driving around on Mars?

    The MOC image in question (#26403), seen here at full resolution of 13.8 meters (45 feet) per pixel, was obtained around 10:22 a.m. PDT on April 26, 1998, during Mars Global Surveyor's 264th orbit. North is approximately up, illumination is from the lower right. Located in eastern Arabia Terra near 16.5o N latitude, 311.4o W longitude, the image showed a number of natural features--small craters formed by meteor impact, several buttes and mesas left by erosion of the surrounding terrain, small dunes and drifts, and a mantle of dust that varies in thickness from place to place. But the new picture also showed two dark lines--each varying in width up to about 15 meters (49 feet)--that extended several kilometers/miles across the image.

    Lines like these have been seen before on Mars. They are most likely the result of dust devils--columnar vortices of wind that move across the landscape, pick up dust, and look somewhat like miniature tornadoes. Dust devils are a common occurrence in dry and desert landscapes on Earth as well as Mars. They form when the ground heats up during the day, warming the air immediately above the surface. As pockets of warm air rise and interfere with one another, they create horizontal pressure variations that, combined with other meteorological winds, cause the upward moving air to spin (the direction of the spin is controlled by the same Coriolis forces that cause terrestrial hurricanes to spin in specific directions). As the spinning column of air moves across the surface, it occasionally encounters dust on the surface, which it can suck upward. This dust rises into the spinning air, giving the appearance of a tornado-like column that moves across the landscape. As the column of air moves, its ability to pick up dust varies--sometimes they hold a lot of dust and are nearly opaque; sometimes you cannot even see them. Dust-devils rarely last long, since their very motion changes the conditions that allowed them to form in the first place.

    Mars Pathfinder detected the passage of several dust devils during its 83 days of operation on Mars in 1997. Mariner 9 and the Viking landers and orbiters of the 1970s also found evidence that dust devils occur on Mars; indeed, some Viking Orbiter images actually show dust devil clouds. MOC image 26403 is the latest entry in the body of evidence for the work of wind in the modern martian environment. The MOC Science Team is continuing to study these and other streaks caused by wind interacting with the martian surface.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  18. Remembering the Roots of Place Meanings for Place-Based Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutson, Garrett

    2011-01-01

    Place-based education seeks to connect learners to local environments through a variety of strategies that increase environmental awareness and connectedness to particular parts of the world. The concept of place meanings encompasses the subjective ways people construct meaning through their experiences with an array of settings. Place meanings…

  19. Operationalizing Place: Discovering, Reasoning about, and Exploring Place Knowledge from Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Benjamin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Places and place types, such as "small town", play a fundamental role in how people organize knowledge about the world. Although places are commonly referenced in human communication, often they are not canonically defined and many of the properties people associate with them have proved difficult to operationalize. In information…

  20. Foundations of Place: A Multidisciplinary Framework for Place-Conscious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, David A.

    2003-01-01

    This article provides educators at all levels with a theoretical rationale for place-conscious education; it also discusses pedagogical pathways, and institutional challenges, to place-consciousness. Drawing on insights from phenomenology, critical geography, bioregionalism, ecofeminism, and other place-conscious traditions, the author gathers…

  1. Re(Place) Your Typical Writing Assignment: An Argument for Place-Based Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Elliot

    2011-01-01

    Place-based writing affords students an opportunity to write meaningfully about themselves, grounded in a place that they know. Place-based writing is versatile and can be additive--taking just a week or two within a semester of different projects--or transformative, if positioned as the theme for an entire course. If students can learn to write…

  2. 45 CFR 1386.92 - Place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...PROGRAMS Practice and Procedure for Hearings Pertaining to States' Conformity and Compliance With Developmental Disabilities State Plans, Reports and Federal Requirements Preliminary Matters-Notice and Parties § 1386.92 Place....

  3. 45 CFR 1386.92 - Place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...PROGRAMS Practice and Procedure for Hearings Pertaining to States' Conformity and Compliance With Developmental Disabilities State Plans, Reports and Federal Requirements Preliminary Matters-Notice and Parties § 1386.92 Place....

  4. 45 CFR 1386.92 - Place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...PROGRAMS Practice and Procedure for Hearings Pertaining to States' Conformity and Compliance With Developmental Disabilities State Plans, Reports and Federal Requirements Preliminary Matters-Notice and Parties § 1386.92 Place....

  5. 45 CFR 1386.92 - Place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...PROGRAMS Practice and Procedure for Hearings Pertaining to States' Conformity and Compliance With Developmental Disabilities State Plans, Reports and Federal Requirements Preliminary Matters-Notice and Parties § 1386.92 Place....

  6. Place Cells, Grid Cells, Attractors, and Remapping

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Place and grid cells are thought to use a mixture of external sensory information and internal attractor dynamics to organize their activity. Attractor dynamics may explain both why neurons react coherently following sufficiently large changes to the environment (discrete attractors) and how firing patterns move smoothly from one representation to the next as an animal moves through space (continuous attractors). However, some features of place cell behavior, such as the sometimes independent responsiveness of place cells to environmental change (called “remapping”), seem hard to reconcile with attractor dynamics. This paper suggests that the explanation may be found in an anatomical separation of the two attractor systems coupled with a dynamic contextual modulation of the connection matrix between the two systems, with new learning being back-propagated into the matrix. Such a scheme could explain how place cells sometimes behave coherently and sometimes independently. PMID:22135756

  7. Intensifying the collective use of public place

    E-print Network

    Aldrich, Darrell E. (Darrell Eugene)

    1994-01-01

    The premise of the thesis states that to intensify the collective use of public place there must exist a broad collective understanding of physical constituents that 'build' spatial relationships. These spatial understandings ...

  8. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings will be...

  9. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings will be...

  10. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings will be...

  11. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings will be...

  12. Light celebrating place, West Texas Road Trip 

    E-print Network

    Mulholland, Jill Cecilia

    2009-05-15

    , and installed or simulated, in four experiential case studies. The case studies were evaluated by published authors of light and place and the dissertation committee and deemed mostly successful. Light installations can be embodied and enhance the spirit...

  13. The Internship Market Place: The New Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuma, June M.; Cerny, Jerome A.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on a survey conducted to provide data on past and future estimates of supply and demand in the internship market place and on current and anticipated financial support for clinical psychology graduate students and interns. (Author/AM)

  14. Public places through the private eye

    E-print Network

    Gáspár, Zsuzsanna, 1967-

    1993-01-01

    The radical change in the pattern of everyday communication has corresponded with a rapid transformation of the character of public urban places and the way they are used. The urban network is no longer the primary space ...

  15. Clinching First Place: Calculating the Magic Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a lesson plan in which students apply their mathematical intuition to determine win-loss possibilities of teams in a sports league and develop a formula for calculating the magic number for clinching first place. (YDS)

  16. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings will be...

  17. Exterior detail direct view of typical entry steps (including 3story ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior detail direct view of typical entry steps (including 3-story trash-dump tower) at east side of Building 7, looking south - North Beach Place, 431 Bay Street, 530 Francisco Street, 431 Bay Street, 530 Francisco Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. Exterior direct detail view of 2nd floor balcony at west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior direct detail view of 2nd floor balcony at west side of Building 6, showing curved concrete rail and tapered concrete column, looking north - North Beach Place, 401 Bay Street, 500 Francisco Street, 401 Bay Street, 500 Francisco Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  19. Interior view, Slave Quarter/Service, second floor, detail view of framing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, Slave Quarter/Service, second floor, detail view of framing to show joists (with ghosts of lathe) and header (trimmer) with keyed through tenon. - Decatur House, National Trust for Historic Preservation, 748 Jackson Place Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. A comparative contrast-detail study of five medical displays

    SciTech Connect

    Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T.; Delong, David M.

    2008-04-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the contrast-detail performance of five different commercial liquid crystal displays (LCDs) to other LCD and cathode-ray tube (CRT) displays for medical applications. A contrast-detail phantom, supplemented with 5 in. of acrylic, was imaged on a commercial digital radiographic system using techniques comparable to chest radiography. The phantom design enabled observer evaluation by a four-alternative forced choice paradigm. The acquired images were independently scored by five observers on five medical display devices: a 5 megapixel monochrome LCD, a 3 megapixel monochrome LCD, a 9 megapixel color LCD, a 5 megapixel monochrome CRT, and a mammographic-grade monochrome CRT. The data were analyzed using the method suggested by the manufacturer based on a nearest neighbor correction technique. They were further analyzed using a logistic regression response model with a natural threshold using an overall chi-square test for display type followed by pairwise comparisons for individual display performance. The differences between the display devices were small. The standard analysis of the results based on the manufacturer-recommended method did not yield any statistically discernible trend among displays. The logistic regression analysis, however, indicated that the 5 megapixel monochrome LCD was statistically significantly (p<0.0001) superior to the others, followed by the 3 megapixel monochrome LCD (p<0.0001). The three other displays exhibited lower but generally similar performance characteristics. The findings suggest that 5 and 3 megapixel monochrome LCDs provide comparable but subtly superior contrast detectability than other tested displays, with the former performing slightly better in the detection of subtle and fine details.

  1. A Detailed Geomorphological Sketch Map of Titan's Afekan Crater Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfeld, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Le Gall, A. A.; Birch, S. P.; Hayes, A.

    2014-12-01

    Due to Titan's uniquely thick atmosphere and organic haze layers, the most detailed images (with resolution of 300 meters per pixel) of the Saturnian moon's surface exist as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images taken by Cassini's RADAR instrument. Using the SAR data, we have been putting together detailed geomorphological sketch maps of various Titan regions in an effort to piece together its geologic history. We initially examined the Afekan region of Titan due to extensive SAR coverage. Features described on Afekan fall under the categories (in order of geologic age, extrapolated from their relative emplacement) of hummocky, labyrinthic, plains, and dunes. During our mapping effort, we also divided each terrain category into several different subclasses on a local level. Our map offers a chance to present and analyze the distribution, relationship, and potential formation hypotheses of the different terrains. In bulk, we find evidence for both Aeolian and fluvial processes. A particularly important unit found in the Afekan region is the unit designated "undifferentiated plains", or the "Blandlands" of Titan, a mid-latitude terrain unit comprising 25% of the moon's surface. Undifferentiated plains are notable for its relative featurelessness in radar and infrared. Our interpretation is that it is a fill unit in and around Afekan crater and other hummocky/mountainous units. The plains suggest that the nature of Titan's geomorphology seems to be tied to ongoing erosional forces and sediment deposition. Other datasets used in characterizing Titan's various geomorphological units include information obtained from radiometry, infrared (ISS), and spectrometry (VIMS). We will present the detailed geomorphological sketch map with all the terrain units assigned and labeled.

  2. Degree Entry Programme Engineering / Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Degree Entry Programme Engineering / Computing Key details Duration: 2 semesters (full-time) Delivery type: Day Intake date: September, January Fees: 38000 AED Overview This programme is designed to provide students with a pathway into an undergraduate degree in Engineering or Computing at the Dubai

  3. Degree Entry Programme Design Studies Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Degree Entry Programme Design Studies Key details Duration: 2 semesters (full-time) Delivery type: Day Intake date: September, January Fees: 38000 AED Overview This programme is designed to provide students with a pathway into an undergraduate degree programme in the School of Textiles and Design

  4. Job Details Position: Research Fellow (Soil Security)

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Charles W.

    Job Details Position: Research Fellow (Soil Security) School/Department: School of Biological of a research team which is part of a NERC funded consortium in the Soil Security programme. The consortium of community dynamics (e.g. food webs). 2. At least 3 years relevant research experience, inclusive of Ph

  5. Detailed balance analysis of nanophotonic solar cells

    E-print Network

    Fan, Shanhui

    Detailed balance analysis of nanophotonic solar cells Sunil Sandhu, Zongfu Yu, and Shanhui Fan-voltage characteristic modeling of nanophotonic solar cells. This approach takes into account the intrinsic material non-idealities, and is useful for determining the theoretical limit of solar cell efficiency for a given structure. Our approach

  6. Detailed numerical simulations of laser cooling processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, J.; Kohel, J.; Thompson, R.; Yu, N.

    2001-01-01

    We developed a detailed semiclassical numerical code of the forces applied on atoms in optical and magnetic fields to increase the understanding of the different roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and number of particles play in experiments with laser cooled and trapped atoms.

  7. Business & Finance BA / MA (Hons) Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Business & Finance BA / MA (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 3 years (BA) / 4 years (MA Hons and finance is an essential prerequisite for those who intend to pursue a career in commerce, industry accounting standards, taxation, mergers and acquisitions, corporate finance, and exchange and interest rates

  8. Accountancy & Finance BA / MA (Hons) Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Accountancy & Finance BA / MA (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 3 years (BA) / 4 years (MA of accounting and finance is an essential prerequisite for those who intend to pursue a career in commerce and reduced periods of pre-qualifying service. Our Accountancy and Finance programme is a specialist degree

  9. Civil Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Civil Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 4 years (BEng Hons) Delivery type civil or structural engineers. After graduation, students are equipped to work for consultants of teaching and is subject to developmental change. First year Semester 1 l Mechanics A l Civil Engineering

  10. Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology Session Details

    E-print Network

    Boehning, Dankmar

    1 Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology Session Details Day 1 - morning 9:30 Arrival and registration 10:00 Lecture 0: Introduction to Epidemiology and Study types: basic concepts of epidemiological 12.30 Lunch Day 1 - afternoon 14:00 Practical 1: Introduction to STATA for epidemiological

  11. Interior Design BA (Hons) Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Interior Design BA (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 4 years Delivery type: Day Intake date: September Fees: 54000 AED per year Overview The Interior Design programme provides students the opportunity characteristics required to advance a career in the vast and complex industry of interior design. Programme

  12. Psychology with Management BSc (Hons) Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Psychology with Management BSc (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 4 years Delivery type: Day% Psychology with 25% Business and Management modules. Psychology modules cover a range of core approaches to psychology as well as research design and analysis and applied specialist topics. The curriculum is based

  13. Chemical Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Chemical Engineering BEng (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 3 years (BEng) / 4 years (BEng Hons) Delivery type: Day Intake date: September Fees: 58000 AED per year Overview Chemical engineering and services, and producing the enabling technology and know-how for a sustainable future. Chemical

  14. Occupation Competency Profile: Steel Detailer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Apprenticeship and Industry Training.

    This document presents information about the apprenticeship training program of Alberta, Canada, in general and the steel detailer program in particular. The first part of the document discusses the following items: Alberta's apprenticeship and industry training system; the apprenticeship and industry training committee structure; local…

  15. Fashion Marketing & Retailing BA (Hons) Key details

    E-print Network

    Painter, Kevin

    Fashion Marketing & Retailing BA (Hons) Key details Duration: Full-time: 3 years (BA) / 4 years (BA Hons) Delivery type: Day Intake date: September Fees: 54000 AED per year Overview Our Fashion Marketing. Students acquire creative, critical and transferable skills for marketing and retailing, which are fashion

  16. Process Detail* 1. Reconcile Carrier Delivery

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Process Detail* 1. Reconcile Carrier Delivery 1. Count packages received, reconcile any differences and signer on "ERSO Incoming Delivery Log" 3. Separate packages by building. 4. Remove packing slip from "Purchase Order" tab 2. Fill in Customer Name, Final Destination, Purchasing Agent, and Delivery Log Name

  17. Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer

    E-print Network

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense of the cancer experience Feeds: Posts Comments Cancer-fighting fountain pen May 20, 2009 by JBBC A research team be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  19. Image use in field guides and identification keys: review and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, Roxanne; Kirchoff, Bruce K.

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Although illustrations have played an important role in identification keys and guides since the 18th century, their use has varied widely. Some keys lack all illustrations, while others are heavily illustrated. Even within illustrated guides, the way in which images are used varies considerably. Here, we review image use in paper and electronic guides, and establish a set of best practices for image use in illustrated keys and guides. Scope Our review covers image use in both paper and electronic guides, though we only briefly cover apps for mobile devices. With this one exception, we cover the full range of guides, from those that consist only of species descriptions with no keys, to lavishly illustrated technical keys. Emphasis is placed on how images are used, not on the operation of the guides and key, which has been reviewed by others. We only deal with operation when it impacts image use. Main points Few illustrated keys or guides use images in optimal ways. Most include too few images to show taxonomic variation or variation in characters and character states. The use of multiple images allows easier taxon identification and facilitates the understanding of characters. Most images are usually not standardized, making comparison between images difficult. Although some electronic guides allow images to be enlarged, many do not. Conclusions The best keys and guides use standardized images, displayed at sizes that are easy to see and arranged in a standardized manner so that similar images can be compared across species. Illustrated keys and glossaries should contain multiple images for each character state so that the user can judge variation in the state. Photographic backgrounds should not distract from the subject and, where possible, should be of a standard colour. When used, drawings should be prepared by professional botanical illustrators, and clearly labelled. Electronic keys and guides should allow images to be enlarged so that their details can be seen. PMID:22476475

  20. Mars Polar Lander Site Surface Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This picture is an enlargement of a portion of a MOC image taken in late July 1999, showing the onset of defrosting of the seasonal carbon dioxide frost cap (small, occasionally fan-shaped dark spots seen throughout this image). Two craters are seen in this image, a very rare occurrence on the south polar layered deposits. Shown for comparison at the same scale is a picture of Jack Murphy (now Qualcomm) Stadium in San Diego, California. Clearly visible in the inset is the baseball diamond and pitcher's mound; less clear but certainly visible are a number of automobiles (small light dots) in the parking lot west (to the left) of the stadium. The elevation of the sun in the Mars image is about 10o; the sunlight is coming from the bottom (north) in this image. The shadow of the rims of the craters can be used to determine their depths. The smaller crater in the bottom right corner is about 60 m (197 feet) across and 7 m (23 feet) deep; the large crater just below the inset is 175 m (574 feet) across and 17 m (56 feet) deep. Similar calculations for other features in the images indicate that much of the surface is smooth and flat. Relief is typically much less than 1-2 meters (3-7 feet) in height over areas of 10-15 meters across (33-49 feet).

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  1. VLBA Movies Reveal New Details of Cosmic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    Astronomers have known for decades that supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies can shoot out jets of subatomic particles at tremendous speeds. However, details about the physics of such jets, including how they are generated, how the high-speed flows are shaped into jets, and how fast the particles are moving, among many others, have remained elusive. An international team of researchers now is making an unprecedented long-term study of the motions of these giant jets, using the super-sharp imaging capabilities of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). "We're making images of 200 galactic jets at regular intervals, tracking their motions and studying their magnetic-field properties. This is making major contributions to our understanding of such jets," said Matthew Lister, of Purdue University. MOJAVE Poster Click image for high-resolution file (11.9 MB) The research team has produced time-lapse movies of 100 of the jets, allowing measurement of the speed and direction of motion. "The results of these VLBA observations are going into a rich and still-growing set of data that is available to the entire astronomical research community as a tool for understanding the many unresolved questions we have about these jets," Lister said. The jet study is called MOJAVE -- Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with VLBA Experiments -- and began in 2002. It is a successor to an earlier VLBA study that regularly made images of nearly 200 jets from 1994 to 2002. The jets are powered by the gravitational energy of black holes containing hundreds of millions times more mass than the Sun. Black holes are concentrations of mass so dense that not even light can escape them. As these monsters draw material toward them, the material falls into a circular disk orbiting the black hole. The jets are propelled outward along the poles of the disk. The MOJAVE movies have given astronomers some surprises and also have spurred follow-on studies of individual objects. "Before the VLBA was built, we were hindered in our studies of extragalactic jets by the lack of a facility that could do high-quality, regularly-spaced images showing very great detail. The VLBA's capabilities have made it a premier facility for studying these objects out to very large distances, and thus getting a large sample," Lister said. The MOJAVE observations are showing new details about the structures of magnetic fields in the jets. This is important, because magnetic fields are thought to play vital roles in the acceleration of the particles and in shaping the jets. The time-lapse movies have revealed a variety of interesting behavior in the jets. For example, the powerful radio galaxy called 3C279 emitted a bright feature that moved along a straight path for 15 years, then suddenly brightened, showed a change in its magnetic field, and sped off in a new direction. Other jets shoot successive bright features that move outward in curved paths. Some features in jets are seen to break apart. "These detailed movies of complex motions are real-world data that allow researchers to refine their computer simulations of the jets, leading to a far better understanding of the physics involved in such impressive cosmic particle accelerators," Lister said. The MOJAVE data will prove valuable for comparison with the gamma-ray information to be collected by NASA's upcoming GLAST satellite. "Using the MOJAVE data along with data from other ground-based and orbiting observatories at different wavelengths is bringing the studies of galactic jets into a new era," Lister concluded. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. Apple Image Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A software system design is proposed and demonstrated with pilot-project software. The system permits the Apple II microcomputer to be used for personalized computer-assisted instruction in the digital image processing of LANDSAT images. The programs provide data input, menu selection, graphic and hard-copy displays, and both general and detailed instructions. The pilot-project results are considered to be successful indicators of the capabilities and limits of microcomputers for digital image processing education.

  3. Parallel MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deshmane, Anagha; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Parallel imaging is a robust method for accelerating the acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, and has made possible many new applications of MR imaging. Parallel imaging works by acquiring a reduced amount of k-space data with an array of receiver coils. These undersampled data can be acquired more quickly, but the undersampling leads to aliased images. One of several parallel imaging algorithms can then be used to reconstruct artifact-free images from either the aliased images (SENSE-type reconstruction) or from the under-sampled data (GRAPPA-type reconstruction). The advantages of parallel imaging in a clinical setting include faster image acquisition, which can be used, for instance, to shorten breath-hold times resulting in fewer motion-corrupted examinations. In this article the basic concepts behind parallel imaging are introduced. The relationship between undersampling and aliasing is discussed and two commonly used parallel imaging methods, SENSE and GRAPPA, are explained in detail. Examples of artifacts arising from parallel imaging are shown and ways to detect and mitigate these artifacts are described. Finally, several current applications of parallel imaging are presented and recent advancements and promising research in parallel imaging are briefly reviewed. PMID:22696125

  4. Pseudo-color coding method of infrared images based on human vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Bai, Tingzhu; Li, Hailan

    2008-03-01

    Infrared images often display in gray scale. The low contrast and the unclear visual effect are the most notable characters of infrared images that make difficult to observe. It is a fact that gray scale is not sensitive to human eyes, and it has only 60 to 90 just noticeable differences (JNDs). In comparison with gray scale, color scale might give up to 500 JNDs. Usually people can distinguish many kinds of colors much more than grays. And in gray images, human don't have the ability to tell apart the nuances about detail. Pseudo-color coding enhancement is the task of applying certain alterations to an input gray-image such as to obtain color-image that is a more visually pleasing. In this paper, we introduced a pseudo-color coding method based on human vision system for infrared images display. The HSI space is especially fit for human vision system and is viewed as an approximation of perceptual color space. So the pseudo-color coding method introduced is based on HSI space. In the first place, the individual functional relationship of Hue, Intensity, and Saturation with gray scale level is established. In the second place, the corresponding RGB values are obtained through transformation from the HSI color space to the RGB space. Lastly, the effect of Infrared images enhancement based on the pseudo-color coding method is displayed. Results indicate that this method is superior to other methods through the comparison.

  5. Chord, Tie Bar & Crossbracing Joint Detail in Plan; Crossbracing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord, Tie Bar & Crossbracing Joint Detail in Plan; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail in Plan; Chord Joining Detail in Plan & Elevation; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar, & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail in Section; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar & Horizontal Brace Joint Detail - Narrows Bridge, Spanning Sugar Creek at Old County Road 280 East, Marshall, Parke County, IN

  6. Cure-in-place process for seals

    DOEpatents

    Hirasuna, Alan R. (Corona Del Mar, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A cure-in-place process which allows a rubber seal element to be deformed to its service configuration before it is cross-linked and, hence, is a plastic and does not build up internal stress as a result of the deformation. This provides maximum residual strength to resist the differential pressure. Furthermore, the process allows use of high modulus formulations of the rubber seal element which would otherwise crack if cured and then deformed to its service configuration, resulting in a seal which has better gap bridging capability. Basically, the process involves positioning an uncured seal element in place, deforming it to its service configuration, heating the seal element, curing it in place, and then fully seating the seal.

  7. imaging essentials images defined,

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yi

    imaging essentials images defined, editing strategies explained Please sign-in & take a handout (on corner of table...) imaging made easy with Beth Beighlie The Harvard Medical School is accredited, or distributing health care related goods, products or services. intro to digital images · digital images defined

  8. Detailed balance in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    E-print Network

    Gianluca Calcagni

    2010-02-04

    We study Horava-Lifshitz gravity in the presence of a scalar field. When the detailed balance condition is implemented, a new term in the gravitational sector is added in order to maintain ultraviolet stability. The four-dimensional theory is of a scalar-tensor type with a positive cosmological constant and gravity is nonminimally coupled with the scalar and its gradient terms. The scalar field has a double-well potential and, if required to play the role of the inflation, can produce a scale-invariant spectrum. The total action is rather complicated and there is no analog of the Einstein frame where Lorentz invariance is recovered in the infrared. For these reasons it may be necessary to abandon detailed balance. We comment on open problems and future directions in anisotropic critical models of gravity.

  9. DETAILED STUDIES OF ELECTRON COOLING FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; ABELL, D.T.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling for RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires detailed simulation of the electron cooling process. The first step towards such calculations is to have an accurate description of the cooling force. Numerical simulations are being used to explore various features of the friction force which appear due to several effects, including the anisotropy of the electron distribution in velocity space and the effect of a strong solenoidal magnetic field. These aspects are being studied in detail using the VORFAL code, which explicitly resolves close binary collisions. Results are compared with available asymptotic and empirical formulas and also, using the BETACOOL code, with direct numerical integration of less approximate expressions over the specified electron distribution function.

  10. Thirty Meter Telescope Detailed Science Case: 2015

    E-print Network

    Skidmore, Warren; Fukugawa, Misato; Goswami, Aruna; Hao, Lei; Jewitt, David; Laughlin, Greg; Steidel, Charles; Hickson, Paul; Simard, Luc; Schöck, Matthias; Treu, Tommaso; Cohen, Judith; Anupama, G C; Dickinson, Mark; Harrison, Fiona; Kodama, Tadayuki; Lu, Jessica R; Macintosh, Bruce; Malkan, Matt; Mao, Shude; Narita, Norio; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Tanaka, Masaomi; Tian, Feng; A'Hearn, Michael; Akiyama, Masayuki; Ali, Babar; Aoki, Wako; Bagchi, Manjari; Barth, Aaron; Bhalerao, Varun; Bradac, Marusa; Bullock, James; Burgasser, Adam J; Chapman, Scott; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Chiba, Masashi; Cooray, Asantha; Crossfield, Ian; Currie, Thayne; Das, Mousumi; Dewangan, G C; de Grijs, Richard; Do, Tuan; Dong, Subo; Evslin, Jarah; Fang, Taotao; Fang, Xuan; Fassnacht, Christopher; Fletcher, Leigh; Gaidos, Eric; Gal, Roy; Ghez, Andrea; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grady, Carol A; Greathouse, Thomas; Gogoi, Rupjyoti; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Ho, Luis; Hasan, Priya; Herczeg, Gregory J; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Imanishi, Masa; Inanmi, Hanae; Iye, Masanori; Kamath, U S; Kane, Stephen; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kirby, Vishal KasliwalEvan; Konopacky, Quinn M; Lepine, Sebastien; Li, Di; Li, Jianyang; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Michael C; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrigue; Lotz, Jennifer; Lubin, Philip; Macri, Lucas; Maeda, Keiichi; Marchis, Franck; Marois, Christian; Marscher, Alan; Martin, Crystal; Matsuo, Taro; Max, Claire; McConnachie, Alan; McGough, Stacy; Melis, Carl; Meyer, Leo; Mumma, Michael; Muto, Takayuki; Nagao, Tohru; Najita, Joan R; Navarro, Julio; Pierce, Michael; Prochaska, Jason X; Oguri, Masamune; Ojha, Devendra K; Okamoto, Yoshiko K; Orton, Glenn; Otarola, Angel; Ouchi, Masami; Packham, Chris; Padgett, Deborah L; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Pilachowsky, Catherine; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Primack, Joel; Puthiyaveettil, Shalima; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Reddy, Naveen; Rich, Michael; Richter, Matthew J; Schombert, James; Sen, Anjan Ananda; Shi, Jianrong; Sheth, Kartik; Srianand, R; Tan, Jonathan C; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tanner, Angelle; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tytler, David; U, Vivian; Wang, Lingzhi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yiping; Wilson, Gillian; Wright, Shelley; Wu, Chao; Wu, Xufeng; Xu, Renxin; Yamada, Toru; Yang, Bin; Zhao, Gongbo; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ),...

  11. Detailed Simulations and Analysis of Shock Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong; Ihme, Matthias; Deiterding, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    The interaction between the reflected shock wave and the boundary layer, that is formed by the incident shock, leads to shock bifurcation. This interaction induced inhomogeneities in the flow-field behind the reflected shock, and thereby affecting the combustion process in shock-tube ignition studies. To quantify effects of shock-bifurcation on the region behind the reflected shock, detailed simulations of a shock-tube system at high-pressure conditions are performed under consideration of detailed hydrogen reaction chemistry. Both 2D and 3D simulations are performed, and simulation results are compared against experiments and low-order shock-bifurcation models. To isolate relevant physical processes, additional simulations for different operating conditions, mixture-compositions, and adiabatic and isothermal walls are conducted, and results of this investigation are discussed in this presentation.

  12. Revisiting the Seductive Details Effect in Multimedia Learning: Context-Dependency of Seductive Details

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, Devrim; Doolittle, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of context-dependency of seductive details on recall and transfer in multimedia learning environments. Seductive details were interesting yet irrelevant sentences in the instructional text. Two experiments were conducted. The purpose of Experiment 1 was to identify context-dependent and…

  13. Consumer views about aging-in-place

    PubMed Central

    Grimmer, Karen; Kay, Debra; Foot, Jan; Pastakia, Khushnum

    2015-01-01

    Background Supporting older people’s choices to live safely and independently in the community (age-in-place) can maximize their quality of life and minimize unnecessary hospitalizations and residential care placement. Little is known of the views of older people about the aging-in-place process, and how they approach and prioritize the support they require to live in the community accommodation of their choice. Purpose To explore and synthesize the experiences and perspectives of older people planning for and experiencing aging-in-place. Methods Two purposively sampled groups of community-dwelling people aged 65+ years were recruited for individual interviews or focus groups. The interviews were semistructured, audio-recorded, and transcribed. Themes were identified by three researchers working independently, then in consort, using a qualitative thematic analysis approach. Results Forty-two participants provided a range of insights about, and strategies for, aging-in-place. Thematic saturation was reached before the final interviews. We identified personal characteristics (resilience, adaptability, and independence) and key elements of successful aging-in-place, summarized in the acronym HIPFACTS: health, information, practical assistance, finance, activity (physical and mental), company (family, friends, neighbors, pets), transport, and safety. Discussion This paper presents rich, and rarely heard, older people’s views about how they and their peers perceive, characterize, and address changes in their capacity to live independently and safely in the community. Participants identified relatively simple, low-cost, and effective supports to enable them to adapt to change, while retaining independence and resilience. The findings highlighted how successful aging-in-place requires integrated, responsive, and accessible primary health and community services. PMID:26604723

  14. Detailed Results Shipment Travel History Help

    E-print Network

    Bartholdi III, John J.

    H Date/Time Activity Location Details Oct 8, 2009 4:24 PM Delivered Oct 8, 2009 8:35 AM On FedEx vehicle for delivery DOTHAN, AL Oct 8, 2009 8:22 AM At local FedEx facility DOTHAN, AL Oct 8, 2009 3:29 AM At dest sort facility TALLAHASSEE, FL Oct 7, 2009 11:12 AM At local FedEx facility ATLANTA, GA Oct 6, 2009

  15. Investigating Change in Young People's Understandings of Japan: A Study of Learning about a Distant Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Liz

    2011-01-01

    This article demonstrates how a set of complementary qualitative methods can be used to construct a detailed picture not only of the nature of young people's representations of a distant place but the processes of learning by which such representations develop over the medium term. The analysis is based on an interpretive case study of a class of…

  16. How Are Community College Students Assessed and Placed in Developmental Math? Grounding Our Understanding in Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melguizo, Tatiana; Kosiewicz, Holly; Prather, George; Bos, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The study's main objective was to provide a detailed description of math Assessment and Placement (A&P) policies in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD). The study was focused on math because a larger proportion of students place into remedial math than remedial reading or English (Bailey, Jeong, & Cho, 2010; Parsad,…

  17. Diversity between and within: Approaches to Teaching about Distant Place in the Secondary School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This study outlines some challenges of teaching about distant place and demonstrates how different strategies can influence school students' framings of diversity. The analysis is based on an interpretive case study of 13-14?year-old students learning about Japan in a UK school. Their changing representations of Japan were tracked in detail

  18. Stellar Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-02-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  19. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  20. Structural concepts and details for seismic design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This manual discusses building and building component behavior during earthquakes, and provides suggested details for seismic resistance which have shown by experience to provide adequate performance during earthquakes. Special design and construction practices are also described which, although they might be common in some high-seismic regions, may not be common in low and moderate seismic-hazard regions of the United States. Special attention is given to describing the level of detailing appropriate for each seismic region. The UBC seismic criteria for all seismic zones is carefully examined, and many examples of connection details are given. The general scope of discussion is limited to materials and construction types common to Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Although the manual is primarily written for professional engineers engaged in performing seismic-resistant design for DOE facilities, the first two chapters, plus the introductory sections of succeeding chapters, contain descriptions which are also directed toward project engineers who authorize, review, or supervise the design and construction of DOE facilities. 88 refs., 188 figs.

  1. Place knowing of persons and populations: restoring the place work of nursing.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Place emerges when space acquires definition in social constructions of meaning as landscape-languages, which reflect assumptions about physical and social realities. The place work of nursing, which resonated throughout Nightingale's work and the profession's evolution, focuses on human health and healing in the historical transitions and landscape-languages of populations. However, evidence-based practice dominated by empirical knowing inadequately addresses complex health and illness dynamics between place and populations. Translating evidence to the life course experiences of individuals and populations requires place knowing of human situated embodiment within discrete space. An exploration of the concept of place, its application to nursing, and the need for a place paradigm for practice is presented. A sense of salience and situated cognition has been identified as the essential element of the transformation needed in the education of nurses. Place knowing integrates other patterns of knowing (empirical, ethical, aesthetical, personal, unknowing, sociopolitical, and emancipatory) in a situated cognition. Place knowing, like other established patterns of knowing, is a significant epistemological foundation of nursing. Place knowing allows the nuanced intricately complex dynamics of embodied situated human health and illness to be examined, the salience of the particulars to be considered, and the whole of the landscape-languages to emerge. PMID:24045704

  2. Roadside Attractions. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Fay

    This document, part of the lesson plan series, "Teaching with Historic Places," examines roadside attractions of the United States. Following introductory material the document sets out student objectives and teaching activities. Among the instructional suggestions are sections on "Setting the Stage"; "Locating the Sites"; "Determining the Facts";…

  3. Geography's Place in Higher Education in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Lily

    2007-01-01

    Unlike the other papers in this symposium, which deal with countries where there are large numbers of universities, and comparison can be made over time and across space of geography's place in higher education, this paper focuses on a country that was for a long time described as a "one-university town": Singapore. What interesting story can…

  4. An Outside Place for Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foran, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This article was motivated by Summer 2006 Canadian Social Studies: History Alive! Old Sources, New Technologies. In light of technological advancements, programs, and efforts to enhance social studies, it appears history educators have forgotten about and overlook the benefits of leading children to authentic, historical places that exist outside…

  5. Place and Space: Calhoun's Fatal Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrmann, G. P.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses how John C. Calhoun's speech "On Reception of the Abolition Petitions," illuminates his logical defense of slavery, while revealing that the logic was inextricably bound up in a powerful psycho-logic. Focuses on the role metaphor plays, particularly the functions of place, space, and related symbolic indices of orientation. (JD)

  6. In-Time On-Place Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauters, Merja; Purma, Jukka; Leinonen, Teemu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this short paper is to look at how mobile video recording devices could support learning related to physical practices or places and situations at work. This paper discusses particular kind of workplace learning, namely learning using short video clips that are related to physical environment and tasks preformed in situ. The paper…

  7. Visual Place Learning in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ofstad, Tyler A.; Zuker, Charles S.; Reiser, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of insects to learn and navigate to specific locations in the environment has fascinated naturalists for decades. While the impressive navigation abilities of ants, bees, wasps, and other insects clearly demonstrate that insects are capable of visual place learning1–4, little is known about the underlying neural circuits that mediate these behaviors. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model organism for dissecting the neural circuitry underlying complex behaviors, from sensory perception to learning and memory. Flies can identify and remember visual features such as size, color, and contour orientation5, 6. However, the extent to which they use vision to recall specific locations remains unclear. Here we describe a visual place-learning platform and demonstrate that Drosophila are capable of forming and retaining visual place memories to guide selective navigation. By targeted genetic silencing of small subsets of cells in the Drosophila brain we show that neurons in the ellipsoid body, but not in the mushroom bodies, are necessary for visual place learning. Together, these studies reveal distinct neuroanatomical substrates for spatial versus non-spatial learning, and substantiate Drosophila as a powerful model for the study of spatial memories. PMID:21654803

  8. Places to Go: YouTube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Founded in 2005 by three former PayPal employees, YouTube has revolutionized the Internet, marking a change from the static Internet to the dynamic Internet. In this edition of Places to Go, Stephen Downes discusses how the rise of a ubiquitous media format--Flash video--has made YouTube's success possible and argues that Flash video has important…

  9. Venturing into Scary Places: The Minority Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Students who have lived as part of a majority for their entire life may find it frightening to be asked to visit a place where they will be in the minority. In this article, the author uses this assignment to demonstrate to his students how some people feel everyday. The Minority Experience assignment challenges students to actively participate in…

  10. Engaging Places: Teacher Research. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Foundation for Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The report was commissioned by the Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) to provide quantitative and qualitative information on the perspectives of teachers, headteachers and governors, from the three pilot regions (London, the South East and Yorkshire and the Humber), towards using local buildings, places and spaces to support learning…

  11. 3 Leopold's Legacy an ecology of place

    E-print Network

    Waller, Donald M.

    3 Leopold's Legacy an ecology of place Donald M. Waller and Susan Flader Figure . . Aldo Leopold plant- ing pines at the shack, . Photograph by Carl Leopold. Reprinted courtesy of the Aldo Leopold Foundation. Abstract Trained as a forester, Aldo Leopold ( ­ ) was rst by avocation and later by vocation

  12. The Barnes Foundation: A Place for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, Rika

    2007-01-01

    This article tells the story of the author's invitation to teach at the Barnes Foundation, and her transformative experience as a teacher in this extraordinary place. The author comes to realize that the Barnes is the physical realization of a philosophical dream, and progresses to an understanding of how Albert C. Barnes collected and assembled…

  13. The Bay in Place of a Glacier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Wayne

    1997-01-01

    The cultural resource specialist at Glacier Bay National Park (Alaska) explains the collaborative efforts of park staff and the Hoonah Tlingit to overcome language and cultural barriers in documenting park place names and clan oral history and traditions. The new park-community relationship, which follows decades of conflict, includes training…

  14. "Place" Value: The Rural Perspective. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Vena; Bush, William S.; Theobald, Paul

    Place-based, or "contextualized," mathematics instruction gives learners the opportunity to see how mathematics is relevant to their lives. Such opportunities are crucial to the success of students in rural settings and may be crucial to the survival of rural communities. For the last half century, schools have educated rural children to believe…

  15. Who Places into Developmental Education and Why

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretlow, Joshua, III; Wathington, Heather D.

    2013-01-01

    Having garnered national attention, high failure rates in developmental education present a significant barrier to state and national policymakers' goals of increasing the percentage of adults who earn a college credential. However, a majority of the research fails to consider why students place into developmental education. This piece…

  16. Place Names in Foreign Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hugo

    1978-01-01

    Students find place names--and their origins--interesting. A number of German examples are given, ranging from the Familiar Koeln (Colonia) and Koblenz (Confluentes) to the less familiar Wien ( Celtic vindos, "white water") and Weimar (wihmari, sacred swamp). (WGA)

  17. Place EPIC Label Within Box UW Medicine

    E-print Network

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Place EPIC Label Within Box UW Medicine Harborview Medical Center ­ UW Medical Center University someone help you manage, the medical treatments that are needed to have a successful outcome after than or equal to 38. Not smoke. Not be actively using street drugs or smoking marijuana. KIDNEY

  18. Aging in place and negotiated risk agreements.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2008-01-01

    An assisted living community (i.e., residence [ALR]) that responds to a resident's changing needs by adjusting services and level of care criteria means that the resident is less likely to be discharged to a higher level of care, such as a nursing home, and will "age in place." A "managed" or negotiated risk agreement (NRA) can facilitate aging in place by accommodating a resident's choices and potential risks of remaining in the residence. Although more than half the states speak to aging-in-place in their assisted living regulations, far fewer provide guidelines for negotiated risk discussion and its influence on service plans. Managing decline and the risks to a resident's safety and well-being can perhaps be addressed by "upstream palliative care," a concept and practice that respects a resident's quality of life interests while meeting and supporting their physical, mental, and emotional needs. This article discusses these issues as well as the capacity of a cognitively impaired/demented resident to enter into an NRA and its continuance when resident understanding is questionable, and dying-in-place. PMID:18394509

  19. Placing a Fyke Net in Wetland Vegetation

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Glen Black of GLSC and Angela Wahlquist of Northland College places fyke net in wetland vegetation in Fish Creek Slough of Lake Superior near Ashland, Wisconsin, as part of a study of bioindicators of wetland degradation in the Great Lakes. This study is funded by the U.S. EPA Environmental Research...

  20. Placing Teachers in Global Governance Agendas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the focus on teacher policies and practices by a range of global actors and explores their meaning for the governance of teachers. Through a historical and contemporary reading, I argue that an important shift in the locus of power to govern has taken place. I show how the mechanisms of global governance of teachers are being…

  1. Embodied Reimagining of Pedagogical Places/Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinha, Shilpi; Bryzzheva, Lyudmila

    2012-01-01

    Students often find themselves disconnected from foundations courses such as Philosophy of Education, citing the abstract nature of some of the ideas studied and a perceived disconnect from practical issues. Moreover, the place/space of the university classroom itself can be seen to contribute to students' disengagement and stunting of their…

  2. Viewing Places: Students as Visual Ethnographers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a micro-ethnographic study that took place during a summer research course for six undergraduate and four graduate students majoring in the disciplines of architecture, art education, geography, landscape architecture and an integrative arts program. The research sought to implement ethnographic, visual methods as a means to…

  3. Good Jobs--but Places for Women?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Pat

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with men and women's experience of elite positions and with the extent to which such positions are seen as places for women, so as to provide an insight into their commitment to continuing in them. Senior management in universities are elite positions in terms of income; those who occupy them are relatively powerful…

  4. Landscape, Space, Place Interdisciplinary Reading Group

    E-print Network

    Qu, Rong

    Mapping the Erosion of Arctic Nature' (Geography) Wednesday 30th April, 3-4pm, Trent A35 Xiaofan Xu, `TheLandscape, Space, Place Interdisciplinary Reading Group 2013-2014 Date/Time/Location Session Leader) Wednesday 27th November, 3-4pm, Trent A35 Dr. Rebekah Scott, `Beckett's Diminishing Spaces' (English

  5. Parentally Placed Private School Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sopko, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    This document focuses on state education agency (SEA) support for child find, consultation and provision of equitable service provisions for parentally placed private school students with disabilities. Project Forum at the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) completed this activity as part of its cooperative…

  6. Is There a Place for Character Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creasy, Kim L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent trends in school curricula place a heavy focus on the improvement of basic skills test scores. As a result, the role of character education has been diminished. This article provides a rationale for the incorporation of a character education program within the school curricula, a working definition of character education, and the role of…

  7. What a Queer Place Is School!?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    lisahunter,

    2012-01-01

    Schools are queer places. Who would have thought that a book focusing on gender and sexual diversity in schools would even be necessary today? But in a time where education seems to have regressed in its liberalism, coupled with increased accessibility to information and knowledge, Elizabeth Meyer's Gender and Sexual Diversity in Schools: An…

  8. The National Register of Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Ronald M., Ed

    2002-01-01

    This journal contains articles and materials to help teachers instruct students about U.S. historical and cultural heritage. Articles and materials are: "The National Register of Historic Places Today" (C. D. Shull); "The (Economic) Value of National Register Listing" (D. D. Rypkema); "The National Register and Heritage Areas" (B. Barrett);…

  9. Jamestown and Disneyland: Two Places in Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrofani, E. Robert; Tideman, Robert

    This unit for high school students uses two dissimilar places in time; (2) Jamestown, Virginia, founded in 1607, one of the earliest settlements in the United States and (2) Disneyland, California, built in 1956, an institution of contemporary culture. The lessons address two fundamental questions in geography: (1) where? and (2) why here rather…

  10. Geological Society of America 3300 Penrose Place

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Clark R.

    Geological Society of America 3300 Penrose Place P.O. Box 9140 Boulder, CO 80301 (303) 447 and restrictions: Copyright © 2002, The Geological Society of America, Inc. (GSA). All rights reserved. Copyright. Opinions presented in this publication do not reflect official positions of the Society. #12;Geological

  11. 39. CLOSE UP DETAIL OF THE FEEDER AND STAMP CONNECTION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. CLOSE UP DETAIL OF THE FEEDER AND STAMP CONNECTION. THE STAMP AN MORTAR BOX ARE ON THE LEFT AND THE FEEDER WITH ITS FEEDER DISK IS ON THE RIGHT. NOTE THE COLLAR ON THE CENTER STAMP STEM (UPPER LEFT CORNER OF THE IMAGE) THAT ACTIVATES THE LEVER IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTO. THE COLLAR IS POSITIONED SUCH THAT WHEN THE LEVEL OF THE MATERIAL REACHES A LOW POINT IN THE MORTAR BOX IT PUSHES DOWN ON THE LEVER WHICH IN TURN ACTIVATES THE AUTOMATIC FEEDER DRIVE MECHANISM WHICH THEM DELIVERS ORE INTO THE BACKSIDE OF THE MORTAR BOX. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  12. Detailed characterization of plasma wave behavior using collective Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Tierney, T.

    2004-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering is widely used to measure bulk plasma parameters in high density, laser-produced plasmas, and is used to detect plasma waves from instabilities. However, inhomogeneity in these small plasmas often leads to a spectrum with insufficient resolution to discern phenomena such as wave damping and nonlinear wave effects. Two techniques are discussed for laser-produced plasmas to overcome these limitations, and provide details of wave damping and nonlinear behavior. First, imaging Thomson scattering is used to obtain spatially-resolved plasma wave profiles in a 100-200 eV plasma, and allows us to infer ion-ion collisional damping rates. Second, a diffraction-limited laser beam is used to drive stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a hot plasma, generating large amplitude Langmuir waves. The comparatively small interaction volume permits sufficient spectral resolution to observe nonlinear wave behavior, previously unresolved in other experiments.

  13. A de-illumination scheme for face recognition based on fast decomposition and detail feature fusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Sheng-Tong; Zhong, Zuo-Yang; Li, Hong-Guang

    2013-05-01

    Almost all the face recognition algorithms are unsatisfied due to illumination variation. Feature with high frequency represents the face intrinsic structure according to the common assumption that illumination varies slowly and the face intrinsic feature varies rapidly. In this paper, we will propose an adaptive scheme based on FBEEMD and detail feature fusion. FBEEMD is a fast version of BEEMD without time-consuming surface interpolation and iteration computation. It can decompose an image into sub-images with high frequency matching detail feature and sub-images with low frequency corresponding to contour feature. However, it is difficult to determine by quantitative analysis that which sub-images with high frequency can be used for reconstructing an illumination-invariant face. Thus, two measurements are proposed to calculate weights for quantifying the detail feature. With this fusion technique, one can reconstruct a more illumination-neutral facial image to improve face recognition rate. Verification experiments using classical recognition algorithms are tested with Yale B, PIE and FERET databases. The encouraging results show that the proposed scheme is very effective when dealing with face images under variable lighting condition. PMID:23669986

  14. Gigantic Cosmic Corkscrew Reveals New Details About Mysterious Microquasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-10-01

    Making an extra effort to image a faint, gigantic corkscrew traced by fast protons and electrons shot out from a mysterious microquasar paid off for a pair of astrophysicists who gained new insights into the beast's inner workings and also resolved a longstanding dispute over the object's distance. Microquasar SS 433 VLA Image of Microquasar SS 433 CREDIT: Blundell & Bowler, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on Image for Larger Version) The astrophysicists used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to capture the faintest details yet seen in the plasma jets emerging from the microquasar SS 433, an object once dubbed the "enigma of the century." As a result, they have changed scientists' understanding of the jets and settled the controversy over its distance "beyond all reasonable doubt," they said. SS 433 is a neutron star or black hole orbited by a "normal" companion star. The powerful gravity of the neutron star or black hole draws material from the stellar wind of its companion into an accretion disk of material tightly circling the dense central object prior to being pulled onto it. This disk propels jets of fast protons and electrons outward from its poles at about a quarter of the speed of light. The disk in SS 433 wobbles like a child's top, causing its jets to trace a corkscrew in the sky every 162 days. The new VLA study indicates that the speed of the ejected particles varies over time, contrary to the traditional model for SS 433. "We found that the actual speed varies between 24 percent to 28 percent of light speed, as opposed to staying constant," said Katherine Blundell, of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. "Amazingly, the jets going in both directions change their speeds simultaneously, producing identical speeds in both directions at any given time," Blundell added. Blundell worked with Michael Bowler, also of Oxford. The scientists' findings have been accepted by the Astrophysical Journal Letters. SS 433 New VLA Image of SS 433: Red-and-Blue Line Shows Path of Constant-Speed Jets. Note Poor Match of Path to Image. CREDIT: Blundell & Bowler, NRAO/AUI/NSF SS 433 Same Image, With Colored Beads Representing Particle Ejections at Different Speeds. Particle Path Now Matches. CREDIT: Blundell & Bowler, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click Here for Page of Full-Sized Graphics The new VLA image shows two full turns of the jets' corkscrew on both sides of the core. Analyzing the image showed that if material came from the core at a constant speed, the jet paths would not accurately match the details of the image. "By simulating ejections at varying speeds, we were able to produce an exact match to the observed structure," Blundell explained. The scientists first did their match to one of the jets. "We then were stunned to see that the varying speeds that matched the structure of one jet also exactly reproduced the other jet's path," Blundell said. Matching the speeds in the two jets reproduced the observed structure even allowing for the fact that, because one jet is moving more nearly away from us than the other, it takes light longer to reach us from it, she added. The astrophysicists speculate that the changes in ejection speed may be caused by changes in the rate at which material is transferred from the companion star onto the accretion disk. The detailed new VLA image also allowed the astrophysicists to determine that SS 433 is nearly 18,000 light-years distant from Earth. Earlier estimates had the object, in the constellation Aquila, as near as 10,000 light-years. An accurate distance, the scientists said, now allows them to better determine the age of the shell of debris blown out by the supernova explosion that created the dense, compact object in the microquasar. Knowing the distance accurately also allows them to measure the actual brightness of the microquasar's components, and this, they said, improves their understanding of the physical processes at work in the system. The breakthrough image was made us

  15. Photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghua; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (also called optoacoustic or thermoacoustic imaging) has the potential to image animal or human organs, such as the breast and the brain, with simultaneous high contrast and high spatial resolution. This article provides an overview of the rapidly expanding field of photoacoustic imaging for biomedical applications. Imaging techniques, including depth profiling in layered media, scanning tomography with focused ultrasonic transducers, image forming with an acoustic lens, and computed tomography with unfocused transducers, are introduced. Special emphasis is placed on computed tomography, including reconstruction algorithms, spatial resolution, and related recent experiments. Promising biomedical applications are discussed throughout the text, including (1) tomographic imaging of the skin and other superficial organs by laser-induced photoacoustic microscopy, which offers the critical advantages, over current high-resolution optical imaging modalities, of deeper imaging depth and higher absorption contrasts, (2) breast cancer detection by near-infrared light or radio-frequency-wave-induced photoacoustic imaging, which has important potential for early detection, and (3) small animal imaging by laser-induced photoacoustic imaging, which measures unique optical absorption contrasts related to important biochemical information and provides better resolution in deep tissues than optical imaging.

  16. Simulation levels of detail for plant motion 

    E-print Network

    Beaudoin, Jacob Michael

    2013-02-22

    briefly compare our method with some of the more prominent prior methods. Sakaguchi and Ohya provide a more detailed model of motion than we use, however they provide no SLOD-like improvements [SO99]. The work of Perbet and Cani [PC01], while certainly..., T. , Kaiser, M. : Evaluating thc Visual Fidelity ol' Physically-Based Animations. ACM Transactions on Graphics (Proceedings of Siggraph 2003), (August 2003), vol. 22, no. 3, pp. [PC01] Pcrbct, F. , Cani, Mc Animating Praries in Real-Time. Proc...

  17. Academic detailing to teach aging and geriatrics.

    PubMed

    Duckett, Ashley; Cuoco, Theresa; Pride, Pamela; Wiley, Kathy; Iverson, Patty J; Marsden, Justin; Moran, William; Caton, Cathryn

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric education is a required component of internal medicine training. Work hour rules and hectic schedules have challenged residency training programs to develop and utilize innovative teaching methods. In this study, the authors examined the use of academic detailing as a teaching intervention in their residents' clinic and on the general medicine inpatient wards to improve clinical knowledge and skills in geriatric care. The authors found that this teaching method enables efficient, directed education without disrupting patient care. We were able to show improvements in medical knowledge as well as self-efficacy across multiple geriatric topics. PMID:24794649

  18. A detailed phylogeny for the Methanomicrobiales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouviere, P.; Mandelco, L.; Winker, S.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The small subunit rRNA sequence of twenty archaea, members of the Methanomicrobiales, permits a detailed phylogenetic tree to be inferred for the group. The tree confirms earlier studies, based on far fewer sequences, in showing the group to be divided into two major clusters, temporarily designated the "methanosarcina" group and the "methanogenium" group. The tree also defines phylogenetic relationships within these two groups, which in some cases do not agree with the phylogenetic relationships implied by current taxonomic names--a problem most acute for the genus Methanogenium and its relatives. The present phylogenetic characterization provides the basis for a consistent taxonomic restructuring of this major methanogenic taxon.

  19. Detailed chemical kinetic model for ethanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.

    1997-04-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for ethanol oxidation has been developed and validated against a variety of experimental data sets. Laminar flame speed data obtained from a constant volume bomb, ignition delay data behind reflected shock waves, and ethanol oxidation product profiles from a turbulent flow reactor were used in this study. Very good agreement was found in modeling the data sets obtained from the three different experimental systems. The computational modeling results show that high temperature ethanol oxidation exhibits strong sensitivity to the fall-off kinetics of ethanol decomposition, branching ratio selection for c2h5oh+oh=products, and reactions involving the hydroperoxyl (HO2) radical.

  20. Apply an Augmented Reality in a Mobile Guidance to Increase Sense of Place for Heritage Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Lien; Hou, Huei-Tse; Pan, Chao-Yang; Sung, Yao-Ting; Chang, Kuo-En

    2015-01-01

    Based on the sense of place theory and the design principles of guidance and interpretation, this study developed an augmented reality mobile guidance system that used a historical geo-context-embedded visiting strategy. This tool for heritage guidance and educational activities enhanced visitor sense of place. This study consisted of 3 visitor…

  1. First Place My Story Second Place Texting While Walking: A Study ELISTUDENTVOICES

    E-print Network

    Sin, Peter

    many different goals and dreams, but I had no dreams and zero goals. My middle school was my favorite place where I liked to sleep in, and I got hit, scolded, and expelled from classes by my teachers from my teachers. I decided the corner of my class was a perfect place to sleep in. I used to joke

  2. "Knowing your Place in the World:" How Place and Culture Support and Obstruct Educational Aims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Sue

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing international interest in learning outside the classroom; place-based education is one manifestation of this. In this article, some conceptualisations of place are considered and attention drawn to alignments with habitus at micro, meso and macro levels. I develop a concept of cultural density as an explanatory tool to theorise…

  3. "Our Place in History": Inspiring Place-Based Social History in Schools and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, David A.; Koppelman, Nancy; Elam, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a teacher development program that engages history and social studies teachers in making connections between learning and the well-being of places in which people actually live. "Our Place in History" is a three-year, federally-funded professional development institute for twenty teachers from diverse communities in…

  4. Algorithmically generated rodent hepatic vascular trees in arbitrary detail.

    PubMed

    Schwen, Lars Ole; Wei, Weiwei; Gremse, Felix; Ehling, Josef; Wang, Lei; Dahmen, Uta; Preusser, Tobias

    2015-01-21

    Physiologically realistic geometric models of the vasculature in the liver are indispensable for modelling hepatic blood flow, the main connection between the liver and the organism. Current in vivo imaging techniques do not provide sufficiently detailed vascular trees for many simulation applications, so it is necessary to use algorithmic refinement methods. The method of Constrained Constructive Optimization (CCO) (Schreiner et al., 2006) is well suited for this purpose. Its results after calibration have been previously compared to experimentally acquired human vascular trees (Schwen and Preusser, 2012). The goal of this paper is to extend this calibration to the case of rodents (mice and rats), the most commonly used animal models in liver research. Based on in vivo and ex vivo micro-CT scans of rodent livers and their vasculature, we performed an analysis of various geometric features of the vascular trees. Starting from pruned versions of the original vascular trees, we applied the CCO procedure and compared these algorithmic results to the original vascular trees using a suitable similarity measure. The calibration of the postprocessing improved the algorithmic results compared to those obtained using standard CCO. In terms of angular features, the average similarity increased from 0.27 to 0.61, improving the total similarity from 0.28 to 0.40. Finally, we applied the calibrated algorithm to refine measured vascular trees to the (higher) level of detail desired for specific applications. Having successfully adapted the CCO algorithm to the rodent model organism, the resulting individual-specific refined hepatic vascular trees can now be used for advanced modeling involving, e.g., detailed blood flow simulations. PMID:25451523

  5. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Model for TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2005-01-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for 2,4,6-tri-nitrotoluene (TNT) has been developed to explore problems of explosive performance and soot formation during the destruction of munitions. The TNT mechanism treats only gas-phase reactions. Reactions for the decomposition of TNT and for the consumption of intermediate products formed from TNT are assembled based on information from the literature and on current understanding of aromatic chemistry. Thermodynamic properties of intermediate and radical species are estimated by group additivity. Reaction paths are developed based on similar paths for aromatic hydrocarbons. Reaction-rate constant expressions are estimated from the literature and from analogous reactions where the rate constants are available. The detailed reaction mechanism for TNT is added to existing reaction mechanisms for RDX and for hydrocarbons. Computed results show the effect of oxygen concentration on the amount of soot precursors that are formed in the combustion of RDX and TNT mixtures in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures.

  6. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrazine Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meagher, Nancy E.; Bates, Kami R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to develop and validate a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. Hydrazine is used extensively in aerospace propulsion, and although liquid hydrazine is not considered detonable, many fuel handling systems create multiphase mixtures of fuels and fuel vapors during their operation. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the decomposition chemistry of hydrazine under a variety of conditions can be of value in assessing potential operational hazards in hydrazine fuel systems. To gain such knowledge, a reasonable starting point is the development and validation of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. A reasonably complete mechanism was published in 1996, however, many of the elementary steps included had outdated rate expressions and a thorough investigation of the behavior of the mechanism under a variety of conditions was not presented. The current work has included substantial revision of the previously published mechanism, along with a more extensive examination of the decomposition behavior of hydrazine. An attempt to validate the mechanism against the limited experimental data available has been made and was moderately successful. Further computational and experimental research into the chemistry of this fuel needs to be completed.

  7. Space Radar Image of Safsaf Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-frequency space radar image of south-central Egypt demonstrates the unique capability of imaging radar to penetrate thin sand cover in arid regions to reveal hidden details below the surface. Nearly all of the structures seen in this image are invisible to the naked eye and to conventional optical satellite sensors. Features appear in various colors because the three separate radar wavelengths are able to penetrate the sand to different depths. Areas that appear red or orange are places that can be seen only by the longest wavelength, L-band, and they are the deepest of the buried structures. Field studies in this area indicate L-band can penetrate as much as 2 meters (6.5 feet) of very dry sand to image buried rock structures. Ancient drainage channels at the bottom of the image are filled with sand more than 2 meters (6.5 feet) thick and therefore appear dark because the radar waves cannot penetrate them. The fractured orange areas at the top of the image and the blue circular structures in the center of the image are granitic areas that may contain mineral ore deposits. Scientists are using the penetrating capabilities of radar imaging in desert areas in studies of structural geology, mineral exploration, ancient climates, water resources and archaeology. This image is 51.9 kilometers by 30.2 kilometers (32.2 miles by 18.7 miles) and is centered at 22.7 degrees north latitude, 29.3degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is C-band, horizontally transmitted and received; and blue is X-band, vertically transmitted and received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on April 16, 1994, on board the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  8. Advanced solar concentrator: Preliminary and detailed design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D. M.; Maraschin, R. A.; Matsushita, M. T.; Erskine, D.; Carlton, R.; Jakovcevic, A.; Yasuda, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    A single reflection point focusing two-axis tracking paraboloidal dish with a reflector aperture diameter of approximately 11 m has a reflective surface made up of 64 independent, optical quality gores. Each gore is a composite of a thin backsilvered mirror glass face sheet continuously bonded to a contoured substrate of lightweight, rigid cellular glass. The use of largely self-supporting gores allows a significant reduction in the weight of the steel support structure as compared to alternate design concepts. Primary emphasis in the preliminary design package for the low-cost, low-weight, mass producible concentrator was placed on the design of the higher cost subsystems. The outer gore element was sufficiently designed to allow fabrication of prototype gores.

  9. Being there: the library as place*

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Frieda

    2004-01-01

    The value of the library as place is examined in this Janet Doe Lecture. The lecture, which is intended to focus on the history or philosophy of health sciences librarianship, presents an overview of the library as a place in society from ancient times to the present. The impact of information technology and changes in the methods of scholarly publication from print to digital are addressed as well as the role of the library as the repository of the written historical record of cultures. Functions and services of libraries are discussed in light of the physical library facility of the future. Finally, librarians are asked to remember the enduring values of librarianship in planning libraries of the future. PMID:14762459

  10. Forwardly-placed firearm fire control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Frickey, Steven J. (Rigby, ID)

    2001-12-22

    A firearm fire control assembly for disposition in a forwardly placed support-hand operative relationship within a firearm having a combination of a firing pin and a firearm hammer adapted to engage and fire a cartridge, a sear assembly to alternately engage and disengage the combination of the firearm hammer and firing pin, and a trigger assembly including a movable trigger mechanism that is operable to engage the sear assembly to cause the firearm hammer firing pin combination to fire the firearm, a fire control assembly including a fire control depression member and a fire control rod operably connected to the depression member, and being positioned in a forward disposition disposed within a forestock of the firearm, and the depression member adapted to be operably engaged and depressed by the user's conventional forwardly placed support hand to maneuver the fire control rod to provide firing control of the firing of the firearm.

  11. Detailed Cloud Patterns in Martian Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Cold and cloudy mornings; cool, hazy afternoons. High winds aloft and weather fronts moving slowly to the east. It is winter in the Martian northern hemisphere. One of the many reasons to study Mars is that, at times, its weather is very 'Earth-like.' At this time of the Martian year, clouds are abundant, especially in the morning and especially in the high northern latitudes. Clouds and fogs are also observed in low-lying areas farther to the south, in some lowlands they are as far south as the equator.

    The above color composite images, obtained by Mars Global Surveyor's camera on June 4, 1998, illustrate this Martian 'weather report.' Most of the thick, white clouds seen here occur north of latitude 35oN (roughly equivalent to Albuquerque NM, Memphis TN, and Charlotte, NC). Fog (seen as bright orange because it is lighter than the ground but some of the ground is still visible) occupies the lowest portions of the Kasei Valles outflow channel around 30oN and at 25oN.

    Several different types of cloud features are seen. The repetitious, wash-board pattern of parallel lines are 'gravity wave clouds'. These commonly form, in the lee--downwind side-- of topographic features such as mountain ranges (on Earth) or crater rims (on Mars), under very specific atmospheric conditions (low temperatures, high humidity, and high wind speeds). In this area, the wave clouds are lower in the atmosphere than some of the other clouds. These other clouds show attributes reflecting more the regional weather pattern, occasionally showing the characteristic 'slash' shape (southwest to northeast) of a weather front. These clouds probably contain mostly crystals of water ice but, depending on the temperature at high altitude (and more likely closer to the pole), some could also contain frozen carbon dioxide ('dry ice').

    MOC images 34501 (the red wide angle image) and 34502 (the blue wide angle image) were obtained on Mars Global Surveyor's 345th orbit about the planet. The pictures were taken around 5: 34 p.m. PDT on June 4, 1998. Winter in the northern hemisphere began in mid-February, 1998, and continues to mid-July, 1998.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  12. Improved Cure-in-Place Silicone Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, C. E.; Sweet, J.; Gonzalez, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two improved cure-in-place silicone-elastomer-based adhesives have low thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity. Adhesives are flexible at low temperature and withstand high temperatures without disintegrating. New ablative compounds were initially developed for in-flight repair of insulating tile on Space Shuttle orbiter. Could find use in other applications requiring high-performance adhesives, such as sealants for solar collectors.

  13. Spirit of place: Bridging the 'epistemological gap'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Nickola B. N.

    My work explores the psychological gap between humans and nature. Also how humanity is a parcel of nature and that the philosophy of spirit of place can create oneness through imagery, describing the landscape while also encompassing the 'larger frame' within the aesthetic. These transcendental moments connect with not only the landscape but to earth as a spiritual entity. My work is a response to the landscape and these moments.

  14. The spirit of place of Bhaktapur, Nepal

    E-print Network

    Silva, Kapila Dharmasena

    2015-04-07

    place….This means controlling pollution – air, water, noise – and the change of the visual environment’ (UNESCO Kathmandu Office 2007a, 7). This definition seems to fall into the materialist perspective of authenticity, neglecting the nascent.... There is no air or noise pollution, like in Kathmandu. Also, it is not crowded or congested with people and cars. People are friendly and helpful. And, above all, this is my birthplace. So, I have no intention of leaving Bhaktapur. The following response from a...

  15. Distributed cognitive maps reflecting real distances between places and views in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Sulpizio, Valentina; Committeri, Giorgia; Galati, Gaspare

    2014-01-01

    Keeping oriented in the environment is a multifaceted ability that requires knowledge of at least three pieces of information: one’s own location (“place”) and orientation (“heading”) within the environment, and which location in the environment one is looking at (“view”). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans to examine the neural signatures of these information. Participants were scanned while viewing snapshots which varied for place, view and heading within a virtual room. We observed adaptation effects, proportional to the physical distances between consecutive places and views, in scene-responsive (retrosplenial complex and parahippocampal gyrus), fronto-parietal and lateral occipital regions. Multivoxel pattern classification of signals in scene-responsive regions and in the hippocampus allowed supra-chance decoding of place, view and heading, and revealed the existence of map-like representations, where places and views closer in physical space entailed activity patterns more similar in neural representational space. The pattern of hippocampal activity reflected both view- and place-based distances, the pattern of parahippocampal activity preferentially discriminated between views, and the pattern of retrosplenial activity combined place and view information, while the fronto-parietal cortex only showed transient effects of changes in place, view, and heading. Our findings provide evidence for the presence of map-like spatial representations which reflect metric distances in terms of both one’s own and landmark locations. PMID:25309392

  16. In-place filter testing summary

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, J.P.; Garcia, E.D.; Ortega, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    The most common method of identifying particle penetration through a filter or adsorber system is through the performance of a periodic penetration test, i.e., in-place test or leak test using an aerosol or gas vapor to challenge the filter or adsorber system. The aerosol is usually formed by vaporization of a liquid, di-2(ethelhexyl sebacate) (DEHS), and allowed to condense to form liquid particles of a certain size and distribution. The gas vapor is formed by vaporization of Freon 11 liquid. The periodic penetration test, although conducted annually, can and has been demonstrated to show the beginning degradation of a filter or adsorber system. Other evidence of penetration can include detection of radiation downstream of the filter system or the existence of an unusually low pressure drop across the filter, i.e., torn filter, etc. However, these kinds of occurrences show up instantaneously and could release radioactive material to the atmosphere before the systems could be shut down. When a filter system fails the in--place test or is showing evidence of.filter or component degradation, corrective measures are put into place in order to return,the system back to its best operating condition. This report presents a summary of all filter tests.

  17. Detailed slab and mantle structure beneath westernmost Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Miller, M. S.; Bezada, M. J.; Humphreys, E.

    2013-12-01

    The geological evolution of the westernmost Mediterranean holds an important piece of the puzzle of how whole western Mediterranean evolved due to the convergence of Africa with Eurasia. Detailed upper mantle seismological images are crucial to test two controversial ideas about the dynamic process of the westernmost Mediterranean during the Cenozoic: slab rollback and lithosphere delamination. Recent tomographic images based on the dense seismic network in Spain and northern Morocco reveal a high-resolution continuous high-velocity anomaly to the transition zone depth under the Alboran domain [Bezada and Humphreys, 2013], which was used to support the slab roll back hypothesis for the westernmost Mediterranean tectonic evolution. However, the slab shape, width, and sharpness of its edges are not well resolved. Furthermore, the deep 2010 earthquake beneath Granada, Spain suggests possible oceanic crust material existing at ~ 600 km depth, which cannot be resolved by current tomography models. The study of multipathing and waveform broadening around sharp features has proven an efficient way to study those features. Here, we use both P and S waveform data from the PICASSO array to produce a detailed image. For the deep Granada earthquake, high frequency second arrivals and long coda after the P and S arrivals are shown on stations in the Rif Mountains of Morocco. By fitting both SH and P waveform data, we suggest that a low-velocity layer (LVL, 2 km thickness, ?Vs = -10%), possibly old oceanic crust, sits on top of the slab. The seismic waves travel through the LVL as guided waves preserving their high frequency energy. The strength of the second arrivals are very sensitive to the relative location between the deep earthquake and the LVL, which indicates the 2010 deep earthquake was most-likely within the subducted oceanic crust. Using both teleseismic and regional data, we conclude that the width of the sub-vertical slab is ~150 km, which is sharper than the tomography result. Further 3D modeling confirms that a sharp-sided slab structure is needed to explain the observed data. We also observe an abrupt travel time change between two nearby stations (PM21 and PM22) for earthquakes from the northeast, which indicates a sharp boundary existing between the Middle Atlas and Rif. This boundary was also observed in receiver functions and shear wave splitting studies [Miller and Becker, 2013]. Furthermore, introducing a low velocity zone across the whole lithosphere beneath the Middle Atlas, similar to interpretations from tomography, explains the waveform data well.

  18. Commodification of Rural Places: A Narrative of Social Fields, Rural Development, and Football

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floysand, Arnt; Jakobsen, Stig-Erik

    2007-01-01

    One of the most significant recent elements of restructuring in rural areas is the transition from an economy based on agricultural production to an economy based on the countryside as a form of commodity. In this transition process, different narratives or images of an area are produced to promote villages and other places in the countryside as…

  19. Capture barrier distributions: Some insights and details

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, N.; Grar, N.; Trotta, M.

    2007-10-15

    The 'experimental barrier distribution' provides a parameter-free representation of experimental heavy-ion capture cross sections that highlights the effects of entrance-channel couplings. Its relation to the s-wave transmission is discussed, and in particular it is shown how the full capture cross section can be generated from an l=0 coupled-channels calculation. Furthermore, it is shown how this transmission can be simply exploited in calculations of quasifission and evaporation-residue cross sections. The system {sup 48}Ca+{sup 154}Sm is studied in detail. A calculation of the compound-nucleus spin distribution reveals a possible energy dependence of barrier weights due to polarization arising from target and projectile quadrupole phonon states; this effect also gives rise to an entrance-channel 'extra-push'.

  20. A meaningful expansion around detailed balance

    E-print Network

    Matteo Colangeli; Christian Maes; Bram Wynants

    2011-01-18

    We consider Markovian dynamics modeling open mesoscopic systems which are driven away from detailed balance by a nonconservative force. A systematic expansion is obtained of the stationary distribution around an equilibrium reference, in orders of the nonequilibrium forcing. The first order around equilibrium has been known since the work of McLennan (1959), and involves the transient irreversible entropy flux. The expansion generalizes the McLennan formula to higher orders, complementing the entropy flux with the dynamical activity. The latter is more kinetic than thermodynamic and is a possible realization of Landauer's insight (1975) that, for nonequilibrium, the relative occupation of states also depends on the noise along possible escape routes. In that way nonlinear response around equilibrium can be meaningfully discussed in terms of two main quantities only, the entropy flux and the dynamical activity. The expansion makes mathematical sense as shown in the simplest cases from exponential ergodicity.

  1. Report Details Solar Radiation Alert and Recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staedter, Tracy

    2006-06-01

    High-energy particles from the Sun and from regions beyond the solar system constantly bombard Earth. Thanks to the planet's atmosphere and magnetic field, comsic radiation is not a significant threat to those rooted on terra firma. But airline crew and passengers flying at high altitudes, or over the poles where the Earth's magnetic field provides no protection, are particularly vulnerable to unpredictable flares on the Sun's surface that launch streams of sub-atomic particles toward Earth. The report, ``Solar Radiation Alert System,'' published by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, in July 2005 (www.faa.gov/library/reports/medical/oamtechreports/2000s/media/0514.pdf) details in alert system designed to estimate the ionizing radiation at aircraft flight altitudes and, depending on the resulting dose rate, issue a warning.

  2. Picornavirus uncoating intermediate captured in atomic detail

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jingshan; Wang, Xiangxi; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Yao; Li, Xuemei; Porta, Claudine; Walter, Thomas S.; Gilbert, Robert J.; Zhao, Yuguang; Axford, Danny; Williams, Mark; McAuley, Katherine; Rowlands, David J.; Yin, Weidong; Wang, Junzhi; Stuart, David I.; Rao, Zihe; Fry, Elizabeth E.

    2013-01-01

    It remains largely mysterious how the genomes of non-enveloped eukaryotic viruses are transferred across a membrane into the host cell. Picornaviruses are simple models for such viruses, and initiate this uncoating process through particle expansion, which reveals channels through which internal capsid proteins and the viral genome presumably exit the particle, although this has not been clearly seen until now. Here we present the atomic structure of an uncoating intermediate for the major human picornavirus pathogen CAV16, which reveals VP1 partly extruded from the capsid, poised to embed in the host membrane. Together with previous low-resolution results, we are able to propose a detailed hypothesis for the ordered egress of the internal proteins, using two distinct sets of channels through the capsid, and suggest a structural link to the condensed RNA within the particle, which may be involved in triggering RNA release. PMID:23728514

  3. Detailed mechanism for oxidation of benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed mechanism for the oxidation of benzene is presented and used to compute experimentally obtained concentration profiles and ignition delay times over a wide range of equivalence ratio and temperature. The computed results agree qualitatively with all the experimental trends. Quantitative agreement is obtained with several of the composition profiles and for the temperature dependence of the ignition delay times. There are indications, however, that some important reactions are as yet undiscovered in this mechanism. Recent literature expressions have been used for the rate coefficients of most important reactions, except for some involving phenol. The discrepancy between the phenol pyrolysis rate coefficient used in this work and a recent literature expression remains to be explained.

  4. Detailed assays conducted on Vietnamese crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Du, P.Q. )

    1990-07-16

    More oil property data, in the form of recent crude oil assays, have been made available for two Vietnamese crude oils, Bach Ho (White Tiger) and Dai Hung (Big Bear). Crude oil data presented earlier gave limited properties of the crudes,which are from the Miocene formations. Further analyses have been conducted on Bach Ho crude from the Oligocene formations. Production from Oligocene is far more representative of the oils produced from the Bach Ho field and marketed worldwide. Currently, Bach Ho is the only producing field. Dai Hung is expected to be in production during the next few years. Bach Ho is currently producing at the rate of 20,000 b/d. That figure is projected to grow to 100,000 b/d by 1992 and to 120,000 b/d by 1995. Detailed assays of both crude oils are presented.

  5. The birth place of the type Ic Supernova 2007gr

    E-print Network

    R. Mark Crockett; Justyn R. Maund; Stephen J. Smartt; Seppo Mattila; Andrea Pastorello; Jonathan Smoker; Andrew W. Stephens; Johan Fynbo; John J. Eldridge; I. John Danziger; Christopher R. Benn

    2007-11-28

    We report our attempts to locate the progenitor of the peculiar type Ic SN 2007gr in HST pre-explosion images of the host galaxy, NGC 1058. Aligning adaptive optics Altair/NIRI imaging of SN 2007gr from the Gemini (North) Telescope with the pre-explosion HST WFPC2 images, we identify the SN position on the HST frames with an accuracy of 20 mas. Although nothing is detected at the SN position we show that it lies on the edge of a bright source, 134+/-23 mas (6.9 pc) from its nominal centre. Based on its luminosity we suggest that this object is possibly an unresolved, compact and coeval cluster and that the SN progenitor was a cluster member, although we note that model profile fitting favours a single bright star. We find two solutions for the age of this assumed cluster; 7-/+0.5 Myrs and 20-30 Myrs, with turn-off masses of 28+/-4 Msun and 12-9 Msun respectively. Pre-explosion ground-based K-band images marginally favour the younger cluster age/higher turn-off mass. Assuming the SN progenitor was a cluster member, the turn-off mass provides the best estimate for its initial mass. More detailed observations, after the SN has faded, should determine if the progenitor was indeed part of a cluster, and if so allow an age estimate to within ~2 Myrs thereby favouring either a high mass single star or lower mass interacting binary progenitor.

  6. Chord, Horizontal Tie Bar & Crossbracing Joint Details; Crossbracing Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord, Horizontal Tie Bar & Crossbracing Joint Details; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Posts, Braces & Counterbrace Joint Detail - Brownsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River (moved to Eagle Creek Park, Indianapolis), Brownsville, Union County, IN

  7. Imaging Borrelly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Boice, D.C.; Britt, D.T.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Kirk, R.L.; Lee, M.; Nelson, R.M.; Oberst, J.; Sandel, B.R.; Stern, S.A.; Thomas, N.; Yelle, R.V.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleus, coma, and dust jets of short-period Comet 19P/Borrelly were imaged from the Deep Space 1 spacecraft during its close flyby in September 2001. A prominent jet dominated the near-nucleus coma and emanated roughly normal to the long axis of nucleus from a broad central cavity. We show it to have remained fixed in position for more than 34 hr, much longer than the 26-hr rotation period. This confirms earlier suggestions that it is co-aligned with the rotation axis. From a combination of fitting the nucleus light curve from approach images and the nucleus' orientation from stereo images at encounter, we conclude that the sense of rotation is right-handed around the main jet vector. The inferred rotation pole is approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the nucleus, consistent with a simple rotational state. Lacking an existing IAU comet-specific convention but applying a convention provisionally adopted for asteroids, we label this the north pole. This places the sub-solar latitude at ???60?? N at the time of the perihelion with the north pole in constant sunlight and thus receiving maximum average insolation. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurable realistic image-based 3D mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. J.; Ding, W.; Almagbile, A.

    2011-12-01

    Maps with 3D visual models are becoming a remarkable feature of 3D map services. High-resolution image data is obtained for the construction of 3D visualized models.The3D map not only provides the capabilities of 3D measurements and knowledge mining, but also provides the virtual experienceof places of interest, such as demonstrated in the Google Earth. Applications of 3D maps are expanding into the areas of architecture, property management, and urban environment monitoring. However, the reconstruction of high quality 3D models is time consuming, and requires robust hardware and powerful software to handle the enormous amount of data. This is especially for automatic implementation of 3D models and the representation of complicated surfacesthat still need improvements with in the visualisation techniques. The shortcoming of 3D model-based maps is the limitation of detailed coverage since a user can only view and measure objects that are already modelled in the virtual environment. This paper proposes and demonstrates a 3D map concept that is realistic and image-based, that enables geometric measurements and geo-location services. Additionally, image-based 3D maps provide more detailed information of the real world than 3D model-based maps. The image-based 3D maps use geo-referenced stereo images or panoramic images. The geometric relationships between objects in the images can be resolved from the geometric model of stereo images. The panoramic function makes 3D maps more interactive with users but also creates an interesting immersive circumstance. Actually, unmeasurable image-based 3D maps already exist, such as Google street view, but only provide virtual experiences in terms of photos. The topographic and terrain attributes, such as shapes and heights though are omitted. This paper also discusses the potential for using a low cost land Mobile Mapping System (MMS) to implement realistic image 3D mapping, and evaluates the positioning accuracy that a measureable realistic image-based (MRI) system can produce. The major contribution here is the implementation of measurable images on 3D maps to obtain various measurements from real scenes.

  9. Part A Personal / Contact Information Part B Passport / Visa Details

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    Part A ­ Personal / Contact Information Part B ­ Passport / Visa Details Part C ­ Travel Plans Our. Passport Details Name as it appears on passport ______________________________________________ Passport

  10. A&M. TAN607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing steel in place prior to pouring concrete for biparting doors between hot shop and special equipment service (SES) room. Facing north. Hot shop to left, SES room to right. slot for north half of door shows at upper left of view. Date: May 21, 1954. INEEL negative no. 10548 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malin, M.C.; Caplinger, M.A.; Carr, M.H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, experiment on the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) consists of a camera characterized by small physical size and mass (???6 ?? 6 ?? 12 cm, including baffle; <500 gm), low power requirements (<2.5 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 x 1000 pixel, low noise). The intent of the investigation is to acquire nested images over a range of resolutions, from 8 m/pixel to better than 1 cm/pixel, during the roughly 2 min it takes the MPL to descend from 8 km to the surface under parachute and rocket-powered deceleration. Observational goals will include studies of (1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes); (2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments: precise location, detailed local relief); and (3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. To accomplish these goals, MARDI will collect three types of images. Four small images (256 x 256 pixels) will be acquired on 0.5 s centers beginning 0.3 s before MPL's heatshield is jettisoned. Sixteen full-frame images (1024 X 1024, circularly edited) will be acquired on 5.3 s centers thereafter. Just after backshell jettison but prior to the start of powered descent, a "best final nonpowered descent image" will be acquired. Five seconds after the start of powered descent, the camera will begin acquiring images on 4 s centers. Storage for as many as ten 800 x 800 pixel images is available during terminal descent. A number of spacecraft factors are likely to impact the quality of MARDI images, including substantial motion blur resulting from large rates of attitude variation during parachute descent and substantial rocket-engine-induced vibration during powered descent. In addition, the mounting location of the camera places the exhaust plume of the hydrazine engines prominently in the field of view. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Using Photoshop with images created by a confocal system.

    PubMed

    Sedgewick, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Many pure colors and grayscales tones that result from confocal imaging are not reproducible to output devices, such as printing presses, laptop projectors, and laser jet printers. Part of the difficulty in predicting the colors and tones that will reproduce lies in both the computer display, and in the display of unreproducible colors chosen for fluorophores. The use of a grayscale display for confocal channels and a LUT display to show saturated (clipped) tonal values aids visualization in the former instance and image integrity in the latter. Computer monitors used for post-processing in order to conform the image to the output device can be placed in darkened rooms, and the gamma for the display can be set to create darker shadow regions, and to control the display of color. These conditions aid in visualization of images so that blacks are set to grayer values that are more amenable to faithful reproduction. Preferences can be set in Photoshop for consistent display of colors, along with other settings to optimize use of memory. The Info window is opened so that tonal information can be shown via readouts. Images that are saved as indexed color are converted to grayscale or RGB Color, 16-bit is converted to 8-bit when desired, and colorized images from confocal software is returned to grayscale and re-colorized according to presented methods so that reproducible colors are made. Images may also be sharpened and noise may be reduced, or more than one image layered to show colocalization according to specific methods. Images are then converted to CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black) for consequent assignment of pigment percentages for printing presses. Changes to single images and multiple images from image stacks are automated for efficient and consistent image processing changes. Some additional changes are done to those images destined for 3D visualization to better separate regions of interest from background. Files are returned to image stacks, saved and then printed to best reveal colors, contrast, details and features. PMID:24052348

  13. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  14. Detailed modelling of the 21-cm Forest

    E-print Network

    Semelin, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The 21-cm forest is a promising probe of the Epoch of Reionization. The local state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is encoded in the spectrum of a background source (radio-loud quasars or gamma ray burst afterglow) by absorption at the local 21-cm wavelength, resulting in a continuous and fluctuating absorption level. Small-scale structures (filaments and minihaloes) in the IGM are responsible for the strongest absorption features. The absorption can also be modulated on large scales by inhomogeneous heating and Wouthuysen-Field coupling. We present the results from a simulation that attempts to preserve the cosmological environment while resolving some of the small-scale structures (a few kpc resolution in a 50 Mpc/h box). The simulation couples the dynamics and the ionizing radiative transfer and includes X-ray and Lyman lines radiative transfer for a detailed physical modelling. As a result we find that soft X-ray self-shielding, Lyman-alpha self-shielding and shock heating all have an impact on the pre...

  15. Detailed characterization of a cold Antarctic eddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, Neil C.; Ansorge, Isabelle J.; Lutjeharms, Johann R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Eddy formation in the Southern Ocean plays a critical role in meridional exchanges of heat and salt. It has also been shown to have a significant impact on primary productivity and on the creation of preferred feeding regions for birds and other predators. This eddy formation is not geographically uniform, but is concentrated in certain specific regions, particularly where the Antarctic Circumpolar Current crosses shallow bathymetry. One such region is at the South-West Indian Ridge where eddies are formed that subsequently drift past the Prince Edward Islands. We have studied such an eddy in detail. It was at least 1000 m deep, had a radius of 60-90 km, a heat content of 5.40 × 1019 J and rotated at a rate of 1 revolution every 5 days. Altimetric observations show that it was formed at 51°S; 32°E and that its intensity-as expressed as its sea level anomaly-declined by ˜40% of the original value within 144 days. This relatively rapid dissipation suggests that these eddies do not have a lifetime of more than 14 months. During that period they will have carried their anomalous heat and salt content about 1.5 degrees of latitude.

  16. Some articulatory details of emotional speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungbok; Yildirim, Serdar; Bulut, Murtaza; Kazemzadeh, Abe; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2005-09-01

    Differences in speech articulation among four emotion types, neutral, anger, sadness, and happiness are investigated by analyzing tongue tip, jaw, and lip movement data collected from one male and one female speaker of American English. The data were collected using an electromagnetic articulography (EMA) system while subjects produce simulated emotional speech. Pitch, root-mean-square (rms) energy and the first three formants were estimated for vowel segments. For both speakers, angry speech exhibited the largest rms energy and largest articulatory activity in terms of displacement range and movement speed. Happy speech is characterized by largest pitch variability. It has higher rms energy than neutral speech but articulatory activity is rather comparable to, or less than, neutral speech. That is, happy speech is more prominent in voicing activity than in articulation. Sad speech exhibits longest sentence duration and lower rms energy. However, its articulatory activity is no less than neutral speech. Interestingly, for the male speaker, articulation for vowels in sad speech is consistently more peripheral (i.e., more forwarded displacements) when compared to other emotions. However, this does not hold for female subject. These and other results will be discussed in detail with associated acoustics and perceived emotional qualities. [Work supported by NIH.

  17. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  18. The place and time of drugs.

    PubMed

    Duff, Cameron

    2014-05-01

    'Context' is one of the most enduring analytical devices in social science accounts of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, although its elaboration tends to emphasise macro-structural processes (like economic change, law enforcement, health policy, racism or stigma) at the expense of more finely-grained understandings of the place and time of consumption. Drawing on Gilles Deleuze's notion of the assemblage, and its reception in recent critical geographies of AOD use, I will characterise context as an assemblage of social, affective and material forces. Such a characterisation is not indifferent to the range of structural forces that are often understood to mediate AOD use. Rather, it is concerned to document how these forces actually participate in the modulations of consumption. The assemblage will thus be construed in ways that align context with the 'real conditions' (place and time) of drug use. I will develop this argument by way of a case study drawn from a recent qualitative study of the social contexts of methamphetamine use in Melbourne. My goal is to document the ways 'context' is produced in the activity of drug use, and how 'context' so constructed, comes to modulate this use. By contrasting traditional approaches to the analysis of context with methods borrowed from Deleuze, I aim to transcend structural understandings of context in order to clarify the active, local and contingent role of contexts in the mediation of what bodies do 'on' and 'with' drugs. PMID:24412676

  19. Image denoising using ridgelet shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Bhurchandi, Kishore

    2015-03-01

    Protecting fine details and edges while denoising digital images is a challenging area of research due to changing characteristics of both, noise and signal. Denoising is used to remove noise from corrupted images but in the process fine details like weak edges and textures are hampered. In this paper we propose an algorithm based on Ridgelet transform to denoise images and protect fine details. Here we use cycle spinning on Ridgelet coefficients with soft thresholding and name the algorithm as Ridgelet Shrinkage in order to suppress noise and preserve details. The projections in Ridgelets filter out the noise while protecting the details while the ridgelet shrinkage further suppress noise. The proposed algorithm out performs the Wavelet Shrinkage and Non-local (NL) means denoising algorithms on the basis of Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Structural Similarity Index Measure (SSIM) numerically and visually both.

  20. Intra-Cardiac 2D US to 3D CT Image Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xishi; Hill, Nicholas A.; Ren, Jing; Guiraudon, Gerard; Peters, Terry M.

    2007-03-01

    Intra-cardiac echocardiography (ICE) is commonly used to guide intra-cardiac procedures, such as the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, effective surgical navigation based on ICE images is not trivial, due to the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and limited field of view of ultrasound (US) images. The interpretation of ICE can be significantly improved if correctly placed in the context of three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images by simultaneously presenting the complementary anatomical information from the two modalities. The purpose of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of multimodality image registration of 2D intra-cardiac US images with 3D computed tomography (CT) images. In our previous work, a two-step registration procedure has been proposed to register US images with MR images and was validated on a patient dataset. In this work, we extend the two-step method to intra-cardiac procedures and provide a detailed assessment of registration accuracy by determining the target registration errors (TRE) on a heart phantom, which had fiducial markers affixed to the surface to facilitate evaluation of registration accuracy. The resultant TRE on the heart phantom was 3.7 mm. This result is considered to be acceptable for guiding a probe in the heart during ablative therapy for atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, there is no previous report describing multimodality registration of 2D intra-cardiac US to high-resolution 3D CT.

  1. Nonlocal image editing.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Hossein; Milanfar, Peyman

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new image editing tool based on the spectrum of a global filter computed from image affinities. Recently, it has been shown that the global filter derived from a fully connected graph representing the image can be approximated using the Nyström extension. This filter is computed by approximating the leading eigenvectors of the filter. These orthonormal eigenfunctions are highly expressive of the coarse and fine details in the underlying image, where each eigenvector can be interpreted as one scale of a data-dependent multiscale image decomposition. In this filtering scheme, each eigenvalue can boost or suppress the corresponding signal component in each scale. Our analysis shows that the mapping of the eigenvalues by an appropriate polynomial function endows the filter with a number of important capabilities, such as edge-aware sharpening, denoising, tone manipulation, and abstraction, to name a few. Furthermore, the edits can be easily propagated across the image. PMID:25148666

  2. Nested Images Qiang Tong#1

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Nested Images Qiang Tong#1 , Song-Hai Zhang#2 , Ralph R. Martin*3 , Paul L. Rosin*4 # Tsinghua.Rosin@cs.cardiff.ac.uk Abstract--A nested image is a form of artistic expression in which one or more secondary figures detects the enclosed outer contour of the figure to be nested, and then finds a place in the outer figure

  3. Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar, & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Tie Bar, & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Medora Bridge, Spanning East Fork of White River at State Route 235, Medora, Jackson County, IN

  4. Brown Dwarfs: Discovery and Detailed Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2001-01-01

    We obtained the optical and IR spectra of Gliese 229B and identified Cs, I, and CO features - as expected in theoretical models. Our optical IR spectrum showed that most of the refractory metals have condensed out of the atmosphere and the presence of Cs, I and CO shows evidence for disequilibrium chemistry. We reported orbital evidence for Gliese 229B. The HST measured optical magnitudes provide additional evidence for the absence of dust in the atmosphere of this cool object. The luminosity of brown dwarfs depend on their masses and ages and in order to interpret the results of the survey we have carried out an extensive Monte Carlo analysis. Our conclusion is that warm brown dwarfs are rare, as companions in the orbital period range beyond approximately 30 - 50 AU. The Palomer survey poses no constraint for brown dwarfs in planetary orbits similar to those of the outer planets. We have just started a program of imaging nearby stars with the newly commissioned AO system at Palomar and Keck and have already found a brown dwarf candidate.

  5. Impregnating unconsolidated pyroclastic sequences: A tool for detailed facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapper, Daniel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Castro, Jon M.; Pacheco, Jose M. R.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2010-05-01

    The interpretation of volcanic eruptions is usually derived from direct observation and the thorough analysis of the deposits. Processes in vent-proximal areas are usually not directly accessible or likely to be obscured. Hence, our understanding of proximal deposits is often limited as they were produced by the simultaneous events stemming from primary eruptive, transportative, and meteorological conditions. Here we present a method that permits for a direct and detailed quasi in-situ investigation of loose pyroclastic units that are usually analysed in the laboratory for their 1) grain-size distribution, 2) componentry, and 3) grain morphology. As the clast assembly is altered during sampling, the genesis of a stratigraphic unit and the relative importance of the above mentioned deposit characteristics is hard to achieve. In an attempt to overcome the possible loss of information during conventional sampling techniques, we impregnated the cleaned surfaces of proximal, unconsolidated units of the 1957-58 Capelinhos eruption on Faial, Azores. During this basaltic, emergent eruption, fluxes in magma rise rate led to a repeated build-up and collapse of tuff cones and consequently to a shift between phreatomagmatic and magmatic eruptive style. The deposits are a succession of generally parallel bedded, cm- to dm-thick layers with a predominantly ashy matrix. The lapilli content is varying gradually; the content of bombs is enriched in discrete layers without clear bomb sags. The sample areas have been cleaned and impregnated with two-component glue (EPOTEK 301). For approx. 10 * 10 cm, a volume of mixed glue of 20 ml was required. Using a syringe, this low-viscosity, transparent glue could be easily applied on the target area. We found that the glue permeated the deposit as deep as 5 mm. After > 24 h, the glue was sufficiently dry to enable the sample to be laid open. This impregnation method renders it possible to cut and polish the sample and investigate grain-size distribution, componentry, and grain morphology in situ in a 2D-plane. In a first step, the sample surface has been scanned and analysed by means of image analysis software (Image J). After that, selected areas were investigated through thin section analysis. We were able to define depositional units in the (sub)-mm scale and the show the varying relative importance of 1) eruptive style, 2) transportation mode, and 3) the influence of wind and (air) humidity. The presented method is an easy and efficient tool for a detailed stratigraphic investigation of unconsolidated pyroclastic units.

  6. Impregnating unconsolidated pyroclastic sequences: A tool for detailed facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapper, D.; Kueppers, U.; Castro, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    The interpretation of volcanic eruptions is usually derived from direct observation and the thorough analysis of the deposits. Processes in vent-proximal areas are usually not directly accessible or likely to be obscured. Hence, our understanding of proximal deposits is often limited as they were produced by the simultaneous events stemming from primary eruptive, transportative, and meteorological conditions. Here we present a method that permits for a direct and detailed quasi in-situ investigation of loose pyroclastic units that are usually analysed in the laboratory for their 1) grain-size distribution, 2) componentry, and 3) grain morphology. As the clast assembly is altered during sampling, the genesis of a stratigraphic unit and the relative importance of the above mentioned deposit characteristics is hard to achieve. In an attempt to overcome the possible loss of information during conventional sampling techniques, we impregnated the cleaned surfaces of proximal, unconsolidated units of the 1957-58 Capelinhos eruption on Faial, Azores. During this basaltic, emergent eruption, fluxes in magma rise rate led to a repeated build-up and collapse of tuff cones and consequently to a shift between phreatomagmatic and magmatic eruptive style. The deposits are a succession of generally parallel bedded, cm- to dm-thick layers with a predominantly ashy matrix. The lapilli content is varying gradually; the content of bombs is enriched in discrete layers without clear bomb sags. The sample areas have been cleaned and impregnated with a two-component glue (EPOTEK 301). For approx. 10 * 10 cm, a volume of mixed glue of 20 ml was required. This low-viscosity, transparent glue allowed for an easy application on the target area by means of a syringe and permeated the deposit as deep as 5 mm. After > 24 h, the glue was sufficiently dry to enable the sample to be laid open. This impregnation method renders it possible to cut and polish the sample and investigate grain-size distribution, componentry, and grain morphology in situ in a 2D-plane. In a first step, the sample surface has been scanned and analysed by means of image analysis software (Image J). After that, selected areas were investigated through thin section analysis. We were able to define depositional units in the (sub)-mm scale and the show the varying relative importance of 1) eruptive style, 2) transportation mode, and 3) the influence of wind and (air) humidity. The presented method is an easy and efficient tool for a detailed stratigraphic investigation of unconsolidated pyroclastic units.

  7. Rhinoscleroma: a detailed histopathological diagnostic insight

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ahmed RH; El-badawy, Zeinab H; Mohamed, Ibrahim R; Abdelhameed, Waleed AM

    2015-01-01

    Rhinoscleroma (RS) is a chronic specific disease of nose and upper respiratory passages caused by Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis bacilli. It is endemic in Egypt and in sporadic areas worldwide. Diagnosis of RS depends on identification of the pathognomonic Mickulicz cells (MCs) which is most prominent during granulomatous phase but spares or absent during catarrhal or sclerotic phases of the disease. This study aimed to identify the potential diagnostic features of nasal RS when MCs are absent. Nasal biopsies from 125 patients complaining of chronic nasal symptoms were retrieved for this study; including 72 chronic non specific inflammatory lesions and 53 RS diagnosed by PAS and Geimsa stains. The detailed histological differences among the two groups were measured statistically. RS was frequently a bilateral disease (P < 0.05) of young age (P < 0.001) with a female predominance (P < 0.05) and usually associated with nasal crustations (P < 0.001). Five strong histological indicators of RS were specified by univariate binary logistic regression analyses including squamous metaplasia (OR 27.2, P < 0.0001), dominance of plasma cells (OR 12.75, P < 0.0001), Russell bodies (OR 8.83, P < 0.0001), neutrophiles (OR 3.7, P < 0.001) and absence of oesinophiles (OR 12.0, P < 0.0001). According to Multivariate analysis, the diagnostic features of RS in absence of MCs can be classified into major criteria including dominance of plasma cells infiltration and absence of oesinophiles and minor criteria including young age, female gender, bilateral nasal involvement, nasal crustation, squamous metaplasia, Russell bodies, and neutrophiles. The diagnostic model using the two major criteria confirmed or excluded RS in 84.3% of the investigated cases. PMID:26339415

  8. Detailed modelling of the 21-cm forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelin, B.

    2016-01-01

    The 21-cm forest is a promising probe of the Epoch of Reionization. The local state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is encoded in the spectrum of a background source (radio-loud quasars or gamma-ray burst afterglow) by absorption at the local 21-cm wavelength, resulting in a continuous and fluctuating absorption level. Small-scale structures (filaments and minihaloes) in the IGM are responsible for the strongest absorption features. The absorption can also be modulated on large scales by inhomogeneous heating and Wouthuysen-Field coupling. We present the results from a simulation that attempts to preserve the cosmological environment while resolving some of the small-scale structures (a few kpc resolution in a 50 h-1 Mpc box). The simulation couples the dynamics and the ionizing radiative transfer and includes X-ray and Lyman lines radiative transfer for a detailed physical modelling. As a result we find that soft X-ray self-shielding, Ly ? self-shielding and shock heating all have an impact on the predicted values of the 21-cm optical depth of moderately overdense structures like filaments. A correct treatment of the peculiar velocities is also critical. Modelling these processes seems necessary for accurate predictions and can be done only at high enough resolution. As a result, based on our fiducial model, we estimate that LOFAR should be able to detect a few (strong) absorptions features in a frequency range of a few tens of MHz for a 20 mJy source located at z = 10, while the SKA would extract a large fraction of the absorption information for the same source.

  9. Diagnostic imaging of infertility

    SciTech Connect

    Winfield, A.C.; Wentz, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This text presents a review of all the imaging modalities available in the diagnosis of infertility. This book integrates the perspectives of experts in ob/gyn, radiology, reproductive endocrinology, and urology. It's a one-of-a-kind ''how to'' guide to hysterosalpinography and infertility evaluation, providing complete clinical information on the techniques, pitfalls, problems encountered and differential diagnosis. Detailed descriptions accompany numerous high-quality illustrations to help correlate findings and give meaning to the radiographic and ultrasound images.

  10. Characterization of a Densely Placed Carbon Observation Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oney, B. J.; Brunner, D.; Henne, S.; Leuenberger, M.; Bamberger, I.; Gruber, N.

    2014-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the suitability of a network with four densely placed, continuous carbon measurement sites located on the Swiss Plateau for regional-scale (~100-500 km) carbon exchange studies. Two sites are located atop mountain ridges approximately 500 m above the valley floor, one site is a small tower in flat terrain, and one site is a 212 m tall tower atop a gentle hill. The analysis concentrates on the evaluation of a regional numerical weather prediction model's ability to represent the local meteorology, and on source sensitivities (footprints) simulated with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model. Simulated and measured meteorology compares very well for the flatland sites whereas the mountaintop site comparisons illustrate discrepancies in simulated meteorological variables due to the inability of the model to resolve the complex topography. Furthermore, the meteorological comparison suggests an accurate representation of the convective boundary layer over the Swiss Plateau on average. We find large differences between the simulated footprint extents in winter and summer and between summer's nocturnal and daily footprint, illustrating the ability of simulations to represent seasonal and diurnal variability. We find that far-field influence increases with increasing measurement height as well as being dependent on local topography-induced flow patterns. This study illustrates the fruitfulness of simulated and measured meteorology comparison and detailed analysis of footprint simulations, and we argue that similar analysis is a necessary initial step for regional carbon exchange studies. The four measurement sites with the CarboCount CH project complement one another to represent typical land cover types for Switzerland and Europe, and provide information rich data sets for forthcoming regional carbon exchange studies, of which we also present first results.

  11. Social marketing: its place in public health.

    PubMed

    Ling, J C; Franklin, B A; Lindsteadt, J F; Gearon, S A

    1992-01-01

    This review of the public health role of social marketing begins by tracing the history of social marketing and noting that social marketing adopts the traditional marketing framework of product, price, place, and promotion and embraces several methods of commercial marketing as well as consumer research. However, no universally acknowledged definition exists. A review of the literature is divided into three time periods representing early theoretical development, the evaluation of experiences, and increasing acceptance. Concerns about social marketing are discussed in terms of ethics, disempowerment, and the commercialization of health information. Examples of social marketing are then provided from developing countries and are analyzed in groupings defined as tangible products, sustained health practices, and service utilization. Practitioners' views and concerns are also reviewed. The strengths of social marketing include knowledge of the audience, systematic use of qualitative methods, use of incentives, closer monitoring, strategic use of the mass media, realistic expectations, aspiring to high standards, and recognition of price. Weaknesses of social marketing include its time, money, and human requirements; the fact that marketing elements are missing (public health lacks the flexibility to adjust products and services to clients' interests and preferences); and the potential serious impact on the future of Public Service Announcements, which may die out because social marketers pay for air time. After placing social marketing in context with other practices designed to achieve social change, the review ends with the prediction that the public health role of social marketing is likely to increase. The World Health Organization's recent call for health promotion and the UN Children's Fund's social mobilization actions are provided as examples of this increased role. It is noted, however, that social marketing alone cannot solve public health problems. PMID:1599593

  12. Placing late Neanderthals in a climatic context.

    PubMed

    Tzedakis, P C; Hughen, K A; Cacho, I; Harvati, K

    2007-09-13

    Attempts to place Palaeolithic finds within a precise climatic framework are complicated by both uncertainty over the radiocarbon calibration beyond about 21,500 14C years bp and the absence of a master calendar chronology for climate events from reference archives such as Greenland ice cores or speleothems. Here we present an alternative approach, in which 14C dates of interest are mapped directly onto the palaeoclimate record of the Cariaco Basin by means of its 14C series, circumventing calendar age model and correlation uncertainties, and placing dated events in the millennial-scale climate context of the last glacial period. This is applied to different sets of dates from levels with Mousterian artefacts, presumably produced by late Neanderthals, from Gorham's Cave in Gibraltar: first, generally accepted estimates of about 32,000 14C years bp for the uppermost Mousterian levels; second, a possible extended Middle Palaeolithic occupation until about 28,000 14C years bp; and third, more contentious evidence for persistence until about 24,000 14C years bp. This study shows that the three sets translate to different scenarios on the role of climate in Neanderthal extinction. The first two correspond to intervals of general climatic instability between stadials and interstadials that characterized most of the Middle Pleniglacial and are not coeval with Heinrich Events. In contrast, if accepted, the youngest date indicates that late Neanderthals may have persisted up to the onset of a major environmental shift, which included an expansion in global ice volume and an increased latitudinal temperature gradient. More generally, our radiocarbon climatostratigraphic approach can be applied to any 'snapshot' date from discontinuous records in a variety of deposits and can become a powerful tool in evaluating the climatic signature of critical intervals in Late Pleistocene human evolution. PMID:17851522

  13. 29 CFR 780.916 - “Place of * * * first marketing.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âPlace of * * * first marketing.â 780.916 Section 780.916... Section 13(b)(16) Exempt Operations on Fruits Or Vegetables § 780.916 “Place of * * * first marketing.” A “place of * * * first marketing” is the second of the two types of places to which the freshly...

  14. 12 CFR 1024.37 - Force-placed insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Force-placed insurance. 1024.37 Section 1024.37... (REGULATION X) Mortgage Servicing § 1024.37 Force-placed insurance. (a) Definition of force-placed insurance. (1) In general. For the purposes of this section, the term “force-placed insurance” means...

  15. 29 CFR 780.916 - “Place of * * * first marketing.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false âPlace of * * * first marketing.â 780.916 Section 780.916... Section 13(b)(16) Exempt Operations on Fruits Or Vegetables § 780.916 “Place of * * * first marketing.” A “place of * * * first marketing” is the second of the two types of places to which the freshly...

  16. 29 CFR 780.916 - “Place of * * * first marketing.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false âPlace of * * * first marketing.â 780.916 Section 780.916... Section 13(b)(16) Exempt Operations on Fruits Or Vegetables § 780.916 “Place of * * * first marketing.” A “place of * * * first marketing” is the second of the two types of places to which the freshly...

  17. 29 CFR 780.916 - “Place of * * * first marketing.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false âPlace of * * * first marketing.â 780.916 Section 780.916... Section 13(b)(16) Exempt Operations on Fruits Or Vegetables § 780.916 “Place of * * * first marketing.” A “place of * * * first marketing” is the second of the two types of places to which the freshly...

  18. Toward an Interdisciplinary Understanding of Place: Lessons for Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardoin, Nicole M.

    2006-01-01

    Sense of place is lauded as critical to developing an environmentally conscious and responsive citizenry. Calls for place-based education have often arisen from an emotional plea to reconnect to the land, become rooted, and conserve natural places. However, in reality, sense of place encompasses a multidimensional array that is not only…

  19. Suppression of impulse noise in medical images with the use of Fuzzy Adaptive Median Filter.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Abdullah; Güler, Inan

    2006-12-01

    A new rule based fuzzy filter for removal of highly impulse noise, called Rule Based Fuzzy Adaptive Median (RBFAM) Filter, is aimed to be discussed in this paper. The RBFAM filter is an improved version of Adaptive Median Filter (AMF) and is presented in the aim of noise reduction of images corrupted with additive impulse noise. The filter has three stages. Two of those stages are fuzzy rule based and last stage is based on standard median and adaptive median filter. The proposed filter can preserve image details better then AMF while suppressing additive salt & pepper or impulse type noise. In this paper, we placed our preference on bell-shaped membership function instead of triangular membership function in order to observe better results. Experimental results indicates that the proposed filter is improvable with increased fuzzy rules to reduce more noise corrupted images and to remove salt and pepper noise in a more effective way than what AMF filter does. PMID:17233159

  20. A Great Place to Watch the Weather (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In this time of year when Mars is most likely to be covered by global dust storms, NASA's Spirit rover has been experiencing relative calm. In fact, the martian winds have been quite beneficial, clearing dust from the rover's solar panels and increasing the solar energy available for driving to new places and conducting scientific experiments.

    Another thing the martian wind has done is send hundreds of dust devils spinning across the surface of the planet. From Spirit's high perch approximately 90 meters (295 feet) above the surrounding plains, as shown in this image taken from the summit of 'Husband Hill,' three dust devils are clearly visible in the plains of Gusev Crater. Planetary Scientist Ron Greeley of Arizona State University, Tempe, describes the whirling vortices of wind and dust as 'vacuum cleaners' that were first seen in images from the Viking Orbiter in 1985, though their existence was predicted as early as 1964.

    The most prominent dust devil in this image, visible on the left side of the 360-degree panorama, is one of the closest seen by Spirit. It is about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) away from the rover, about 90 meters (295 feet) in diameter at its widest point, and 275 meters (902 feet) tall. Its flux is about 1 kilogram per second, meaning it is picking up about 2 pounds of sediment each second and moving it around.

    The smaller dust devil just to the right of the largest one is 2.5 to 3 kilometers (1.6 to 1.9 miles) away and is churning up about 0.5 kilograms (1 pound) per second. Both are north of the rover's position and are moving in an east-southeast direction. On the right side of the mosaic shown here is a third dust devil.

    Greeley has calculated that if the number and frequency of dust devils Spirit has encountered are similarly spaced throughout Gusev Crater, the crater probably experiences about 90,000 dust devils per martian day, or sol. Collectively, the whirlwinds lift and redeposit an estimated 4.5 million kilograms (9.9 million U.S. pounds) of sediment per sol.

    Spirit took this mosaic of images with its navigation camera on sol 581 (Aug. 22). Straight ahead, just east of the rover, is the summit of 'Husband Hill.' The 360-degree field of view is presented in a vertical projection with geometrical seam correction.