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Sample records for image guided radio

  1. In vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access: towards image guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. We aim to develop optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging guidance for RFA. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using OCT catheter to image endocardia wall in active beating hearts through percutaneous access. This is a critical step toward image guided RFA in a clinic setting. METHODS A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into active beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardia wall. The images were then acquired at 10 frames per second at an axial resolution and lateral resolution of 15 μm. RESULTS We report the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in active beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible to acquire OCT images in beating hearts through percutaneous access. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  2. Minimally invasive radio-guided surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism: From preoperative to intraoperative localization imaging.

    PubMed

    Rubello, D; Kapse, N; Grassetto, G; Massaro, A; Al-Nahhas, A

    2010-12-01

    The introduction and successful implementation of minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) has revolutionized the surgical approach to remove parathyroid adenomas. A prerequisite for such success is an accurate localization of the offending adenoma. To achieve this goal, a multimodality approach is commonly employed using a combination of anatomical and functional imaging. Of the anatomical cross-sectional techniques, ultrasonography is the most widely available but is operator-dependent and has reduced sensitivity, specially in the presence of thyroid nodules. Similarly, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have low sensitivities but provide value in detecting retrotracheal, retro-oesophageal and mediastinal adenomas. Functional imaging with ⁹⁹(m)Tc-Sestamibi is currently the most vital imaging procedure in this respect with variable protocols including dual-phase and dual isotope imaging. The sensitivity and specificity can improve by acquiring in single photon emission tomography (SPECT) mode and using co-registration with low dose CT to provide anatomical data (SPECT/CT). The current recommended approach is the combination of functional imaging with ⁹⁹(m)Tc-Sestamibi and high-resolution ultrasound (US), supplemented with intraoperative gamma probe in certain cases and quick persurgical measurement of parathyroid hormone. This review aims to explore the utility of various imaging modalities, alone and in combination, in detecting parathyroid adenoma and facilitating the current approach of MIRP. PMID:20846640

  3. Image-Guided Radio-Frequency Gain Calibration for High-Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Elodie; McGorty, KellyAnne; Wiggins, Graham C.; Axel, Leon; Kim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    High-field (≥ 3T) MRI provides a means to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, due to its higher tissue magnetization compared with 1.5T. However, both the static magnetic field (B0) and the transmit radio-frequency (RF) field (B1+) inhomogeneities are comparatively higher than those at 1.5T. These challenging factors at high-field strengths make it more difficult to accurately calibrate the transmit RF gain using standard RF calibration procedures. An image-based RF calibration procedure was therefore developed, in order to accurately calibrate the transmit RF gain within a specific region-of-interest (ROI). Using a single-shot ultra-fast gradient echo pulse sequence with centric k-space reordering, a series of “saturation-no-recovery” images was acquired by varying the flip angle of the preconditioning pulse. In the resulting images, the signal null occurs in regions where the flip angle of the preconditioning pulse is 90°. For a given ROI, the mean signal can be plotted as a function of the nominal flip angle, and the resulting curve can be used to quantitatively identify the signal null. This image-guided RF calibration procedure was evaluated through phantom and volunteer imaging experiments at 3T and 7T. The image-guided RF calibration results in vitro were consistent with standard B0 and B1+ maps. The standard automated RF calibration procedure produced approximately 20% and 15–30% relative error in the transmit RF gain in the left kidney at 3T and brain at 7T, respectively. For initial application, a T2 mapping pulse sequence was applied at 7T. The T2 measurements in the thalamus at 7T were 60.6 ms and 48.2 ms using the standard and image-guided RF calibration procedures, respectively. This rapid, image-guided RF calibration procedure can be used to optimally calibrate the flip angle for a given ROI and thus minimize measurement errors for quantitative MRI and MR spectroscopy. PMID:20014333

  4. [Radio-guided parathyroidectomy].

    PubMed

    Calbo, L; Gorgone, S; Palmieri, R; Lazzara, S; Sciglitano, P; Catalfamo, A; Calbo, E; Campennì, A; Ruggeri, M; Vermiglio, F; Baldari, S

    2009-01-01

    The Authors, after a careful review of literature about the instrumental diagnostic techniques (with particular attention to the nuclear-medical ones) and the surgical therapy of parathyroid diseases, report their experience on the use of the radio-guided mininvasive surgery with MIBI and gamma-probe for intraoperative localization of pathological glands. Once exposed their experience, the Authors conclude asserting that this technique is fast, slightly invasive and expensive, and certainly useful for the detection of pathological or ectopic glands. It can be widely employed because, in comparison to its numerous advantages, such as the reduction of the operating time and of the hospital-stay, the greater radicality and the possibility to use mininvasive techniques, it does not present significant technical limitations and/or radio-protectionistic problems. PMID:20109383

  5. In vivo intracardiac optical coherence tomography imaging through percutaneous access: toward image-guided radio-frequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter to image endocardial wall in actively beating hearts through percutaneous access. We reported the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. This is a critical step toward image-guided RFA in a clinical setting. A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardial wall. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium, and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA. PMID:22112101

  6. In vivo intracardiac optical coherence tomography imaging through percutaneous access: toward image-guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2011-11-01

    Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter to image endocardial wall in actively beating hearts through percutaneous access. We reported the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. This is a critical step toward image-guided RFA in a clinical setting. A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardial wall. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium, and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  7. Radionuclide (131)I labeled reduced graphene oxide for nuclear imaging guided combined radio- and photothermal therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Yi, Xuan; Huang, Min; Ning, Ping; Liu, Teng; Ge, Cuicui; Chai, Zhifang; Liu, Zhuang; Yang, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Nano-graphene and its derivatives have attracted great attention in biomedicine, including their applications in cancer theranostics. In this work, we develop 131I labeled, polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated reduced nano-graphene oxide (RGO), obtaining 131I-RGO-PEG for nuclear imaging guided combined radiotherapy and photothermal therapy of cancer. Compared with free 131I, 131IRGO- PEG exhibits enhanced cellular uptake and thus improved radio-therapeutic efficacy against cancer cells. As revealed by gamma imaging, efficient tumor accumulation of 131I-RGO-PEG is observed after its intravenous injection. While RGO exhibits strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and could induce effective photothermal heating of tumor under NIR light irradiation, 131I is able to emit high-energy X-ray to induce cancer killing as the result of radio ionization effect. By utilizing the combined photothermal therapy and radiotherapy, both of which are delivered by a single agent 131IRGO- PEG, effective elimination of tumors is achieved in our animal tumor model experiments. Toxicology studies further indicate that 131I-RGO-PEG induces no appreciable toxicity to mice at the treatment dose. Our work demonstrates the great promise of combing nuclear medicine and photothermal therapy as a novel therapeutic strategy to realize synergistic efficacy in cancer treatment. PMID:26188609

  8. Radiosensitizer-eluting nanocoatings on gold fiducials for biological in-situ image-guided radio therapy (BIS-IGRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesha, D. K.; Tada, D. B.; Stambaugh, C. K. K.; Gultepe, E.; Jost, E.; Levy, C. O.; Cormack, R.; Makrigiorgos, G. M.; Sridhar, S.

    2010-10-01

    Image-guided radiation treatments (IGRT) routinely utilize radio-opaque implantable devices, such as fiducials or brachytherapy spacers, for improved spatial accuracy. The therapeutic efficiency of IGRT can be further enhanced by biological in situ dose painting (BIS-IGRT) of radiosensitizers through localized delivery within the tumor using gold fiducial markers that have been coated with nanoporous polymer matrices loaded with nanoparticles (NPs). In this work, two approaches were studied: (i) a free drug release system consisting of Doxorubicin (Dox), a hydrophilic drug, loaded into a non-degradable polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) coating and (ii) poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs loaded with fluorescent Coumarin-6, serving as a model for a hydrophobic drug, in a biodegradable chitosan matrix. Temporal release kinetics measurements in buffer were carried out using fluorescence spectroscopy. In the first case of free Dox release, an initial release within the first few hours was followed by a sustained release over the course of the next 3 months. In the second platform, release of NPs and the free drug was controlled by the degradation rate of the chitosan matrix and PLGA. The results show that dosage and rate of release of these radiosensitizers coated on gold fiducials for IGRT can be precisely tailored to achieve the desired release profile for radiation therapy of cancer.

  9. Radiosensitizer-eluting nanocoatings on gold fiducials for biological in-situ image-guided radio therapy (BIS-IGRT).

    PubMed

    Nagesha, D K; Tada, D B; Stambaugh, C K K; Gultepe, E; Jost, E; Levy, C O; Cormack, R; Makrigiorgos, G M; Sridhar, S

    2010-10-21

    Image-guided radiation treatments (IGRT) routinely utilize radio-opaque implantable devices, such as fiducials or brachytherapy spacers, for improved spatial accuracy. The therapeutic efficiency of IGRT can be further enhanced by biological in situ dose painting (BIS-IGRT) of radiosensitizers through localized delivery within the tumor using gold fiducial markers that have been coated with nanoporous polymer matrices loaded with nanoparticles (NPs). In this work, two approaches were studied: (i) a free drug release system consisting of Doxorubicin (Dox), a hydrophilic drug, loaded into a non-degradable polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) coating and (ii) poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs loaded with fluorescent Coumarin-6, serving as a model for a hydrophobic drug, in a biodegradable chitosan matrix. Temporal release kinetics measurements in buffer were carried out using fluorescence spectroscopy. In the first case of free Dox release, an initial release within the first few hours was followed by a sustained release over the course of the next 3 months. In the second platform, release of NPs and the free drug was controlled by the degradation rate of the chitosan matrix and PLGA. The results show that dosage and rate of release of these radiosensitizers coated on gold fiducials for IGRT can be precisely tailored to achieve the desired release profile for radiation therapy of cancer. PMID:20858923

  10. Minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Rubello, Domenico; Giannini, Sandro; Martini, Chiara; Piotto, Andrea; Rampin, Lucia; Fanti, Stefano; Armigliato, Michela; Nardi, Alfredo; Carpi, Angelo; Mariani, Giuliano; Gross, Milton D; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa

    2006-04-01

    We reported here the data on minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) in a large group of 253 patients enrolled from the whole series of 355 consecutive patients affected by primary hyperparathyroidism (P-HPT) referred to our center. On the basis of preoperative imaging including Sestamibi scintigraphy and neck ultrasound (US), 263 patients (74% of the whole series) with evidence of a solitary parathyroid adenoma (PA) and a normal thyroid gland were addressed to MIRP and in 253 (96%) of them this minimally invasive neck exploration was successfully performed. The MIRP protocol developed in our center consisted of a very low 1 mCi Sestamibi injection in the operating room a few minutes before the start of intervention, thus minimizing the radiation exposure dose to the patient and personnel. No major intraoperative complication was recorded in patients treated by MIRP and only a transient hypocalcemia in 8.5% of cases. The mean duration time for MIRP was 35 min and the mean hospital stay 1.2 days. Local anesthesia was also performed in 62 patients, 54 of whom were elderly patients with concomitant invalidating diseases contraindicating general anesthesia. No HPT relapse was observed during subsequent follow-up. The gamma probe was used also during bilateral neck exploration in the group of 92 patients excluded from MIRP. The most frequent cause of exclusion from MIRP in our series was the presence of concomitant Sestamibi avid thyroid nodules (68.5% of cases) that can give false positive results at radio-guided surgery. In conclusion, MIRP is an effective treatment in patients with a high likelihood of a solitary PA and a normal thyroid gland at scintigraphy and US so that an accurate preoperative localizing imaging is required for MIRP. A low 1 mCi Sestamibi dose appears sufficient to perform MIRP. Patients with concomitant Sestamibi avid thyroid nodules should be excluded from MIRP. PMID:16524690

  11. Radio and optical interferometric imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Tim J.

    1992-01-01

    Since diffraction-limited imaging with a single aperture yields angular resolution approx. lambda/D, the attainment of high angular resolution with single apertures requires the construction of correspondingly large monolithic apertures, the whole surface of which must be figured to much less than a wavelength. At the longer wavelengths, it is impossible to build a sufficiently large single aperture: for example, at lambda 21 cm, arcsec resolution requires an aperture of diameter approx. 50 km. At the shorter wavelengths, the atmosphere imposes a natural limit in resolution of about one arcsec. However, another route is possible; that is, using synthetic apertures to image the sky. Synthetic apertures are now in use in many fields, e.g., radio interferometry, radar imaging, and magnetic-resonance imaging. Radio-interferometric techniques developed in radio astronomy over the past 40 years are now being applied to optical and IR astronomical imaging by a number of groups. Furthermore, the problem of figuring synthetic apertures is considerably simpler, and can be implemented in a computer: new 'self-calibration' techniques allow imaging even in the presence of phase errors due to the atmosphere.

  12. Radio-Optical Imaging of ATLBS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorat, Kshitij

    2011-12-01

    We present the radio-optical imaging of ATLBS, a sensitive radio survey (Subrahmanyan et al. 2010). The primary aim of the ATLBS survey is to image low-power radio sources which form the bulk of the radio source population to moderately high red-shifts ( z ˜ 1.0). The accompanying multiband optical and near infra-red observations provide information about the hosts and environments of the radio sources. We give here details of the imaging of the radio data and optical data for the ATLBS survey.

  13. Imaging Guided Breast Interventions.

    PubMed

    Masroor, Imrana; Afzal, Shaista; Sufian, Saira Naz

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging is a developing field, with new and upcoming innovations, decreasing the morbidity and mortality related to breast pathologies with main emphasis on breast cancer. Breast imaging has an essential role in the detection and management of breast disease. It includes a multimodality approach, i.e. mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine techniques and interventional procedures, done for the diagnosis and definitive management of breast abnormalities. The range of methods to perform biopsy of a suspicious breast lesion found on imaging has also increased markedly from the 1990s with hi-technological progress in surgical as well as percutaneous breast biopsy methods. The image guided percutaneous breast biopsy procedures cause minimal breast scarring, save time, and relieve the patient of the anxiety of going to the operation theatre. The aim of this review was to describe and discuss the different image guided breast biopsy techniques presently employed along with the indications, contraindication, merits and demerits of each method. PMID:27353993

  14. Radio continuum polarimetric imaging of high redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Owen, F. N.; Harris, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Multifrequency images of total and polarized radio continuum emission from the two high redshift radio galaxies 0902+343 (z = 3.40) and 0647+415 (4C 41.17, z = 3.80) are presented. These images represent the most sensitive polarimetric study of high redshift ratio galaxies to date. The emission from both galaxies is substantially polarized, up to 30% in some regions, and both sources sit behind deep 'Faraday screens,' producing large rotation measures, over 10(exp 3) rad/sq. m in magnitude, and large rotation measure gradients across the sources. Such large rotation measures provide further evidence that high redshift radio galaxies are situated in very dense environments. Drawing the analogy to a class of low redshift powerful radio galaxies with similarly large rotation measures, we suggest that 0902+343 and 0647+415 are situated at the centers of dense, x-ray 'colling flow' clusters, and that the cluster gas is substantially magnetized. The remarkable similarity between the optical and radio morphologies of 0647+415 on scales as small as 0.1 sec is presented. We consider, and reject, both synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation as possible sources of the optical emission. We also consider both scattering of light out of a 'cone' of radiation from an obscured nucleus, and jet-induced star formation, and find that both models encounter difficulties in explaining this remarkably close radio-optical alignment. High resolution spectral index images reveal compact, flat spectrum components in both sources. We suggest that these components are the active nuclei of the galaxies. Lastly, high resolution images of 0902+343 show that the southernmost component forms a 'ring' of 0.2 sec radius. We discuss the possibility that this ring is the result of gravitational lensing, along the lines proposed by Kochanek & Lawrence (1990).

  15. Teacher's Guide to the German/American Heritage Radio Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasselriis, Peter

    The guide suggests teaching methods and learning activities related to German Americans and their heritage in Missouri. Intended for upper elementary and secondary ethnic studies or history courses, the material outlines and supports 13 radio programs. The objective is to increase awareness and understanding of the various facets of the German…

  16. Radio imaging of Jupiter's magnetosphere with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, P.

    2003-04-01

    Jupiter emits intense decameter radio waves, detectable from the ground in the range ~10 to 40 MHz. They are produced by energetic electron precipitations in its auroral regions, as well as near the magnetic footprints of the galilean satellite Io. Radio imaging imaging of these decameter emissions with arcsecond angular resolution and millisecond time resolution should give access to: - an improved mapping of the surface planetary magnetic field, deduced from the highest frequency of radio emission coming from a given point above the ionosphere (emission is produced at the local electron cyclotron frequency, proportional to the magnetic field amplitude) ; - detailed information on the Io-Jupiter electrodynamic interaction: imaging will allow to measure the angle between the field line instantaneously threading through Io and the one(s) emitting radio waves at that time, which is a strong constraint of the interaction mechanism (current circuit or Alfvèn waves) ; when performed at millisecond time resolution, imaging should allow to "see" the electron bunches thought to be at the origin of the sporadic drifting decameter bursts, and to follow them along magnetic field lines, measuring thus their speed and energy, and revealing possible electric potential drops along magnetic field lines ; - correlation of radio images with ultraviolet and infrared images of the aurora as well as of the galilean satellite footprints will provide complementary information on the precipitated energy and an interesting input to magnetospheric dynamics ; - imaging of decameter radio sources through the Io plasma torus will allow to probe for the first time the torus electron density as a function of longitude through analysis of the Faraday rotation of decameter waves crossing the torus ; diffraction effects that may be at the origin of observed fringe patterns could also be studied. Very fast imaging should be allowed by the very high intensity of Jovian decameter bursts, up to

  17. Guide to Digital Radiographic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mol, André; Yoon, Douglas C

    2015-09-01

    This is a resource for clinicians who are considering purchasing a digital imaging system or those already using one who want to optimize its use. It covers selected topics in digital imaging fundamentals, detector technology, image processing and quality assurance. Through a critical appraisal of the strengths and limitations of digital imaging components, the goal of this guide is to contribute to the appropriate use of these systems to maximize the health benefit for patients. PMID:26820007

  18. Contrast-guided image interpolation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhe; Ma, Kai-Kuang

    2013-11-01

    In this paper a contrast-guided image interpolation method is proposed that incorporates contrast information into the image interpolation process. Given the image under interpolation, four binary contrast-guided decision maps (CDMs) are generated and used to guide the interpolation filtering through two sequential stages: 1) the 45(°) and 135(°) CDMs for interpolating the diagonal pixels and 2) the 0(°) and 90(°) CDMs for interpolating the row and column pixels. After applying edge detection to the input image, the generation of a CDM lies in evaluating those nearby non-edge pixels of each detected edge for re-classifying them possibly as edge pixels. This decision is realized by solving two generalized diffusion equations over the computed directional variation (DV) fields using a derived numerical approach to diffuse or spread the contrast boundaries or edges, respectively. The amount of diffusion or spreading is proportional to the amount of local contrast measured at each detected edge. The diffused DV fields are then thresholded for yielding the binary CDMs, respectively. Therefore, the decision bands with variable widths will be created on each CDM. The two CDMs generated in each stage will be exploited as the guidance maps to conduct the interpolation process: for each declared edge pixel on the CDM, a 1-D directional filtering will be applied to estimate its associated to-be-interpolated pixel along the direction as indicated by the respective CDM; otherwise, a 2-D directionless or isotropic filtering will be used instead to estimate the associated missing pixels for each declared non-edge pixel. Extensive simulation results have clearly shown that the proposed contrast-guided image interpolation is superior to other state-of-the-art edge-guided image interpolation methods. In addition, the computational complexity is relatively low when compared with existing methods; hence, it is fairly attractive for real-time image applications. PMID:23846469

  19. Image-guided endobronchial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, William E.; Zang, Xiaonan; Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Byrnes, Patrick; Kuhlengel, Trevor; Bascom, Rebecca; Toth, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now recommended as a standard procedure for in vivo verification of extraluminal diagnostic sites during cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Yet, physicians vary considerably in their skills at using EBUS effectively. Regarding existing bronchoscopy guidance systems, studies have shown their effectiveness in the lung-cancer management process. With such a system, a patient's X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan is used to plan a procedure to regions of interest (ROIs). This plan is then used during follow-on guided bronchoscopy. Recent clinical guidelines for lung cancer, however, also dictate using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying suspicious ROIs and aiding in the cancer-staging process. While researchers have attempted to use guided bronchoscopy systems in tandem with PET imaging and EBUS, no true EBUS-centric guidance system exists. We now propose a full multimodal image-based methodology for guiding EBUS. The complete methodology involves two components: 1) a procedure planning protocol that gives bronchoscope movements appropriate for live EBUS positioning; and 2) a guidance strategy and associated system graphical user interface (GUI) designed for image-guided EBUS. We present results demonstrating the operation of the system.

  20. Image-guided tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ballyns, Jeffrey J; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-01-01

    Replication of anatomic shape is a significant challenge in developing implants for regenerative medicine. This has lead to significant interest in using medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to design tissue engineered constructs. Implementation of medical imaging and computer aided design in combination with technologies for rapid prototyping of living implants enables the generation of highly reproducible constructs with spatial resolution up to 25 μm. In this paper, we review the medical imaging modalities available and a paradigm for choosing a particular imaging technique. We also present fabrication techniques and methodologies for producing cellular engineered constructs. Finally, we comment on future challenges involved with image guided tissue engineering and efforts to generate engineered constructs ready for implantation. PMID:19583811

  1. Wide field imaging problems in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, T. J.; Golap, K.; Bhatnagar, S.

    2005-03-01

    The new generation of synthesis radio telescopes now being proposed, designed, and constructed face substantial problems in making images over wide fields of view. Such observations are required either to achieve the full sensitivity limit in crowded fields or for surveys. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA Consortium, Tech. Rep., 2004), now being developed by an international consortium of 15 countries, will require advances well beyond the current state of the art. We review the theory of synthesis radio telescopes for large fields of view. We describe a new algorithm, W projection, for correcting the non-coplanar baselines aberration. This algorithm has improved performance over those previously used (typically an order of magnitude in speed). Despite the advent of W projection, the computing hardware required for SKA wide field imaging is estimated to cost up to $500M (2015 dollars). This is about half the target cost of the SKA. Reconfigurable computing is one way in which the costs can be decreased dramatically.

  2. Imaging Radio Galaxies with Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, W. H.; van Breugel, W. J. M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Roberts, J.; Fidkowski, K.

    2000-12-01

    We present 42 milli-arcsecond resolution Adaptive Optics near-infrared images of 3C 452 and 3C 294, two powerful radio galaxies at z=0.081 and z=1.79 respectively, obtained with the NIRSPEC/SCAM+AO instrument on the Keck telescope. The observations provide unprecedented morphological detail of radio galaxy components like nuclear dust-lanes, off-centered or binary nuclei, and merger induced starforming structures; all of which are key features in understanding galaxy formation and the onset of powerful radio emission. Complementary optical HST imaging data are used to construct high resolution color images, which, for the first time, have matching optical and near-IR resolutions. Based on these maps, the extra-nuclear structural morphologies and compositions of both galaxies are discussed. Furthermore, detailed brightness profile analysis of 3C 452 allows a direct comparison to a large literature sample of nearby ellipticals, all of which have been observed in the optical and near-IR by HST. Both the imaging data and the profile information on 3C 452 are consistent with it being a relative diminutive and well-evolved elliptical, in stark contrast to 3C 294 which seems to be in its initial formation throes with an active AGN off-centered from the main body of the galaxy. These results are discussed further within the framework of radio galaxy triggering and the formation of massive ellipticals. The work of WdV and WvB was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. The work at UCSD has been supported by the NSF Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, under agreement No. AST-98-76783.

  3. From radio-astronomy to medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Peters, T M

    1991-12-01

    A common thread in much of the medical imaging that has developed over the past 20 years has been the Fourier transform. It was Richard Bates' interest in radio-interferometry, as well as his fascination with problems of medical imaging that prompted an initial interest in applying Fourier techniques to medical imaging in general and to Computed Tomography in particular. This resulted 20 years ago in one of the earliest technical papers advocating Fourier techniques for reconstructing cross-sections from radiographic projections (Bates and Peters, NZ J Science 14:883-896, 1971). Since those early days, medical imaging has explored into a multi-billion dollar industry. The CT scanner has become the workhorse imaging modality in the radiology department, while its more recent relative, the MR scanner, is rapidly gaining ground as a technique of even greater importance. Richard Bates, with his team of "Medical Imagers" was a very significant force in the development of the field of Medical Imaging as we know it today. This paper attempts to chronicle the genesis of this process from the personal perspective of the author. PMID:1789769

  4. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation using iodine 125 Seeds “ROLLIS” to guide surgical removal of an impalpable posterior chest wall melanoma metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, Shashini; Dissanayake, Deepthi; Taylor, Donna B

    2015-09-15

    Cancer screening and surveillance programmes and the use of sophisticated imaging tools such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) have increased the detection of impalpable lesions requiring imaging guidance for excision. A new technique involves intra-lesional insertion of a low-activity iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) seed and detection of the radioactive signal in theatre using a hand-held gamma probe to guide surgery. Whilst several studies describe using this method to guide the removal of impalpable breast lesions, only a handful of publications report its use to guide excision of lesions outside the breast. We describe a case in which radio-guided occult lesion localisation using an iodine 125 seed was used to guide excision of an impalpable posterior chest wall metastasis detected on PET-CT.

  5. The Radio Plasma Imager Investigation on the IMAGE Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinisch, Bodo W.; Haines, D. M.; Bibl, K.; Cheney, G.; Galkin, I. A.; Huang, X.; Myers, S. H.; Sales, G. S.; Benson, R. F.; Fung, S. F.

    1999-01-01

    Radio plasma imaging uses total reflection of electromagnetic waves from plasmas whose plasma frequencies equal the radio sounding frequency and whose electron density gradients are parallel to the wave normals. The Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has two orthogonal 500-m long dipole antennas in the spin plane for near omni-directional transmission. The third antenna is a 20-m dipole. Echoes from the magnetopause, plasmasphere and cusp will be received with three orthogonal antennas, allowing the determination of their angle-of-arrival. Thus it will be possible to create image fragments of the reflecting density structures. The instrument can execute a large variety of programmable measuring programs operating at frequencies between 3 kHz and 3 MHz. Tuning of the transmit antennas provides optimum power transfer from the 10 W transmitter to the antennas. The instrument can operate in three active sounding modes: (1) remote sounding to probe magnetospheric boundaries, (2) local (relaxation) sounding to probe the local plasma, and (3) whistler stimulation sounding. In addition, there is a passive mode to record natural emissions, and to determine the local electron density and temperature by using a thermal noise spectroscopy technique.

  6. Experienced radio-guided surgery teams can successfully perform minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy without intraoperative parathyroid hormone assays.

    PubMed

    Caudle, Abigail S; Brier, Sarah E; Calvo, Benjamin F; Kim, Hong Jin; Meyers, Michael O; Ollila, David W

    2006-09-01

    Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is an accepted treatment option for primary hyperparathyroidism. The need for intraoperative parathyroid hormone assays (iPTH) to confirm adenoma removal remains controversial. We studied minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) performed using preoperative sestamibi localization studies, intraoperative gamma detection probe, and the selective use of frozen section pathology without the use of iPTH. This is a single institution review of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism treated with MIRP by surgeons experienced in radio-guided surgery between October 1, 1998 and July 15, 2005. Information was obtained by reviewing computer medical records as well as contacting primary care physicians. Factors evaluated included laboratory values, pathology results, and evidence of recurrence. One hundred forty patients were included with a median preoperative calcium level of 11.3 mg/dL (range, 9.6-17) and a PTH level of 147 pg/mL (range, 19-5042). The median postoperative calcium level was 9.3 mg/dL. All patients were initially eucalcemic postoperatively except for one who had normal parathyroid levels. However, five (4%) patients required re-exploration for various reasons. Of the failures, one was secondary to the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism, and therefore would not have benefited from iPTH, one had thyroid tissue removed at the first operation, and three developed evidence of a second adenoma. One of these three patients had a drop in PTH level from 1558 pg/mL preoperatively to 64 pg/mL on postoperative Day 1, indicating that iPTH would not have prevented this failure. Thus, only three (2.1%) patients could have potentially benefited from the use of iPTH. MIRP was successful in 96 per cent of patients using a combination of preoperative sestamibi scans, intraoperative localization with a gamma probe, and the selective use of frozen pathology. This correlates with reported success rates of 95 per cent

  7. Amateur Radio in Space: A Teacher's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Sandy; White, Rosalie

    This educator's guide contains background information on the Space Amateur Radio EXperiment (SAREX) designed to facilitate communication between astronauts in orbit and students on the ground. Through SAREX, astronauts make scheduled and unscheduled amateur radio contacts from the Shuttle orbiter with schools selected through a proposal process…

  8. A photoelectric guide for sunspot images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, S. A.; Maslov, I. L.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    A photoelectric guide designed to directly handle sunspot images is described. A quadrant photodiode (serving as the photodetector) is placed in the beam reflected from the Dove prism face. The actuators are two plane-parallel plates attached to low-inertia electromagnetic drives, ensuring a high frequency (up to 3 Hz) of control action in response to image motion. The guide is placed in front of the spectrograph entrance slit and can be used with any standard AZU-5 telescope.

  9. Improving Performance During Image-Guided Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, James R.; Tabriz, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective Image-guided procedures have become a mainstay of modern health care. This article reviews how human operators process imaging data and use it to plan procedures and make intraprocedural decisions. Methods A series of models from human factors research, communication theory, and organizational learning were applied to the human-machine interface that occupies the center stage during image-guided procedures. Results Together, these models suggest several opportunities for improving performance as follows: 1. Performance will depend not only on the operator’s skill but also on the knowledge embedded in the imaging technology, available tools, and existing protocols. 2. Voluntary movements consist of planning and execution phases. Performance subscores should be developed that assess quality and efficiency during each phase. For procedures involving ionizing radiation (fluoroscopy and computed tomography), radiation metrics can be used to assess performance. 3. At a basic level, these procedures consist of advancing a tool to a specific location within a patient and using the tool. Paradigms from mapping and navigation should be applied to image-guided procedures. 4. Recording the content of the imaging system allows one to reconstruct the stimulus/response cycles that occur during image-guided procedures. Conclusions When compared with traditional “open” procedures, the technology used during image-guided procedures places an imaging system and long thin tools between the operator and the patient. Taking a step back and reexamining how information flows through an imaging system and how actions are conveyed through human-machine interfaces suggest that much can be learned from studying system failures. In the same way that flight data recorders revolutionized accident investigations in aviation, much could be learned from recording video data during image-guided procedures. PMID:24921628

  10. Evolution of luminous IRAS galaxies: Radio imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Hutchings, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    In a recent study of IRAS galaxies' optical morphologies, we found that luminous IR sources lie in the IR color-luminosity plane in groups which separate out by optical spectroscopic type and also by degree of tidal disturbance. We found that the most luminous steep-IR-spectrum sources are generally galaxies in the initial stages of a major tidal interaction. Galaxies with active nuclei were generally found to have flatter IR spectra, to cover a range of IR luminosity, and to be in the later stages of a tidal interaction. We proposed a sequence of events by which luminous IR sources evolve: they start as interacting or merging galaxies, some develop active nuclei, and most undergo extensive star-formation in their central regions. Another way to study these objects and their individual evolution is to study their radio morphologies. Radio emission may arise at a detectable level from supernovae in star-forming regions and/or the appearance of an active nucleus can be accompanied by a nuclear radio source (which may develop extended structure). Therefore, the compact radio structure may trace the evolution of the inner regions of IRAS-luminous sources. If the radio sources are triggered by the interactions, we would expect to find the radio morphology related to the optical 'interactivity' of the systems. Here, we explore using the radio emission of IRAS galaxies as a possible tracer of galaxy evolution. We present and discuss observations of the compact radio morphology of 111 luminous IRAS-selected active galaxies covering a wide range of IR and optical properties.

  11. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  12. An MF/HF radio array for radio and radar imaging of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isham, Brett; Gustavsson, Bjorn; Belyey, Vasyl; Bullett, Terrence

    2016-07-01

    The Aguadilla Radio Array will be installed at the Interamerican University Aguadilla Campus, located in northwestern Puerto Rico. The array is intended for broad-band medium and high-frequency (MF/HF, roughly 2 to 25 MHz) radio and bistatic radar observations of the ionosphere. The main array consists of 20 antenna elements, arranged in a semi-random pattern providing a good distribution of baseline vectors, with 6-meter minimum spacing to eliminate spacial aliasing. A relocatable 6-element array is also being developed, in which each element consists of a crossed pair of active electric dipoles and all associated electronics for phase-coherent radio measurements. A primary scientific goal of the array is to create images of the region of ionospheric radio emissions stimulated by the new Arecibo Observatory high-power high-frequency radio transmitter. A second primary goal is the study of ionospheric structure and dynamics via coherent radar imaging of the ionosphere in collaboration with the University of Colorado / NOAA Versatile Interferometric Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR), located at the USGS San Juan Observatory in Cayey, Puerto Rico. In addition to ionospheric research in collaboration with the Cayey and Arecibo Observatories, the goals of the project include the development of radio sounding, polarization, interferometry, and imaging techniques, and training of students at the university and high school levels.

  13. Guy's Guide to Body Image

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – ... KidsHealth > For Teens > A Guy's Guide to ...

  14. Investigations of Remote Plasma Irregularites by Radio Sounding: Applications of the Radio Plasma Imager on IMAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Benson, Robert F.; Carpenter, Donald L.; Reinsch, Bodo W.; Gallagher, Dennis L.

    1999-01-01

    The Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) mission operates like a radar by transmitting and receiving coherent electromagnetic pulses. Long-range echoes of electromagnetic sounder waves are reflected at remote plasma cutoffs. Thus, analyses of RPI observations will yield the plasma parameters and distances to the remote reflection points. These analyses assume that the reflecting plasma surfaces are cold and are sufficiently smooth that they effectively behave as plane mirrors to the incoming sounder waves, i.e., that geometric optics can be used. The RPI will employ pulse compression and spectral integration techniques, perfected in ground-based ionospheric digital sounders, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio in long-range magnetospheric sounding. When plasma irregularities exist in the remote magnetospheric plasmas that are being probed by the sounder waves, echo signatures may become complicated. Ionospheric sounding experience indicates that while topside sounding echo strengths can actually be enhanced by the presence of irregularities, ground-based sounding indicates that coherent detection techniques can still be employed. In this paper we investigate the plasma conditions that will allow coherent signals to be detected by the RPI and the signatures to be expected, such as scattering and plasma resonances, in the presence of multi-scale irregularities, may possibly have on RPI signals. Sounding of irregular plasma structures in the plasmasphere, plasmapause and magnetopause are also discussed.

  15. Guide to Magellan image interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, John P.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Weitz, Catherine M.; Farr, Tom G.; Senske, David A.; Stofan, Ellen R.; Michaels, Gregory; Parker, Timothy J.; Fulton, D. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    An overview of Magellan Mission requirements, radar system characteristics, and methods of data collection is followed by a description of the image data, mosaic formats, areal coverage, resolution, and pixel DN-to-dB conversion. The availability and sources of image data are outlined. Applications of the altimeter data to estimate relief, Fresnel reflectivity, and surface slope, and the radiometer data to derive microwave emissivity are summarized and illustrated in conjunction with corresponding SAR image data. Same-side and opposite-side stereo images provide examples of parallax differences from which to measure relief with a lateral resolution many times greater than that of the altimeter. Basic radar interactions with geologic surfaces are discussed with respect to radar-imaging geometry, surface roughness, backscatter modeling, and dielectric constant. Techniques are described for interpreting the geomorphology and surface properties of surficial features, impact craters, tectonically deformed terrain, and volcanic landforms. The morphologic characteristics that distinguish impact craters from volcanic craters are defined. Criteria for discriminating extensional and compressional origins of tectonic features are discussed. Volcanic edifices, constructs, and lava channels are readily identified from their radar outlines in images. Geologic map units are identified on the basis of surface texture, image brightness, pattern, and morphology. Superposition, cross-cutting relations, and areal distribution of the units serve to elucidate the geologic history.

  16. Imaging interplanetary CMEs at radio frequency from solar polar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Hao; Yan, Jingye; Wang, Chi; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Shui

    2011-09-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) represent a great concentration of mass and energy input into the lower corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions change in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, observations of CMEs are important for understanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. This paper discusses a proposed mission, the Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) mission, which will observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs to distances of near 0.35 AU from the Sun. The orbit of SPORT is an elliptical solar polar orbit. The inclination angle between the orbit and ecliptic plane should be about 90°. The main payload on board SPORT will be an imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band (radio telescope), which can follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs. The images that are obtained by the radio telescope embody the brightness temperature of the objectives. Due to the very large size required for the antenna aperture of the radio telescope, we adopt interferometric imaging technology to reduce it. Interferometric imaging technology is based on indirect spatial frequency domain measurements plus Fourier transformation. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind ion instrument, an energetic particle detector, a magnetometer, a wave detector and a solar radio burst spectrometer.

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma: modern image-guided therapies.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Sapna; Patel, Rafiuddin; Yap, Ki Sing; Patel, Jai; Wah, Tze; Snoddon, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The most common primary malignancy of the liver and the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which presents a major global health problem due to its increasing incidence. Most cases of HCC are secondary to either infection (hepatitis B or C) or cirrhosis (alcohol being the most common cause). Clinical presentation is variable and the tumour can be an incidental finding. Treatment options for HCC and prognosis are dependent on many factors but most importantly tumour size and staging. The last two decades have revolutionised the treatment of HCC using image-guided techniques. The concepts of imaging and image-guided techniques are still young and not well described in standard textbooks and hence an up to date review article is essential. The clinical subspecialities may lack familiarity with image-guided techniques but are responsible for management of these patients before and after the treatment by interventional radiologists. This article reviews current image-guided techniques, evidence and outcomes and provides educational highlights and question and answers. The article provides an overview in a simple understandable manner to enable readers from various levels of practice and training to benefit from and apply in their practice. PMID:26787919

  18. A Population of Dark Clouds Detected in Radio Continuum Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Using the VLA and GBT, radio continuum images of the inner Galaxy reveal the presence of numerous dark features. These dark features coincide with dense molecular and dust clouds. Unlike infrared dark clouds or extinction clouds at optical wavelengths, these features which we call ``radio dark clouds'' are produced by a deficiency in radio continuum emission from molecular clouds that are embedded in a bath of UV radiation field or synchrotron emitting cosmic ray particles. The contribution of the continuum emission along different pathlengths results in dark features that trace embedded molecular clouds. The new technique of identifying cold clouds can place constraints on the depth and the strength of diffuse magnetic field of molecular clouds. We present several examples of radio dark clouds and demonstrate an anti-correlation between the distributions of radio continuum and molecular line and dust emission. The level at which the continuum flux is suppressed in these sources suggests that the depth of the molecular cloud is similar to the size of the continuum emission within a factor of two. These examples suggest that radio continuum survey images can be powerful probes of interacting molecular clouds with massive stars and supernova remnants in the Galaxy as well as in the nuclei of active galaxies.

  19. Imaging shallow objects with scattered guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Gerard C.; Milligan, Paul A.; Huggins, Robert J.; Rector, James W.

    1999-10-01

    Current surface seismic reflection techniques based on the common-midpoint (CMP) reflection stacking method cannot be readily used to image small objects in the first few meters of a weathered layer. We discuss a seismic imaging method to detect such objects; it uses the first-arrival (guided) wave, scattered by shallow heterogeneities and converted into scattered Rayleigh waves. These guided waves and Rayleigh waves are dominant in the shallow weathered layer and therefore might be suitable for shallow object imaging. We applied this method to a field data set and found that we could certainly image meter-size objects up to about 3 m off to the side of a survey line consisting of vertical geophones. There are indications that cross-line horizontal geophone data could be used to identify shallow objects up to 10 m offline in the same region.

  20. Green Channel Guiding Denoising on Bayer Image

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Maojun

    2014-01-01

    Denoising is an indispensable function for digital cameras. In respect that noise is diffused during the demosaicking, the denoising ought to work directly on bayer data. The difficulty of denoising on bayer image is the interlaced mosaic pattern of red, green, and blue. Guided filter is a novel time efficient explicit filter kernel which can incorporate additional information from the guidance image, but it is still not applied for bayer image. In this work, we observe that the green channel of bayer mode is higher in both sampling rate and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) than the red and blue ones. Therefore the green channel can be used to guide denoising. This kind of guidance integrates the different color channels together. Experiments on both actual and simulated bayer images indicate that green channel acts well as the guidance signal, and the proposed method is competitive with other popular filter kernel denoising methods. PMID:24741370

  1. Transverse mode imaging of guided matter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dall, R. G.; Hodgman, S. S.; Johnsson, M. T.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2010-01-15

    Ultracold atoms whose de Broglie wavelength is of the same order as an extended confining potential can experience waveguiding along the potential. When the transverse kinetic energy of the atoms is sufficiently low, they can be guided in the lowest order mode of the confining potential by analogy with light guided by a single mode optical fiber. We have obtained the first images of the transverse mode structure of guided matter waves in a confining potential with up to 65% of atoms in the lowest order mode. The coherence of the guided atomic de Broglie waves is demonstrated by the diffraction pattern produced when incident upon a two dimensional periodic structure. Such coherent waveguides will be important atom optic components in devices with applications such as atom holography and atom interferometry.

  2. Innovation in image-guided spine intervention.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kieran J

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided spine intervention continues to evolve and is still an intellectually active field. But it is important not to confuse market and commercial success with intellectual, medical, or long-term success. What drives this evolution and innovation, and where is the activity currently? The history of vertebroplasty is a good case in point. PMID:21500137

  3. An Imaging Study of a Complex Solar Coronal Radio Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Song, H. Q.; Wang, B.; Kong, X. L.

    2016-08-01

    Solar coronal radio bursts are enhanced radio emission excited by energetic electrons accelerated during solar eruptions. Studying these bursts is important for investigating the origin and physical mechanism of energetic particles and further diagnosing coronal parameters. Earlier studies suffered from a lack of simultaneous high-quality imaging data of the radio burst and the eruptive structure in the inner corona. Here we present a study on a complex solar radio eruption consisting of a type II burst and three reversely drifting type III bursts, using simultaneous EUV and radio imaging data. It is found that the type II burst is closely associated with a propagating and evolving CME-driven EUV shock structure, originated initially at the northern shock flank and later transferred to the top part of the shock. This source transfer is coincident with the presence of shock decay and enhancing signatures observed at the corresponding side of the EUV front. The electron energy accelerated by the shock at the flank is estimated to be ˜0.3 c by examining the imaging data of the fast-drifting herringbone structure of the type II burst. The reverse-drifting type III sources are found to be within the ejecta and correlated with a likely reconnection event therein. The implications for further observational studies and relevant space weather forecasting techniques are discussed.

  4. The Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Kasper, Justin; Alibay, Farah; Belov, Konstantin

    2016-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are able to accelerate particles at their shock fronts, as evidenced by the radio emissions that they generate. However, many aspects of this particle acceleration remain poorly constrained, including the location or locations of the sites of particle acceleration and the evolution of the particle acceleration as the CME moves out into the heliosphere. Ground-based radio telescopes are able to image CMEs and locate the particle acceleration sites during the early stages of a CME, but they are limited to tracking CMEs to only a few solar radii before the frequencies of radio emission drop below the Earth's ionospheric cutoff. Triangulation between the STEREO/SWAVES and Wind/WAVES instruments have provided some initial constraints on particle acceleration sites at larger distances (lower frequencies), but the uncertainties remain considerable. We describe the Sun Radio Imaging Space Experiment (SunRISE) mission concept. A constellation of small spacecraft, with each spacecraft carrying a radio receiving system for observations below 30 MHz, SunRISE will produce the first images of CMEs more than a few solar radii from the Sun. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. An Imaging Study of a Complex Solar Coronal Radio Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Song, H. Q.; Wang, B.; Kong, X. L.

    2016-08-01

    Solar coronal radio bursts are enhanced radio emission excited by energetic electrons accelerated during solar eruptions. Studying these bursts is important for investigating the origin and physical mechanism of energetic particles and further diagnosing coronal parameters. Earlier studies suffered from a lack of simultaneous high-quality imaging data of the radio burst and the eruptive structure in the inner corona. Here we present a study on a complex solar radio eruption consisting of a type II burst and three reversely drifting type III bursts, using simultaneous EUV and radio imaging data. It is found that the type II burst is closely associated with a propagating and evolving CME-driven EUV shock structure, originated initially at the northern shock flank and later transferred to the top part of the shock. This source transfer is coincident with the presence of shock decay and enhancing signatures observed at the corresponding side of the EUV front. The electron energy accelerated by the shock at the flank is estimated to be ∼0.3 c by examining the imaging data of the fast-drifting herringbone structure of the type II burst. The reverse-drifting type III sources are found to be within the ejecta and correlated with a likely reconnection event therein. The implications for further observational studies and relevant space weather forecasting techniques are discussed.

  6. RESOLVE: A new algorithm for aperture synthesis imaging of extended emission in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junklewitz, H.; Bell, M. R.; Selig, M.; Enßlin, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present resolve, a new algorithm for radio aperture synthesis imaging of extended and diffuse emission in total intensity. The algorithm is derived using Bayesian statistical inference techniques, estimating the surface brightness in the sky assuming a priori log-normal statistics. resolve estimates the measured sky brightness in total intensity, and the spatial correlation structure in the sky, which is used to guide the algorithm to an optimal reconstruction of extended and diffuse sources. During this process, the algorithm succeeds in deconvolving the effects of the radio interferometric point spread function. Additionally, resolve provides a map with an uncertainty estimate of the reconstructed surface brightness. Furthermore, with resolve we introduce a new, optimal visibility weighting scheme that can be viewed as an extension to robust weighting. In tests using simulated observations, the algorithm shows improved performance against two standard imaging approaches for extended sources, Multiscale-CLEAN and the Maximum Entropy Method.

  7. Imprints of Molecular Clouds in Radio Continuum Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.

    2012-11-01

    We show radio continuum images of several molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy and report the presence of dark features that coincide with dense molecular clouds. Unlike infrared dark clouds, these features which we call "radio dark clouds" are produced by a deficiency in radio continuum emission from molecular clouds that are embedded in a bath of UV radiation field or synchrotron emitting cosmic-ray particles. The contribution of the continuum emission along different path lengths results in dark features that trace embedded molecular clouds. The new technique of identifying cold clouds can place constraints on the depth and the magnetic field of molecular clouds when compared to those of the surrounding hot plasma radiating at radio wavelengths. The study of five molecular complexes in the inner Galaxy, Sgr A, Sgr B2, radio Arc, the Snake filament, and G359.75-0.13 demonstrates an anti-correlation between the distributions of radio continuum and molecular line and dust emission. Radio dark clouds are identified in Green Bank Telescope maps and Very Large Array images taken with uniform sampling of uv coverage. The level at which the continuum flux is suppressed in these sources suggests that the depth of the molecular cloud is similar to the size of the continuum emission within a factor of two. These examples suggest that high-resolution, high-dynamic-range continuum images can be powerful probes of interacting molecular clouds with massive stars and supernova remnants in regions where the kinematic distance estimates are ambiguous as well as in the nuclei of active galaxies.

  8. Image-guided radiation therapy: Physician's perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, T.; Narayan, C. Anand

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of radiotherapy has been ontogenetically linked to medical imaging. Over the years, major technological innovations have resulted in substantial improvements in radiotherapy planning, delivery, and verification. The increasing use of computed tomography imaging for target volume delineation coupled with availability of computer-controlled treatment planning and delivery systems have progressively led to conformation of radiation dose to the target tissues while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Recent advances in imaging technology coupled with improved treatment delivery allow near-simultaneous soft-tissue localization of tumor and repositioning of patient. The integration of various imaging modalities within the treatment room for guiding radiation delivery has vastly improved the management of geometric uncertainties in contemporary radiotherapy practice ushering in the paradigm of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Image-guidance should be considered a necessary and natural corollary to high-precision radiotherapy that was long overdue. Image-guided radiation therapy not only provides accurate information on patient and tumor position on a quantitative scale, it also gives an opportunity to verify consistency of planned and actual treatment geometry including adaptation to daily variations resulting in improved dose delivery. The two main concerns with IGRT are resource-intensive nature of delivery and increasing dose from additional imaging. However, increasing the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery through IGRT is likely to reduce toxicity with potential for dose escalation and improved tumor control resulting in favourable therapeutic index. The radiation oncology community needs to leverage this technology to generate high-quality evidence to support widespread adoption of IGRT in contemporary radiotherapy practice. PMID:23293448

  9. The Golden Age of Radio and Television Programming: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Eleanor S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes reference works that are devoted to the content, background, criticism, history, and scheduling of U.S. television and radio programs from the beginnings of broadcasting through 1960. Works are divided into six categories: general encyclopedias, specific genres, chronology, catalogs and archives, criticism, and "TV Guide." (42…

  10. Alignments of radio galaxies in deep radio imaging of ELAIS N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. R.; Jagannathan, P.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the distribution of radio jet position angles of radio galaxies over an area of 1 square degree in the ELAIS N1 field. ELAIS N1 was observed with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 612 MHz to an rms noise level of 10 μJy and angular resolution of 6 arcsec × 5 arcsec. The image contains 65 resolved radio galaxy jets. The spatial distribution reveals a prominent alignment of jet position angles along a `filament' of about 1°. We examine the possibility that the apparent alignment arises from an underlying random distribution and find that the probability of chance alignment is less than 0.1 per cent. An angular covariance analysis of the data indicates the presence of spatially coherence in position angles on scales >0 .^{circ}5. This angular scales translates to a comoving scale of >20 Mpc at a redshift of 1. The implied alignment of the spin axes of massive black holes that give rise to the radio jets suggest the presence of large-scale spatial coherence in angular momentum. Our results reinforce prior evidence for large-scale spatial alignments of quasar optical polarization position angles.

  11. Astronomers Make First Images With Space Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    Marking an important new milestone in radio astronomy history, scientists at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, have made the first images using a radio telescope antenna in space. The images, more than a million times more detailed than those produced by the human eye, used the new Japanese HALCA satellite, working in conjunction with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and Very Large Array (VLA) ground-based radio telescopes. The landmark images are the result of a long-term NRAO effort supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). "This success means that our ability to make detailed radio images of objects in the universe is no longer limited by the size of the Earth," said NRAO Director Paul Vanden Bout. "Astronomy's vision has just become much sharper." HALCA, launched on Feb. 11 by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), is the first satellite designed for radio astronomy imaging. It is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by NRAO; Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. On May 22, HALCA observed a distant active galaxy called PKS 1519-273, while the VLBA and VLA also observed it. Data from the satellite was received by a tracking station at the NRAO facility in Green Bank, West Virginia. Tape-recorded data from the satellite and from the radio telescopes on the ground were sent to NRAO's Array Operations Center (AOC) in Socorro, NM. In Socorro, astronomers and computer scientists used a special-purpose computer to digitally combine the signals from the satellite and the ground telescopes to make them all work together as a single, giant radio telescope. This dedicated machine, the VLBA Correlator, built as

  12. Imaging Interplanetary CMEs at Radio Frequency From Solar Polar Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ji; Sun, Weiying; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Chi; Wang, C. B.; Wang, S.

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are violent discharges of plasma and magnetic fields from the Sun's corona. They have come to be recognized as the major driver of physical conditions in the Sun-Earth system. Consequently, the detection of CMEs is important for un-derstanding and ultimately predicting space weather conditions. The Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) is a proposed mission to observe the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from solar polar orbit. The main payload (radio telescope) on board SPORT will be an in-terferometric imaging radiometer working at the meter wavelength band, which will follow the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from a distance of a few solar radii to near 1 AU from solar polar orbit. The SPORT spacecraft will also be equipped with a set of optical and in situ measurement instruments such as a EUV solar telescope, a solar wind plasma experiment, a solar wind ion composition instrument, an energetic particle detector, a wave detector, a mag-netometer and an interplanetary radio burst tracker. In this paper, we first describe the current shortage of interplanetary CME observations. Next, the scientific motivation and objectives of SPORT are introduced. We discuss the basic specifications of the main radio telescope of SPORT with reference to the radio emission mechanisms and the radio frequency band to be observed. Finally, we discuss the key technologies of the SPORT mission, including the con-ceptual design of the main telescope, the image retrieval algorithm and the solar polar orbit injection. Other payloads and their respective observation objectives are also briefly discussed. Key words: Interplanetary CMEs; Interferometric imaging; Solar polar orbit; Radiometer.

  13. Guide to Citizen Action in Radio and TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prowitt, Marsha O'Bannon

    The Federal Communications Act of 1934 states that broadcast stations must operate "in the public interest, convenience, and necessity." Seeing that they do so is largely the responsibility of citizen groups. The purpose of this guide is to show how to counter broadcaster violations concerning extremist propaganda, commercials, personal attacks on…

  14. Image-guided positioning and tracking.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Dan; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy aims at maximizing tumor control while minimizing normal tissue complication. The introduction of stereotactic treatment explores the volume effect and achieves dose escalation to tumor target with small margins. The use of ablative irradiation dose and sharp dose gradients requires accurate tumor definition and alignment between patient and treatment geometry. Patient geometry variation during treatment may significantly compromise the conformality of delivered dose and must be managed properly. Setup error and interfraction/intrafraction motion are incorporated in the target definition process by expanding the clinical target volume to planning target volume, whereas the alignment between patient and treatment geometry is obtained with an adaptive control process, by taking immediate actions in response to closely monitored patient geometry. This article focuses on the monitoring and adaptive response aspect of the problem. The term "image" in "image guidance" will be used in a most general sense, to be inclusive of some important point-based monitoring systems that can be considered as degenerate cases of imaging. Image-guided motion adaptive control, as a comprehensive system, involves a hierarchy of decisions, each of which balances simplicity versus flexibility and accuracy versus robustness. Patient specifics and machine specifics at the treatment facility also need to be incorporated into the decision-making process. Identifying operation bottlenecks from a system perspective and making informed compromises are crucial in the proper selection of image-guidance modality, the motion management mechanism, and the respective operation modes. Not intended as an exhaustive exposition, this article focuses on discussing the major issues and development principles for image-guided motion management systems. We hope these information and methodologies will facilitate conscientious practitioners to adopt image-guided motion management systems

  15. Dirichlet Methods for Bayesian Source Detection in Radio Astronomy Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlander, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The sheer volume of data to be produced by the next generation of radio telescopes - exabytes of data on hundreds of millions of objects - makes automated methods for the detection of astronomical objects ("sources") essential. Of particular importance are low surface brightness objects, which are not well found by current automated methods. This thesis explores Bayesian methods for source detection that use Dirichlet or multinomial models for pixel intensity distributions in discretised radio astronomy images. A novel image discretisation method that incorporates uncertainty about how the image should be discretised is developed. Latent Dirichlet allocation - a method originally developed for inferring latent topics in document collections - is used to estimate source and background distributions in radio astronomy images. A new Dirichlet-multinomial ratio, indicating how well a region conforms to a well-specified model of background versus a loosely-specified model of foreground, is derived. Finally, latent Dirichlet allocation and the Dirichlet-multinomial ratio are combined for source detection in astronomical images. The methods developed in this thesis perform source detection well in comparison to two widely-used source detection packages and, importantly, find dim sources not well found by other algorithms.

  16. Endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs)

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventions are rapidly replacing invasive surgical procedures for the most prevalent human disease conditions. X-ray image-guided interventions carried out using the insertion and navigation of catheters through the vasculature are increasing in number and sophistication. In this article, we offer our vision for the future of this dynamic field of endovascular image-guided interventions in the form of predictions about (1) improvements in high-resolution detectors for more accurate guidance, (2) the implementation of high-resolution region of interest computed tomography for evaluation and planning, (3) the implementation of dose tracking systems to control patient radiation risk, (4) the development of increasingly sophisticated interventional devices, (5) the use of quantitative treatment planning with patient-specific computer fluid dynamic simulations, and (6) the new expanding role of the medical physicist. We discuss how we envision our predictions will come to fruition and result in the universal goal of improved patient care. PMID:18293585

  17. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:22941021

  18. Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, Ł; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

    2010-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields. PMID:20360067

  19. Reliability-guided digital image correlation for image deformation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Bing

    2009-03-10

    A universally applicable reliability-guided digital image correlation (DIC) method is proposed for reliable image deformation measurement. The zero-mean normalized cross correlation (ZNCC) coefficient is used to identify the reliability of the point computed. The correlation calculation begins with a seed point and is then guided by the ZNCC coefficient. That means the neighbors of the point with the highest ZNCC coefficient in a queue for computed points will be processed first. Thus the calculation path is always along the most reliable direction, and possible error propagation of the conventional DIC method can be avoided. The proposed novel DIC method is universally applicable to the images with shadows, discontinuous areas, and deformation discontinuity. Two image pairs were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique, and the successful results clearly demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness.

  20. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-03-01

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  1. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  2. Jet Directions in Seyfert Galaxies: Radio Continuum Imaging Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, H. R.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Antonucci, R. R. J.; Kinney, A. L.

    2001-02-01

    We present the results of VLA A-array 8.46 GHz continuum imaging of 55 Seyfert galaxies (19 Seyfert 1's and 36 Seyfert 2's). These galaxies are part of a larger sample of 88 Seyfert galaxies, selected from mostly isotropic properties, the flux at 60 μm, and warm infrared 25-60 μm colors. These images are used to study the structure of the radio continuum emission of these galaxies and their position angles, in the case of extended sources. These data, combined with information from broadband B and I observations, have been used to study the orientation of radio jets relative to the plane of their host galaxies (Kinney et al.).

  3. Simultaneous Radio and EUV Imaging of a Multi-lane Coronal Type II Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S. W.; Du, G. H.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Li, G.; Guo, F.

    2015-04-01

    A multi-lane solar type II radio burst was observed by several solar spectrographs on 16 February 2011. The event was also recorded by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) at several metric wavelengths, by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) onboard the Solar TErrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) in a number of EUV passbands. These multi-wavelength data provide a rare opportunity to reveal the emission source of the multiple type II lanes. Our study shows that all lanes are associated with a single EUV wave, presumably the radio-emitting shock. The EUV wave was driven by a coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an M1.6 flare and a filament eruption. With the NRH data and the three-dimensional (3D) bow-shock reconstruction that we built using the multi-viewpoint data of the EUV wave, we are able to deduce the 3D coordinates of the radio sources. We conclude that all the three type II lanes originated from the western flank of the shock, with two of them from closely adjacent locations on the southern part, the other one from a distinct location on the northern part. This case study demonstrates how the type II origin can be pinpointed by combining analyses of different data sets.

  4. Terrestrial Myriametric Radio Burst Observed by IMAGE and Geotail Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Hashimoto, Kozo; Boardsen, Scott A.; Garcia, Leonard N.; Green, James L.; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    2010-01-01

    We report IMAGE and Geotail simultaneous observations of a terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB) detected on August 19, 2001. The TMRB was confined in time (0830-1006 UT) and frequency (12-50 kHz), suggesting a fan beam-like emission pattern from a single discrete source. Analysis and comparisons with existing TMR radiations strongly suggest that the TMRB is a distinct emission perhaps resulting from dayside magnetic reconnection instigated by northward interplanetary field condition.

  5. First Radio Burst Imaging Observation From Mingantu Ultrawide Spectral Radioheliograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yihua; Chen, Linjie; Yu, Sijie; CSRH Team

    2015-08-01

    Radio imaging spectroscopy over wide range wavelength in dm/cm-bands will open new windows on solar flares and coronal mass ejections by tracing the radio emissions from accelerated electrons. The Chinese Spectral Radioheliograph (CSRH) with two arrays in 400MHz-2GHz /2-15GHz ranges with 64/532 frequency channels have been established in Mingantu Observing Station, Inner Mongolia of China, since 2013 and is in test observations now. CSRH is renamed as MUSER (Mingantu Ultrawide SpEctral Radioheliograph) after it's accomplishment We will introduce the progress and current status of CSRH. Some preliminary results of CSRH will be presented.On 11 Nov2014, the first burst event was registered by MUSER-I array at 400MHz-2GHz waveband. According to SGD event list there was a C-class flare peaked at 04:49UT in the disk center and the radio bursts around 04:22-04:24UT was attributed to this flare. However, MUSER-I image observation of the burst indicates that the radio burst peaked around 04:22UT was due to the eruption at the east limb of the Sun and connected to a CME appeared in that direction about 1 hour later. This demonstrate the importance of the spectroscopy observation of the solar radio burst.Acknowledgement: The CSRH team includes Wei Wang, Zhijun Chen, Fei Liu, Lihong Geng and Jian Zhang and CSRH project is supported by National Major Scientific Equipment R&D Project ZDYZ2009-3. The research was also supported by NSFC grants (11433006, 11221063), MOST grant (MOST2011CB811401), CAS Pilot-B Project (XDB09000000) and Marie Curie PIRSES- GA-295272-RADIOSUN.

  6. Radio Imaging Observations of Solar Activity Cycle and Its Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2011-12-01

    The 24th solar activity cycle has started and relative sunspot numbers are increasing. However, their rate of increase is rather slow compared to previous cycles. Active region sizes are small, lifetime is short, and big (X-class) flares are rare so far. We study this anomalous situation using data from Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). Radio imaging observations have been done by NoRH since 1992. Nearly 20 years of daily radio images of the Sun at 17 GHz are used to synthesize a radio butterfly diagram. Due to stable operation of the instrument and a robust calibration method, uniform datasets are available covering the whole period of observation. The radio butterfly diagram shows bright features corresponding to active region belts and their migration toward low latitude as the solar cycle progresses. In the present solar activity cycle (24), increase of radio brightness is delayed and slow. There are also bright features around both poles (polar brightening). Their brightness show solar cycle dependence but peaks around solar minimum. Comparison between the last minimum and the previous one shows decrease of its brightness. This corresponds to weakening of polar magnetic field activity between them. In the northern pole, polar brightening is already weakened in 2011, which means it is close to solar maximum in the northern hemisphere. Southern pole does not show such feature yet. Slow rise of activity in active region belt, weakening of polar activity during the minimum, and large north-south asymmetry in polar activity imply that global solar activity and its synchronization are weakening.

  7. A hitchhiker's guide to diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Soares, José M; Marques, Paulo; Alves, Victor; Sousa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) studies are increasingly popular among clinicians and researchers as they provide unique insights into brain network connectivity. However, in order to optimize the use of DTI, several technical and methodological aspects must be factored in. These include decisions on: acquisition protocol, artifact handling, data quality control, reconstruction algorithm, and visualization approaches, and quantitative analysis methodology. Furthermore, the researcher and/or clinician also needs to take into account and decide on the most suited software tool(s) for each stage of the DTI analysis pipeline. Herein, we provide a straightforward hitchhiker's guide, covering all of the workflow's major stages. Ultimately, this guide will help newcomers navigate the most critical roadblocks in the analysis and further encourage the use of DTI. PMID:23486659

  8. A hitchhiker's guide to diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Soares, José M.; Marques, Paulo; Alves, Victor; Sousa, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) studies are increasingly popular among clinicians and researchers as they provide unique insights into brain network connectivity. However, in order to optimize the use of DTI, several technical and methodological aspects must be factored in. These include decisions on: acquisition protocol, artifact handling, data quality control, reconstruction algorithm, and visualization approaches, and quantitative analysis methodology. Furthermore, the researcher and/or clinician also needs to take into account and decide on the most suited software tool(s) for each stage of the DTI analysis pipeline. Herein, we provide a straightforward hitchhiker's guide, covering all of the workflow's major stages. Ultimately, this guide will help newcomers navigate the most critical roadblocks in the analysis and further encourage the use of DTI. PMID:23486659

  9. Low frequency radio synthesis imaging of the galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Michael Evans

    2005-11-01

    The Very Large Array radio interferometer has been equipped with new receivers to allow observations at 330 and 74 MHz, frequencies much lower than were previously possible with this instrument. Though the VLA dishes are not optimal for working at these frequencies, the system is successful and regular observations are now taken at these frequencies. However, new data analysis techniques are required to work at these frequencies. The technique of self- calibration, used to remove small atmospheric effects at higher frequencies, has been adapted to compensate for ionospheric turbulence in much the same way that adaptive optics is used in the optical regime. Faceted imaging techniques are required to compensate for the noncoplanar image distortion that affects the system due to the wide fields of view at these frequencies (~2.3° at 330 MHz and ~11° at 74 MHz). Furthermore, radio frequency interference is a much larger problem at these frequencies than in higher frequencies and novel approaches to its mitigation are required. These new techniques and new system are allowing for imaging of the radio sky at sensitivities and resolutions orders of magnitude higher than were possible with the low frequency systems of decades past. In this work I discuss the advancements in low frequency data techniques required to make high resolution, high sensitivity, large field of view measurements with the new Very Large Array low frequency system and then detail the results of turning this new system and techniques on the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. At 330 MHz I image the Galactic center region with roughly 10 inches resolution and 1.6 mJy beam -1 sensitivity. New Galactic center nonthermal filaments, new pulsar candidates, and the lowest frequency detection to date of the radio source associated with our Galaxy's central massive black hole result. At 74 MHz I image a region of the sky roughly 40° x 6° with, ~10 feet resolution. I use the high opacity of H II regions at 74

  10. Image guided versus palpation guided core needle biopsy of palpable breast masses: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Smriti; Kumari, Swati; Srivastava, Anurag; Thulkar, Sanjay; Mathur, Sandeep; Veedu, Prasad Thotton

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Biopsy of palpable breast masses can be performed manually by palpation guidance or under imaging guidance. Based on retrospective studies, image guided biopsy is considered more accurate than palpation guided breast biopsy; however, these techniques have not been compared prospectively. We conducted this prospective study to verify the superiority and determine the size of beneficial effect of image guided biopsy over palpation guided biopsy. Methods: Over a period of 18 months, 36 patients each with palpable breast masses were randomized into palpation guided and image guided breast biopsy arms. Ultrasound was used for image guidance in 33 patients and mammographic (stereotactic) guidance in three patients. All biopsies were performed using 14 gauge automated core biopsy needles. Inconclusive, suspicious or imaging-histologic discordant biopsies were repeated. Results: Malignancy was found in 30 of 36 women in palpation guided biopsy arm and 27 of 36 women in image guided biopsy arm. Palpation guided biopsy had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 46.7, 100, 100, 27.3 per cent, respectively, for diagnosing breast cancer. Nineteen of 36 women (52.8%) required repeat biopsy because of inadequate samples (7 of 19), suspicious findings (2 of 19) or imaging-histologic discordance (10 of 19). On repeat biopsy, malignancy was found in all cases of imaging-histologic discordance. Image guided biopsy had 96.3 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity. There was no case of inadequate sample or imaging-histologic discordance with image guided biopsy. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in palpable breast masses, image guided biopsy was superior to palpation guided biopsy in terms of sensitivity, false negative rate and repeat biopsy rates. PMID:27488003

  11. Radio, Television, and Film in the Secondary School, MSA Curriculum Guide 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Deldee M., Ed.; Ratliffe, Sharon A., Ed.

    This eight-unit volume of the Michigan Speech Association curriculum guide is designed for use by instructors who teach a one semester course in radio, television, and/or film. It can also be used by those who teach a media unit within an English or speech class. The subject of the first unit is media analysis and evaluation. The second unit is an…

  12. Stereofluoroscopic image-guided robotic biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Minyan; Liu, Hong; Tao, Gang; Fajardo, Laurie L.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the key techniques of a stereo- fluoroscopic image-guided robotic biopsy system: 3D position reconstruction, 3D path planning, path registration and robot trajectory control with safety considerations. This system automatically adjusts the needle inserting path according to a real-time 3D position error feedback. This system is particularly applicable to the soft tissue and organ biopsy, with advantages of increased accuracy, short completion time and minimum invasiveness to the patient. Simulation shows the safety and accuracy of this robotic biopsy system.

  13. Direction Dependent Effects In Widefield Wideband Full Stokes Radio Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Preshanth; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Rau, Urvashi; Taylor, Russ

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis imaging in radio astronomy is affected by instrumental and atmospheric effects which introduce direction dependent gains.The antenna power pattern varies both as a function of time and frequency. The broad band time varying nature of the antenna power pattern when not corrected leads to gross errors in full stokes imaging and flux estimation. In this poster we explore the errors that arise in image deconvolution while not accounting for the time and frequency dependence of the antenna power pattern. Simulations were conducted with the wideband full stokes power pattern of the Very Large Array(VLA) antennas to demonstrate the level of errors arising from direction-dependent gains. Our estimate is that these errors will be significant in wide-band full-pol mosaic imaging as well and algorithms to correct these errors will be crucial for many up-coming large area surveys (e.g. VLASS)

  14. Simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique based on guided image filtering.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dongjiang; Qu, Gangrong; Liu, Baodong

    2016-07-11

    The challenge of computed tomography is to reconstruct high-quality images from few-view projections. Using a prior guidance image, guided image filtering smoothes images while preserving edge features. The prior guidance image can be incorporated into the image reconstruction process to improve image quality. We propose a new simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique based on guided image filtering. Specifically, the prior guidance image is updated in the image reconstruction process, merging information iteratively. To validate the algorithm practicality and efficiency, experiments were performed with numerical phantom projection data and real projection data. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and efficient for nondestructive testing and rock mechanics. PMID:27410859

  15. A solar type II radio burst from coronal mass ejection-coronal ray interaction: Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Feng, Shiwei; Kong, Xiangliang; Wang, Bing; Feng, Li; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2014-05-20

    Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white-light imaging data are examined for a solar type II radio burst occurring on 2010 March 18 to deduce its source location. Using a bow-shock model, we reconstruct the three-dimensional EUV wave front (presumably the type-II-emitting shock) based on the imaging data of the two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft. It is then combined with the Nançay radio imaging data to infer the three-dimensional position of the type II source. It is found that the type II source coincides with the interface between the coronal mass ejection (CME) EUV wave front and a nearby coronal ray structure, providing evidence that the type II emission is physically related to the CME-ray interaction. This result, consistent with those of previous studies, is based on simultaneous radio and EUV imaging data for the first time.

  16. Clues to (Radio) Galaxy Formation from Deep HST Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.

    We review recent clues from deep HST images on the formation and evolution of galaxies, and of μJy and mJy radio sources in particular. Constraints from the radio source counts over 7 dex in flux and 1 dex in frequency are discussed. We review recent results from deep HST primary and parallel surveys relevant to (radio) galaxy formation. The WFPC2 galaxy counts as a function of morphological type for B < ~ 27 mag show that E/S0's and Sabc's are only marginally above the non-evolving predictions. The faint blue galaxy counts are dominated by Sd/Irr's, and are explained by a combination of a moderately steep local luminosity function undergoing strong luminosity evolution plus low-luminosity lower-redshift dwarf galaxies. Deep WFPC2 images in the medium-band filter F410M yielded 18 faint, compact Lyα emitting candidates at z ≃ 2.4 surrounding the radio galaxy 53W002 at z𢐲.390, as well as 18 more z ≃ 2.4 candidates in three random parallel fields. These objects appear to be star-forming spheroids smaller (rhl ≍ 0''.1 or 0.5-1 kpc) and fainter (MV (z=0)=-17--> -21) than the bulges of typical galaxies seen today. They may the building blocks from which many of the luminous nearby galaxies were formed through repeated hierarchical mergers. HST/PC images in BV I - as well as in redshifted Lyα - of 53W002 show several morphological components: (1) a blue AGN with < ~ 20-25% of the total continuum light; (2) an r1/4-like light distribution with colors indicating a stellar population age ~0.4 Gyr; and (3) two small blue clouds roughly aligned with the radio axis and the main stellar population. We show that both reflected AGN light and jet-induced starformation likely play a role in explaining its "alignment effect". We discuss a possible formation and evolution scenario of 53W002 in context of its surrounding sub-galactic objects, and argue that it will end up like a giant elliptical today.

  17. An EW technology research of jamming IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiu-qin; Rong, Hua; Liang, Jing-ping; Chen, Qi; Chen, Min-rong

    2009-07-01

    The IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons have been playing an important role in the modern warfare by means of select attacking the vital parts of targets with the features of highly secret attacking, high precision, and excellent anti-jamming capability ,therefore, they are viewed to be one of the promising precisely guided weapons ,receiving great concern through out the world. This paper discusses the characteristics of IR-Imaging guidance systems at the highlight of making a study of correlated technologies of jamming IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons on the basis of elaborating the operational principles of IR-Imaging-guided Weapons.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Kress, Bodo; Fiebach, Jochen; Rieker, Marcus; Spitzenberg, Doreen; Marmulla, Rüdiger; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2006-03-01

    Image guided implantology using navigation systems is more accurate than manual dental implant insertion. The underlying image data are usually derived from computer tomography. The suitability of MR imaging for dental implant planning is a marginal issue so far. MRI data from cadaver heads were acquired using various MRI sequences. The data were assessed for the quality of anatomical imaging, geometric accuracy and susceptibility to dental metal artefacts. For dental implant planning, 3D models of the jaws were created. A software system for segmentation of the mandible and maxilla MRI data was implemented using c++, mitk, and qt. With the VIBE_15 sequence, image data with high geometric accuracy were acquired. Dental metal artefacts were lower than in CT data of the same heads. The segmentation of the jaws was feasible, in contrast to the segmentation of the dentition, since there is a lack of contrast to the intraoral soft tissue structures. MRI is a suitable method for imaging of the region of mouth and jaws. The geometric accuracy is excellent and the susceptibility to artefacts is low. However, there are yet two limitations: Firstly, the imaging of the dentition needs further improvement to allow accurate segmentation of these regions. Secondly, the sequence used in this study takes several minutes and hence is susceptible to motion artefacts.

  19. Imaging Radio Photospheres with the Jansky Very Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, L. D.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2015-08-01

    Using the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), we have imaged the radio photosphere of the long-period variable star W Hya at 45 GHz (˜ 7 mm) with a resolution of ˜ 40 mas. Our data reveal a non-spherical photospheric shape, consistent with earlier measurements. We also find evidence for an elongation along PA ≍ -5°, the orientation of which is consistent with the previously measured projected magnetic field direction and an extension in the 18 μm dust emission, both at larger scales.

  20. Definition imaging of an orebody with the radio imaging method (RIM)

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarczyk, L.G. )

    1992-10-01

    Waste rock dilution is an economic concern in the planning and design of mining methods for mineralized ore zones. Diamond core drilling and mineralogical examination of core are routinely used to determine the general shape of the ore body. Drilling on closer centers enhances the definition of the mineralization and oregrade across the orebody. In a practical sense, drilling time and cost limit definition. Crosshole scanning between drillholes with the radio imaging method (RIM) has been used to map changes in mineralization in the rock mass. The magnitude and phase of the RIM radio wave depend on the electrical conductivity of the rock mass. The conductivity strongly depends on the percent mineralization. Since the attenuation rate and phase constants of the radio wave are proportional to the one half power of conductivity, the measured crosshole radio wave data can be processed in a tomography algorithm to reconstruct images (map the change in conductivity (mineralization)). The tomography image enhances definition in the orebody while reducing the number of drillholes. This paper compares reconstructed images of the radio wave propagation constants to percent mineralization in the ore body.

  1. Overview of image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Lei . E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Li, T.-F.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Luxton, Gary; Koong, Albert

    2006-07-01

    Radiation therapy has gone through a series of revolutions in the last few decades and it is now possible to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution by using techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The improved dose conformity and steep dose gradients have necessitated enhanced patient localization and beam targeting techniques for radiotherapy treatments. Components affecting the reproducibility of target position during and between subsequent fractions of radiation therapy include the displacement of internal organs between fractions and internal organ motion within a fraction. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) uses advanced imaging technology to better define the tumor target and is the key to reducing and ultimately eliminating the uncertainties. The purpose of this article is to summarize recent advancements in IGRT and discussed various practical issues related to the implementation of the new imaging techniques available to radiation oncology community. We introduce various new IGRT concepts and approaches, and hope to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of the emerging clinical IGRT technologies. Some important research topics will also be addressed.

  2. Interactive image-guided hepatic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansic, James D.; Herline, Alan J.; Bass, W. Andrew; Chapman, William C.; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    1999-05-01

    While laparoscopes are used for numerous minimally invasive procedures, minimally invasive liver resection and ablation occur infrequently. the paucity of cases is due to limited field of view and difficulty in determination of tumor location and margins under video guidance. By merging minimally invasive surgery with interactive, image-guided surgery, we hope to make laparoscopic liver procedures feasible. In previous work, we described methods for tracking an endoscope accurately in patient space and registration between endoscopic image space and physical space using the direct linear transformation (DLT). We have now developed a PC-based software system to display up to four 512 Χ 512 images indicating current surgical position using an active optical tracking system. We have used this system in several open liver cases and believe that a surface-based registration technique can be used to register physical space to tomographic space after liver mobilization. For preliminary phantom liver studies, our registration error is approximately 2.0mm. The surface-based registration technique will allow better localization of non-visible liver tumors, more accurate probe placement for ablation procedures, and more accurate margin determination for open surgical liver cases. The surface-based registration technique will allow better localization of non-visible liver tumors, more accurate probe placement for ablation procedures, and more accurate margin determination for open surgical liver cases. The surface-based/DLT registration methods, in combination with the video display and tracked endoscope, will hopefully make laparoscopic liver cryoablation and resection procedures feasible.

  3. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency. PMID:25479095

  4. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency.

  5. Ionospheric imaging using merged ultraviolet airglow and radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Andrew W.; Budzien, Scott A.; Finn, Susanna C.; Cook, Timothy A.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Powell, Steven P.; Psiaki, Mark L.

    2014-09-01

    The Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) and GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry-Colocated (GROUP-C) experiments are being considered for flight aboard the Space Test Program Houston 5 (STP-H5) experiment pallet to the International Space Station (ISS). LITES is a compact imaging spectrograph that makes one-dimensional images of atmospheric and ionospheric ultraviolet (60-140 nm) airglow above the limb of the Earth. The LITES optical design is advantageous in that it uses a toroidal grating as its lone optical surface to create these high-sensitivity images without the need for any moving parts. GROUP-C consists of two instruments: a nadir-viewing ultraviolet photometer that measures nighttime ionospheric airglow at 135.6 nm with unprecedented sensitivity, and a GPS receiver that measures ionospheric electron content and scintillation with the assistance of a novel antenna array designed for multipath mitigation. By flying together, these two experiments form an ionospheric observatory aboard the ISS that will provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. This paper presents the design and implementation of the LITES and GROUP-C experiments on the STP-H5 payload that will combine for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry with vertical spectrographic imagery of ionospheric airglow to create high-fidelity images of ionospheric structures. The addition of the GPS radio occultation measurement provides the unique opportunity to constrain, as well as cross-validate, the merged airglow measurements.

  6. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Koch, Guillaume; Caudrelier, Jean; Garnon, Julien; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Edalat, Faramarz; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option. PMID:27329231

  7. Three-year financial analysis of minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Julie R; Yandell, David W; Bumpous, Jeffrey M; Fleming, Muffin M; Flynn, Michael B

    2004-12-01

    Minimally invasive radio-guided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) has had a high success rate in correcting hypercalcemia, along with a low morbidity rate and high patient satisfaction. Our study was conducted in an attempt to analyze the cost-effectiveness of MIRP in patients treated for primary hyperparathyroidism. We conducted a retrospective study of the total charges of three groups of patients undergoing surgery for previously untreated hyperparathyroidism in a single health care system. The three study groups included patients undergoing traditional bilateral neck exploration, MIRP, and neck exploration guided by intraoperative parathormone (PTH) assay. Charges were stratified into preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative categories. The average total charge was $8,512 for MIRP, $12,723 for traditional neck exploration, and $13,011 for bilateral neck exploration with PTH assay. The decreased charge for MIRP was due to reduced operating room time, anesthesia costs, length of hospitalization, and an avoidance of the use of intraoperative tissue analysis and PTH assay. There was a greater than $4,000 savings with MIRP as compared with the more extensive neck exploration. These savings more than compensate for the cost of technology (preoperative sestamibi scan and intraoperative gamma probe) necessary to perform radio-guided parathyroidectomy. PMID:15663056

  8. An innovative radio-guided surgery technique for complete resection of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russomando, A.; Collamati, F.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Senzacqua, M.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Voena, C.

    2014-12-01

    Finding new ways to fight cancer is essential to increase the patients life expectancy. This paper reports the latest results of the project CHIRONE finalized to increase the potential of the Radio Guided Surgery through the use of β- emitting radio-tracers and β- probes. This innovation could overcome the present main limiting factor represented by a diffuse background due to the high penetration power of the gamma radiation used. We created a prototype of β- probe and in this paper we report measures of photon efficiency, acquired with commercial photons sources. Then we estimated the signal and background rates in realistic cases of meningioma through a simulation. The device is able to detect residuals of 0.1 ml in 1 s with an administered activity less than 3 MBq/kg.

  9. Model images of radio halos around supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    I present model calculations of profiles and two-dimensional images of the radio synchrotron emission of young supernova remnants, concentrating on observable effects of relativistic eletrons diffusing upstream of the shock wave. If the preshock electron scattering mean free path is sufficiently long, observable synchrotron halos outside the bulk of the radio emission can potentially result; their absence can constrain the mean free path from above. If scattering is primarily due, as expected, to Alfven waves with amplitude detla(B), the halo is expected to extend a distance of order r(sub g)c(delta(B)/B)(exp 2)/v(sub s) beyond the shock, where r(sub g) is the gyroradius of the electrons emitting at the observed frequency, B is the upstream magnetic field strength, v(sub s) is the shock velocity, and the amplitude delta(B) refers to wave with wavelength comparable to r(sub g), of order 10(exp 13) cm for typical supernova-remnant parameters. However, the detailed geometry of the halo varies with the assumptions about particle acceleration in the shock wave. I present an atlas of model profiles and images as a function of preshock diffusion length, of aspect angle between the magnetic field and the line of sight, and of other relevant parameters.

  10. Image-guided therapy: evolution and breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Haigron, Pascal; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Beyond the advances made in computer-assisted interventions and robotic systems, the demand for more efficient and safer therapies remains challenging. Thus, if it is possible to improve the instrument tracking, steering, and target localization, to miniaturize the sensors and actuators, and to conduct preoperatively planned minimally invasive therapies, we still need new resources to achieve permanent destruction of abnormal tissues or suppression of pathological processes. Most of the physics-based (or energy-based) therapeutic principles at our disposal have been established a long time ago, but their actions on basic cellular and molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. They all have a wide spectrum of clinical targets in terms of organs and pathologies, modes of application (external, interstitial, intraluminal, etc.) with advantages and side-effect drawbacks, proven indications, and contraindications. Some of them may still face controversies regarding their outcomes. This short article, mainly focused on tumor destruction, briefly reviews in its first part some of these techniques and sketches the next generation under investigation. The former include radio frequency (RF), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HiFU), microwaves, and cryotherapy, of which all are temperature based. Laser-based approaches [e.g., photodynamic therapy (PDT) at large] are also discussed. Radiotherapy and its variants (hadrontherapy, brachytherapy, Gamma Knife, and CyberKnife) remain, of course, as the reference technique in cancer treatment. The next breakthroughs are examined in the second part of the article. They are based on the close association between imaging agents, drugs, and some stimulation techniques. The ongoing research efforts in that direction show that, if they are still far from clinical applications, strong expectations are made. From the point of view of interventional planning and image guidance, all of them share a lot of concerns. PMID:20176527

  11. Infrared imaging of MG 0414 + 0534 - The red gravitational lens systems as lensed radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, James; Luppino, Gerard A.

    1993-01-01

    We present an IR image of the gravitational lens system MG 0414 + 0534, and IR photometry of PG 1115 + 080, H1413 + 117, and Q1429 - 008. The IR of MG 0414 + 0534 shows a morphology that is similar to the radio and optical morphologies. The object is bright (K-prime = 13.7) and extremely red (I-K-prime = 5.7). MG 0414 + 0534 thus becomes the second radio-selected lens system to have very red optical IR colors. When plotted on a color-magnitude diagram of objects from a radio survey, MG 0414 + 0534 and the other very red system, MG 1131 + 0456, lie near the locus of radio galaxies. We therefore suggest that these systems are lensed high-redshift radio galaxies. In general, lensed radio galaxies should be common among lens systems selected from radio surveys, since a high proportion of radio sources are radio galaxies.

  12. Motion compensated SLAM for image guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness and clinical benefits of image guided surgery are well established for procedures where there is manageable tissue motion. In minimally invasive cardiac, gastrointestinal, or abdominal surgery, large scale tissue deformation prohibits accurate registration and fusion of pre- and intraoperative data. Vision based techniques such as structure from motion and simultaneous localization and mapping are capable of recovering 3D structure and laparoscope motion. Current research in the area generally assumes the environment is static, which is difficult to satisfy in most surgical procedures. In this paper, a novel framework for simultaneous online estimation of laparoscopic camera motion and tissue deformation in a dynamic environment is proposed. The method only relies on images captured by the laparoscope to sequentially and incrementally generate a dynamic 3D map of tissue motion that can be co-registered with pre-operative data. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated with both simulated and ex vivo data. The practical application of the technique is further demonstrated on in vivo procedures. PMID:20879352

  13. Deep HST imaging of distant weak radio and field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, R. A.; Gordon, J. M.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Schmidtke, P. C.; Keel, W. C.; Burkey, J. M.; Dunlop, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera (WFC) V- and I-band images of three distant weak radio galaxies with z = 0.311-2.390 and seven field galaxies with z = 0.131-0.58. The images were deconvolved with both the Lucy and multiresolution CLEAN methods, which yield a restoring Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of less than or equal to 0.2 sec, (nearly) preserve photons and signal-to-noise ratio at low spatial frequencies, and produce consistent light profiles down to our 2 sigma surface brightness sensitivity limit of V approximately 27.2 and I approximately 25.9 mag/sq arcsec. Multi-component image modeling was used to provide deconvolution-independent estimates of structural parameters for symmetric galaxies. We present 12-band (m(sub 2750) UBVRIgriJHK) photometry for a subset of the galaxies and bootstrap the unknown FOC/48 zero point at 2750 A in three independent ways (yielding m(sub 2750) = 21.34 +/- 0.09 mag for 1.0 e(-)/s). Two radio galaxies with z = 0.311 and 0.528, as well as one field galaxy with z = 0.58, have the colors and spectra of early-type galaxies, and a(exp 1/4)-like light profiles in the HST images. The two at z greater than 0.5 have little or no color gradients in V - I and are likely giant ellipticals, while the z = 0.311 radio galaxy has a dim exponential disk and is likely an S0. Six of the seven field galaxies have light profiles that indicate (small) inner bulges following a(exp 1/4) laws and outer exponential disks, both with little or no color gradients. These are (early-type) spiral galaxies with z = 0.131-0.528. About half have faint companions or bars. One shows lumpy structure, possibly a merger. The compact narrow-line galaxy 53W002 at z = 2.390 has less than or = 30% +/- 10% of its HST V and I flux in the central kiloparsec (due to its weak Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN)). Most of its light (V approximately equal to 23.3) occurs in a symmetric envelope with a regular a(exp 1/4)-like profile of effective

  14. Image transmission in tactical radio frequency shared network propagation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Kent H.; Wagner, Kerry A.; O'Hanian, Scott

    1997-06-01

    The need to transmit images across tactical radio frequency (rf) links has been identified in army digitization applications. For example, military doctrine requires that tactical functions like identification of battlefield entities as potential targets and battle damage assessment be performed by the soldier. Currently, a key input to these processes is imagery. Therefore, the quality and timeliness of the image directly impact tactical performance. The military is investigating the employment of remote sensors and advanced communications systems to meet this requirement as part of its digitization effort. Army communications systems exist that partially meet this requirement. However, many existing solutions employ these legacy systems in the context of a point-to-point communications architecture. Solutions to the problem of transmitting images across a rf network have not been fully explored. The term network implies that the rf transmission media is common to and shared by multiple subscribers. It is a suite of capabilities that collectively manage media access and information transfer for its subscribers thus providing substantial improvements in effectiveness, efficiency, and robustness. This paper discusses the challenges of transmitting images using one army legacy communications system in a tactical rf network, presents a conceptual framework for attacking the problem, and discusses one solution.

  15. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Radio and T.V. Repair. Course: Basic Radio Theory & Component Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter, B.; And Others

    One of four individualized courses included in a radio and television repair curriculum, this course focuses on diagnosing difficulties, making necessary adjustments, and removing and replacing components for a radio receiver. The course is comprised of seven units: (1) Introduction to Radio, (2) Crystal Detectors, (3) Regenerative Receivers, (4)…

  16. Applications of a travelling wave-based radio-frequency-only stacked ring ion guide.

    PubMed

    Giles, Kevin; Pringle, Steven D; Worthington, Kenneth R; Little, David; Wildgoose, Jason L; Bateman, Robert H

    2004-01-01

    The use of radio-frequency (RF)-only ion guides for efficient transport of ions through regions of a mass spectrometer where the background gas pressure is relatively high is widespread in present instrumentation. Whilst multiple collisions between ions and the background gas can be beneficial, for example in inducing fragmentation and/or decreasing the spread in ion energies, the resultant reduction of ion axial velocity can be detrimental in modes of operation where a rapidly changing influx of ions to the gas-filled ion guide needs to be reproduced at the exit. In general, the RF-only ion guides presently in use are based on multipole rod sets. Here we report investigations into a new mode of ion propulsion within an RF ion guide based on a stack of ring electrodes. Ion propulsion is produced by superimposing a voltage pulse on the confining RF of an electrode and then moving the pulse to an adjacent electrode and so on along the guide to provide a travelling voltage wave on which the ions can surf. Through appropriate choice of the travelling wave pulse height, velocity and gas pressure it will be shown that the stacked ring ion guide with the travelling wave is effective as a collision cell in a tandem mass spectrometer where fast mass scanning or switching is required, as an ion mobility separator at pressures around 0.2 mbar, as an ion delivery device for enhancement of duty cycle on an orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (oa-TOF) mass analyser, and as an ion fragmentation device at higher wave velocities. PMID:15386629

  17. Terrestrial Myriametric Radio Burst Observed by IMAGE and Geotail Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Hashimoto, KoZo; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Boardson, Scott A.; Garcia, Leonard N.; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Green, James L.; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    2013-01-01

    We report the simultaneous detection of a terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB) by IMAGE and Geotail on 19 August 2001. The TMRB was confined in time (0830-1006 UT) and frequency (12-50kHz). Comparisons with all known nonthermal myriametric radiation components reveal that the TMRB might be a distinct radiation with a source that is unrelated to the previously known radiation. Considerations of beaming from spin-modulation analysis and observing satellite and source locations suggest that the TMRB may have a fan beamlike radiation pattern emitted by a discrete, dayside source located along the poleward edge of magnetospheric cusp field lines. TMRB responsiveness to IMF Bz and By orientations suggests that a possible source of the TMRB could be due to dayside magnetic reconnection instigated by northward interplanetary field condition.

  18. A novel multiwavelength fluorescence image-guided surgery imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpi, D.; Tullis, I. D. C.; Laios, A.; Pathiraja, P. N. J.; Haldar, K.; Ahmed, A. A.; Vojnovic, B.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the development and performance analysis of two clinical near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) devices that aim to overcome some of the limitations of current FIGS systems. The devices operate in a widefield-imaging mode and can work (1) in conjunction with a laparoscope, during minimally invasive surgery, and (2) as a hand-held, open surgery imaging system. In both cases, narrow-band excitation light, delivered at multiple wavelengths, is efficiently combined with white reflectance light. Light is delivered to ~100 cm2 surgical field at 1-2 mW/cm2 for white light and 3-7 mW/cm2 (depending on wavelength) of red - near infrared excitation, at a typical working distance of 350 mm for the hand-held device and 100 mm for the laparoscope. A single, sensitive, miniaturized color camera collects both fluorescence and white reflectance light. The use of a single imager eliminates image alignment and software overlay complexity. A novel filtering and illumination arrangement allows simultaneous detection of white reflectance and fluorescence emission from multiple dyes in real-time. We will present both fluorescence detection sensitivity modeling and practical performance data. We have demonstrated the efficiency and the advantages of the devices both pre-clinically and during live surgery on humans. Both the hand-held and the laparoscopic systems have proved to be reliable and beneficial in an ongoing clinical trial involving sentinel lymph node detection in gynecological cancers. We will show preliminary results using two clinically approved dyes, Methylene blue and indocyanine green. We anticipate that this technology can be integrated and routinely used in a larger variety of surgical procedures.

  19. Discrete Method of Images for 3D Radio Propagation Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Discretization by rasterization is introduced into the method of images (MI) in the context of 3D deterministic radio propagation modeling as a way to exploit spatial coherence of electromagnetic propagation for fine-grained parallelism. Traditional algebraic treatment of bounding regions and surfaces is replaced by computer graphics rendering of 3D reflections and double refractions while building the image tree. The visibility of reception points and surfaces is also resolved by shader programs. The proposed rasterization is shown to be of comparable run time to that of the fundamentally parallel shooting and bouncing rays. The rasterization does not affect the signal evaluation backtracking step, thus preserving its advantage over the brute force ray-tracing methods in terms of accuracy. Moreover, the rendering resolution may be scaled back for a given level of scenario detail with only marginal impact on the image tree size. This allows selection of scene optimized execution parameters for faster execution, giving the method a competitive edge. The proposed variant of MI can be run on any GPU that supports real-time 3D graphics.

  20. Radio Synthesis Imaging - A High Performance Computing and Communications Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, Richard M.

    The National Science Foundation has funded a five-year High Performance Computing and Communications project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) for the direct implementation of several of the computing recommendations of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee (the "Bahcall report"). This paper is a summary of the project goals and a progress report. The project will implement a prototype of the next generation of astronomical telescope systems - remotely located telescopes connected by high-speed networks to very high performance, scalable architecture computers and on-line data archives, which are accessed by astronomers over Gbit/sec networks. Specifically, a data link has been installed between the BIMA millimeter-wave synthesis array at Hat Creek, California and NCSA at Urbana, Illinois for real-time transmission of data to NCSA. Data are automatically archived, and may be browsed and retrieved by astronomers using the NCSA Mosaic software. In addition, an on-line digital library of processed images will be established. BIMA data will be processed on a very high performance distributed computing system, with I/O, user interface, and most of the software system running on the NCSA Convex C3880 supercomputer or Silicon Graphics Onyx workstations connected by HiPPI to the high performance, massively parallel Thinking Machines Corporation CM-5. The very computationally intensive algorithms for calibration and imaging of radio synthesis array observations will be optimized for the CM-5 and new algorithms which utilize the massively parallel architecture will be developed. Code running simultaneously on the distributed computers will communicate using the Data Transport Mechanism developed by NCSA. The project will also use the BLANCA Gbit/s testbed network between Urbana and Madison, Wisconsin to connect an Onyx workstation in the University of Wisconsin Astronomy Department to the NCSA CM-5, for development of long

  1. Evaluation of Image-Guided Positioning for Frameless Intracranial Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lamba, Michael Breneman, John C.; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The standard for target alignment and immobilization in intracranial radiosurgery is frame-based alignment and rigid immobilization using a stereotactic head ring. Recent improvements in image-guidance systems have introduced the possibility of image-guided radiosurgery with nonrigid immobilization. We present data on the alignment accuracy and patient stability of a frameless image-guided system. Methods and Materials: Isocenter alignment errors were measured for in vitro studies in an anthropomorphic phantom for both frame-based stereotactic and frameless image-guided alignment. Subsequently, in vivo studies assessed differences between frame-based and image-guided alignment in patients who underwent frame-based intracranial radiosurgery. Finally, intratreatment target stability was determined by image-guided alignment performed before and after image-guided mask immobilized radiosurgery. Results: In vitro hidden target localization errors were comparable for the framed (0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm) and image-guided (0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm) techniques. The in vivo differences in alignment were 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm (anteroposterior), -0.2 {+-} 0.4 mm (superoinferior), and 0.3 {+-} 0.5 mm (lateral). For in vivo stability tests, the mean distance differed between the pre- and post-treatment positions with mask-immobilized radiosurgery by 0.5 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: Frame-based and image-guided alignment accuracy in vitro was comparable for the system tested. In vivo tests showed a consistent trend in the difference of alignment in the anteroposterior direction, possibly due to torque to the ring and mounting system with frame-based localization. The mask system as used appeared adequate for patient immobilization.

  2. Radio-frequency energy quantification in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, Leeor

    Mapping of radio frequency (RF) energy deposition has been challenging for 50+ years, especially, when scanning patients in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment. As result, electromagnetic simulation software is often used for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR), the rate of RF energy deposition in tissue. The thesis work presents challenges associated with aligning information provided by electromagnetic simulation and MRI experiments. As result of the limitations of simulations, experimental methods for the quantification of SAR were established. A system for quantification of the total RF energy deposition was developed for parallel transmit MRI (a system that uses multiple antennas to excite and image the body). The system is capable of monitoring and predicting channel-by-channel RF energy deposition, whole body SAR and capable of tracking potential hardware failures that occur in the transmit chain and may cause the deposition of excessive energy into patients. Similarly, we demonstrated that local RF power deposition can be mapped and predicted for parallel transmit systems based on a series of MRI temperature mapping acquisitions. Resulting from the work, we developed tools for optimal reconstruction temperature maps from MRI acquisitions. The tools developed for temperature mapping paved the way for utilizing MRI as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of RF/microwave emitting device safety. Quantification of the RF energy was demonstrated for both MRI compatible and non-MRI-compatible devices (such as cell phones), while having the advantage of being noninvasive, of providing millimeter resolution and high accuracy.

  3. Recent advances in image-guided targeted prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anna M; Elbuluk, Osama; Mertan, Francesca; Sankineni, Sandeep; Margolis, Daniel J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in the United States that results in over 30,000 deaths per year. The current state of prostate cancer diagnosis, based on PSA screening and sextant biopsy, has been criticized for both overdiagnosis of low-grade tumors and underdiagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancers (Gleason score ≥7). Recently, image guidance has been added to perform targeted biopsies of lesions detected on multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) scans. These methods have improved the ability to detect clinically significant cancer, while reducing the diagnosis of low-grade tumors. Several approaches have been explored to improve the accuracy of image-guided targeted prostate biopsy, including in-bore MRI-guided, cognitive fusion, and MRI/transrectal ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy. This review will examine recent advances in these image-guided targeted prostate biopsy techniques. PMID:25596716

  4. Image-guided inversion of electrical resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Revil, A.; Karaoulis, M.; Hale, D.; Doetsch, J.; Cuttler, S.

    2014-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is based on solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential and is characterized by a good sensitivity only in the vicinity of the electrodes used to gather the data. To provide more information to ERT, we propose an image-guided or structure-constrained inversion of the apparent resistivity data. This approach uses structural information obtained directly from a guiding image. This guiding image can be drawn from a high resolution geophysical method based on the propagation equation (e.g. migrated seismic or ground penetrating radar images) or possibly from a geological cross-section of the subsurface based on some prior geological expertise. The locations and orientations of the structural features can be extracted by image processing methods to determine the structure tensor and the semblances of the guiding image at a set of pixel. Then, we introduce these structural constraints into the inversion of the apparent resistivity data by weighting the four-direction smoothing matrix to smooth along, but not across, structural features. This approach allows preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. The image-guided inversion is also combined with an image-guided interpolation approach used to focus a smooth resistivity image. This yields structurally-appealing resistivity tomograms, while the whole process remains computationally efficient. Such a procedure generates a more realistic resistivity distribution (closer to the true ones), which can be, in turn, used quantitatively using appropriate petrophysical transforms, to obtain parameters of interest such as porosity and saturation. We check the validity of this approach using two synthetic case studies as well as two real datasets. For the field data, the image used to guide the inversion of the electrical resistivity data is a GPR section in the first case and a combination of seismic and structural information in the

  5. Structure-constrained image-guided inversion of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jieyi

    The regularization term in the objective function of an inverse problem is equivalent to the "model covariance" in Tarantola's wording. It is not entirely reasonable to consider the model covariance to be isotropic and homogenous, as done in classical Tikhonov regularization, because the correlation relationships among model cells are likely to change with different directions and locations. The structure-constrained image-guided inversion method, presented in this thesis, aims to solve this problem, and can be used to integrate different types of geophysical data and geological information. The method is first theoretically developed and successfully tested with electrical resistivity data. Then it is applied to hydraulic tomography, and promising hydraulic conductivity models are obtained as well. With a correct guiding image, the image-guided inversion results not only follow the correct structure patterns, but also are closer to the true model in terms of parameter values, when compared with the conventional inversion results. To further account for the uncertainty in the guiding image, a Bayesian inversion scheme is added to the image-guided inversion algorithm. Each geophysical model parameter and geological (structure) model parameter is described by a probability density. Using the data misfit of image-guided inversion of the geophysical data as criterion, a stochastic (image-guided) inversion algorithm allows one to optimize both the geophysical model and the geological model at the same time. The last problem discussed in this thesis is, image-guided inversion and interpolation can help reduce non-uniqueness and improve resolution when utilizing spectral induced polarization data and petrophysical relationships to estimate permeability.

  6. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Terrence T.; Johnson, J. Patrick; Pashman, Robert; Drazin, Doniel

    2016-01-01

    We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy. PMID:27213152

  7. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Terrence T; Johnson, J Patrick; Pashman, Robert; Drazin, Doniel

    2016-01-01

    We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy. PMID:27213152

  8. Direct imaging of radio-frequency modes via traveling wave magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonyushkin, A.; Deelchand, D. K.; Van de Moortele, P.-F.; Adriany, G.; Kiruluta, A.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an experimental method for direct 2D and 3D imaging of magnetic radio-frequency (rf) field distribution in metal-dielectric structures based on traveling wave (TW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (>7 T). The typical apparatus would include an ultra-high field whole body or small bore MRI scanner, waveguide elements filled with MRI active dielectrics with predefined electric and magnetic properties, and TW rf transmit-receive probes. We validated the technique by obtaining TW MR images of the magnetic field distribution of the rf modes of circular waveguide filled with deionized water in a 16.4 T small-bore MRI scanner and compared the MR images with numerical simulations. Our MRI technique opens up a practical non-perturbed way of imaging of previously inaccessible rf field distribution of modes inside various shapes metal waveguides with inserted dielectric objects, including waveguide mode converters and transformers.

  9. Stereotactic mammography imaging combined with 3D US imaging for image guided breast biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Surry, K. J. M.; Mills, G. R.; Bevan, K.; Downey, D. B.; Fenster, A.

    2007-11-15

    Stereotactic X-ray mammography (SM) and ultrasound (US) guidance are both commonly used for breast biopsy. While SM provides three-dimensional (3D) targeting information and US provides real-time guidance, both have limitations. SM is a long and uncomfortable procedure and the US guided procedure is inherently two dimensional (2D), requiring a skilled physician for both safety and accuracy. The authors developed a 3D US-guided biopsy system to be integrated with, and to supplement SM imaging. Their goal is to be able to biopsy a larger percentage of suspicious masses using US, by clarifying ambiguous structures with SM imaging. Features from SM and US guided biopsy were combined, including breast stabilization, a confined needle trajectory, and dual modality imaging. The 3D US guided biopsy system uses a 7.5 MHz breast probe and is mounted on an upright SM machine for preprocedural imaging. Intraprocedural targeting and guidance was achieved with real-time 2D and near real-time 3D US imaging. Postbiopsy 3D US imaging allowed for confirmation that the needle was penetrating the target. The authors evaluated 3D US-guided biopsy accuracy of their system using test phantoms. To use mammographic imaging information, they registered the SM and 3D US coordinate systems. The 3D positions of targets identified in the SM images were determined with a target localization error (TLE) of 0.49 mm. The z component (x-ray tube to image) of the TLE dominated with a TLE{sub z} of 0.47 mm. The SM system was then registered to 3D US, with a fiducial registration error (FRE) and target registration error (TRE) of 0.82 and 0.92 mm, respectively. Analysis of the FRE and TRE components showed that these errors were dominated by inaccuracies in the z component with a FRE{sub z} of 0.76 mm and a TRE{sub z} of 0.85 mm. A stereotactic mammography and 3D US guided breast biopsy system should include breast compression for stability and safety and dual modality imaging for target localization

  10. Multimodality Image Fusion-Guided Procedures: Technique, Accuracy, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Kruecker, Jochen; Kadoury, Samuel; Kobeiter, Hicham; Venkatesan, Aradhana M. Levy, Elliot Wood, Bradford J.

    2012-10-15

    Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care: Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. Positron-emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image-guided procedures, such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methods of image-fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided.

  11. Image-guided urological interventions: What the urologists must know

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandan J.; Baliyan, Vinit; Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology. While the traditional biopsy and drainage techniques are firmly established, image-based stone management and endovascular management of hematuria have evolved further. Ablative techniques for renal and prostate cancer and prostate artery embolization for benign prostatic hypertrophy have evolved into viable alternative treatments. Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation. This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques. PMID:26166963

  12. Multimodality Image Fusion Guided Procedures: Technique, Accuracy, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Kruecker, Jochen; Kadoury, Samuel; Kobeiter, Hicham; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Levy, Elliot; Wood, Bradford J.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care; Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization, and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. PET, MRI and contrast enhanced CT may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image guided procedures such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methods of image fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided. PMID:22851166

  13. Polycrystalline para-terphenyl scintillator adopted in a β- detecting probe for radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Senzacqua, M.; Voena, C.

    2015-06-01

    A radio-guided surgery technique exploiting β- emitters is under development. It aims at a higher target-to-background activity ratio implying both a smaller radiopharmaceutical activity and the possibility of extending the technique to cases with a large uptake of surrounding healthy organs. Such technique requires a dedicated intraoperative probe detecting β- radiation. A first prototype has been developed relying on the low density and high light yield of the diphenylbutadiene doped para-therphenyl organic scintillator. The scintillation light produced in a cylindrical crystal, 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height, is guided to a photo-multiplier tube by optical fibres. The custom readout electronics is designed to optimize its usage in terms of feedback to the surgeon, portability and remote monitoring of the signal. Tests show that with a radiotracer activity comparable to those administered for diagnostic purposes the developed probe can detect a 0.1 ml cancerous residual of meningioma in a few seconds.

  14. Primary cardiac angiosarcoma confirmed by multimodality imaging guided liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is an extremely rare malignant tumor with various clinical presentations but usually in late stage. We report a case presented with bloody pericardial effusion, in which the final diagnosis was confirmed by multiple imaging modalities such as echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, as well as ultrasound-guided liver biopsy. PMID:24696736

  15. Image-guided surgery using multimodality strategy and molecular probes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Hubei

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer surgery is to maximize the excision of tumorous tissue with minimal damage to the collateral normal tissues, reduce the postoperative recurrence, and improve the survival rate of patients. In order to locate tumor lesions, highlight tumor margins, visualize residual disease in the surgical wound, and map potential lymph node metastasis, various imaging techniques and molecular probes have been investigated to assist surgeons to perform more complete tumor resection. Combining imaging techniques with molecular probes is particularly promising as a new approach for image-guided surgery. Considering inherent limitations of different imaging techniques and insufficient sensitivity of nonspecific molecular probes, image-guided surgery with multimodality strategy and specific molecular probes appears to be an optimal choice. In this article, we briefly describe typical imaging techniques and molecular probes followed by a focused review on the current progress of multimodal image-guided surgery with specific molecular navigation. We also discuss optimal strategy that covers all stages of image-guided surgery including preoperative scanning of tumors, intraoperative inspection of surgical bed and postoperative care of patients. PMID:26053199

  16. Image-Guided Tumor Ablation: Emerging Technologies and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Justin P.; Lee, Edward W.; Yamamoto, Shota; Loh, Christopher T.; Kee, Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    As the trend continues toward the decreased invasiveness of medical procedures, image-guided percutaneous ablation has begun to supplant surgery for the local control of small tumors in the liver, kidney, and lung. New ablation technologies, and refinements of existing technologies, will enable treatment of larger and more complex tumors in these and other organs. At the same time, improvements in intraprocedural imaging promise to improve treatment accuracy and reduce complications. In this review, the latest advancements in clinical and experimental ablation technologies will be summarized, and new applications of image-guided tumor ablation will be discussed. PMID:22550370

  17. Robotic Image-Guided Needle Interventions of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Mozer, Pierre C; Partin, Alan W; Stoianovici, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Prostate biopsy and needle-directed prostate therapies are currently performed free-handed or with needle external templates under ultrasound guidance. Direct image-guided intervention robots are modern instruments that have the potential to substantially enhance these procedures. These may increase the accuracy and repeatability with which needles are placed in the gland. The authors’ group has developed a robot for precise prostate targeting that operates remotely alongside the patient in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner, as guided according to the image. PMID:19390670

  18. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: Imaging and Source Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Edward B.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-braid) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  19. Digital document imaging systems: An overview and guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This is an aid to NASA managers in planning the selection of a Digital Document Imaging System (DDIS) as a possible solution for document information processing and storage. Intended to serve as a manager's guide, this document contains basic information on digital imaging systems, technology, equipment standards, issues of interoperability and interconnectivity, and issues related to selecting appropriate imaging equipment based upon well defined needs.

  20. Image-Guided Abdominal Surgery and Therapy Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Robert L.; Herrell, S. Duke; Miga, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Image-Guided Surgery has become the standard of care in intracranial neurosurgery providing more exact resections while minimizing damage to healthy tissue. Moving that process to abdominal organs presents additional challenges in the form of image segmentation, image to physical space registration, organ motion and deformation. In this paper, we present methodologies and results for addressing these challenges in two specific organs: the liver and the kidney. PMID:25077012

  1. Image-guided plasma therapy of cutaneous wound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Zhang, Shiwu; Yue, Ting; Xu, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Despite the clinical significance in chronic wound management, no effective methods have been developed for quantitative image-guided treatment. We integrated a multimodal imaging system with a cold atmospheric plasma probe for image-guided treatment of chronic wound. Multimodal imaging system offers a non-invasive, painless, simultaneous and quantitative assessment of cutaneous wound healing. Cold atmospheric plasma accelerates the wound healing process through many mechanisms including decontamination, coagulation and stimulation of the wound healing. The therapeutic effect of cold atmospheric plasma is studied in vivo under the guidance of a multimodal imaging system. Cutaneous wounds are created on the dorsal skin of the nude mice. During the healing process, the sample wound is treated by cold atmospheric plasma at different controlled dosage, while the control wound is healed naturally. The multimodal imaging system integrating a multispectral imaging module and a laser speckle imaging module is used to collect the information of cutaneous tissue oxygenation (i.e. oxygen saturation, StO2) and blood perfusion simultaneously to assess and guide the plasma therapy. Our preliminary tests show that cold atmospheric plasma in combination with multimodal imaging guidance has the potential to facilitate the healing of chronic wounds.

  2. Thermal Imaging of Medical Saw Blades and Guides

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Steffner, Thomas E

    2007-01-01

    Better Than New, LLC., has developed a surface treatment to reduce the friction and wear of orthopedic saw blades and guides. The medical saw blades were thermally imaged while sawing through fresh animal bone and an IR camera was used to measure the blade temperature as it exited the bone. The thermal performance of as-manufactured saw blades was compared to surface-treated blades, and a freshly used blade was used for temperature calibration purposes in order to account for any emissivity changes due to organic transfer layers. Thermal imaging indicates that the treated saw blades cut faster and cooler than untreated blades. In orthopedic surgery, saw guides are used to perfectly size the bone to accept a prosthesis. However, binding can occur between the blade and guide because of misalignment. This condition increases the saw blade temperature and may result in tissue damage. Both treated ad untreated saw guides were also studied. The treated saw guide operated at a significantly lower temperature than untreated guide. Saw blades and guides that operate at a cooler temperature are expected to reduce the amount of tissue damage (thermal necrosis) and may reduce the number of post-operative complications.

  3. Advances in MR image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-sun

    2015-05-01

    The clinical role of magnetic resonance image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is rapidly expanding due to its merit of non-invasiveness. MR thermometry based on a proton resonance frequency shift technique is able to accurately measure HIFU-induced temperature changes, which provides considerable advantages over ultrasonography-guided HIFU in terms of safety and therapeutic efficacy. Recent studies and the resulting technological advances in MR-HIFU such as MR thermometry for moving organs, MR-acoustic radiation force imaging, and a volumetric mild hyperthermia technique further will expand its clinical roles from mere ablation therapy to targeted drug delivery and chemo- or radio-sensitisation for cancer treatment. In this article, MR-HIFU therapy is comprehensively reviewed with an emphasis on the roles of MR imaging in HIFU therapy, techniques of MR monitoring, recent advances in clinical MR-HIFU systems, and potential future applications of MR-HIFU therapy. In addition, the pros and cons of MR-HIFU when compared with ultrasonography-guided HIFU are discussed. PMID:25373687

  4. Groupwise Image Registration Guided by a Dynamic Digraph of Images.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenyu; Fan, Yong

    2016-04-01

    For groupwise image registration, graph theoretic methods have been adopted for discovering the manifold of images to be registered so that accurate registration of images to a group center image can be achieved by aligning similar images that are linked by the shortest graph paths. However, the image similarity measures adopted to build a graph of images in the extant methods are essentially pairwise measures, not effective for capturing the groupwise similarity among multiple images. To overcome this problem, we present a groupwise image similarity measure that is built on sparse coding for characterizing image similarity among all input images and build a directed graph (digraph) of images so that similar images are connected by the shortest paths of the digraph. Following the shortest paths determined according to the digraph, images are registered to a group center image in an iterative manner by decomposing a large anatomical deformation field required to register an image to the group center image into a series of small ones between similar images. During the iterative image registration, the digraph of images evolves dynamically at each iteration step to pursue an accurate estimation of the image manifold. Moreover, an adaptive dictionary strategy is adopted in the groupwise image similarity measure to ensure fast convergence of the iterative registration procedure. The proposed method has been validated based on both simulated and real brain images, and experiment results have demonstrated that our method was more effective for learning the manifold of input images and achieved higher registration accuracy than state-of-the-art groupwise image registration methods. PMID:26585712

  5. Improved Guided Image Fusion for Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jameel, Amina

    2014-01-01

    Improved guided image fusion for magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging is proposed. Existing guided filtering scheme uses Gaussian filter and two-level weight maps due to which the scheme has limited performance for images having noise. Different modifications in filter (based on linear minimum mean square error estimator) and weight maps (with different levels) are proposed to overcome these limitations. Simulation results based on visual and quantitative analysis show the significance of proposed scheme. PMID:24695586

  6. Cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging: A guide and atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas provides a clinical guide to interpreting cranial and spinal magnetic resonance images. The book includes coverage of the cerebrum, temporal bone, and cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, with more than 400 scan images depicting both normal anatomy and pathologic findings. Introductory chapters review the practical physics of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, offer guidelines for interpreting cranial MR scans, and provide coverage of each anatomic region of the cranium and spine. For each region, scans accompanied by captions, show normal anatomic sections matched with MR images. These are followed by MR scans depicting various disease states.

  7. Sensor technology for image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinreich, S. J.; Helm, Patrick

    1998-06-01

    The advances in radiographic imaging techniques that have occurred within the past decades have significantly enhanced our abilities to display anatomy as well as pathology. Although image acquisition commonly generates three-dimensional datasets, limitation in user interfaces generally requires that this information be presented clinically as a series of two dimensional images. Consequently, during preoperative planning, surgeons are required to mentally transform a wealth of two dimensional hard copy images qualitatively into three-dimensional concepts that are used as a road map to surgery. The sugeron's success is dependent on the accurate mental transfer of Computer Tomographic X-ray (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging information to the operative site to assist direct visual perception of the procedure. Thus, the surgical procedure is performed with the surgeon intuitively transferring radiographic information to the surgical site. Neurosurgeons, for example, are especially hampered because of limited ability to visually distinguish tumor tissue, peritumoral edema, and normal brain parenchyma. This limitation at least partially accounts for the relatively high incidence of subtotal tumor excision. Based on the need to assit the surgeon transform the preoperative scans to the operative site, stereotactic systems were developed and would evolve into frameless stereotaxy with the advance of various sensors.

  8. Smart travel guide: from internet image database to intelligent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chareyron, Ga"l.; Da Rugna, Jérome; Cousin, Saskia

    2011-02-01

    To help the tourist to discover a city, a region or a park, many options are provided by public tourism travel centers, by free online guides or by dedicated book guides. Nonetheless, these guides provide only mainstream information which are not conform to a particular tourist behavior. On the other hand, we may find several online image databases allowing users to upload their images and to localize each image on a map. These websites are representative of tourism practices and constitute a proxy to analyze tourism flows. Then, this work intends to answer this question: knowing what I have visited and what other people have visited, where should I go now? This process needs to profile users, sites and photos. our paper presents the acquired data and relationship between photographers, sites and photos and introduces the model designed to correctly estimate the site interest of each tourism point. The third part shows an application of our schema: a smart travel guide on geolocated mobile devices. This android application is a travel guide truly matching the user wishes.

  9. Peering through Jupiter’s clouds with radio spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Sault, R. J.; Butler, Bryan; DeBoer, David; Wong, Michael H.

    2016-06-01

    Radio wavelengths can probe altitudes in Jupiter’s atmosphere below its visible cloud layers. We used the Very Large Array to map this unexplored region down to ~8 bar, ~100 kilometers below the visible clouds. Our maps reveal a dynamically active planet at pressures less than 2 to 3 bar. A radio-hot belt exists, consisting of relatively transparent regions (a low ammonia concentration, NH3 being the dominant source of opacity) probing depths to over ~8 bar; these regions probably coincide with 5-micrometer hot spots. Just to the south we distinguish an equatorial wave, bringing up ammonia gas from Jupiter’s deep atmosphere. This wave has been theorized to produce the 5-micrometer hot spots; we observed the predicted radio counterpart of such hot spots.

  10. Peering through Jupiter's clouds with radio spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Sault, R J; Butler, Bryan; DeBoer, David; Wong, Michael H

    2016-06-01

    Radio wavelengths can probe altitudes in Jupiter's atmosphere below its visible cloud layers. We used the Very Large Array to map this unexplored region down to ~8 bar, ~100 kilometers below the visible clouds. Our maps reveal a dynamically active planet at pressures less than 2 to 3 bar. A radio-hot belt exists, consisting of relatively transparent regions (a low ammonia concentration, NH3 being the dominant source of opacity) probing depths to over ~8 bar; these regions probably coincide with 5-micrometer hot spots. Just to the south we distinguish an equatorial wave, bringing up ammonia gas from Jupiter's deep atmosphere. This wave has been theorized to produce the 5-micrometer hot spots; we observed the predicted radio counterpart of such hot spots. PMID:27257253

  11. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  12. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  13. From clinical imaging and computational models to personalised medicine and image guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, David J

    2016-10-01

    This short paper describes the development of the UCL Centre for Medical Image Computing (CMIC) from 2006 to 2016, together with reference to historical developments of the Computational Imaging sciences Group (CISG) at Guy's Hospital. Key early work in automated image registration led to developments in image guided surgery and improved cancer diagnosis and therapy. The work is illustrated with examples from neurosurgery, laparoscopic liver and gastric surgery, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer and breast cancer, and image guided radiotherapy for lung cancer. PMID:27407003

  14. Image-guided navigation: a cost effective practical introduction using the Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK).

    PubMed

    Güler, Özgür; Yaniv, Ziv

    2012-01-01

    Teaching the key technical aspects of image-guided interventions using a hands-on approach is a challenging task. This is primarily due to the high cost and lack of accessibility to imaging and tracking systems. We provide a software and data infrastructure which addresses both challenges. Our infrastructure allows students, patients, and clinicians to develop an understanding of the key technologies by using them, and possibly by developing additional components and integrating them into a simple navigation system which we provide. Our approach requires minimal hardware, LEGO blocks to construct a phantom for which we provide CT scans, and a webcam which when combined with our software provides the functionality of a tracking system. A premise of this approach is that tracking accuracy is sufficient for our purpose. We evaluate the accuracy provided by a consumer grade webcam and show that it is sufficient for educational use. We provide an open source implementation of all the components required for a basic image-guided navigation as part of the Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). It has long been known that in education there is no substitute for hands-on experience, to quote Sophocles, "One must learn by doing the thing; for though you think you know it, you have no certainty, until you try.". Our work provides this missing capability in the context of image-guided navigation. Enabling a wide audience to learn and experience the use of a navigation system. PMID:23367310

  15. Polymer fiber-image-guide-based embedded optical circuit board.

    PubMed

    Ai, J; Li, Y

    1999-01-10

    We propose a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-image-guide-based embedded optical circuit board for future optoelectronic array-interconnection applications. An experimental prototypical board that embeds perfect-shuffle and banyan interconnect patterns of 16 x 16 parallel links, each of which offers a fiber pixel density of >1000 pixels/mm(2), are demonstrated experimentally. PMID:18305618

  16. WFPC2 LRF Imaging of Emission-Line Nebulae in 3CR Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, G. C.; O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Axon, D. J.; Kharb, P.; Buchanan, C. L.; Sparks, W.; Chiaberge, M.

    2008-04-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 Linear Ramp Filter images of high surface brightness emission lines (either [O II], [O III], or H α + [N II]) in 80 3CR radio sources. We overlay the emission-line images on high-resolution VLA radio images (eight of which are new reductions of archival data) in order to examine the spatial relationship between the optical and radio emission. We confirm that the radio and optical emission-line structures are consistent with weak alignment at low redshift (z < 0.6) except in the compact steep-spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies where both the radio source and the emission-line nebulae are on galactic scales and strong alignment is seen at all redshifts. There are weak trends for the aligned emission-line nebulae to be more luminous and for the emission-line nebula size to increase with redshift and/or radio power. The combination of these results suggests that there is a limited but real capacity for the radio source to influence the properties of the emission-line nebulae at these low redshifts (z < 0.6). Our results are consistent with previous suggestions that both mechanical and radiant energy are responsible for generating alignment between the radio source and emission-line gas. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 05-26555. These observations are associated with program 5957.

  17. JUICE/RPWI/JENRAGE: a low frequency radio imager at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Kasaba, Y.; Bergman, J. E. S.; Zarka, P.; Lamy, L.; Hess, S. L. G.; Rothkaehl, H.

    2015-10-01

    The JENRAGE (Jovian Environment Radio Astronomy and Ganymede Exploration) experiment of the Radio and Plasma Waves Instrument (RPWI) on-board JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) is a sensitive, and versatile radio instrument. It will observe radio waves ranging from 80 kHz to 45 MHz at a 100 Msample per second aquisition rate. The instrument is composed of set of 3 electrical dipoles (developed by the Polish team), connected to low noise preamplifiers and conditioning analog filters (built by the Japanese team), then sampled and digitally filtererd into ~300 kHz bands (digital part developed by the Swedish team). This international project is coordinated by B. Cecconi and Y. Kasaba, both co-PI of JUICE/RPWI. Although the radio antenna connected to this instrument have no intrinsic directivity, the JENRAGE measurements can provide instantaneous direction of arrival, flux density and polarization degree of the observed radio waves. Hence, the JENRAGE can be described as an full-sky radio imager. As the instrument provides direction of arrival, radio sources can be located with some assumption on the propagation between the source and the observer. Hence, it is possible to produce radio source maps and correlate them with observations at other wavelengths, such as UV or IR observations of the auroral regions of Jupiter. The flux and polarization measurements together with the time- frequency shape of the radio emissions can also be used to identify the radio emission processes. These features have shown their capabilities on Cassini, with the RPWS/HFR instrument. We will present the JUICE/RPWI/JENRAGE design and the science objectives. Additional science topics linked to the icy satellites, which are currently being assessed, will also be presented.

  18. Images d'Afrique (Images of Africa). Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Stephanie

    The teacher's guide to a series of seven videotape recordings based on television programs of three African countries, Gabon, Cameroon, and the Ivory Coast, is for use in intermediate to advanced college level French courses. Its objectives are to: improve students' vocabulary, listening comprehension, and speaking skills; acquaint students with…

  19. Imaging the host galaxies of high-redshift radio-quiet QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowenthal, James D.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lehnert, Matthew, D.; Elias, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    We present new deep K-band and optical images of four radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 1 and six radio-quiet QSOs at z approximately = 2.5, as well as optical images only of six more at z approximately = 2.5. We have examined the images carefully for evidence of extended 'fuzz' from any putative QSO host galaxy. None of the z approximately = 2.5 QSOs shows any extended emission, and only two of the z approximately = 1 QSOs show marginal evidence for extended emission. Our 3 sigma detection limits in the K images, m(sub K) approximately = 21 for an isolated source, would correspond approximately to an unevolved L(sup star) elliptical galaxy at z = 2.5 or 2-3 mag fainter than an L(sup star) elliptical at z = 1, although our limits on host galaxy light are weaker than this due to the difficulty of separating galaxy light from QSO light. We simulate simple models of disk and elliptical host galaxies, and find that the marginal emission around the two z approximately = 1 QSOs can be explained by disks or bulges that are approximately 1-2 mag brighter than an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy in one case and approximately 1.5-2.5 mag brighter than L(sub star) in the other. For two other z approximately = 1 QSOs, we have only upper limits (L approximately = L(sup star)). The hosts of the high-redshift sample must be no brighter than about 3 mag above an unevolved L(sup star) galaxy, and are at least 1 magnitude fainter than the hosts of radio-loud QSOs at the same redshift. If the easily detected K-band light surrounding a previous sample of otherwise similar but radio-loud QSOs is starlight, then it must evolve on timescales of greater than or approximately equal to 10(exp 8) yr (e.g., Chambers & Charlot 1990); therefore our non-detection of host galaxy fuzz around radio-quiet QSOs supports the view that high-redshift radio-quiet and radio-loud QSOs inhabit different host objects, rather than being single types of objects that turn their radio emission on and off over

  20. CT guided diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as blood, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer detection. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at wavelengths of 650 and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements, the width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an EMCCD camera with air cooling is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we report our effort and progress on the integration of the multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  1. Radio Imaging of a Type IVM Radio Burst on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-01

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 100-102 cm-3, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  2. Radio imaging of a type IVM radio burst on the 14th of August 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C. L.

    2014-02-10

    Propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by burst signatures in radio spectrogram data. We present Nançay Radioheliograph observations of a moving source of broadband radio emission, commonly referred to as a type IV radio burst (type IVM), which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP, and by the STEREO SECCHI and SOHO LASCO white light (WL) coronagraphs. The EUV and WL observations show the type IVM source to be cospatial with the CME core. The observed spectra is well fitted by a power law with a negative slope, which is consistent with optically thin gyrosynchrotron emission. The spectrum shows no turn over at the lowest Nançay frequencies. By comparing simulated gyrosynchrotron spectra with Nançay Radioheliograph observations, and performing a rigorous parameter search we are able to constrain several key parameters of the underlying plasma. Simulated spectra found to fit the data suggest a nonthermal electron distribution with a low energy cutoff of several tens to 100 keV, with a nonthermal electron density in the range 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} cm{sup –3}, in a magnetic field of a few Gauss. The nonthermal energy content of the source is found to contain 0.001%-0.1% of the sources thermal energy content. Furthermore, the energy loss timescale for this distribution equates to several hours, suggesting that the electrons could be accelerated during the CME initiation or early propagation phase and become trapped in the magnetic structure of the CME core without the need to be replenished.

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Image-Guided IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayles, P.

    2006-12-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of the subject of intensity modulated radiotherapy and the associated imaging. Most of the names associated with advanced radiotherapy can be found among the 80 authors and the book is therefore an authoritative reference text. The early chapters deal with the basic principles and include an interesting comparison between views of quality assurance for IMRT from Europe and North America. It is refreshing to see that the advice given has moved on from the concept of individual patient based quality control to more generic testing of the delivery system. However, the point is made that the whole process including the data transfer needs to be quality assured and the need for thorough commissioning of the process is emphasised. The `tricks' needed to achieve a dose based IMRT plan are well covered by the group at Ghent and there is an interesting summary of biological aspects of treatment planning for IMRT by Andrzej Niemierko. The middle section of the book deals with advanced imaging aspects of both treatment planning and delivery. The contributions of PET and MR imaging are well covered and there is a rather rambling section on molecular imaging. Image guidance in radiotherapy treatment is addressed including the concept of adaptive radiotherapy. The treatment aspects could perhaps have merited some more coverage, but there is a very thorough discussion of 4D techniques. The final section of the book considers each site of the body in turn. This will be found useful by those wishing to embark on IMRT in a new area, although some of the sections are more comprehensive than others. The book contains a wealth of interesting and thought provoking articles giving details as well as broad principles, and would be a useful addition to every departmental library. The editors have done a good job of ensuring that the different chapters are complementary, and of encouraging a systematic approach to the descriptions of IMRT in

  4. Technique development for photoacoustic imaging guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qian; Zhang, Haonan; Yuan, Jie; Feng, Ting; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), i.e. tissue destruction induced by a local increase of temperature by means of laser light energy transmission, has been frequently used for minimally invasive treatments of various diseases such as benign thyroid nodules and liver cancer. The emerging photoacoustic (PA) imaging, when integrated with ultrasound (US), could contribute to LITT procedure. PA can enable a good visualization of percutaneous apparatus deep inside tissue and, therefore, can offer accurate guidance of the optical fibers to the target tissue. Our initial experiment demonstrated that, by picking the strong photoacoustic signals generated at the tips of optical fibers as a needle, the trajectory and position of the fibers could be visualized clearly using a commercial available US unit. When working the conventional US Bscan mode, the fibers disappeared when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 60 degree; while working on the new PA mode, the fibers could be visualized without any problem even when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 75 degree. Moreover, with PA imaging function integrated, the optical fibers positioned into the target tissue, besides delivering optical energy for thermotherapy, can also be used to generate PA signals for on-line evaluation of LITT. Powered by our recently developed PA physio-chemical analysis, PA measurements from the tissue can provide a direct and accurate feedback of the tissue responses to laser ablation, including the changes in not only chemical compositions but also histological microstructures. The initial experiment on the rat liver model has demonstrated the excellent sensitivity of PA imaging to the changes in tissue temperature rise and tissue status (from native to coagulated) when the tissue is treated in vivo with LITT.

  5. Fast Radiometry Guided Fusion of Disparity Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Stephan; Fritsch, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    Previous work on disparity map fusion has mostly focused on geometric or statistical properties of disparity maps. Since failure of stereo algorithms is often consistent in many frames of a scene, it cannot be detected by such methods. Instead, we propose to use radiometric information from the original camera images together with externally supplied camera pose information to detect mismatches. As radiometric information is local information, the computations in the proposed algorithm for disparity fusion can be decoupled and parallelized to a very large degree, which allows us to easily achieve real-time performance.

  6. Photoacoustic image-guided needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Akers, Walter J.; Maslov, Konstantin; Song, Liang; Jankovic, Ladislav; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Achilefu, Samuel; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    We have implemented a hand-held photoacoustic and ultrasound probe for image-guided needle biopsy using a modified clinical ultrasound array system. Pulsed laser light was delivered via bifurcated optical fiber bundles integrated with the hand-held ultrasound probe. We photoacoustically guided needle insertion into rat sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) following accumulation of indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic image contrast of the needle was achieved. After intradermal injection of ICG in the left forepaw, deeply positioned SLNs (beneath 2-cm thick chicken breast) were easily indentified in vivo and in real time. Further, we confirmed ICG uptake in axillary lymph nodes with in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this hand-held photoacoustic system for facile identification and needle biopsy of SLNs for cancer staging and metastasis detection in humans.

  7. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles for Image-Guided Therapy of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Oumzil, Khalid; Ramin, Michael A; Lorenzato, Cyril; Hémadou, Audrey; Laroche, Jeanny; Jacobin-Valat, Marie Josée; Mornet, Stephane; Roy, Claude-Eric; Kauss, Tina; Gaudin, Karen; Clofent-Sanchez, Gisèle; Barthélémy, Philippe

    2016-03-16

    Although the application of nanotechnologies to atherosclerosis remains a young field, novel strategies are needed to address this public health issue. In this context, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach has been gradually investigated in order to enable image-guided treatments. In this contribution, we report a new approach based on nucleoside-lipids allowing the synthesis of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) loaded with iron oxide particles and therapeutic agents. The insertion of nucleoside-lipids allows the formation of stable SLNs loaded with prostacycline (PGI2) able to inhibit platelet aggregation. The new SLNs feature better relaxivity properties in comparison to the clinically used contrast agent Feridex, indicating that SLNs are suitable for image-guided therapy. PMID:26751997

  8. Concurrent image and dose reconstruction for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Ke

    The importance of knowing the patient actual position is essential for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This procedure uses tightened margin and escalated tumor dose. In order to eliminate the uncertainty of the geometry in IMRT, daily imaging is prefered. The imaging dose, limited field of view and the imaging concurrency of the MVCT (mega-voltage computerized tomography) are investigated in this work. By applying partial volume imaging (PVI), imaging dose can be reduced for a region of interest (ROI) imaging. The imaging dose and the image quality are quantitatively balanced with inverse imaging dose planning. With PVI, 72% average imaging dose reduction was observed on a typical prostate patient case. The algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) based projection onto convex sets (POCS) shows higher robustness than filtered back projection when available imaging data is not complete and continuous. However, when the projection is continuous as in the actual delivery, a non-iterative wavelet based multiresolution local tomography (WMLT) is able to achieve 1% accuracy within the ROI. The reduction of imaging dose is dependent on the size of ROI. The improvement of concurrency is also discussed based on the combination of PVI and WMLT. Useful target images were acquired with treatment beams and the temporal resolution can be increased to 20 seconds in tomotherapy. The data truncation problem with the portal imager was also studied. Results show that the image quality is not adversely affected by truncation when WMLT is employed. When the online imaging is available, a perturbation dose calculation (PDC) that estimates the actual delivered dose is proposed. Corrected from the Fano's theorem, PDC counts the first order term in the density variation to calculate the internal and external anatomy change. Although change in the dose distribution that is caused by the internal organ motion is less than 1% for 6 MV beams, the external anatomy change has

  9. Image hologram as visual light guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, John W.

    1994-05-01

    A durable and practical architectural installation of an image hologram that can be used to modify the direction of light from a natural or incandescent source. Working from a silver halide master prepared by the author, transfers were made by The Polaroid Corporation to their photopolymer recording material. The H2 was then applied to tempered glass using an index matching material. The glass panels are typical of those used in aluminum mullioned entries in contemporary building. The reference and read out angles of the hologram were arranged in such a way as to advantageously modify the output of the metal halide light sources used to illuminate the space. Solar tracking specular metal strips maintain reference angle during daylight at a constant input. The holograms appear as thin strips of transparent material applied to glass until the visual field is entered, then a bright and wide field image is viewed. The hologram serves to redirect approximately forty percent of the light falling on its surface deeper into the building.

  10. Image Fusion During Vascular and Nonvascular Image-Guided Procedures☆

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Kobeiter, Hicham; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford J.

    2013-01-01

    Image fusion may be useful in any procedure where previous imaging such as positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) defines information that is referenced to the procedural imaging, to the needle or catheter, or to an ultrasound transducer. Fusion of prior and intraoperative imaging provides real-time feedback on tumor location or margin, metabolic activity, device location, or vessel location. Multimodality image fusion in interventional radiology was initially introduced for biopsies and ablations, especially for lesions only seen on arterial phase CT, magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography/CT but has more recently been applied to other vascular and nonvascular procedures. Two different types of platforms are commonly used for image fusion and navigation: (1) electromagnetic tracking and (2) cone-beam CT. Both technologies would be reviewed as well as their strengths and weaknesses, indications, when to use one vs the other, tips and guidance to streamline use, and early evidence defining clinical benefits of these rapidly evolving, commercially available and emerging techniques. PMID:23993079

  11. High Resolution Radio Imaging of the Merging Galaxies NGC3256 and NGC4194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Campion, S. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present new 6cm and 4cm radio continuum images of the central regions of the merging galaxy systems NGC3256 and NGC4194. NGC3256 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 1 in. or approx. 190pc; NGC4194 is imaged with a resolution of approx. 0.3 in. or approx. 50pc. In both systems, we detect numerous compact radio sources embedded in more diffuse radio emission. We detect 65 compact sources in NGC3256 at 6cm and we detect 46 compact sources in NGC4194, both to a limiting luminosity of approx. 5 x 10(exp 18) W/ Hz or approx. 5 times the luminosity of Cas A. Most of the compact radio sources are loosely associated with active star forming regions but not with specific optical emission sources. Several compact radio sources in NGC3256 are near positions of compact X-ray sources detected by Lira et al.. In both NGC3256 and NGC4194, we are able to measure reliable spectral indices for the stronger sources. We find in NGC3256 approx. 20% have nominally flat radio spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by thermal radio emission from HII regions) while approx. 80% have nominally steep spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by nonthermal emission from supernova remnants). In NGC4194, half the compact radio sources have flat spectral indices and half have steep indices. For the flat-spectrum sources, we estimate the number of young massive stars and the associated ionized gas masses. For the steep-spectrum sources, we estimate supernova rates. We compare these results with those from other well-studied merging galaxy systems. We gratefully acknowledge use of the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) and the VLA Archive. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  12. Real-time Fluorescence Image-Guided Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Suman B.; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a critical role in cancer diagnosis and planning. Many of these patients rely on surgical intervention for curative outcomes. This requires a careful identification of the primary and microscopic tumors, and the complete removal of cancer. Although there have been efforts to adapt traditional imaging modalities for intraoperative image guidance, they suffer from several constraints such as large hardware footprint, high operation cost, and disruption of the surgical workflow. Because of the ease of image acquisition, relatively low cost devices and intuitive operation, optical imaging methods have received tremendous interests for use in real-time image-guided surgery. To improve imaging depth under low interference by tissue autofluorescence, many of these applications utilize light in the near-infra red (NIR) wavelengths, which is invisible to human eyes. With the availability of a wide selection of tumor-avid contrast agents, advancements in imaging sensors, electronic and optical designs, surgeons are able to combine different attributes of NIR optical imaging techniques to improve treatment outcomes. The emergence of diverse commercial and experimental image guidance systems, which are in various stages of clinical translation, attests to the potential high impact of intraoperative optical imaging methods to improve speed of oncologic surgery with high accuracy and minimal margin positivity. PMID:25287689

  13. Design, implementation and investigation of an image guide-based optical flip-flop array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, P. C.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the design for an image guide-based optical flip-flop array created using a Hughes liquid crystal light valve and a flexible image guide in a feedback loop. This design is used to investigate the application of image guides as a communication mechanism in numerical optical computers. It is shown that image guides can be used successfully in this manner but mismatch match between the input and output fiber arrays is extremely limiting.

  14. Radiologists' leading position in image-guided therapy.

    PubMed

    Helmberger, Thomas; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Pereira, Philippe; Gillams, Alice; Martínez, Jose; Lammer, Johannes; Malagari, Katarina; Gangi, Afshin; de Baere, Thierry; Adam, E Jane; Rasch, Coen; Budach, Volker; Reekers, Jim A

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are related to, or performed under, some kind of imaging. Such imaging may be direct inspection (as in open surgery) or indirect inspection as in endoscopy or laparoscopy. Common to all these techniques is the transformation of optical and visible information to a monitor or the eye of the operator. Image-guided therapy (IGT) differs by using processed imaging data acquired before, during and after a wide range of different imaging techniques. This means that the planning, performing and monitoring, as well as the control of the therapeutic procedure, are based and dependent on the "virtual reality" provided by imaging investigations. Since most of such imaging involves radiology in the broadest sense, there is a need to characterise IGT in more detail. In this paper, the technical, medico-legal and medico-political issues will be discussed. The focus will be put on state-of-the-art imaging, technical developments, methodological and legal requisites concerning radiation protection and licensing, speciality-specific limitations and crossing specialty borders, definition of technical and quality standards, and finally to the issue of awareness of IGT within the medical and public community. The specialty-specific knowledge should confer radiologists with a significant role in the overall responsibility for the imaging-related processes in various non-radiological specialties. These processes may encompass purchase, servicing, quality management, radiation protection and documentation, also taking responsibility for the definition and compliance with the legal requirements regarding all radiological imaging performed by non-radiologists. PMID:23325609

  15. An Amateur's Guide to Observing and Imaging the Heavens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morison, Ian

    2014-06-01

    Foreword; Acknowledgments; Prologue: a tale of two scopes; 1. Telescope and observing fundamentals; 2. Refractors; 3. Binoculars and spotting scopes; 4. The Newtonian telescope and its derivatives; 5. The Cassegrain telescope and its derivatives - Schmidt-Cassegrains and Maksutovs; 6. Telescope maintenance, collimation and star testing; 7. Telescope accessories: finders, eyepieces and bino-viewers; 8. Telescope mounts: alt/az and equatorial with their computerised variants; 9. The art of visual observing; 10. Visual observations of the Moon and planets; 11. Imaging the Moon and planets with DSLRs and web-cams; 12. Observing and imaging the Sun in white light and H-alpha; 13. Observing with an astro-video camera to 'see' faint objects; 14. Deep sky imaging with standard and H-alpha modified DSLR cameras; 15. Deep sky imaging with cooled CCD cameras; 16. Auto-guiding techniques and equipment; 17. Spectral studies of the Sun, stars and galaxies; 18. Improving and enhancing images in Photoshop; Index.

  16. Image Analysis, Modeling, Enhancement, Restoration, Feature Extraction and Their Applications in Nondestructive Evaluation and Radio Astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi.

    The principal topic of this dissertation is the development and application of signal and image processing to Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) and radio astronomy. The dissertation consists of nine papers published or submitted for publication. Each of them has a specific and unique topic related to signal processing or image processing in NDE or radio astronomy. Those topics are listed in the following. (1) Time series analysis and modeling of Very Large Array (VLA) phase data. (2) Image analysis, feature extraction and various applied enhancement methods for industrial NDE X-ray radiographic images. (3) Enhancing NDE radiographic X-ray images by adaptive regional Kalman filtering. (4) Robotic image segmentation, modeling, and restoration with a rule based expert system. (5) Industrial NDE radiographic X-ray image modeling and Kalman filtering considering signal-dependent colored noise. (6) Computational study of Kalman filtering VLA phase data and its computational performance on a supercomputer. (7) A practical and fast maximum entropy deconvolution method for de-blurring industrial NDE X-ray and infrared images. (8) Local feature enhancement of synthetic radio images by adaptive Kalman filtering. (9) A new technique for correcting phase data of a synthetic -aperture antenna array.

  17. Retinal image registration via feature-guided Gaussian mixture model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengyin; Ma, Jiayi; Ma, Yong; Huang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Registration of retinal images taken at different times, from different perspectives, or with different modalities is a critical prerequisite for the diagnoses and treatments of various eye diseases. This problem can be formulated as registration of two sets of sparse feature points extracted from the given images, and it is typically solved by first creating a set of putative correspondences and then removing the false matches as well as estimating the spatial transformation between the image pairs or solved by estimating the correspondence and transformation jointly involving an iteration process. However, the former strategy suffers from missing true correspondences, and the latter strategy does not make full use of local appearance information, which may be problematic for low-quality retinal images due to a lack of reliable features. In this paper, we propose a feature-guided Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to address these issues. We formulate point registration as the estimation of a feature-guided mixture of densities: A GMM is fitted to one point set, such that both the centers and local features of the Gaussian densities are constrained to coincide with the other point set. The problem is solved under a unified maximum-likelihood framework together with an iterative expectation-maximization algorithm initialized by the confident feature correspondences, where the image transformation is modeled by an affine function. Extensive experiments on various retinal images show the robustness of our approach, which consistently outperforms other state-of-the-art methods, especially when the data is badly degraded. PMID:27409682

  18. Particle accelerators in the hot spots of radio galaxy 3C 445, imaged with the VLT.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M Almudena; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Mack, Karl-Heinz

    2002-10-01

    Hot spots (HSs) are regions of enhanced radio emission produced by supersonic jets at the tip of the radio lobes of powerful radio sources. Obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT), images of the HSs in the radio galaxy 3C 445 show bright knots embedded in diffuse optical emission distributed along the post-shock region created by the impact of the jet into the intergalactic medium. The observations reported here confirm that relativistic electrons are accelerated by Fermi-I acceleration processes in HSs. Furthermore, both the diffuse emission tracing the rims of the front shock and the multiple knots demonstrate the presence of additional continuous re-acceleration processes of electrons (Fermi-II). PMID:12364799

  19. Eddy current imaging with an atomic radio-frequency magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Leefer, Nathan; Blanchard, John W.; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    We use a radio-frequency 85Rb alkali-vapor cell magnetometer based on a paraffin-coated cell with long spin-coherence time and a small, low-inductance driving coil to create highly resolved conductivity maps of different objects. We resolve sub-mm features in conductive objects, we characterize the frequency response of our technique, and by operating at frequencies up to 250 kHz we are able to discriminate between differently conductive materials based on the induced response. The method is suited to cover a wide range of driving frequencies and can potentially be used for detecting non-metallic objects with low DC conductivity.

  20. Image-inpainting and quality-guided phase unwrapping algorithm.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lei; Fang, Suping; Yang, Pengcheng; Wang, Leijie; Komori, Masaharu; Kubo, Aizoh

    2012-05-01

    For the wrapped phase map with regional abnormal fringes, a new phase unwrapping algorithm that combines the image-inpainting theory and the quality-guided phase unwrapping algorithm is proposed. First, by applying a threshold to the modulation map, the valid region (i.e., the interference region) is divided into the doubtful region (called the target region during the inpainting period) and the reasonable one (the source region). The wrapped phase of the doubtful region is thought to be unreliable, and the data are abandoned temporarily. Using the region-filling image-inpainting method, the blank target region is filled with new data, while nothing is changed in the source region. A new wrapped phase map is generated, and then it is unwrapped with the quality-guided phase unwrapping algorithm. Finally, a postprocessing operation is proposed for the final result. Experimental results have shown that the performance of the proposed algorithm is effective. PMID:22614426

  1. Image-guided drainage of cystic vestibular schwannomata.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Chris; Prasad, K S Manjunath; Hill, John; Johnson, Ian; Heaton, Judith M; Crossman, John E; Mendelow, Alexander D

    2010-01-01

    The management of vestibular schwannomata is controversial. Surveillance remains an acceptable option for elderly patients or those with small lesions. Stereoradiosurgery is also an option, while surgery is often preferred in younger patients with larger lesions. In elderly patients with lesions causing brainstem compression, craniotomy is a major undertaking. We report two cases of cystic cerebellopontine angle tumours in patients with co-morbidity, who were managed successfully with image-guided insertion of a cystoperitoneal shunt. PMID:19693430

  2. Novel Image-Guided Management of a Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Przybojewski, Stefan J. Sadler, David J.

    2011-02-15

    The investigators present a novel image-guided embolization, not previously described, of a uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) resistant to endovascular management. The uterus was exposed surgically, and Histoacryl (Braun, Fulda, Germany) was injected directly into the nidus using ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopy. The patient had a successful full-term pregnancy after this procedure. This technique may be a useful alternative management strategy in patients with uterine AVM who fail traditional endovascular embolization and who still desire fertility.

  3. Compact instrument for fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Bhaumik, Srabani; Li, Qing; Staudinger, V. Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is an emerging technique in oncology, neurology, and cardiology. To adapt intraoperative imaging for various surgical applications, increasingly flexible and compact FIGS instruments are necessary. We present a compact, portable FIGS system and demonstrate its use in cardiovascular mapping in a preclinical model of myocardial ischemia. Our system uses fiber optic delivery of laser diode excitation, custom optics with high collection efficiency, and compact consumer-grade cameras as a low-cost and compact alternative to open surgical FIGS systems. Dramatic size and weight reduction increases flexibility and access, and allows for handheld use or unobtrusive positioning over the surgical field.

  4. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Johnson, Perry B; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-04-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ~0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  5. Ultrasound elastography: enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Ioana N.; Rivaz, Hassan; Macura, Katarzyna; Su, Li-Ming; Hamper, Ulrike; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L., II; Lotan, Tamara; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2009-02-01

    Radical prostatectomy using the laparoscopic and robot-assisted approach lacks tactile feedback. Without palpation, the surgeon needs an affordable imaging technology which can be easily incorporated into the laparoscopic surgical procedure, allowing for precise real time intraoperative tumor localization that will guide the extent of surgical resection. Ultrasound elastography (USE) is a novel ultrasound imaging technology that can detect differences in tissue density or stiffness based on tissue deformation. USE was evaluated here as an enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy. USE using a 2D Dynamic Programming (DP) algorithm was applied on data from ex vivo human prostate specimens. It proved consistent in identification of lesions; hard and soft, malignant and benign, located in the prostate's central gland or in the peripheral zone. We noticed the 2D DP method was able to generate low-noise elastograms using two frames belonging to the same compression or relaxation part of the palpation excitation, even at compression rates up to 10%. Good preliminary results were validated by pathology findings, and also by in vivo and ex vivo MR imaging. We also evaluated the use of ultrasound elastography for imaging cavernous nerves; here we present data from animal model experiments.

  6. Technology and human errors in image-guided surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaowei; Miao, Song; Zamorano, Lucia J.; Li, Qinghang; Gong, JianXing; Diaz, Fernando

    1998-06-01

    Using image guidance for stereotactic surgery has been widely adopted in neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery and other surgery operations. Careful, precise and robust implementation of image-guidance can offer surgeon accurate intra-operative information that traditional techniques can not reach. Weak design, careless utilization, and dilemma in quality assurance protocol may result in severe scenarios. It is because that introducing image guidance into the operating room involves high precise technologies, delicate instruments and sophisticated processes. These can offer precision as well as space for human errors. A method based on the 'failure modes and effects analysis' is introduced to systematically study human errors in the image-guided surgery field. The paper presented the fundamental steps and architectures of the method. For better understanding of the method, a simple example is also provided. Analyzing human errors with the 'failure mode and effects analysis' benefits the development life cycle of the image-guided surgery system. It also helps for designing the clinical quality assurance process and the training courses for surgeons.

  7. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE ATLBS REGIONS: THE RADIO SOURCE COUNTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thorat, K.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Saripalli, L.; Ekers, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    The Australia Telescope Low-brightness Survey (ATLBS) regions have been mosaic imaged at a radio frequency of 1.4 GHz with 6'' angular resolution and 72 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms noise. The images (centered at R.A. 00{sup h}35{sup m}00{sup s}, decl. -67 Degree-Sign 00'00'' and R.A. 00{sup h}59{sup m}17{sup s}, decl. -67 Degree-Sign 00'00'', J2000 epoch) cover 8.42 deg{sup 2} sky area and have no artifacts or imaging errors above the image thermal noise. Multi-resolution radio and optical r-band images (made using the 4 m CTIO Blanco telescope) were used to recognize multi-component sources and prepare a source list; the detection threshold was 0.38 mJy in a low-resolution radio image made with beam FWHM of 50''. Radio source counts in the flux density range 0.4-8.7 mJy are estimated, with corrections applied for noise bias, effective area correction, and resolution bias. The resolution bias is mitigated using low-resolution radio images, while effects of source confusion are removed by using high-resolution images for identifying blended sources. Below 1 mJy the ATLBS counts are systematically lower than the previous estimates. Showing no evidence for an upturn down to 0.4 mJy, they do not require any changes in the radio source population down to the limit of the survey. The work suggests that automated image analysis for counts may be dependent on the ability of the imaging to reproduce connecting emission with low surface brightness and on the ability of the algorithm to recognize sources, which may require that source finding algorithms effectively work with multi-resolution and multi-wavelength data. The work underscores the importance of using source lists-as opposed to component lists-and correcting for the noise bias in order to precisely estimate counts close to the image noise and determine the upturn at sub-mJy flux density.

  9. Optical imaging-guided cancer therapy with fluorescent nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shan; Gnanasammandhan, Muthu Kumara; Zhang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of cancer have been greatly improved with the recent developments in nanotechnology. One of the promising nanoscale tools for cancer diagnosis is fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), such as organic dye-doped NPs, quantum dots and upconversion NPs that enable highly sensitive optical imaging of cancer at cellular and animal level. Furthermore, the emerging development of novel multi-functional NPs, which can be conjugated with several functional molecules simultaneously including targeting moieties, therapeutic agents and imaging probes, provides new potentials for clinical therapies and diagnostics and undoubtedly will play a critical role in cancer therapy. In this article, we review the types and characteristics of fluorescent NPs, in vitro and in vivo imaging of cancer using fluorescent NPs and multi-functional NPs for imaging-guided cancer therapy. PMID:19759055

  10. Toward Intraoperative Image-Guided Transoral Robotic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen P; Reaugamornrat, Sureerat; Deguet, Anton; Sorger, Jonathan M; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Richmon, Jeremy; Taylor, Russell H

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of video augmentation on the stereoscopic da Vinci S system with intraoperative image guidance for base of tongue tumor resection in transoral robotic surgery (TORS). Proposed workflow for image-guided TORS begins by identifying and segmenting critical oropharyngeal structures (e.g., the tumor and adjacent arteries and nerves) from preoperative computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These preoperative planned data can be deformably registered to the intraoperative endoscopic view using mobile C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) [1, 2]. Augmentation of TORS endoscopic video defining surgical targets and critical structures has the potential to improve navigation, spatial orientation, and confidence in tumor resection. Experiments in animal specimens achieved statistically significant improvement in target localization error when comparing the proposed image guidance system to simulated current practice. PMID:25525474

  11. Superimposed holographic image-guided neurosurgery. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Ko, K

    1998-04-01

    Computerized tomography scanning-derived narrow band reflection holograms of patients undergoing craniofacial procedures were created to evaluate the applicability of superimposing these three-dimensional images (3-D) on the operative field during neurological surgery. These sterilized radiological holograms were positioned over the surgical site by using bone sutures as registration points between the skull and the 3-D image to serve as a visual template between the patient and surgeon. Surgeries were then performed with the surgeon looking through the radiological hologram at the patient. Holograms were accurate to within 2 mm (plus or minus) of the actual calvarial anatomy. The use of the holographic image as a visual guide during surgery eliminated intraoperative guesswork or free-handed contouring. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of the superimposed holographic image used in situ during surgery. PMID:9525729

  12. Feature-based multiexposure image-sequence fusion with guided filter and image alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Du, Junping; Zhang, Zhenhong

    2015-01-01

    Multiexposure fusion images have a higher dynamic range and reveal more details than a single captured image of a real-world scene. A clear and intuitive feature-based fusion technique for multiexposure image sequences is conceptually proposed. The main idea of the proposed method is to combine three image features [phase congruency (PC), local contrast, and color saturation] to obtain weight maps of the images. Then, the weight maps are further refined using a guided filter which can improve their accuracy. The final fusion result is constructed using the weighted sum of the source image sequence. In addition, for multiexposure image-sequence fusion involving dynamic scenes containing moving objects, ghost artifacts can easily occur if fusion is directly performed. Therefore, an image-alignment method is first used to adjust the input images to correspond to a reference image, after which fusion is performed. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has a superior performance compared to the existing methods.

  13. ITV and Radio Resources in the Defined Minimum Program. 1985-86 Curriculum Guide. A Guide for Use of Instructional Television and Radio Programs Presented over the South Carolina Educational Television and Radio Networks, in Meeting Curriculum Needs in Elementary, Junior High and Senior High Levels of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, A. Wayne, Ed.

    This guide is intended for use by superintendents, district directors of instruction, curriculum writers, principals, and teachers in identifying and selecting instructional television (ITV) and radio resources that will aid their schools in meeting specific instructional requirements of the Defined Minimum Program and continuing objectives of the…

  14. Potential Usefulness of 99mTc-DMSA for Radio-Guided Surgery in Pediatric Renal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Demetrio; Di Franco, Davide; Cacciaguerra, Sebastiano; Ruggeri, Antonella; Russo, Simona; Fornito, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of an ectopic/hypoplastic kidney removed by radio-guided surgery. A 7-year-old girl, with a history of vaginal drainage of urine, underwent renal scintigraphy with Tc-DMSA. SPECT/CT revealed a focal uptake in the pelvis, corresponding to hypoplastic kidney as confirmed by MRI. Based on SPECT/CT findings, the patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, using Tc-DMSA scan to help the surgeon to detect the small ectopic kidney. Intraoperatory histological report confirmed the renal origin of the specimen. PMID:26462041

  15. Imaging-guided delivery of RNAi for anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junqing; Mi, Peng; Lin, Gan; Wáng, Yì Xiáng J; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-09-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) technique is a new modality for cancer therapy, and several candidates are being tested clinically. In the development of RNAi-based therapeutics, imaging methods can provide a visible and quantitative way to investigate the therapeutic effect at anatomical, cellular, and molecular level; to noninvasively trace the distribution; to and study the biological processes in preclinical and clinical stages. Their abilities are important not only for therapeutic optimization and evaluation but also for shortening of the time of drug development to market. Typically, imaging-functionalized RNAi therapeutics delivery that combines nanovehicles and imaging techniques to study and improve their biodistribution and accumulation in tumor site has been progressively integrated into anticancer drug discovery and development processes. This review presents an overview of the current status of translating the RNAi cancer therapeutics in the clinic, a brief description of the biological barriers in drug delivery, and the roles of imaging in aspects of administration route, systemic circulation, and cellular barriers for the clinical translation of RNAi cancer therapeutics, and with partial content for discussing the safety concerns. Finally, we focus on imaging-guided delivery of RNAi therapeutics in preclinical development, including the basic principles of different imaging modalities, and their advantages and limitations for biological imaging. With growing number of RNAi therapeutics entering the clinic, various imaging methods will play an important role in facilitating the translation of RNAi cancer therapeutics from bench to bedside. PMID:26805788

  16. A miniature wearable optical imaging system for guiding surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mela, Christopher A.; Patterson, Carrie L.; Liu, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Image guidance can result in improved surgical outcomes, shorter operating times as well as a reduced likelihood of requiring a follow-up surgery for various medical interventions. Many intraoperative imaging systems utilize 2D computer monitors, making it difficult to correlate the surgical landscape with the displayed functional information as well as potentially distracting the surgeon. To address this issue, a miniature, wearable Near Infrared (NIR) fluorescent imaging system entitled Stereoscopic Optical Imaging Goggle is developed. The system is made up of two imaging sensors affixed to a wearable stereoscopic display, providing the surgeon with functional data in 3 dimensions with depth perception. We have characterized the system's optical properties and fluorescent detection limits. In addition, we have demonstrated the efficacy of the system during surgical studies in chicken. We have found that the system can resolve fluorescent structures down to 0.25mm. The system was successfully guided the excision of fluorescent tissue from a chicken. To the best of our knowledge, the Stereoscopic Optical Imaging Goggle is the first wearable wide-field fluorescence imaging system that offers stereoscopic imaging capability and 3D depth perception.

  17. Image fusion and navigation platforms for percutaneous image-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Manoj; Venkatesan, Aradhana M

    2016-04-01

    Image-guided interventional procedures, particularly image guided biopsy and ablation, serve an important role in the care of the oncology patient. The need for tumor genomic and proteomic profiling, early tumor response assessment and confirmation of early recurrence are common scenarios that may necessitate successful biopsies of targets, including those that are small, anatomically unfavorable or inconspicuous. As image-guided ablation is increasingly incorporated into interventional oncology practice, similar obstacles are posed for the ablation of technically challenging tumor targets. Navigation tools, including image fusion and device tracking, can enable abdominal interventionalists to more accurately target challenging biopsy and ablation targets. Image fusion technologies enable multimodality fusion and real-time co-displays of US, CT, MRI, and PET/CT data, with navigational technologies including electromagnetic tracking, robotic, cone beam CT, optical, and laser guidance of interventional devices. Image fusion and navigational platform technology is reviewed in this article, including the results of studies implementing their use for interventional procedures. Pre-clinical and clinical experiences to date suggest these technologies have the potential to reduce procedure risk, time, and radiation dose to both the patient and the operator, with a valuable role to play for complex image-guided interventions. PMID:26826086

  18. Image-guided transorbital procedures with endoscopic video augmentation

    PubMed Central

    DeLisi, Michael P.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical interventions to the orbital space behind the eyeball are limited to highly invasive procedures due to the confined nature of the region along with the presence of several intricate soft tissue structures. A minimally invasive approach to orbital surgery would enable several therapeutic options, particularly new treatment protocols for optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. The authors have developed an image-guided system for the purpose of navigating a thin flexible endoscope to a specified target region behind the eyeball. Navigation within the orbit is particularly challenging despite its small volume, as the presence of fat tissue occludes the endoscopic visual field while the surgeon must constantly be aware of optic nerve position. This research investigates the impact of endoscopic video augmentation to targeted image-guided navigation in a series of anthropomorphic phantom experiments. Methods: A group of 16 surgeons performed a target identification task within the orbits of four skull phantoms. The task consisted of identifying the correct target, indicated by the augmented video and the preoperative imaging frames, out of four possibilities. For each skull, one orbital intervention was performed with video augmentation, while the other was done with the standard image guidance technique, in random order. Results: The authors measured a target identification accuracy of 95.3% and 85.9% for the augmented and standard cases, respectively, with statistically significant improvement in procedure time (Z = −2.044, p = 0.041) and intraoperator mean procedure time (Z = 2.456, p = 0.014) when augmentation was used. Conclusions: Improvements in both target identification accuracy and interventional procedure time suggest that endoscopic video augmentation provides valuable additional orientation and trajectory information in an image-guided procedure. Utilization of video augmentation in transorbital interventions could further minimize

  19. Compact wearable dual-mode imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Nan; Huang, Chih-Yu; Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Huang, Chongyuan; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel; Liang, Rongguang

    2015-09-01

    A wearable all-plastic imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery is presented. The compact size of the system is especially suitable for applications in the operating room. The system consists of a dual-mode imaging system, see-through goggle, autofocusing, and auto-contrast tuning modules. The paper will discuss the system design and demonstrate the system performance.

  20. Compact wearable dual-mode imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Nan; Huang, Chih-Yu; Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Huang, Chongyuan; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel; Liang, Rongguang

    2015-09-01

    A wearable all-plastic imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery is presented. The compact size of the system is especially suitable for applications in the operating room. The system consists of a dual-mode imaging system, see-through goggle, autofocusing, and auto-contrast tuning modules. The paper will discuss the system design and demonstrate the system performance. PMID:26358823

  1. Radio imaging of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Raftery, C. L.; Saint-Hilaire, P.

    2012-12-01

    Radio observations can be used to identify sources of electron acceleration within flares and CMEs. In a small number of events, radio imaging has revealed the presence of synchrotron emission from nonthermal electrons in the expanding loops of the CME (Bastian et al. (2001), Maia et al. (2007) and Démoulin et al. (2012)). Events in which the synchrotron emission is sufficiently bright to be identified in the presence of plasma emission from radio bursts, which are prevalent at meter wavelengths, are infrequent. Using radio images from the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) we present observations of synchrotron emission associated with a CME which occurred on the 14th of August 2010. Using context observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2, the LASCO coronograph onboard SOHO and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we follow the propagation of the CME out to 2-3 solar radii and characterize the associated electron distribution. We find that the synchrotron emission is cospatial with the CME core.

  2. Signal reduction in fluorescence imaging using radio frequency-multiplexed excitation by compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Antony C. S.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence imaging using radio frequency-multiplexed excitation (FIRE) has emerged to enable an order-of-magnitude higher frame rate than the current technologies. Similar to all high-speed realtime imaging modalities, FIRE inherently generates massive image data continuously. While this technology entails high-throughput data sampling, processing, and storage in real-time, strategies in data compression on the fly is also beneficial. We here report that it is feasible to exploit the radio frequency-multiplexed excitation scheme in FIRE for implementing compressed sensing (CS) without any modification of the FIRE system. We numerically demonstrate that CS-FIRE can reduce the effective data rate by 95% without severe degradation of image quality.

  3. Radio Pulsation Search and Imaging Study of SGR J1935+2154

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surnis, Mayuresh. P.; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Maan, Yogesh; Krishnakumar, M. A.; Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun

    2016-08-01

    We present the results obtained from imaging observations and a search for radio pulsations toward the magnetar SGR J1935+2154 made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the Ooty Radio Telescope. We present the high-resolution radio image of the supernova remnant (SNR) G57.2+0.8, which is positionally associated with SGR J1935+2154. We did not detect significant periodic radio pulsations from the magnetar, with 8σ upper limits on its flux density of 0.4 and 0.2 mJy at 326.5 and 610 MHz, respectively, for an assumed duty cycle of 10%. The corresponding 6σ upper limits at the two frequencies for any burst emission with an assumed width of 10 ms are 0.5 Jy and 63 mJy, respectively. No continuum radio point source was detected at the position of SGR J1935+2154 with a 3σ upper limit of 1.2 mJy. We also did not detect significant diffuse radio emission in a radius of 70 arc s coinciding with the recently reported diffuse X-ray emission, with a 3σ upper limit of 4.5 mJy. Using the archival HI spectra, we estimate the distance of SNR G57.2+0.8 to be 11.7 ± 2.8 kpc. Based on the measured HI column density (N H ) along this line of sight, we argue that the magnetar could be physically associated with SNR G57.2+0.8. Based on the present data, we cannot rule out either a pulsar wind nebula or a dust-scattering halo origin for the diffuse X-ray emission seen around the magnetar.

  4. A Radio Continuum Study of Dwarf Galaxies: 6 cm imaging of LITTLE THINGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchener, Ben; Brinks, Elias; Heesen, Volker; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Zhang, Hongxin; Rau, Urvashi; Rupen, Michael P.; Little Things Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    To bypass uncertainties introduced by extinction caused by dust at optical wavelengths, we examine to what extent the radio continuum can probe star formation (SF) in dwarf galaxies. We provide VLA 6-cm C-array (4 to 8 GHz) radio continuum images with integrated flux densities for 40 dwarf galaxies taken from LITTLE THINGS. We find 27 harbor significant emission coincident with SF tracers; 17 are new detections. We infer the average thermal fraction to be 39 +- 25%. The LITTLE THINGS galaxies follow the Condon radio continuum - star formation rate (SFR) relation down to an SFR of 0.1 Msol/yr. At lower rates they follow a power-law characterized by a slope of 1.2 +- 0.1 with a scatter of 0.2 dex . We interpret this as an underproduction of the non-thermal radio continuum component. When considering the non-thermal radio continuum to star formation rate slope on its own, we find the slope to be 1.2. The magnetic field strength we find is typically 9.4 +- 3.8 muG in and around star forming regions which is similar to that in spiral galaxies. In a few dwarfs, the magnetic field strength can reach as high as 30 muG in localized 100 pc star forming regions. The underproduction of non-thermal radio continuum is likely due to the escape of Cosmic Ray electrons from the galaxy. The LITTLE THINGS galaxies are consistent with the radio continuum - far infrared luminosity relation. We observe a power-law slope of 1.06 +- 0.08 with a scatter of 0.24 dex which suggests that the 'conspiracy' of the radio continuum - far infrared relation continues to hold even for dwarf galaxies.

  5. A multimodal nano agent for image-guided cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinzi; Muhanna, Nidal; De Souza, Raquel; Wada, Hironobu; Chan, Harley; Akens, Margarete K; Anayama, Takashi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Serra, Stefano; Irish, Jonathan; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative imaging technologies including computed tomography and fluorescence optical imaging are becoming routine tools in the cancer surgery operating room. They constitute an enabling platform for high performance surgical resections that assure local control while minimizing morbidity. New contrast agents that can increase the sensitivity and visualization power of existing intraoperative imaging techniques will further enhance their clinical benefit. We report here the development, detection and visualization of a dual-modality computed tomography and near-infrared fluorescence nano liposomal agent (CF800) in multiple preclinical animal models of cancer. We describe the successful application of this agent for combined preoperative computed tomography based three-dimensional surgical planning and intraoperative target mapping (>200 Hounsfield Units enhancement), as well as near-infrared fluorescence guided resection (>5-fold tumor-to-background ratio). These results strongly support the clinical advancement of this agent for image-guided surgery with potential to improve lesion localization, margin delineation and metastatic lymph node detection. PMID:26218742

  6. Web hospital information system for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Tsai, Weu-Tek; Canessa, Gino; Canessa, John C.

    2002-05-01

    A complete Web based hospital information system, which can allow medical doctors to access and modify patient information and records anywhere in the world via the Internet, was developed. More specifically, this Web information system can be linked seamlessly to our fully computerized MR image-guided neurosurgery suite. This information system, which utilizes the unprecedented Internet infrastructure and adopts the most updated software technologies, addresses the urgent need for handling today's hospital information flow and management. With this new information system in our surgery suite, images and records that have been transferred directly from a diagnostic system such as MR, CT, etc. to the DICOM archive are accessible via a secured Internet connection. When data is accessed via the Web, it can be retrieved in several formats, including raw DICOM and binary, which are extremely useful for various research and development purposes, as well as new applications that require access to the original image data. The Internet-based Web Hospital Information System (WHIS) can easily match the existing standards for this type of information system in a hospital and can accommodate any anticipated requirements for image-guided minimally invasive surgery in the future. A practical and potentially low cost Web Hospital information system, which is functionality- driven, will be presented in this paper. It provides an extremely intuitive interactive environment, as well as a very user-friendly interface for use by both medical doctors and patients.

  7. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  8. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation for breast lesions under computer-aided MRI guidance: the first experience and initial results

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, M H; Kilic, F; Icten, G E; Aydogan, F; Ozben, V; Halac, M; Olgun, D C; Gazioglu, E; Celik, V; Uras, C; Altug, Z A

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to present an alternative technique for the pre-operative localisation of solely MRI-detected suspicious breast lesions using a computer-assisted MRI-guided radio-guided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) technique. Methods Between January 2009 and June 2010, 25 females with a total of 25 suspicious breast lesions that could be detected only by MRI, and for whom breast surgery was planned, underwent the computer-assisted MRI-guided ROLL technique. A seven-channel biopsy breast array coil and computerised diagnostic workstation were used for the localisation procedure. Three-phase dynamic contrast-enhanced axial images were taken. After investigating the localisation co-ordinates with the help of intervention software on a workstation, an 18 G coaxial cannula was placed in the exact position determined. Following verification of the cannula position by additional axial scans, 99mTc-labelled macroalbumin aggregate and MRI contrast material were injected. Post-procedure MRI scans were used to confirm the correct localisation. Results All the procedures were technically successful. The mean lesion size was 10.8 mm (range: 4–25 mm). The mean total magnet and the mean localisation times were 28.6 min (range: 18–46 min) and 13.1 min (range: 8–20 min), respectively. Grid and pillar methods were used for localisation in 24 procedures and 1 procedure, respectively. On histopathological examination, 6 malignant, 10 high-risk and 9 benign lesions were identified. All patients tolerated the procedure well. There were no major complications. Conclusion This is the first report documenting the application of MRI-guided ROLL. Based on our preliminary results, this technique is very efficient and seems to be a good alternative to wire localisation. PMID:22010030

  9. High Angular Resolution Imaging of Solar Radio Bursts from the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Lazio, J.; Bale, S.; Burns, J. O.; Farrell, W. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Weiler, K.

    2011-12-01

    Locating low frequency radio observatories on the lunar surface has a number of advantages, including positional stability and a very low ionospheric radio cutoff. Here, we describe the Radio Observatory on the Lunar Surface for Solar studies (ROLSS), a concept for a low frequency, radio imaging interferometric array designed to study particle acceleration in the corona and inner heliosphere. ROLSS would be deployed during an early lunar sortie or by a robotic rover as part of an unmanned landing. The preferred site is on the lunar near side to simplify the data downlink to Earth. The prime science mission is to image type II and type III solar radio bursts with the aim of determining the sites at and mechanisms by which the radiating particles are accelerated. Secondary science goals include constraining the density of the lunar ionosphere by measuring the low radio frequency cutoff of the solar radio emissions or background galactic radio emission, measuring the flux, particle mass, and arrival direction of interplanetary and interstellar dust, and constraining the low energy electron population in astrophysical sources. Furthermore, ROLSS serves a pathfinder function for larger lunar radio arrays. Key design requirements on ROLSS include the operational frequency and angular resolution. The electron densities in the solar corona and inner heliosphere are such that the relevant emission occurs below 10 MHz, essentially unobservable from Earth's surface due to the terrestrial ionospheric cutoff. Resolving the potential sites of particle acceleration requires an instrument with an angular resolution of at least 2 deg at 10 MHz, equivalent to a linear array size of approximately one kilometer. The major components of the ROLSS array are 3 antenna arms, each of 500 m length, arranged in a Y formation, with a central electronics package (CEP) at their intersection. Each antenna arm is a linear strip of polyimide film (e.g., Kapton) on which 16 single polarization

  10. High Angular Resolution Imaging of Solar Radio Bursts from the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowall, Robert J.; Lazio, Joseph; Bale, Stuart; Burns, Jack O.; Farrell, William M.; Gopalswamy, Nat; Jones, Dayton L.; Kasper, Justin Christophe; Weiler, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Locating low frequency radio observatories on the lunar surface has a number of advantages, including positional stability and a very low ionospheric radio cutoff. Here, we describe the Radio Observatory on the lunar Surface for Solar studies (ROLSS), a concept for a low frequency, radio imaging interferometric array designed to study particle acceleration in the corona and inner heliosphere. ROLSS would be deployed during an early lunar sortie or by a robotic rover as part of an unmanned landing. The preferred site is on the lunar near side to simplify the data downlink to Earth. The prime science mission is to image type II and type III solar radio bursts with the aim of determining the sites at and mechanisms by which the radiating particles are accelerated. Secondary science goals include constraining the density of the lunar ionosphere by measuring the low radio frequency cutoff of the solar radio emissions or background galactic radio emission, measuring the flux, particle mass, and arrival direction of interplanetary and interstellar dust, and constraining the low energy electron population in astrophysical sources. Furthermore, ROLSS serves a pathfinder function for larger lunar radio arrays. Key design requirements on ROLSS include the operational frequency and angular resolution. The electron densities in the solar corona and inner heliosphere are such that the relevant emission occurs below 10 M Hz, essentially unobservable from Earth's surface due to the terrestrial ionospheric cutoff. Resolving the potential sites of particle acceleration requires an instrument with an angular resolution of at least 2 deg at 10 MHz, equivalent to a linear array size of approximately one kilometer. The major components of the ROLSS array are 3 antenna arms, each of 500 m length, arranged in a Y formation, with a central electronics package (CEP) at their intersection. Each antenna arm is a linear strip of polyimide film (e.g., Kapton(TradeMark)) on which 16 single

  11. Fast radio imaging of Jupiter's magnetosphere at low-frequencies with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, P.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter emits intense decameter (DAM) radio waves, detectable from the ground in the range ˜10-40 MHz. They are produced by energetic electron precipitations in its auroral regions (auroral-DAM), as well as near the magnetic footprints of the Galilean satellite Io (Io-DAM). Radio imaging of these decameter emissions with arcsecond angular resolution and millisecond time resolution should provide: an improved mapping of the surface planetary magnetic field, via imaging of instantaneous cyclotron sources of highest frequency; measurements of the beaming angle of the radiation relative to the local magnetic field, as a function of frequency; detailed information on the Io-Jupiter electrodynamic interaction, in particular the lead angle between the Io flux tube and the radio emitting field line; direct information on the origin of the sporadic drifting decameter S-bursts, thought to be electron bunches propagating along magnetic field lines, and possibly revealing electric potential drops along these field lines; direct observation of DAM emission possibly related to the Ganymede-Jupiter, Europa-Jupiter and/or Callisto-Jupiter interactions, and their energetics; information on the magnetospheric dynamics, via correlation of radio images with ultraviolet and infrared images of the aurora as well as of the Galilean satellite footprints, and study of their temporal variations; an improved mapping of the Jovian plasma environment (especially the Io torus) via the propagation effects that it induces on the radio waves propagating through it (Faraday rotation, diffraction fringes, etc.); possibly on the long-term a better accuracy on the determination of Jupiter's rotation period. Fast imaging should be permitted by the very high intensity of Jovian decameter bursts. LOFAR's capability to measure the full polarization of the incoming waves will be exploited. The main limitation will come from the maximum angular resolution reachable. We discuss several approaches for

  12. Automated quality assurance for image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Elder, Eric; Fox, Tim

    2009-01-01

    The use of image-guided patient positioning requires fast and reliable Quality Assurance (QA) methods to ensure the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam coincides with the integrated kilovoltage (kV) or volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging and guidance systems. Current QA protocol is based on visually observing deviations of certain features in acquired kV in-room treatment images such as markers, distances, or HU values from phantom specifications. This is a time-consuming and subjective task because these features are identified by human operators. The method implemented in this study automated an IGRT QA protocol by using specific image processing algorithms that rigorously detected phantom features and performed all measurements involved in a classical QA protocol. The algorithm was tested on four different IGRT QA phantoms. Image analysis algorithms were able to detect QA features with the same accuracy as the manual approach but significantly faster. All described tests were performed in a single procedure, with acquisition of the images taking approximately 5 minutes, and the automated software analysis taking less than 1 minute. The study showed that the automated image analysis based procedure may be used as a daily QA procedure because it is completely automated and uses a single phantom setup. PMID:19223842

  13. Faint Radio Sources in the NOAO Boötes Field: VLBA Imaging and Optical Identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Taylor, G. B.; Rector, T. A.; Myers, S. T.; Fassnacht, C. D.

    2005-09-01

    As a step toward investigating the parsec-scale properties of faint extragalactic radio sources, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) was used at 5.0 GHz to obtain phase-referenced images of 76 sources in the NOAO Boötes field. These 76 sources were selected from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) catalog to have peak flux densities above 10 mJy at 5" resolution and deconvolved major diameters of less than 3" at 1.4 GHz. Of these faint radio sources, 57 were identified with accretion-powered radio galaxies and quasars brighter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band. On Very Large Array (VLA) scales at 1.4 GHz, a measure of the compactness of the faint sources (the ratio of the peak flux density from FIRST to the integrated flux density from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog) spans the full range of possibilities arising from source-resolution effects. Of the faint radio sources, 30, or 39+9-7%, were detected with the VLBA at 5.0 GHz with peak flux densities above 6 σ~2 mJy at 2 mas resolution. The VLBA detections occur through the full range of compactness ratios. The stronger VLBA detections can themselves serve as phase-reference calibrators, boding well for opening up much of the radio sky to VLBA imaging. For the adopted cosmology, the VLBA resolution corresponds to 17 pc or finer. Most VLBA detections are unresolved or slightly resolved, but one is diffuse and five show either double or core-jet structures; the properties of these latter six are discussed in detail. Three VLBA detections are unidentified and fainter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band; their properties are highlighted because they likely mark optically obscured active nuclei at high redshift.

  14. The evolution of image-guided lumbosacral spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Austin R.; Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques and approaches of spinal fusion have considerably evolved since their first description in the early 1900s. The incorporation of pedicle screw constructs into lumbosacral spine surgery is among the most significant advances in the field, offering immediate stability and decreased rates of pseudarthrosis compared to previously described methods. However, early studies describing pedicle screw fixation and numerous studies thereafter have demonstrated clinically significant sequelae of inaccurate surgical fusion hardware placement. A number of image guidance systems have been developed to reduce morbidity from hardware malposition in increasingly complex spine surgeries. Advanced image guidance systems such as intraoperative stereotaxis improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using a variety of surgical approaches, however their clinical indications and clinical impact remain debated. Beginning with intraoperative fluoroscopy, this article describes the evolution of image guided lumbosacral spinal fusion, emphasizing two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) navigational methods. PMID:25992368

  15. Fast Source Camera Identification Using Content Adaptive Guided Image Filter.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Kang, Xiangui

    2016-03-01

    Source camera identification (SCI) is an important topic in image forensics. One of the most effective fingerprints for linking an image to its source camera is the sensor pattern noise, which is estimated as the difference between the content and its denoised version. It is widely believed that the performance of the sensor-based SCI heavily relies on the denoising filter used. This study proposes a novel sensor-based SCI method using content adaptive guided image filter (CAGIF). Thanks to the low complexity nature of the CAGIF, the proposed method is much faster than the state-of-the-art methods, which is a big advantage considering the potential real-time application of SCI. Despite the advantage of speed, experimental results also show that the proposed method can achieve comparable or better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy. PMID:27404627

  16. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselwander, Christopher J.; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A.

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5 Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately 2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500 kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs.

  17. gr-MRI: A software package for magnetic resonance imaging using software defined radios.

    PubMed

    Hasselwander, Christopher J; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop software that enables the rapid implementation of custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available software defined radios (SDRs). The developed gr-MRI software package comprises a set of Python scripts, flowgraphs, and signal generation and recording blocks for GNU Radio, an open-source SDR software package that is widely used in communications research. gr-MRI implements basic event sequencing functionality, and tools for system calibrations, multi-radio synchronization, and MR signal processing and image reconstruction. It includes four pulse sequences: a single-pulse sequence to record free induction signals, a gradient-recalled echo imaging sequence, a spin echo imaging sequence, and an inversion recovery spin echo imaging sequence. The sequences were used to perform phantom imaging scans with a 0.5Tesla tabletop MRI scanner and two commercially-available SDRs. One SDR was used for RF excitation and reception, and the other for gradient pulse generation. The total SDR hardware cost was approximately $2000. The frequency of radio desynchronization events and the frequency with which the software recovered from those events was also measured, and the SDR's ability to generate frequency-swept RF waveforms was validated and compared to the scanner's commercial spectrometer. The spin echo images geometrically matched those acquired using the commercial spectrometer, with no unexpected distortions. Desynchronization events were more likely to occur at the very beginning of an imaging scan, but were nearly eliminated if the user invoked the sequence for a short period before beginning data recording. The SDR produced a 500kHz bandwidth frequency-swept pulse with high fidelity, while the commercial spectrometer produced a waveform with large frequency spike errors. In conclusion, the developed gr-MRI software can be used to develop high-fidelity, low-cost custom MRI spectrometers using commercially-available SDRs. PMID:27394165

  18. [Design of an FPGA-based image guided surgery hardware platform].

    PubMed

    Zou, Fa-Dong; Qin, Bin-Jie

    2008-07-01

    An FPGA-Based Image Guided Surgery Hardware Platform has been designed and implemented in this paper. The hardware platform can provide hardware acceleration for image guided surgery. It is completed with a video decoder interface, a DDR memory controller, a 12C bus controller, an interrupt controller and so on. It is able to perform real time video endoscopy image capturing in the surgery and to preserve the hardware interface for image guided surgery algorithm module. PMID:18973036

  19. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  20. A guide to human in vivo microcirculatory flow image analysis.

    PubMed

    Massey, Michael J; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2016-01-01

    Various noninvasive microscopic camera technologies have been used to visualize the sublingual microcirculation in patients. We describe a comprehensive approach to bedside in vivo sublingual microcirculation video image capture and analysis techniques in the human clinical setting. We present a user perspective and guide suitable for clinical researchers and developers interested in the capture and analysis of sublingual microcirculatory flow videos. We review basic differences in the cameras, optics, light sources, operation, and digital image capture. We describe common techniques for image acquisition and discuss aspects of video data management, including data transfer, metadata, and database design and utilization to facilitate the image analysis pipeline. We outline image analysis techniques and reporting including video preprocessing and image quality evaluation. Finally, we propose a framework for future directions in the field of microcirculatory flow videomicroscopy acquisition and analysis. Although automated scoring systems have not been sufficiently robust for widespread clinical or research use to date, we discuss promising innovations that are driving new development. PMID:26861691

  1. LOFAR tied-array imaging of Type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosan, D. E.; Gallagher, P. T.; Zucca, P.; Fallows, R.; Carley, E. P.; Mann, G.; Bisi, M. M.; Kerdraon, A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Rucker, H. O.; Thidé, B.; Magdalenić, J.; Vocks, C.; Reid, H.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; Conway, J. E.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Markoff, S.; McKean, J. P.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pietka, G.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schwarz, D.; Serylak, M.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B. W.; Stewart, A.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission which is often associated with energetic phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (<100 MHz), the Sun has not been imaged extensively because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio telescopes. Aims: Here, the combined high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) was used to study solar Type III radio bursts at 30-90 MHz and their association with CMEs. Methods: The Sun was imaged with 126 simultaneous tied-array beams within ≤5 R⊙ of the solar centre. This method offers benefits over standard interferometric imaging since each beam produces high temporal (~83 ms) and spectral resolution (12.5 kHz) dynamic spectra at an array of spatial locations centred on the Sun. LOFAR's standard interferometric output is currently limited to one image per second. Results: Over a period of 30 min, multiple Type III radio bursts were observed, a number of which were found to be located at high altitudes (~4 R⊙ from the solar center at 30 MHz) and to have non-radial trajectories. These bursts occurred at altitudes in excess of values predicted by 1D radial electron density models. The non-radial high altitude Type III bursts were found to be associated with the expanding flank of a CME. Conclusions: The CME may have compressed neighbouring streamer plasma producing larger electron densities at high altitudes, while the non-radial burst trajectories can be explained by the deflection of radial magnetic fields as the CME expanded in the low corona. Movie associated to Fig. 2 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The 2011 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  3. Miniature image guided three-axis scanning and positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avirovik, Dragan; Dave, Digant; Priya, Shashank

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a high precision three axes scanning and positioning system for integration with Multifunctional Image Guided Surgical (MIGS) Platform. The stage integrates three main components: an optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe, laser scalpel and suction cup. The requirements for this stage were to provide scanning area of 400mm2, resolution of less than 10 microns and scanning velocity in the range of 10 - 40 mm/s. The stage was modeled using computer aided design software NX Unigraphics. In addition to the parameters mentioned above, additional boundary conditions for the stage were set as low volume and modularity. Optimized stage model was fabricated by using rapid prototyping technique that integrates low cost stepper motors, threaded rod drive train and a stepper motor controller. The EZ4axis stepper motor controller was able to provide 1/8th microstep resolution control over the motors, which met the criterion desired for the MIGS platform. Integration of computer controlled three-axis stage with MIGS platform provides the opportunity for conducting intricate surgical procedures using remote control or joystick. The device is image guided using the OCT probe and it is able to pin point any location requiring a laser scalpel incision. Due to the scanning capabilities, a high quality threedimensional image of the tissue topography is obtained which allows the surgeon to make a confident decision of where to apply the laser scalpel and make an incision.

  4. Object segmentation based on guided layering from video image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guangfeng; Zhu, Hong; Fan, Caixia; Zhang, Erhu

    2011-09-01

    When the object is similar to the background, it is difficult to segment the completed human body object from video images. To solve the problem, this paper proposes an object segmentation algorithm based on guided layering from video images. This algorithm adopts the structure of advance by degrees, including three parts altogether. Each part constructs the different energy function in terms of the spatiotemporal information to maximize the posterior probability of segmentation label. In part one, the energy functions are established, respectively, with the frame difference information in the first layer and second layer. By optimization, the initial segmentation is solved in the first layer, and then the amended segmentation is obtained in the second layer. In part two, the energy function is built in the interframe with the shape feature as the prior guiding to eliminate the interframe difference of the segmentation result. In art three, the segmentation results in the previous two parts are fused to suppress or inhibit the over-repairing segmentation and the object shape variations in the adjacent two-frame. The results from the compared experiment indicate that this algorithm can obtain the completed human body object in the case of the video image with similarity between object and background.

  5. Calibration and Imaging for the Next Generation of Radio Synthesis Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, T. J.

    2007-10-01

    The next big improvements in scientific capability in radio astronomy are expected to come from large increases in sensitivity and field of view, leading to telescopes that are ideally suited to surveying the radio sky. For the last fifteen years radio astronomers around the world have been competing and collaborating to come up with designs for a Square Kilometer Array (SKA), which will be roughly fifty times more sensitive than the Very Large Array and three orders of magnitude faster at surveying. The challenge of building such a telescope at a relatively affordable cost (1 Billion Euros) has led to a number of innovative designs. The common element of the leading designs is an increasing reliance on digital technology for beam forming. In this paper, I review the two main areas of innovation, aperture arrays and phased array feeds, and describe how these solve some problems but raise others, particularly for calibration and imaging.

  6. Chimenea and other tools: Automated imaging of multi-epoch radio-synthesis data with CASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, T. D.; Anderson, G. E.

    2015-11-01

    In preparing the way for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders, there is a pressing need to begin probing the transient sky in a fully robotic fashion using the current generation of radio telescopes. Effective exploitation of such surveys requires a largely automated data-reduction process. This paper introduces an end-to-end automated reduction pipeline, AMIsurvey, used for calibrating and imaging data from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array. AMIsurvey makes use of several component libraries which have been packaged separately for open-source release. The most scientifically significant of these is chimenea, which implements a telescope-agnostic algorithm for automated imaging of pre-calibrated multi-epoch radio-synthesis data, of the sort typically acquired for transient surveys or follow-up. The algorithm aims to improve upon standard imaging pipelines by utilizing iterative RMS-estimation and automated source-detection to avoid so called 'Clean-bias', and makes use of CASA subroutines for the underlying image-synthesis operations. At a lower level, AMIsurvey relies upon two libraries, drive-ami and drive-casa, built to allow use of mature radio-astronomy software packages from within Python scripts. While targeted at automated imaging, the drive-casa interface can also be used to automate interaction with any of the CASA subroutines from a generic Python process. Additionally, these packages may be of wider technical interest beyond radio-astronomy, since they demonstrate use of the Python library pexpect to emulate terminal interaction with an external process. This approach allows for rapid development of a Python interface to any legacy or externally-maintained pipeline which accepts command-line input, without requiring alterations to the original code.

  7. Multi-focus image fusion using a guided-filter-based difference image.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang; Qin, Hanlin; Li, Jia; Zhou, Huixin; Yang, Tingwu

    2016-03-20

    The aim of multi-focus image fusion technology is to integrate different partially focused images into one all-focused image. To realize this goal, a new multi-focus image fusion method based on a guided filter is proposed and an efficient salient feature extraction method is presented in this paper. Furthermore, feature extraction is primarily the main objective of the present work. Based on salient feature extraction, the guided filter is first used to acquire the smoothing image containing the most sharpness regions. To obtain the initial fusion map, we compose a mixed focus measure by combining the variance of image intensities and the energy of the image gradient together. Then, the initial fusion map is further processed by a morphological filter to obtain a good reprocessed fusion map. Lastly, the final fusion map is determined via the reprocessed fusion map and is optimized by a guided filter. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method does markedly improve the fusion performance compared to previous fusion methods and can be competitive with or even outperform state-of-the-art fusion methods in terms of both subjective visual effects and objective quality metrics. PMID:27140557

  8. Optoacoustic imaging of the prostate: development toward image-guided biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, André; Fronheiser, Matthew; Bell, Brent A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-03-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) tomography has demonstrated utility in identifying blood-rich malignancies in breast tissue. We describe the development and characterization of a laser OA imaging system for the prostate (LOIS-P). The system consists of a fiber-coupled Q-switched laser operating at 757 nm, a commercial 128-channel ultrasonic probe, a digital signal processor, and software that uses the filtered radial back-projection algorithm for image reconstruction. The system is used to reconstruct OA images of a blood-rich lesion induced in vivo in a canine prostate. OA images obtained in vivo are compared to images acquired using ultrasound, the current gold standard for guiding biopsy of the prostate. Although key structural features such as the urethra could be identified with both imaging techniques, a bloody lesion representing a highly vascularized tumor could only be clearly identified in OA images. The advantages and limitations of both forward and backward illumination modes are also evaluated by collecting OA images of phantoms simulating blood vessels within tissue. System resolution is estimated to be 0.2 mm in the radial direction of the acoustic array. The minimum detectable pressure signal is 1.83 Pa. Our results encourage further development toward a dual-modality OA/ultrasonic system for prostate imaging and image-guided biopsy.

  9. Fast-MICP for frameless image-guided surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Wang, Sheng-Ta; Lin, Chung-Wei; Lee, Shin-Tseng

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) systems, image-to-physical registration is critical for reliable anatomical information mapping and spatial guidance. Conventional stereotactic frame-based or fiducial-based approaches provide accurate registration but are not patient-friendly. This study proposes a frameless cranial IGS system that uses computer vision techniques to replace the frame or fiducials with the natural features of the patient. Methods: To perform a cranial surgery with the proposed system, the facial surface of the patient is first reconstructed by stereo vision. Accuracy is ensured by capturing parallel-line patterns projected from a calibrated LCD projector. Meanwhile, another facial surface is reconstructed from preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of the patient. The proposed iterative closest point (ICP)-based algorithm [fast marker-added ICP (Fast-MICP)] is then used to register the two facial data sets, which transfers the anatomical information from the CT images to the physical space. Results: Experimental results reveal that the Fast-MICP algorithm reduces the computational cost of marker-added ICP (J.-D. Lee et al., ''A coarse-to-fine surface registration algorithm for frameless brain surgery,'' in Proceedings of International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007, pp. 836-839) to 10% and achieves comparable registration accuracy, which is under 3 mm target registration error (TRE). Moreover, two types of optical-based spatial digitizing devices can be integrated for further surgical navigation. Anatomical information or image-guided surgical landmarks can be projected onto the patient to obtain an immersive augmented reality environment. Conclusion: The proposed frameless IGS system with stereo vision obtains TRE of less than 3 mm. The proposed Fast-MICP registration algorithm reduces registration time by 90% without compromising accuracy.

  10. Image-guided breast biopsy: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, E A M; Wilson, A R M; Michell, M J

    2010-04-01

    Percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy is widely practised to evaluate predominantly non-palpable breast lesions. There has been steady development in percutaneous biopsy techniques. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was the original method of sampling, followed in the early 1990s by large core needle biopsy. The accuracy of both has been improved by ultrasound and stereotactic guidance. Larger bore vacuum-assisted biopsy devices became available in the late 1990s and are now commonplace in most breast units. We review the different types of breast biopsy devices currently available together with various localization techniques used, focusing on their advantages, limitations and current controversial clinical management issues. PMID:20338392

  11. Image-Guided Thromboembolectomy of Acute Arterial Occlusion in Children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Han, Ahram; Choi, Chanjoong; Min, Sang-Il; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Ha, Jongwon; Min, Seung-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute arterial thromboembolism (ATE) is rare in childhood, but this medical emergency requires immediate treatment. Described herein are separate instances of lower extremity ATE in 2 children, both of whom were successfully managed through image-guided thromboembolectomy (IGT). One patient, a 34-month-old female child with nephrotic syndrome, developed bilateral iliac and popliteal thromboembolic arterial occlusions after high-dose steroid therapy. Another 9-year-old girl suffered an embolism of left popliteal artery due to infectious endocarditis. Both patients underwent IGT using over-the-wire Fogarty catheters. During follow-up, presenting symptoms resolved without significant complications. PMID:27177711

  12. [Image-guided stereotaxic biopsy of central nervous system lesions].

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Esperança, J C; Duarte, F

    1998-06-01

    In a series of 44 image guided stereotactic biopsy from August 1995 until March 1997, findings were as follows (frequency order). Tumors, glioblastoma was the most frequent. Primary lymphoma and other conditions associated to AIDS. Metastasis, three cases, Vasculites, two cases, Arachnoid cyst, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, cortical degeneration, inespecific calcification (one case each). The age varied from 1 to 83 years. Forty one lesions were supratentorial, two infratentorial, and one was outside the brain (dura and skull) and we used stereotaxy to localize it. There was no mortality and morbidity was 2.3%. The literature is reviewed. We conclude that this procedure is safe and highly diagnostic. PMID:9698729

  13. Imaging guided mediastinal percutaneal core biopsy--technique and complications.

    PubMed

    Azrumelashvili, T; Mizandari, M; Magalashvili, D; Dundua, T

    2015-05-01

    165 percutaneous biopsies of anterior, middle and posterior mediastinum lesions were performed to 156 patients. Procedure was guided by US in 40 cases, by CT - in 125 cases. Hydrodissection was used in 5 cases, artificial pneumothorax - in 3 cases in order to avoid transpulmonary needle pass. Post-biopsy CT scan was performed and patients observed for any complications. Adequate tissue for histological diagnosis was obtained in 156 (94.5%) cases at the first attempt; in 9 (5.5%) cases the repeated procedure was needed. No major complications were detected after biopsy procedures; minor complications (pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemophtysis) were detected in 23 (13.9%) cases. No complications were detected after US guided procedures; In 17 (10.3% of all complications) cases pneumothorax, in 4 (2.4%) cases - hemothorax and in 2 (1.2%) cases hemophtisis was detected on CT guided procedures. All hemothorax and hemophtisis and 10 pneumothorax cases happened to be self-limited; in 3 pneumothorax cases aspiration and in 4 cases - pleural drainage was needed. Percutaneous image-guided core biopsy of mediastinal lesions is an accurate and safe procedure, which enables to get the tissue material from all mediastinum compartments. Ultrasound is the most efficient for biopsy guidance, if the target is adequately imaged by it; the advantages of US guidance are: a) possibility of real-time needle movement control b) possibility of real-time blood flow imaging b) noninvasiveness c) cost-effectiveness d) possibility to perform the biopsy at the bedside, in a semiupright position; so, ultrasound is a "Gold Standard" for procedure guidance if the 'target" can be adequately imaged by this technique. If US guidance is impossible biopsy should be performed under CT guidance. Hydrodissection and artificial pneumothorax enables to avoid the lung tissue penetration related complications. Pneumothorax was associated with multiple Needle passes and larger diameter needle use. The safety

  14. Image navigation as a means to expand the boundaries of fluorescence-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Oscar R; Buckle, Tessa; Bunschoten, Anton; Kuil, Joeri; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Wendler, Thomas; Valdés-Olmos, Renato A; van der Poel, Henk G; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2012-05-21

    Hybrid tracers that are both radioactive and fluorescent help extend the use of fluorescence-guided surgery to deeper structures. Such hybrid tracers facilitate preoperative surgical planning using (3D) scintigraphic images and enable synchronous intraoperative radio- and fluorescence guidance. Nevertheless, we previously found that improved orientation during laparoscopic surgery remains desirable. Here we illustrate how intraoperative navigation based on optical tracking of a fluorescence endoscope may help further improve the accuracy of hybrid surgical guidance. After feeding SPECT/CT images with an optical fiducial as a reference target to the navigation system, optical tracking could be used to position the tip of the fluorescence endoscope relative to the preoperative 3D imaging data. This hybrid navigation approach allowed us to accurately identify marker seeds in a phantom setup. The multispectral nature of the fluorescence endoscope enabled stepwise visualization of the two clinically approved fluorescent dyes, fluorescein and indocyanine green. In addition, the approach was used to navigate toward the prostate in a patient undergoing robot-assisted prostatectomy. Navigation of the tracked fluorescence endoscope toward the target identified on SPECT/CT resulted in real-time gradual visualization of the fluorescent signal in the prostate, thus providing an intraoperative confirmation of the navigation accuracy. PMID:22547491

  15. Image navigation as a means to expand the boundaries of fluorescence-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Oscar R.; Buckle, Tessa; Bunschoten, Anton; Kuil, Joeri; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Wendler, Thomas; Valdés-Olmos, Renato A.; van der Poel, Henk G.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2012-05-01

    Hybrid tracers that are both radioactive and fluorescent help extend the use of fluorescence-guided surgery to deeper structures. Such hybrid tracers facilitate preoperative surgical planning using (3D) scintigraphic images and enable synchronous intraoperative radio- and fluorescence guidance. Nevertheless, we previously found that improved orientation during laparoscopic surgery remains desirable. Here we illustrate how intraoperative navigation based on optical tracking of a fluorescence endoscope may help further improve the accuracy of hybrid surgical guidance. After feeding SPECT/CT images with an optical fiducial as a reference target to the navigation system, optical tracking could be used to position the tip of the fluorescence endoscope relative to the preoperative 3D imaging data. This hybrid navigation approach allowed us to accurately identify marker seeds in a phantom setup. The multispectral nature of the fluorescence endoscope enabled stepwise visualization of the two clinically approved fluorescent dyes, fluorescein and indocyanine green. In addition, the approach was used to navigate toward the prostate in a patient undergoing robot-assisted prostatectomy. Navigation of the tracked fluorescence endoscope toward the target identified on SPECT/CT resulted in real-time gradual visualization of the fluorescent signal in the prostate, thus providing an intraoperative confirmation of the navigation accuracy.

  16. LOFAR imaging of Cygnus A - Direct detection of a turnover in the hotspot radio spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKean, J. P.; Godfrey, L. E. H.; Vegetti, S.; Wise, M. W.; Morganti, R.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Rafferty, D.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Blaauw, R.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Cerrigone, L.; Ciardi, B.; de Gasperin, F.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J. M.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horst, A. J. van der; Iacobelli, M.; Intema, H.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J.. A.; Rowlinson, A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Serylak, M.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2016-08-01

    The low-frequency radio spectra of the hotspots within powerful radio galaxies can provide valuable information about the physical processes operating at the site of the jet termination. These processes are responsible for the dissipation of jet kinetic energy, particle acceleration, and magnetic-field generation. Here we report new observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) between 109 and 183 MHz, at an angular resolution of ˜3.5 arcsec. The radio emission of the lobes is found to have a complex spectral index distribution, with a spectral steepening found towards the centre of the source. For the first time, a turnover in the radio spectrum of the two main hotspots of Cygnus A has been directly observed. By combining our LOFAR imaging with data from the Very Large Array at higher frequencies, we show that the very rapid turnover in the hotspot spectra cannot be explained by a low-energy cut-off in the electron energy distribution, as has been previously suggested. Thermal (free-free) absorption or synchrotron self absorption models are able to describe the low-frequency spectral shape of the hotspots, however, as with previous studies, we find that the implied model parameters are unlikely, and interpreting the spectra of the hotspots remains problematic.

  17. Image use in field guides and identification keys: review and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, Roxanne; Kirchoff, Bruce K.

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Although illustrations have played an important role in identification keys and guides since the 18th century, their use has varied widely. Some keys lack all illustrations, while others are heavily illustrated. Even within illustrated guides, the way in which images are used varies considerably. Here, we review image use in paper and electronic guides, and establish a set of best practices for image use in illustrated keys and guides. Scope Our review covers image use in both paper and electronic guides, though we only briefly cover apps for mobile devices. With this one exception, we cover the full range of guides, from those that consist only of species descriptions with no keys, to lavishly illustrated technical keys. Emphasis is placed on how images are used, not on the operation of the guides and key, which has been reviewed by others. We only deal with operation when it impacts image use. Main points Few illustrated keys or guides use images in optimal ways. Most include too few images to show taxonomic variation or variation in characters and character states. The use of multiple images allows easier taxon identification and facilitates the understanding of characters. Most images are usually not standardized, making comparison between images difficult. Although some electronic guides allow images to be enlarged, many do not. Conclusions The best keys and guides use standardized images, displayed at sizes that are easy to see and arranged in a standardized manner so that similar images can be compared across species. Illustrated keys and glossaries should contain multiple images for each character state so that the user can judge variation in the state. Photographic backgrounds should not distract from the subject and, where possible, should be of a standard colour. When used, drawings should be prepared by professional botanical illustrators, and clearly labelled. Electronic keys and guides should allow images to be enlarged so that

  18. Daily targeting of liver tumors: Screening patients with a mock treatment and using a combination of internal and external fiducials for image-guided respiratory-gated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil; Briere, Tina Marie; Dong Lei; Murthy, Ravi; Ng, Chaan; Balter, Peter; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T.; Beddar, A. Sam

    2007-12-15

    The feasibility and accuracy of using a mock treatment to screen suitable patients for respiratory-gated image-guided radiotherapy was investigated. Radio-opaque fiducials implanted adjacent to the liver tumor were used for online positioning to minimize the systematic error in patient positioning. The consistency in the degree of correlation between the external and internal fiducials was analyzed during a mock treatment. This technique could screen patients for gated therapy, reduce setup inaccuracy, and possibly individualize treatment margins.

  19. A novel radio frequency coil for veterinary magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Bin; Huang, Kai-Wen; Wang, Wei-Min

    2010-07-01

    In this article, a novel designed radio frequency (RF) coil is designed and built for the imaging of puppies in a V-shape permanent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Two sets of Helmholtz coil pairs with a V-shape structure are used to improve the holding of an animal in the coil. The homogeneity and the sensitivity of the RF field in the coil are analysed by theoretical calculation. The size and the shape of the new coil are optimized and validated by simulation through using the finite element method (FEM). Good magnetic resonance (MR) images are achieved on a shepherd dog.

  20. Guided Adaptive Image Smoothing via Directional Anisotropic Structure Measurement.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yu; Huang, Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Image smoothing prefers a good metric to identify dominant structures from textures adaptive of intensity contrast. In this paper, we drop on a novel directional anisotropic structure measurement (DASM) toward adaptive image smoothing. With observations on psychological perception regarding anisotropy, non-periodicity and local directionality, DASM can well characterize structures and textures independent on their contrast scales. By using such measurement as constraint, we design a guided adaptive image smoothing scheme by improving extrema localization and envelopes construction in a structure-aware manner. Our approach can well suppresses the staircase-like artifacts and blur of structures that appear in previous methods, which better suits structure-preserving image smoothing task. The algorithm is performed on a space-filling curve as the reduced domain, so it is very fast and much easy to implement in practice. We make comprehensive comparisons with previous state-of-the-art methods for a variety of applications. Experimental results demonstrate the merit using our DASM as metric to identify structures, and the effectiveness and efficiency of our adaptive image smoothing approach to produce commendable results. PMID:26357284

  1. Guided wave phased array beamforming and imaging in composite plates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyu; Tian, Zhenhua

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes phased array beamforming using guided waves in anisotropic composite plates. A generic phased array algorithm is presented, in which direction dependent guided wave parameters and the energy skew effect are considered. This beamforming at an angular direction is achieved based on the classic delay-and-sum principle by applying phase delays to signals received at array elements and adding up the delayed signals. The phase delays are determined with the goal to maximize the array output at the desired direction and minimize it otherwise. For array characterization, the beam pattern of rectangular grid arrays in composite plates is derived. In addition to the beam pattern, the beamforming factor in terms of wavenumber distribution is defined to provide intrinsic explanations for phased array beamforming. The beamforming and damage detection in a composite plate are demonstrated using rectangular grid arrays made by a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Detection images of the composite plate with multiple surface defects at various directions are obtained. The results show that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures. PMID:26907891

  2. Astronomical Images from the Very Large Array (VLA) FIRST Survey Images from the STScI Archive (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm)

    DOE Data Explorer

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters was a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid. The binary data are available in detailed source catalogs, but the full images themselves, developed through special techniques, are also available for public access. Note that the images are fairly large, typically 1150x1550 pixels. Access to the images is simple through the search interface; the images are also available via anonymous ftp at ftp://archive.stsci.edu/pub/vla_first/data. Another convenient way to obtain images is through the FIRST Cutout Server, which allows an image section to be extracted from the coadded image database at a user-specified position. The cutout server is also linked to the FIRST Search Engine, so that the catalog can be searched for sources of interest and then images can be obtained for those objects. All images taken through 2011 are available through the cutout server at http://third.ucllnl.org/cgi-bin/firstcutout.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Focal Prostate Ablation.

    PubMed

    Nour, Sherif G

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer (other than skin cancer) in American men, with one in seven men being diagnosed with this disease during his lifetime. The estimated number of new prostate cancer cases in 2016 is 180,890. For the first time, imaging has become the center of the search for contained, intraglandular, small-volume, and unifocal disease, and an increasing number of academic institutions as well as private practices are implementing programs for prostate multiplanar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as parts of their routine offerings. This article reviews the role of MRI-guided focal prostate ablation, as well as opportunities for further growth in this minimally invasive therapy of prostate cancer. PMID:27582608

  4. Image-guided focal therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sankineni, Sandeep; Wood, Bradford J; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Walton Diaz, Annerleim; Hoang, Anthony N; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Türkbey, Barış

    2014-11-01

    The adoption of routine prostate specific antigen screening has led to the discovery of many small and low-grade prostate cancers which have a low probability of causing mortality. These cancers, however, are often treated with radical therapies resulting in long-term side effects. There has been increasing interest in minimally invasive focal therapies to treat these tumors. While imaging modalities have improved rapidly over the past decade, similar advances in image-guided therapy are now starting to emerge--potentially achieving equivalent oncologic efficacy while avoiding the side effects of conventional radical surgery. The purpose of this article is to review the existing literature regarding the basis of various focal therapy techniques such as cryotherapy, microwave, laser, and high intensity focused ultrasound, and to discuss the results of recent clinical trials that demonstrate early outcomes in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:25205025

  5. Image-guided focal therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sankineni, Sandeep; Wood, Bradford J.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Diaz, Annerleim Walton; Hoang, Anthony N.; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter L.; Türkbey, Barış

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of routine prostate specific antigen screening has led to the discovery of many small and low-grade prostate cancers which have a low probability of causing mortality. These cancers, however, are often treated with radical therapies resulting in long-term side effects. There has been increasing interest in minimally invasive focal therapies to treat these tumors. While imaging modalities have improved rapidly over the past decade, similar advances in image-guided therapy are now starting to emerge—potentially achieving equivalent oncologic efficacy while avoiding the side effects of conventional radical surgery. The purpose of this article is to review the existing literature regarding the basis of various focal therapy techniques such as cryotherapy, microwave, laser, and high intensity focused ultrasound, and to discuss the results of recent clinical trials that demonstrate early outcomes in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:25205025

  6. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Radio and T.V. Repair. Course: D.C. Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoggatt, P.; And Others

    One of four individualized courses included in a radio and television repair curriculum, this course deals with the basic electrical properties of current, voltage, resistance, magnetism, mutual induction, and capacitance. The course is comprised of ten units: (1) Current, (2) Voltage, (3) Resistance, (4) Measuring Voltage and Current in Series…

  7. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Radio and T.V. Repair. Course: Television Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arneson, R.; And Others

    One of four individualized courses included in a radio and television repair, curriculum, this course focuses on trouble-shooting procedures for both black and white and color television equipment. The course is comprised of ten units: (1) Introduction to/and Block Diagrams of Television, (2) Television Audio Section Troubles, (3) Television Video…

  8. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Radio and T.V. Repair. Course: A.C. Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoggatt, P.; And Others

    One of four individualized courses included in a radio and television repair curriculum, this course focuses on alternating current relationships and computations, transformers, power supplies, series and parallel resistive-reactive circuits, and series and parallel resonance. The course is comprised of eight units: (1) Introduction to Alternating…

  9. Image-Guided Predictions of Liposome Transport in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Shawn

    Due to the ability to preferentially accumulate and deliver drug payloads to solid tumours, liposomes have emerged as an exciting therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. Unfortunately, the initial excitement was dampened by limited clinical results, where only negligible increases in patient survival following liposome therapy have been observed. What are the reasons for the limited clinical efficacy? Is the nanoparticle formulation optimal? Is the enhanced permeability and retention effect overstated? What are the barriers limiting the delivery of drugs to cancer cells? What is the optimal dosing and treatment schedule? Addressing these questions requires developing quantitative tools to understand the behaviour of liposomes in vivo, such as pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, intra-tumoural accumulation, and drug release. Central to each of these questions is the concept of transport - the collection of biophysical processes responsible for the delivery of molecules to tissues. Understanding transport means understanding the crucial links between the spatio-temporal accumulation of liposomes, the physicochemical properties of liposomes, and properties of the tumour microenvironment. In this thesis, a biophysical mathematical transport model is developed that when used in combination with non-invasive imaging methods can predict liposome transport in solid tumours. The mathematical transport framework is validated in its ability to predict the bulk and intra-tumoural accumulation of liposomes based on biophysical transport properties of solid tumours. Furthermore, novel imaging methods are developed and used to elucidate the crucial links between transport barriers and spatial heterogeneity in liposome accumulation. Finally, methods are presented to integrate quantitative imaging and mathematical modelling such that an accurate prediction of liposome transport in solid tumours is possible. In summary, this thesis presents and validates an image-guided mathematical

  10. Transpersonal Psychology: Guiding Image for the Advancement of International Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    1984-01-01

    The importance of guiding images is examined, along with analyses of the images of humankind and worldviews previously offered by psychology and adopted by society-at-large. The article focuses on the contribution of transpersonal psychology, the discipline's fourth force, which integrates and extends prior guiding images. (CT)

  11. Image Guided Endoscopic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chad M; Vespa, Paul; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Carmichael, Stanley T.; Alger, Jeffry; Frazee, John; Starkman, Sid; Liebeskind, David; Nenov, Valeriy; Elashoff, Robert; Martin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. ICH lacks an effective medical or surgical treatment despite the acknowledged pathophysiological benefits of achieved hemostasis and clot removal. Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising minimally invasive approach designed to limit operative injury and maximize hematoma removal. Methods A single center randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of stereotactic hematoma evacuation compared to best medical management. Patients were randomized within 24 hours of hemorrhage in a 3:2 fashion to best medical management plus endoscopic hematoma evacuation or best medical management alone. Data was collected to assess efficacy and safety of hematoma evacuation and to identify procedural components requiring technical improvement. Results 10 patients have been enrolled and randomized to treatment. Six patients underwent endoscopic evacuation with a hematoma volume reduction of 80% +/−13 at 24 hours post procedure. The medical arm demonstrated a hematoma enlargement of 78% +/−142 during this same period. Rehemorrhage rates and deterioration rates were similar in the two groups. Mortality was 20% in the endoscopic group and 50% in the medical treatment cohort. The endoscopic technique was shown to be effective in identification and evacuation of hematomas while reduction in the number of endoscopic passes and maintenance of hemostasis require further study. Conclusion Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma removal is a promising minimally invasive technique that is effective in immediate hematoma evacuation. This technique deserves further investigation to determine its role in ICH management. PMID:18424298

  12. High-resolution VLBA imaging of the radio source Sgr A* at the Galactic Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, K. Y.; Backer, D. C.; Kellermann, K. I.; Reid, M.; Zhao, J. H.; Goss, W. M.; Moran, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Images of Sgr* A with milliarcsecond resolution obtained by using five telescopes of the partially completed Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) in conjunction with a few additional telescopes are presented. The image of Sgr A* at a wavelength of 3.6 cm confirms almost exactly the elliptical Gaussian model that has been proposed on the basis of previous data. The source size at 1.34 cm wavelength is 2.4 +/- 0.2 mas, similar to previous results. At both wavelengths, the radio source is smooth, without detectable fine structure. These observations support the suggestion that the radio emission from Sgr A* is strongly scattered by electron-density fluctuations along the line of sight. On the assumption that the emission is due to a black hole accreting stellar winds from massive stars in the central 0.5 pc, the observations are consistent with a black hole mass of less than about 2 million solar masses.

  13. Computed Tomography- and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Guided Microtherapy.

    PubMed

    Seibel; Melzer; Schmidt; Plabetamann

    1997-06-01

    This report describes techniques of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image-guided diagnosis and therapy. Fine-needle biopsy, interstitial tumor therapy, and chemical sympathectomy, as well as the treatment of chronic spinal diseases, including periradicular infiltration at irritated spinal nerve roots, percutaneous laser decompression of intervertebral disks, and intraspinal microendoscopic scar dissection after failed back surgery are described. To overcome specific drawbacks of CT application, we have evaluated technological prerequisites and feasibility of MRI guidance of interventional procedures, such as biopsy, aspiration of neoplasm, and local interstitial drug instillation. New MR-compatible needles, trocars/cannulae, endoscopes, and ancillary equipment were developed and evaluated in collaboration with industry. Sequences, study protocols, and the strategies of performing the procedure within the environment of an interventional MRI suite have been formulated. In 168 patients, 204 interventions such as aspiration biopsy, peridural corticoid injection at spinal nerve roots, intratumoral ethanol instillation, chemical sympathectomy, and percutaneous laser decompression of herniated intervertebral disks were performed successfully. CT and MRI guidance of percutaneous and microendoscopic interventions provides a reproducible and precise means of instrument control. Aside from preoperative planning of the access trajectory, instruments can be placed under CT or MRI control and the therapeutic process can be monitored. Although MRI avoids the need for ionizing radiation and provides multiplanar multislice images with excellent soft tissue contrast, the representation of instruments and the resolution is currently inferior to that achieved by CT imaging. PMID:10401142

  14. Image-guided radiation therapy in lymphoma management

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is a process of incorporating imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasound (US) during radiation therapy (RT) to improve treatment accuracy. It allows real-time or near real-time visualization of anatomical information to ensure that the target is in its position as planned. In addition, changes in tumor volume and location due to organ motion during treatment can be also compensated. IGRT has been gaining popularity and acceptance rapidly in RT over the past 10 years, and many published data have been reported on prostate, bladder, head and neck, and gastrointestinal cancers. However, the role of IGRT in lymphoma management is not well defined as there are only very limited published data currently available. The scope of this paper is to review the current use of IGRT in the management of lymphoma. The technical and clinical aspects of IGRT, lymphoma imaging studies, the current role of IGRT in lymphoma management and future directions will be discussed. PMID:26484299

  15. Photoacoustic image-guided drug delivery in the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shanshan; Chen, Jian; Samant, Pratik; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-03-01

    Image guided drug delivery is a novel strategy that combines the effect of therapy and visibility into one system. Here we apply photoacoustic (PA) imaging to visualize the drug delivery process, and perform a simulation study on monitoring the photosensitizer concentration in a prostate tumor during photodynamic therapy (PDT). A 3D optical model of the human prostate is developed, and the light absorption distribution in the prostate is estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method. The filtered back-projection algorithm is used to reconstruct PA images. PA images of transurethral laser/transrectal ultrasound are compared to those of transrectal laser/ultrasound. Results show that the transurethral laser has a better penetration depth in the prostate compared with transrectal one. Urethral thermal safety is investigated via COMSOL Multiphysics, and the results show that the proposed pulsed transurethral laser will cause no thermal damage on the urethral surface. Regression analysis for PA signal amplitude and drug concentration demonstrates that the PA technique has the potential to monitor drug distributions in PDT, as well as in other laser-based prostate therapy modalities.

  16. Image-guided interventional therapy for cancer with radiotherapeutic nanoparticles✩

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William T.; Bao, Ande; Brenner, Andrew J.; Goins, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the major limitations of current cancer therapy is the inability to deliver tumoricidal agents throughout the entire tumor mass using traditional intravenous administration. Nanoparticles carrying beta-emitting therapeutic radionuclides that are delivered using advanced image-guidance have significant potential to improve solid tumor therapy. The use of image-guidance in combination with nanoparticle carriers can improve the delivery of localized radiation to tumors. Nanoparticles labeled with certain beta-emitting radionuclides are intrinsically theranostic agents that can provide information regarding distribution and regional dosimetry within the tumor and the body. Image-guided thermal therapy results in increased uptake of intravenous nanoparticles within tumors, improving therapy. In addition, nanoparticles are ideal carriers for direct intratumoral infusion of beta-emitting radionuclides by convection enhanced delivery, permitting the delivery of localized therapeutic radiation without the requirement of the radionuclide exiting from the nanoparticle. With this approach, very high doses of radiation can be delivered to solid tumors while sparing normal organs. Recent technological developments in image-guidance, convection enhanced delivery and newly developed nanoparticles carrying beta-emitting radionuclides will be reviewed. Examples will be shown describing how this new approach has promise for the treatment of brain, head and neck, and other types of solid tumors. PMID:25016083

  17. Opinion: Assessing the Barriers to Image Guided Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Gregory M.; Moonen, Chrit; Baker, James R.; Chang, Esther; Cheng, Zheng; Grodzinski, Piotr; Ferrara, Katherine; Hynynen, Kullervo; Kelloff, Gary; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Patri, Anil K; Sept, David; Schnitzer, Jan E.; Wood, Bradford J.; Zhang, Miqin; Zheng, Gang; Farahani, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Imaging has become a cornerstone for medical diagnosis and the guidance of patient management. A new field called Image Guided Drug Delivery (IGDD) now combines the vast potential of the radiological sciences with the delivery of treatment and promises to fulfill the vision of personalized medicine. Whether imaging is used to deliver focused energy to drug-laden particles for enhanced, local drug release around tumors, or it is invoked in the context of nanoparticle-based agents to quantify distinctive biomarkers that could risk-stratify patients for improved targeted drug delivery efficiency, the overarching goal of IGDD is to use imaging to maximize effective therapy in diseased tissues and to minimize systemic drug exposure in order to reduce toxicities. Over the last several years innumerable reports and reviews covering the gamut of IGDD technologies have been published, but inadequate attention has been directed towards identifying and addressing the barriers limiting clinical translation. In this consensus opinion, the opportunities and challenges impacting the clinical realization of IGDD-based personalized medicine were discussed as a panel and recommendations were proffered to accelerate the field forward. PMID:24339356

  18. Micro-tattoo guided OCT imaging of site specific inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Choudhury, Niloy; Samatham, Ravikant V.; Singh, Harvinder; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    Epithelial biologists studying human skin diseases such as cancer formation and psoriasis commonly utilize mouse models to characterize the interplay among cells and intracellular signal transduction pathways that result in programmed changes in gene expression and cellular behaviors. The information obtained from animal models is useful only when phenotypic presentations of disease recapitulate those observed in humans. Excision of tissues followed by histochemical analysis is currently the primary means of establishing the morphological presentation. Non invasive imaging of animal models provides an alternate means to characterize tissue morphology associated with the disease of interest in vivo. While useful, the ability to perform in vivo imaging at different time points in the same tissue location has been a challenge. This information is key to understanding site specific changes as the imaged tissue can now be extracted and analyzed for mRNA expression. We present a method employing a micro-tattoo to guide optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of ultraviolet induced inflammation over time in the same tissue locations.

  19. Faint Radio Sources in the NOAO Bootes Field. VLBA Imaging And Optical Identifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J.M.; Taylor, Greg B.; Rector, T.A.; Myers, S.T.; Fassnacht, C.D.; /UC, Davis

    2005-06-13

    As a step toward investigating the parsec-scale properties of faint extragalactic radio sources, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) was used at 5.0 GHz to obtain phase-referenced images of 76 sources in the NOAO Booetes field. These 76 sources were selected from the FIRST catalog to have peak flux densities above 10 mJy at 5'' resolution and deconvolved major diameters of less than 3'' at 1.4 GHz. Fifty-five of these faint radio sources were identified with accretion-powered radio galaxies and quasars brighter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band. On VLA scales at 1.4 GHz, a measure of the compactness of the faint sources (the ratio of the peak flux density from FIRST to the integrated flux density from the NVSS catalog) spans the full range of possibilities arising from source-resolution effects. Thirty of the faint radio sources, or 39{sub -7}{sup +9}%, were detected with the VLBA at 5.0 GHz with peak flux densities above 6 {sigma} {approx} 2 mJy at 2 mas resolution. The VLBA detections occur through the full range of compactness ratios. The stronger VLBA detections can themselves serve as phase-reference calibrators, boding well for opening up much of the radio sky to VLBA imaging. For the adopted cosmology, the VLBA resolution corresponds to 17 pc or finer. Most VLBA detections are unresolved or slightly resolved but one is diffuse and five show either double or core-jet structures; the properties of these latter six are discussed in detail. Eight VLBA detections are unidentified and fainter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band; their properties are highlighted because they likely mark optically-obscured active nuclei at high redshift.

  20. Radioisotope guided surgery with imaging probe, a hand-held high-resolution gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soluri, A.; Trotta, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Tofani, A.; D'Alessandria, C.; Pasta, V.; Stella, S.; Massari, R.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1997, our group of Physics together with Nuclear Physicians studies imaging probes (IP), hand-held, high-resolution gamma cameras for radio-guided surgery (RGS). Present work is aimed to verify the usefulness of two updated IP in different surgical operations. Forty patients scheduled for breast cancer sentinel node (SN) biopsy, five patients with nodal recurrence of thyroid cancer, seven patients with parathyroid adenomas, five patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET), were operated under the guide of IP. We used two different IP with field of view of 1 and 4 in. 2, respectively and intrinsic spatial resolution of about 2 mm. Radioisotopes were 99mTc, 123I and 111In. The 1 in. 2 IP detected SN in all the 40 patients and more than one node in 24, whereas anger camera (AC) failed locating SN in four patients and detected true positive second nodes in only nine patients. The 4 in. 2 IP was used for RGS of thyroid, parathyroid and NETs. It detected eight latero-cervical nodes. In the same patients, AC detected five invaded nodes. Parathyroid adenomas detected by IP were 10 in 7 patients, NET five in five patients. One and 4 in. 2 IPs showed usefulness in all operations. Initial studies on SN biopsy were carried out on small series of patients to validate IP and to demonstrate the effectiveness and usefulness of IP alone or against conventional probes. We propose the use of the IP as control method for legal documentation and surgeon strategy guide before and after lesion(s) removal.

  1. Probing the bright radio flare and afterglow of GRB 130427A with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G. E.; van der Horst, A. J.; Staley, T. D.; Fender, R. P.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Rumsey, C.; Titterington, D. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Saunders, R. D. E.

    2014-05-01

    We present one of the best sampled early-time light curves of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) at radio wavelengths. Using the Arcminute Mircrokelvin Imager (AMI), we observed GRB 130427A at the central frequency of 15.7 GHz between 0.36 and 59.32 d post-burst. These results yield one of the earliest radio detections of a GRB and demonstrate a clear rise in flux less than one day after the γ-ray trigger followed by a rapid decline. This early-time radio emission probably originates in the GRB reverse shock so our AMI light curve reveals the first ever confirmed detection of a reverse shock peak in the radio domain. At later times (about 3.2 d post-burst), the rate of decline decreases, indicating that the forward shock component has begun to dominate the light curve. Comparisons of the AMI light curve with modelling conducted by Perley et al. show that the most likely explanation of the early-time 15.7 GHz peak is caused by the self-absorption turn-over frequency, rather than the peak frequency, of the reverse shock moving through the observing bands.

  2. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUN AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES WITH THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Oberoi, Divya; Matthews, Lynn D.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Benkevitch, Leonid; Cairns, Iver H.; Lobzin, Vasili; Emrich, David; Wayth, Randall B.; Arcus, Wayne; Morgan, Edward H.; Williams, Christopher; Prabu, T.; Vedantham, Harish; Williams, Andrew; White, Stephen M.; Allen, G.; Barnes, David; Bernardi, Gianni; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, Frank H.

    2011-02-20

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9- 201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of 'low' to 'medium' activity, one broadband emission feature and numerous short-lived, narrowband, non-thermal emission features are evident. Our data represent a significant advance in low radio frequency solar imaging, enabling us to follow the spatial, spectral, and temporal evolution of events simultaneously and in unprecedented detail. The rich variety of features seen here reaffirms the coronal diagnostic capability of low radio frequency emission and provides an early glimpse of the nature of radio observations that will become available as the next generation of low-frequency radio interferometers come online over the next few years.

  3. A contrast and registration template for magnetic resonance image data guided dental implant placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Cosgarea, Raluca; Rieker, Marcus; Kress, Bodo; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    An oral imaging template was developed to address the shortcomings of MR image data for image guided dental implant planning and placement. The template was conctructed as a gadolinium filled plastic shell to give contrast to the dentition and also to be accurately re-attachable for use in image guided dental implant placement. The result of segmentation and modelling of the dentition from MR Image data with the template was compared to plaster casts of the dentition. In a phantom study dental implant placement was performed based on MR image data. MR imaging with the contrast template allowed complete representation of the existing dentition. In the phantom study, a commercially available system for image guided dental implant placement was used. Transformation of the imaging contrast template into a surgical drill guide based on the MR image data resulted in pilot burr hole placement with an accuracy of 2 mm. MRI based imaging of the existing dentition for proper image guided planning is possible with the proposed template. Using the image data and the template resulted in less accurate pilot burr hole placement in comparison to CT-based image guided implant placement.

  4. Image guided constitutive modeling of the silicone brain phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzrin, Alexander; Skrinjar, Oskar; Ozan, Cem; Kim, Sihyun; Mukundan, Srinivasan

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to develop reliable constitutive models of the mechanical behavior of the in-vivo human brain tissue for applications in neurosurgery. We propose to define the mechanical properties of the brain tissue in-vivo, by taking the global MR or CT images of a brain response to ventriculostomy - the relief of the elevated intracranial pressure. 3D image analysis translates these images into displacement fields, which by using inverse analysis allow for the constitutive models of the brain tissue to be developed. We term this approach Image Guided Constitutive Modeling (IGCM). The presented paper demonstrates performance of the IGCM in the controlled environment: on the silicone brain phantoms closely simulating the in-vivo brain geometry, mechanical properties and boundary conditions. The phantom of the left hemisphere of human brain was cast using silicon gel. An inflatable rubber membrane was placed inside the phantom to model the lateral ventricle. The experiments were carried out in a specially designed setup in a CT scanner with submillimeter isotropic voxels. The non-communicative hydrocephalus and ventriculostomy were simulated by consequently inflating and deflating the internal rubber membrane. The obtained images were analyzed to derive displacement fields, meshed, and incorporated into ABAQUS. The subsequent Inverse Finite Element Analysis (based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm) allowed for optimization of the parameters of the Mooney-Rivlin non-linear elastic model for the phantom material. The calculated mechanical properties were consistent with those obtained from the element tests, providing justification for the future application of the IGCM to in-vivo brain tissue.

  5. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  6. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  7. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, D. Mark; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N(sub e)) as a function of height (the N(sub e) profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year (1958). The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N(sub e) profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al., 1992), has never been put into space. NASA's 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study "The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010" suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung, 1993). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R(sub e) (Reiff et al., 1994; Calvert et al., 1995). Magnetospheric radio sounding from space will provide remote density measurements of

  8. Guided Wave Annular Array Sensor Design for Improved Tomographic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koduru, Jaya Prakash; Rose, Joseph L.

    2009-03-01

    Guided wave tomography for structural health monitoring is fast emerging as a reliable tool for the detection and monitoring of hotspots in a structure, for any defects arising from corrosion, crack growth etc. To date guided wave tomography has been successfully tested on aircraft wings, pipes, pipe elbows, and weld joints. Structures practically deployed are subjected to harsh environments like exposure to rain, changes in temperature and humidity. A reliable tomography system should take into account these environmental factors to avoid false alarms. The lack of mode control with piezoceramic disk sensors makes it very sensitive to traces of water leading to false alarms. In this study we explore the design of annular array sensors to provide mode control for improved structural tomography, in particular, addressing the false alarm potential of water loading. Clearly defined actuation lines in the phase velocity dispersion curve space are calculated. A dominant in-plane displacement point is found to provide a solution to the water loading problem. The improvement in the tomographic images with the annular array sensors in the presence of water traces is clearly illustrated with a series of experiments. An annular array design philosophy for other problems in NDE/SHM is also discussed.

  9. Towards image-guided photodynamic therapy of Glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Liu, Joyce; Mai, Zhiming; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive cancer with dismal survival rates and few new treatment options. Fluorescence guided resection of GBM followed by photodynamic therapy (PDT) has shown promise in several chemo- or radiotherapy non-responsive GBM treatments clinically. PDT is an emerging light and photosensitizer (PS) mediated cytotoxic method. However, as with other therapeutic modalities, the outcomes are variable largely due to the nonpersonalization of dose parameters. The variability can be attributed to the differences in heterogeneous photosensitizer accumulation in tumors. Building upon our previous findings on utilizing PS fluorescence for designing tumor-specific PDT dose, we explore the use of photoacoustic imaging, a technique that provides contrast based on the tissue optical absorption properties, to obtain 3D information on the tumoral photosensitizer accumulation. The findings of this study will form the basis for customized photodynamic therapy for glioblastoma and have the potential to serve as a platform for treatment of other cancers.

  10. Concurrent Image Processing Executive (CIPE). Volume 2: Programmer's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Winifred I.

    1990-01-01

    This manual is intended as a guide for application programmers using the Concurrent Image Processing Executive (CIPE). CIPE is intended to become the support system software for a prototype high performance science analysis workstation. In its current configuration CIPE utilizes a JPL/Caltech Mark 3fp Hypercube with a Sun-4 host. CIPE's design is capable of incorporating other concurrent architectures as well. CIPE provides a programming environment to applications' programmers to shield them from various user interfaces, file transactions, and architectural complexities. A programmer may choose to write applications to use only the Sun-4 or to use the Sun-4 with the hypercube. A hypercube program will use the hypercube's data processors and optionally the Weitek floating point accelerators. The CIPE programming environment provides a simple set of subroutines to activate user interface functions, specify data distributions, activate hypercube resident applications, and to communicate parameters to and from the hypercube.

  11. Active constraint control for image-guided robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yen, P-L; Davies, B L

    2010-01-01

    The concept of active constraint control for image-guided robotic surgery is introduced, together with its benefits and a short outline of its history. The clinical use of active constraint control in orthopaedic surgery is discussed, together with the outcomes of a clinical trial for unicondylar knee replacement surgery. The evolution of the robotic design from large costly structures towards simpler, more cost-effective systems is also presented, leading to the design of the Acrobot 'Sculptor' system. A new approach to the achievement of robotic total knee replacement is also presented, in which a high-speed rotary cutter is used to slice through the bone to achieve a speedy resection. The control concept is presented, together with the results of trials on animal bones and a cadaver, showing that it is possible to remove large quantities of bone both quickly and accurately. PMID:20718267

  12. TRACING ELECTRON BEAMS IN THE SUN'S CORONA WITH RADIO DYNAMIC IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.; White, S. M.; Gary, D. E.; Perley, R.; Rupen, M.; Carlson, B.

    2013-01-20

    We report observations of type III radio bursts at decimeter wavelengths (type IIIdm bursts)-signatures of suprathermal electron beams propagating in the low corona-using the new technique of radio dynamic imaging spectroscopy provided by the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For the first time, type IIIdm bursts were imaged with high time and frequency resolution over a broad frequency band, allowing electron beam trajectories in the corona to be deduced. Together with simultaneous hard X-ray and extreme ultraviolet observations, we show that these beams emanate from an energy release site located in the low corona at a height below {approx}15 Mm, and propagate along a bundle of discrete magnetic loops upward into the corona. Our observations enable direct measurements of the plasma density along the magnetic loops, and allow us to constrain the diameter of these loops to be less than 100 km. These overdense and ultra-thin loops reveal the fundamentally fibrous structure of the Sun's corona. The impulsive nature of the electron beams, their accessibility to different magnetic field lines, and the detailed structure of the magnetic release site revealed by the radio observations indicate that the localized energy release is highly fragmentary in time and space, supporting a bursty reconnection model that involves secondary magnetic structures for magnetic energy release and particle acceleration.

  13. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-02-01

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy.A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth

  14. Intraoperative Imaging-Guided Cancer Surgery: From Current Fluorescence Molecular Imaging Methods to Future Multi-Modality Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Chongwei; Du, Yang; Ye, Jinzuo; Kou, Deqiang; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Tian, Jie; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a major threat to human health. Diagnosis and treatment using precision medicine is expected to be an effective method for preventing the initiation and progression of cancer. Although anatomical and functional imaging techniques such as radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have played an important role for accurate preoperative diagnostics, for the most part these techniques cannot be applied intraoperatively. Optical molecular imaging is a promising technique that provides a high degree of sensitivity and specificity in tumor margin detection. Furthermore, existing clinical applications have proven that optical molecular imaging is a powerful intraoperative tool for guiding surgeons performing precision procedures, thus enabling radical resection and improved survival rates. However, detection depth limitation exists in optical molecular imaging methods and further breakthroughs from optical to multi-modality intraoperative imaging methods are needed to develop more extensive and comprehensive intraoperative applications. Here, we review the current intraoperative optical molecular imaging technologies, focusing on contrast agents and surgical navigation systems, and then discuss the future prospects of multi-modality imaging technology for intraoperative imaging-guided cancer surgery. PMID:25250092

  15. Potential Applications of Imaging and Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases and Glioblastoma to Improve Patient Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Mai L.; Vock, Jacqueline; Lemanski, Claire; Kerr, Christine; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Chi, Alexander; Khan, Rihan; Woods, William; Altdorfer, Gabor; D’Andrea, Mark; Karlsson, Ulf; Hamilton, Russ; Ampil, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and brain metastasis remains a challenge because of the poor survival and the potential for brain damage following radiation. Despite concurrent chemotherapy and radiation dose escalation, local recurrence remains the predominant pattern of failure in GBM most likely secondary to repopulation of cancer stem cells. Even though radiotherapy is highly effective for local control of radio-resistant tumors such as melanoma and renal cell cancer, systemic disease progression is the cause of death in most patients with brain metastasis. Preservation of quality of life (QOL) of cancer survivors is the main issue for patients with brain metastasis. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by virtue of precise radiation dose delivery may reduce treatment time of patients with GBM without excessive toxicity and potentially improve neurocognitive function with preservation of local control in patients with brain metastasis. Future prospective trials for primary brain tumors or brain metastasis should include IGRT to assess its efficacy to improve patient QOL. PMID:24312897

  16. Radio and Hard X-Ray Images of High-Energy Electrons in an X-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Krucker, S.; Shibasaki, K.; Yokoyama, T.; Shimojo, M.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first comparison between radio images of high-energy electrons accelerated by a solar flare and images of hard X-rays produced by the same electrons at photon energies above 100 keV. The images indicate that the high-energy X-rays originate at the footpoints of the loops dominating the radio emission. The radio and hard X-ray light curves match each other well and are quantitatively consistent with an origin in a single population of nonthermal electrons with a power-law index of around 4.5-5. The high-frequency radio spectral index suggests a flatter energy spectrum, but this is ruled out by the X-ray spectrum up to 8 MeV.

  17. Deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of 53W044 - An S0 radio galaxy at z = 0.311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    1993-01-01

    Images of the Wide Field Camera (WFC) and Faint-Object Camera (FOC) of the radio galaxy 53W044 are presented. The WFC images are used to examine the structure of the galaxy, and show evidence for a significant disk, on the basis of which 53W044 is classified as an S0. This radio galaxy is near the maximum radio power associated with sources in S0 host galaxies. The FOC image is combined with ground-based spectroscopy to study 53W044's stellar population, which appears normal for an E/S0 galaxy of modest luminosity. No evidence is found for a significant contribution from a nuclear blue-continuum source, and the stellar population is old with a continuum level at 2100 A, consistent with what is seen in nearby radio galaxies.

  18. Hybrid Imaging-Periodicity Search for Radio Pulsars: A Pilot VLA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Molly; Wharton, Robert; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James M.; Kaplan, David L. A.; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Crawford, Fronefield; Deller, Adam; Lazio, Joseph; Ransom, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all of the ~2300 known pulsars have been discovered using the standard period-dispersion measure (P-DM) search. In a P-DM search, time series intensity data are collected, de-dispersed for a set of trial DMs, and searched for periodic signals usually with frequency-domain algorithms but with fast-folding algorithms for long-period objects. Here we describe a hybrid imaging-periodicity search, an alternate method that uses an imaging survey to select radio point sources as pulsar candidates, followed by a deep P-DM search of these candidates using new or archival data. Since the hybrid search is largely conducted in the imaging domain of time-averaged intensities, it does not suffer reduced sensitivity (as the P-DM method does) when a pulsar signal is heavily modulated by orbital motion, pulse-broadened by scattering, or intermittently emitting (due to large-scale magnetospheric changes, eclipses, etc). As such, the hybrid method is sensitive to systems that are highly selected against in P-DM searches such as compact neutron star binaries, highly scattered millisecond pulsars, and pulsars with spin periods less than a millisecond (should they exist). Interferometric imaging also requires a lower significance threshold for detection than a periodicity search and is more robust against radio-frequency interference. We present preliminary results of a wide-field high dynamic range imaging survey conducted with the Jansky VLA at 1-2 GHz in a pilot program to test the efficacy of a hybrid imaging-periodicity search for radio pulsars in the Galactic plane. The survey region covers four square degrees (Galactic longitudes 32.5-36.5 degrees) using 38 pointings and overlaps with the Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey, which will be used as the periodicity component of our hybrid search. We analyze the observed properties of the 23 known radio pulsars in the survey region and discuss the implications for the selection process needed to narrow the thousands of detected

  19. The Radio Amateur's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeslee, Douglas, Ed.

    The objectives of this basic reference work for the radio amateur are to present radio theory and practice in terms of application and to reflect both the fundamentals and the rapidly-advancing technology of radio communications so that the radio amateur will have a guide to what is practical, meaningful, proven, and useful. Twenty-three chapters…

  20. High resolution deep imaging of a bright radio quiet QSO at z ~ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; He, Wei; Yamada, Toru; Tanaka, Ichi; Iye, Masanori; Ji, Tuo

    2015-05-01

    We have obtained deep J and Ks-band images centered on a bright radio quiet QSO UM 402 (zem = 2.856) using the IRCS camera and adaptive optics systems that are part of the Subaru Telescope, as well as retrieved WFC3/F140W archive images of this object. A faint galaxy (mk = 23.32±0.05 in the Vega magnitude system) that lies ~ 2.4″ north of the QSO sightline has been clearly resolved in all three deep high resolution datasets, and appears as an irregular galaxy with two close components in the Ks-band images (separation ~ 0.3″). Given the small impact parameter (b = 19.6 kpc, at zlls = 2.531), as well as the red color of (J - Ks)Vega ~ 1.6, it might be a candidate galaxy giving rise to the Lyman Limit system absorption at zabs = 2.531 seen in the QSO spectrum. After carefully subtracting the point spread function from the QSO images, the host galaxy of this bright radio quiet QSO at z ~ 3 was marginally revealed. We placed a lower limit on the host component of mk ~ 23.3 according to our analyses. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  1. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-Term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Steven M.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Waldman, Stephen D.; Rudan, John F.; Bardana, Davide D.; Stewart, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous osteochondral cartilage repair is a valuable reconstruction option for cartilage defects, but the accuracy to harvest and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically guided and template guided) can improve the outcome of these procedures. Design: Fifteen sheep were operated to create traumatic chondral injuries in each knee. After 4 months, the chondral defect in one knee was repaired using (a) conventional approach, (b) optically guided method, or (c) template-guided method. For both image-guided groups, harvest and delivery sites were preoperatively planned using custom-made software. During optically guided surgery, instrument position and orientation were tracked and superimposed onto the surgical plan. For the template-guided group, plastic templates were manufactured to allow an exact fit between template and the joint anatomy. Cylindrical holes within the template guided surgical tools according to the plan. Three months postsurgery, both knees were harvested and computed tomography scans were used to compare the reconstructed versus the native pre-injury joint surfaces. For each repaired defect, macroscopic (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS]) and histological repair (ICRS II) scores were assessed. Results: Three months after repair surgery, both image-guided surgical approaches resulted in significantly better histology scores compared with the conventional approach (improvement by 55%, P < 0.02). Interestingly, there were no significant differences found in cartilage surface reconstruction and macroscopic scores between the image-guided and the conventional surgeries. PMID:26069658

  2. Radio Induced Fluorescence (RIF) Imaging Of E-region Quasi-periodic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    The horizontal structure of sporadic-E layers has been imaged using artificial airglow excited by high power radio waves. In January 1998, the HF facility at Arecibo, Puerto Rico beamed a 80 MW signal upward at 3.175 MHz. The beam reflected in the E- region near 120 km altitude to excite green-line emissions at 557.7 nm. Ground based images showed quasi-periodic structures with periods near 2 and 10 km. These struc- tures been interpreted as being produced by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities in the neutral atmosphere. The excitation of radio induced fluorescence (RIF) emissions has been studied with both one-dimensional and two-dimensional computer simulations of the conversion of electromagnetic waves into electron plasma waves. The steep gradients on the bottomside of the E-layer provide conditions for efficient mode conversion. The re- sulting Langmuir waves accelerate electrons to energies between 2 and 10 eV. These suprathermal electrons collide with oxygen atoms to produce green-line emissions. The optical glow only occurs in the parts of the E-region where the plamsa is dense enough to reflect the 3.175 MHz radio waves. Results of the E-layer observations using the RIF technique have shown horizontal stuctures that are most likely produced by the K-H instability. A numerical model has been generated to demonstrate the effects of neutral wind shears on the E-region structures. The model includes the effects of both speed-shear and turning shear dy- namics. The results of the numerical model are used to suggest future research using high-power radio wave to study the ion dynamics of the lower thermosphere.

  3. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500-1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths.

  4. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    PubMed Central

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500–1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths. PMID:24791129

  5. WSCLEAN: an implementation of a fast, generic wide-field imager for radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offringa, A. R.; McKinley, B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Briggs, F. H.; Wayth, R. B.; Kaplan, D. L.; Bell, M. E.; Feng, L.; Neben, A. R.; Hughes, J. D.; Rhee, J.; Murphy, T.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Jacobs, D. C.; Kasper, J. C.; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Pindor, B.; Procopio, P.; Prabu, T.; Riding, J.; Roshi, D. A.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2014-10-01

    Astronomical wide-field imaging of interferometric radio data is computationally expensive, especially for the large data volumes created by modern non-coplanar many-element arrays. We present a new wide-field interferometric imager that uses the w-stacking algorithm and can make use of the w-snapshot algorithm. The performance dependences of CASA's w-projection and our new imager are analysed and analytical functions are derived that describe the required computing cost for both imagers. On data from the Murchison Widefield Array, we find our new method to be an order of magnitude faster than w-projection, as well as being capable of full-sky imaging at full resolution and with correct polarization correction. We predict the computing costs for several other arrays and estimate that our imager is a factor of 2-12 faster, depending on the array configuration. We estimate the computing cost for imaging the low-frequency Square Kilometre Array observations to be 60 PetaFLOPS with current techniques. We find that combining w-stacking with the w-snapshot algorithm does not significantly improve computing requirements over pure w-stacking. The source code of our new imager is publicly released.

  6. Single camera imaging system for color and near-infrared fluorescence image guided surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenyue; Zhu, Nan; Pacheco, Shaun; Wang, Xia; Liang, Rongguang

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging systems have been developed for image guided surgery in recent years. However, current systems are typically bulky and work only when surgical light in the operating room (OR) is off. We propose a single camera imaging system that is capable of capturing NIR fluorescence and color images under normal surgical lighting illumination. Using a new RGB-NIR sensor and synchronized NIR excitation illumination, we have demonstrated that the system can acquire both color information and fluorescence signal with high sensitivity under normal surgical lighting illumination. The experimental results show that ICG sample with concentration of 0.13 μM can be detected when the excitation irradiance is 3.92 mW/cm2 at an exposure time of 10 ms. PMID:25136502

  7. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-03-01

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy. PMID:26881415

  8. VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY IMAGING OF PARSEC-SCALE RADIO EMISSIONS IN NEARBY RADIO-QUIET NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Asada, Keiichi; Inoue, Makoto; Fujisawa, Kenta; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Wajima, Kiyoaki

    2013-03-01

    We conducted Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of seven nearby narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies at 1.7 GHz ({lambda}18 cm) with milliarcsecond resolution. This is the first systematic very long baseline interferometry study focusing on the central parsec-scale regions of radio-quiet NLS1s. Five of the seven were detected at a brightness temperature of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K and contain radio cores with high brightness temperatures of >6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, indicating a nonthermal process driven by jet-producing central engines as in radio-loud NLS1s and other active galactic nucleus classes. VLBA images of MRK 1239, MRK 705, and MRK 766 exhibit parsec-scale jets with clear linear structures. A large portion of the radio power comes from diffuse emission components that are distributed within the nuclear regions ({approx}< 300 pc), which is a common characteristic throughout the observed NLS1s. Jet kinetic powers limited by the Eddington limit may be insufficient to allow the jets to escape to kiloparsec scales for these radio-quiet NLS1s with low-mass black holes of {approx}< 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }.

  9. Multimodality Imaging of the Painful Elbow: Current Imaging Concepts and Image-Guided Treatments for the Injured Thrower's Elbow.

    PubMed

    Gustas, Cristy N; Lee, Kenneth S

    2016-09-01

    Elbow pain in overhead sport athletes is not uncommon. Repetitive throwing can lead to chronic overuse and/or acute injury to tendons, ligaments, bones, or nerves about the elbow. A thorough history and physical examination of the thrower's elbow frequently establishes the diagnosis for pain. Imaging can provide additional information when the clinical picture is unclear or further information is necessary for risk stratification and treatment planning. This article focuses on current imaging concepts and image-guided treatments for injuries commonly affecting the adult throwing athlete's elbow. PMID:27545422

  10. Improved Reconstruction of Radio Holographic Signal for Forward Scatter Radar Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Cheng; Liu, Changjiang; Wang, Rui; Zeng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Forward scatter radar (FSR), as a specially configured bistatic radar, is provided with the capabilities of target recognition and classification by the Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR) imaging technology. This paper mainly discusses the reconstruction of radio holographic signal (RHS), which is an important procedure in the signal processing of FSR SISAR imaging. Based on the analysis of signal characteristics, the method for RHS reconstruction is improved in two parts: the segmental Hilbert transformation and the reconstruction of mainlobe RHS. In addition, a quantitative analysis of the method's applicability is presented by distinguishing between the near field and far field in forward scattering. Simulation results validated the method's advantages in improving the accuracy of RHS reconstruction and imaging. PMID:27164114

  11. Improved Reconstruction of Radio Holographic Signal for Forward Scatter Radar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Cheng; Liu, Changjiang; Wang, Rui; Zeng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Forward scatter radar (FSR), as a specially configured bistatic radar, is provided with the capabilities of target recognition and classification by the Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR) imaging technology. This paper mainly discusses the reconstruction of radio holographic signal (RHS), which is an important procedure in the signal processing of FSR SISAR imaging. Based on the analysis of signal characteristics, the method for RHS reconstruction is improved in two parts: the segmental Hilbert transformation and the reconstruction of mainlobe RHS. In addition, a quantitative analysis of the method’s applicability is presented by distinguishing between the near field and far field in forward scattering. Simulation results validated the method’s advantages in improving the accuracy of RHS reconstruction and imaging. PMID:27164114

  12. Ultrasound stylet for non-image-guided ventricular catheterization.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Nathaniel K; Chiarelli, Peter A; Su, David K; Chang, Jason J; MacConaghy, Brian; Murthy, Revathi; Toms, Peter; Robb, Terrence L; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Browd, Samuel R; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Urgent ventriculostomy placement can be a lifesaving procedure in the setting of hydrocephalus or elevated intracranial pressure. While external ventricular drain (EVD) insertion is common, there remains a high rate of suboptimal drain placement. Here, the authors seek to demonstrate the feasibility of an ultrasound-based guidance system that can be inserted into an existing EVD catheter to provide a linear ultrasound trace that guides the user toward the ventricle. METHODS The ultrasound stylet was constructed as a thin metal tube, with dimensions equivalent to standard catheter stylets, bearing a single-element, ceramic ultrasound transducer at the tip. Ultrasound backscatter signals from the porcine ventricle were processed by custom electronics to offer real-time information about ventricular location relative to the catheter. Data collected from the prototype device were compared with reference measurements obtained using standard clinical ultrasound imaging. RESULTS A study of porcine ventricular catheterization using the experimental device yielded a high rate of successful catheter placement after a single pass (10 of 12 trials), despite the small size of pig ventricles and the lack of prior instruction on porcine ventricular architecture. A characteristic double-peak signal was identified, which originated from ultrasound reflections off of the near and far ventricular walls. Ventricular dimensions, as obtained from the width between peaks, were in agreement with standard ultrasound reference measurements (p < 0.05). Furthermore, linear ultrasound backscatter data permitted in situ measurement of the stylet distance to the ventricular wall (p < 0.05), which assisted in catheter guidance. CONCLUSIONS The authors have demonstrated the ability of the prototype ultrasound stylet to guide ventricular access in the porcine brain. The alternative design of the device makes it potentially easy to integrate into the standard workflow for bedside EVD

  13. Sparsity based defect imaging in pipes using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golato, Andrew; Santhanam, Sridhar; Ahmad, Fauzia; Amin, Moeness G.

    2016-05-01

    Pipes are used for the transport of fluids and gases in urban and industrial settings, such as buried pipelines to transport water, oil, and other resources. To ensure reliable operation, it is essential that an inspection system be in place to identify and localize damage/defects in the pipes. Unfortunately, many of the typical nondestructive evaluation techniques are inadequate due to limited pipe access; often, only the beginning and end sections of the pipe are physically accessible. As such, this problem is well suited to the use of ultrasonic guided-wave based structural health monitoring. With a limited number of transducers, ultrasonic guided waves can be used to interrogate long lengths of pipes. In this paper, we propose a damage detection and localization scheme that relies upon the inherent sparsity of defects in the pipes. A sparse array of transducers, deployed in accessible areas of the pipes, is utilized in pitch-catch mode to record signals scattered by defects in the pipe. Both the direct path scattering off the defect, and the helical modes, which are paths that spiral around the circumference of the pipe before or after interaction with the defect, are recorded. A Lamb wave based signal model is formulated that accounts for this multipath approach. The signal model is then inverted via group sparse reconstruction, in order to produce an image of the scene. The model accounts for the specificities of Lamb wave propagation through the pipe. Performance validation of the proposed approach is provided using simulated data for an aluminum pipe.

  14. Forward modeling of radio imaging (RIM) data with the Comsol RF module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxing; Smith, Richard S.

    2015-12-01

    Radio imaging method (RIM) is an electromagnetic (EM) tomographic method, which can be applied to image the electrical properties (principally the conductivity) in the plane defined by two boreholes. RIM employs the EM waves at radio frequencies between 100 kHz and 10 MHz, and the manner that these waves propagate around subsurface ore bodies has not been studied thoroughly. We studied the wave propagation using the finite element modeling (FEM) algorithm as implemented in the Comsol RF module. An appropriate element size is quantified by comparing the Comsol modeling results of 6 types of element sizes at 4 frequencies with the analytical solution in the homogeneous whole space. The FEM model data with 5 elements per wavelength have errors less than 5%; 7-8 elements per wavelength provide the errors around 1%; when there are 10 elements per wavelength, the errors are less than 1%. Comparison studies for more complicated models with anomalous conductivity structures show that the Comsol modeling results are consistent with results derived from analytical solutions, finite-difference time-domain methods and integral equations. To illustrate the flexibility of the Comsol method for RIM modeling, we provide an example with two moderately conductive bodies between boreholes. Receiver profiles and a relative variation map show that when the conductive bodies are two wavelengths away from the source, the EM wave attenuation and reflection by the conductive bodies can be observed. The amplitude tomography of the model data reveals that with the SIRT algorithm, the location of the conductive anomalies can be reconstructed successfully, although, some limitations exist such as low resolution, incorrect conductivity estimation, and some artifacts. From our work, we conclude that Comsol modeling is helpful to study radio wave propagation and imaging methods.

  15. Towards magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanescu, Teodor Marius

    The goal of this work is to address key aspects of the magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT) process of cancer sites. MRIgRT is implemented by using a system comprised of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner coupled with a radiation source, in our case a radiotherapy accelerator (Linac). The potential benefits of MRIgRT are the real-time tracking of the tumor and neighbouring healthy anatomy during treatment irradiation leading to on-line treatment plan optimization. Ultimately, this results in an increased accuracy and efficiency of the overall treatment process. A large research effort is conducted at Cross Cancer Institute to develop a hybrid MRI-Linac system consisting of a bi-planar 0.2 T permanent magnet coupled with a 6 MV Linac. The present work is part of this project and aims to address the following key components: (a) magnetic shielding and dosimetric effects of the MRI-Linac system, (b) measure and correction of scanner-related MR image distortions, and (c) MRI-based treatment planning procedure for intracranial lesions. The first two components are essential for the optimal construction and operation of the MRI-Linac system while the third one represents a direct application of the system. The linac passive shielding was achieved by (a) adding two 10 cm thick steel (1020) plates placed at a distance of 10 cm from the structure on opposite sides of the magnet; and (b) a box lined with a 1 mm MuMetal(TM) wall surrounding the Linac. For our proposed MRI-Linac configuration (i.e. 0.2 T field and rotating bi-planar geometry) the maximum dose difference from zero magnetic field case was found to be within 6% and 12% in a water and water-lung-water phantom, respectively. We developed an image system distortion correction method for MRI that relies on adaptive thresholding and an iterative algorithm to determine the 3D distortion field. Applying this technique the residual image distortions were reduced to within the voxel

  16. Direct imaging of planetary systems with a ground-based radio telescope array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    1994-01-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory's proposed Millimeter Array (MMA) will bring unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution, and image dynamic range to the millimeter wavelength region of the spectrum. An obvious question is whether such an instrument could be used to detect planets orbiting nearby stars. The techniques of aperture synthesis imaging developed for centimeter wavelength radio arrays are capable of producing images whose dynamic ranges greatly exceed the brightness ratio of a solar-type star and a Jupiter-like planet at sub-millimeter or millimeter wavelengths. The angular resolution required to separate a star and planet at a few pc distance can be obtained with baselines of several km. The greatest challenge is sensitivity. At the highest possible observing frequencies (approximately 300 GHz for typical high, dry sites, and approximately 900 GHz from the Antarctic plateau), the proposed MMA will be unable to detect the thermal emission from a Jupiter-like planet a few pc away. An upgraded MMA operating near 300 GHz with twice the currently proposed number of antennas, a 20% fractional bandwidth, and improved receivers could detect Jupiter at 4 pc in a few months. Building such an array on the Antarctic plateau and operating at approximately 900 GHz would allow Jupiter at 4 pc to be detected in approximately one day of observing time.

  17. Radio tomographic imaging of sporadic-E layers during SEEK-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Selcher, C. A.; Siefring, C.; Wilkens, M.; Compton, C.; Bust, G.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.; Takayuki, O.; Wakabayashi, M.; Mori, H.

    2005-10-01

    During the SEEK-2 Rocket Campaign in August 2002, a Dual Band Beacon (DBB) transmitting to Ground Receivers provided unique data on E-Region electron densities. Information from two rocket beacons and four ground receivers yielded multiple samples of E-region horizontal and vertical variations. The radio beacon measurements were made at four sites (Uchinoura, Tarumizu, Tanegashima, Takazaki) in Japan for two rockets (S310-31 and S310-32) launched by the Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science (ISAS). Analysis was completed for four sets of beacon data to provide electron density images of sporadic-E layers. Signals from the two-frequency beacons on the SEEK-2 rockets were processed to yield total electron content (TEC) data that was converted into electron density measurements. Wide variations in layer structures were detected. These included horizontal sporadic-E variations, vertical profiles of double, single, and weak layers. The radio beacon measurements were shown to be in agreement with the in-situ SEEK-2 sensors. The first tomographic image of a sporadic-E layer was produced from the data. The rocket beacon technique was shown to be an excellent tool to study sporadic-E layers because absolute TEC accuracy of 0.01 TEC Units can be easily obtained and, with proper receiver placement, electron density images can be produced using computerized ionospheric tomography with better than 1km horizontal and vertical resolution. Keywords. Ionospheric irregularities Instruments and techniques Mid-latitude ionosphere

  18. High definition cross-well electrical resistivity imaging using seismoelectric focusing and image-guided inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sava, P.; Revil, A.; Karaoulis, M.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a new, simple and efficient method to image electrical resistivity between a set of wells. Our procedure consists of two steps: first, we map the interfaces between various subsurface formations using seismoelectric conversions; second, we derive the formation resistivity using image-guided cross-well electric tomography. In the first step, we focus seismic energy at a set of points located on a regular grid between wells, which enables us to map the geological formations in terms of heterogeneities in electrical, hydraulic and/or seismic properties. The density of the scanning points (i.e. the seismoelectric image resolution) is related to the wavelength of the seismic impulse used to scan the formations. Each time the seismic energy is focused at a point, the resulting electrical potential burst (equivalent to the one generated by a volumetric seismic source) is recorded remotely at a set of electrodes positioned in wells (the reference electrode can be located on the ground surface or far enough to be considered at infinity). We construct a high-resolution `seismoelectric' image by assigning the electrical potential simulated at these fixed electrodes to the location of the seismic focus. In a follow-up step, the structure of this image is used in image-guided inversion to improve electrical resistivity tomography between the two wells. The structural information from the seismoelectric image is used to impose constraints on the model covariance matrix used in the inversion of the electrical resistivity data. This approach offers new perspectives in recovering fine structure of resistivity (high definition resistivity tomography) between the wells, which cannot be resolved through conventional cross-well resistivity or from seismic tomography alone.

  19. Enhanced thermal stability of silica-coated gold nanorods for photoacoustic imaging and image-guided therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Sheng; Frey, Wolfgang; Kim, Seungsoo; Homan, Kimberly; Kruizinga, Pieter; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Photothermal stability and, therefore, consistency of both optical absorption and photoacoustic response of the plasmonic nanoabsorbers is critical for successful photoacoustic image-guided photothermal therapy. In this study, silica-coated gold nanorods were developed as a multifunctional molecular imaging and therapeutic agent suitable for image-guided photothermal therapy. The optical properties and photothermal stability of silica-coated gold nanorods under intense irradiation with nanosecond laser pulses were investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Silica-coated gold nanorods showed increased photothermal stability and retained their superior optical properties under much higher fluences. The changes in photoacoustic response of PEGylated and silica-coated nanorods under laser pulses of various fluences were compared. The silica-coated gold nanorods provide a stable photoacoustic signal, which implies better imaging capabilities and make silica-coated gold nanorods a promising imaging and therapeutic nano-agent for photoacoustic imaging and image-guided photothermal therapy. PMID:20588732

  20. VLBI observations of SN 2011dh: imaging of the youngest radio supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Tudose, V.; Paragi, Z.; Yang, J.; Marcaide, J. M.; Guirado, J. C.; Ros, E.; Alberdi, A.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Argo, M. K.; van der Horst, A. J.; Garrett, M. A.; Stockdale, C. J.; Weiler, K. W.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the VLBI detection of supernova SN 2011dh at 22 GHz using a subset of the EVN array. The observations took place 14 days after the discovery of the supernova, thus resulting in a VLBI image of the youngest radio-loud supernova ever. We provide revised coordinates for the supernova with milli-arcsecond precision, linked to the ICRF. The recovered flux density is a factor ~2 below the EVLA flux density reported by other authors at the same frequency and epoch of our observations. This discrepancy could be due to extended emission detected with the EVLA or to calibration problems in the VLBI and/or EVLA observations.

  1. Computed tomography imaging-guided radiotherapy by targeting upconversion nanocubes with significant imaging and radiosensitization enhancements

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Huaiyong; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Ren, Qingguo; Bu, Wenbo; Ge, Weiqiang; Xiao, Qingfeng; Zhang, Shengjian; Wei, Chenyang; Qu, Haiyun; Wang, Zheng; Hua, Yanqing; Zhou, Liangping; Peng, Weijun; Zhao, Kuaile; Shi, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    The clinical potentials of radiotherapy could not be achieved completely because of the inaccurate positioning and inherent radioresistance of tumours. In this study, a novel active-targeting upconversion theranostic agent (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-labelled BaYbF5: 2% Er3+ nanocube) was developed for the first time to address these clinical demands. Heavy metal-based nanocubes (~10 nm) are potential theranostic agents with bifunctional features: computed tomography (CT) contrast agents for targeted tumour imaging and irradiation dose enhancers in tumours during radiotherapy. Remarkably, they showed low toxicity and excellent performance in active-targeting CT imaging and CT imaging-guided radiosensitizing therapy, which could greatly concentrate and enlarge the irradiation dose deposition in tumours to enhance therapeutic efficacy and minimize the damage to surrounding tissues. PMID:23624542

  2. Image improvement from a sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C. E., LLNL

    1997-06-01

    A sodium-layer laser guide star beacon with high-order adaptive optics at Lick Observatory produced a factor of 2.4 intensity increase and a factor of 2 decrease in full width at half maximum for an astronomical point source, compared with image motion compensation alone. Image full widths at half maximum were identical for laser and natural guide stars (0.3 arc seconds). The Strehl ratio with the laser guide star was 65% of that with a natural guide star. This technique should allow ground-based telescopes to attain the diffraction limit, by correcting for atmospheric distortions.

  3. The Radio JOVE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L.; Thieman, J.; Higgins, C.

    1999-09-01

    Radio JOVE is an interactive educational activity which brings the radio sounds of Jupiter and the Sun to students, teachers, and the general public. This is accomplished through the construction of a simple radio telescope kit and the use of a real-time radio observatory on the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/) will contain science information, instruction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for students and teachers. Our target audience is high school science classes, but subjects can be tailored to college undergraduate physics and astronomy courses or even to middle school science classes. The goals of the project are: 1) Educate people about planetary and solar radio astronomy, space physics, and the scientific method 2) Provide teachers and students with a hands-on radio astronomy exercise as a science curriculum support activity by building and using a simple radio telescope receiver/antenna kit 3) Create the first ever online radio observatory which provides real-time data for those with internet access 4) Allow interactions among participating schools by facilitating exchanges of ideas, data, and observing experiences. Our current funding will allow us to impact 100 schools by partially subsidizing their participation in the program. We expect to expand well beyond this number as publicity and general interest increase. Additional schools are welcome to fully participate, but we will not be able to subsidize their kit purchases. We hope to make a wide impact among the schools by advertising through appropriate newsletters, space grant consortia, the INSPIRE project (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/inspire/), electronic links, and science and education meetings. We would like to acknoledge support from the NASA/GSFC Director's Discretionary Fund, the STScI IDEAS grant program and the NASA/GSFC Space Science Data Operations Office.

  4. Massive Elliptical Galaxies at High Redshift: NICMOS Imaging of z~1 Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirm, Andrew W.; Dickinson, Mark; Dey, Arjun

    2003-03-01

    We present deep, ~1.6 μm, continuum images of 11 high-redshift (0.811radio galaxies observed with NICMOS on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our NICMOS images probe the rest-frame optical light where stars are expected to dominate the galaxy luminosity. The rest-frame ultraviolet light of eight of these galaxies demonstrates the well-known ``alignment effect,'' with extended and often complex morphologies elongated along an axis close to that of the Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) radio source. As has been previously noted from ground-based near-infrared imaging, most of the radio galaxies have rounder, more symmetric morphologies at rest-frame optical wavelengths. Here we show the most direct evidence that in most cases the stellar hosts are normal elliptical galaxies with r1/4-law light profiles. For a few galaxies, very faint traces (less than 4% of the total H-band light) of the UV-bright aligned component are also visible in the infrared images. We derive both the effective radius and surface brightness for nine of 11 sample galaxies by fitting one- and two-dimensional surface-brightness models to them. We compare the high-redshift radio galaxies to lower redshift counterparts. We find that their sizes are similar to those of local FRII radio source hosts and are in general larger than other local galaxies. The derived host galaxy luminosities are very high and lie at the bright end of luminosity functions constructed at similar redshifts. This indicates that the high-redshift radio galaxies are likely rare, massive sources. The galaxies in our sample are also brighter than the rest-frame size-surface-brightness locus defined by the low-redshift sources. Passive evolution roughly aligns the z~1 galaxies with the low-redshift samples with a slope equal to 4.7. This value is intermediate between the canonical Kormendy relation (~3.5) and a constant luminosity line (=5). The optical host is sometimes centered on a local minimum in the rest-frame UV

  5. Technician-free system for image-guided bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Rahul; Bascom, Rebecca; Higgins, William E.

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that guidance systems improve accuracy and reduce skill variation among physicians during bronchoscopy. However, most of these systems suffer from one or more of the following limitations: 1) an attending technician must carefully keep the system position synchronized with the bronchoscope position during the procedure; 2) extra bronchoscope tracking hardware may be required; 3) guidance cannot take place in real time; 4) the guidance system is unable to detect and correct faulty bronchoscope maneuvers; and 5) a resynchronization procedure must be followed after adverse events such as patient cough or dynamic airway collapse. Here, we propose an image-based system for technician-free bronchoscopy guidance that relies on two features. First, our system precomputes a guidance plan that suggests natural bronchoscope maneuvers at every bifurcation leading toward a region of interest (ROI). Second, our system enables bronchoscope position verification that relies on a global-registration algorithm to establish the global bronchoscope position and, thus, provide the physician with updated navigational information during bronchoscopy. The system can handle general navigation to an ROI, as well as adverse events, and is directly controlled by the physician by a foot pedal. Guided bronchoscopy results using airway-tree phantoms and human cases demonstrate the efficacy of the system.

  6. Image-guided ablation of primary liver and renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Breen, David J; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2015-03-01

    Image-guided ablation (IGA) techniques have evolved considerably over the past 20 years and are increasingly used to definitively treat small primary cancers of the liver and kidney. IGA is recommended by most guidelines as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-defined as either a single tumour smaller than 5 cm or up to three nodules smaller than 3 cm-when surgical options are precluded, and has potential as first-line therapy, in lieu of surgery, for patients with very early stage tumours smaller than 2 cm. With regard to renal cell carcinoma, despite the absence of any randomized trial comparing the outcomes of IGA with those of standard partial nephrectomy, a growing amount of data demonstrate robust oncological outcomes for this minimally invasive approach and testify to its potential as a standard-of-care treatment. Herein, we review the various ablation techniques, the supporting evidence, and clinical application of IGA in the treatment of primary liver and kidney cancers. PMID:25601446

  7. Image-guided surgery and therapy: current status and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terence M.

    2001-05-01

    Image-guided surgery and therapy is assuming an increasingly important role, particularly considering the current emphasis on minimally-invasive surgical procedures. Volumetric CT and MR images have been used now for some time in conjunction with stereotactic frames, to guide many neurosurgical procedures. With the development of systems that permit surgical instruments to be tracked in space, image-guided surgery now includes the use of frame-less procedures, and the application of the technology has spread beyond neurosurgery to include orthopedic applications and therapy of various soft-tissue organs such as the breast, prostate and heart. Since tracking systems allow image- guided surgery to be undertaken without frames, a great deal of effort has been spent on image-to-image and image-to- patient registration techniques, and upon the means of combining real-time intra-operative images with images acquired pre-operatively. As image-guided surgery systems have become increasingly sophisticated, the greatest challenges to their successful adoption in the operating room of the future relate to the interface between the user and the system. To date, little effort has been expended to ensure that the human factors issues relating to the use of such equipment in the operating room have been adequately addressed. Such systems will only be employed routinely in the OR when they are designed to be intuitive, unobtrusive, and provide simple access to the source of the images.

  8. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and

  9. Recent Results From the Whistler- and Z-mode Radio Sounding From the IMAGE Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Reddy, A.; Mayank, K.; Hazra, S.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Whistler mode radio sounding method [Sonwalkar et al., JGR, 2011] was applied to two case studies: (1) daytime and nighttime cases of whistler mode echoes observed on IMAGE inside the plasmasphere (L<4, altitude <5000 km), and (2) cases of whistler mode echoes observed during geomagnetic storm activity. Preliminary results indicate: (i) O+/H+ and O+/ (H+ + He+) transition heights at nighttime are a few hundred kilometers lower than that at daytime. (ii) Electron and ion densities found from whistler mode sounding are consistent with those from the past in situ and radio sounding measurements, but differ from those predicted by IRI-2012 and GCPM. (iii) Electron and ion densities undergo temporal changes as a function of geomagnetic storm activity, and each species has different recovery period. (iv) Major, moderate, and minor storms affect Ne, H+, and O+ densities in a similar manner, but affect He+ density differently-the minor storm did not affect it. By comparing the electron and ion densities measured by whistler mode radio sounding with those predicted by physics based ionospheric models (e.g. SAMI 2) it may be possible to understand how thermospheric winds influence the evolution of the ionospheric electron and ion densities during geomagnetic storms. The application of Sonwalkar et al. [2011] method to nonducted and ducted fast Z mode echoes observed on IMAGE has led to the measurement of field aligned electron density and duct width and enhancement factor from ~1000 km up to the equator. In two cases, ducts with widths of ~0.05-0.1 L and density depletions of ~5-10 % accounted for the observed properties of ducted Z mode echoes. The measurements of both electron density and ducts are consistent with past measurements. The results from the whistler and Z mode sounding will lead to new empirical models of field aligned electron and ion densities and a statistical characterization of ducts in the magnetosphere.

  10. Radio Spectroscopic Imaging of Bi-directional Electron Beam Pairs in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Zhitao; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-05-01

    In solar flares, energetic electrons are believed to be accelerated at or near the magnetic reconnection site. They propagate outward along newly reconnected field lines usually in the form of electron beams. These beams can emit radio waves commonly known as type III radio bursts. An important feature of these bursts is that they are emitted near the local plasma frequency or its harmonic, which is only a function of the ambient plasma density. In particular, an electron beam propagating upward in the corona encounters plasma with lower and lower density, producing a radio burst with a “normal” frequency slope (whose frequency decreases in time). Similarly, a downward propagating beam produces a reverse-slope burst. Sometimes both the normal- and reverse-slope type III bursts are observed simultaneously. These type III burst with opposite slopes have been considered to be the signature of a pair of bi-directional electron beams emerging from a common acceleration site. However, previous studies had no imaging capability to locate these bursts and put them in the flare context. Here we report observations of decimetric type III burst pairs by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) during the impulsive phase of a C5.6 flare. Using VLA’s unprecedented ultra-high-cadence spectroscopic imaging capability, we demonstrate that the type III burst pairs indeed correspond to high speed (~0.1c), bi-directional electron beams emerging from a common site in the corona where post-flare loops appeared later on. Implications of our results on magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration will be briefly discussed.

  11. Ultrasound in Radiology: from Anatomic, Functional, Molecular Imaging to Drug Delivery and Image-Guided Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, ultrasound has expanded medical imaging well beyond the “traditional” radiology setting - a combination of portability, low cost and ease of use makes ultrasound imaging an indispensable tool for radiologists as well as for other medical professionals who need to obtain imaging diagnosis or guide a therapeutic intervention quickly and efficiently. Ultrasound combines excellent ability for deep penetration into soft tissues with very good spatial resolution, with only a few exceptions (i.e. those involving overlying bone or gas). Real-time imaging (up to hundreds and thousands frames per second) enables guidance of therapeutic procedures and biopsies; characterization of the mechanical properties of the tissues greatly aids with the accuracy of the procedures. The ability of ultrasound to deposit energy locally brings about the potential for localized intervention encompassing: tissue ablation, enhancing penetration through the natural barriers to drug delivery in the body and triggering drug release from carrier micro- and nanoparticles. The use of microbubble contrast agents brings the ability to monitor and quantify tissue perfusion, and microbubble targeting with ligand-decorated microbubbles brings the ability to obtain molecular biomarker information, i.e., ultrasound molecular imaging. Overall, ultrasound has become the most widely used imaging modality in modern medicine; it will continue to grow and expand. PMID:26200224

  12. A Method for Synthesis of Frequency-Time Radio Images in Non-Radiating Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyatyev, Yu. N.; Donets, I. V.; Onishchenko, V. S.; Reizenkind, Y. A.; Shevchenko, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a modification of the known method used to synthesize frequency time radio images in non-radiating radars and based on minimization of the r.m.s. deviation of the observation data vector from its linear model with an additional limitation imposed on the L1 norm of the vector of the evaluated amplitudes of two-dimensional signal distribution in the range of delays and Doppler frequencies. The essence of the modification is that instead of solving the problem of conditional minimization at a full array in the "time delay—Doppler frequency shift" coordinates, this problem is solved sequentially for the zeroth and a preset frequency shift. In combination with additional computational tricks, the proposed modification allows one to increase the computational efficiency of image formation by three orders of magnitude.

  13. Quantification and comparison of visibility and image artifacts of a new liquid fiducial marker in a lung phantom for image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Scherman Rydhög, Jonas Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Irming Jølck, Rasmus; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A new biodegradable liquid fiducial marker was devised to allow for easy insertion in lung tumors using thin needles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visibility of the liquid fiducial markers for image-guided radiation therapy and compare to existing solid fiducial markers and to one existing liquid fiducial marker currently commercially available. Methods: Fiducial marker visibility was quantified in terms of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) on planar kilovoltage x-ray images in a thorax phantom for different concentrations of the radio-opaque component of the new liquid fiducial marker, four solid fiducial markers, and one existing liquid fiducial marker. Additionally, the image artifacts produced on computer tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) of all fiducial markers were quantified. Results: The authors found that the new liquid fiducial marker with the highest concentration of the radio-opaque component had a CNR > 2.05 for 62/63 exposures, which compared favorably to the existing solid fiducial markers and to the existing liquid fiducial marker evaluated. On CT and CBCT, the new liquid fiducial marker with the highest concentration produced lower streaking index artifact (30 and 14, respectively) than the solid gold markers (113 and 20, respectively) and the existing liquid fiducial marker (39 and 20, respectively). The size of the image artifact was larger for all of the liquid fiducial markers compared to the solid fiducial markers because of their larger physical size. Conclusions: The visibility and the image artifacts produced by the new liquid fiducial markers were comparable to existing solid fiducial markers and the existing liquid fiducial marker. The authors conclude that the new liquid fiducial marker represents an alternative to the fiducial markers tested.

  14. Spatially weighted mutual information image registration for image guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Samuel B.; Rhee, Frank C.; Monroe, James I.; Sohn, Jason W.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To develop a new metric for image registration that incorporates the (sub)pixelwise differential importance along spatial location and to demonstrate its application for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: It is well known that rigid-body image registration with mutual information is dependent on the size and location of the image subset on which the alignment analysis is based [the designated region of interest (ROI)]. Therefore, careful review and manual adjustments of the resulting registration are frequently necessary. Although there were some investigations of weighted mutual information (WMI), these efforts could not apply the differential importance to a particular spatial location since WMI only applies the weight to the joint histogram space. The authors developed the spatially weighted mutual information (SWMI) metric by incorporating an adaptable weight function with spatial localization into mutual information. SWMI enables the user to apply the selected transform to medically ''important'' areas such as tumors and critical structures, so SWMI is neither dominated by, nor neglects the neighboring structures. Since SWMI can be utilized with any weight function form, the authors presented two examples of weight functions for IGRT application: A Gaussian-shaped weight function (GW) applied to a user-defined location and a structures-of-interest (SOI) based weight function. An image registration example using a synthesized 2D image is presented to illustrate the efficacy of SWMI. The convergence and feasibility of the registration method as applied to clinical imaging is illustrated by fusing a prostate treatment planning CT with a clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) image set acquired for patient alignment. Forty-one trials are run to test the speed of convergence. The authors also applied SWMI registration using two types of weight functions to two head and neck cases and a prostate case with clinically acquired CBCT/MVCT image sets. The

  15. An integrated platform for image-guided cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying Liang; Shetty, Anoop K.; Duckett, Simon; Etyngier, Patrick; Gijsbers, Geert; Bullens, Roland; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Rhode, Kawal S.

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective procedure for patients with heart failure but 30% of patients do not respond. This may be due to sub-optimal placement of the left ventricular (LV) lead. It is hypothesized that the use of cardiac anatomy, myocardial scar distribution and dyssynchrony information, derived from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may improve outcome by guiding the physician for optimal LV lead positioning. Whole heart MR data can be processed to yield detailed anatomical models including the coronary veins. Cine MR data can be used to measure the motion of the LV to determine which regions are late-activating. Finally, delayed Gadolinium enhancement imaging can be used to detect regions of scarring. This paper presents a complete platform for the guidance of CRT using pre-procedural MR data combined with live x-ray fluoroscopy. The platform was used for 21 patients undergoing CRT in a standard catheterization laboratory. The patients underwent cardiac MRI prior to their procedure. For each patient, a MRI-derived cardiac model, showing the LV lead targets, was registered to x-ray fluoroscopy using multiple views of a catheter looped in the right atrium. Registration was maintained throughout the procedure by a combination of C-arm/x-ray table tracking and respiratory motion compensation. Validation of the registration between the three-dimensional (3D) roadmap and the 2D x-ray images was performed using balloon occlusion coronary venograms. A 2D registration error of 1.2 ± 0.7 mm was achieved. In addition, a novel navigation technique was developed, called Cardiac Unfold, where an entire cardiac chamber is unfolded from 3D to 2D along with all relevant anatomical and functional information and coupled to real-time device detection. This allowed more intuitive navigation as the entire 3D scene was displayed simultaneously on a 2D plot. The accuracy of the unfold navigation was assessed off-line using 13 patient data sets

  16. MIND Demons for MR-to-CT Deformable Image Registration In Image-Guided Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reaungamornrat, S.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Khanna, A. J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Prince, J. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Localization of target anatomy and critical structures defined in preoperative MR images can be achieved by means of multi-modality deformable registration to intraoperative CT. We propose a symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration algorithm incorporating a modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) and a robust Huber metric for MR-to-CT registration. Method The method, called MIND Demons, solves for the deformation field between two images by optimizing an energy functional that incorporates both the forward and inverse deformations, smoothness on the velocity fields and the diffeomorphisms, a modality-insensitive similarity function suitable to multi-modality images, and constraints on geodesics in Lagrangian coordinates. Direct optimization (without relying on an exponential map of stationary velocity fields used in conventional diffeomorphic Demons) is carried out using a Gauss-Newton method for fast convergence. Registration performance and sensitivity to registration parameters were analyzed in simulation, in phantom experiments, and clinical studies emulating application in image-guided spine surgery, and results were compared to conventional mutual information (MI) free-form deformation (FFD), local MI (LMI) FFD, and normalized MI (NMI) Demons. Result The method yielded sub-voxel invertibility (0.006 mm) and nonsingular spatial Jacobians with capability to preserve local orientation and topology. It demonstrated improved registration accuracy in comparison to the reference methods, with mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.5 mm compared to 10.9, 2.3, and 4.6 mm for MI FFD, LMI FFD, and NMI Demons methods, respectively. Validation in clinical studies demonstrated realistic deformation with sub-voxel TRE in cases of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Conclusions A modality-independent deformable registration method has been developed to estimate a viscoelastic diffeomorphic map between preoperative MR and intraoperative CT. The

  17. Diabetic mastopathy: imaging features and the role of image-guided biopsy in its diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the imaging features of diabetic mastopathy (DMP) and the role of image-guided biopsy in its diagnosis. Methods: Two experienced radiologists retrospectively reviewed the mammographic and sonographic images of 19 pathologically confirmed DMP patients. The techniques and results of the biopsies performed in each patient were also reviewed. Results: Mammograms showed negative findings in 78% of the patients. On ultrasonography (US), 13 lesions were seen as masses and six as non-mass lesions. The US features of the mass lesions were as follows: irregular shape (69%), oval shape (31%), indistinct margin (69%), angular margin (15%), microlobulated margin (8%), well-defined margin (8%), heterogeneous echogenicity (62%), hypoechoic echogenicity (38%), posterior shadowing (92%), parallel orientation (100%), the absence of calcifications (100%), and the absence of vascularity (100%). Based on the US findings, 17 lesions (89%) were classified as Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category 4 and two (11%) as category 3. US-guided core biopsy was performed in 18 patients, and 10 (56%) were diagnosed with DMP on that basis. An additional vacuum-assisted biopsy was performed in seven patients and all were diagnosed with DMP. Conclusion: The US features of DMP were generally suspicious for malignancy, whereas the mammographic findings were often negative or showed only focal asymmetry. Core biopsy is an adequate method for initial pathological diagnosis. However, since it yields non-diagnostic results in a considerable number of cases, the evaluation of correlations between imaging and pathology plays an important role in the diagnostic process. PMID:26810194

  18. MIND Demons for MR-to-CT deformable image registration in image-guided spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Khanna, A. J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Prince, J. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Localization of target anatomy and critical structures defined in preoperative MR images can be achieved by means of multi-modality deformable registration to intraoperative CT. We propose a symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration algorithm incorporating a modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) and a robust Huber metric for MR-to-CT registration. Method: The method, called MIND Demons, solves for the deformation field between two images by optimizing an energy functional that incorporates both the forward and inverse deformations, smoothness on the velocity fields and the diffeomorphisms, a modality-insensitive similarity function suitable to multi-modality images, and constraints on geodesics in Lagrangian coordinates. Direct optimization (without relying on an exponential map of stationary velocity fields used in conventional diffeomorphic Demons) is carried out using a Gauss-Newton method for fast convergence. Registration performance and sensitivity to registration parameters were analyzed in simulation, in phantom experiments, and clinical studies emulating application in image-guided spine surgery, and results were compared to conventional mutual information (MI) free-form deformation (FFD), local MI (LMI) FFD, and normalized MI (NMI) Demons. Result: The method yielded sub-voxel invertibility (0.006 mm) and nonsingular spatial Jacobians with capability to preserve local orientation and topology. It demonstrated improved registration accuracy in comparison to the reference methods, with mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.5 mm compared to 10.9, 2.3, and 4.6 mm for MI FFD, LMI FFD, and NMI Demons methods, respectively. Validation in clinical studies demonstrated realistic deformation with sub-voxel TRE in cases of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Conclusions: A modality-independent deformable registration method has been developed to estimate a

  19. Hierarchical content-based image retrieval by dynamic indexing and guided search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jane; Cheung, King H.; Liu, James; Guo, Linong

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to content-based image retrieval by using dynamic indexing and guided search in a hierarchical structure, and extending data mining and data warehousing techniques. The proposed algorithms include: a wavelet-based scheme for multiple image feature extraction, the extension of a conventional data warehouse and an image database to an image data warehouse for dynamic image indexing, an image data schema for hierarchical image representation and dynamic image indexing, a statistically based feature selection scheme to achieve flexible similarity measures, and a feature component code to facilitate query processing and guide the search for the best matching. A series of case studies are reported, which include a wavelet-based image color hierarchy, classification of satellite images, tropical cyclone pattern recognition, and personal identification using multi-level palmprint and face features.

  20. Sparse representations and convex optimization as tools for LOFAR radio interferometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; Garsden, H.; Starck, J. L.; Corbel, S.; Woiselle, A.; Tasse, C.; McKean, J. P.; Bobin, J.

    2015-08-01

    Compressed sensing theory is slowly making its way to solve more and more astronomical inverse problems. We address here the application of sparse representations, convex optimization and proximal theory to radio interferometric imaging. First, we expose the theory behind interferometric imaging, sparse representations and convex optimization, and second, we illustrate their application with numerical tests with SASIR, an implementation of the FISTA, a Forward-Backward splitting algorithm hosted in a LOFAR imager. Various tests have been conducted in Garsden et al., 2015. The main results are: i) an improved angular resolution (super resolution of a factor ≈ 2) with point sources as compared to CLEAN on the same data, ii) correct photometry measurements on a field of point sources at high dynamic range and iii) the imaging of extended sources with improved fidelity. SASIR provides better reconstructions (five time less residuals) of the extended emission as compared to CLEAN. With the advent of large radiotelescopes, there is scope for improving classical imaging methods with convex optimization methods combined with sparse representations.

  1. Rician noise reduction in magnetic resonance images using adaptive non-local mean and guided image filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Muhammad Tariq; Chu, Yeon-Ho; Choi, Young-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a Rician noise reduction method for magnetic resonance (MR) images. The proposed method is based on adaptive non-local mean and guided image filtering techniques. In the first phase, a guidance image is obtained from the noisy image through an adaptive non-local mean filter. Sobel operators are applied to compute the strength of edges which is further used to control the spread of the kernel in non-local mean filtering. In the second phase, the noisy and the guidance images are provided to the guided image filter as input to restore the noise-free image. The improved performance of the proposed method is investigated using the simulated and real data sets of MR images. Its performance is also compared with the previously proposed state-of-the art methods. Comparative analysis demonstrates the superiority of the proposed scheme over the existing approaches.

  2. Rician noise reduction in magnetic resonance images using adaptive non-local mean and guided image filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Muhammad Tariq; Chu, Yeon-Ho; Choi, Young-Kyu

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a Rician noise reduction method for magnetic resonance (MR) images. The proposed method is based on adaptive non-local mean and guided image filtering techniques. In the first phase, a guidance image is obtained from the noisy image through an adaptive non-local mean filter. Sobel operators are applied to compute the strength of edges which is further used to control the spread of the kernel in non-local mean filtering. In the second phase, the noisy and the guidance images are provided to the guided image filter as input to restore the noise-free image. The improved performance of the proposed method is investigated using the simulated and real data sets of MR images. Its performance is also compared with the previously proposed state-of-the art methods. Comparative analysis demonstrates the superiority of the proposed scheme over the existing approaches.

  3. Automatic 3D ultrasound calibration for image guided therapy using intramodality image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Kirmizibayrak, Can; Shamdasani, Vijay; Metz, Steve; Hristov, Dimitre

    2013-11-01

    Many real time ultrasound (US) guided therapies can benefit from management of motion-induced anatomical changes with respect to a previously acquired computerized anatomy model. Spatial calibration is a prerequisite to transforming US image information to the reference frame of the anatomy model. We present a new method for calibrating 3D US volumes using intramodality image registration, derived from the ‘hand-eye’ calibration technique. The method is fully automated by implementing data rejection based on sensor displacements, automatic registration over overlapping image regions, and a self-consistency error metric evaluated continuously during calibration. We also present a novel method for validating US calibrations based on measurement of physical phantom displacements within US images. Both calibration and validation can be performed on arbitrary phantoms. Results indicate that normalized mutual information and localized cross correlation produce the most accurate 3D US registrations for calibration. Volumetric image alignment is more accurate and reproducible than point selection for validating the calibrations, yielding <1.5 mm root mean square error, a significant improvement relative to previously reported hand-eye US calibration results. Comparison of two different phantoms for calibration and for validation revealed significant differences for validation (p = 0.003) but not for calibration (p = 0.795).

  4. Use of image guided radiation therapy techniques and imaging dose measurement at Indian hospitals: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Dhote, D. S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Naidu, Suresh; Sutar, A.; Kannan, V.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey was conducted to obtain information about the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and IGRT dose measurement methods being followed at Indian radiotherapy centers. A questionnaire containing parameters relevant to use of IGRT was prepared to collect the information pertaining to (i) availability and type of IGRT delivery system, (ii) frequency of image acquisition protocol and utilization of these images for different purpose, and (iii) imaging dose measurement. The questionnaire was circulated to 75 hospitals in the country having IGRT facility, and responses of 51 centers were received. Survey results showed that among surveyed hospitals, 86% centers have IGRT facility, 78% centers have kilo voltage three-dimensional volumetric imaging. 75% of hospitals in our study do not perform computed tomography dose index measurements and 89% of centers do not perform patient dose measurements. Moreover, only 29% physicists believe IGRT dose is additional radiation burden to patient. This study has brought into focus the need to design a national protocol for IGRT dose measurement and development of indigenous tools to perform IGRT dose measurements. PMID:26865758

  5. Use of image guided radiation therapy techniques and imaging dose measurement at Indian hospitals: A survey.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Dhote, D S; Kumar, Rajesh; Naidu, Suresh; Sutar, A; Kannan, V

    2015-01-01

    A national survey was conducted to obtain information about the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and IGRT dose measurement methods being followed at Indian radiotherapy centers. A questionnaire containing parameters relevant to use of IGRT was prepared to collect the information pertaining to (i) availability and type of IGRT delivery system, (ii) frequency of image acquisition protocol and utilization of these images for different purpose, and (iii) imaging dose measurement. The questionnaire was circulated to 75 hospitals in the country having IGRT facility, and responses of 51 centers were received. Survey results showed that among surveyed hospitals, 86% centers have IGRT facility, 78% centers have kilo voltage three-dimensional volumetric imaging. 75% of hospitals in our study do not perform computed tomography dose index measurements and 89% of centers do not perform patient dose measurements. Moreover, only 29% physicists believe IGRT dose is additional radiation burden to patient. This study has brought into focus the need to design a national protocol for IGRT dose measurement and development of indigenous tools to perform IGRT dose measurements. PMID:26865758

  6. Radio reflection imaging of asteroid and comet interiors I: Acquisition and imaging theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sava, Paul; Ittharat, Detchai; Grimm, Robert; Stillman, David

    2015-05-01

    Imaging the interior structure of comets and asteroids can provide insight into their formation in the early Solar System, and can aid in their exploration and hazard mitigation. Accurate imaging can be accomplished using broadband wavefield data penetrating deep inside the object under investigation. This can be done in principle using seismic systems (which is difficult since it requires contact with the studied object), or using radar systems (which is easier since it can be conducted from orbit). We advocate the use of radar systems based on instruments similar to the ones currently deployed in space, e.g. the CONSERT experiment of the Rosetta mission, but perform imaging using data reflected from internal interfaces, instead of data transmitted through the imaging object. Our core methodology is wavefield extrapolation using time-domain finite differences, a technique often referred to as reverse-time migration and proven to be effective in high-quality imaging of complex geologic structures. The novelty of our approach consists in the use of dual orbiters around the studied object, instead of an orbiter and a lander. Dual orbiter systems can provide multi-offset data that illuminate the target object from many different illumination angles. Multi-offset data improve image quality (a) by avoiding illumination shadows, (b) by attenuating coherent noise (image artifacts) caused by wavefield multi-pathing, and (c) by providing information necessary to infer the model parameters needed to simulate wavefields inside the imaging target. The images obtained using multi-offset are robust with respect to instrument noise comparable in strength with the reflected signal. Dual-orbiter acquisition leads to improved image quality which is directly dependent on the aperture between the transmitter and receiver antennas. We illustrate the proposed methodology using a complex model based on a scaled version of asteroid 433 Eros.

  7. 99mTc-MIBI radio-guided minimally invasive parathyroidectomy: experience with patients with normal thyroids and nodular goiters.

    PubMed

    Casara, Dario; Rubello, Domenico; Cauzzo, Cristina; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa

    2002-01-01

    The surgical approach to primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is changing. In patients with a high probability to be affected by a solitary parathyroid adenoma (PA), a unilateral neck exploration (UNE) or a minimally invasive radio-guided surgery (MIRS) using the intraoperative gamma probe (IGP) technique have recently been proposed. We investigated the role of IGP in a group of 84 patients with primary HPT who were homogeneously evaluated before surgery by a single-day imaging protocol including 99mTcO4/MIBI subtraction scan and neck ultrasound (US) and then operated on by the same surgical team. Quick parathyroid hormone (QPTH) was intraoperatively measured in all cases to confirm successful parathyroidectomy. In 70 patients with scan/US evidence of a single enlarged parathyroid gland (EPG) and with a normal thyroid gland, MIRS was planned. In the other 14 patients, the IGP technique was utilized during a standard bilateral neck exploration (BNE) because of the presence of concomitant nodular goiter (11 cases) or multiglandular disease (MGD) (3 cases). The IGP technique consisted of the following: (1) in the operating room, a low 99mTc-MIBI dose (37 MBq) was injected intravenously during anesthesia induction; (2) subsequently, the patient's neck was scanned with the probe by the surgeon to localize the cutaneous projection of the EPG; (3) in patients who underwent MIRS, the EPG was detected intraoperatively with the probe and removed through a small, 2 to 2.5 cm skin incision; (4) radioactivity was measured on the EPG both in vivo and ex vivo, the thyroid, the background and the parathyroid bed after EPG removal. In patients with concomitant nodular goiter, the radioactivity was also measured on the thyroid nodules. Surgical and pathologic findings were consistent with a single PA in 78 patients, parathyroid carcinoma in 2, and MGD in 4. MIRS was successfully performed in 67 of the 70 patients (97.7%) in whom this approach was planned. It must be pointed out that

  8. Intelligent image analysis for image-guided hair removal and skin therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Brian; Lu, Thomas; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    We present the development of advanced automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms for the hair follicles identification in digital skin images to accurately direct the laser beam to remove the hair. The ATR system first performs a wavelet filtering to enhance the contrast of the hair features in the image. The system then extracts the unique features of the targets and sends the features to an Adaboost based classifier for training and recognition operations. The ATR system automatically classifies the hair, moles, or other skin lesion and provides the accurate coordinates of the intended hair follicle locations. The coordinates can be used to guide a scanning laser to focus energy only on the hair follicles. The intended benefit would be to protect the skin from unwanted laser exposure and to provide more effective skin therapy.

  9. Intelligent Image Analysis for Image-Guided Laser Hair Removal and Skin Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Brian; Lu, Thomas; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    We present the development of advanced automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms for the hair follicles identification in digital skin images to accurately direct the laser beam to remove the hair. The ATR system first performs a wavelet filtering to enhance the contrast of the hair features in the image. The system then extracts the unique features of the targets and sends the features to an Adaboost based classifier for training and recognition operations. The ATR system automatically classifies the hair, moles, or other skin lesion and provides the accurate coordinates of the intended hair follicle locations. The coordinates can be used to guide a scanning laser to focus energy only on the hair follicles. The intended benefit would be to protect the skin from unwanted laser exposure and to provide more effective skin therapy.

  10. The FIRST Survey: Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Helfand, David J.

    1995-09-01

    The FIRST survey to produce Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters is now underway using the NRAO Very Large Array. We describe here the scientific motivation for a large-area sky survey at radio frequencies which has a sensitivity and angular resolution comparable to the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey, and we recount the history that led to the current survey project. The technical design of the survey is covered in detail, including a description and justification of the grid pattern chosen, the rationale behind the integration time and angular resolution selected, and a summary of the other considerations which informed our planning for the project. A comprehensive description of the automated data analysis pipeline we have developed is presented. We also report here the results of the first year of FIRST observations. A total of 144 hr of time in 1993 April and May was used for a variety of tests, as well as to cover an initial strip of the survey extending between 07h 15m and 16h 30m in a 2°.8 wide declination zone passing through the local zenith (28.2 <δ < 31.0). A total of 2153 individual pointings yielded an image database containing 1039 merged images 46'.5 × 34'.5 in extent with 1".8 pixels and a typical rms of 0.13 mJy. A catalog derived from this 300 deg2 region contains 28,000 radio sources. We have performed extensive tests on the images and source list in order to establish the photometric and astrometric accuracy of these data products. We find systematic astrometric errors of < 0".05 individual sources down to the 1 mJy survey flux density threshold have 90% confidence error circles with radii of < 1". CLEAN bias introduces a systematic underestimate of point-source flux densities of ˜0.25 mJy; the bias is more severe for extended sources. Nonetheless, a comparison with a published deep survey field demonstrates that we successfully detect 39/49 sources with integrated flux densities greater than 0.75 mJy, including 19 of 20

  11. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose {+-} standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 {+-} 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 {+-} 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 {+-} 8 Gy and 36 {+-} 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  12. Deep Radio Imaging with MERLIN of the Supernova Remnants in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muxlow, T. W. B.; Pedlar, A.; Riley, J. D.; McDonald, A. R.; Beswick, R. J.; Wills, K. A.

    An 8 day MERLIN deep integration at 5GHz of the central region of the starburst galaxy M82 has been used to investigate the radio structure of a number of supernova remnants in unprecedented detail revealing new shells and partial shell structures for the first time. In addition, by comparing the new deep 2002 image with an astrometrically aligned image from 36 hours of data taken in 1992, it has been possible to directly measure the expansion velocities of 4 of the most compact remnants in M82. For the two most compact remnants, 41.95+575 and 43.31+592, expansion velocities of 2800 ± 300 km s-1 and 8750 ± 400 km s-1 have been derived. These confirm and refine the measured expansion velocities which have been derived from VLBI multi-epoch studies. For remnants 43.18+583 and 44.01+596, expansion velocities of 10500 ± 750 km s -1 and 2400 ± 250 km s-1 have been measured for the first time. In addition, the peak of the radio emission for SNR 45.17+612 has moved between the two epochs implying velocities around 7500km s-1. The relatively compact remnants in M82 are thus found to be expanding over a wide range of velocities which appear unrelated to their size. The new 2002 map is the most sensitive high-resolution image yet made of M82, achieving an rms noise level of 17µJy beam-1. This establishes a first epoch for subsequent deep studies of expansion velocities for many SNR within M82.

  13. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  14. Performance of a small CdTe gamma camera for radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Sakahara, Harmui; Hayama, Kazuhide; Funaki, Minoru; Shirahata, T.; Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar

    2001-12-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy has been shown to be highly accurate for detecting metastatic diseases, such as melanoma and breast cancer. Gamma probes that measure only the relative presence of radioactivity are commonly used to identify sentinel lymph nodes. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows the size, shape, and location of the target tissues to be visualized. The purpose of this study is to characterize the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for diagnosing other diseases amenable to the smaller- format associated with this prototype imaging system. Methods & Design: The detector head was comprised of a 32 x 32 Cadmium Telluride semiconductor array and application- specific integrated circuit (ASIC) with a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mm x 166 mm x 65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mm x 44.8 mm. Two spherical 5 mm diameter Tc-99m radioactive sources having activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq were used to simulate sentinel lymph nodes and injection site. The relative detectability of these foci was compared using the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera. Use of the prototype was also explored on patients in a variety of clinical applications. Results: the SSGC provided better spatial resolution on phantom studies than the conventional gamma camera control. Both foci could be visualized clearly by the SSGC using a 15 second acquisition time, whereas they could not be readily identified using the conventional system under comparable conditions. Preliminary clinical tests of the SSGC were found to be successful in imaging diseases in a variety of tissues including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints, and sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusion: The SSGC has significant potential for use in diagnosing diseases and for facilitating subsequent radioguided surgery. (This project was supported by a Grant- in

  15. Clinical trial of combined radio- and fluorescence-guided sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; Rietbergen, Daphne D.D.; van der Hiel, Bernies; van der Vorst, Joost R.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Frangioni, John V.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; van Leeuwen, Fijs W.B.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Combining radioactive colloids and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore permit preoperative planning and intraoperative localization of deeply located sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) with direct optical guidance by a single lymphatic tracer. The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate and optimize a hybrid NIR fluorescence and radioactive tracer for SLN detection in breast cancer patients. Method Patients with breast cancer undergoing SLN biopsy were enrolled. The day before surgery, indocyanine green (ICG)-99mTc-Nanocolloid was injected periareolarly and a lymphoscintigram was acquired. Directly before surgery, blue dye was injected. Intraoperative SLN localization was performed by a gamma probe and the Mini-FLARETM NIR fluorescence imaging system. Patients were divided into two dose groups, with one group receiving twice the particle density of ICG and nanocolloid, but the same dose of radioactive 99mTechnetium. Results Thirty-two patients were enrolled in the trial. At least one SLN was identified pre- and intraoperatively. All 48 axillary SLNs could be detected by gamma tracing and NIR fluorescence imaging, but only 42 of them stained blue. NIR fluorescence permitted detection of lymphatic vessels draining to the SLN up to 29 hours after injection. Increasing the particle density by two-fold did not yield a difference in fluorescence intensity, median 255 (range 98 – 542) vs. median 284 (90 – 921; P = 0.590), or signal- to- background ratio, median 5.4 (range 3.0 – 15.4) vs. median 4.9 (3.5 – 16.3; P = 1.000), of the SLN. Conclusion The hybrid NIR fluorescence and radioactive tracer ICG-99mTc-Nanocolloid permitted accurate pre- and intraoperative detection of the SLNs in patients with breast cancer. PMID:23696463

  16. Radio Imaging Observations of PSR J1023+0038 in an LMXB State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, A. T.; Moldon, J.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Patruno, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Archibald, A. M.; Paragi, Z.; Heald, G.; Vilchez, N.

    2015-08-01

    The transitional millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary system PSR J1023+0038 re-entered an accreting state in 2013 June in which it bears many similarities to low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in quiescence or near-quiescence. At a distance of just 1.37 kpc, PSR J1023+0038 offers an unsurpassed ability to study low-level accretion onto a highly magnetized compact object. We have monitored PSR J1023+0038 intensively using radio imaging with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the European VLBI Network and the Low Frequency Array, seeing rapidly variable, flat spectrum emission that persists over a period of six months. The flat spectrum and variability are indicative of synchrotron emission originating in an outflow from the system, most likely in the form of a compact, partially self-absorbed jet, as is seen in LMXBs at higher accretion rates. The radio brightness, however, greatly exceeds extrapolations made from observations of more vigorously accreting neutron star LMXB systems. We postulate that PSR J1023+0038 is undergoing radiatively inefficient “propeller-mode” accretion, with the jet carrying away a dominant fraction of the liberated accretion luminosity. We confirm that the enhanced γ-ray emission seen in PSR J1023+0038 since it re-entered an accreting state has been maintained; the increased γ-ray emission in this state can also potentially be associated with propeller-mode accretion. Similar accretion modes can be invoked to explain the radio and X-ray properties of the other two known transitional MSP systems XSS J12270-4859 and PSR J1824-2452I (M28I), suggesting that radiatively inefficient accretion may be a ubiquitous phenomenon among (at least one class of) neutron star binaries at low accretion rates.

  17. AO Observations of Three Powerful Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W; van Bruegel, W; Quirrenbach, A

    2002-08-01

    The host galaxies of powerful radio sources are ideal laboratories to study active galactic nuclei (AGN). The galaxies themselves are among the most massive systems in the universe, and are believed to harbor supermassive black holes (SMBH). If large galaxies are formed in a hierarchical way by multiple merger events, radio galaxies at low redshift represent the end-products of this process. However, it is not clear why some of these massive ellipticals have associated radio emission, while others do not. Both are thought to contain SMBHs, with masses proportional to the total luminous mass in the bulge. It either implies every SMBH has recurrent radio-loud phases, and the radio-quiet galaxies happen to be in the ''low'' state, or that the radio galaxy nuclei are physically different from radio-quiet ones, i.e. by having a more massive SMBH for a given bulge mass. Here we present the first results from our adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy pilot program on three nearby powerful radio galaxies. Initiating a larger, more systematic AO survey of radio galaxies (preferentially with Laser Guide Star equipped AO systems) has the potential of furthering our understanding of the physical properties of radio sources, their triggering, and their subsequent evolution.

  18. Improvement in the synchronization between the radio frequency signal and the image detector in an acousto-optic tunable filter imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huijie; Li, Chongchong; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Zefu

    2014-04-10

    An improved synchronization between the radio frequency (RF) signal and the image detector in an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer is proposed to optimize power consumption and eliminate image smear. The RF signal is controlled on and off alternately to match the exposure of the image sensor. This scheme reduces the RF power and rejects the light illumination on the image sensor in the interval of charge transfer. An experiment using a visible AOTF, a frame transfer charge-coupled device camera, and an incandescent lamp is conducted for demonstration. The average RF power decreases 7.6%, and the image smear is eliminated. PMID:24787400

  19. TU-D-BRD-01: Image Guided SBRT II: Challenges ' Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z; Yin, F; Cho, J

    2014-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been effective treatment for the management of various diseases, which often delivers high radiation dose in a single or a few fractions. SBRT therefore demands precise treatment delivery to the tumor while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Recent developments in image guidance enable target localization with increased accuracy. With such improvements in localization, image-guided SBRT has been widely adopted into clinical practice. In SBRT, high radiation dose is generally delivered with small fields. Therefore, it is crucial to accurately measure dosimetric data for the small fields during commissioning. In addition, image-guided SBRT demands accurate image localization to ensure safety and quality of patient care. Lately, the reports of AAPM TG 142 and TG 104 have been published and added recommendations for imaging devices that are integrated with the linear accelerator for SBRT. Furthermore, various challenges and potential pitfalls lie in the clinical implementation of image-guided SBRT. In this lecture, these challenges and pitfalls of image-guided SBRT will be illustrated and discussed from dosimetric, technical and clinical perspectives.Being a promising technique, image-guided SBRT has shown great potentials, and will lead to more accurate and safer SBRT treatments. Learning Objectives: To understand dosimetric challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major clinical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major technical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT.

  20. The first VLBI image of an infrared-faint radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Tingay, S.; Mao, M. Y.; Phillips, C. J.; Hotan, A. W.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  1. Deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a compact radio galaxy at z = 2.390

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, Rogier; Mathis, Douglas F.; Keel, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The radio galaxy with the highest redshift in the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey, 53W002, is described and examined in terms of UV profile in relation to an early-type galaxy. The HST WFC images have a resolution of 0.2 arcsec FWHM, and the I- and V-band structures are assessed. The source is elongated in a manner similar to the Ly alpha cloud in V, and the structure is highly compact in I. The present object with a young starburst has very high central UV surface brightnesses relative to nearby luminous early-type galaxies, while the light profiles are similar. The data are concluded to suggest that 53W002 is a young galaxy that has a regular light profile at z = 2.390 even though it has been forming stars since not more than about 0.5 Gyr before z = 2.390. Such a scenario is consistent with concurrent dynamical collapse and star formation in the compact radio galaxy.

  2. Monte Carlo modeling of ultrasound probes for image guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Schlosser, Jeffrey; Chen, Josephine; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-10-15

    X6-1 probe in vertical orientation caused the highest attenuation of the 6 and 15 MV beams, which at 10 cm depth accounted for 33% and 43% decrease compared to the respective (15 × 15) cm{sup 2} open fields. The C5-2 probe in horizontal orientation, on the other hand, caused a dose increase of 10% and 53% for the 6 and 15 MV beams, respectively, in the buildup region at 0.5 cm depth. For the X6-1 probe in vertical orientation, the dose at 5 cm depth for the 3-cm diameter 6 MV and 5-cm diameter 15 MV beams was attenuated compared to the corresponding open fields to a greater degree by 65% and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. Due to the high beam attenuation of the US probes, the authors generally recommend avoiding delivery of treatment beams that intersect the probe. However, the presented MC models can be effectively integrated into US-guided radiotherapy treatment planning in cases for which beam avoidance is not practical due to anatomy geometry.

  3. Health technology assessment of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT): A systematic review of current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Arabloo, Jalal; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Mousavinezhad, Seyedeh Maryam; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Pooyandjoo, Morvarid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Image-guided radiotherapy used multiple imaging during the radiation therapy course to improve the precision and accuracy of health care provider's treatment. Objectives: This study aims to assess the safety, effectiveness and economic aspects of image-guided radiation therapy for decision-making about this technology in Iran. Methods: In this study, the most important medical databases such as PubMed and Cochrane Library were searched until November 2014. The systematic reviews, health technology assessment reports and economic evaluation studies were included. The results of included studies were analyzed via the thematic synthesis. Results: Seven articles were included in the study. The results showed that image-guided radiation therapy, regardless of the imaging technique used in it, is associated with no major toxicity and has the potential to reduce the symptoms of poisoning. Using image-guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer resulted in substantial improvement in the quality of the received dose and optimal therapeutic dose of radiation to the targeted tumor while the radiation dose to the surrounding healthy tissues was minimal. Additionally, image-guided radiation therapy facilitated the diagnosis and management of exception deviations, including immediate changes and gross errors, weight loss, significant limbs deformity, systematic changes in the internal organs and changes in respiratory movements. Usage of image-guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer was associated with increased costs. Conclusion: Current available evidence suggests that the image-guided radiation therapy can reduce the amount of radiation to healthy tissue around the tumor and the toxicity associated with it. This can enhance the safe dose of radiation to the tumor and increase the likelihood of destruction of tumor. The current level of evidence required conducting further studies on the costs and effectiveness of this technology compared with conventional

  4. Guided radio-wave propagation in the equatorial ionosphere according to the topside sounding onboard Interkosmos-19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpachev, A. T.; Zhbankov, G. A.; Kuleshova, V. P.; Telegin, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to normal vertical-incident ionogram traces, strongly remote (up to 2000 km) traces of HF-radio-signal reflections observed on topside-sounder ionograms of the Interkosmos-19 satellite obtained in the equatorial ionosphere are presented. Such traces are connected with waveguides (ducts). These waveguides are field-aligned irregularities of the ionospheric plasma with electron density depletions of a few percent and cross-field dimension of a few to several kilometers. Ray tracing confirms this supposition and allows an estimate of typical waveguide parameters: diameter ≤10-15 km and amplitude |ΔN/N|≥10%, where N is the electron density. The waveguide traces usually start at the cutoff frequencies of the main traces. However, sometimes they begin at much lower frequencies which indicates the satellite was transitioning through an equatorial plasma bubble during the recording of the ionogram. The X-mode of ducted echoes is more distinct then the O-mode. Only one ducted trace is usually observed on the Interkosmos-19 ionograms; a second conjugate trace is rarely recorded. The same is true for combination modes which is a combination of an oblique-incidence and guided propagation. Waveguides are observed at all heights of Interkosmos-19 (500-1000 km) inside the equatorial anomaly region (from -40° to +40° Dip). Waveguides are usually associated with other irregularities of various sizes in the equatorial ionosphere, some of which cause additional traces and spread F on the topside-sounding ionograms. Ducted-echo characteristics observed with Interkosmos-19 are different from those observed earlier with the Alouette and ISIS satellites. This difference is discussed. It is shown that the ionospheric plasma irregularities responsible for the waveguides are observed much more often during nighttime than during daytime.

  5. Integration of patient specific modeling and advanced image processing techniques for image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archip, Neculai; Fedorov, Andriy; Lloyd, Bryn; Chrisochoides, Nikos; Golby, Alexandra; Black, Peter M.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2006-03-01

    A major challenge in neurosurgery oncology is to achieve maximal tumor removal while avoiding postoperative neurological deficits. Therefore, estimation of the brain deformation during the image guided tumor resection process is necessary. While anatomic MRI is highly sensitive for intracranial pathology, its specificity is limited. Different pathologies may have a very similar appearance on anatomic MRI. Moreover, since fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging are not currently available during the surgery, non-rigid registration of preoperative MR with intra-operative MR is necessary. This article presents a translational research effort that aims to integrate a number of state-of-the-art technologies for MRI-guided neurosurgery at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH). Our ultimate goal is to routinely provide the neurosurgeons with accurate information about brain deformation during the surgery. The current system is tested during the weekly neurosurgeries in the open magnet at the BWH. The preoperative data is processed, prior to the surgery, while both rigid and non-rigid registration algorithms are run in the vicinity of the operating room. The system is tested on 9 image datasets from 3 neurosurgery cases. A method based on edge detection is used to quantitatively validate the results. 95% Hausdorff distance between points of the edges is used to estimate the accuracy of the registration. Overall, the minimum error is 1.4 mm, the mean error 2.23 mm, and the maximum error 3.1 mm. The mean ratio between brain deformation estimation and rigid alignment is 2.07. It demonstrates that our results can be 2.07 times more precise then the current technology. The major contribution of the presented work is the rigid and non-rigid alignment of the pre-operative fMRI with intra-operative 0.5T MRI achieved during the neurosurgery.

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fiducial marker placement for image-guided radiation therapy without fluoroscopy: safety and technical feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Dhadham, Gautamy Chitiki; Hoffe, Sarah; Harris, Cynthia L.; Klapman, Jason B.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fiducial marker placement for image-guided radiation treatment (IGRT) is becoming more widespread. Most case series report the procedure performed using fluoroscopy for spatial geometry although the benefits of this are unclear. The aim of our study is to report the technical feasibility, safety, and migration rate of fiducial marker placement in a large cohort of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies who underwent EUS-guided fiducial marker placement for IGRT without fluoroscopy. Patients and methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients referred for EUS-guided fiducial marker placement from 08/1/07 to 7/31/14 at Moffitt Cancer Center. Results: During the study period, 514 patients underwent placement of 1093 gold fiducial markers under EUS-guidance. Two hundred and forty patients with esophageal/gastro-esophageal junction cancer had 405 fiducials placed. In 188 patients with pancreatic ancer, 510 fiducials were placed. In 54 patients with rectal cancer, 103 fiducials were placed and 32 patients had 75 fiducials placed into other gastrointestinal tract lesions. Minor bleeding, which resolved spontaneously, occurred in two patients. Technical difficulty in placing fiducials was noted in 18 patients. Intraprocedural fiducial migration was noted in two patients and only 2/1093 fiducials (.002%) in two esophageal patients migrated as noted on simulation computed tomography scan. Conclusions: EUS-guided fiducial marker placement without fluoroscopy is technically feasible and safe. There were minimal intraprocedure/post-procedure complications. Imaging at the time of simulation also revealed the migration rate to be extremely low. These results may allow for more widespread adoption of EUS-guided fiducial marker placement. PMID:27004258

  7. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy: the potential for imaging science research to improve cancer treatment outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    The role of medical imaging in the planning and delivery of radiation therapy (RT) is rapidly expanding. This is being driven by two developments: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and biological image-based planning (BIBP). IGRT is the systematic use of serial treatment-position imaging to improve geometric targeting accuracy and/or to refine target definition. The enabling technology is the integration of high-performance three-dimensional (3D) imaging systems, e.g., onboard kilovoltage x-ray cone-beam CT, into RT delivery systems. IGRT seeks to adapt the patient's treatment to weekly, daily, or even real-time changes in organ position and shape. BIBP uses non-anatomic imaging (PET, MR spectroscopy, functional MR, etc.) to visualize abnormal tissue biology (angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, etc.) leading to more accurate clinical target volume (CTV) delineation and more accurate targeting of high doses to tissue with the highest tumor cell burden. In both cases, the goal is to reduce both systematic and random tissue localization errors (2-5 mm for conventional RT) conformality so that planning target volume (PTV) margins (varying from 8 to 20 mm in conventional RT) used to ensure target volume coverage in the presence of geometric error, can be substantially reduced. Reduced PTV expansion allows more conformal treatment of the target volume, increased avoidance of normal tissue and potential for safe delivery of more aggressive dose regimens. This presentation will focus on the imaging science challenges posed by the IGRT and BIBP. These issues include: Development of robust and accurate nonrigid image-registration (NIR) tools: Extracting locally nonlinear mappings that relate, voxel-by-voxel, one 3D anatomic representation of the patient to differently deformed anatomies acquired at different time points, is essential if IGRT is to move beyond simple translational treatment plan adaptations. NIR is needed to map segmented and labeled anatomy from the

  8. Hands-free, Wireless Goggles for Near-infrared Fluorescence and Real-time Image-guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Bauer, Adam Q.; Akers, Walter; Sudlow, Gail; Liang, Kexian; Shen, Duanwen; Berezin, Mikhail; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Background Current cancer management faces several challenges, including the occurrence of residual tumor after resection, the use of radioactive materials or high concentrations of blue dyes for sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy, and use of bulky systems in surgical suites for image guidance. To overcome these limitations, we developed a real-time intraoperative imaging device that, when combined with near infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes, can aid identification of tumor margins, guide surgical resections, map SLNs, and transfer acquired data wirelessly for remote analysis. Methods We developed a new compact, wireless, wearable, and battery-operated device that allows hands-free operation by surgeons. A CCD-based consumer-grade night vision viewer was used to develop the detector portion of the device and the light source portion was developed from a compact headlamp. This piece was retrofitted to provide both NIR excitation and white light illumination simultaneously. Wireless communication was enabled by integrating a battery-operated miniature radio-frequency video transmitter into the system. We applied the device in several types of oncologic surgical procedures in murine models, including SLN mapping, fluorescence-guided tumor resection, and surgery under remote expert guidance. Results Unlike conventional imaging instruments, the device directly displays fluorescence information on its eyepiece. When employed in SLN mapping, the locations of SLNs were clearly visualized, even with tracer level dosing of a NIR fluorescent dye, indocyanine green. When utilized in tumor resection, tumor margins and small nodules not visible to the naked eye were readily visualized. In a simulated point-of-care setting, tumors were successfully located and removed under remote guidance using the wireless feature of the device. Importantly, the total cost of this prototype system ($1200) is significantly lower than existing imaging instruments. Conclusion Our results

  9. Calibration of three-dimensional ultrasound images for image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, L G; Meeks, S L; Goodchild, G; Bova, F J; Buatti, J M; Friedman, W A

    2001-02-01

    overall tracking accuracy of our 3D ultrasound image-guided positioning system was measured to be on average 0.2 mm, 0.9 mm and 0.6 mm for the AP, lateral and axial directions respectively. PMID:11229734

  10. Testicular Doses in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Yu, James B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Peschel, Richard E.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate testicular doses contributed by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions from kVCBCT on 3 prostate cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were compared between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments and kVCBCT scans. The impact of CBCT scanning mode, kilovoltage peak energy (kVp), and CBCT field span on dose deposition to testes and other organs was investigated. Results: In comparison with one 10-MV IMRT treatment, a 125-kV half-fan CBCT scan delivered 3.4, 3.8, 4.1, and 5.7 cGy to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, respectively, accounting for 1.7%, 3.2%, 3.2%, and 8.4% of megavoltage photon dose contributions. However, the testes received 2.9 cGy from the same CBCT scan, a threefold increase as compared with 0.7 cGy received during IMRT. With the same kVp, full-fan mode deposited much less dose to organs than half-fan mode, ranging from 9% less for prostate to 69% less for testes, except for rectum, where full-fan mode delivered 34% more dose. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, kVCBCT-contributed doses increased exponentially for all organs, irrespective of scanning mode. Reducing CBCT field span from 30 to 10 cm in the superior-inferior direction cut testicular doses from 5.7 to 0.2 cGy in half-fan mode and from 1.5 to 0.1 cGy in full-fan mode. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, kVCBCT-contributed doses to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads are clinically insignificant, whereas dose to the testes is threefold more. Full-fan CBCT usually deposits much less dose to organs (except for rectum) than half-fan mode in prostate patients. Kilovoltage CBCT-contributed doses increase exponentially with photon beam energy. Reducing CBCT field significantly cuts doses to testes and other organs.

  11. Designing Tracking Software for Image-Guided Surgery Applications: IGSTK Experience

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Gobbi, David; Turek, Matt; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Lindseth, Frank; Cleary, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Objective Many image-guided surgery applications require tracking devices as part of their core functionality. The Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK) was designed and developed to interface tracking devices with software applications incorporating medical images. Methods IGSTK was designed as an open source C++ library that provides the basic components needed for fast prototyping and development of image-guided surgery applications. This library follows a component-based architecture with several components designed for specific sets of image-guided surgery functions. At the core of the toolkit is the tracker component that handles communication between a control computer and navigation device to gather pose measurements of surgical instruments present in the surgical scene. The representations of the tracked instruments are superimposed on anatomical images to provide visual feedback to the clinician during surgical procedures. Results The initial version of the IGSTK toolkit has been released in the public domain and several trackers are supported. The toolkit and related information are available at www.igstk.org. Conclusion With the increased popularity of minimally invasive procedures in health care, several tracking devices have been developed for medical applications. Designing and implementing high-quality and safe software to handle these different types of trackers in a common framework is a challenging task. It requires establishing key software design principles that emphasize abstraction, extensibility, reusability, fault-tolerance, and portability. IGSTK is an open source library that satisfies these needs for the image-guided surgery community. PMID:20037671

  12. Magnetic resonance image-guided versus ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2013-08-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for more than ten years, primarily in the treatment of liver and prostate cancers. HIFU has the advantages of precise cancer ablation and excellent protection of healthy tissue. Breast cancer is a common cancer in women. HIFU therapy, in combination with other therapies, has the potential to improve both oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients by providing a curative therapy that conserves mammary shape. Currently, HIFU therapy is not commonly used in breast cancer treatment, and efforts to promote the application of HIFU is expected. In this article, we compare different image-guided models for HIFU and reviewed the status, drawbacks, and potential of HIFU therapy for breast cancer. PMID:23237221

  13. Magnetic resonance image-guided versus ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used for more than ten years, primarily in the treatment of liver and prostate cancers. HIFU has the advantages of precise cancer ablation and excellent protection of healthy tissue. Breast cancer is a common cancer in women. HIFU therapy, in combination with other therapies, has the potential to improve both oncologic and cosmetic outcomes for breast cancer patients by providing a curative therapy that conserves mammary shape. Currently, HIFU therapy is not commonly used in breast cancer treatment, and efforts to promote the application of HIFU is expected. In this article, we compare different image-guided models for HIFU and reviewed the status, drawbacks, and potential of HIFU therapy for breast cancer. PMID:23237221

  14. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps of the treatment chain are explained, including imaging techniques and beam delivery techniques. Clinical studies using different motion management techniques are reviewed, and finally future directions for image guidance and motion management are outlined. PMID:25955231

  15. Markerless tumor tracking using short kilovoltage imaging arcs for lung image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Huang, Chen-Yu; Feain, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers is clinically advantageous for lung image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Existing markerless tracking methods often suffer from overlapping structures and low visibility of tumors on kV projection images. We introduce the short arc tumor tracking (SATT) method to overcome these issues. The proposed method utilizes multiple kV projection images selected from a nine-degree imaging arc to improve tumor localization, and respiratory-correlated 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) prior knowledge to minimize the effects of overlapping anatomies. The 3D tumor position is solved as an optimization problem with prior knowledge incorporated via regularization. We retrospectively validated SATT on 11 clinical scans from four patients with central tumors. These patients represent challenging scenarios for markerless tumor tracking due to the inferior adjacent contrast. The 3D trajectories of implanted fiducial markers were used as the ground truth for tracking accuracy evaluation. In all cases, the tumors were successfully tracked at all gantry angles. Compared to standard pre-treatment CBCT guidance alone, trajectory errors were significantly smaller with tracking in all cases, and the improvements were the most prominent in the superior-inferior direction. The mean 3D tracking error ranged from 2.2-9.9 mm, which was 0.4-2.6 mm smaller compared to pre-treatment CBCT. In conclusion, we were able to directly track tumors with inferior visibility on kV projection images using SATT. Tumor localization accuracies are significantly better with tracking compared to the current standard of care of lung IGRT. Future work involves the prospective evaluation and clinical implementation of SATT.

  16. Time-resolved imaging system for fluorescence-guided surgery with lifetime imaging capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powolny, F.; Homicsko, K.; Sinisi, R.; Bruschini, Claudio E.; Grigoriev, E.; Homulle, H.; Prior, John O.; Hanahan, D.; Dubikovskaya, E.; Charbon, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present a single-photon camera for fluorescence imaging, with a time resolution better than 100ps, capable of providing both intensity and lifetime images. the camera was fabricated in standard CMOS technology. With this FluoCam we show the possibility to study sub-nanosecond fluorescence mechanisms. The FluoCam was used to characterize a near-infrared probe, indocyanine green, conjugated with multimeric cyclic pentapeptide (cRGD). The fluorescent probe-conjugated was used to target and mark tumors with better specificity, in particular aiming at targeting the integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5. As a first step towards clinical studies, preliminary results obtained in-vivo are presented. The first envisioned clinical application would be image-guided surgical oncology to help the surgeon to remove tumor tissue by a better discrimination from normal tissues and also to improve the detection of metastatic lymph nodes. A further application could be the in-vivo determination of the αvβ3 and αvβ5 targets to select patients for therapy with RGD chemotherapy conjugates.

  17. Global VLBI Observations of Weak Extragalactic Radio Sources: Imaging Candidates to Align the VLBI and Gaia Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourda, Geraldine; Collioud, Arnaud; Charlot, Patrick; Porcas, Richard; Garrington, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical QSO-based celestial reference frame. For consistency between optical and radio positions, it will be important to align the Gaia and VLBI frames (International Celestial Reference Frame) with the highest accuracy. In this respect, it is found that only 10% of the ICRF sources are suitable to establish this link (70 sources), either because most of the ICRF sources are not bright enough at optical wavelengths or because they show extended radio emission which precludes reaching the highest astrometric accuracy. In order to improve the situation, we initiated a multi-step VLBI observational project, dedicated to finding additional suitable radio sources for aligning the two frames. The sample consists of about 450 optically-bright radio sources, typically 20 times weaker than the ICRF sources, which have been selected by cross-correlating optical and radio catalogs. The initial observations, aimed at checking whether these sources are detectable with VLBI, and conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in 2007, showed an excellent 90% detection rate. This paper reports on global VLBI observations carried out in March 2008 to image 105 from the 398 previously detected sources. All sources were successfully imaged, revealing compact VLBI structure for about half of them, which is very promising for the future.

  18. Multimodality Imaging for Guiding EP Ablation Procedures.

    PubMed

    Njeim, Mario; Desjardins, Benoit; Bogun, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in 3-dimensional electroanatomical mapping have been met by continuous improvements in the field of cardiac imaging and image integration during ablation procedures. Echocardiography, computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and nuclear imaging provide information about cardiac anatomy and ultrastructure of the heart that may be crucial for a successful ablation procedure. Techniques and value of pre-procedural, intraprocedural, and post-procedural imaging and image integration are discussed in this review article. Pre-procedural imaging provides key anatomic information that can be complemented by intraprocedural imaging to minimize procedural complications. Furthermore, the presence and extent of structural heart disease can be assessed pre-procedurally and can be displayed intraprocedurally to limit and focus the mapping and ablation procedure to the area of interest. Pre-procedural imaging combined with imaging obtained during the ablation procedure further enhances procedural safety, reduces exposure to ionizing radiation from fluoroscopy, reduces procedure time, and may improve outcomes. PMID:27388666

  19. Obscured Star-Formation in Merging Galaxies: High Resolution Radio Imaging of a Time-Ordered Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Campion, S. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    We present new, deep, high resolution 6cm and 4cm radio continuum images of the central regions of a time-ordered sequence of seven large galaxy mergers. The radio observations are able to detect star-forming re- gions that are completely obscured at optical wavelengths. In all systems, we detect numerous compact radio sources embedded in more diffuse ra- dio emission, with limiting luminosities of approx. 1-5 x 10(exp l8) W Hz or approx. 1-5 times the luminosity of Cas A. Many of the compact radio sources are loosely associated with active starforming regions but not with specific optical or W emission sources. Several of the compact radio sources are coincident with Ultra-luminous X-ray objects (ULX's). In most systems, we are able to measure reliable spectral indices for the stronger sources. We find that the fraction of compact radio cources with nominally flat radio spectral indices (indicating they ae dominated by thermal radio emission from HII regions) decreases with merger age, while the fraction of sources with nonimally steep spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by nonthermal emission from supernova remnants) increases. For the flat-spectrum sources, we estimate the numbers of young massive stars, associated ionized gas masses, we estimate supernova rates and required star-formation rates, We compare these results with those from other well-studied merging galaxy systems and from other determinations of star-formation rates. We gratefully acknowledge use of the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) and the VLA Archive. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  20. Plasmaspheric Electron Density Distributions Sampled by Radio Plasma Imager on the IMAGE Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; Garcia, L. N.; Green, J. L.; Gallagher, D. L.; Carpenter, D. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Galkin, I. A.; Khmyrov, G.; Sandel, B. R.

    2001-12-01

    Distribution of plasmaspheric density changes in response to plasma electrodynamical processes in both the ionosphere and magnetosphere. During a geomagnetic storm, for example, the plasmasphere can significantly diminish in size during the main phase of the storm and relax to regain its more normal size during recovery phase. During unusually quiet times, the plasmasphere can become quite large. The processes by which the plasmasphere is eroded and refilled are still areas of active research [Carpenter and Lemaire, 1997]. Previous in situ observations (e.g., CRRES) have shown that the plasmasphere has a lot of structures [Carpenter et al., 2000], quite possibly results of plasma dynamical processes. Recent global EUV images obtained by IMAGE also reveal large-scale plasma structures as well as large-scale variations of the plasmasphere resulting from magnetospheric activities. In this paper, we investigate the large-scale plasmaspheric density variations as a function of solar wind and geomagnetic activities by analyzing a large collection of passive RPI observations of quasi-thermal noise through the plasmasphere obtained over the first year of the IMAGE mission. We will compare our results with existing models of plasmaspheric density distributions. Carpenter, D. L., and J. Lemaire, Erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere in the plasmapause region, Space Sci. Rev., 80, 153, 1997. Carpenter, D. L., R. R. Anderson, W. Calvert, and M. B. Moldwin, CRRES observations of density cavities inside the plasmasphere, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 23323, 2000.

  1. User guide to the Magellan synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Stephen D.; Mcconnell, Shannon L.; Leff, Craig E.; Austin, Richard S.; Beratan, Kathi K.; Rokey, Mark J.

    1995-01-01

    The Magellan radar-mapping mission collected a large amount of science and engineering data. Now available to the general scientific community, this data set can be overwhelming to someone who is unfamiliar with the mission. This user guide outlines the mission operations and data set so that someone working with the data can understand the mapping and data-processing techniques used in the mission. Radar-mapping parameters as well as data acquisition issues are discussed. In addition, this user guide provides information on how the data set is organized and where specific elements of the set can be located.

  2. The Q/U Imaging Experiment: Polarization Measurements of Radio Sources at 43 and 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Ruud, T. M.; Wehus, I. K.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Gaier, T.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Miller, A. D.; Radford, S. J. E.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Staggs, S. T.; Tajima, O.; Thompson, K. L.; QUIET Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ˜480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30-40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%-20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  3. Image-guided Treatment in the Hepatobiliary System: Role of Imaging in Treatment Planning and Posttreatment Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Surabhi; Kambadakone, Avinash; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Arellano, Ronald S; Gervais, Debra A; Sahani, Dushyant

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, image-guided targeted treatments such as percutaneous ablation, intra-arterial embolic therapies, and targeted radiation therapy have shown substantial promise in management of hepatobiliary malignancies. Imaging is integral to patient selection, treatment delivery, and assessment of treatment effectiveness. Preprocedural imaging is crucial and allows local tumor staging, evaluation of surrounding structures, and selection of suitable therapeutic options and strategies for treatment delivery. Postprocedural imaging is required to monitor therapeutic success, detect residual or recurrent disease, and identify procedure-related complications to guide appropriate future therapy. Technical innovations in cross-sectional imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, combined with advances in image postprocessing and new types of contrast agents, allow precise morphologic assessment and functional evaluation of hepatobiliary tumors. Advanced postprocessing techniques such as image fusion and volumetric assessment not only facilitate procedural planning and treatment delivery but also enhance posttreatment imaging surveillance. In addition, molecular imaging techniques such as fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET), PET/CT, and PET/MR imaging offer opportunities to evaluate various physiologic properties of tumors. PMID:26252365

  4. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Thing, Rune Slot; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images. PMID:27405692

  5. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images.

  6. A molecular image-directed, 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system for the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Schuster, David M.; Master, Viraj; Akbari, Hamed; Fenster, Aaron; Nieh, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is the standard method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, this biopsy approach uses two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound images to guide biopsy and can miss up to 30% of prostate cancers. We are developing a molecular image-directed, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imageguided biopsy system for improved detection of prostate cancer. The system consists of a 3D mechanical localization system and software workstation for image segmentation, registration, and biopsy planning. In order to plan biopsy in a 3D prostate, we developed an automatic segmentation method based wavelet transform. In order to incorporate PET/CT images into ultrasound-guided biopsy, we developed image registration methods to fuse TRUS and PET/CT images. The segmentation method was tested in ten patients with a DICE overlap ratio of 92.4% +/- 1.1 %. The registration method has been tested in phantoms. The biopsy system was tested in prostate phantoms and 3D ultrasound images were acquired from two human patients. We are integrating the system for PET/CT directed, 3D ultrasound-guided, targeted biopsy in human patients.

  7. Image pixel guided tours: a software platform for non-destructive x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Emery, R.

    2009-02-01

    Multivariate analysis seeks to describe the relationship between an arbitrary number of variables. To explore highdimensional data sets, projections are often used for data visualisation to aid discovering structure or patterns that lead to the formation of statistical hypothesis. The basic concept necessitates a systematic search for lower-dimensional representations of the data that might show interesting structure(s). Motivated by the recent research on the Image Grand Tour (IGT), which can be adapted to view guided projections by using objective indexes that are capable of revealing latent structures of the data, this paper presents a signal processing perspective on constructing such indexes under the unifying exploratory frameworks of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and Projection Pursuit (PP). Our investigation begins with an overview of dimension reduction techniques by means of orthogonal transforms, including the classical procedure of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and extends to an application of the more powerful techniques of ICA in the context of our recent work on non-destructive testing technology by element specific x-ray imaging.

  8. 3D Image-Guided Automatic Pipette Positioning for Single Cell Experiments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Long, Brian; Li, Lu; Knoblich, Ulf; Zeng, Hongkui; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a method to facilitate single cell, image-guided experiments including in vivo electrophysiology and electroporation. Our method combines 3D image data acquisition, visualization and on-line image analysis with precise control of physical probes such as electrophysiology microelectrodes in brain tissue in vivo. Adaptive pipette positioning provides a platform for future advances in automated, single cell in vivo experiments. PMID:26689553

  9. Technique for Targeting Arteriovenous Malformations Using Frameless Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, Dimitre; Liu, Lina; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Moore, Teri; Sarmiento, Marily; Chang, Steve D.; Dodd, Robert; Marks, Michael; Do, Huy M.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To integrate three-dimensional (3D) digital rotation angiography (DRA) and two-dimensional (2D) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging into a targeting methodology enabling comprehensive image-guided robotic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: DRA geometric integrity was evaluated by imaging a phantom with embedded markers. Dedicated DSA acquisition modes with preset C-arm positions were configured. The geometric reproducibility of the presets was determined, and its impact on localization accuracy was evaluated. An imaging protocol composed of anterior-posterior and lateral DSA series in combination with a DRA run without couch displacement between acquisitions was introduced. Software was developed for registration of DSA and DRA (2D-3D) images to correct for: (a) small misalignments of the C-arm with respect to the estimated geometry of the set positions and (b) potential patient motion between image series. Within the software, correlated navigation of registered DRA and DSA images was incorporated to localize AVMs within a 3D image coordinate space. Subsequent treatment planning and delivery followed a standard image-guided robotic radiosurgery process. Results: DRA spatial distortions were typically smaller than 0.3 mm throughout a 145-mm x 145-mm x 145-mm volume. With 2D-3D image registration, localization uncertainties resulting from the achievable reproducibility of the C-arm set positions could be reduced to about 0.2 mm. Overall system-related localization uncertainty within the DRA coordinate space was 0.4 mm. Image-guided frameless robotic radiosurgical treatments with this technique were initiated. Conclusions: The integration of DRA and DSA into the process of nidus localization increases the confidence with which radiosurgical ablation of AVMs can be performed when using only an image-guided technique. Such an approach can increase patient comfort, decrease time pressure on clinical and

  10. 3D Image-Guided Automatic Pipette Positioning for Single Cell Experiments in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Long, Brian; Li, Lu; Knoblich, Ulf; Zeng, Hongkui; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a method to facilitate single cell, image-guided experiments including in vivo electrophysiology and electroporation. Our method combines 3D image data acquisition, visualization and on-line image analysis with precise control of physical probes such as electrophysiology microelectrodes in brain tissue in vivo. Adaptive pipette positioning provides a platform for future advances in automated, single cell in vivo experiments. PMID:26689553

  11. Image Reconstruction in Radio Astronomy with Non-Coplanar Synthesis Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrick, L.

    2015-03-01

    Traditional radio astronomy imaging techniques assume that the interferometric array is coplanar, with a small field of view, and that the two-dimensional Fourier relationship between brightness and visibility remains valid, allowing the Fast Fourier Transform to be used. In practice, to acquire more accurate data, the non-coplanar baseline effects need to be incorporated, as small height variations in the array plane introduces the w spatial frequency component. This component adds an additional phase shift to the incoming signals. There are two approaches to account for the non-coplanar baseline effects: either the full three-dimensional brightness and visibility model can be used to reconstruct an image, or the non-coplanar effects can be removed, reducing the three dimensional relationship to that of the two-dimensional one. This thesis describes and implements the w-projection and w-stacking algorithms. The aim of these algorithms is to account for the phase error introduced by non-coplanar synthesis arrays configurations, making the recovered visibilities more true to the actual brightness distribution model. This is done by reducing the 3D visibilities to a 2D visibility model. The algorithms also have the added benefit of wide-field imaging, although w-stacking supports a wider field of view at the cost of more FFT bin support. For w-projection, the w-term is accounted for in the visibility domain by convolving it out of the problem with a convolution kernel, allowing the use of the two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform. Similarly, the w-Stacking algorithm applies a phase correction in the image domain to image layers to produce an intensity model that accounts for the non-coplanar baseline effects. This project considers the KAT7 array for simulation and analysis of the limitations and advantages of both the algorithms. Additionally, a variant of the Högbom CLEAN algorithm was used which employs contour trimming for extended source emission flagging. The

  12. Deep Interior Mission: Imaging the Interior of Near-Earth Asteroids Using Radio Reflection Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safaeinili, A.; Asphaug, E.; Rodriquez, E.; Gurrola, E.; Belton, M.; Klaasen, K.; Ostro, S.; Plaut, J.; Yeomans, D.

    2005-01-01

    Near-Earth asteroids are important exploration targets since they provide clues to the evolution of the solar system. They are also of interest since they present a clear danger to Earth. Our mission objective is to image the internal structure of two NEOs using radio reflection tomography (RRT) in order to explore the record of asteroid origin and impact evolution, and to test the fundamental hypothesis that some NEOs are rubble piles rather than consolidated bodies. Our mission s RRT technique is analogous to doing a CAT scan of the asteroid from orbit. Closely sampled radar echoes are processed to yield volumetric maps of mechanical and compositional boundaries, and to measure interior material dielectric properties. The RRT instrument is a radar that operates at 5 and 15 MHz with two 30-m (tip-to-tip) dipole antennas that are used in a cross-dipole configuration. The radar transmitter and receiver electronics have heritage from JPL's MARSIS contribution to Mars Express, and the antenna is similar to systems used in IMAGE and LACE missions. The 5-MHz channel is designed to penetrate greater than 1 km of basaltic rock, and 15-MHz penetrates a few hundred meters or more. In addition to RRT volumetric imaging, we use redundant color cameras to explore the surface expressions of unit boundaries, in order to relate interior radar imaging to what is observable from spacecraft imaging and from Earth. The camera also yields stereo color imaging for geology and RRT-related compositional analysis. Gravity and high fidelity geodesy are used to explore how interior structure is expressed in shape, density, mass distribution and spin. Ion thruster propulsion is utilized by Deep Interior to enable tomographic radar mapping of multiple asteroids. Within the Discovery AO scheduling parameters we identify two targets, S-type 1999 ND43 (approximately 500 m diameter) and V-type 3908 Nyx (approximately 1 km), asteroids whose compositions bracket the diversity of solar system

  13. Radio astronomical image formation using constrained least squares and Krylov subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouri Sardarabadi, Ahmad; Leshem, Amir; van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    2016-04-01

    Aims: Image formation for radio astronomy can be defined as estimating the spatial intensity distribution of celestial sources throughout the sky, given an array of antennas. One of the challenges with image formation is that the problem becomes ill-posed as the number of pixels becomes large. The introduction of constraints that incorporate a priori knowledge is crucial. Methods: In this paper we show that in addition to non-negativity, the magnitude of each pixel in an image is also bounded from above. Indeed, the classical "dirty image" is an upper bound, but a much tighter upper bound can be formed from the data using array processing techniques. This formulates image formation as a least squares optimization problem with inequality constraints. We propose to solve this constrained least squares problem using active set techniques, and the steps needed to implement it are described. It is shown that the least squares part of the problem can be efficiently implemented with Krylov-subspace-based techniques. We also propose a method for correcting for the possible mismatch between source positions and the pixel grid. This correction improves both the detection of sources and their estimated intensities. The performance of these algorithms is evaluated using simulations. Results: Based on parametric modeling of the astronomical data, a new imaging algorithm based on convex optimization, active sets, and Krylov-subspace-based solvers is presented. The relation between the proposed algorithm and sequential source removing techniques is explained, and it gives a better mathematical framework for analyzing existing algorithms. We show that by using the structure of the algorithm, an efficient implementation that allows massive parallelism and storage reduction is feasible. Simulations are used to compare the new algorithm to classical CLEAN. Results illustrate that for a discrete point model, the proposed algorithm is capable of detecting the correct number of sources

  14. Optical imaging of airglow structure in equatorial plasma bubbles at radio scintillation scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. M.; Pedersen, T.; Parris, R. T.; Stephens, B.; Caton, R. G.; Dao, E. V.; Kratochvil, S.; Morton, Y.; Xu, D.; Jiao, Y.; Taylor, S.; Carrano, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    Imagery of optical emissions from F-region plasma is one of the few means available todetermine plasma density structure in two dimensions. However, the smallest spatial scalesobservable with this technique are typically limited not by magnification of the lens or resolutionof the detector but rather by the optical throughput of the system, which drives the integrationtime, which in turn causes smearing of the features that are typically moving at speeds of 100m/s or more. In this paper we present high spatio-temporal imagery of equatorial plasma bubbles(EPBs) from an imaging system called the Large Aperture Ionospheric Structure Imager(LAISI), which was specifically designed to capture short-integration, high-resolution images ofF-region recombination airglow at λ557.7 nm. The imager features 8-inch diameter entranceoptics comprised of a unique F/0.87 lens, combined with a monolithic 8-inch diameterinterference filter and a 2x2-inch CCD detector. The LAISI field of view is approximately 30degrees. Filtered all-sky images at common airglow wavelengths are combined with magneticfield-aligned LAISI images, GNSS scintillation, and VHF scintillation data obtained atAscension Island (7.98S, 14.41W geographic). A custom-built, multi-constellation GNSS datacollection system was employed that sampled GPS L1, L2C, L5, GLONASS L1 and L2, BeidouB1, and Galileo E1 and E5a signals. Sophisticated processing software was able to maintainlock of all signals during strong scintillation, providing unprecedented spatial observability ofL band scintillation. The smallest-resolvable scale sizes above the noise floor in the EPBs, as viewed byLAISI, are illustrated for integration times of 1, 5 and 10 seconds, with concurrentzonal irregularity drift speeds from both spaced-receiver VHF measurements and single-stationGNSS measurements of S4 and σφ. These observable optical scale sizes are placed in thecontext of those that give rise to radio scintillation in VHF and L band signals.

  15. Phased array beamforming and imaging in composite laminates using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Yu, Lingyu

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the phased array beamforming and imaging using guided waves in anisotropic composite laminates. A generic phased array beamforming formula is presented, based on the classic delay-and-sum principle. The generic formula considers direction-dependent guided wave properties induced by the anisotropic material properties of composites. Moreover, the array beamforming and imaging are performed in frequency domain where the guided wave dispersion effect has been considered. The presented phased array method is implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) to detect multiple simulated defects at different locations in an anisotropic composite plate. The array is constructed of scan points in a small area rapidly scanned by the SLDV. Using the phased array method, multiple simulated defects at different locations are successfully detected. Our study shows that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  16. Phased Array Beamforming and Imaging in Composite Laminates Using Guided Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Yu, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the phased array beamforming and imaging using guided waves in anisotropic composite laminates. A generic phased array beamforming formula is presented, based on the classic delay-and-sum principle. The generic formula considers direction-dependent guided wave properties induced by the anisotropic material properties of composites. Moreover, the array beamforming and imaging are performed in frequency domain where the guided wave dispersion effect has been considered. The presented phased array method is implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) to detect multiple defects at different locations in an anisotropic composite plate. The array is constructed of scan points in a small area rapidly scanned by the SLDV. Using the phased array method, multiple defects at different locations are successfully detected. Our study shows that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  17. Image improvement from a sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.; Olivier, S.S.; Friedman, H.W.

    1997-09-12

    A sodium-layer laser guide star beacon with high-order adaptive optics at Lick Observatory (Mount Hamilton, California) produced a factor of 2.4 intensity increase and a factor of 2 decrease in full width at half maximum for an astronomical point source, compared with image motion compensation alone. The image full widths at half maximum were identical for laser and natural guide stars (0.3 arc second). The Strehl ratio with the laser guide star was 65 percent of that with a natural guide star. This technique should allow ground-based telescopes to attain the diffraction limit, by correcting for atmospheric distortions. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Image-guided drug delivery to the brain using nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hong; Wu, Fang; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting across the blood--brain barrier (BBB) for treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases represents the most challenging aspect of, as well as one of the largest growing fields in, neuropharmaceutics. Combining nanotechnology with multiple imaging techniques has a unique role in the diagnosis and treatment (theranostics) of CNS disease. Such imaging techniques include anatomical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), electron microscopy, autoradiography and optical imaging as well as thermal images. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent advances in formulations, current challenges and possible hypotheses concerning the use of such theranostics across the BBB.[LM1] PMID:23817076

  19. Toward efficient biomechanical-based deformable image registration of lungs for image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Velec, Mike; Brock, Kristy

    2011-08-01

    Both accuracy and efficiency are critical for the implementation of biomechanical model-based deformable registration in clinical practice. The focus of this investigation is to evaluate the potential of improving the efficiency of the deformable image registration of the human lungs without loss of accuracy. Three-dimensional finite element models have been developed using image data of 14 lung cancer patients. Each model consists of two lungs, tumor and external body. Sliding of the lungs inside the chest cavity is modeled using a frictionless surface-based contact model. The effect of the type of element, finite deformation and elasticity on the accuracy and computing time is investigated. Linear and quadrilateral tetrahedral elements are used with linear and nonlinear geometric analysis. Two types of material properties are applied namely: elastic and hyperelastic. The accuracy of each of the four models is examined using a number of anatomical landmarks representing the vessels bifurcation points distributed across the lungs. The registration error is not significantly affected by the element type or linearity of analysis, with an average vector error of around 2.8 mm. The displacement differences between linear and nonlinear analysis methods are calculated for all lungs nodes and a maximum value of 3.6 mm is found in one of the nodes near the entrance of the bronchial tree into the lungs. The 95 percentile of displacement difference ranges between 0.4 and 0.8 mm. However, the time required for the analysis is reduced from 95 min in the quadratic elements nonlinear geometry model to 3.4 min in the linear element linear geometry model. Therefore using linear tetrahedral elements with linear elastic materials and linear geometry is preferable for modeling the breathing motion of lungs for image-guided radiotherapy applications.

  20. Preprocedural magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided catheter ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qian; Piers, Sebastiaan R D; Lamb, Hildo J; Zeppenfeld, Katja; van der Geest, Rob J

    2015-02-01

    To present and validate a highly automated MRI analysis workflow for image-guided catheter ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation procedures. A cohort of 15 post-infarction patients underwent MRI prior to VT ablation. The MRI study included a black-blood turbo spin echo sequence for visualizing the aortic root and ostium of the left main (LM) coronary artery, and a 3D late gadolinium enhanced sequence for visualizing the LV anatomy and myocardial scar substrate. Semi-automated segmentation of the LV, aortic root and ostium of LM was performed, followed by fully automated segmentation of myocardial scar. All segmented structures were aligned using an automated image registration algorithm to remove inter-scan displacement. MRI was integrated at the beginning of the procedure after mapping a single LM point. The integration performance was compared to that of the traditional iterative closest point (ICP) method. The proposed method required a single LM mapping point only, compared to 255 ± 43 points with the ICP method. The single-point method achieved a mean point-to-surface distance of 4.9 ± 1.5 mm on the LV surface and 5.1 ± 1.7 mm on the aorta surface (ICP: 3.7 ± 0.8 and 9.2 ± 7.2 mm, P < 0.05). The Cohen's kappa coefficient between the MRI-defined and EAM-defined scar was 0.36 ± 0.16 for the presented method, significantly higher than that of ICP method (0.23 ± 0.21, P = 0.03), indicating more accurate scar substrate localization during integration. This study demonstrated the feasibility of preprocedural MRI integration into the VT ablation procedure, with highly automated image analysis workflow and minimal mapping effort. PMID:25341408

  1. The management of imaging dose during image-guided radiotherapy: Report of the AAPM Task Group 75

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Martin J.; Balter, James; Balter, Stephen; BenComo, Jose A. Jr.; Das, Indra J.; Jiang, Steve B.; Ma, C.-M.; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Rodebaugh, Raymond F.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Shirato, Hiroki; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2007-10-15

    Radiographic image guidance has emerged as the new paradigm for patient positioning, target localization, and external beam alignment in radiotherapy. Although widely varied in modality and method, all radiographic guidance techniques have one thing in common--they can give a significant radiation dose to the patient. As with all medical uses of ionizing radiation, the general view is that this exposure should be carefully managed. The philosophy for dose management adopted by the diagnostic imaging community is summarized by the acronym ALARA, i.e., as low as reasonably achievable. But unlike the general situation with diagnostic imaging and image-guided surgery, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) adds the imaging dose to an already high level of therapeutic radiation. There is furthermore an interplay between increased imaging and improved therapeutic dose conformity that suggests the possibility of optimizing rather than simply minimizing the imaging dose. For this reason, the management of imaging dose during radiotherapy is a different problem than its management during routine diagnostic or image-guided surgical procedures. The imaging dose received as part of a radiotherapy treatment has long been regarded as negligible and thus has been quantified in a fairly loose manner. On the other hand, radiation oncologists examine the therapy dose distribution in minute detail. The introduction of more intensive imaging procedures for IGRT now obligates the clinician to evaluate therapeutic and imaging doses in a more balanced manner. This task group is charged with addressing the issue of radiation dose delivered via image guidance techniques during radiotherapy. The group has developed this charge into three objectives: (1) Compile an overview of image-guidance techniques and their associated radiation dose levels, to provide the clinician using a particular set of image guidance techniques with enough data to estimate the total diagnostic dose for a specific

  2. Head and neck imaging: An atlas and diagnostic guide

    SciTech Connect

    Noyek, A.; Wortzman, G.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents an illustrated guide to the radiologic diagnosis of specific clinical problems. It combines the atlas format with a focus on making the diagnosis with the help of decision trees, strategies, and work-up protocols that include CT, ultrasound, and other modalities. It emphasizes communication between radiologists and otolaryngologists. It reviews radiologic evaluation of such clinical problems as the congenital ear, traumatic lesions, osteomyelitis, facial paralysis, local manifestations of systemic disease and post-surgical disorders.

  3. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  4. A Guide to Analysing Tongue Motion from Ultrasound Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    This paper is meant to be an introduction to and general reference for ultrasound imaging for new and moderately experienced users of the instrument. The paper consists of eight sections. The first explains how ultrasound works, including beam properties, scan types and machine features. The second section discusses image quality, including the…

  5. Investigation of radio astronomy image processing techniques for use in the passive millimetre-wave security screening environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher T.; Hutchinson, Simon; Salmon, Neil A.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Cameron, Colin D.

    2014-06-01

    Image processing techniques can be used to improve the cost-effectiveness of future interferometric Passive MilliMetre Wave (PMMW) imagers. The implementation of such techniques will allow for a reduction in the number of collecting elements whilst ensuring adequate image fidelity is maintained. Various techniques have been developed by the radio astronomy community to enhance the imaging capability of sparse interferometric arrays. The most prominent are Multi- Frequency Synthesis (MFS) and non-linear deconvolution algorithms, such as the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) and variations of the CLEAN algorithm. This investigation focuses on the implementation of these methods in the defacto standard for radio astronomy image processing, the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package, building upon the discussion presented in Taylor et al., SPIE 8362-0F. We describe the image conversion process into a CASA suitable format, followed by a series of simulations that exploit the highlighted deconvolution and MFS algorithms assuming far-field imagery. The primary target application used for this investigation is an outdoor security scanner for soft-sided Heavy Goods Vehicles. A quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of the aforementioned image processing techniques is presented, with thoughts on the potential cost-savings such an approach could yield. Consideration is also given to how the implementation of these techniques in CASA might be adapted to operate in a near-field target environment. This may enable a much wider usability by the imaging community outside of radio astronomy and thus would be directly relevant to portal screening security systems in the microwave and millimetre wave bands.

  6. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Breton, R. P.; Stewart, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Bell, M. E.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Jonker, P.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Law, C. J.; Markoff, S.; Molenaar, G. J.; Pietka, M.; Scheers, L. H. A.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M. W.; Zarka, P.

    2016-01-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. ‘black widows’ and ‘redbacks’) are often studied using high-time-resolution, ‘beamformed’ radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of two weeks – six months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent (∝ν−0.4), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes. PMID:27279782

  7. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Breton, R. P.; Stewart, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Bell, M. E.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Jonker, P.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Law, C. J.; Markoff, S.; Molenaar, G. J.; Pietka, M.; Scheers, L. H. A.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M. W.; Zarka, P.

    2016-07-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of two weeks - six months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent (∝ν-0.4), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.

  8. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Breton, R. P.; Stewart, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Bell, M. E.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Jonker, P.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Law, C. J.; Markoff, S.; Molenaar, G. J.; Pietka, M.; Scheers, L. H. A.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M. W.; Zarka, P.

    2016-04-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of 2 weeks - 6 months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent (∝ν-0.4), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.

  9. Computational challenges for image-guided radiation therapy: framework and current research.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lei; Siebers, Jeffrey; Keall, Paul

    2007-10-01

    It is arguable that the imaging and delivery hardware necessary for delivering real-time adaptive image-guided radiotherapy is available on high-end linear accelerators. Robust and computationally efficient software is the limiting factor in achieving highly accurate and precise radiotherapy to the constantly changing anatomy of a cancer patient. The limitations are not caused by the availability of algorithms but rather issues of reliability, integration, and calculation time. However, each of the software components is an active area of research and development at academic and commercial centers. This article describes the software solutions in 4 broad areas: deformable image registration, adaptive replanning, real-time image guidance, and dose calculation and accumulation. Given the pace of technological advancement, the integration of these software solutions to develop real-time adaptive image-guided radiotherapy and the associated challenges they bring will be implemented to varying degrees by all major manufacturers over the coming years. PMID:17903702

  10. Live imaging using adaptive optics with fluorescent protein guide-stars

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xiaodong; Crest, Justin; Kotadia, Shaila; Azucena, Oscar; Chen, Diana C.; Sullivan, William; Kubby, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Spatially and temporally dependent optical aberrations induced by the inhomogeneous refractive index of live samples limit the resolution of live dynamic imaging. We introduce an adaptive optical microscope with a direct wavefront sensing method using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and fluorescent protein guide-stars for live imaging. The results of imaging Drosophila embryos demonstrate its ability to correct aberrations and achieve near diffraction limited images of medial sections of large Drosophila embryos. GFP-polo labeled centrosomes can be observed clearly after correction but cannot be observed before correction. Four dimensional time lapse images are achieved with the correction of dynamic aberrations. These studies also demonstrate that the GFP-tagged centrosome proteins, Polo and Cnn, serve as excellent biological guide-stars for adaptive optics based microscopy. PMID:22772285

  11. Guided wave imaging for detection and evaluation of impact-induced delamination in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara; Seebo, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, guided wavefield interactions with delamination damage in laminated composite panels are investigated. The frequency-wavenumber representations of the guided wavefields show that different wavenumbers are present in the delaminated plate, compared to a pristine case. The wavenumbers are correlated to trapped waves in the delamination region. Novel approaches for imaging the composite panels using guided waves are discussed and demonstrated for quantitative evaluation of the delamination damage. A filter reconstruction imaging method is shown to provide a rapid technique to locate delamination damage by showing where guided wave energy is trapped. A spatial wavenumber-based imaging algorithm is applied to calculate wavenumber values at each spatial location and highlights the delamination damage as regions with larger wavenumber values. The imaging approaches are demonstrated using experimental data from a plate with a simulated delamination (teflon insert) and from a plate containing impact-induced delamination damage. The methods are also applied to a multiple mode guided wave case to demonstrate application to complex wave cases.

  12. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  13. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  14. Estimate of the shielding effect on secondary cancer risk due to cone-beam CT in image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jiwon; Baek, Tae Seong; Yoon, Myonggeun; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a simple shielding method using a thin lead sheet on the imaging dose caused by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Reduction of secondary doses from CBCT was measured using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLGD) placed inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The entire body, except for the region scanned by using CBCT, was shielded by wrapping it with a 2-mm lead sheet. Changes in secondary cancer risk due to shielding were calculated using BEIR VII models. Doses to out-of-field organs for head-and-neck, chest, and pelvis scans were decreased 15 ~ 100%, 23 ~ 90%, and 23 ~ 98%, respectively, and the average reductions in lifetime secondary cancer risk due to the 2-mm lead shielding were 1.6, 11.5, and 12.7 persons per 100,000, respectively. These findings suggest that a simple, thin-lead-sheet-based shielding method can effectively decrease secondary doses to out-of-field regions for CBCT, which reduces the lifetime cancer risk on average by 9 per 100,000 patients.

  15. Monte Carlo feasibility study for image guided surgery: from direct beta minus detection to Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigliotti, C. R.; Altabella, L.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this work is to compare the performances of different beta minus detection strategies for image guided surgery or ex vivo tissue analysis. In particular we investigated Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) with and without the use of a radiator, direct and indirect beta detection and bremsstrahlung imaging using beta emitters commonly employed in Nuclear Medicine. Monte Carlo simulations were implemented using the GAMOS plug-in for GEANT4 considering a slab of muscle and a radioactive source (32P or 90Y) placed at 0.5 mm depth. We estimated the gain that can be obtained in terms of produced photons using different materials placed on the slab used as Cerenkov radiators, we then focused on the number of exiting photons and their spatial distribution for the different strategies. The use of radiator to enhance Cerenkov signal reduces the spatial resolution because of the increased optical spread. We found that direct beta detection and CLI are best approaches in term of resolution while the use of a thin scintillator increases the signal but the spatial resolution is degraded. Bremsstrahlung presents lower signal and it does not represent the best choice for image guided surgery. CLI represents a more flexible approach for image guided surgery using or ex vivo tissue analysis using beta-emitter imaging.

  16. Quality Assurance Issues for Computed Tomography-, Ultrasound-, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cormack, Robert A.

    2008-05-01

    The requirements of quality assurance (QA) for both brachytherapy and imaging devices are well-defined, but image-guided brachytherapy has raised new issues. Image guidance in brachytherapy involves the transition from reference point dosimetry using films to volumetric imaging such as computed tomography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging for treatment planning and guidance of applicator, needle, or seed placement. The QA of these devices might not reflect the conditions of use in brachytherapy or the requirements of brachytherapy treatment planning. Image interpretation becomes much more important with image-guided brachytherapy. The success of a procedure could depend on the interpretation of a single image in a calibration phase done under the time pressures of the operative setting. This change has implications at the level of treatment, the process, and the field of brachytherapy as a whole. The QA concerns arising from brachytherapy procedures using ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging guidance are discussed, as are the problems associated with using imaging in an interventional setting. This report was intended to indicate the QA concerns arising from the convergence of brachytherapy and imaging-highlighting areas in which technical improvements are needed.

  17. A Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Image-Guided HIFU Hemostasis of Blood Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Greaby, Robyn; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-28

    A pulsatile flow phantom for studying ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis in a controlled environment has been developed. An ex vivo porcine carotid artery was attached to the phantom and embedded in a visually and ultrasonically transparent gel. Heparinized porcine blood was pumped through the phantom. Power-Doppler and B-mode ultrasound were used to remotely target the HIFU focus to the site of a needle puncture. In nine trials, complete hemostasis was achieved after an average HIFU application of 55 +/- 34 seconds. The vessels remained patent after treatment. With this phantom, it will be possible to do controlled studies of ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a radio-quiet galaxy at redshift z = 3.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giavalisco, Mauro; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Madau, Piero; Sparks, William B.

    1995-01-01

    We have observed with the Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) a radio-quiet Ly alpha-emitting galaxy at redshift z = 3.428 (G2 below). The images probe the rest-frame UV light around 1250 A with an angular resolution of approx. = 0.1 sec, corresponding to 1.4 h(exp -1, sub 50) kpc at redshift z = 3.4 (in this Letter we use q(sub 0) = 0 and H(sub 0) = 50 h(exp -1, sub 50) km/s/Mpc). The light profile of the central approx. 10h(exp -1, sub 50) kpc region is well fitted by an r(exp 1/4) law with r(sub e) approx. = 1.3 h(exp -1, sub 50) kpc, suggesting a dynamically relaxed state. The outer regions are characterized by the presence of substructures, such as an elongated formation and low surface brightness nebulosities. The isophotal analysis shows no evidence of an active galactic nuclei (AGN)-like unresolved source in the center. The structural properties of G2 are consistent with a dynamically hot stellar system observed during an early phase of star formation, very likely the progenitor of an elliptical or the bulge of a spiral galaxy.

  19. Image guided surgery in the management of craniocerebral gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Elserry, Tarek; Anwer, Hesham; Esene, Ignatius Ngene

    2013-01-01

    Background: A craniocerebral trauma caused by firearms is a complex injury with high morbidity and mortality. One of the most intriguing and controversial part in their management in salvageable patients is the decision to remove the bullet/pellet. A bullet is foreign to the brain and, in principle, should be removed. Surgical options for bullet extraction span from conventional craniotomy, through C-arm-guided surgery to minimally invasive frame or frameless stereotaxy. But what is the best surgical option? Methods: We prospectively followed up a cohort of 28 patients with cranio-cerebral gunshot injury (CCHSI) managed from January to December 2012 in our department of neurosurgery. The missiles were extracted via stereotaxy (frame or frameless), C-arm-guided, or free-hand-based surgery. Cases managed conservatively were excluded. The Glasgow Outcome Score was used to assess the functional outcome on discharge. Results: Five of the eight “stereotactic cases” had an excellent outcome after missile extraction while the initially planned stereotaxy missed locating the missile in three cases and were thus subjected to free hand craniotomy. Excellent outcome was obtained in five of the nine “neuronavigation cases, five of the eight cases for free hand surgery based on the bony landmarks, and five of the six C-arm-based surgery. Conclusion: Conventional craniotomy isn’t indicated in the extraction of isolated, retained, intracranial firearm missiles in civilian injury but could be useful when the missile is incorporated within a surgical lesion. Stereotactic surgery could be useful for bullet extraction, though with limited precision in identifying small pellets because of their small sizes, thus exposing patients to same risk of brain insult when retrieving a missile by conventional surgery. Because of its availability, C-arm-guided surgery continues to be of much benefit, especially in emergency situations. We recommend an extensive long-term study of these

  20. First experience with image-guided resection of paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Einspieler, Ingo; Novotny, Alexander; Okur, Asli; Essler, Markus; Martignoni, Marc E

    2014-08-01

    A 32-year-old male patient showed 2 focal uptakes of I-MIBG next to the left renal vein in a diagnostic scan, corresponding to paragangliomas. An operation was indicated, and to guide resection during surgery we used the freehand SPECT system. In the operating room, using freehand SPECT, both lesions were found. The system was of additional value in planning the operative access to the region of interest and in determining the depth of 1 lesion for precise and more rapid extirpation. Furthermore, it confirmed no residues in the operating field after resection of the tumors. PMID:24217546

  1. Image-guided cancer surgery using near-infrared fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; Hutteman, Merlijn; van der Vorst, Joost R; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Frangioni, John V

    2013-09-01

    Paradigm shifts in surgery arise when surgeons are empowered to perform surgery faster, better and less expensively than current standards. Optical imaging that exploits invisible near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent light (700-900 nm) has the potential to improve cancer surgery outcomes, minimize the time patients are under anaesthesia and lower health-care costs largely by way of its improved contrast and depth of tissue penetration relative to visible light. Accordingly, the past few years have witnessed an explosion of proof-of-concept clinical trials in the field. In this Review, we introduce the concept of NIR fluorescence imaging for cancer surgery, examine the clinical trial literature to date and outline the key issues pertaining to imaging system and contrast agent optimization. Although NIR seems to be superior to many traditional imaging techniques, its incorporation into routine care of patients with cancer depends on rigorous clinical trials and validation studies. PMID:23881033

  2. Radio imaging spectroscopy of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Hazel; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C.

    2013-07-01

    We present Nancay Radioheliograph observations of a moving type IV solar radio burst which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2 and by the LASCO white light coronograph. The burst emission was found to be cospatial with the core of the CME. Using radio imaging spectroscopy we are able to characterize the underlying electron distribution and plasma parameters within the source. Fitted spectra reveal a clear power law component consistent with optically thin synchrotron emission from accelerated electrons trapped in the erupting flux rope. As is often observed in type IV bursts, polarization measurements show the source to be moderately polarized during the peak of the burst, before steadily increasing to around 70% as the brightness temperature of the burst decays.

  3. CALORIMETRY OF GRB 030329: SIMULTANEOUS MODEL FITTING TO THE BROADBAND RADIO AFTERGLOW AND THE OBSERVED IMAGE EXPANSION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Mesler, Robert A.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.

    2013-09-01

    We perform calorimetry on the bright gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 by fitting simultaneously the broadband radio afterglow and the observed afterglow image size to a semi-analytic MHD and afterglow emission model. Our semi-analytic method is valid in both the relativistic and non-relativistic regimes, and incorporates a model of the interstellar scintillation that substantially effects the broadband afterglow below 10 GHz. The model is fitted to archival measurements of the afterglow flux from 1 day to 8.3 yr after the burst. Values for the initial burst parameters are determined and the nature of the circumburst medium is explored. Additionally, direct measurements of the lateral expansion rate of the radio afterglow image size allow us to estimate the initial Lorentz factor of the jet.

  4. Critical parameters for parallel interconnects using VCSEL arrays and fiber image guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayan D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Geib, Kent M.; Choquette, Kent D.; Carter, Tony R.; Fischer, Arthur J.; Robinson, Matthew; Sullivan, Charles T.

    2003-04-01

    Several thousand glass optical fibers fused together is routinely used as fiber image guides for medical and other image remoting applications. Fiber image guides also offer possibility for flexible optical interconnect links with potentially thousands of bi-directional parallel channels with data rates as high as 10 Gbps per channel, leading to more than Tera bits per second aggregate data transfer rates. A fair number of fiber image guide based link demonstrations using vertical cavity surface emitting lasers have been reported. However, little is known about designable parameters and optimization paradigms for applications to massively parallel optical interconnects. This paper discusses critical optical parameters that characterize a massively parallel link. Experimental characterizations were carried out to explore some of the fundamental interactions between single-mode 850 nm VCSELs and fiber image guides having different numerical apertures, 0.25, 0.55 and 1.00. Preliminary optical simulation results are given. Finally, potential directions for further experimental and analytical explorations, and for applicability into designable link systems are suggested.

  5. Image-Guided Intervention of the Postoperative Foot and Ankle After Ligament and Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Monica; Walker, Miny; Amiras, Dimitri; Rosenfeld, Peter

    2016-02-01

    This review article describes the potential range of image-guided interventional procedures performed following foot and ankle ligament and/or tendon repair. Diagnosis of the cause of recurrent or persistent pain/symptoms in this postoperative group is challenging and requires a coordinated clinical and radiologic assessment. This directs appropriate treatment including image-guided intervention that may be used both as a diagnostic tool and a therapeutic option. There is a paucity of high-quality studies on the role of image-guided intervention in the foot and ankle after ligament/tendon repair. Many of the procedures used in this group are extrapolated from other areas of the body or the preoperative scenario. We review the role of imaging to identify the cause of postsurgical symptoms and to direct appropriate image-guided intervention. The available injectables and their roles are discussed. Specific surgical procedures are described including lateral ligament repair, Achilles repair, posterior tibialis tendon surgery, and peroneal tendon surgery. PMID:27077592

  6. Image-guided fine-needle aspiration of retroperitoneal masses: The role of the cytopathologist

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ghazala; Maheshwari, Veena; Afzal, Sheerin; Ansari, Hena A; Ahmad, Ibne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Retroperitoneal tumors constitute a difficult diagnostic category as they are not easily accessible. The advent of image-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has resolved this problem significantly. Aims: We present a short study based on guided aspiration of retroperitoneal tumors, in which we have tried to assess the role of image-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology as a tool for pre-operative diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on patients diagnosed with retroperitoneal masses. FNA was performed under image guidance with the help of ultrasonography and/or computed tomography; smears were prepared and meticulously screened according to a fixed protocol. The results were analyzed to determine sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic efficacy of cytopathological diagnosis using image-guided FNA techniques. Results: We assessed 38 patients with retroperitoneal masses. In all cases, adequate cellular material was obtained. No major complications were encountered. Statistical analysis was carried out in 35 cases; sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 100% in these cases. Conclusion: FNA under image guidance should be considered a first-line diagnostic approach for retroperitoneal and other abdominal tumors, although caution should be exercised in case selection. In areas where advanced tests are not available, the cytotechnologist and cytopathologist have a very important role to play in ensuring accurate diagnoses. PMID:23661939

  7. Imaging and Imaging-Guided Interventions in the Diagnosis and Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)-Review of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ghanaati, Hossein; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Jafarian, Ali; Ebrahimi Daryani, Nasser; Nassiri-Toosi, Mohsen; Jalali, Amir Hossein; Shakiba, Madjid

    2012-01-01

    The imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is challenging and plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and staging of the disease. A variety of imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear medicine are currently used in evaluating patients with HCC. Although the best option for the treatment of these cases is hepatic resection or transplantation, only 20% of HCCs are surgically treatable. In those patients who are not eligible for surgical treatment, interventional therapies such as transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), radio-frequency ablation (RFA), percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy (PMC), laser ablation or cryoablation, and acetic acid injection are indicated. In this paper, we aimed to review the evidence regarding imaging modalities and therapeutic interventions of HCC. PMID:23407596

  8. Image-guided Raman spectroscopic recovery of canine cortical bone contrast in situ.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Schulmerich, Matthew; Cole, Jacqueline H; Dooley, Kathryn A; Kreider, Jaclynn M; Pogue, Brian W; Morris, Michael D; Goldstein, Steven A

    2008-08-01

    Raman scattering provides valuable biochemical and molecular markers for studying bone tissue composition with use in predicting fracture risk in osteoporosis. Raman tomography can image through a few centimeters of tissue but is limited by low spatial resolution. X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging can provide high-resolution image-guidance of the Raman spectroscopic characterization, which enhances the quantitative recovery of the Raman signals, and this technique provides additional information to standard imaging methods. This hypothesis was tested in data measured from Teflon tissue phantoms and from a canine limb. Image-guided Raman spectroscopy (IG-RS) of the canine limb using CT images of the tissue to guide the recovery recovered a contrast of 145:1 between the cortical bone and background. Considerably less contrast was found without the CT image to guide recovery. This study presents the first known IG-RS results from tissue and indicates that intrinsically high contrasts (on the order of a hundred fold) are available. PMID:18679495

  9. Adaptive 4D MR Imaging Using Navigator-Based Respiratory Signal for MRI-Guided Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Haque, Hasnine A.; Tsukamoto, Tetsuji; Matsumiya, Kiyoshi; Liao, Hongen; Masamune, Ken; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2010-01-01

    For real-time 3D visualization of respiratory organ motion for MRI-guided therapy, a new adaptive 4D MR imaging method based on navigator echo and multiple gating windows was developed. This method was designed to acquire a time series of volumetric 3D images of a cyclically moving organ, enabling therapy to be guided by synchronizing the 4D image with the actual organ motion in real time. The proposed method was implemented in an open-configuration 0.5T clinical MR scanner. To evaluate the feasibility and determine optimal imaging conditions, studies were conducted with a phantom, volunteers, and a patient. In the phantom study the root mean square (RMS) position error in the 4D image of the cyclically moving phantom was 1.9 mm and the imaging time was ≈10 min when the 4D image had six frames. In the patient study, 4D images were successfully acquired under clinical conditions and a liver tumor was discriminated in the series of frames. The image quality was affected by the relations among the encoding direction, the slice orientation, and the direction of motion of the target organ. In conclusion, this study has shown that the proposed method is feasible and capable of providing a real-time dynamic 3D atlas for surgical navigation with sufficient accuracy and image quality. PMID:18429011

  10. FluoSTIC: miniaturized fluorescence image-guided surgery system.

    PubMed

    Gioux, Sylvain; Coutard, Jean-Guillaume; Berger, Michel; Grateau, Henri; Josserand, Véronique; Keramidas, Michelle; Righini, Christian; Coll, Jean-Luc; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2012-10-01

    Over the last few years, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has witnessed rapid growth and is already used in clinical trials for various procedures. However, most clinically compatible imaging systems are optimized for large, open-surgery procedures. Such systems cannot be employed during head and neck oncologic surgeries because the system is not able to image inside deep cavities or allow the surgeon access to certain tumors due to the large footprint of the system. We describe a miniaturized, low-cost, NIR fluorescence system optimized for clinical use during oral oncologic surgeries. The system, termed FluoSTIC, employs a miniature, high-quality, consumer-grade lipstick camera for collecting fluorescence light and a novel custom circular optical fiber array for illumination that combines both white light and NIR excitation. FluoSTIC maintains fluorescence imaging quality similar to that of current large-size imaging systems and is 22 mm in diameter and 200 mm in height and weighs less than 200 g. PMID:23052561

  11. FluoSTIC: miniaturized fluorescence image-guided surgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Coutard, Jean-Guillaume; Berger, Michel; Grateau, Henri; Josserand, Véronique; Keramidas, Michelle; Righini, Christian; Coll, Jean-Luc; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2012-10-01

    Over the last few years, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has witnessed rapid growth and is already used in clinical trials for various procedures. However, most clinically compatible imaging systems are optimized for large, open-surgery procedures. Such systems cannot be employed during head and neck oncologic surgeries because the system is not able to image inside deep cavities or allow the surgeon access to certain tumors due to the large footprint of the system. We describe a miniaturized, low-cost, NIR fluorescence system optimized for clinical use during oral oncologic surgeries. The system, termed FluoSTIC, employs a miniature, high-quality, consumer-grade lipstick camera for collecting fluorescence light and a novel custom circular optical fiber array for illumination that combines both white light and NIR excitation. FluoSTIC maintains fluorescence imaging quality similar to that of current large-size imaging systems and is 22 mm in diameter and 200 mm in height and weighs less than 200 g.

  12. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Current Status for Image-Guided Therapy.

    PubMed

    Copelan, Alexander; Hartman, Jason; Chehab, Monzer; Venkatesan, Aradhana M

    2015-12-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an innovative therapeutic technology, permitting extracorporeal or endocavitary delivery of targeted thermal ablation while minimizing injury to the surrounding structures. While ultrasound-guided HIFU was the original image-guided system, MR-guided HIFU has many inherent advantages, including superior depiction of anatomic detail and superb real-time thermometry during thermoablation sessions, and it has recently demonstrated promising results in the treatment of both benign and malignant tumors. HIFU has been employed in the management of prostate cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, uterine leiomyomas, and breast tumors, and has been associated with success in limited studies for palliative pain management in pancreatic cancer and bone tumors. Nonthermal HIFU bioeffects, including immune system modulation and targeted drug/gene therapy, are currently being explored in the preclinical realm, with an emphasis on leveraging these therapeutic effects in the care of the oncology patient. Although still in its early stages, the wide spectrum of therapeutic capabilities of HIFU offers great potential in the field of image-guided oncologic therapy. PMID:26622104

  13. The clinician's guide to diagnostic imaging: Cost effective pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Z.D.; Chew, F.S.; Ellis, D.A.; Brigham, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents logical, step-by-step imaging sequences for 47 medical, surgical, and pediatric problems. Topics considered include breast cancer screening, acute spinal trauma, search for primary cancer of unknown origin, acute anuria, blunt chest trauma, new onset seizures, and spinal cord compression from metastases. Other chapters have been rewritten to enhance the clarity of presentation and to incorporate new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging, dipyridamole stress testing, and single photon emission computed tomography. The book highlights the expanding role of CT in evaluation of thoracic and abdominal problems, the emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a vital diagnostic tool for the central nervous system, and the clinical utility of many newly developed radiopharmaceuticals.

  14. A miniaturized imaging system for optical guided surgery of head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atallah, Ihab; Milet, Clément; Dorval, Paul; Gayet, Pascal; Rizo, Philippe; Henry, Maxime; Reyt, Emile; Josserand, Véronique; Hurbin, Amandine; Righini, Christian; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery, FIGS, has lately shown a huge potential in oncologic and lymphatic related surgeries. In some indications such as liver or heart surgery, fluorescence-reachable anatomic structures are limited by the access to the surgical field. Nevertheless, most of the systems available on the market are too large to image the sides of cavities. Small devices are clearly required to improve workability of fluorescence imaging systems. The current work describes the evaluation of Fluostick a CE med certified instrument dedicated to narrow area imaging. This small size device is made of an optical head connected to a control box. We tested this instrumentation at the preclinical level for the optical-guided surgery of head and neck tumors.

  15. An object tracking method based on guided filter for night fusion image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuedong; Han, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Online object tracking is a challenging problem as it entails learning an effective model to account for appearance change caused by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In this paper, we propose a novel online object tracking with guided image filter for accurate and robust night fusion image tracking. Firstly, frame difference is applied to produce the coarse target, which helps to generate observation models. Under the restriction of these models and local source image, guided filter generates sufficient and accurate foreground target. Then accurate boundaries of the target can be extracted from detection results. Finally timely updating for observation models help to avoid tracking shift. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations on challenging image sequences demonstrate that the proposed tracking algorithm performs favorably against several state-of-art methods.

  16. Targeting Error Simulator for Image-guided Prostate Needle Placement

    PubMed Central

    Lasso, Andras; Avni, Shachar; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Motivation Needle-based biopsy and local therapy of prostate cancer depend multimodal imaging for both target planning and needle guidance. The clinical process involves selection of target locations in a pre-operative image volume and registering these to an intra-operative volume. Registration inaccuracies inevitably lead to targeting error, a major clinical concern. The analysis of targeting error requires a large number of images with known ground truth, which has been infeasible even for the largest research centers. Methods We propose to generate realistic prostate imaging data in a controllable way, with known ground truth, by simulation of prostate size, shape, motion and deformation typically encountered in prostatic needle placement. This data is then used to evaluate a given registration algorithm, by testing its ability to reproduce ground truth contours, motions and deformations. The method builds on statistical shape atlas to generate large number of realistic prostate shapes and finite element modeling to generate high-fidelity deformations, while segmentation error is simulated by warping the ground truth data in specific prostate regions. Expected target registration error (TRE) is computed as a vector field. Results The simulator was configured to evaluate the TRE when using a surface-based rigid registration algorithm in a typical prostate biopsy targeting scenario. Simulator parameters, such as segmentation error and deformation, were determined by measurements in clinical images. Turnaround time for the full simulation of one test case was below 3 minutes. The simulator is customizable for testing, comparing, optimizing segmentation and registration methods and is independent of the imaging modalities used. PMID:21096275

  17. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study. PMID:23847430

  18. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. “Hyperstimulation analgesia” with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study. PMID:23847430

  19. Investigation of therapy improvement using real-time photoacoustic imaging guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huizhong

    There are a lot of risks in cancer treatment by invasive surgery, such as bleeding, wound infection, and long recovery time, etc. Therefore, there is great need for minimally- or non-invasive treatment. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a rapidly growing and truly non-invasive technology. It has been widely used in therapeutic applications, such as rapid tissue heating and tissue ablation. With proper imaging guidance, HIFU treatment can be performed totally noninvasively. Currently, ultrasound imaging-guided HIFU has been extensively studied. However, ultrasound imaging guidance is less precise because of the relatively low imaging contrast, sensitivity, and specificity for noninvasive detection. In this study, we employed photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technique, which has been developed a novel promising imaging technique for early cancer detection, to guide HIFU treatment. The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of PAI to guide, monitor in real time and enhance the HIFU therapy. In this dissertation, as the first step, the integrated PAI and HIFU system had been shown to have the feasibility to guide HIFU both ex vivo and in vivo. Then, the system was improved and developed to a real-time PAI-guided HIFU system. It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of PA detection for HIFU lesion is very high and the saturation of PA signals can be used as the indicator for tissue coagulation. During the temperature measurement using this system, laser-enhanced HIFU heating was found. Thus, we further investigated the laser enhanced technique in both HIFU heating and pulsed HIFU thrombolysis. In the HIFU therapy, laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. We demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to significantly enhance HIFU by reducing cavitation threshold.

  20. MRI-guided brain PET image filtering and partial volume correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianhua; Chu-Shern Lim, Jason; Townsend, David W.

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) image quantification is a challenging problem due to limited spatial resolution of acquired data and the resulting partial volume effects (PVE), which depend on the size of the structure studied in relation to the spatial resolution and which may lead to over or underestimation of the true tissue tracer concentration. In addition, it is usually necessary to perform image smoothing either during image reconstruction or afterwards to achieve a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, an isotropic Gaussian filtering (GF) is used for this purpose. However, the noise suppression is at the cost of deteriorating spatial resolution. As hybrid imaging devices such as PET/MRI have become available, the complementary information derived from high definition morphologic images could be used to improve the quality of PET images. In this study, first of all, we propose an MRI-guided PET filtering method by adapting a recently proposed local linear model and then incorporate PVE into the model to get a new partial volume correction (PVC) method without parcellation of MRI. In addition, both the new filtering and PVC are voxel-wise non-iterative methods. The performance of the proposed methods were investigated with simulated dynamic FDG brain dataset and 18F-FDG brain data of a cervical cancer patient acquired with a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR scanner. The initial simulation results demonstrated that MRI-guided PET image filtering can produce less noisy images than traditional GF and bias and coefficient of variation can be further reduced by MRI-guided PET PVC. Moreover, structures can be much better delineated in MRI-guided PET PVC for real brain data.

  1. Image-guided therapies in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: A multidisciplinary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Willatt, Jonathon; Hannawa, Kevin K; Ruma, Julie A; Frankel, Timothy L; Owen, Dawn; Barman, Pranab M

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has led to improvements in screening, detection, and treatments. Interventional techniques include thermal ablation, transarterial chemoembolization, and radioembolization whilst stereotactic body radiation therapy also uses imaging to target the radiation. Both survival rates and cure rates have improved markedly since the introduction of these techniques. This review article describes the image guided techniques used for the treatment of HCC. PMID:25729478

  2. Microencapsulation of Indocyanine Green for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery†

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel process to encapsulate Indocyanine Green (ICG) in liposomal droplets at high concentration for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery. The microencapsulation process follows two consecutive steps of droplet formation by liquid-driving coaxial flow focusing (LDCFF) and solvent removal by oil phase dewetting. These biocompatible lipid vesicles may have important applications in drug delivery and fluorescence imaging. PMID:25450664

  3. MRI-guided brain PET image filtering and partial volume correction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jianhua; Lim, Jason Chu-Shern; Townsend, David W

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) image quantification is a challenging problem due to limited spatial resolution of acquired data and the resulting partial volume effects (PVE), which depend on the size of the structure studied in relation to the spatial resolution and which may lead to over or underestimation of the true tissue tracer concentration. In addition, it is usually necessary to perform image smoothing either during image reconstruction or afterwards to achieve a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, an isotropic Gaussian filtering (GF) is used for this purpose. However, the noise suppression is at the cost of deteriorating spatial resolution. As hybrid imaging devices such as PET/MRI have become available, the complementary information derived from high definition morphologic images could be used to improve the quality of PET images. In this study, first of all, we propose an MRI-guided PET filtering method by adapting a recently proposed local linear model and then incorporate PVE into the model to get a new partial volume correction (PVC) method without parcellation of MRI. In addition, both the new filtering and PVC are voxel-wise non-iterative methods. The performance of the proposed methods were investigated with simulated dynamic FDG brain dataset and (18)F-FDG brain data of a cervical cancer patient acquired with a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR scanner. The initial simulation results demonstrated that MRI-guided PET image filtering can produce less noisy images than traditional GF and bias and coefficient of variation can be further reduced by MRI-guided PET PVC. Moreover, structures can be much better delineated in MRI-guided PET PVC for real brain data. PMID:25575248

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: initiating a program

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Soliman, Abraam; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has increased, and there is growing evidence to suggest that improvements in accuracy of target delineation in MRI-guided brachytherapy may improve clinical outcomes in cervical cancer. To implement a high quality image guided brachytherapy program, a multidisciplinary team is required with appropriate expertise as well as an adequate patient load to ensure a sustainable program. It is imperative to know that the most important source of uncertainty in the treatment process is related to target delineation and therefore, the necessity of training and expertise as well as quality assurance should be emphasized. A short review of concepts and techniques that have been developed for implementation and/or improvement of workflow of a MRI-guided brachytherapy program are provided in this document, so that institutions can use and optimize some of them based on their resources to minimize their procedure times. PMID:26622249

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: initiating a program.

    PubMed

    Owrangi, Amir M; Prisciandaro, Joann I; Soliman, Abraam; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decade, the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has increased, and there is growing evidence to suggest that improvements in accuracy of target delineation in MRI-guided brachytherapy may improve clinical outcomes in cervical cancer. To implement a high quality image guided brachytherapy program, a multidisciplinary team is required with appropriate expertise as well as an adequate patient load to ensure a sustainable program. It is imperative to know that the most important source of uncertainty in the treatment process is related to target delineation and therefore, the necessity of training and expertise as well as quality assurance should be emphasized. A short review of concepts and techniques that have been developed for implementation and/or improvement of workflow of a MRI-guided brachytherapy program are provided in this document, so that institutions can use and optimize some of them based on their resources to minimize their procedure times. PMID:26622249

  6. Feature identification for image-guided transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Rajchl, Martin; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Chu, Michael W.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive alternative to open-heart surgery, and is critically dependent on imaging for accurate placement of the new valve. Augmented image-guidance for TAVI can be provided by registering together intra-operative transesophageal echo (TEE) ultrasound and a model derived from pre-operative CT. Automatic contour delineation on TEE images of the aortic root is required for real-time registration. This study develops an algorithm to automatically extract contours on simultaneous cross-plane short-axis and long-axis (XPlane) TEE views, and register these features to a 3D pre-operative model. A continuous max-flow approach is used to segment the aortic root, followed by analysis of curvature to select appropriate contours for use in registration. Results demonstrate a mean contour boundary distance error of 1.3 and 2.8mm for the short and long-axis views respectively, and a mean target registration error of 5.9mm. Real-time image guidance has the potential to increase accuracy and reduce complications in TAVI.

  7. The Moving Image: A Guide to Cinematic Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Robert

    This book examines the unique patterns and structure that make cinema a story-telling art form. A comparison of books or plays with films that have been made from them reveals the essence of cinema: its emphasis on movement, fluidity, and pictorial image. Excerpts from shooting scripts demonstrate the ways in which the components of drama…

  8. Accurate calibration of a stereo-vision system in image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dezhi; Li, Shidong

    2006-11-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy using a three-dimensional (3D) camera as the on-board surface imaging system requires precise and accurate registration of the 3D surface images in the treatment machine coordinate system. Two simple calibration methods, an analytical solution as three-point matching and a least-squares estimation method as multipoint registration, were introduced to correlate the stereo-vision surface imaging frame with the machine coordinate system. Both types of calibrations utilized 3D surface images of a calibration template placed on the top of the treatment couch. Image transformational parameters were derived from corresponding 3D marked points on the surface images to their given coordinates in the treatment room coordinate system. Our experimental results demonstrated that both methods had provided the desired calibration accuracy of 0.5 mm. The multipoint registration method is more robust particularly for noisy 3D surface images. Both calibration methods have been used as our weekly QA tools for a 3D image-guided radiotherapy system. PMID:17153416

  9. Accurate calibration of a stereo-vision system in image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Dezhi; Li Shidong

    2006-11-15

    Image-guided radiotherapy using a three-dimensional (3D) camera as the on-board surface imaging system requires precise and accurate registration of the 3D surface images in the treatment machine coordinate system. Two simple calibration methods, an analytical solution as three-point matching and a least-squares estimation method as multipoint registration, were introduced to correlate the stereo-vision surface imaging frame with the machine coordinate system. Both types of calibrations utilized 3D surface images of a calibration template placed on the top of the treatment couch. Image transformational parameters were derived from corresponding 3D marked points on the surface images to their given coordinates in the treatment room coordinate system. Our experimental results demonstrated that both methods had provided the desired calibration accuracy of 0.5 mm. The multipoint registration method is more robust particularly for noisy 3D surface images. Both calibration methods have been used as our weekly QA tools for a 3D image-guided radiotherapy system.

  10. Near-infrared image-guided laser ablation of dental decay

    PubMed Central

    Tao, You-Chen; Fried, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Image-guided laser ablation systems are now feasible for dentistry with the recent development of nondestructive high-contrast imaging modalities such as near-IR (NIR) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) that are capable of discriminating between sound and demineralized dental enamel at the early stages of development. Our objective is to demonstrate that images of demineralized tooth surfaces have sufficient contrast to be used to guide a CO2 laser for the selective removal of natural and artificial caries lesions. NIR imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 1310-nm are used to acquire images of natural lesions on extracted human teeth and highly patterned artificial lesions produced on bovine enamel. NIR and PS-OCT images are analyzed and converted to binary maps designating the areas on the samples to be removed by a CO2 laser to selectively remove the lesions. Postablation NIR and PS-OCT images confirmed preferential removal of demineralized areas with minimal damage to sound enamel areas. These promising results suggest that NIR and PS-OCT imaging systems can be integrated with a CO2 laser ablation system for the selective removal of dental caries. PMID:19895146

  11. Near-infrared image-guided laser ablation of dental decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, You-Chen; Fried, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Image-guided laser ablation systems are now feasible for dentistry with the recent development of nondestructive high-contrast imaging modalities such as near-IR (NIR) imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) that are capable of discriminating between sound and demineralized dental enamel at the early stages of development. Our objective is to demonstrate that images of demineralized tooth surfaces have sufficient contrast to be used to guide a CO2 laser for the selective removal of natural and artificial caries lesions. NIR imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 1310-nm are used to acquire images of natural lesions on extracted human teeth and highly patterned artificial lesions produced on bovine enamel. NIR and PS-OCT images are analyzed and converted to binary maps designating the areas on the samples to be removed by a CO2 laser to selectively remove the lesions. Postablation NIR and PS-OCT images confirmed preferential removal of demineralized areas with minimal damage to sound enamel areas. These promising results suggest that NIR and PS-OCT imaging systems can be integrated with a CO2 laser ablation system for the selective removal of dental caries.

  12. The MEPUC concept adapts the C-arm fluoroscope to image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Suhm, Norbert; Müller, Paul; Bopp, Urs; Messmer, Peter; Regazzoni, Pietro

    2004-06-01

    Image-guided surgery requires surgeons to be able to manipulate the imaging modality themselves and without delay. Intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging does not meet this requirement as the C-arm fluoroscope cannot be operated or positioned by the surgeons themselves. The Motorized Exact Positioning Unit for C-arm (MEPUC) concept aims to optimize the workflow of positioning the C-arm fluoroscope. The hardware component of the MEPUC equips the fluoroscope with electric stepping motors. The software component allows the surgeon to control the fluoroscope's movements. The study presented here showed that translational movements within the x-y plane are most frequently performed when positioning the C-arm fluoroscope. Furthermore, reproducing a former projection was found to be a frequent task during image-guided procedures. In our opinion, the MEPUC concept adapts the fluoroscope to image-guided surgery. The most important improvement being definition of a bidirectional data exchange between the surgeon and the C-arm fluoroscope: positioning data from the surgeon to the C-arm fluoroscope and-subsequently-image information from C-arm fluoroscope to the surgeon. PMID:15183713

  13. Sclerotic Vertebral Metastases: Pain Palliation Using Percutaneous Image-Guided Cryoablation

    SciTech Connect

    Costa de Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Menezes, Marcos Roberto de; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Cryoablative therapies have been proposed to palliate pain from soft-tissue or osteolytic bone tumors. A case of a patient with painful thoracic and sacral spine sclerotic metastases successfully treated by image-guided percutaneous cryoablation with the aid of insulation techniques and thermosensors is reported in this case report.

  14. Image-guided diagnosis of prostate cancer can increase detection of tumors

    Cancer.gov

    In the largest prospective study to date of image-guided technology for identifying suspicious regions of the prostate to biopsy, researchers compared the ability of this technology to detect high-risk prostate cancer with that of the current standard of

  15. Assisting in Radiology/Imaging. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is designed for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This…

  16. Optimization of Focused Ultrasound and Image Based Modeling in Image Guided Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almekkawy, Mohamed Khaled Ibrahim

    Image-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming increasingly accepted as a form of noninvasive ablative therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer, uterine fibroids and other tissue abnormalities. In principle, HIFU beams can be focused within small volumes which results in forming precise lesions within the target volume (e.g. tumor, atherosclerotic plaque) while sparing the intervening tissue. With this precision, HIFU offers the promise of noninvasive tumor therapy. The goal of this thesis is to develop an image-guidance mode with an interactive image-based computational modeling of tissue response to HIFU. This model could be used in treatment planning and post-treatment retrospective evaluation of treatment outcome(s). Within the context of treatment planning, the challenge of using HIFU to target tumors in organs partially obscured by the rib cage are addressed. Ribs distort HIFU beams in a manner that reduces the focusing gain at the target (tumor) and could cause a treatment-limiting collateral damage. We present a refocusing algorithms to efficiently steer higher power towards the target while limiting power deposition on the ribs, improving the safety and efficacy of tumor ablation. Our approach is based on an approximation of a non-convex to a convex optimization known as the semidefinite relaxation (SDR) technique. An important advantage of the SDR method over previously proposed optimization methods is the explicit control of the sidelobes in the focal plane. A finite-difference time domain (FDTD) heterogeneous propagation model of a 1-MHz concave phased array was used to model the acoustic propagation and temperature simulations in different tissues including ribs. The numerical methods developed for the refocusing problem are also used for retrospective analysis of targeting of atherosclerotic plaques using HIFU. Cases were simulated where seven adjacent HIFU shots (5000 W/cm2, 2 sec exposure time) were focused at the plaque

  17. Radio-Tomographic Images of Post-midnight Equatorial Plasma Depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, M. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Wilkens, M.; Huba, J. D.; Krall, J.; Valladares, C. E.; Heelis, R. A.; Hairston, M. R.; Coley, W. R.; Chau, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, post-midnight equatorial plasma depletions (EPDs) have been imaged in the longitude-altitude plane using radio-tomography. High-resolution (~10 km × 10 km) electron-density reconstructions were created from total electron content (TEC) data using an array of receivers sited in Peru and the Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) inversion algorithm. TEC data were obtained from the 150 and 400 MHz signals transmitted by the CERTO beacon on the C/NOFS satellite. In-situ electron density data from the C/NOFS CINDI instrument and electron density profiles from the UML Jicamarca ionosonde were used to generate an initial guess for the MART inversion, and also to constrain the inversion process. Observed EPDs had widths of 100-1000 km, spacings of 300-900 km, and often appeared 'pinched off' at the bottom. Well-developed EPDs appeared on an evening with a very small (4 m/s) Pre-Reversal-Enhancement (PRE), suggesting that postmidnight enhancements of the vertical plasma drift and/or seeding-induced uplifts (e.g. gravity waves) were responsible for driving the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability into the nonlinear regime on this night. On another night the Jicamarca ISR recorded postmidnight (~0230 LT) Eastward electric fields nearly twice as strong as the PRE fields seven hours earlier. These electric fields lifted the whole ionosphere, including embedded EPDs, over a longitude range ~14° wide. CINDI detected a dawn depletion in exactly the area where the reconstruction showed an uplifted EPD. Strong Equatorial Spread-F observed by the Jicamarca ionosonde during receiver observation times confirmed the presence of ionospheric irregularities.

  18. Open-source platforms for navigated image-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-10-01

    Navigation technology is changing the clinical standards in medical interventions by making existing procedures more accurate, and new procedures possible. Navigation is based on preoperative or intraoperative imaging combined with 3-dimensional position tracking of interventional tools registered to the images. Research of navigation technology in medical interventions requires significant engineering efforts. The difficulty of developing such complex systems has been limiting the clinical translation of new methods and ideas. A key to the future success of this field is to provide researchers with platforms that allow rapid implementation of applications with minimal resources spent on reimplementing existing system features. A number of platforms have been already developed that can share data in real time through standard interfaces. Complete navigation systems can be built using these platforms using a layered software architecture. In this paper, we review the most popular platforms, and show an effective way to take advantage of them through an example surgical navigation application. PMID:27344106

  19. A guide to SPECT equipment for brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, P.B.; Zubal, G.

    1991-12-31

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was started by Kuhl and Edwards about 30 years ago. Their original instrument consisted of four focused Nal probes mounted on a moving gantry. During the 1980s, clinical SPECT imaging was most frequently performed using single-headed Anger-type cameras which were modified for rotational as well as static imaging. Such instruments are still available and may be useful in settings where there are few patients and SPECT is used only occasionally. More frequently, however, dedicated SPECT devices are purchased which optimize equipment potential while being user-friendly. Modern SPECT instrumentation incorporates improvements in the detector, computers, mathematical formulations, electronics and display systems. A comprehensive discussion of all aspects of SPECT is beyond the scope of this article. The authors, however, discuss general concepts of SPECT, the current state-of-the-art in clinical SPECT instrumentation, and areas of common misunderstanding. 9 refs.

  20. A Novel Linear Accelerator For Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Xiaodong; Boucher, Salime

    2011-06-01

    RadiaBeam is developing a novel linear accelerator which produces both kilovoltage ({approx}100 keV) X-rays for imaging, and megavoltage (6 to 20 MeV) X-rays for therapy. We call this system the DEXITron: Dual Energy X-ray source for Imaging and Therapy. The Dexitron is enabled by an innovation in the electromagnetic design of the linac, which allows the output energy to be rapidly switched from high energy to low energy. In brief, the method involves switching the phase of the radiofrequency (RF) power by 180 degrees at some point in the linac such that, after that point, the linac decelerates the beam, rather than accelerating it. The Dexitron will have comparable cost to other linacs, and avoids the problems associated with current IGRT equipment.

  1. A Novel Linear Accelerator For Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaodong; Boucher, Salime

    2011-06-01

    RadiaBeam is developing a novel linear accelerator which produces both kilovoltage (˜100 keV) X-rays for imaging, and megavoltage (6 to 20 MeV) X-rays for therapy. We call this system the DEXITron: Dual Energy X-ray source for Imaging and Therapy. The Dexitron is enabled by an innovation in the electromagnetic design of the linac, which allows the output energy to be rapidly switched from high energy to low energy. In brief, the method involves switching the phase of the radiofrequency (RF) power by 180 degrees at some point in the linac such that, after that point, the linac decelerates the beam, rather than accelerating it. The Dexitron will have comparable cost to other linacs, and avoids the problems associated with current IGRT equipment.

  2. An image-guided tool to prevent hospital acquired infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Melinda; Szilágyi, László; Lehotsky, Ákos; Haidegger, Tamás; Benyó, Balázs

    2011-03-01

    Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) represent the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and claims hundreds of thousands of lives annually in the rest of the world. This paper presents a novel low-cost mobile device|called Stery-Hand|that helps to avoid HAI by improving hand hygiene control through providing an objective evaluation of the quality of hand washing. The use of the system is intuitive: having performed hand washing with a soap mixed with UV re ective powder, the skin appears brighter in UV illumination on the disinfected surfaces. Washed hands are inserted into the Stery-Hand box, where a digital image is taken under UV lighting. Automated image processing algorithms are employed in three steps to evaluate the quality of hand washing. First, the contour of the hand is extracted in order to distinguish the hand from the background. Next, a semi-supervised clustering algorithm classies the pixels of the hand into three groups, corresponding to clean, partially clean and dirty areas. The clustering algorithm is derived from the histogram-based quick fuzzy c-means approach, using a priori information extracted from reference images, evaluated by experts. Finally, the identied areas are adjusted to suppress shading eects, and quantied in order to give a verdict on hand disinfection quality. The proposed methodology was validated through tests using hundreds of images recorded in our laboratory. The proposed system was found robust and accurate, producing correct estimation for over 98% of the test cases. Stery-Hand may be employed in general practice, and it may also serve educational purposes.

  3. Image-guided percutaneous internal fixation of sacral fracture.

    PubMed

    Kinon, Merritt D; Desai, Rupen; Loriaux, Daniel; Houten, John K

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous iliosacral screw placement is a technically challenging procedure with a significant complication profile for misplaced screws. The use of stereotactic image guidance has been shown to provide superior accuracy in the placement of spinal instrumentation. Here, the authors describe a novel application of O-arm technology (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) to help safely place iliosacral screws for the treatment of a traumatic sacral fracture. PMID:26433323

  4. Economic challenges in breast imaging. A survivor's guide to success.

    PubMed

    Feig, S A

    2000-07-01

    Most breast imaging centers today operate under financial strain. Among strategies designed to improve their bottom line, more efficient use of the radiologist's time is the most fundamental strategy and the one most likely to succeed in all breast imaging centers. Tasks performed by the radiologist that are not directly related to interpretation and consultation should be shifted to other personnel. Other strategies that may help some breast imaging centers include accepting only self-paying patients, renegotiating the hospital contract, performing more interventional procedures, and extending the hours of operation. Measures that can improve the economic efficiency of screening mammography include batch interpretation of mammograms; paperwork reduction; brief automated reports; limiting requests for previous films from other facilities to only potentially necessary cases; dedicated screening mammography examination rooms; reduction in recall rates; and, in certain circumstances, extension of breast center hours. Measures that can improve the economic efficiency of diagnostic mammography performance and interpretation include dedicated diagnostic mammography examination rooms, automated film rotators, improved scheduling, and efficient work-flow patterns for examination performance. Measures that can improve the economic efficiency of both screening and diagnostic mammography include improved triage of screening and diagnostic patients, reminder telephone calls to confirm mammography appointments, greater use of medical assistants to help the radiologists and technologists, and streamlined film library procedures and operations. Measures that can improve the economic efficiency of breast interventional procedures include preprocedure work-up, establishment of scheduling protocols, and greater involvement of technologists and medical assistants in assisting the radiologist who performs the interventional procedures. All of these methods are intended to create a

  5. Combination of nonlinear ultrasonics and guided wave tomography for imaging the micro-defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Weibin; Cho, Younho

    2016-02-01

    The use of guided wave tomography has become an attractive alternative to convert ultrasonic wave raw data to visualized results for quantitative signal interpretation. For more accurate life prediction and efficient management strategies for critical structural components, there is a demand of imaging micro-damages in early stage. However, there is rarely investigation on guided wave tomographic imaging of micro-defects. One of the reasons for this might be that it becomes challenging to monitor tiny signal difference coefficient in a reliable manner for wave propagation in the specimens with micro-damages. Nonlinear acoustic signal whose frequency differs from that of the input signal can be found in the specimens with micro-damages. Therefore, the combination of guided wave tomography and nonlinear acoustic response induced by micro-damages could be a feasibility study for imaging micro-damages. In this paper, the nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave tomographic method is investigated to locate and size micro-corrosive defect region in an isotropic solid media. The variations of acoustic nonlinear responses of ultrasonic waves in the specimens with and without defects are used in guided wave tomographic algorithm to construct the images. The comparisons between images obtained by experimental signals and real defect region induced by hydrogen corrosion are presented in this paper. Results show that the images of defect regions with different shape, size and location are successfully obtained by this novel technique, while there is no visualized result constructed by conventional linear ultrasonic tomographic one. The present approach shows a potential for inspecting, locating and imaging micro-defects by nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave tomography. PMID:26552636

  6. Image-guided spine surgery: state of the art and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Shafizadeh, Sven; Rixen, Dieter; Paffrath, Thomas; Bouillon, Bertil; Steinhausen, Eva S.; Baethis, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Navigation technology is a widely available tool in spine surgery and has become a part of clinical routine in many centers. The issue of where and when navigation technology should be used is still an issue of debate. It is the aim of this study to give an overview on the current knowledge concerning the technical capabilities of image-guided approaches and to discuss possible future directions of research and implementation of this technique. Based on a Medline search total of 1,462 publications published until October 2008 were retrieved. The abstracts were scanned manually for relevance to the topics of navigated spine surgery in the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, the lumbar spine, as well as ventral spine surgery, radiation exposure, tumor surgery and cost-effectivity in navigated spine surgery. Papers not contributing to these subjects were deleted resulting in 276 papers that were included in the analysis. Image-guided approaches have been investigated and partially implemented into clinical routine in virtually any field of spine surgery. However, the data available is mostly limited to small clinical series, case reports or retrospective studies. Only two RCTs and one metaanalysis have been retrieved. Concerning the most popular application of image-guided approaches, pedicle screw insertion, the evidence of clinical benefit in the most critical areas, e.g. the thoracic spine, is still lacking. In many other areas of spine surgery, e.g. ventral spine surgery or tumor surgery, image-guided approaches are still in an experimental stage. The technical development of image-guided techniques has reached a high level as the accuracies that can be achieved technically meet the anatomical demands. However, there is evidence that the interaction between the surgeon (‘human factor’) and the navigation system is a source of inaccuracy. It is concluded that more effort needs to be spend to understand this interaction. PMID:19763640

  7. PhotoAcoustic-guided Focused UltraSound imaging (PAFUSion) for reducing reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mithun K.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2015-07-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic reflectors is an important problem in reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging. The light absorbed by skin and superficial optical absorbers may produce high photoacoustic signals, which traverse into the tissue and get reflected from structures having different acoustic impedance. These reflected photoacoustic signals, when reconstructed may appear in the region of interest, which causes complications in interpreting the images. We propose a novel method to identify and reduce reflection artifacts in photoacoustic images by making use of PhotoAcoustic-guided Focused UltraSound [PAFUSion]. Our method ultrasonically mimics the photoacoustic image formation process and thus delivers a clinically feasible way to reduce reflection artifacts. Simulation and phantom measurement results are presented to demonstrate the validity and impact of this method. Results show that PAFUSion technique can identify and differentiate reflection signals from the signals of interest and thus foresees good potential for improving photoacoustic imaging of deep tissue.

  8. Image-Guided Surgery using Invisible Near-Infrared Light: Fundamentals of Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Gioux, Sylvain; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V.

    2011-01-01

    The field of biomedical optics has matured rapidly over the last decade and is poised to make a significant impact on patient care. In particular, wide-field (typically > 5 cm), planar, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has the potential to revolutionize human surgery by providing real-time image guidance to surgeons for tissue that needs to be resected, such as tumors, and tissue that needs to be avoided, such as blood vessels and nerves. However, to become a clinical reality, optimized imaging systems and NIR fluorescent contrast agents will be needed. In this review, we introduce the principles of NIR fluorescence imaging, analyze existing NIR fluorescence imaging systems, and discuss the key parameters that guide contrast agent development. We also introduce the complexities surrounding clinical translation using our experience with the Fluorescence-Assisted Resection and Exploration (FLARE™) imaging system as an example. Finally, we introduce state-of-the-art optical imaging techniques that might someday improve image-guided surgery even further. PMID:20868625

  9. Image guided IMRT dosimetry using anatomy specific MOSFET configurations.

    PubMed

    Amin, Md Nurul; Norrlinger, Bern; Heaton, Robert; Islam, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of using a set of multiple MOSFETs in conjunction with the mobile MOSFET wireless dosimetry system, to perform a comprehensive and efficient quality assurance (QA) of IMRT plans. Anatomy specific MOSFET configurations incorporating 5 MOSFETs have been developed for a specially designed IMRT dosimetry phantom. Kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT) imaging was used to increase the positional precision and accuracy of the detectors and phantom, and so minimize dosimetric uncertainties in high dose gradient regions. The effectiveness of the MOSFET based dose measurements was evaluated by comparing the corresponding doses measured by an ion chamber. For 20 head and neck IMRT plans the agreement between the MOSFET and ionization chamber dose measurements was found to be within -0.26 +/- 0.88% and 0.06 +/- 1.94% (1 sigma) for measurement points in the high dose and low dose respectively. A precision of 1 mm in detector positioning was achieved by using the X-Ray Volume Imaging (XVI) kV CBCT system available with the Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator. Using the anatomy specific MOSFET configurations, simultaneous measurements were made at five strategically located points covering high dose and low dose regions. The agreement between measurements and calculated doses by the treatment planning system for head and neck and prostate IMRT plans was found to be within 0.47 +/- 2.45%. The results indicate that a cylindrical phantom incorporating multiple MOSFET detectors arranged in an anatomy specific configuration, in conjunction with image guidance, can be utilized to perform a comprehensive and efficient quality assurance of IMRT plans. PMID:18716593

  10. SU-E-T-255: Optimized Supine Craniospinal Irradiation with Image-Guided and Field Matched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Z; Holupka, E; Naughton, J; Williams, H; Galper, S; Huang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Conventional craniospinal irradiation (CSI) challenges include dose inhomogeneity at field junctions and position uncertainty due to the field divergence, particular for the two spinal fields. Here we outline a new supine CSI technique to address these difficulties. Methods: Patient was simulated in supine position. The cranial fields had isocenter at C2/C3 vertebral and were matched with 1st spinal field. Their inferior border was chosen to avoid the shoulder, as well as chin from the 1st spine field. Their collimator angles were dependent on asymmetry jaw setting of the 1st spinal field. With couch rotation, the spinal field gantry angles were adjusted to ensure, the inferior border of 1st and superior border of 2nd spinal fields were perpendicular to the table top. The radio-opaque wire position for the spinal junction was located initially by the light field from an anterior setup beam, and was finalized by the portal imaging of the 1st spinal field. With reference to the spinal junction wire, the fields were matched by positioning the isocenter of the 2nd spinal field. A formula was derived to optimize supine CSI treatment planning, by utilizing the relationship among the Yjaw setting, the spinal field gantry angles, cranial field collimator angles, and the spinal field isocenters location. The plan was delivered with portal imaging alignment for the both cranial and spinal junctions. Results: Utilizing this technique with matching beams, and conventional technique such as feathering and forwarding planning, a homogenous dose distribution was achieved throughout the entire CSI treatment volume including the spinal junction. Placing the spinal junction wire visualized in both spinal portals, allows for precise determination and verification of the appropriate match line of the spine fields. Conclusion: This technique of optimization supine CSI achieved a homogenous dose distributions and patient localization accuracy with image-guided and matched beams.

  11. Image-Guided Local Delivery Strategies Enhance Therapeutic Nanoparticle Uptake in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mouli, Samdeep K.; Tyler, Patrick; McDevitt, Joseph L.; Eifler, Aaron C.; Guo, Yang; Nicolai, Jodi; Lewandowski, Robert .J.; Li, Weiguo; Procissi, Daniel; Ryu, Robert K.; Wang, Y. Andrew; Salem, Riad; Larson, Andrew C.; Omary, Reed A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) have emerged as a novel class of therapeutic agents that overcome many of the limitations of current cancer chemotherapeutics. However, a major challenge to many current NP platforms is unfavorable biodistribution, and limited tumor uptake, upon systemic delivery. Delivery, therefore, remains a critical barrier to widespread clinical adoption of NP therapeutics. To overcome these limitations, we have adapted the techniques of image-guided local drug delivery to develop nano-ablation and nano-embolization. Nano-ablation is a tumor ablative strategy that employs image-guided placement of electrodes into tumor tissue to electroporate tumor cells, resulting in rapid influx of NPs that is not dependent on cellular uptake machinery or stage of the cell cycle. Nano-embolization involves the image-guided delivery of NPs and embolic agents directly into the blood supply of tumors. We describe the design and testing of our innovative local delivery strategies using doxorubicin functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (DOX-SPIOs) in cell culture, and the N1S1 hepatoma and VX2 tumor models, imaged by high resolution 7T MRI. We demonstrate that local delivery techniques result in significantly increased intra-tumoral DOX-SPIO uptake, with limited off-target delivery in tumor bearing animal models. The techniques described are versatile enough to be extended to any NP platform, targeting any solid organ malignancy that can be accessed via imaging guidance. PMID:23952712

  12. Real-time three-dimensional Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography video image guided microsurgeries

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Kang; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Cha, Jaepyeong; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Gehlbach, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The authors describe the development of an ultrafast three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system that provides real-time intraoperative video images of the surgical site to assist surgeons during microsurgical procedures. This system is based on a full-range complex conjugate free Fourier-domain OCT (FD-OCT). The system was built in a CPU-GPU heterogeneous computing architecture capable of video OCT image processing. The system displays at a maximum speed of 10  volume/s for an image volume size of 160×80×1024 (X×Y×Z) pixels. We have used this system to visualize and guide two prototypical microsurgical maneuvers: microvascular anastomosis of the rat femoral artery and ultramicrovascular isolation of the retinal arterioles of the bovine retina. Our preliminary experiments using 3D-OCT-guided microvascular anastomosis showed optimal visualization of the rat femoral artery (diameter<0.8  mm), instruments, and suture material. Real-time intraoperative guidance helped facilitate precise suture placement due to optimized views of the vessel wall during anastomosis. Using the bovine retina as a model system, we have performed “ultra microvascular” feasibility studies by guiding handheld surgical micro-instruments to isolate retinal arterioles (diameter∼0.1  mm). Isolation of the microvessels was confirmed by successfully passing a suture beneath the vessel in the 3D imaging environment. PMID:23224164

  13. Image-Guided Percutaneous Splenic Biopsy and Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Sammon, Jennifer; Twomey, Maria; Crush, Lee; Maher, Michael M.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous splenic biopsy and drainage are relatively safe and accurate procedures. The risk of major complication (1.3%) following percutaneous splenic biopsy does not exceed that of other solid intra-abdominal organ biopsies, and it has less morbidity and mortality than splenectomy. Both computed tomography and ultrasound can be used to provide image guidance for biopsy and drainage. The safety profile of fine-needle aspiration cytology is better than core needle biopsy, but core biopsy has superior diagnostic accuracy. PMID:24293803

  14. Image-guided interventions and computer-integrated therapy: Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Peters, Terry M; Linte, Cristian A

    2016-10-01

    Significant efforts have been dedicated to minimizing invasiveness associated with surgical interventions, most of which have been possible thanks to the developments in medical imaging, surgical navigation, visualization and display technologies. Image-guided interventions have promised to dramatically change the way therapies are delivered to many organs. However, in spite of the development of many sophisticated technologies over the past two decades, other than some isolated examples of successful implementations, minimally invasive therapy is far from enjoying the wide acceptance once envisioned. This paper provides a large-scale overview of the state-of-the-art developments, identifies several barriers thought to have hampered the wider adoption of image-guided navigation, and suggests areas of research that may potentially advance the field. PMID:27373146

  15. Prospective Evaluation of Dual-Energy Imaging in Patients Undergoing Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Initial Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sherertz, Tracy; Hoggarth, Mark; Luce, Jason; Block, Alec M.; Nagda, Suneel; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: A prospective feasibility study was conducted to investigate the utility of dual-energy (DE) imaging compared to conventional x-ray imaging for patients undergoing kV-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved feasibility study enrolled patients with lung cancer undergoing IGRT and was initiated in September 2011. During daily setup, 2 sequential respiration-gated x-ray images were obtained using an on-board imager. Imaging was composed of 1 standard x-ray image at 120 kVp (1 mAs) and a second image obtained at 60 kVp (4 mAs). Weighted logarithmic subtraction of the 2 images was performed offline to create a soft tissue-selective DE image. Conventional and DE images were evaluated by measuring relative contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and also by comparing spatial localization, using both approaches. Imaging dose was assessed using a calibrated ion chamber. Results: To date, 10 patients with stage IA to IIIA lung cancer were enrolled and 57 DE images were analyzed. DE subtraction resulted in complete suppression of overlying bone in all 57 DE images, with an average improvement in relative contrast of 4.7 ± 3.3 over that of 120 kVp x-ray images (P<.0002). The improvement in relative contrast with DE imaging was seen for both smaller (gross tumor volume [GTV] ≤5 cc) and larger tumors (GTV >5 cc), with average relative contrast improvement ratios of 3.4 ± 4.1 and 5.4 ± 3.6, respectively. Moreover, the GTV was reliably localized in 95% of the DE images versus 74% of the single energy (SE images, (P=.004). Mean skin dose per DE image set was 0.44 ± 0.03 mGy versus 0.43 ± 0.03 mGy, using conventional kV imaging parameters. Conclusions: Initial results of this feasibility study suggest that DE thoracic imaging may enhance tumor localization in lung cancer patients receiving kV-based IGRT without increasing imaging dose.

  16. Image-guided percutaneous needle biopsy in cancer diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjay; Madoff, David C

    2007-06-01

    Image-guided percutaneous biopsy is a well-established and safe technique and plays a crucial role in management of cancer patients. Improvements in needle designs, development of new biopsy techniques, and continual advances in image-guidance technology have improved the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Lesions previously considered relatively inaccessible can now be safely biopsied. In this article, we review the various needle types, biopsy techniques, methods of safely assessing difficult-to-reach lesions, the advantages and disadvantages of various imaging modalities, and specific biopsy techniques applicable to different regions of the body. PMID:18070687

  17. Imaging performance analysis of adaptive optical telescopes using laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Welsh, B M

    1991-12-01

    The use of laser guide stars in conjunction with adaptive optical telescopes offers the possibility of nearly diffraction-limited imaging performance from large, ground-based telescopes. We investigate the expected imaging performance of an adaptive telescope, using laser guide stars created in the mesospheric sodium (Na) layer. A 2-3-m class telescope is analyzed for the case of a single, on-axis guide star at an altitude of 92 km (the nominal height of the mesospheric Na layer). We analyze an annular telescope pupil with approximately 15 wave-front sensor subapertures and mirror actuators spanning the pupil diameter. The imaging performance is quantified in terms of the pupil-averaged rms wave-front error, the optical transfer function, the point spread function, the Strehl ratio, and finally the angular resolution. The performance analysis takes into account the degradation caused by the limitation of the wave-front sensor as well as the deformable mirror. These limitations include the finite spacing and size of the wave-front sensor subapertures and the spacing and influence function of the mirror actuators. The effects of anisoplanatism and shot noise are also included in the analysis. The results of the investigation indicate that a 3-m adaptive telescope using a single Na guide star is capable of achieving a Strehl ratio of 0.57 and an angular resolution nearly matching that of diffraction-limited performance (0.05 arcsec). This performance is achieved assuming that r(0) = 20 cm and a 5-W laser is used to create the guide star. The effect of variations in seeing conditions and guide star brightness is also investigated. PMID:20717316

  18. The image-guided surgery toolkit IGSTK: an open source C++ software toolkit.

    PubMed

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Cheng, Patrick; Gary, Kevin; Ibanez, Luis; Gobbi, David; Lindseth, Frank; Yaniv, Ziv; Aylward, Stephen; Jomier, Julien; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the image-guided surgery toolkit (IGSTK). IGSTK is an open source C++ software library that provides the basic components needed to develop image-guided surgery applications. It is intended for fast prototyping and development of image-guided surgery applications. The toolkit was developed through a collaboration between academic and industry partners. Because IGSTK was designed for safety-critical applications, the development team has adopted lightweight software processes that emphasizes safety and robustness while, at the same time, supporting geographically separated developers. A software process that is philosophically similar to agile software methods was adopted emphasizing iterative, incremental, and test-driven development principles. The guiding principle in the architecture design of IGSTK is patient safety. The IGSTK team implemented a component-based architecture and used state machine software design methodologies to improve the reliability and safety of the components. Every IGSTK component has a well-defined set of features that are governed by state machines. The state machine ensures that the component is always in a valid state and that all state transitions are valid and meaningful. Realizing that the continued success and viability of an open source toolkit depends on a strong user community, the IGSTK team is following several key strategies to build an active user community. These include maintaining a users and developers' mailing list, providing documentation (application programming interface reference document and book), presenting demonstration applications, and delivering tutorial sessions at relevant scientific conferences. PMID:17703338

  19. Cone-Beam CT with a Flat-Panel Detector: From Image Science to Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel x-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions - for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck / skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  20. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  1. Cone-Beam CT with a Flat-Panel Detector: From Image Science to Image-Guided Surgery.

    PubMed

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel x-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions - for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck / skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  2. Near-IR Image-Guided Laser Ablation of Demineralization on Tooth Occlusal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies have shown that reflectance images at near-IR wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption are well-suited for image-guided laser ablation of carious lesions since the contrast between sound and demineralized enamel is extremely high and interference from stains is minimized. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that near-IR reflectance images taken at a wavelength range of 1,500–1,700 nm can be used to guide a 9.3 μm CO2 laser for the selective ablation of early demineralization on tooth occlusal surfaces. Methods The occlusal surfaces of ten sound human molars were used in this in vitro study. Shallow simulated caries lesions with random patterns and varying depth and position were produced on tooth occlusal surfaces. Sequential near-IR reflectance images at 1,500–1,700 nm were used to guide the laser for the selective removal of the demineralized enamel. Digital microscopy and polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) were used to assess selectivity. Results Images taken before and after lesion removal suggest that the demineralized areas were removed with high selectivity. Although the estimated volume of tissue ablated was typically higher than the initial lesion volume measured with PS-OCT, the volume of enamel removed by the laser correlated well with the initial lesion volume. Conclusion Sequential near-IR reflectance images at 1,500–1,700 nm can be used to guide a 9.3 μm CO2 laser for the selective ablation of early demineralization on tooth occlusal surfaces. PMID:26763111

  3. Pharmacodynamic imaging guides dosing of a selective estrogen receptor degrader

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Pedram; Deng, Francis; Esfahani, Shadi A.; Leece, Alicia K.; Shoup, Timothy M.; Vasdev, Neil; Mahmood, Umar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Estrogen receptor (ER) targeting is key in management of receptor-positive breast cancer (BrCa). Currently, there are no methods to optimize anti-ER therapy dosing. This study assesses the utility of 16α-18F-fluoroestradiol (18F-FES) PET for fulvestrant dose optimization in a preclinical ER+ BrCa model. Experimental Design In vitro, 18F-FES retention was compared to ERα protein expression (ELISA) and ESR1 mRNA transcription (qPCR) in MCF7 cells (ER+) after treatment with different fulvestrant doses. MCF7 xenografts were grown in ovariectomized nude mice and assigned to vehicle, low- (0.05mg), medium- (0.5mg) or high-dose (5mg) fulvestrant treatment groups (5–7 per group). Two and three days after fulvestrant treatment, PET/CT was performed using 18F-FES and 18F-FDG, respectively. ER expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and qPCR on xenografts. Tumor proliferation was assessed using Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Results In vitro, we observed a parallel graded reduction in 18F-FES uptake and ER expression with increased fulvestrant doses, despite enhancement of ER mRNA transcription. In xenografts, ER expression significantly decreased with increased fulvestrant dose, despite similar mRNA expression and Ki-67 staining among the treatment groups. We observed a significant dose-dependent reduction of 18F-FES PET mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) with fulvestrant treatment, but no significant difference among the treatment groups in 18F-FDG PET SUVmean.. Conclusion We demonstrated that 18F-FES uptake mirrors the dose-dependent changes in functional ER expression with fulvestrant resulting in ER degradation and/or blockade; these precede changes in tumor metabolism and proliferation. Quantitative 18F-FES PET may be useful for tracking early efficacy of ER blockade/degradation and guiding ER-targeted therapy dosing in BrCa patients. PMID:25609068

  4. Current Brachytherapy Quality Assurance Guidance: Does It Meet the Challenges of Emerging Image-Guided Technologies?

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2008-05-01

    In the past decade, brachytherapy has shifted from the traditional surgical paradigm to more modern three-dimensional image-based planning and delivery approaches. The role of intraoperative and multimodality image-based planning is growing. Published American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American College of Radiology, European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and International Atomic Energy Agency quality assurance (QA) guidelines largely emphasize the QA of planning and delivery devices rather than processes. These protocols have been designed to verify compliance with major performance specifications and are not risk based. With some exceptions, complete and clinically practical guidance exists for sources, QA instrumentation, non-image-based planning systems, applicators, remote afterloading systems, dosimetry, and calibration. Updated guidance is needed for intraoperative imaging systems and image-based planning systems. For non-image-based brachytherapy, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group reports 56 and 59 provide reasonable guidance on procedure-specific process flow and QA. However, improved guidance is needed even for established procedures such as ultrasound-guided prostate implants. Adaptive replanning in brachytherapy faces unsolved problems similar to that of image-guided adaptive external beam radiotherapy.

  5. Tailored Near-Infrared Contrast Agents for Image Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Njiojob, Costyl N.; Owens, Eric A.; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    The success of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence to be employed for intraoperative imaging relies on the ability to develop a highly stable, NIR fluorescent, nontoxic, biocompatible, and highly excreted compound that retains a reactive functionality for conjugation to a cancer-recognizing peptide. Herein, systematic modifications to previously detailed fluorophore ZW800-1 are explored. Specific modifications, including the isosteric replacement of the O atom of ZW800-1, include nucleophilic amine and sulfur species attached to the heptamethine core. These novel compounds have shown similar satisfactory results in biodistribution and clearance while also expressing increased stability in serum. Most importantly, all of the synthesized and evaluated compounds display a reactive functionality (either a free amino group or carboxylic acid moiety) for further bioconjugation. The results obtained from the newly prepared derivatives demonstrate that the central substitution with the studied linking agents retains the ultralow background in vivo performance of the fluorophores regardless of the total net charge. PMID:25711712

  6. Robotically-adjustable microstereotactic frames for image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratchman, Louis B.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2013-03-01

    Stereotactic frames are a standard tool for neurosurgical targeting, but are uncomfortable for patients and obstruct the surgical field. Microstereotactic frames are more comfortable for patients, provide better access to the surgical site, and have grown in popularity as an alternative to traditional stereotactic devices. However, clinically available microstereotactic frames require either lengthy manufacturing delays or expensive image guidance systems. We introduce a robotically-adjusted, disposable microstereotactic frame for deep brain stimulation surgery that eliminates the drawbacks of existing microstereotactic frames. Our frame can be automatically adjusted in the operating room using a preoperative plan in less than five minutes. A validation study on phantoms shows that our approach provides a target positioning error of 0.14 mm, which exceeds the required accuracy for deep brain stimulation surgery.

  7. Image-Guided Percutaneous Ablation of Hepatic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Gretchen

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a common site of primary and secondary malignancies, often resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Evaluating these patients in a multidisciplinary setting allows for optimal utilization of all oncologic therapies including surgery, radiation, systemic chemotherapy, transarterial therapies, and ablation. While surgical intervention often provides the best outcomes when treating most hepatic tumors, many patients are not surgical candidates due to extensive tumor burden, underlying liver disease, or other comorbid conditions. The evolution of imaging and ablation devices has allowed for the increased utilization of percutaneous ablation as definitive and palliative treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic malignancies. Ablation induces tumor necrosis by injection of chemicals (chemical ablation) or temperature modification (thermal ablation). The goal of this review is to provide an overview of different ablation techniques commonly used for hepatic malignancies, discuss the oncologic outcomes of these interventions, and outline the current indications, contraindications, and reported complications of these therapies. PMID:25071304

  8. Image guided audit of surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, N D; Cook, M J; Shorvon, S D; Fish, D R; Thomas, D G

    1994-01-01

    Studies on surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy are hampered by lack of information about the actual surgery that has taken place. A method is described for accurately measuring the volumes of resection by MRI after surgery. Ten cases of surgically treated temporal lobe epilepsy (nine non-tailored resections, one selective amygdalohippocampectomy) are presented to show the technique. Indices of extent of resection in both the mesiobasal and lateral temporal lobe compartments have been measured, compared, and evaluated. By comparison with identical preoperative volumetric MRI the hippocampal resections have been correlated with the demonstrated hippocampal volume loss, thought to be of relevance in the aetiology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Detailed postoperative audit in this manner is vital in providing a rational basis for follow up studies of outcome. Images PMID:7931384

  9. Dosimetric evaluation of the OneDose MOSFET for measuring kilovoltage imaging dose from image-guided radiotherapy procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a single-use dosimeter, OneDose MOSFET designed for in vivo patient dosimetry, for measuring the radiation dose from kilovoltage (kV) x rays resulting from image-guided procedures. Methods: The OneDose MOSFET dosimeters were precalibrated by the manufacturer using Co-60 beams. Their energy response and characteristics for kV x rays were investigated by using an ionization chamber, in which the air-kerma calibration factors were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (ADCL). The dosimetric properties have been tested for typical kV beams used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Results: The direct dose reading from the OneDose system needs to be multiplied by a correction factor ranging from 0.30 to 0.35 for kilovoltage x rays ranging from 50 to 125 kVp, respectively. In addition to energy response, the OneDose dosimeter has up to a 20% reduced sensitivity for beams (70-125 kVp) incident from the back of the OneDose detector. Conclusions: The uncertainty in measuring dose resulting from a kilovoltage beam used in IGRT is approximately 20%; this uncertainty is mainly due to the sensitivity dependence of the incident beam direction relative to the OneDose detector. The ease of use may allow the dosimeter to be suitable for estimating the dose resulting from image-guided procedures.

  10. Progressive cone beam CT dose control in image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hao; Cervino, Laura; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia Xun; Zhen Xin

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) offers a tremendous advantage for treatment guidance. The associated imaging dose is a clinical concern. One unique feature of CBCT-based IGRT is that the same patient is repeatedly scanned during a treatment course, and the contents of CBCT images at different fractions are similar. The authors propose a progressive dose control (PDC) scheme to utilize this temporal correlation for imaging dose reduction. Methods: A dynamic CBCT scan protocol, as opposed to the static one in the current clinical practice, is proposed to gradually reduce the imaging dose in each treatment fraction. The CBCT image from each fraction is processed by a prior-image based nonlocal means (PINLM) module to enhance its quality. The increasing amount of prior information from previous CBCT images prevents degradation of image quality due to the reduced imaging dose. Two proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted using measured phantom data and Monte Carlo simulated patient data with deformation. Results: In the measured phantom case, utilizing a prior image acquired at 0.4 mAs, PINLM is able to improve the image quality of a CBCT acquired at 0.2 mAs by reducing the noise level from 34.95 to 12.45 HU. In the synthetic patient case, acceptable image quality is maintained at four consecutive fractions with gradually decreasing exposure levels of 0.4, 0.1, 0.07, and 0.05 mAs. When compared with the standard low-dose protocol of 0.4 mAs for each fraction, an overall imaging dose reduction of more than 60% is achieved. Conclusions: PINLM-PDC is able to reduce CBCT imaging dose in IGRT utilizing the temporal correlations among the sequence of CBCT images while maintaining the quality.

  11. Algorithm-enabled exploration of image-quality potential of cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Sidky, Emil Y.; Bian, Junguo; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-06-01

    Kilo-voltage (KV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit mounted onto a linear accelerator treatment system, often referred to as on-board imager (OBI), plays an increasingly important role in image-guided radiation therapy. While the FDK algorithm is currently used for reconstructing images from clinical OBI data, optimization-based reconstruction has also been investigated for OBI CBCT. An optimization-based reconstruction involves numerous parameters, which can significantly impact reconstruction properties (or utility). The success of an optimization-based reconstruction for a particular class of practical applications thus relies strongly on appropriate selection of parameter values. In the work, we focus on tailoring the constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction, an optimization-based reconstruction previously shown of some potential for CBCT imaging conditions of practical interest, to OBI imaging through appropriate selection of parameter values. In particular, for given real data of phantoms and patient collected with OBI CBCT, we first devise utility metrics specific to OBI-quality-assurance tasks and then apply them to guiding the selection of parameter values in constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction. The study results show that the reconstructions are with improvement, relative to clinical FDK reconstruction, in both visualization and quantitative assessments in terms of the devised utility metrics.

  12. In vivo 808 nm image-guided photodynamic therapy based on an upconversion theranostic nanoplatform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Que, Ivo; Kong, Xianggui; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Chang, Yulei; Wang, Tong Tong; Chan, Alan; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; Zhang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    A new strategy for efficient in vivo image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated utilizing a ligand-exchange constructed upconversion-C60 nanophotosensitizer. This theranostic platform is superior to the currently reported nanophotosensitizers in (i) directly bonding photosensitizer C60 to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) by a smart ligand-exchange strategy, which greatly shortened the energy transfer distance and enhanced the 1O2 production, resulting in the improvement of the therapeutic effect; (ii) realizing in vivo NIR 808 nm image-guided PDT with both excitation (980 nm) and emission (808 nm) light falling in the biological window of tissues, which minimized auto-fluorescence, reduced light scatting and improved the imaging contrast and depth, and thus guaranteed noninvasive diagnostic accuracy. In vivo and ex vivo tests demonstrated its favorable bio-distribution, tumor-selectivity and high therapeutic efficacy. Owing to the effective ligand exchange strategy and the excellent intrinsic photophysical properties of C60, 1O2 production yield was improved, suggesting that a low 980 nm irradiation dosage (351 J cm-2) and a short treatment time (15 min) were sufficient to perform NIR (980 nm) to NIR (808 nm) image-guided PDT. Our work enriches the understanding of UCNP-based PDT nanophotosensitizers and highlights their potential use in future NIR image-guided noninvasive deep cancer therapy.A new strategy for efficient in vivo image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated utilizing a ligand-exchange constructed upconversion-C60 nanophotosensitizer. This theranostic platform is superior to the currently reported nanophotosensitizers in (i) directly bonding photosensitizer C60 to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) by a smart ligand-exchange strategy, which greatly shortened the energy transfer distance and enhanced the 1O2 production, resulting in the improvement of the therapeutic effect; (ii

  13. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  14. User-guided segmentation for volumetric retinal optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xin; Chao, Jennifer R.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Despite the existence of automatic segmentation techniques, trained graders still rely on manual segmentation to provide retinal layers and features from clinical optical coherence tomography (OCT) images for accurate measurements. To bridge the gap between this time-consuming need of manual segmentation and currently available automatic segmentation techniques, this paper proposes a user-guided segmentation method to perform the segmentation of retinal layers and features in OCT images. With this method, by interactively navigating three-dimensional (3-D) OCT images, the user first manually defines user-defined (or sketched) lines at regions where the retinal layers appear very irregular for which the automatic segmentation method often fails to provide satisfactory results. The algorithm is then guided by these sketched lines to trace the entire 3-D retinal layer and anatomical features by the use of novel layer and edge detectors that are based on robust likelihood estimation. The layer and edge boundaries are finally obtained to achieve segmentation. Segmentation of retinal layers in mouse and human OCT images demonstrates the reliability and efficiency of the proposed user-guided segmentation method. PMID:25147962

  15. Polydopamine Nanoparticles as a Versatile Molecular Loading Platform to Enable Imaging-guided Cancer Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Gao, Min; Zhu, Wenwen; Sun, Xiaoqi; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer combination therapy to treat tumors with different therapeutic approaches can efficiently improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Herein, we develop a theranostic nano-platform based on polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, which then are exploited as a versatile carrier to allow simultaneous loading of indocyanine green (ICG), doxorubicin (DOX) and manganese ions (PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn)), to enable imaging-guided chemo & photothermal cancer therapy. In this system, ICG acts as a photothermal agent, which shows red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and enhanced photostability compared with free ICG. DOX, a model chemotherapy drug, is then loaded onto the surface of PDA-ICG-PEG with high efficiency. With Mn2+ ions intrinsically chelated, PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn) is able to offer contrast under T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In a mouse tumor model, the MR imaging-guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy achieves a remarkable synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the respective single treatment modality. This work demonstrates that PDA nanoparticles could serve as a versatile molecular loading platform for MR imaging guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy with minimal side effects, showing great potential for cancer theranostics. PMID:27217836

  16. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  17. Image-guided focused ultrasound ablation of breast cancer: current status, challenges, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, A. C.; Gianfelice, D.; Daniel, B. L.; Mali, W. P. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    Image-guided focussed ultrasound (FUS) ablation is a non-invasive procedure that has been used for treatment of benign or malignant breast tumours. Image-guidance during ablation is achieved either by using real-time ultrasound (US) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The past decade phase I studies have proven MRI-guided and US-guided FUS ablation of breast cancer to be technically feasible and safe. We provide an overview of studies assessing the efficacy of FUS for breast tumour ablation as measured by percentages of complete tumour necrosis. Successful ablation ranged from 20% to 100%, depending on FUS system type, imaging technique, ablation protocol, and patient selection. Specific issues related to FUS ablation of breast cancer, such as increased treatment time for larger tumours, size of ablation margins, methods used for margin assessment and residual tumour detection after FUS ablation, and impact of FUS ablation on sentinel node procedure are presented. Finally, potential future applications of FUS for breast cancer treatment such as FUS-induced anti-tumour immune response, FUS-mediated gene transfer, and enhanced drug delivery are discussed. Currently, breast-conserving surgery remains the gold standard for breast cancer treatment. PMID:18351348

  18. Image-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of ovarian tumors: An assessment of diagnostic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ghazala; Maheshwari, Veena; Afzal, Sheerin; Ansari, Hena A; Ansari, Maryem

    2010-01-01

    Background: Image-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of ovarian lumps is being increasingly used for the successful diagnosis of ovarian tumors, although borderline cases may be difficult to diagnose by this method. Aim: To demonstrate the efficacy of image-guided FNAC in diagnosing ovarian tumors (benign and malignant) and to evaluate the usefulness of cytology as a mode of easy and rapid diagnosis of ovarian lumps. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 42 female patients. Clinical evaluation and relevant investigations were carried out. Diagnosis was established by FNAC performed under image guidance (ultrasonography/computed tomography). The cytological diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination. Results: Cytological diagnosis was rendered on all the 42 ovarian lesions, with a correct diagnosis in 34 cases, resulting in a diagnostic accuracy of 80.9%. Most of the cases with discordant diagnoses were surface epithelial tumors of low malignant potential and required histopathological examination for a final diagnosis. Conclusions: Image-guided FNAC is an inexpensive, rapid and fairly accurate procedure for the diagnosis of ovarian lesions. It provides a safe alternative to the more expensive, time consuming and cumbersome surgical route to diagnosis. PMID:21187883

  19. Radial Scar at Image-guided Needle Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Niamh; D’Arcy, Clare; Kaplan, Jennifer B.; Bowser, Zenica L.; Cordero, Anibal; Brogi, Edi; Corben, Adriana D.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal management of a lesion yielding radial scar (RS) without epithelial atypia on breast biopsy is controversial. In this single-institution study spanning 17 years, 53 patients with this biopsy diagnosis were evaluated in terms of clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features and outcomes. RSs were categorized as either “incidental” or as the “targeted” lesion according to defined criteria. Of 48 patients who underwent surgical excision after a diagnosis of RS on biopsy, only 1 had an “upgrade” diagnosis of malignancy (2%). No “incidental” RS was associated with the presence of malignancy on surgical excision. Meta-analysis of 20 RS excision studies demonstrated an overall upgrade rate of 10.4%, with a higher rate in patients with a diagnosis of RS with atypia (26%). The upgrade rate for RS without atypia was 7.5% overall. The lower rate of upgrade to malignancy in this study (2%) is likely related to the thorough radiologic-pathologic review undertaken. In the setting of multidisciplinary agreement and careful radiologic-pathologic correlation, it may be appropriate for patients with a biopsy diagnosis of RS without atypia to forego surgical excision in favor of imaging follow-up. PMID:25634748

  20. A study on laser-based ultrasonic technique by the use of guided wave tomographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Junpil Lim, Juyoung; Cho, Younho; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2015-03-31

    Guided wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and coarse surfaces or geometrically complicated features. A non-contact setup with a laser ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is the classic attractive for guided wave inspection. The present work was done to develop a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique by laser ultrasonic technique in a plate-like structure. A method for Lam wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulse laser ultrasonic transmitter and a Michelson interferometer receiver has been developed. In the images obtained by laser scanning, the defect shape and area showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact-based online inspection and monitoring technique.

  1. Image-guided bronchoscopy for histopathologic diagnosis of pure ground glass opacity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Christine; Izumo, Takehiro; Nakamura, Yukiko; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchida, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Guided bronchoscopy has been found to be useful for the diagnosis of solid peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPLs) but more evidence on ground glass opacities (GGOs), especially those without a solid component, are lacking. A 69-year-old male, asymptomatic, heavy smoker was referred to our department for non-surgical diagnosis of a focal pure GGO in the right upper lobe that was found incidentally on computed tomography (CT). Transbronchial biopsy (TBB) with the aide of endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath (EBUS-GS), virtual bronchoscopic navigation (VBN), and fluoroscopy was performed for sampling. There were no complications after the procedure. The diagnosis of adenocarcinoma with lepidic growth pattern was established from the fourth and fifth TBB specimens and was confirmed on subsequent surgical resection. Image-guided bronchoscopy with TBB was successful for the diagnosis of a pure GGO. Use of a larger biopsy device may be helpful for the histopathologic diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma with lepidic growth. PMID:24977033

  2. Image-guided bronchoscopy for histopathologic diagnosis of pure ground glass opacity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Christine; Sasada, Shinji; Izumo, Takehiro; Nakamura, Yukiko; Tsuta, Koji; Tsuchida, Takaaki

    2014-06-01

    Guided bronchoscopy has been found to be useful for the diagnosis of solid peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPLs) but more evidence on ground glass opacities (GGOs), especially those without a solid component, are lacking. A 69-year-old male, asymptomatic, heavy smoker was referred to our department for non-surgical diagnosis of a focal pure GGO in the right upper lobe that was found incidentally on computed tomography (CT). Transbronchial biopsy (TBB) with the aide of endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath (EBUS-GS), virtual bronchoscopic navigation (VBN), and fluoroscopy was performed for sampling. There were no complications after the procedure. The diagnosis of adenocarcinoma with lepidic growth pattern was established from the fourth and fifth TBB specimens and was confirmed on subsequent surgical resection. Image-guided bronchoscopy with TBB was successful for the diagnosis of a pure GGO. Use of a larger biopsy device may be helpful for the histopathologic diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma with lepidic growth. PMID:24977033

  3. Radio Tomography and Imaging of Ionospheric Disturbances Caused by Active Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav; Padokhin, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Tereshchenko, Evgeny; Nesterov, Ivan; Vladimir Frolov, S.

    We present the results of the radiotomographic imaging of the artificial ionospheric disturbances obtained in the experiments on the modification of the midlatitude ionosphere by powerful HF radiowaves carried out during last decade at the Sura heating facility. The experiments were conducted using both O- and X- mode radiowaves at frequencies lower than critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer both in daytime and nighttime ionosphere. Various schemes of the radiation of the heating wave were used including square wave modulation of the effective radiated power (ERP) at various frequencies and power stepping. Radio transmissions of the low- (Parus/Tsikada) and high-orbital (GPS/GLONASS) navigational satellites received at the mobile network of receiving sites were used for the remote sensing of the heated area of the ionosphere. We study the variations in TEC caused by HF heating showing that the GNSS TEC spectra often contain frequency components corresponding to the modulation periods of the ERP of the heating wave. The manifestations of the heating-induced variations in TEC are most prominent in the area of magnetic zenith of the pumping wave. In this work we also present the radiotomographic reconstructions of the spatial structure of the disturbed area of the ionosphere corresponding to the directivity pattern of the heater as well as the spatial structure of the wave-like disturbances, which are possibly AGWs, diverging from the heated area of the ionosphere. We also compare the effects obsereved during artificial heating experiments with those obsereved during rocket launches and powerful industiral explosions. The possibility of generation of electromagnetic waves by moving wave-like structures in ionosphere (like AGWs induced by HF-heating observed in our experiments) is also addressed in this work. The authors acknowledge the support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants № 13-05-01122, 14-05-31445, 14-05-00855, 14-05-10069), grants

  4. Voxel-based 2-D/3-D registration of fluoroscopy images and CT scans for image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Weese, J; Penney, G P; Desmedt, P; Buzug, T M; Hill, D L; Hawkes, D J

    1997-12-01

    Registration of intraoperative fluoroscopy images with preoperative three-dimensional (3-D) CT images can be used for several purposes in image-guided surgery. On the one hand, it can be used to display the position of surgical instruments, which are being tracked by a localizer, in the preoperative CT scan. On the other hand, the registration result can be used to project preoperative planning information or important anatomical structures visible in the CT image onto the fluoroscopy image. For this registration task, a novel voxel-based method in combination with a new similarity measure (pattern intensity) has been developed. The basic concept of the method is explained at the example of two-dimensional (2-D)/3-D registration of a vertebra in an X-ray fluoroscopy image with a 3-D CT image. The registration method is described, and the results for a spine phantom are presented and discussed. Registration has been carried out repeatedly with different starting estimates to study the capture range. Information about registration accuracy has been obtained by comparing the registration results with a highly accurate "ground-truth" registration, which has been derived from fiducial markers attached to the phantom prior to imaging. In addition, registration results for different vertebrae have been compared. The results show that the rotation parameters and the shifts parallel to the projection plane can accurately be determined from a single projection. Because of the projection geometry, the accuracy of the height above the projection plane is significantly lower. PMID:11020832

  5. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. This paper was presented at RSNA 2013 and was carried out at Kanazawa University, JAPAN.

  6. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-21

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks. PMID:27008208

  7. Multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image guided treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. D.; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Mujat, Mircea; Husain, Deeba

    2009-02-01

    Subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNM) are a deleterious complication of laser eye injury and retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroiditis, and myopic retinopathy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs are approved treatment methods. PDT acts by selective dye accumulation, activation by laser light, and disruption and clotting of the new leaky vessels. However, PDT surgery is currently not image-guided, nor does it proceed in an efficient or automated manner. This may contribute to the high rate of re-treatment. We have developed a multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) for automated diagnosis and image-guided treatment of SRNMs associated with AMD. The system combines line scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (LSLO), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), PDT laser delivery, and retinal tracking in a compact, efficient platform. This paper describes the system hardware and software design, performance characterization, and automated patient imaging and treatment session procedures and algorithms. Also, we present initial imaging and tracking measurements on normal subjects and automated lesion demarcation and sizing analysis of previously acquired angiograms. Future pre-clinical testing includes line scanning angiography and PDT treatment of AMD subjects. The automated acquisition procedure, enhanced and expedited data post-processing, and innovative image visualization and interpretation tools provided by the multimodal retinal imager may eventually aid in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of AMD and other retinal diseases.

  8. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  9. A novel spatially adaptive guide-filter total variation (SAGFTV) regularization for image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hao; Li, Qian; Huang, Zhenghua

    2015-12-01

    Denoising algorithms based on gradient dependent energy functionals, such as Perona-Malik, total variation and adaptive total variation denoising, modify images towards piecewise constant functions. Although edge sharpness and location is well preserved, important information, encoded in image features like textures or certain details, is often compromised in the process of denoising. In this paper, We propose a novel Spatially Adaptive Guide-Filtering Total Variation (SAGFTV) regularization with image restoration algorithm for denoising images. The guide-filter is extended to the variational formulations of imaging problem, and the spatially adaptive operator can easily distinguish flat areas from texture areas. Our simulating experiments show the improvement of peak signal noise ratio (PSNR), root mean square error (RMSE) and structure similarity increment measurement (SSIM) over other prior algorithms. The results of both simulating and practical experiments are more appealing visually. This type of processing can be used for a variety of tasks in PDE-based image processing and computer vision, and is stable and meaningful from a mathematical viewpoint.

  10. Laser active imaging-guided anti-tank missile system small-scale integration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mingliang; Shan, Xiangqian; Qu, Zhou

    2010-10-01

    At present, the domestic and international third-generation anti-tank missiles, laser-guided missiles are mostly divided into active laser-guided and laser semi-active guidance, this guidance system, there are vulnerable to electronic interference, can not be fully realized after launching deficiencies. Article based on this, an in-depth understanding of imaging-guided laser-active working principle, based on the pairs of third-generation anti-tank missile guidance system, boldly proposed to improve the anti-tank missiles, laser-active small-scale integration of imaging guidance system design, the main purpose is to improve a certain type of The optical target missile, TV angle measurement, laser-guided instruction transmission means, so that anti-tank missiles to achieve forward-looking, the next obstacle avoidance TV and multi-functional integration of the entire after launching smart missiles, and in theory be able to study the new antitank missiles play a certain reference.

  11. NOTE: Practical aspects of MR imaging in the presence of conductive guide wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Natalie; Shmatukha, Andriy; Asmah, Peter; Stainsby, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Various aspects of RF-induced heating of guide wires during their MRI guidance have been investigated in the past. However, the previous works focused on inducing tip heating in either fully immersed or tip-immersed (and otherwise free) wires of impractical lengths in small phantoms. This study simulates real clinical conditions using a product guide wire and a same-length conductive wire partially inserted into a torso-size phantom filled with saline solution. The purpose was to identify potential safety concerns relevant to real clinical applications, as opposed to identifying the worst-case heating scenario. Significant heating occurred at the insertion point, independent of tip heating, with a strong correlation with excitation frequency-dependent imaging parameters. Heat transfer through the wire was also demonstrated to be a safety concern. From these experiments, we have been able to demonstrate additional impacting factors that increase the complexity of safety considerations for the use of conductive guide wires during MR imaging. Safety under a particular set of conditions does not imply safety in all possible conditions that can be encountered during real MRI-guided interventions. This work was presented in part at the 17th Annual ISMRM Scientific Meeting and Exhibition (Honolulu, HI, 18-24 April 2009).

  12. NICMOS Imaging of the Dusty Microjansky Radio Source VLA J123642+621331 at z = 4.424.

    PubMed

    Waddington; Windhorst; Cohen; Partridge; Spinrad; Stern

    1999-12-01

    We present the discovery of a radio galaxy at a likely redshift of z=4.424 in one of the flanking fields of the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). Radio observations with the Very Large Array and MERLIN centered on the HDF yielded a complete sample of microjansky radio sources, of which about 20% have no optical counterpart to Iimages in the F110W (J110) and F160W (H160) filters. VLA J123642+621331 has a single emission line at 6595 Å, which we identify with Lyalpha at z=4.424. We argue that this faint (H160=23.9 mag), compact (re approximately 0&farcs;2), red (I814-K=2.0) object is most likely a dusty, star-forming galaxy with an embedded active nucleus. PMID:10550282

  13. MR Imaging-Guided Partial Volume Correction of PET Data in PET/MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Dickson, John; Arridge, Simon; Atkinson, David; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hutton, Brian F

    2016-04-01

    Partial volume effects are caused by the limited spatial resolution of the PET system. There is increasing evidence that partial volume correction (PVC) is necessary to guarantee quantitative accuracy in PET; however, there is reluctance to apply PVC routinely in clinical practice, partly because of uncertainty regarding the method of choice. To perform accurate PVC, it is necessary to introduce information from high-resolution anatomic images, such as MR imaging. All the methods rely on accurate coregistration between the anatomic image and the PET image. PET/MR imaging offers clear advantages for PVC and can help alleviate the image registration issues. PMID:26952729

  14. Guided waves based diagnostic imaging of circumferential cracks in small-diameter pipe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kehai; Wu, Zhanjun; Jiang, Youqiang; Wang, Yishou; Zhou, Kai; Chen, Yingpu

    2016-02-01

    To improve the safety and reliability of pipeline structures, much work has been done using ultrasonic guided waves methods for pipe inspection. Though good for evaluating the defects in the pipes, most of the methods lack the capability to precisely identify the defects in the pipe features like welds or supports. Therefore, a novel guided wave based cross-sectional diagnostic imaging algorithm was developed to improve the ability of circumferential cracks identification in the pipe features. To ensure the accuracy of the imaging, an angular profile-based frequency selection method is presented. As validation, the approach was employed to identify the presence and location of a small circumferential crack with 1.13% cross sectional area (CSA) in the welding zone of a 48 mm diameter type 304 stainless steel pipe. Accurate identification results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed approach. PMID:26548527

  15. A computer-controlled pump and realistic anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for validating image-guided systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ralph; Wilson, Emmanuel; Tang, Jonathan; Stoianovici, Dan; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    The development of image-guided interventions requires validation studies to evaluate new protocols. So far, these validation studies have been limited to animal models and to software and physical phantoms that simulate respiratory motion but cannot accommodate needle punctures in a realistic manner. We have built a computer-controlled pump that drives an anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for simulating natural breathing patterns. This pump consists of a power supply, a motion controller with servo amplifier, linear actuator, and custom fabricated pump assembly. By generating several sample waveforms, we were able to simulate typical breathing patterns. Using this pump, we were able to produce chest wall movements similar to typical chest wall movements observed in humans. This system has potential applications for evaluating new respiratory compensation algorithms and may facilitate improved testing of image-guided protocols under realistic interventional conditions.

  16. The chemistry of acrylic bone cements and implications for clinical use in image-guided therapy.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, David A; Gailloud, Philippe; Murphy, Kieran

    2004-02-01

    Advances in image-guided therapy for vertebral fractures and other bone-related disorders have made acrylic bone cement an integral part of the interventional armamentarium. Unfortunately, information on the properties and chemistry of these compounds is mostly published in the biomaterial sciences literature, a source with which the interventional community is generally unfamiliar. This review focuses on the chemistry of bone cement polymerization and the properties of components in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based polymers, the most commonly used bone cements in interventional procedures such as percutaneous vertebroplasty. The effects of altering the concentration of components such as methylmethacrylate monomers, PMMA beads, benzoyl peroxide activator, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT) initiator, and radiopacifiers on the setting time, polymerization temperature, and compressive strength of the cement are also considered. This information will allow interventional radiologists to manipulate bone cement characteristics for specific applications and maximize the clinical potential of image-guided interventions. PMID:14963178

  17. Velocity map imaging of a slow beam of ammonia molecules inside a quadrupole guide.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Jansen, Paul; Bethlem, Hendrick L

    2012-07-21

    Velocity map imaging inside an electrostatic quadrupole guide is demonstrated. By switching the voltages that are applied to the rods, the quadrupole can be used for guiding Stark decelerated molecules and for extracting the ions. The extraction field is homogeneous along the axis of the quadrupole, while it defocuses the ions in the direction perpendicular to both the axis of the quadrupole and the axis of the ion optics. To compensate for this astigmatism, a series of planar electrodes with horizontal and vertical slits is used. A velocity resolution of 35 m s(-1) is obtained. It is shown that signal due to thermal background can be eliminated, resulting in the detection of slow molecules with an increased signal-to-noise ratio. As an illustration of the resolving power we have used the velocity map imaging system to characterize the phase-space distribution of a Stark decelerated ammonia beam. PMID:22652864

  18. Using Fluorescence Imaging to Track Drug Delivery and Guide Treatment Planning In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiaoya; Huang, Huang; Chen, Juan; Zheng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Imaging has become an indispensable tool in both clinical medicine and preclinical sciences. It enables doctors to locate sites of cancer/disease, track drug delivery, and guide operative planning, thus enhancing the treatment efficacy. Recently, we developed a multimodal theranostic lipid nanoparticles, named HPPS(NIR)-chol-siRNA with its built-in near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe core as a useful surrogate for tracking small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery. By using the image co-registration of computed tomography (CT) and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), we achieved noninvasive assessment and treatment planning of siRNA delivery into the orthotopic tumor, thus enabling efficacious RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. In this chapter, we introduce this method to illustrate the use of CT-FMT co-registration for tracking drug delivery and guiding treatment planning in vivo. PMID:27283425

  19. The Image-Guided Surgery ToolKit IGSTK: an open source C++ software toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Ibanez, Luis; Gobbi, David; Gary, Kevin; Aylward, Stephen; Jomier, Julien; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Zhang, Hui; Kim, Hee-su; Blake, M. Brian; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    The Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK) is an open source C++ software library that provides the basic components needed to develop image-guided surgery applications. The focus of the toolkit is on robustness using a state machine architecture. This paper presents an overview of the project based on a recent book which can be downloaded from igstk.org. The paper includes an introduction to open source projects, a discussion of our software development process and the best practices that were developed, and an overview of requirements. The paper also presents the architecture framework and main components. This presentation is followed by a discussion of the state machine model that was incorporated and the associated rationale. The paper concludes with an example application.

  20. Image-guided thermal therapy with a dual-contrast magnetic nanoparticle formulation: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Attaluri, Anilchandra; Seshadri, Madhav; Mirpour, Sahar; Wabler, Michele; Marinho, Thomas; Furqan, Muhammad; Zhou, Haoming; De Paoli, Silvia; Gruettner, Cordula; Gilson, Wesley; DeWeese, Theodore; Garcia, Monica; Ivkov, Robert; Liapi, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/objective The aim of this study was to develop and investigate the properties of a magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle–ethiodised oil formulation for image-guided thermal therapy of liver cancer. Materials and methods The formulation comprises bionised nano-ferrite (BNF) nanoparticles suspended in ethiodised oil, emulsified with polysorbate 20 (BNF-lip). Nanoparticle size was measured via photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In vivo thermal therapy capability was tested in two groups of male Foxn1nu mice bearing subcutaneous HepG2 xenograft tumours. Group I (n =12) was used to screen conditions for group II (n =48). In group II, mice received one of BNF-lip (n =18), BNF alone (n =16), or PBS (n =14), followed by alternating magnetic field (AMF) hyperthermia, with either varied duration (15 or 20 min) or amplitude (0, 16, 20, or 24 kA/m). Image-guided fluoroscopic intra-arterial injection of BNF-lip was tested in New Zealand white rabbits (n =10), bearing liver VX2 tumours. The animals were subsequently imaged with CT and 3 T MRI, up to 7 days post-injection. The tumours were histopathologically evaluated for distribution of BNF-lip. Results The BNF showed larger aggregate diameters when suspended in BNF-lip, compared to clear solution. The BNF-lip formulation produced maximum tumour temperatures with AMF >20 kA/m and showed positive X-ray visibility and substantial shortening of T1 and T2 relaxation time, with sustained intratumoural retention up to 7 days post-injection. On pathology, intratumoural BNF-lip distribution correlated well with CT imaging of intratumoural BNF-lip distribution. Conclusion The BNF-lip formulation has favourable thermal and dual imaging capabilities for image-guided thermal therapy of liver cancer, suggesting further exploration for clinical applications. PMID:27151045

  1. The use of virtual fiducials in image-guided kidney surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisson, Courtenay; Ong, Rowena; Simpson, Amber; Clark, Peter; Herrell, S. D.; Galloway, Robert

    2011-03-01

    The alignment of image-space to physical-space lies at the heart of all image-guided procedures. In intracranial surgery, point-based registrations can be used with either skin-affixed or bone-implanted extrinsic objects called fiducial markers. The advantages of point-based registration techniques are that they are robust, fast, and have a well developed mathematical foundation for the assessment of registration quality. In abdominal image-guided procedures such techniques have not been successful. It is difficult to accurately locate sufficient homologous intrinsic points in imagespace and physical-space, and the implantation of extrinsic fiducial markers would constitute "surgery before the surgery." Image-space to physical-space registration for abdominal organs has therefore been dominated by surfacebased registration techniques which are iterative, prone to local minima, sensitive to initial pose, and sensitive to percentage coverage of the physical surface. In our work in image-guided kidney surgery we have developed a composite approach using "virtual fiducials." In an open kidney surgery, the perirenal fat is removed and the surface of the kidney is dotted using a surgical marker. A laser range scanner (LRS) is used to obtain a surface representation and matching high definition photograph. A surface to surface registration is performed using a modified iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. The dots are extracted from the high definition image and assigned the three dimensional values from the LRS pixels over which they lie. As the surgery proceeds, we can then use point-based registrations to re-register the spaces and track deformations due to vascular clamping and surgical tractions.

  2. Image capture via a wedge light-guide with no margins.

    PubMed

    Travis, Adrian R L; Large, Tim; Emerton, Neil; Zhu, Zhaoming; Bathiche, Steven

    2010-04-12

    We report the capture of images via a wedge light-guide without the margin for fan-in needed heretofore. While this lets one look out of a slim panel as if it were a periscope, half the power is lost and resolution is degraded by aperture diffraction. Volume gratings may resolve these drawbacks at certain wavelengths and we consider how these might be extruded. PMID:20588691

  3. Single fraction multimodal image guided focal salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Hans-Christian; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Knobe, Sven; Volgeova-Neher, Natalja; Kollefrath, Michael; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Grosu, Anca Ligia; Baltas, Dimos; Kroenig, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We present a novel method for treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) following radiation therapy: focal, multimodal image guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Material and methods We treated two patients with recurrent PCa after primary (#1) or adjuvant (#2) external beam radiation therapy. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), choline, positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT), or prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-PET combined with CT identified a single intraprostatic lesion. Positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging – transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion guided transperineal biopsy confirmed PCa within each target lesion. We defined a PET and mpMRI based gross tumor volume (GTV). A 5 mm isotropic margin was applied additionally to each lesion to generate a planning target volume (PTV), which accounts for technical fusion inaccuracies. A D90 of 18 Gy was intended in one fraction to each PTV using ultrasound guided HDR brachytherapy. Results Six month follow-up showed adequate prostate specific antygen (PSA) decline in both patients (ΔPSA 83% in patient 1 and ΔPSA 59.3% in patient 2). Follow-up 3-tesla MRI revealed regressive disease in both patients and PSMA-PET/CT showed no evidence of active disease in patient #1. No acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions Single fraction, focal, multimodal image guided salvage HDR brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer is a feasible therapy for selected patients with single lesions. This approach has to be evaluated in larger clinical trials. PMID:27504134

  4. Image-Guided Percutaneous Ablation of Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, A. Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone and soft tissue tumors is an effective minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy. Proven applications include treatment of benign primary bone tumors, particularly osteoid osteoma, as well as palliation of painful bone metastases. Use of percutaneous ablation in combination with cementoplasty can provide stabilization of metastases at risk for fracture. Local control of oligometastatic disease and treatment of desmoid tumors are emerging applications. PMID:22550367

  5. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, D.M.; Reinisch, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N{sub e}) as a function of height (the N{sub e} profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year. The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N{sub e} profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al.), has never been put into space. NASA`s 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study `The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010` suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R{sub e} (Reiff et al.; Calvert et al.).

  6. Fluorescence guided lymph node biopsy in large animals using direct image projection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringhausen, Elizabeth; Wang, Tylon; Pitts, Jonathan; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    The use of fluorescence imaging for aiding oncologic surgery is a fast growing field in biomedical imaging, revolutionizing open and minimally invasive surgery practices. We have designed, constructed, and tested a system for fluorescence image acquisition and direct display on the surgical field for fluorescence guided surgery. The system uses a near-infrared sensitive CMOS camera for image acquisition, a near-infra LED light source for excitation, and DLP digital projector for projection of fluorescence image data onto the operating field in real time. Instrument control was implemented in Matlab for image capture, processing of acquired data and alignment of image parameters with the projected pattern. Accuracy of alignment was evaluated statistically to demonstrate sensitivity to small objects and alignment throughout the imaging field. After verification of accurate alignment, feasibility for clinical application was demonstrated in large animal models of sentinel lymph node biopsy. Indocyanine green was injected subcutaneously in Yorkshire pigs at various locations to model sentinel lymph node biopsy in gynecologic cancers, head and neck cancer, and melanoma. Fluorescence was detected by the camera system during operations and projected onto the imaging field, accurately identifying tissues containing the fluorescent tracer at up to 15 frames per second. Fluorescenc