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Sample records for image-guided neuronavigator including

  1. Neuronavigation. Principles. Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Marcel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2009-01-01

    Neuronavigation and stereotaxy are techniques designed to help neurosurgeons precisely localize different intracerebral pathological processes by using a set of preoperative images (CT, MRI, fMRI, PET, SPECT etc.). The development of computer assisted surgery was possible only after a significant technological progress, especially in the area of informatics and imagistics. The main indications of neuronavigation are represented by the targeting of small and deep intracerebral lesions and choosing the best way to treat them, in order to preserve the neurological function. Stereotaxis also allows lesioning or stimulation of basal ganglia for the treatment of movement disorders. These techniques can bring an important amount of confort both to the patient and to the neurosurgeon. Neuronavigation was introduced in Romania around 2003, in four neurosurgical centers. We present our five-years experience in neuronavigation and describe the main principles and surgical techniques. PMID:20108488

  2. A Study of Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Fiducials for Localized Prostate Cancer Including Pelvic Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Annie; Pawlicki, Todd; Luxton, Gary; Hara, Wendy; King, Christopher R. . E-mail: crking@stanford.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To study the impact on nodal coverage and dose to fixed organs at risk when using daily fiducial localization of the prostate to deliver intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Five patients with prostate cancer in whom prostate and pelvic nodes were irradiated with IMRT were studied. Dose was prescribed such that 95% of the prostate planning target volume (PTV) and 90% of the nodal PTV were covered. Random and systematic prostate displacements in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior, and left-right directions were simulated to shift the original isocenter of the IMRT plan. The composite dose during the course of treatment was calculated. Results: Compared with a static setup, simulating random shifts reduced dose by less than 1.5% for nodal hotspot (i.e., dose to 1 cm{sup 3}), by less than 1% for the 90% nodal PTV coverage, and by less than 0.5% for the nodal mean dose. Bowel and femoral head hotspots were reduced by less than 1.5% and 2%, respectively. A 10-mm systematic offset reduced nodal coverage by up to 10%. Conclusion: The use of prostate fiducials for daily localization during IMRT treatment results in negligible changes in dose coverage of pelvic nodes or normal tissue sparing in the absence of a significant systematic offset. This offers a simple and practical solution to the problem of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer when including pelvic nodes.

  3. Integration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound for enhanced neuronavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Keith D.; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.

    2012-03-01

    True three-dimensional (3D) volumetric ultrasound (US) acquisitions stand to benefit intraoperative neuronavigation on multiple fronts. While traditional two-dimensional (2D) US and its tracked, hand-swept version have been recognized for many years to advantage significantly image-guided neurosurgery, especially when coregistered with preoperative MR scans, its unregulated and incomplete sampling of the surgical volume of interest have limited certain intraoperative uses of the information that are overcome through direct volume acquisition (i.e., through 2D scan-head transducer arrays). In this paper, we illustrate several of these advantages, including image-based intraoperative registration (and reregistration) and automated, volumetric displacement mapping for intraoperative image updating. These applications of 3D US are enabled by algorithmic advances in US image calibration, and volume rasterization and interpolation for multi-acquisition synthesis that will also be highlighted. We expect to demonstrate that coregistered 3D US is well worth incorporating into the standard neurosurgical navigational environment relative to traditional tracked, hand-swept 2D US.

  4. Imaging Guided Breast Interventions.

    PubMed

    Masroor, Imrana; Afzal, Shaista; Sufian, Saira Naz

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging is a developing field, with new and upcoming innovations, decreasing the morbidity and mortality related to breast pathologies with main emphasis on breast cancer. Breast imaging has an essential role in the detection and management of breast disease. It includes a multimodality approach, i.e. mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine techniques and interventional procedures, done for the diagnosis and definitive management of breast abnormalities. The range of methods to perform biopsy of a suspicious breast lesion found on imaging has also increased markedly from the 1990s with hi-technological progress in surgical as well as percutaneous breast biopsy methods. The image guided percutaneous breast biopsy procedures cause minimal breast scarring, save time, and relieve the patient of the anxiety of going to the operation theatre. The aim of this review was to describe and discuss the different image guided breast biopsy techniques presently employed along with the indications, contraindication, merits and demerits of each method. PMID:27353993

  5. An image-intensive ePR for image-guided minimally invasive spine surgery applications including real-time intra-operative image acquisition, archival, and display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Documet, Jorge R.; Le, Anh; Liu, Brent; Huang, H. K.; Chiu, John

    2009-02-01

    Recent developments in medical imaging informatics have improved clinical workflow in Radiology enterprise but gaps remain in the clinical workflow from diagnosis to surgical treatment through post-operative follow-up. One solution to bridge this gap is the development of an electronic patient record (ePR) that integrates key imaging and informatics data during the pre, intra, and post-operative phases of clinical workflow. We present an ePR system based on standards and tailored to the clinical application for image-guided minimally invasive spinal surgery (MISS). The ePR system has been implemented in a clinical environment for a half-year.

  6. Biomechanical modeling provides more accurate data for neuronavigation than rigid registration

    PubMed Central

    Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Roy, Aditi; Joldes, Grand Roman; Wittek, Adam; Mostayed, Ahmed; Doyle, Barry; Warfield, Simon Keith; Kikinis, Ron; Knuckey, Neville; Bunt, Stuart; Miller, Karol

    2015-01-01

    It is possible to improve neuronavigation during image-guided surgery by warping the high-quality preoperative brain images so that they correspond with the current intraoperative configuration of the brain. In this work, the accuracy of registration results obtained using comprehensive biomechanical models is compared to the accuracy of rigid registration, the technology currently available to patients. This comparison allows us to investigate whether biomechanical modeling provides good quality image data for neuronavigation for a larger proportion of patients than rigid registration. Preoperative images for 33 cases of neurosurgery were warped onto their respective intraoperative configurations using both biomechanics-based method and rigid registration. We used a Hausdorff distance-based evaluation process that measures the difference between images to quantify the performance of both methods of registration. A statistical test for difference in proportions was conducted to evaluate the null hypothesis that the proportion of patients for whom improved neuronavigation can be achieved, is the same for rigid and biomechanics-based registration. The null hypothesis was confidently rejected (p-value<10−4). Even the modified hypothesis that less than 25% of patients would benefit from the use of biomechanics-based registration was rejected at a significance level of 5% (p-value = 0.02). The biomechanics-based method proved particularly effective for cases experiencing large craniotomy-induced brain deformations. The outcome of this analysis suggests that our nonlinear biomechanics-based methods are beneficial to a large proportion of patients and can be considered for use in the operating theatre as one possible method of improving neuronavigation and surgical outcomes. PMID:24460486

  7. Intraventricular trigonal meningioma: Neuronavigation? No, thanks!

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Danilo O. A.; Matis, Georgios K.; Costa, Leonardo F.; Kitamura, Matheus A. P.; Birbilis, Theodossios A.; Azevedo Filho, Hildo R. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Most of the time meningiomas are benign brain tumors and surgical removal ensures cure in the vast majority of the cases. Thus, whenever possible, complete surgical resection should be the goal of the treatment. Methods: This is a report of our surgical technique for the operative resection of a trigonal meningioma in a resource-limited setting. The necessity of accurate and deep knowledge of the regional anatomy is outlined. Results: A 44-year-old male presented to our outpatient clinic complaining of cephalalgia increasing in frequency and intensity over the last month. His neurological exam was normal, yet a brain computed tomography scan revealed a lesion in the right trigone of the ventricular system. The diagnosis of possible meningioma was set. After thoroughly informing the patient, tumor resection was decided. An intraparietal sulcus approach was favored without the use of any modern technological aids such as intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging or neuronavigation. The postoperative course was uneventful and a postoperative computed tomography scan demonstrated the complete resection of the tumor. The patient was discharged two days later with no neurological deficits. In a two-year-follow-up he remains recurrence-free. Conclusion: In the current cost-effective era it is still possible to safely remove an intraventricular trigonal meningioma without the convenience of neuronavigation. Since the best neuronavigator is the profound neuroanatomical knowledge, no technological advancement could replace a well-educated and trained neurosurgeon. PMID:21886886

  8. Computational Modeling for Enhancing Soft Tissue Image Guided Surgery: An Application in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Miga, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent advances in computing, the opportunities to translate computational models to more integrated roles in patient treatment are expanding at an exciting rate. One area of considerable development has been directed towards correcting soft tissue deformation within image guided neurosurgery applications. This review captures the efforts that have been undertaken towards enhancing neuronavigation by the integration of soft tissue biomechanical models, imaging and sensing technologies, and algorithmic developments. In addition, the review speaks to the evolving role of modeling frameworks within surgery and concludes with some future directions beyond neurosurgical applications. PMID:26354118

  9. Neuronavigation as a diagnostic tool: An innovative application.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ian A; Chumas, Paul D

    2016-06-01

    The role of neuronavigation in tumour surgery is well established. We present an innovative use for this software, as a tool to compare ventricular size between serial sets of cranial imaging. We conclude that neuronavigation software is potentially a powerful diagnostic tool that should not be overlooked when making comparative assessments between scans. PMID:26742421

  10. [Application of frameless neuronavigation in urgent neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Burov, S A; Dash'ian, V G; Shaklunov, A A

    2008-01-01

    Application of a novel technique is analyzed. Frameless CT-based navigation was applied for planning of surgical approach in 92 patients aged 14 to 69 with acute intracranial hemorrhage of different etiology (43 cases of hypertensive hemorrhages, 10 cases of traumatic intracranial hematomas and 16 cases of secondary non-traumatic intracerebral hematomas). Comparative analysis of radioopaque markers and natural anatomical landmarks for registration of patients showed that anatomical landmarks are sufficient for surgical planning without significant distortion of approach trajectory (mean error was 2.2 +/- 1 mm) in supratentorial haemorrhage. This discovery simplified the application of neuronavigation in emergency cases. In posterior fossa hematomas additional radioopaque markers are essential due to absence of constant anatomical landmarks in occipital region. Applicatyion of frameless neuronavigation in surgical treatment of acute intracranial hemorrhages may diminish intraoperative damage to the brain tissue and decrease invasiveness of the operation because of high accuracy of planning of surgical approach. This technique has good perspectives in emergency neurosurgery. PMID:19062589

  11. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:22941021

  12. Development of fluoroscopic registration in spinal neuronavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Hamid R.; Grzeszczuk, Robert; Chin, Shao; Holz, H.; Hariri, Sanaz; Badr, Rana; Kim, Daniel; Adler, John R.; Shahidi, Ramin

    2001-05-01

    We present a system involving a computer-instrumented fluoroscope for the purpose of 3D navigation and guidance using pre-operative diagnostic scans as a reference. The goal of the project is to devise a computer-assisted tool that will improve the accuracy, reduce risk, minimize the invasiveness, and shorten the time it takes to perform a variety of neurosurgical and orthopedic procedures of the spine. For this purpose we propose an apparatus that will track surgical tools and localize them with respect to the patient's 3D anatomy and pre-operative 3D diagnostic scans using intraoperative fluoroscopy for in situ registration and localization of embedded fiducials. Preliminary studies have found a fiducial registration error (FRE) of 1.41 mm and a Target Localization Error (TLE) of 0.48 mm. The resulting system leverages equipment already commonly available in the operating room (OR), providing an important new functionality that is free of many current limitations, such as the inadequacy of skin fiducials for spinal neuronavigation, while keeping costs contained.

  13. Image-guided urological interventions: What the urologists must know

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandan J.; Baliyan, Vinit; Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology. While the traditional biopsy and drainage techniques are firmly established, image-based stone management and endovascular management of hematuria have evolved further. Ablative techniques for renal and prostate cancer and prostate artery embolization for benign prostatic hypertrophy have evolved into viable alternative treatments. Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation. This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques. PMID:26166963

  14. Image-guided tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ballyns, Jeffrey J; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-01-01

    Replication of anatomic shape is a significant challenge in developing implants for regenerative medicine. This has lead to significant interest in using medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to design tissue engineered constructs. Implementation of medical imaging and computer aided design in combination with technologies for rapid prototyping of living implants enables the generation of highly reproducible constructs with spatial resolution up to 25 μm. In this paper, we review the medical imaging modalities available and a paradigm for choosing a particular imaging technique. We also present fabrication techniques and methodologies for producing cellular engineered constructs. Finally, we comment on future challenges involved with image guided tissue engineering and efforts to generate engineered constructs ready for implantation. PMID:19583811

  15. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  16. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation for functional mapping after aborted awake craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Prag; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Awake craniotomy is currently the gold standard for aggressive tumor resections in eloquent cortex. However, a significant subset of patients is unable to tolerate this procedure, particularly the very young or old or those with psychiatric comorbidities, cardiopulmonary comorbidities, or obesity, among other conditions. In these cases, typical alternative procedures include biopsy alone or subtotal resection, both of which are associated with diminished surgical outcomes. Case Description: Here, we report the successful use of a preoperatively obtained resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software in order to perform functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy due to loss of airway. Conclusion: Resting state functional connectivity MRI integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software can provide an alternative option for functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy. PMID:26958419

  17. Image-guided endobronchial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, William E.; Zang, Xiaonan; Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Byrnes, Patrick; Kuhlengel, Trevor; Bascom, Rebecca; Toth, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now recommended as a standard procedure for in vivo verification of extraluminal diagnostic sites during cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Yet, physicians vary considerably in their skills at using EBUS effectively. Regarding existing bronchoscopy guidance systems, studies have shown their effectiveness in the lung-cancer management process. With such a system, a patient's X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan is used to plan a procedure to regions of interest (ROIs). This plan is then used during follow-on guided bronchoscopy. Recent clinical guidelines for lung cancer, however, also dictate using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying suspicious ROIs and aiding in the cancer-staging process. While researchers have attempted to use guided bronchoscopy systems in tandem with PET imaging and EBUS, no true EBUS-centric guidance system exists. We now propose a full multimodal image-based methodology for guiding EBUS. The complete methodology involves two components: 1) a procedure planning protocol that gives bronchoscope movements appropriate for live EBUS positioning; and 2) a guidance strategy and associated system graphical user interface (GUI) designed for image-guided EBUS. We present results demonstrating the operation of the system.

  18. Image-guided radiation therapy: Physician's perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, T.; Narayan, C. Anand

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of radiotherapy has been ontogenetically linked to medical imaging. Over the years, major technological innovations have resulted in substantial improvements in radiotherapy planning, delivery, and verification. The increasing use of computed tomography imaging for target volume delineation coupled with availability of computer-controlled treatment planning and delivery systems have progressively led to conformation of radiation dose to the target tissues while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Recent advances in imaging technology coupled with improved treatment delivery allow near-simultaneous soft-tissue localization of tumor and repositioning of patient. The integration of various imaging modalities within the treatment room for guiding radiation delivery has vastly improved the management of geometric uncertainties in contemporary radiotherapy practice ushering in the paradigm of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Image-guidance should be considered a necessary and natural corollary to high-precision radiotherapy that was long overdue. Image-guided radiation therapy not only provides accurate information on patient and tumor position on a quantitative scale, it also gives an opportunity to verify consistency of planned and actual treatment geometry including adaptation to daily variations resulting in improved dose delivery. The two main concerns with IGRT are resource-intensive nature of delivery and increasing dose from additional imaging. However, increasing the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery through IGRT is likely to reduce toxicity with potential for dose escalation and improved tumor control resulting in favourable therapeutic index. The radiation oncology community needs to leverage this technology to generate high-quality evidence to support widespread adoption of IGRT in contemporary radiotherapy practice. PMID:23293448

  19. Image-guided surgery using multimodality strategy and molecular probes.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Hubei

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer surgery is to maximize the excision of tumorous tissue with minimal damage to the collateral normal tissues, reduce the postoperative recurrence, and improve the survival rate of patients. In order to locate tumor lesions, highlight tumor margins, visualize residual disease in the surgical wound, and map potential lymph node metastasis, various imaging techniques and molecular probes have been investigated to assist surgeons to perform more complete tumor resection. Combining imaging techniques with molecular probes is particularly promising as a new approach for image-guided surgery. Considering inherent limitations of different imaging techniques and insufficient sensitivity of nonspecific molecular probes, image-guided surgery with multimodality strategy and specific molecular probes appears to be an optimal choice. In this article, we briefly describe typical imaging techniques and molecular probes followed by a focused review on the current progress of multimodal image-guided surgery with specific molecular navigation. We also discuss optimal strategy that covers all stages of image-guided surgery including preoperative scanning of tumors, intraoperative inspection of surgical bed and postoperative care of patients. PMID:26053199

  20. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  1. 3D-neuronavigation in vivo through a patient's brain during a spontaneous migraine headache.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Alexandre F; Nascimento, Thiago D; Love, Tiffany; DosSantos, Marcos F; Martikainen, Ilkka K; Cummiford, Chelsea M; DeBoer, Misty; Lucas, Sarah R; Bender, MaryCatherine A; Koeppe, Robert A; Hall, Theodore; Petty, Sean; Maslowski, Eric; Smith, Yolanda R; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research, generated primarily from MRI-based studies, shows that migraine appears to occur, and possibly endure, due to the alteration of specific neural processes in the central nervous system. However, information is lacking on the molecular impact of these changes, especially on the endogenous opioid system during migraine headaches, and neuronavigation through these changes has never been done. This study aimed to investigate, using a novel 3D immersive and interactive neuronavigation (3D-IIN) approach, the endogenous µ-opioid transmission in the brain during a migraine headache attack in vivo. This is arguably one of the most central neuromechanisms associated with pain regulation, affecting multiple elements of the pain experience and analgesia. A 36 year-old female, who has been suffering with migraine for 10 years, was scanned in the typical headache (ictal) and nonheadache (interictal) migraine phases using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the selective radiotracer [(11)C]carfentanil, which allowed us to measure µ-opioid receptor availability in the brain (non-displaceable binding potential - µOR BPND). The short-life radiotracer was produced by a cyclotron and chemical synthesis apparatus on campus located in close proximity to the imaging facility. Both PET scans, interictal and ictal, were scheduled during separate mid-late follicular phases of the patient's menstrual cycle. During the ictal PET session her spontaneous headache attack reached severe intensity levels; progressing to nausea and vomiting at the end of the scan session. There were reductions in µOR BPND in the pain-modulatory regions of the endogenous µ-opioid system during the ictal phase, including the cingulate cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAcc), thalamus (Thal), and periaqueductal gray matter (PAG); indicating that µORs were already occupied by endogenous opioids released in response to the ongoing pain. To our knowledge, this is the first time that changes

  2. Overview of image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Lei . E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu; Thorndyke, Brian; Schreibmann, Eduard; Yang Yong; Li, T.-F.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Luxton, Gary; Koong, Albert

    2006-07-01

    Radiation therapy has gone through a series of revolutions in the last few decades and it is now possible to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution by using techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The improved dose conformity and steep dose gradients have necessitated enhanced patient localization and beam targeting techniques for radiotherapy treatments. Components affecting the reproducibility of target position during and between subsequent fractions of radiation therapy include the displacement of internal organs between fractions and internal organ motion within a fraction. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) uses advanced imaging technology to better define the tumor target and is the key to reducing and ultimately eliminating the uncertainties. The purpose of this article is to summarize recent advancements in IGRT and discussed various practical issues related to the implementation of the new imaging techniques available to radiation oncology community. We introduce various new IGRT concepts and approaches, and hope to provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of the emerging clinical IGRT technologies. Some important research topics will also be addressed.

  3. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  4. Improving Performance During Image-Guided Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, James R.; Tabriz, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective Image-guided procedures have become a mainstay of modern health care. This article reviews how human operators process imaging data and use it to plan procedures and make intraprocedural decisions. Methods A series of models from human factors research, communication theory, and organizational learning were applied to the human-machine interface that occupies the center stage during image-guided procedures. Results Together, these models suggest several opportunities for improving performance as follows: 1. Performance will depend not only on the operator’s skill but also on the knowledge embedded in the imaging technology, available tools, and existing protocols. 2. Voluntary movements consist of planning and execution phases. Performance subscores should be developed that assess quality and efficiency during each phase. For procedures involving ionizing radiation (fluoroscopy and computed tomography), radiation metrics can be used to assess performance. 3. At a basic level, these procedures consist of advancing a tool to a specific location within a patient and using the tool. Paradigms from mapping and navigation should be applied to image-guided procedures. 4. Recording the content of the imaging system allows one to reconstruct the stimulus/response cycles that occur during image-guided procedures. Conclusions When compared with traditional “open” procedures, the technology used during image-guided procedures places an imaging system and long thin tools between the operator and the patient. Taking a step back and reexamining how information flows through an imaging system and how actions are conveyed through human-machine interfaces suggest that much can be learned from studying system failures. In the same way that flight data recorders revolutionized accident investigations in aviation, much could be learned from recording video data during image-guided procedures. PMID:24921628

  5. Recent advances in image-guided targeted prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anna M; Elbuluk, Osama; Mertan, Francesca; Sankineni, Sandeep; Margolis, Daniel J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in the United States that results in over 30,000 deaths per year. The current state of prostate cancer diagnosis, based on PSA screening and sextant biopsy, has been criticized for both overdiagnosis of low-grade tumors and underdiagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancers (Gleason score ≥7). Recently, image guidance has been added to perform targeted biopsies of lesions detected on multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) scans. These methods have improved the ability to detect clinically significant cancer, while reducing the diagnosis of low-grade tumors. Several approaches have been explored to improve the accuracy of image-guided targeted prostate biopsy, including in-bore MRI-guided, cognitive fusion, and MRI/transrectal ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy. This review will examine recent advances in these image-guided targeted prostate biopsy techniques. PMID:25596716

  6. The Use of Neuronavigation as an Adjunct in Facial Reconstructive Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zach Z; Peters, Daniel A; Allen, Murray; Boyd, Kirsty U

    2016-06-01

    Neuronavigation, a ubiquitous tool used in neurosurgery, is rarely used in maxillofacial reconstructive surgery despite it offering many advantages without any disadvantage to the patient. The present report describes one patient with complex gun-shot wound facial injury and one patient with a rare malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor involving the skull base, in which neuronavigation was used to improve the accuracy of bony reduction and minimize surgical invasiveness. Although neuronavigation is not necessary for all maxillofacial surgery, it can be a useful adjunct in complex maxillofacial reconstruction and maxillofacial tumor resection. PMID:27228375

  7. Neuronavigation in the surgical management of brain tumors: current and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Orringer, Daniel A; Golby, Alexandra; Jolesz, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Neuronavigation has become an ubiquitous tool in the surgical management of brain tumors. This review describes the use and limitations of current neuronavigational systems for brain tumor biopsy and resection. Methods for integrating intraoperative imaging into neuronavigational datasets developed to address the diminishing accuracy of positional information that occurs over the course of brain tumor resection are discussed. In addition, the process of integration of functional MRI and tractography into navigational models is reviewed. Finally, emerging concepts and future challenges relating to the development and implementation of experimental imaging technologies in the navigational environment are explored. PMID:23116076

  8. Innovation in image-guided spine intervention.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kieran J

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided spine intervention continues to evolve and is still an intellectually active field. But it is important not to confuse market and commercial success with intellectual, medical, or long-term success. What drives this evolution and innovation, and where is the activity currently? The history of vertebroplasty is a good case in point. PMID:21500137

  9. Hepatocellular carcinoma: modern image-guided therapies.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Sapna; Patel, Rafiuddin; Yap, Ki Sing; Patel, Jai; Wah, Tze; Snoddon, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The most common primary malignancy of the liver and the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which presents a major global health problem due to its increasing incidence. Most cases of HCC are secondary to either infection (hepatitis B or C) or cirrhosis (alcohol being the most common cause). Clinical presentation is variable and the tumour can be an incidental finding. Treatment options for HCC and prognosis are dependent on many factors but most importantly tumour size and staging. The last two decades have revolutionised the treatment of HCC using image-guided techniques. The concepts of imaging and image-guided techniques are still young and not well described in standard textbooks and hence an up to date review article is essential. The clinical subspecialities may lack familiarity with image-guided techniques but are responsible for management of these patients before and after the treatment by interventional radiologists. This article reviews current image-guided techniques, evidence and outcomes and provides educational highlights and question and answers. The article provides an overview in a simple understandable manner to enable readers from various levels of practice and training to benefit from and apply in their practice. PMID:26787919

  10. Knowledge modeling in image-guided neurosurgery: application in understanding intraoperative brain shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Adad, Julien; Paul, Perrine; Morandi, Xavier; Jannin, Pierre

    2006-03-01

    During an image-guided neurosurgery procedure, the neuronavigation system is subject to inaccuracy because of anatomical deformations which induce a gap between the preoperative images and their anatomical reality. Thus, the objective of many research teams is to succeed in quantifying these deformations in order to update preoperative images. Anatomical intraoperative deformations correspond to a complex spatio-temporal phenomenon. Our objective is to identify the parameters implicated in these deformations and to use these parameters as constrains for systems dedicated to updating preoperative images. In order to identify these parameters of deformation we followed the iterative methodology used for cognitive system conception: identification, conceptualization, formalization, implementation and validation. A state of the art about cortical deformations has been established in order to identify relevant parameters probably involved in the deformations. As a first step, 30 parameters have been identified and described following an ontological approach. They were formalized into a Unified Modeling Language (UML) class diagram. We implemented that model into a web-based application in order to fill a database. Two surgical cases have been studied at this moment. After having entered enough surgical cases for data mining purposes, we expect to identify the most relevant and influential parameters and to gain a better ability to understand the deformation phenomenon. This original approach is part of a global system aiming at quantifying and correcting anatomical deformations.

  11. Use of frameless neuronavigation for bedside placement of external ventricular catheters.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Chad A; Conner, Andrew K; Cheema, Ahmed A; Burks, Joshua D; Case, Justin L; O'Neal, Christen; Sughrue, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Neuronavigation for placement of ventricular catheters has been described. At our institution, electromagnetic neuronavigation is frequently utilized for difficult ventricular catheter placement. In patients who develop a trapped ventricle as a result of an intraparenchymal or intraventricular mass lesion, successful catheter placement may be difficult, as the location and trajectory are unfamiliar. The authors report their experience using electromagnetic neuronavigation for bedside placement of external ventricular catheters in patients with trapped ventricles. The technique for bedside placement of external ventricular catheters utilizing electromagnetic neuronavigation is reviewed. The benefits of this technique and those patients in whom it may be most useful are discussed. Utilization of bedside electromagnetic neuronavigation for placement of difficult external ventricular catheters into trapped ventricles is an option for accurate navigated catheter placement. Bedside electromagnetic neuronavigation offers accurate catheter placement in awake patients. This technique may be utilized in patients with high perioperative risk factors as it does not require general anesthesia. The procedure is well tolerated as it does not require rigid head fixation. PMID:26642952

  12. Endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs)

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventions are rapidly replacing invasive surgical procedures for the most prevalent human disease conditions. X-ray image-guided interventions carried out using the insertion and navigation of catheters through the vasculature are increasing in number and sophistication. In this article, we offer our vision for the future of this dynamic field of endovascular image-guided interventions in the form of predictions about (1) improvements in high-resolution detectors for more accurate guidance, (2) the implementation of high-resolution region of interest computed tomography for evaluation and planning, (3) the implementation of dose tracking systems to control patient radiation risk, (4) the development of increasingly sophisticated interventional devices, (5) the use of quantitative treatment planning with patient-specific computer fluid dynamic simulations, and (6) the new expanding role of the medical physicist. We discuss how we envision our predictions will come to fruition and result in the universal goal of improved patient care. PMID:18293585

  13. Health technology assessment of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT): A systematic review of current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Arabloo, Jalal; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Mousavinezhad, Seyedeh Maryam; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Pooyandjoo, Morvarid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Image-guided radiotherapy used multiple imaging during the radiation therapy course to improve the precision and accuracy of health care provider's treatment. Objectives: This study aims to assess the safety, effectiveness and economic aspects of image-guided radiation therapy for decision-making about this technology in Iran. Methods: In this study, the most important medical databases such as PubMed and Cochrane Library were searched until November 2014. The systematic reviews, health technology assessment reports and economic evaluation studies were included. The results of included studies were analyzed via the thematic synthesis. Results: Seven articles were included in the study. The results showed that image-guided radiation therapy, regardless of the imaging technique used in it, is associated with no major toxicity and has the potential to reduce the symptoms of poisoning. Using image-guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer resulted in substantial improvement in the quality of the received dose and optimal therapeutic dose of radiation to the targeted tumor while the radiation dose to the surrounding healthy tissues was minimal. Additionally, image-guided radiation therapy facilitated the diagnosis and management of exception deviations, including immediate changes and gross errors, weight loss, significant limbs deformity, systematic changes in the internal organs and changes in respiratory movements. Usage of image-guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer was associated with increased costs. Conclusion: Current available evidence suggests that the image-guided radiation therapy can reduce the amount of radiation to healthy tissue around the tumor and the toxicity associated with it. This can enhance the safe dose of radiation to the tumor and increase the likelihood of destruction of tumor. The current level of evidence required conducting further studies on the costs and effectiveness of this technology compared with conventional

  14. Image-guided positioning and tracking.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Dan; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy aims at maximizing tumor control while minimizing normal tissue complication. The introduction of stereotactic treatment explores the volume effect and achieves dose escalation to tumor target with small margins. The use of ablative irradiation dose and sharp dose gradients requires accurate tumor definition and alignment between patient and treatment geometry. Patient geometry variation during treatment may significantly compromise the conformality of delivered dose and must be managed properly. Setup error and interfraction/intrafraction motion are incorporated in the target definition process by expanding the clinical target volume to planning target volume, whereas the alignment between patient and treatment geometry is obtained with an adaptive control process, by taking immediate actions in response to closely monitored patient geometry. This article focuses on the monitoring and adaptive response aspect of the problem. The term "image" in "image guidance" will be used in a most general sense, to be inclusive of some important point-based monitoring systems that can be considered as degenerate cases of imaging. Image-guided motion adaptive control, as a comprehensive system, involves a hierarchy of decisions, each of which balances simplicity versus flexibility and accuracy versus robustness. Patient specifics and machine specifics at the treatment facility also need to be incorporated into the decision-making process. Identifying operation bottlenecks from a system perspective and making informed compromises are crucial in the proper selection of image-guidance modality, the motion management mechanism, and the respective operation modes. Not intended as an exhaustive exposition, this article focuses on discussing the major issues and development principles for image-guided motion management systems. We hope these information and methodologies will facilitate conscientious practitioners to adopt image-guided motion management systems

  15. Stereofluoroscopic image-guided robotic biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Minyan; Liu, Hong; Tao, Gang; Fajardo, Laurie L.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the key techniques of a stereo- fluoroscopic image-guided robotic biopsy system: 3D position reconstruction, 3D path planning, path registration and robot trajectory control with safety considerations. This system automatically adjusts the needle inserting path according to a real-time 3D position error feedback. This system is particularly applicable to the soft tissue and organ biopsy, with advantages of increased accuracy, short completion time and minimum invasiveness to the patient. Simulation shows the safety and accuracy of this robotic biopsy system.

  16. Neuronavigation-guided Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo-Jin; Hahn, Soo Jung; Kim, Won-Seok; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is widely used for several neurological conditions, as it has gained acknowledgement for its potential therapeutic effects. Brain excitability is non-invasively modulated by rTMS, and rTMS to the language areas has proved its potential effects on treatment of aphasia. In our protocol, we aim to artificially induce virtual aphasia in healthy subjects by inhibiting Brodmann area 44 and 45 using neuronavigational TMS (nTMS), and F3 of the International 10-20 EEG system for conventional TMS (cTMS). To measure the degree of aphasia, changes in reaction time to a picture naming task pre- and post-stimulation are measured and compare the delay in reaction time between nTMS and cTMS. Accuracy of the two TMS stimulation methods is compared by averaging the Talairach coordinates of the target and the actual stimulation. Consistency of stimulation is demonstrated by the error range from the target. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate use of nTMS and to describe the benefits and limitations of the nTMS compared to those of cTMS. PMID:27214154

  17. Image-guided plasma therapy of cutaneous wound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwu; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Zhang, Shiwu; Yue, Ting; Xu, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Despite the clinical significance in chronic wound management, no effective methods have been developed for quantitative image-guided treatment. We integrated a multimodal imaging system with a cold atmospheric plasma probe for image-guided treatment of chronic wound. Multimodal imaging system offers a non-invasive, painless, simultaneous and quantitative assessment of cutaneous wound healing. Cold atmospheric plasma accelerates the wound healing process through many mechanisms including decontamination, coagulation and stimulation of the wound healing. The therapeutic effect of cold atmospheric plasma is studied in vivo under the guidance of a multimodal imaging system. Cutaneous wounds are created on the dorsal skin of the nude mice. During the healing process, the sample wound is treated by cold atmospheric plasma at different controlled dosage, while the control wound is healed naturally. The multimodal imaging system integrating a multispectral imaging module and a laser speckle imaging module is used to collect the information of cutaneous tissue oxygenation (i.e. oxygen saturation, StO2) and blood perfusion simultaneously to assess and guide the plasma therapy. Our preliminary tests show that cold atmospheric plasma in combination with multimodal imaging guidance has the potential to facilitate the healing of chronic wounds.

  18. Web hospital information system for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Tsai, Weu-Tek; Canessa, Gino; Canessa, John C.

    2002-05-01

    A complete Web based hospital information system, which can allow medical doctors to access and modify patient information and records anywhere in the world via the Internet, was developed. More specifically, this Web information system can be linked seamlessly to our fully computerized MR image-guided neurosurgery suite. This information system, which utilizes the unprecedented Internet infrastructure and adopts the most updated software technologies, addresses the urgent need for handling today's hospital information flow and management. With this new information system in our surgery suite, images and records that have been transferred directly from a diagnostic system such as MR, CT, etc. to the DICOM archive are accessible via a secured Internet connection. When data is accessed via the Web, it can be retrieved in several formats, including raw DICOM and binary, which are extremely useful for various research and development purposes, as well as new applications that require access to the original image data. The Internet-based Web Hospital Information System (WHIS) can easily match the existing standards for this type of information system in a hospital and can accommodate any anticipated requirements for image-guided minimally invasive surgery in the future. A practical and potentially low cost Web Hospital information system, which is functionality- driven, will be presented in this paper. It provides an extremely intuitive interactive environment, as well as a very user-friendly interface for use by both medical doctors and patients.

  19. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Koch, Guillaume; Caudrelier, Jean; Garnon, Julien; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Edalat, Faramarz; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of the ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option. PMID:27329231

  20. Utility of diffusion tensor imaging studies linked to neuronavigation and other modalities in repeat hemispherotomy for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kiehna, Erin N; Widjaja, Elysa; Holowka, Stephanie; Carter Snead, O; Drake, James; Weiss, Shelly K; Ochi, Ayako; Thompson, Eric M; Go, Cristina; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Donner, Elizabeth J; Rutka, James T

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Hemispherectomy for unilateral, medically refractory epilepsy is associated with excellent long-term seizure control. However, for patients with recurrent seizures following disconnection, workup and investigation can be challenging, and surgical options may be limited. Few studies have examined the role of repeat hemispherotomy in these patients. The authors hypothesized that residual fiber connections between the hemispheres could be the underlying cause of recurrent epilepsy in these patients. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to test this hypothesis, and to target residual connections at reoperation using neuronavigation. METHODS The authors identified 8 patients with recurrent seizures following hemispherectomy who underwent surgery between 1995 and 2012. Prolonged video electroencephalography recordings documented persistent seizures arising from the affected hemisphere. In all patients, DTI demonstrated residual white matter association fibers connecting the hemispheres. A repeat craniotomy and neuronavigation-guided targeted disconnection of these residual fibers was performed. Engel class was used to determine outcome after surgery at a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. RESULTS Two patients underwent initial hemidecortication and 6 had periinsular hemispherotomy as their first procedures at a median age of 9.7 months. Initial pathologies included hemimegalencephaly (n = 4), multilobar cortical dysplasia (n = 3), and Rasmussen's encephalitis (n = 1). The mean duration of seizure freedom for the group after the initial procedure was 32.5 months (range 6-77 months). In all patients, DTI showed limited but definite residual connections between the 2 hemispheres, primarily across the rostrum/genu of the corpus callosum. The median age at reoperation was 6.8 years (range 1.3-14 years). The average time taken for reoperation was 3 hours (range 1.8-4.3 hours), with a mean blood loss of 150 ml (range 50-250 ml). One patient required a blood transfusion

  1. Retractor-induced brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2013-03-01

    In image-guided neurosurgery, intraoperative brain shift significantly degrades the accuracy of neuronavigation that is solely based on preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR). To compensate for brain deformation and to maintain the accuracy in image guidance achieved at the start of surgery, biomechanical models have been developed to simulate brain deformation and to produce model-updated MR images (uMR) to compensate for brain shift. To-date, most studies have focused on shift compensation at early stages of surgery (i.e., updated images are only produced after craniotomy and durotomy). Simulating surgical events at later stages such as retraction and tissue resection are, perhaps, clinically more relevant because of the typically much larger magnitudes of brain deformation. However, these surgical events are substantially more complex in nature, thereby posing significant challenges in model-based brain shift compensation strategies. In this study, we present results from an initial investigation to simulate retractor-induced brain deformation through a biomechanical finite element (FE) model where whole-brain deformation assimilated from intraoperative data was used produce uMR for improved accuracy in image guidance. Specifically, intensity-encoded 3D surface profiles at the exposed cortical area were reconstructed from intraoperative stereovision (iSV) images before and after tissue retraction. Retractor-induced surface displacements were then derived by coregistering the surfaces and served as sparse displacement data to drive the FE model. With one patient case, we show that our technique is able to produce uMR that agrees well with the reconstructed iSV surface after retraction. The computational cost to simulate retractor-induced brain deformation was approximately 10 min. In addition, our approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow, suggesting the potential for its clinical application.

  2. Optical imaging-guided cancer therapy with fluorescent nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shan; Gnanasammandhan, Muthu Kumara; Zhang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of cancer have been greatly improved with the recent developments in nanotechnology. One of the promising nanoscale tools for cancer diagnosis is fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), such as organic dye-doped NPs, quantum dots and upconversion NPs that enable highly sensitive optical imaging of cancer at cellular and animal level. Furthermore, the emerging development of novel multi-functional NPs, which can be conjugated with several functional molecules simultaneously including targeting moieties, therapeutic agents and imaging probes, provides new potentials for clinical therapies and diagnostics and undoubtedly will play a critical role in cancer therapy. In this article, we review the types and characteristics of fluorescent NPs, in vitro and in vivo imaging of cancer using fluorescent NPs and multi-functional NPs for imaging-guided cancer therapy. PMID:19759055

  3. Image fusion and navigation platforms for percutaneous image-guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Manoj; Venkatesan, Aradhana M

    2016-04-01

    Image-guided interventional procedures, particularly image guided biopsy and ablation, serve an important role in the care of the oncology patient. The need for tumor genomic and proteomic profiling, early tumor response assessment and confirmation of early recurrence are common scenarios that may necessitate successful biopsies of targets, including those that are small, anatomically unfavorable or inconspicuous. As image-guided ablation is increasingly incorporated into interventional oncology practice, similar obstacles are posed for the ablation of technically challenging tumor targets. Navigation tools, including image fusion and device tracking, can enable abdominal interventionalists to more accurately target challenging biopsy and ablation targets. Image fusion technologies enable multimodality fusion and real-time co-displays of US, CT, MRI, and PET/CT data, with navigational technologies including electromagnetic tracking, robotic, cone beam CT, optical, and laser guidance of interventional devices. Image fusion and navigational platform technology is reviewed in this article, including the results of studies implementing their use for interventional procedures. Pre-clinical and clinical experiences to date suggest these technologies have the potential to reduce procedure risk, time, and radiation dose to both the patient and the operator, with a valuable role to play for complex image-guided interventions. PMID:26826086

  4. Mutual-information-corrected tumor displacement using intraoperative ultrasound for brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2008-03-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) has emerged as a practical neuronavigational tool for brain shift compensation in image-guided tumor resection surgeries. The use of iUS is optimized when coregistered with preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR) of the patient's head. However, the fiducial-based registration alone does not necessarily optimize the alignment of internal anatomical structures deep in the brain (e.g., tumor) between iUS and pMR. In this paper, we investigated and evaluated an image-based re-registration scheme to maximize the normalized mutual information (nMI) between iUS and pMR to improve tumor boundary alignment using the fiducial registration as a starting point for optimization. We show that this scheme significantly (p<<0.001) reduces tumor boundary misalignment pre-durotomy. The same technique was employed to measure tumor displacement post-durotomy, and the locally measured tumor displacement was assimilated into a biomechanical model to estimate whole-brain deformation. Our results demonstrate that the nMI re-registration pre-durotomy is critical for obtaining accurate measurement of tumor displacement, which significantly improved model response at the craniotomy when compared with stereopsis data acquired independently from the tumor registration. This automatic and computationally efficient (<2min) re-registration technique is feasible for routine clinical use in the operating room (OR).

  5. Motion compensated SLAM for image guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness and clinical benefits of image guided surgery are well established for procedures where there is manageable tissue motion. In minimally invasive cardiac, gastrointestinal, or abdominal surgery, large scale tissue deformation prohibits accurate registration and fusion of pre- and intraoperative data. Vision based techniques such as structure from motion and simultaneous localization and mapping are capable of recovering 3D structure and laparoscope motion. Current research in the area generally assumes the environment is static, which is difficult to satisfy in most surgical procedures. In this paper, a novel framework for simultaneous online estimation of laparoscopic camera motion and tissue deformation in a dynamic environment is proposed. The method only relies on images captured by the laparoscope to sequentially and incrementally generate a dynamic 3D map of tissue motion that can be co-registered with pre-operative data. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated with both simulated and ex vivo data. The practical application of the technique is further demonstrated on in vivo procedures. PMID:20879352

  6. Interactive image-guided hepatic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansic, James D.; Herline, Alan J.; Bass, W. Andrew; Chapman, William C.; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    1999-05-01

    While laparoscopes are used for numerous minimally invasive procedures, minimally invasive liver resection and ablation occur infrequently. the paucity of cases is due to limited field of view and difficulty in determination of tumor location and margins under video guidance. By merging minimally invasive surgery with interactive, image-guided surgery, we hope to make laparoscopic liver procedures feasible. In previous work, we described methods for tracking an endoscope accurately in patient space and registration between endoscopic image space and physical space using the direct linear transformation (DLT). We have now developed a PC-based software system to display up to four 512 Χ 512 images indicating current surgical position using an active optical tracking system. We have used this system in several open liver cases and believe that a surface-based registration technique can be used to register physical space to tomographic space after liver mobilization. For preliminary phantom liver studies, our registration error is approximately 2.0mm. The surface-based registration technique will allow better localization of non-visible liver tumors, more accurate probe placement for ablation procedures, and more accurate margin determination for open surgical liver cases. The surface-based registration technique will allow better localization of non-visible liver tumors, more accurate probe placement for ablation procedures, and more accurate margin determination for open surgical liver cases. The surface-based/DLT registration methods, in combination with the video display and tracked endoscope, will hopefully make laparoscopic liver cryoablation and resection procedures feasible.

  7. Image-guided surgery and therapy: current status and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terence M.

    2001-05-01

    Image-guided surgery and therapy is assuming an increasingly important role, particularly considering the current emphasis on minimally-invasive surgical procedures. Volumetric CT and MR images have been used now for some time in conjunction with stereotactic frames, to guide many neurosurgical procedures. With the development of systems that permit surgical instruments to be tracked in space, image-guided surgery now includes the use of frame-less procedures, and the application of the technology has spread beyond neurosurgery to include orthopedic applications and therapy of various soft-tissue organs such as the breast, prostate and heart. Since tracking systems allow image- guided surgery to be undertaken without frames, a great deal of effort has been spent on image-to-image and image-to- patient registration techniques, and upon the means of combining real-time intra-operative images with images acquired pre-operatively. As image-guided surgery systems have become increasingly sophisticated, the greatest challenges to their successful adoption in the operating room of the future relate to the interface between the user and the system. To date, little effort has been expended to ensure that the human factors issues relating to the use of such equipment in the operating room have been adequately addressed. Such systems will only be employed routinely in the OR when they are designed to be intuitive, unobtrusive, and provide simple access to the source of the images.

  8. Image-Guided Intervention of the Postoperative Foot and Ankle After Ligament and Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Monica; Walker, Miny; Amiras, Dimitri; Rosenfeld, Peter

    2016-02-01

    This review article describes the potential range of image-guided interventional procedures performed following foot and ankle ligament and/or tendon repair. Diagnosis of the cause of recurrent or persistent pain/symptoms in this postoperative group is challenging and requires a coordinated clinical and radiologic assessment. This directs appropriate treatment including image-guided intervention that may be used both as a diagnostic tool and a therapeutic option. There is a paucity of high-quality studies on the role of image-guided intervention in the foot and ankle after ligament/tendon repair. Many of the procedures used in this group are extrapolated from other areas of the body or the preoperative scenario. We review the role of imaging to identify the cause of postsurgical symptoms and to direct appropriate image-guided intervention. The available injectables and their roles are discussed. Specific surgical procedures are described including lateral ligament repair, Achilles repair, posterior tibialis tendon surgery, and peroneal tendon surgery. PMID:27077592

  9. An EW technology research of jamming IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiu-qin; Rong, Hua; Liang, Jing-ping; Chen, Qi; Chen, Min-rong

    2009-07-01

    The IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons have been playing an important role in the modern warfare by means of select attacking the vital parts of targets with the features of highly secret attacking, high precision, and excellent anti-jamming capability ,therefore, they are viewed to be one of the promising precisely guided weapons ,receiving great concern through out the world. This paper discusses the characteristics of IR-Imaging guidance systems at the highlight of making a study of correlated technologies of jamming IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons on the basis of elaborating the operational principles of IR-Imaging-guided Weapons.

  10. Evaluation of Image-Guided Positioning for Frameless Intracranial Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lamba, Michael Breneman, John C.; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The standard for target alignment and immobilization in intracranial radiosurgery is frame-based alignment and rigid immobilization using a stereotactic head ring. Recent improvements in image-guidance systems have introduced the possibility of image-guided radiosurgery with nonrigid immobilization. We present data on the alignment accuracy and patient stability of a frameless image-guided system. Methods and Materials: Isocenter alignment errors were measured for in vitro studies in an anthropomorphic phantom for both frame-based stereotactic and frameless image-guided alignment. Subsequently, in vivo studies assessed differences between frame-based and image-guided alignment in patients who underwent frame-based intracranial radiosurgery. Finally, intratreatment target stability was determined by image-guided alignment performed before and after image-guided mask immobilized radiosurgery. Results: In vitro hidden target localization errors were comparable for the framed (0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm) and image-guided (0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm) techniques. The in vivo differences in alignment were 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm (anteroposterior), -0.2 {+-} 0.4 mm (superoinferior), and 0.3 {+-} 0.5 mm (lateral). For in vivo stability tests, the mean distance differed between the pre- and post-treatment positions with mask-immobilized radiosurgery by 0.5 {+-} 0.3 mm. Conclusion: Frame-based and image-guided alignment accuracy in vitro was comparable for the system tested. In vivo tests showed a consistent trend in the difference of alignment in the anteroposterior direction, possibly due to torque to the ring and mounting system with frame-based localization. The mask system as used appeared adequate for patient immobilization.

  11. Image-guided spine surgery: state of the art and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Shafizadeh, Sven; Rixen, Dieter; Paffrath, Thomas; Bouillon, Bertil; Steinhausen, Eva S.; Baethis, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Navigation technology is a widely available tool in spine surgery and has become a part of clinical routine in many centers. The issue of where and when navigation technology should be used is still an issue of debate. It is the aim of this study to give an overview on the current knowledge concerning the technical capabilities of image-guided approaches and to discuss possible future directions of research and implementation of this technique. Based on a Medline search total of 1,462 publications published until October 2008 were retrieved. The abstracts were scanned manually for relevance to the topics of navigated spine surgery in the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, the lumbar spine, as well as ventral spine surgery, radiation exposure, tumor surgery and cost-effectivity in navigated spine surgery. Papers not contributing to these subjects were deleted resulting in 276 papers that were included in the analysis. Image-guided approaches have been investigated and partially implemented into clinical routine in virtually any field of spine surgery. However, the data available is mostly limited to small clinical series, case reports or retrospective studies. Only two RCTs and one metaanalysis have been retrieved. Concerning the most popular application of image-guided approaches, pedicle screw insertion, the evidence of clinical benefit in the most critical areas, e.g. the thoracic spine, is still lacking. In many other areas of spine surgery, e.g. ventral spine surgery or tumor surgery, image-guided approaches are still in an experimental stage. The technical development of image-guided techniques has reached a high level as the accuracies that can be achieved technically meet the anatomical demands. However, there is evidence that the interaction between the surgeon (‘human factor’) and the navigation system is a source of inaccuracy. It is concluded that more effort needs to be spend to understand this interaction. PMID:19763640

  12. MRI Guided Brain Stimulation without the Use of a Neuronavigation System

    PubMed Central

    Vaghefi, Ehsan; Cai, Peng; Fang, Fang; Byblow, Winston D.; Stinear, Cathy M.; Thompson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    A key issue in the field of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) is the accurate localization of scalp positions that correspond to targeted cortical areas. The current gold standard is to combine structural and functional brain imaging with a commercially available “neuronavigation” system. However, neuronavigation systems are not commonplace outside of specialized research environments. Here we describe a technique that allows for the use of participant-specific functional and structural MRI data to guide NIBS without a neuronavigation system. Surface mesh representations of the head were generated using Brain Voyager and vectors linking key anatomical landmarks were drawn on the mesh. Our technique was then used to calculate the precise distances on the scalp corresponding to these vectors. These calculations were verified using actual measurements of the head and the technique was used to identify a scalp position corresponding to a brain area localized using functional MRI. PMID:26413537

  13. Imaging-guided delivery of RNAi for anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junqing; Mi, Peng; Lin, Gan; Wáng, Yì Xiáng J; Liu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-09-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) technique is a new modality for cancer therapy, and several candidates are being tested clinically. In the development of RNAi-based therapeutics, imaging methods can provide a visible and quantitative way to investigate the therapeutic effect at anatomical, cellular, and molecular level; to noninvasively trace the distribution; to and study the biological processes in preclinical and clinical stages. Their abilities are important not only for therapeutic optimization and evaluation but also for shortening of the time of drug development to market. Typically, imaging-functionalized RNAi therapeutics delivery that combines nanovehicles and imaging techniques to study and improve their biodistribution and accumulation in tumor site has been progressively integrated into anticancer drug discovery and development processes. This review presents an overview of the current status of translating the RNAi cancer therapeutics in the clinic, a brief description of the biological barriers in drug delivery, and the roles of imaging in aspects of administration route, systemic circulation, and cellular barriers for the clinical translation of RNAi cancer therapeutics, and with partial content for discussing the safety concerns. Finally, we focus on imaging-guided delivery of RNAi therapeutics in preclinical development, including the basic principles of different imaging modalities, and their advantages and limitations for biological imaging. With growing number of RNAi therapeutics entering the clinic, various imaging methods will play an important role in facilitating the translation of RNAi cancer therapeutics from bench to bedside. PMID:26805788

  14. Computed Tomography- and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Guided Microtherapy.

    PubMed

    Seibel; Melzer; Schmidt; Plabetamann

    1997-06-01

    This report describes techniques of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image-guided diagnosis and therapy. Fine-needle biopsy, interstitial tumor therapy, and chemical sympathectomy, as well as the treatment of chronic spinal diseases, including periradicular infiltration at irritated spinal nerve roots, percutaneous laser decompression of intervertebral disks, and intraspinal microendoscopic scar dissection after failed back surgery are described. To overcome specific drawbacks of CT application, we have evaluated technological prerequisites and feasibility of MRI guidance of interventional procedures, such as biopsy, aspiration of neoplasm, and local interstitial drug instillation. New MR-compatible needles, trocars/cannulae, endoscopes, and ancillary equipment were developed and evaluated in collaboration with industry. Sequences, study protocols, and the strategies of performing the procedure within the environment of an interventional MRI suite have been formulated. In 168 patients, 204 interventions such as aspiration biopsy, peridural corticoid injection at spinal nerve roots, intratumoral ethanol instillation, chemical sympathectomy, and percutaneous laser decompression of herniated intervertebral disks were performed successfully. CT and MRI guidance of percutaneous and microendoscopic interventions provides a reproducible and precise means of instrument control. Aside from preoperative planning of the access trajectory, instruments can be placed under CT or MRI control and the therapeutic process can be monitored. Although MRI avoids the need for ionizing radiation and provides multiplanar multislice images with excellent soft tissue contrast, the representation of instruments and the resolution is currently inferior to that achieved by CT imaging. PMID:10401142

  15. A multimodal nano agent for image-guided cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinzi; Muhanna, Nidal; De Souza, Raquel; Wada, Hironobu; Chan, Harley; Akens, Margarete K; Anayama, Takashi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Serra, Stefano; Irish, Jonathan; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative imaging technologies including computed tomography and fluorescence optical imaging are becoming routine tools in the cancer surgery operating room. They constitute an enabling platform for high performance surgical resections that assure local control while minimizing morbidity. New contrast agents that can increase the sensitivity and visualization power of existing intraoperative imaging techniques will further enhance their clinical benefit. We report here the development, detection and visualization of a dual-modality computed tomography and near-infrared fluorescence nano liposomal agent (CF800) in multiple preclinical animal models of cancer. We describe the successful application of this agent for combined preoperative computed tomography based three-dimensional surgical planning and intraoperative target mapping (>200 Hounsfield Units enhancement), as well as near-infrared fluorescence guided resection (>5-fold tumor-to-background ratio). These results strongly support the clinical advancement of this agent for image-guided surgery with potential to improve lesion localization, margin delineation and metastatic lymph node detection. PMID:26218742

  16. 3D Image-Guided Automatic Pipette Positioning for Single Cell Experiments in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Long, Brian; Li, Lu; Knoblich, Ulf; Zeng, Hongkui; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a method to facilitate single cell, image-guided experiments including in vivo electrophysiology and electroporation. Our method combines 3D image data acquisition, visualization and on-line image analysis with precise control of physical probes such as electrophysiology microelectrodes in brain tissue in vivo. Adaptive pipette positioning provides a platform for future advances in automated, single cell in vivo experiments. PMID:26689553

  17. Image-Guided Percutaneous Ablation of Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, A. Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone and soft tissue tumors is an effective minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy. Proven applications include treatment of benign primary bone tumors, particularly osteoid osteoma, as well as palliation of painful bone metastases. Use of percutaneous ablation in combination with cementoplasty can provide stabilization of metastases at risk for fracture. Local control of oligometastatic disease and treatment of desmoid tumors are emerging applications. PMID:22550367

  18. 3D Image-Guided Automatic Pipette Positioning for Single Cell Experiments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Long, Brian; Li, Lu; Knoblich, Ulf; Zeng, Hongkui; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-01-01

    We report a method to facilitate single cell, image-guided experiments including in vivo electrophysiology and electroporation. Our method combines 3D image data acquisition, visualization and on-line image analysis with precise control of physical probes such as electrophysiology microelectrodes in brain tissue in vivo. Adaptive pipette positioning provides a platform for future advances in automated, single cell in vivo experiments. PMID:26689553

  19. Image-guided therapies in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: A multidisciplinary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Willatt, Jonathon; Hannawa, Kevin K; Ruma, Julie A; Frankel, Timothy L; Owen, Dawn; Barman, Pranab M

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has led to improvements in screening, detection, and treatments. Interventional techniques include thermal ablation, transarterial chemoembolization, and radioembolization whilst stereotactic body radiation therapy also uses imaging to target the radiation. Both survival rates and cure rates have improved markedly since the introduction of these techniques. This review article describes the image guided techniques used for the treatment of HCC. PMID:25729478

  20. Resective surgery for medically refractory epilepsy using intraoperative MRI and functional neuronavigation: the Erlangen experience of 415 patients.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Karl; Hofmann, Andrea; Sommer, Bjoern; Grummich, Peter; Coras, Roland; Kasper, Burkard Sebastian; Hamer, Hajo M; Blumcke, Ingmar; Stefan, Hermann; Nimsky, Christopher; Buchfelder, Michael

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraoperative overestimation of resection volume in epilepsy surgery is a well-known problem that can lead to an unfavorable seizure outcome. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) combined with neuronavigation may help surgeons avoid this pitfall and facilitate visualization and targeting of sometimes ill-defined heterogeneous lesions or epileptogenic zones and may increase the number of complete resections and improve seizure outcome. METHODS To investigate this hypothesis, the authors conducted a retrospective clinical study of consecutive surgical procedures performed during a 10-year period for epilepsy in which they used neuronavigation combined with iMRI and functional imaging (functional MRI for speech and motor areas; diffusion tensor imaging for pyramidal, speech, and visual tracts; and magnetoencephalography and electrocorticography for spike detection). Altogether, there were 415 patients (192 female and 223 male, mean age 37.2 years; 41% left-sided lesions and 84.9% temporal epileptogenic zones). The mean preoperative duration of epilepsy was 17.5 years. The most common epilepsy-associated pathologies included hippocampal sclerosis (n = 146 [35.2%]), long-term epilepsy-associated tumor (LEAT) (n = 67 [16.1%]), cavernoma (n = 45 [10.8%]), focal cortical dysplasia (n = 31 [7.5%]), and epilepsy caused by scar tissue (n = 23 [5.5%]). RESULTS In 11.8% (n = 49) of the surgeries, an intraoperative second-look surgery (SLS) after incomplete resection verified by iMRI had to be performed. Of those incomplete resections, LEATs were involved most often (40.8% of intraoperative SLSs, 29.9% of patients with LEAT). In addition, 37.5% (6 of 16) of patients in the diffuse glioma group and 12.9% of the patients with focal cortical dysplasia underwent an SLS. Moreover, iMRI provided additional advantages during implantation of grid, strip, and depth electrodes and enabled intraoperative correction of electrode position in 13.0% (3 of 23) of the cases. Altogether, an

  1. Neuronavigation-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening: A preliminary study in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-11-01

    FUS-induced BBB opening is a promising technique for noninvasive and local delivery of drugs into the brain. Here we propose the novel use of a neuronavigation system to guide the FUS-induced BBB opening procedure, and investigate its feasibility in vivo in large animals. We developed an interface between the neuronavigator and FUS to allow guidance of the focal energy produced by the FUS transducer. The system was tested in 29 pigs by more than 40 sonication procedures and evaluated by MRI. Gd-DTPA concentration was quantitated in vivo by MRI R1 relaxometry and compared by ICP-OES assay. Brain histology after FUS exposure was investigated by HE and TUNEL staining. Neuronavigation could successfully guide the focal beam with comparable precision to neurosurgical stereotactic procedures (2.3 ± 0.9 mm). FUS pressure of 0.43 MPa resulted in consistent BBB-opening. Neuronavigation-guided BBB-opening increased Gd-DTPA deposition by up to 1.83 mM (140% increase). MR relaxometry demonstrated high correlation to ICP-OES measurements (r2 = 0.822), suggesting that Gd-DTPA deposition can be directly measured by imaging. Neuronavigation could provide sufficient precision for guiding FUS to temporally and locally open the BBB. Gd-DTPA deposition in the brain could be quantified by MR relaxometry, providing a potential tool for the in vivo quantification of therapeutic agents in CNS disease treatment.

  2. Structure-constrained image-guided inversion of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jieyi

    The regularization term in the objective function of an inverse problem is equivalent to the "model covariance" in Tarantola's wording. It is not entirely reasonable to consider the model covariance to be isotropic and homogenous, as done in classical Tikhonov regularization, because the correlation relationships among model cells are likely to change with different directions and locations. The structure-constrained image-guided inversion method, presented in this thesis, aims to solve this problem, and can be used to integrate different types of geophysical data and geological information. The method is first theoretically developed and successfully tested with electrical resistivity data. Then it is applied to hydraulic tomography, and promising hydraulic conductivity models are obtained as well. With a correct guiding image, the image-guided inversion results not only follow the correct structure patterns, but also are closer to the true model in terms of parameter values, when compared with the conventional inversion results. To further account for the uncertainty in the guiding image, a Bayesian inversion scheme is added to the image-guided inversion algorithm. Each geophysical model parameter and geological (structure) model parameter is described by a probability density. Using the data misfit of image-guided inversion of the geophysical data as criterion, a stochastic (image-guided) inversion algorithm allows one to optimize both the geophysical model and the geological model at the same time. The last problem discussed in this thesis is, image-guided inversion and interpolation can help reduce non-uniqueness and improve resolution when utilizing spectral induced polarization data and petrophysical relationships to estimate permeability.

  3. The Image-Guided Surgery ToolKit IGSTK: an open source C++ software toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Ibanez, Luis; Gobbi, David; Gary, Kevin; Aylward, Stephen; Jomier, Julien; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Zhang, Hui; Kim, Hee-su; Blake, M. Brian; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    The Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK) is an open source C++ software library that provides the basic components needed to develop image-guided surgery applications. The focus of the toolkit is on robustness using a state machine architecture. This paper presents an overview of the project based on a recent book which can be downloaded from igstk.org. The paper includes an introduction to open source projects, a discussion of our software development process and the best practices that were developed, and an overview of requirements. The paper also presents the architecture framework and main components. This presentation is followed by a discussion of the state machine model that was incorporated and the associated rationale. The paper concludes with an example application.

  4. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Terrence T.; Johnson, J. Patrick; Pashman, Robert; Drazin, Doniel

    2016-01-01

    We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy. PMID:27213152

  5. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Terrence T; Johnson, J Patrick; Pashman, Robert; Drazin, Doniel

    2016-01-01

    We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy. PMID:27213152

  6. Image-Guided Tumor Ablation: Emerging Technologies and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Justin P.; Lee, Edward W.; Yamamoto, Shota; Loh, Christopher T.; Kee, Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    As the trend continues toward the decreased invasiveness of medical procedures, image-guided percutaneous ablation has begun to supplant surgery for the local control of small tumors in the liver, kidney, and lung. New ablation technologies, and refinements of existing technologies, will enable treatment of larger and more complex tumors in these and other organs. At the same time, improvements in intraprocedural imaging promise to improve treatment accuracy and reduce complications. In this review, the latest advancements in clinical and experimental ablation technologies will be summarized, and new applications of image-guided tumor ablation will be discussed. PMID:22550370

  7. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Current Status for Image-Guided Therapy.

    PubMed

    Copelan, Alexander; Hartman, Jason; Chehab, Monzer; Venkatesan, Aradhana M

    2015-12-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an innovative therapeutic technology, permitting extracorporeal or endocavitary delivery of targeted thermal ablation while minimizing injury to the surrounding structures. While ultrasound-guided HIFU was the original image-guided system, MR-guided HIFU has many inherent advantages, including superior depiction of anatomic detail and superb real-time thermometry during thermoablation sessions, and it has recently demonstrated promising results in the treatment of both benign and malignant tumors. HIFU has been employed in the management of prostate cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, uterine leiomyomas, and breast tumors, and has been associated with success in limited studies for palliative pain management in pancreatic cancer and bone tumors. Nonthermal HIFU bioeffects, including immune system modulation and targeted drug/gene therapy, are currently being explored in the preclinical realm, with an emphasis on leveraging these therapeutic effects in the care of the oncology patient. Although still in its early stages, the wide spectrum of therapeutic capabilities of HIFU offers great potential in the field of image-guided oncologic therapy. PMID:26622104

  8. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of malignancies in various inner organs - technique, indications, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Tina; Ricke, Jens; Gebauer, Bernhard; Streitparth, Florian

    2016-06-01

    In the last few years, minimally invasive tumor ablation performed by interventional radiologists has gained increasing relevance in oncologic patient care. Limitations of thermal ablation techniques such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), including large tumor size, cooling effects of adjacent vessels, and tumor location near thermosensitive structures, have led to the development of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, especially for the treatment of liver malignancies. This article reviews technical properties of image-guided brachytherapy, indications and its current clinical role in multimodal cancer treatment. Furthermore, perspectives of this novel therapy option will be discussed. PMID:27504135

  9. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of malignancies in various inner organs – technique, indications, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bretschneider, Tina; Ricke, Jens; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, minimally invasive tumor ablation performed by interventional radiologists has gained increasing relevance in oncologic patient care. Limitations of thermal ablation techniques such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), including large tumor size, cooling effects of adjacent vessels, and tumor location near thermosensitive structures, have led to the development of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, especially for the treatment of liver malignancies. This article reviews technical properties of image-guided brachytherapy, indications and its current clinical role in multimodal cancer treatment. Furthermore, perspectives of this novel therapy option will be discussed. PMID:27504135

  10. The image-guided surgery toolkit IGSTK: an open source C++ software toolkit.

    PubMed

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Cheng, Patrick; Gary, Kevin; Ibanez, Luis; Gobbi, David; Lindseth, Frank; Yaniv, Ziv; Aylward, Stephen; Jomier, Julien; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the image-guided surgery toolkit (IGSTK). IGSTK is an open source C++ software library that provides the basic components needed to develop image-guided surgery applications. It is intended for fast prototyping and development of image-guided surgery applications. The toolkit was developed through a collaboration between academic and industry partners. Because IGSTK was designed for safety-critical applications, the development team has adopted lightweight software processes that emphasizes safety and robustness while, at the same time, supporting geographically separated developers. A software process that is philosophically similar to agile software methods was adopted emphasizing iterative, incremental, and test-driven development principles. The guiding principle in the architecture design of IGSTK is patient safety. The IGSTK team implemented a component-based architecture and used state machine software design methodologies to improve the reliability and safety of the components. Every IGSTK component has a well-defined set of features that are governed by state machines. The state machine ensures that the component is always in a valid state and that all state transitions are valid and meaningful. Realizing that the continued success and viability of an open source toolkit depends on a strong user community, the IGSTK team is following several key strategies to build an active user community. These include maintaining a users and developers' mailing list, providing documentation (application programming interface reference document and book), presenting demonstration applications, and delivering tutorial sessions at relevant scientific conferences. PMID:17703338

  11. Percutaneous inner-ear access via an image-guided industrial robot system

    PubMed Central

    Baron, S; Eilers, H; Munske, B; Toennies, JL; Balachandran, R; Labadie, RF; Ortmaier, T; Webster, RJ

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided robots have been widely used for bone shaping and percutaneous access to interventional sites. However, due to high-accuracy requirements and proximity to sensitive nerves and brain tissues, the adoption of robots in inner-ear surgery has been slower. In this paper the authors present their recent work towards developing two image-guided industrial robot systems for accessing challenging inner-ear targets. Features of the systems include optical tracking of the robot base and tool relative to the patient and Kalman filter-based data fusion of redundant sensory information (from encoders and optical tracking systems) for enhanced patient safety. The approach enables control of differential robot positions rather than absolute positions, permitting simplified calibration procedures and reducing the reliance of the system on robot calibration in order to ensure overall accuracy. Lastly, the authors present the results of two phantom validation experiments simulating the use of image-guided robots in inner-ear surgeries such as cochlear implantation and petrous apex access. PMID:20718268

  12. Polymer fiber-image-guide-based embedded optical circuit board.

    PubMed

    Ai, J; Li, Y

    1999-01-10

    We propose a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-image-guide-based embedded optical circuit board for future optoelectronic array-interconnection applications. An experimental prototypical board that embeds perfect-shuffle and banyan interconnect patterns of 16 x 16 parallel links, each of which offers a fiber pixel density of >1000 pixels/mm(2), are demonstrated experimentally. PMID:18305618

  13. IMRT for Image-Guided Single Vocal Cord Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Keskin-Cambay, Fatma; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have been developing an image-guided single vocal cord irradiation technique to treat patients with stage T1a glottic carcinoma. In the present study, we compared the dose coverage to the affected vocal cord and the dose delivered to the organs at risk using conventional, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) coplanar, and IMRT non-coplanar techniques. Methods and Materials: For 10 patients, conventional treatment plans using two laterally opposed wedged 6-MV photon beams were calculated in XiO (Elekta-CMS treatment planning system). An in-house IMRT/beam angle optimization algorithm was used to obtain the coplanar and non-coplanar optimized beam angles. Using these angles, the IMRT plans were generated in Monaco (IMRT treatment planning system, Elekta-CMS) with the implemented Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. The organs at risk included the contralateral vocal cord, arytenoids, swallowing muscles, carotid arteries, and spinal cord. The prescription dose was 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Results: For the conventional plans and coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, the population-averaged mean dose {+-} standard deviation to the planning target volume was 67 {+-} 1 Gy. The contralateral vocal cord dose was reduced from 66 {+-} 1 Gy in the conventional plans to 39 {+-} 8 Gy and 36 {+-} 6 Gy in the coplanar and non-coplanar IMRT plans, respectively. IMRT consistently reduced the doses to the other organs at risk. Conclusions: Single vocal cord irradiation with IMRT resulted in good target coverage and provided significant sparing of the critical structures. This has the potential to improve the quality-of-life outcomes after RT and maintain the same local control rates.

  14. Image-guided navigation: a cost effective practical introduction using the Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK).

    PubMed

    Güler, Özgür; Yaniv, Ziv

    2012-01-01

    Teaching the key technical aspects of image-guided interventions using a hands-on approach is a challenging task. This is primarily due to the high cost and lack of accessibility to imaging and tracking systems. We provide a software and data infrastructure which addresses both challenges. Our infrastructure allows students, patients, and clinicians to develop an understanding of the key technologies by using them, and possibly by developing additional components and integrating them into a simple navigation system which we provide. Our approach requires minimal hardware, LEGO blocks to construct a phantom for which we provide CT scans, and a webcam which when combined with our software provides the functionality of a tracking system. A premise of this approach is that tracking accuracy is sufficient for our purpose. We evaluate the accuracy provided by a consumer grade webcam and show that it is sufficient for educational use. We provide an open source implementation of all the components required for a basic image-guided navigation as part of the Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). It has long been known that in education there is no substitute for hands-on experience, to quote Sophocles, "One must learn by doing the thing; for though you think you know it, you have no certainty, until you try.". Our work provides this missing capability in the context of image-guided navigation. Enabling a wide audience to learn and experience the use of a navigation system. PMID:23367310

  15. Metabolic approach for tumor delineation in glioma surgery: 3D MR spectroscopy image-guided resection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Lin, Ching-Po; Wang, Tian-Liang; Qin, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Jin-Song

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The extent of resection is one of the most essential factors that influence the outcomes of glioma resection. However, conventional structural imaging has failed to accurately delineate glioma margins because of tumor cell infiltration. Three-dimensional proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) can provide metabolic information and has been used in preoperative tumor differentiation, grading, and radiotherapy planning. Resection based on glioma metabolism information may provide for a more extensive resection and yield better outcomes for glioma patients. In this study, the authors attempt to integrate 3D (1)H-MRS into neuronavigation and assess the feasibility and validity of metabolically based glioma resection. METHODS Choline (Cho)-N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) maps were calculated and integrated into neuronavigation. The CNI thresholds were quantitatively analyzed and compared with structural MRI studies. Glioma resections were performed under 3D (1)H-MRS guidance. Volumetric analyses were performed for metabolic and structural images from a low-grade glioma (LGG) group and high-grade glioma (HGG) group. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurological assessments were performed immediately after surgery and 1 year after tumor resection. RESULTS Fifteen eligible patients with primary cerebral gliomas were included in this study. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS maps were successfully coregistered with structural images and integrated into navigational system. Volumetric analyses showed that the differences between the metabolic volumes with different CNI thresholds were statistically significant (p < 0.05). For the LGG group, the differences between the structural and the metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.5 were statistically significant (p = 0.0005 and 0.0129, respectively). For the HGG group, the differences between the structural and metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.0 were statistically significant (p = 0.0027 and 0

  16. Design, implementation and investigation of an image guide-based optical flip-flop array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, P. C.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the design for an image guide-based optical flip-flop array created using a Hughes liquid crystal light valve and a flexible image guide in a feedback loop. This design is used to investigate the application of image guides as a communication mechanism in numerical optical computers. It is shown that image guides can be used successfully in this manner but mismatch match between the input and output fiber arrays is extremely limiting.

  17. Integration of 3D 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy data into neuronavigation systems for tumor biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanberoglu, Berkay; Moore, Nina Z.; Frakes, David; Karam, Lina J.; Debbins, Josef P.; Preul, Mark C.

    2013-03-01

    Many important applications in clinical medicine can benefit from the fusion of spectroscopy data with anatomical images. For example, the correlation of metabolite profiles with specific regions of interest in anatomical tumor images can be useful in characterizing and treating heterogeneous tumors that appear structurally homogeneous. Such applications can build on the correlation of data from in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (1HMRSI) with data from genetic and ex-vivo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. To establish that correlation, tissue samples must be neurosurgically extracted from specifically identified locations with high accuracy. Toward that end, this paper presents new neuronavigation technology that enhances current clinical capabilities in the context of neurosurgical planning and execution. The proposed methods improve upon the current state-of-the-art in neuronavigation through the use of detailed three dimensional (3D) 1H-MRSI data. MRSI spectra are processed and analyzed, and specific voxels are selected based on their chemical contents. 3D neuronavigation overlays are then generated and applied to anatomical image data in the operating room. Without such technology, neurosurgeons must rely on memory and other qualitative resources alone for guidance in accessing specific MRSI-identified voxels. In contrast, MRSI-based overlays provide quantitative visual cues and location information during neurosurgery. The proposed methods enable a progressive new form of online MRSI-guided neuronavigation that we demonstrate in this study through phantom validation and clinical application.

  18. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles for Image-Guided Therapy of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Oumzil, Khalid; Ramin, Michael A; Lorenzato, Cyril; Hémadou, Audrey; Laroche, Jeanny; Jacobin-Valat, Marie Josée; Mornet, Stephane; Roy, Claude-Eric; Kauss, Tina; Gaudin, Karen; Clofent-Sanchez, Gisèle; Barthélémy, Philippe

    2016-03-16

    Although the application of nanotechnologies to atherosclerosis remains a young field, novel strategies are needed to address this public health issue. In this context, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach has been gradually investigated in order to enable image-guided treatments. In this contribution, we report a new approach based on nucleoside-lipids allowing the synthesis of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) loaded with iron oxide particles and therapeutic agents. The insertion of nucleoside-lipids allows the formation of stable SLNs loaded with prostacycline (PGI2) able to inhibit platelet aggregation. The new SLNs feature better relaxivity properties in comparison to the clinically used contrast agent Feridex, indicating that SLNs are suitable for image-guided therapy. PMID:26751997

  19. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  20. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Image-Guided IMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayles, P.

    2006-12-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of the subject of intensity modulated radiotherapy and the associated imaging. Most of the names associated with advanced radiotherapy can be found among the 80 authors and the book is therefore an authoritative reference text. The early chapters deal with the basic principles and include an interesting comparison between views of quality assurance for IMRT from Europe and North America. It is refreshing to see that the advice given has moved on from the concept of individual patient based quality control to more generic testing of the delivery system. However, the point is made that the whole process including the data transfer needs to be quality assured and the need for thorough commissioning of the process is emphasised. The `tricks' needed to achieve a dose based IMRT plan are well covered by the group at Ghent and there is an interesting summary of biological aspects of treatment planning for IMRT by Andrzej Niemierko. The middle section of the book deals with advanced imaging aspects of both treatment planning and delivery. The contributions of PET and MR imaging are well covered and there is a rather rambling section on molecular imaging. Image guidance in radiotherapy treatment is addressed including the concept of adaptive radiotherapy. The treatment aspects could perhaps have merited some more coverage, but there is a very thorough discussion of 4D techniques. The final section of the book considers each site of the body in turn. This will be found useful by those wishing to embark on IMRT in a new area, although some of the sections are more comprehensive than others. The book contains a wealth of interesting and thought provoking articles giving details as well as broad principles, and would be a useful addition to every departmental library. The editors have done a good job of ensuring that the different chapters are complementary, and of encouraging a systematic approach to the descriptions of IMRT in

  2. Image-guided drainage of cystic vestibular schwannomata.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Chris; Prasad, K S Manjunath; Hill, John; Johnson, Ian; Heaton, Judith M; Crossman, John E; Mendelow, Alexander D

    2010-01-01

    The management of vestibular schwannomata is controversial. Surveillance remains an acceptable option for elderly patients or those with small lesions. Stereoradiosurgery is also an option, while surgery is often preferred in younger patients with larger lesions. In elderly patients with lesions causing brainstem compression, craniotomy is a major undertaking. We report two cases of cystic cerebellopontine angle tumours in patients with co-morbidity, who were managed successfully with image-guided insertion of a cystoperitoneal shunt. PMID:19693430

  3. Image-Guided Abdominal Surgery and Therapy Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Robert L.; Herrell, S. Duke; Miga, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Image-Guided Surgery has become the standard of care in intracranial neurosurgery providing more exact resections while minimizing damage to healthy tissue. Moving that process to abdominal organs presents additional challenges in the form of image segmentation, image to physical space registration, organ motion and deformation. In this paper, we present methodologies and results for addressing these challenges in two specific organs: the liver and the kidney. PMID:25077012

  4. Novel Image-Guided Management of a Uterine Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Przybojewski, Stefan J. Sadler, David J.

    2011-02-15

    The investigators present a novel image-guided embolization, not previously described, of a uterine arteriovenous malformation (AVM) resistant to endovascular management. The uterus was exposed surgically, and Histoacryl (Braun, Fulda, Germany) was injected directly into the nidus using ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopy. The patient had a successful full-term pregnancy after this procedure. This technique may be a useful alternative management strategy in patients with uterine AVM who fail traditional endovascular embolization and who still desire fertility.

  5. Technique development for photoacoustic imaging guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qian; Zhang, Haonan; Yuan, Jie; Feng, Ting; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), i.e. tissue destruction induced by a local increase of temperature by means of laser light energy transmission, has been frequently used for minimally invasive treatments of various diseases such as benign thyroid nodules and liver cancer. The emerging photoacoustic (PA) imaging, when integrated with ultrasound (US), could contribute to LITT procedure. PA can enable a good visualization of percutaneous apparatus deep inside tissue and, therefore, can offer accurate guidance of the optical fibers to the target tissue. Our initial experiment demonstrated that, by picking the strong photoacoustic signals generated at the tips of optical fibers as a needle, the trajectory and position of the fibers could be visualized clearly using a commercial available US unit. When working the conventional US Bscan mode, the fibers disappeared when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 60 degree; while working on the new PA mode, the fibers could be visualized without any problem even when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 75 degree. Moreover, with PA imaging function integrated, the optical fibers positioned into the target tissue, besides delivering optical energy for thermotherapy, can also be used to generate PA signals for on-line evaluation of LITT. Powered by our recently developed PA physio-chemical analysis, PA measurements from the tissue can provide a direct and accurate feedback of the tissue responses to laser ablation, including the changes in not only chemical compositions but also histological microstructures. The initial experiment on the rat liver model has demonstrated the excellent sensitivity of PA imaging to the changes in tissue temperature rise and tissue status (from native to coagulated) when the tissue is treated in vivo with LITT.

  6. Image-guided therapy: evolution and breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Haigron, Pascal; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Beyond the advances made in computer-assisted interventions and robotic systems, the demand for more efficient and safer therapies remains challenging. Thus, if it is possible to improve the instrument tracking, steering, and target localization, to miniaturize the sensors and actuators, and to conduct preoperatively planned minimally invasive therapies, we still need new resources to achieve permanent destruction of abnormal tissues or suppression of pathological processes. Most of the physics-based (or energy-based) therapeutic principles at our disposal have been established a long time ago, but their actions on basic cellular and molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. They all have a wide spectrum of clinical targets in terms of organs and pathologies, modes of application (external, interstitial, intraluminal, etc.) with advantages and side-effect drawbacks, proven indications, and contraindications. Some of them may still face controversies regarding their outcomes. This short article, mainly focused on tumor destruction, briefly reviews in its first part some of these techniques and sketches the next generation under investigation. The former include radio frequency (RF), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HiFU), microwaves, and cryotherapy, of which all are temperature based. Laser-based approaches [e.g., photodynamic therapy (PDT) at large] are also discussed. Radiotherapy and its variants (hadrontherapy, brachytherapy, Gamma Knife, and CyberKnife) remain, of course, as the reference technique in cancer treatment. The next breakthroughs are examined in the second part of the article. They are based on the close association between imaging agents, drugs, and some stimulation techniques. The ongoing research efforts in that direction show that, if they are still far from clinical applications, strong expectations are made. From the point of view of interventional planning and image guidance, all of them share a lot of concerns. PMID:20176527

  7. [Treatment of central and neuropathic facial pain by chronic stimulation of the motor cortex: value of neuronavigation guidance systems for the localization of the motor cortex].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, J P; Lefaucheur, J P; Le Guerinel, C; Fontaine, D; Nakano, N; Sakka, L; Eizenbaum, J F; Pollin, B; Keravel, Y

    2000-11-01

    Thirty two patients with refractory central and neuropathic pain of peripheral origin were treated by chronic stimulation of the motor cortex between May 1993 and January 1997. The mean follow-up was 27. 3 months. The first 24 patients were operated according to the technique described by Tsubokawa. The last 13 cases (8 new patients and 5 reinterventions) were operated by a technique including localization by superficial CT reconstruction of the central region and neuronavigator guidance. The position of the central sulcus was confirmed by the use of intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials. The somatotopic organisation of the motor cortex was established peroperatively by studying the motor responses at stimulation of the motor cortex through the dura. Ten of the 13 patients with central pain (77%) and nine of the 12 patients with neuropathic facial pain had experienced substantial pain relief (75%). One of the 3 patients with post-paraplegia pain was clearly improved. A satisfactory result was obtained in one patient with pain related to plexus avulsion and in one patient with pain related to intercostal herpes zoster. None of the patients developed epileptic seizures. The position of the stimulating poles effective on pain corresponded to the somatotopic representation of the motor cortex. The neuronavigator localization and guidance technique proved to be most useful identifying the appropriate portion of the motor gyrus. It also allowed the establishment of reliable correlations between electrophysiological-clinical and anatomical data which may be used to improve the clinical results and possibly to extend the indications of this technique. PMID:11084480

  8. Use of an image-guided robotic radiosurgery system for the treatment of canine nonlymphomatous nasal tumors.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Seth A; Charney, Sarah; Dervisis, Nikolaos G; Witten, Matthew R; Ettinger, Susan; Berg, Jason; Joseph, Richard

    2014-01-01

    An image-guided robotic stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) system can be used to deliver curative-intent radiation in either single fraction or hypofractionated doses. Medical records for 19 dogs with nonlymphomatous nasal tumors treated with hypofractionated image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), either with or without adjunctive treatment, were retrospectively analyzed for survival and prognostic factors. Median survival time (MST) was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Age, breed, tumor type, stage, tumor size, prescribed radiation dose, and heterogeneity index were analyzed for prognostic significance. Dogs were treated with three consecutive-day, 8-12 gray (Gy) fractions of image-guided robotic SBRT. Overall MST was 399 days. No significant prognostic factors were identified. Acute side effects were rare and mild. Late side effects included one dog with an oronasal fistula and six dogs with seizures. In three of six dogs, seizures were a presenting complaint prior to SBRT. The cause of seizures in the remaining three dogs could not be definitively determined due to lack of follow-up computed tomography (CT) imaging. The seizures could have been related to either progression of disease or late radiation effect. Results indicate that image-guided robotic SBRT, either with or without adjunctive therapy, for canine nonlymphomatous nasal tumors provides comparable survival times (STs) to daily fractionated megavoltage radiation with fewer required fractions and fewer acute side effects. PMID:24446402

  9. Intraoperative neurosonography revisited: effective neuronavigation in pediatric neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) is a widely used noninvasive method to evaluate the morphology, vasculature, and pathologies of the brain. The advantages of IOUS include realtime depiction of neuroanatomy, accurate localization and characterization of a lesion, reduced surgical exploration and surgical time, and presumably decreased patient morbidity. IOUS is useful in the intraoperative monitoring of lesion resection as well as intraoperative localization and characterization of focal parenchymal lesions. This review aims to provide an overview of the clinical application of IOUS in pediatric intracranial neurosurgery. PMID:25672771

  10. Cavernous sinus lesions biopsy with neuronavigation and tip-cut needle

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzetti, Martin; Carvalho, Herculano; Cattoni, Maria; Gonçalves-Ferreira, Antonio; Pimentel, José; Antuñes, Joao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transoval biopsy of cavernous sinus (CS) lesions is the last non-invasive diagnostic option in those 15% of patients in whom etiology remains unclear in spite of extensive neuroradiological imaging, clinical assessment, and laboratory evaluation. However, there are no guidelines defining indications and the most appropriate technique for this procedure. Case Description: We present four patients in whom we performed X-ray and neuronavigation-assisted transoval CS biopsies using tip-cut needles. Conclusion: The technique described allows the operator to determine the optimal angle for entering the CS, avoiding the complications due to distorted anatomy, and facilitating orientation once inside the CS. It reduces both radiation exposure as well as general anesthesia duration. PMID:25593783

  11. Development of a MicroCT-Based Image-Guided Conformal Radiotherapy System for Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hu; Rodriguez, Manuel; van den Haak, Fred; Nelson, Geoffrey; Jogani, Rahil; Xu, Jiali; Zhu, Xinzhi; Xian, Yongjiang; Tran, Phuoc T.; Felsher, Dean W.; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The need for clinically-relevant radiation therapy technology for the treatment of preclinical models of disease has spurred the development of a variety of dedicated platforms for small animal irradiation. Our group has taken the approach of adding the ability to deliver conformal radiotherapy to an existing 120 kVp micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner. Methods A GE eXplore RS120 microCT scanner was modified by the addition of a two-dimensional subject translation stage and a variable aperture collimator. Quality assurance protocols for these devices, including measurement of translation stage positioning accuracy, collimator aperture accuracy, and collimator alignment with the x-ray beam, were devised. Use of this system for image-guided radiotherapy was assessed by irradiation of a solid water phantom as well as of two mice bearing spontaneous MYC-induced lung tumors. Radiation damage was assessed ex vivo by immunohistochemical detection of γH2AX foci. Results The positioning error of the translation stage was found to be less than 0.05 mm, while after alignment of the collimator with the x-ray axis through adjustment of its displacement and rotation, the collimator aperture error was less than 0.1 mm measured at isocenter. CT image-guided treatment of a solid water phantom demonstrated target localization accuracy to within 0.1 mm. γH2AX foci were detected within irradiated lung tumors in mice, with contralateral lung tissue displaying background staining. Conclusions Addition of radiotherapy functionality to a microCT scanner is an effective means of introducing image-guided radiation treatments into the preclinical setting. This approach has been shown to facilitate small animal conformal radiotherapy while leveraging existing technology. PMID:20395069

  12. Image-guided transorbital procedures with endoscopic video augmentation

    PubMed Central

    DeLisi, Michael P.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical interventions to the orbital space behind the eyeball are limited to highly invasive procedures due to the confined nature of the region along with the presence of several intricate soft tissue structures. A minimally invasive approach to orbital surgery would enable several therapeutic options, particularly new treatment protocols for optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. The authors have developed an image-guided system for the purpose of navigating a thin flexible endoscope to a specified target region behind the eyeball. Navigation within the orbit is particularly challenging despite its small volume, as the presence of fat tissue occludes the endoscopic visual field while the surgeon must constantly be aware of optic nerve position. This research investigates the impact of endoscopic video augmentation to targeted image-guided navigation in a series of anthropomorphic phantom experiments. Methods: A group of 16 surgeons performed a target identification task within the orbits of four skull phantoms. The task consisted of identifying the correct target, indicated by the augmented video and the preoperative imaging frames, out of four possibilities. For each skull, one orbital intervention was performed with video augmentation, while the other was done with the standard image guidance technique, in random order. Results: The authors measured a target identification accuracy of 95.3% and 85.9% for the augmented and standard cases, respectively, with statistically significant improvement in procedure time (Z = −2.044, p = 0.041) and intraoperator mean procedure time (Z = 2.456, p = 0.014) when augmentation was used. Conclusions: Improvements in both target identification accuracy and interventional procedure time suggest that endoscopic video augmentation provides valuable additional orientation and trajectory information in an image-guided procedure. Utilization of video augmentation in transorbital interventions could further minimize

  13. Image-guided inversion of electrical resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Revil, A.; Karaoulis, M.; Hale, D.; Doetsch, J.; Cuttler, S.

    2014-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is based on solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential and is characterized by a good sensitivity only in the vicinity of the electrodes used to gather the data. To provide more information to ERT, we propose an image-guided or structure-constrained inversion of the apparent resistivity data. This approach uses structural information obtained directly from a guiding image. This guiding image can be drawn from a high resolution geophysical method based on the propagation equation (e.g. migrated seismic or ground penetrating radar images) or possibly from a geological cross-section of the subsurface based on some prior geological expertise. The locations and orientations of the structural features can be extracted by image processing methods to determine the structure tensor and the semblances of the guiding image at a set of pixel. Then, we introduce these structural constraints into the inversion of the apparent resistivity data by weighting the four-direction smoothing matrix to smooth along, but not across, structural features. This approach allows preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. The image-guided inversion is also combined with an image-guided interpolation approach used to focus a smooth resistivity image. This yields structurally-appealing resistivity tomograms, while the whole process remains computationally efficient. Such a procedure generates a more realistic resistivity distribution (closer to the true ones), which can be, in turn, used quantitatively using appropriate petrophysical transforms, to obtain parameters of interest such as porosity and saturation. We check the validity of this approach using two synthetic case studies as well as two real datasets. For the field data, the image used to guide the inversion of the electrical resistivity data is a GPR section in the first case and a combination of seismic and structural information in the

  14. Image-guided breast biopsy: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, E A M; Wilson, A R M; Michell, M J

    2010-04-01

    Percutaneous image-guided breast biopsy is widely practised to evaluate predominantly non-palpable breast lesions. There has been steady development in percutaneous biopsy techniques. Fine-needle aspiration cytology was the original method of sampling, followed in the early 1990s by large core needle biopsy. The accuracy of both has been improved by ultrasound and stereotactic guidance. Larger bore vacuum-assisted biopsy devices became available in the late 1990s and are now commonplace in most breast units. We review the different types of breast biopsy devices currently available together with various localization techniques used, focusing on their advantages, limitations and current controversial clinical management issues. PMID:20338392

  15. Robotic Image-Guided Needle Interventions of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Mozer, Pierre C; Partin, Alan W; Stoianovici, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Prostate biopsy and needle-directed prostate therapies are currently performed free-handed or with needle external templates under ultrasound guidance. Direct image-guided intervention robots are modern instruments that have the potential to substantially enhance these procedures. These may increase the accuracy and repeatability with which needles are placed in the gland. The authors’ group has developed a robot for precise prostate targeting that operates remotely alongside the patient in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner, as guided according to the image. PMID:19390670

  16. Compact instrument for fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Bhaumik, Srabani; Li, Qing; Staudinger, V. Paul; Yazdanfar, Siavash

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) is an emerging technique in oncology, neurology, and cardiology. To adapt intraoperative imaging for various surgical applications, increasingly flexible and compact FIGS instruments are necessary. We present a compact, portable FIGS system and demonstrate its use in cardiovascular mapping in a preclinical model of myocardial ischemia. Our system uses fiber optic delivery of laser diode excitation, custom optics with high collection efficiency, and compact consumer-grade cameras as a low-cost and compact alternative to open surgical FIGS systems. Dramatic size and weight reduction increases flexibility and access, and allows for handheld use or unobtrusive positioning over the surgical field.

  17. [Image-guided stereotaxic biopsy of central nervous system lesions].

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Esperança, J C; Duarte, F

    1998-06-01

    In a series of 44 image guided stereotactic biopsy from August 1995 until March 1997, findings were as follows (frequency order). Tumors, glioblastoma was the most frequent. Primary lymphoma and other conditions associated to AIDS. Metastasis, three cases, Vasculites, two cases, Arachnoid cyst, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, cortical degeneration, inespecific calcification (one case each). The age varied from 1 to 83 years. Forty one lesions were supratentorial, two infratentorial, and one was outside the brain (dura and skull) and we used stereotaxy to localize it. There was no mortality and morbidity was 2.3%. The literature is reviewed. We conclude that this procedure is safe and highly diagnostic. PMID:9698729

  18. Image-Guided Thromboembolectomy of Acute Arterial Occlusion in Children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Han, Ahram; Choi, Chanjoong; Min, Sang-Il; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Ha, Jongwon; Min, Seung-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute arterial thromboembolism (ATE) is rare in childhood, but this medical emergency requires immediate treatment. Described herein are separate instances of lower extremity ATE in 2 children, both of whom were successfully managed through image-guided thromboembolectomy (IGT). One patient, a 34-month-old female child with nephrotic syndrome, developed bilateral iliac and popliteal thromboembolic arterial occlusions after high-dose steroid therapy. Another 9-year-old girl suffered an embolism of left popliteal artery due to infectious endocarditis. Both patients underwent IGT using over-the-wire Fogarty catheters. During follow-up, presenting symptoms resolved without significant complications. PMID:27177711

  19. Technology and human errors in image-guided surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaowei; Miao, Song; Zamorano, Lucia J.; Li, Qinghang; Gong, JianXing; Diaz, Fernando

    1998-06-01

    Using image guidance for stereotactic surgery has been widely adopted in neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery and other surgery operations. Careful, precise and robust implementation of image-guidance can offer surgeon accurate intra-operative information that traditional techniques can not reach. Weak design, careless utilization, and dilemma in quality assurance protocol may result in severe scenarios. It is because that introducing image guidance into the operating room involves high precise technologies, delicate instruments and sophisticated processes. These can offer precision as well as space for human errors. A method based on the 'failure modes and effects analysis' is introduced to systematically study human errors in the image-guided surgery field. The paper presented the fundamental steps and architectures of the method. For better understanding of the method, a simple example is also provided. Analyzing human errors with the 'failure mode and effects analysis' benefits the development life cycle of the image-guided surgery system. It also helps for designing the clinical quality assurance process and the training courses for surgeons.

  20. Miniature image guided three-axis scanning and positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avirovik, Dragan; Dave, Digant; Priya, Shashank

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a high precision three axes scanning and positioning system for integration with Multifunctional Image Guided Surgical (MIGS) Platform. The stage integrates three main components: an optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe, laser scalpel and suction cup. The requirements for this stage were to provide scanning area of 400mm2, resolution of less than 10 microns and scanning velocity in the range of 10 - 40 mm/s. The stage was modeled using computer aided design software NX Unigraphics. In addition to the parameters mentioned above, additional boundary conditions for the stage were set as low volume and modularity. Optimized stage model was fabricated by using rapid prototyping technique that integrates low cost stepper motors, threaded rod drive train and a stepper motor controller. The EZ4axis stepper motor controller was able to provide 1/8th microstep resolution control over the motors, which met the criterion desired for the MIGS platform. Integration of computer controlled three-axis stage with MIGS platform provides the opportunity for conducting intricate surgical procedures using remote control or joystick. The device is image guided using the OCT probe and it is able to pin point any location requiring a laser scalpel incision. Due to the scanning capabilities, a high quality threedimensional image of the tissue topography is obtained which allows the surgeon to make a confident decision of where to apply the laser scalpel and make an incision.

  1. Image Guided Endoscopic Evacuation of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chad M; Vespa, Paul; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Carmichael, Stanley T.; Alger, Jeffry; Frazee, John; Starkman, Sid; Liebeskind, David; Nenov, Valeriy; Elashoff, Robert; Martin, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality. ICH lacks an effective medical or surgical treatment despite the acknowledged pathophysiological benefits of achieved hemostasis and clot removal. Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising minimally invasive approach designed to limit operative injury and maximize hematoma removal. Methods A single center randomized controlled trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of stereotactic hematoma evacuation compared to best medical management. Patients were randomized within 24 hours of hemorrhage in a 3:2 fashion to best medical management plus endoscopic hematoma evacuation or best medical management alone. Data was collected to assess efficacy and safety of hematoma evacuation and to identify procedural components requiring technical improvement. Results 10 patients have been enrolled and randomized to treatment. Six patients underwent endoscopic evacuation with a hematoma volume reduction of 80% +/−13 at 24 hours post procedure. The medical arm demonstrated a hematoma enlargement of 78% +/−142 during this same period. Rehemorrhage rates and deterioration rates were similar in the two groups. Mortality was 20% in the endoscopic group and 50% in the medical treatment cohort. The endoscopic technique was shown to be effective in identification and evacuation of hematomas while reduction in the number of endoscopic passes and maintenance of hemostasis require further study. Conclusion Image guided stereotactic endoscopic hematoma removal is a promising minimally invasive technique that is effective in immediate hematoma evacuation. This technique deserves further investigation to determine its role in ICH management. PMID:18424298

  2. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S; Johnson, Perry B; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-04-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ~0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  3. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  4. Image guided surgery in the management of craniocerebral gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Elserry, Tarek; Anwer, Hesham; Esene, Ignatius Ngene

    2013-01-01

    Background: A craniocerebral trauma caused by firearms is a complex injury with high morbidity and mortality. One of the most intriguing and controversial part in their management in salvageable patients is the decision to remove the bullet/pellet. A bullet is foreign to the brain and, in principle, should be removed. Surgical options for bullet extraction span from conventional craniotomy, through C-arm-guided surgery to minimally invasive frame or frameless stereotaxy. But what is the best surgical option? Methods: We prospectively followed up a cohort of 28 patients with cranio-cerebral gunshot injury (CCHSI) managed from January to December 2012 in our department of neurosurgery. The missiles were extracted via stereotaxy (frame or frameless), C-arm-guided, or free-hand-based surgery. Cases managed conservatively were excluded. The Glasgow Outcome Score was used to assess the functional outcome on discharge. Results: Five of the eight “stereotactic cases” had an excellent outcome after missile extraction while the initially planned stereotaxy missed locating the missile in three cases and were thus subjected to free hand craniotomy. Excellent outcome was obtained in five of the nine “neuronavigation cases, five of the eight cases for free hand surgery based on the bony landmarks, and five of the six C-arm-based surgery. Conclusion: Conventional craniotomy isn’t indicated in the extraction of isolated, retained, intracranial firearm missiles in civilian injury but could be useful when the missile is incorporated within a surgical lesion. Stereotactic surgery could be useful for bullet extraction, though with limited precision in identifying small pellets because of their small sizes, thus exposing patients to same risk of brain insult when retrieving a missile by conventional surgery. Because of its availability, C-arm-guided surgery continues to be of much benefit, especially in emergency situations. We recommend an extensive long-term study of these

  5. [Design of an FPGA-based image guided surgery hardware platform].

    PubMed

    Zou, Fa-Dong; Qin, Bin-Jie

    2008-07-01

    An FPGA-Based Image Guided Surgery Hardware Platform has been designed and implemented in this paper. The hardware platform can provide hardware acceleration for image guided surgery. It is completed with a video decoder interface, a DDR memory controller, a 12C bus controller, an interrupt controller and so on. It is able to perform real time video endoscopy image capturing in the surgery and to preserve the hardware interface for image guided surgery algorithm module. PMID:18973036

  6. Multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image guided treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. D.; Patel, Ankit H.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Mujat, Mircea; Husain, Deeba

    2009-02-01

    Subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNM) are a deleterious complication of laser eye injury and retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), choroiditis, and myopic retinopathy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs are approved treatment methods. PDT acts by selective dye accumulation, activation by laser light, and disruption and clotting of the new leaky vessels. However, PDT surgery is currently not image-guided, nor does it proceed in an efficient or automated manner. This may contribute to the high rate of re-treatment. We have developed a multimodal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) for automated diagnosis and image-guided treatment of SRNMs associated with AMD. The system combines line scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (LSLO), fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), PDT laser delivery, and retinal tracking in a compact, efficient platform. This paper describes the system hardware and software design, performance characterization, and automated patient imaging and treatment session procedures and algorithms. Also, we present initial imaging and tracking measurements on normal subjects and automated lesion demarcation and sizing analysis of previously acquired angiograms. Future pre-clinical testing includes line scanning angiography and PDT treatment of AMD subjects. The automated acquisition procedure, enhanced and expedited data post-processing, and innovative image visualization and interpretation tools provided by the multimodal retinal imager may eventually aid in the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of AMD and other retinal diseases.

  7. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome

    PubMed Central

    SHIMOKAWA, Nobuyuki; ABE, Junya; SATOH, Hidetoshi; ARIMA, Hironori; TAKAMI, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  8. Image-guided Tumor Ablation: Standardization of Terminology and Reporting Criteria—A 10-Year Update

    PubMed Central

    Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L.; Breen, David J.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D.; Dupuy, Damian E.; Gervais, Debra A.; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R.; Lee, Fred T.; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J.; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S.; McGahan, John P.; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L.; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C.; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Soulen, Michael C.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24927329

  9. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria--a 10-year update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L; Breen, David J; Callstrom, Matthew R; Charboneau, J William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R; Lee, Fred T; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S; McGahan, John P; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Solomon, Stephen B; Soulen, Michael C; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-10-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. Online supplemental material is available for this article . PMID:24927329

  10. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    PubMed Central

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500–1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths. PMID:24791129

  11. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500-1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths.

  12. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic Or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Nobuyuki; Abe, Junya; Satoh, Hidetoshi; Arima, Hironori; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-08-15

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  13. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria--a 10-year update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L; Breen, David J; Callstrom, Matthew R; Charboneau, J William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R; Lee, Fred T; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S; McGahan, John P; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Solomon, Stephen B; Soulen, Michael C; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-11-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. PMID:25442132

  14. Accuracy analysis of an image-guided system for vertebroplasty spinal therapy based on electromagnetic tracking of instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jienan; Khan, Noureen; Cheng, Patrick; Wilson, Emmanuel; Watson, Vance; Cleary, Kevin; Yaniv, Ziv

    2008-03-01

    Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure in which bone cement is pumped into a fractured vertebral body that has been weakened by osteoporosis, long-term steroid use, or cancer. In this therapy, a trocar (large bore hollow needle) is inserted through the pedicle of the vertebral body which is a narrow passage and requires great skill on the part of the physician to avoid going outside of the pathway. In clinical practice, this procedure is typically done using 2D X-ray fluoroscopy. To investigate the feasibility of providing 3D image guidance, we developed an image-guided system based on electromagnetic tracking and our open source software platform the Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The system includes path planning, interactive 3D navigation, and dynamic referencing. This paper will describe the system and our initial evaluation.

  15. Toward Intraoperative Image-Guided Transoral Robotic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen P; Reaugamornrat, Sureerat; Deguet, Anton; Sorger, Jonathan M; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Richmon, Jeremy; Taylor, Russell H

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of video augmentation on the stereoscopic da Vinci S system with intraoperative image guidance for base of tongue tumor resection in transoral robotic surgery (TORS). Proposed workflow for image-guided TORS begins by identifying and segmenting critical oropharyngeal structures (e.g., the tumor and adjacent arteries and nerves) from preoperative computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These preoperative planned data can be deformably registered to the intraoperative endoscopic view using mobile C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) [1, 2]. Augmentation of TORS endoscopic video defining surgical targets and critical structures has the potential to improve navigation, spatial orientation, and confidence in tumor resection. Experiments in animal specimens achieved statistically significant improvement in target localization error when comparing the proposed image guidance system to simulated current practice. PMID:25525474

  16. Photoacoustic image-guided needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Akers, Walter J.; Maslov, Konstantin; Song, Liang; Jankovic, Ladislav; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Achilefu, Samuel; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    We have implemented a hand-held photoacoustic and ultrasound probe for image-guided needle biopsy using a modified clinical ultrasound array system. Pulsed laser light was delivered via bifurcated optical fiber bundles integrated with the hand-held ultrasound probe. We photoacoustically guided needle insertion into rat sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) following accumulation of indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic image contrast of the needle was achieved. After intradermal injection of ICG in the left forepaw, deeply positioned SLNs (beneath 2-cm thick chicken breast) were easily indentified in vivo and in real time. Further, we confirmed ICG uptake in axillary lymph nodes with in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this hand-held photoacoustic system for facile identification and needle biopsy of SLNs for cancer staging and metastasis detection in humans.

  17. Image-guided focal therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sankineni, Sandeep; Wood, Bradford J; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Walton Diaz, Annerleim; Hoang, Anthony N; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Türkbey, Barış

    2014-11-01

    The adoption of routine prostate specific antigen screening has led to the discovery of many small and low-grade prostate cancers which have a low probability of causing mortality. These cancers, however, are often treated with radical therapies resulting in long-term side effects. There has been increasing interest in minimally invasive focal therapies to treat these tumors. While imaging modalities have improved rapidly over the past decade, similar advances in image-guided therapy are now starting to emerge--potentially achieving equivalent oncologic efficacy while avoiding the side effects of conventional radical surgery. The purpose of this article is to review the existing literature regarding the basis of various focal therapy techniques such as cryotherapy, microwave, laser, and high intensity focused ultrasound, and to discuss the results of recent clinical trials that demonstrate early outcomes in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:25205025

  18. The evolution of image-guided lumbosacral spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Austin R.; Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques and approaches of spinal fusion have considerably evolved since their first description in the early 1900s. The incorporation of pedicle screw constructs into lumbosacral spine surgery is among the most significant advances in the field, offering immediate stability and decreased rates of pseudarthrosis compared to previously described methods. However, early studies describing pedicle screw fixation and numerous studies thereafter have demonstrated clinically significant sequelae of inaccurate surgical fusion hardware placement. A number of image guidance systems have been developed to reduce morbidity from hardware malposition in increasingly complex spine surgeries. Advanced image guidance systems such as intraoperative stereotaxis improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using a variety of surgical approaches, however their clinical indications and clinical impact remain debated. Beginning with intraoperative fluoroscopy, this article describes the evolution of image guided lumbosacral spinal fusion, emphasizing two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) navigational methods. PMID:25992368

  19. Image-guided focal therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sankineni, Sandeep; Wood, Bradford J.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Diaz, Annerleim Walton; Hoang, Anthony N.; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter L.; Türkbey, Barış

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of routine prostate specific antigen screening has led to the discovery of many small and low-grade prostate cancers which have a low probability of causing mortality. These cancers, however, are often treated with radical therapies resulting in long-term side effects. There has been increasing interest in minimally invasive focal therapies to treat these tumors. While imaging modalities have improved rapidly over the past decade, similar advances in image-guided therapy are now starting to emerge—potentially achieving equivalent oncologic efficacy while avoiding the side effects of conventional radical surgery. The purpose of this article is to review the existing literature regarding the basis of various focal therapy techniques such as cryotherapy, microwave, laser, and high intensity focused ultrasound, and to discuss the results of recent clinical trials that demonstrate early outcomes in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:25205025

  20. Active constraint control for image-guided robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yen, P-L; Davies, B L

    2010-01-01

    The concept of active constraint control for image-guided robotic surgery is introduced, together with its benefits and a short outline of its history. The clinical use of active constraint control in orthopaedic surgery is discussed, together with the outcomes of a clinical trial for unicondylar knee replacement surgery. The evolution of the robotic design from large costly structures towards simpler, more cost-effective systems is also presented, leading to the design of the Acrobot 'Sculptor' system. A new approach to the achievement of robotic total knee replacement is also presented, in which a high-speed rotary cutter is used to slice through the bone to achieve a speedy resection. The control concept is presented, together with the results of trials on animal bones and a cadaver, showing that it is possible to remove large quantities of bone both quickly and accurately. PMID:20718267

  1. Radiologists' leading position in image-guided therapy.

    PubMed

    Helmberger, Thomas; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Pereira, Philippe; Gillams, Alice; Martínez, Jose; Lammer, Johannes; Malagari, Katarina; Gangi, Afshin; de Baere, Thierry; Adam, E Jane; Rasch, Coen; Budach, Volker; Reekers, Jim A

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are related to, or performed under, some kind of imaging. Such imaging may be direct inspection (as in open surgery) or indirect inspection as in endoscopy or laparoscopy. Common to all these techniques is the transformation of optical and visible information to a monitor or the eye of the operator. Image-guided therapy (IGT) differs by using processed imaging data acquired before, during and after a wide range of different imaging techniques. This means that the planning, performing and monitoring, as well as the control of the therapeutic procedure, are based and dependent on the "virtual reality" provided by imaging investigations. Since most of such imaging involves radiology in the broadest sense, there is a need to characterise IGT in more detail. In this paper, the technical, medico-legal and medico-political issues will be discussed. The focus will be put on state-of-the-art imaging, technical developments, methodological and legal requisites concerning radiation protection and licensing, speciality-specific limitations and crossing specialty borders, definition of technical and quality standards, and finally to the issue of awareness of IGT within the medical and public community. The specialty-specific knowledge should confer radiologists with a significant role in the overall responsibility for the imaging-related processes in various non-radiological specialties. These processes may encompass purchase, servicing, quality management, radiation protection and documentation, also taking responsibility for the definition and compliance with the legal requirements regarding all radiological imaging performed by non-radiologists. PMID:23325609

  2. Fast-MICP for frameless image-guided surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Wang, Sheng-Ta; Lin, Chung-Wei; Lee, Shin-Tseng

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: In image-guided surgery (IGS) systems, image-to-physical registration is critical for reliable anatomical information mapping and spatial guidance. Conventional stereotactic frame-based or fiducial-based approaches provide accurate registration but are not patient-friendly. This study proposes a frameless cranial IGS system that uses computer vision techniques to replace the frame or fiducials with the natural features of the patient. Methods: To perform a cranial surgery with the proposed system, the facial surface of the patient is first reconstructed by stereo vision. Accuracy is ensured by capturing parallel-line patterns projected from a calibrated LCD projector. Meanwhile, another facial surface is reconstructed from preoperative computed tomography (CT) images of the patient. The proposed iterative closest point (ICP)-based algorithm [fast marker-added ICP (Fast-MICP)] is then used to register the two facial data sets, which transfers the anatomical information from the CT images to the physical space. Results: Experimental results reveal that the Fast-MICP algorithm reduces the computational cost of marker-added ICP (J.-D. Lee et al., ''A coarse-to-fine surface registration algorithm for frameless brain surgery,'' in Proceedings of International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007, pp. 836-839) to 10% and achieves comparable registration accuracy, which is under 3 mm target registration error (TRE). Moreover, two types of optical-based spatial digitizing devices can be integrated for further surgical navigation. Anatomical information or image-guided surgical landmarks can be projected onto the patient to obtain an immersive augmented reality environment. Conclusion: The proposed frameless IGS system with stereo vision obtains TRE of less than 3 mm. The proposed Fast-MICP registration algorithm reduces registration time by 90% without compromising accuracy.

  3. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging versus standard neuronavigation for the neurosurgical treatment of glioblastoma: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kubben, Pieter L.; Scholtes, Felix; Schijns, Olaf E.M.G.; ter Laak-Poort, Mariël P.; Teernstra, Onno P.M.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.; van Overbeeke, Jacobus J.; Martin, Didier H.; van Santbrink, Henk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although the added value of increasing extent of glioblastoma resection is still debated, multiple technologies can assist neurosurgeons in attempting to achieve this goal. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) might be helpful in this context, but to date only one randomized trial exists. Methods: We included 14 adults with a supratentorial tumor suspect for glioblastoma and an indication for gross total resection in this randomized controlled trial of which the interim analysis is presented here. Participants were assigned to either ultra-low-field strength iMRI-guided surgery (0.15 Tesla) or to conventional neuronavigation-guided surgery (cNN). Primary endpoint was residual tumor volume (RTV) percentage. Secondary endpoints were clinical performance, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and survival. Results: Median RTV in the cNN group is 6.5% with an interquartile range of 2.5-14.75%. Median RTV in the iMRI group is 13% with an interquartile range of 3.75-27.75%. A Mann-Whitney test showed no statistically significant difference between these groups (P =0.28). Median survival in the cNN group is 472 days, with an interquartile range of 244-619 days. Median survival in the iMRI group is 396 days, with an interquartile range of 191-599 days (P =0.81). Clinical performance did not differ either. For HRQOL only descriptive statistics were applied due to a limited sample size. Conclusion: This interim analysis of a randomized trial on iMRI-guided glioblastoma resection compared with cNN-guided glioblastoma resection does not show an advantage with respect to extent of resection, clinical performance, and survival for the iMRI group. Ultra-low-field strength iMRI does not seem to be cost-effective compared with cNN, although the lack of a valid endpoint for neurosurgical studies evaluating extent of glioblastoma resection is a limitation of our study and previous volumetry-based studies on this topic. PMID:24991473

  4. Minimally-Invasive, Image-Guided Cochlear Implantation Surgery: First report of clinical implementation

    PubMed Central

    Labadie, Robert F; Balachandran, Ramya; Noble, Jack H; Blachon, Grégoire S; Mitchell, Jason E; Reda, Fitsum A; Dawant, Benoit M; Fitzpatrick, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally-invasive image-guided approach to cochlear implantation (CI) involves drilling a narrow, linear tunnel to the cochlea. Reported herein is the first clinical implementation of this approach. STUDY DESIGN Prospective, cohort study. METHODS On preoperative CT, a safe linear trajectory through the facial recess targeting the scala tympani was planned. Intraoperatively, fiducial markers were bone-implanted, a second CT was acquired, and the trajectory was transferred from preoperative to intraoperative CT. A customized microstereotactic frame was rapidly designed and constructed to constrain a surgical drill along the desired trajectory. Following sterilization, the frame was employed to drill the tunnel to the middle ear. After lifting a tympanomeatal flap and performing a cochleostomy, the electrode array was threaded through the drilled tunnel and into the cochlea. RESULTS Eight of nine patients were successfully implanted using the proposed approach with six insertions completely within scala tympani. Traditional mastoidectomy was performed on one patient following difficulty threading the electrode array via the narrow tunnel. Other difficulties encountered included use of the back-up implant when an electrode was dislodged during threading via the tunnel, tip fold-over, and facial nerve paresis (House-Brackmann II/VII at 12 months) secondary to heat during drilling. Average time of intervention was 182±36 minutes. CONCLUSION Minimally-invasive, image-guided CI is clinically achievable. Further clinical study is necessary to address technological difficulties during drilling and insertion and to assess potential benefits including decreased time of intervention, standardization of surgical intervention, and decreased tissue dissection potentially leading to shorter recovery and earlier implant activation. PMID:24272427

  5. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-02-01

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy.A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging for cranial neuronavigation: methods for automated and standardized data processing and management. A technical note.

    PubMed

    Nennig, E; Heiland, S; Rasche, D; Sartor, K; Stippich, C

    2007-04-30

    Preoperative fMRI is one of the best established clinical fMRI applications. Due to the difficulties in recording and coregistration of functional image data, we present methods to standardize and automate these procedures. We used a self-made interactive software package (AFI - Automated Functional Imaging) to automate the time consuming and complex analysis of fMRI data. AFI controls the BrainVoyager program, a postprocessing software package, and furthermore facilitates data management, anonymization of patient data, storage, documentation, data export to neuronavigation systems and the opportunity of spatial transformation of image data for use in group studies. By the end of 2006 we have used this method on 123 patients with brain tumors and 47 patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The fundamental basis of multimodal neuronavigation is precise coregistration. EPI images contain spatial distortions of 5-15 mm. We were able to reduce the misregistration of EPI and FLASH images in a selectable region of interest to 1-2 mm. Furthermore AFI reduces the average evaluation time for a standard clinical fMRI study (four functional measurements, one anatomical data set) by approx. 50% from 140 minutes to about 70 minutes in comparison to manual evaluation by an expert. More importantly, the personal attendance time required for the evaluation decreases by 84% to 23 minutes as the remainder of the program runs automatically. In comparison to currently available online postprocessing software tools which are more limited in use, BrainVoyager can be used for coregistration, data export to neuronavigation systems and spatial transformation. PMID:24299636

  7. Ultrasound elastography: enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Ioana N.; Rivaz, Hassan; Macura, Katarzyna; Su, Li-Ming; Hamper, Ulrike; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L., II; Lotan, Tamara; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2009-02-01

    Radical prostatectomy using the laparoscopic and robot-assisted approach lacks tactile feedback. Without palpation, the surgeon needs an affordable imaging technology which can be easily incorporated into the laparoscopic surgical procedure, allowing for precise real time intraoperative tumor localization that will guide the extent of surgical resection. Ultrasound elastography (USE) is a novel ultrasound imaging technology that can detect differences in tissue density or stiffness based on tissue deformation. USE was evaluated here as an enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy. USE using a 2D Dynamic Programming (DP) algorithm was applied on data from ex vivo human prostate specimens. It proved consistent in identification of lesions; hard and soft, malignant and benign, located in the prostate's central gland or in the peripheral zone. We noticed the 2D DP method was able to generate low-noise elastograms using two frames belonging to the same compression or relaxation part of the palpation excitation, even at compression rates up to 10%. Good preliminary results were validated by pathology findings, and also by in vivo and ex vivo MR imaging. We also evaluated the use of ultrasound elastography for imaging cavernous nerves; here we present data from animal model experiments.

  8. Image-guided ablation of primary liver and renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Breen, David J; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2015-03-01

    Image-guided ablation (IGA) techniques have evolved considerably over the past 20 years and are increasingly used to definitively treat small primary cancers of the liver and kidney. IGA is recommended by most guidelines as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-defined as either a single tumour smaller than 5 cm or up to three nodules smaller than 3 cm-when surgical options are precluded, and has potential as first-line therapy, in lieu of surgery, for patients with very early stage tumours smaller than 2 cm. With regard to renal cell carcinoma, despite the absence of any randomized trial comparing the outcomes of IGA with those of standard partial nephrectomy, a growing amount of data demonstrate robust oncological outcomes for this minimally invasive approach and testify to its potential as a standard-of-care treatment. Herein, we review the various ablation techniques, the supporting evidence, and clinical application of IGA in the treatment of primary liver and kidney cancers. PMID:25601446

  9. Real-time Fluorescence Image-Guided Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Suman B.; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a critical role in cancer diagnosis and planning. Many of these patients rely on surgical intervention for curative outcomes. This requires a careful identification of the primary and microscopic tumors, and the complete removal of cancer. Although there have been efforts to adapt traditional imaging modalities for intraoperative image guidance, they suffer from several constraints such as large hardware footprint, high operation cost, and disruption of the surgical workflow. Because of the ease of image acquisition, relatively low cost devices and intuitive operation, optical imaging methods have received tremendous interests for use in real-time image-guided surgery. To improve imaging depth under low interference by tissue autofluorescence, many of these applications utilize light in the near-infra red (NIR) wavelengths, which is invisible to human eyes. With the availability of a wide selection of tumor-avid contrast agents, advancements in imaging sensors, electronic and optical designs, surgeons are able to combine different attributes of NIR optical imaging techniques to improve treatment outcomes. The emergence of diverse commercial and experimental image guidance systems, which are in various stages of clinical translation, attests to the potential high impact of intraoperative optical imaging methods to improve speed of oncologic surgery with high accuracy and minimal margin positivity. PMID:25287689

  10. Image-guided interventional therapy for cancer with radiotherapeutic nanoparticles✩

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William T.; Bao, Ande; Brenner, Andrew J.; Goins, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the major limitations of current cancer therapy is the inability to deliver tumoricidal agents throughout the entire tumor mass using traditional intravenous administration. Nanoparticles carrying beta-emitting therapeutic radionuclides that are delivered using advanced image-guidance have significant potential to improve solid tumor therapy. The use of image-guidance in combination with nanoparticle carriers can improve the delivery of localized radiation to tumors. Nanoparticles labeled with certain beta-emitting radionuclides are intrinsically theranostic agents that can provide information regarding distribution and regional dosimetry within the tumor and the body. Image-guided thermal therapy results in increased uptake of intravenous nanoparticles within tumors, improving therapy. In addition, nanoparticles are ideal carriers for direct intratumoral infusion of beta-emitting radionuclides by convection enhanced delivery, permitting the delivery of localized therapeutic radiation without the requirement of the radionuclide exiting from the nanoparticle. With this approach, very high doses of radiation can be delivered to solid tumors while sparing normal organs. Recent technological developments in image-guidance, convection enhanced delivery and newly developed nanoparticles carrying beta-emitting radionuclides will be reviewed. Examples will be shown describing how this new approach has promise for the treatment of brain, head and neck, and other types of solid tumors. PMID:25016083

  11. Opinion: Assessing the Barriers to Image Guided Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Gregory M.; Moonen, Chrit; Baker, James R.; Chang, Esther; Cheng, Zheng; Grodzinski, Piotr; Ferrara, Katherine; Hynynen, Kullervo; Kelloff, Gary; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Patri, Anil K; Sept, David; Schnitzer, Jan E.; Wood, Bradford J.; Zhang, Miqin; Zheng, Gang; Farahani, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Imaging has become a cornerstone for medical diagnosis and the guidance of patient management. A new field called Image Guided Drug Delivery (IGDD) now combines the vast potential of the radiological sciences with the delivery of treatment and promises to fulfill the vision of personalized medicine. Whether imaging is used to deliver focused energy to drug-laden particles for enhanced, local drug release around tumors, or it is invoked in the context of nanoparticle-based agents to quantify distinctive biomarkers that could risk-stratify patients for improved targeted drug delivery efficiency, the overarching goal of IGDD is to use imaging to maximize effective therapy in diseased tissues and to minimize systemic drug exposure in order to reduce toxicities. Over the last several years innumerable reports and reviews covering the gamut of IGDD technologies have been published, but inadequate attention has been directed towards identifying and addressing the barriers limiting clinical translation. In this consensus opinion, the opportunities and challenges impacting the clinical realization of IGDD-based personalized medicine were discussed as a panel and recommendations were proffered to accelerate the field forward. PMID:24339356

  12. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Kress, Bodo; Fiebach, Jochen; Rieker, Marcus; Spitzenberg, Doreen; Marmulla, Rüdiger; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2006-03-01

    Image guided implantology using navigation systems is more accurate than manual dental implant insertion. The underlying image data are usually derived from computer tomography. The suitability of MR imaging for dental implant planning is a marginal issue so far. MRI data from cadaver heads were acquired using various MRI sequences. The data were assessed for the quality of anatomical imaging, geometric accuracy and susceptibility to dental metal artefacts. For dental implant planning, 3D models of the jaws were created. A software system for segmentation of the mandible and maxilla MRI data was implemented using c++, mitk, and qt. With the VIBE_15 sequence, image data with high geometric accuracy were acquired. Dental metal artefacts were lower than in CT data of the same heads. The segmentation of the jaws was feasible, in contrast to the segmentation of the dentition, since there is a lack of contrast to the intraoral soft tissue structures. MRI is a suitable method for imaging of the region of mouth and jaws. The geometric accuracy is excellent and the susceptibility to artefacts is low. However, there are yet two limitations: Firstly, the imaging of the dentition needs further improvement to allow accurate segmentation of these regions. Secondly, the sequence used in this study takes several minutes and hence is susceptible to motion artefacts.

  14. Fluorescent supramolecular micelles for imaging-guided cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengmeng; Yin, Wenyan; Dong, Xinghua; Yang, Wantai; Zhao, Yuliang; Yin, Meizhen

    2016-03-01

    A novel smart fluorescent drug delivery system composed of a perylene diimide (PDI) core and block copolymer poly(d,l-lactide)-b-poly(ethyl ethylene phosphate) is developed and named as PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8. The biodegradable PDI-star-(PLA-b-PEEP)8 is a unimolecular micelle and can self-assemble into supramolecular micelles, called as fluorescent supramolecular micelles (FSMs), in aqueous media. An insoluble drug camptothecin (CPT) can be effectively loaded into the FSMs and exhibits pH-responsive release. Moreover, the FSMs with good biocompatibility can also be employed as a remarkable fluorescent probe for cell labelling because the maximum emission of PDI is beneficial for bio-imaging. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrate that the micelles are easily endocytosed by cancer cells. In vitro and in vivo tumor growth-inhibitory studies reveal a better therapeutic effect of FSMs after CPT encapsulation when compared with the free CPT drug. The multifunctional FSM nanomedicine platform as a nanovehicle has great potential for fluorescence imaging-guided cancer therapy. PMID:26881415

  15. Image-guided radiation therapy in lymphoma management

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is a process of incorporating imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasound (US) during radiation therapy (RT) to improve treatment accuracy. It allows real-time or near real-time visualization of anatomical information to ensure that the target is in its position as planned. In addition, changes in tumor volume and location due to organ motion during treatment can be also compensated. IGRT has been gaining popularity and acceptance rapidly in RT over the past 10 years, and many published data have been reported on prostate, bladder, head and neck, and gastrointestinal cancers. However, the role of IGRT in lymphoma management is not well defined as there are only very limited published data currently available. The scope of this paper is to review the current use of IGRT in the management of lymphoma. The technical and clinical aspects of IGRT, lymphoma imaging studies, the current role of IGRT in lymphoma management and future directions will be discussed. PMID:26484299

  16. Automated quality assurance for image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Elder, Eric; Fox, Tim

    2009-01-01

    The use of image-guided patient positioning requires fast and reliable Quality Assurance (QA) methods to ensure the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam coincides with the integrated kilovoltage (kV) or volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging and guidance systems. Current QA protocol is based on visually observing deviations of certain features in acquired kV in-room treatment images such as markers, distances, or HU values from phantom specifications. This is a time-consuming and subjective task because these features are identified by human operators. The method implemented in this study automated an IGRT QA protocol by using specific image processing algorithms that rigorously detected phantom features and performed all measurements involved in a classical QA protocol. The algorithm was tested on four different IGRT QA phantoms. Image analysis algorithms were able to detect QA features with the same accuracy as the manual approach but significantly faster. All described tests were performed in a single procedure, with acquisition of the images taking approximately 5 minutes, and the automated software analysis taking less than 1 minute. The study showed that the automated image analysis based procedure may be used as a daily QA procedure because it is completely automated and uses a single phantom setup. PMID:19223842

  17. Photoacoustic image-guided drug delivery in the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shanshan; Chen, Jian; Samant, Pratik; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-03-01

    Image guided drug delivery is a novel strategy that combines the effect of therapy and visibility into one system. Here we apply photoacoustic (PA) imaging to visualize the drug delivery process, and perform a simulation study on monitoring the photosensitizer concentration in a prostate tumor during photodynamic therapy (PDT). A 3D optical model of the human prostate is developed, and the light absorption distribution in the prostate is estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method. The filtered back-projection algorithm is used to reconstruct PA images. PA images of transurethral laser/transrectal ultrasound are compared to those of transrectal laser/ultrasound. Results show that the transurethral laser has a better penetration depth in the prostate compared with transrectal one. Urethral thermal safety is investigated via COMSOL Multiphysics, and the results show that the proposed pulsed transurethral laser will cause no thermal damage on the urethral surface. Regression analysis for PA signal amplitude and drug concentration demonstrates that the PA technique has the potential to monitor drug distributions in PDT, as well as in other laser-based prostate therapy modalities.

  18. Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Image-Guided Surgery Using a Multifunctional Targeted Nanoprobe

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Lei; Zhou, Guangyin; Gao, Ning; Yang, Lily; Gonzalo, David A.; Hughes, Steven J.; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A complete surgical excision with negative tumor margins is the single most important factor in the prediction of long-term survival for most cancer patients with solid tumors. We hypothesized that image-guided surgery using nanoparticle-enhanced photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging could significantly reduce the rate of local recurrence. Methods A murine model of invasive mammary carcinoma was utilized. Three experimental groups were included: (1) control; (2) tumor-bearing mice injected with non-targeted nanoprobe; and (3) tumor-bearing mice injected with targeted nanoprobe. The surgeon removed the primary tumor following the guidance of photoacoustic imaging (PAI), then inspected the surgical wound and removed the suspicious tissue using intraoperative near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging. The mice were followed with bioluminescence imaging weekly to quantify local recurrence. Results Nanoprobe-enhanced photoacoustic contrast enabled PAI to map the volumetric tumor margins up to a depth of 31 mm. The targeted nanoparticles provided significantly greater enhancement than non-targeted nano-particles. Seven mice in the group injected with the targeted nanoprobes underwent additional resections based upon NIR fluorescence imaging. Pathological analysis confirmed residual cancer cells in the re-resected specimens in 5/7 mice. Image-guided resection resulted in a significant reduction in local recurrence; 8.7 and 33.3 % of the mice in the targeted and control groups suffered recurrence, respectively. Conclusions These results suggest that photoacoustic and NIR intraoperative imaging can effectively assist a surgeon to locate primary tumors and to identify residual disease in real-time. This technology has promise to overcome current clinical challenges that result in the need for second surgical procedures. PMID:24554061

  19. A novel multiwavelength fluorescence image-guided surgery imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpi, D.; Tullis, I. D. C.; Laios, A.; Pathiraja, P. N. J.; Haldar, K.; Ahmed, A. A.; Vojnovic, B.

    2014-02-01

    We describe the development and performance analysis of two clinical near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS) devices that aim to overcome some of the limitations of current FIGS systems. The devices operate in a widefield-imaging mode and can work (1) in conjunction with a laparoscope, during minimally invasive surgery, and (2) as a hand-held, open surgery imaging system. In both cases, narrow-band excitation light, delivered at multiple wavelengths, is efficiently combined with white reflectance light. Light is delivered to ~100 cm2 surgical field at 1-2 mW/cm2 for white light and 3-7 mW/cm2 (depending on wavelength) of red - near infrared excitation, at a typical working distance of 350 mm for the hand-held device and 100 mm for the laparoscope. A single, sensitive, miniaturized color camera collects both fluorescence and white reflectance light. The use of a single imager eliminates image alignment and software overlay complexity. A novel filtering and illumination arrangement allows simultaneous detection of white reflectance and fluorescence emission from multiple dyes in real-time. We will present both fluorescence detection sensitivity modeling and practical performance data. We have demonstrated the efficiency and the advantages of the devices both pre-clinically and during live surgery on humans. Both the hand-held and the laparoscopic systems have proved to be reliable and beneficial in an ongoing clinical trial involving sentinel lymph node detection in gynecological cancers. We will show preliminary results using two clinically approved dyes, Methylene blue and indocyanine green. We anticipate that this technology can be integrated and routinely used in a larger variety of surgical procedures.

  20. Image guided constitutive modeling of the silicone brain phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzrin, Alexander; Skrinjar, Oskar; Ozan, Cem; Kim, Sihyun; Mukundan, Srinivasan

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to develop reliable constitutive models of the mechanical behavior of the in-vivo human brain tissue for applications in neurosurgery. We propose to define the mechanical properties of the brain tissue in-vivo, by taking the global MR or CT images of a brain response to ventriculostomy - the relief of the elevated intracranial pressure. 3D image analysis translates these images into displacement fields, which by using inverse analysis allow for the constitutive models of the brain tissue to be developed. We term this approach Image Guided Constitutive Modeling (IGCM). The presented paper demonstrates performance of the IGCM in the controlled environment: on the silicone brain phantoms closely simulating the in-vivo brain geometry, mechanical properties and boundary conditions. The phantom of the left hemisphere of human brain was cast using silicon gel. An inflatable rubber membrane was placed inside the phantom to model the lateral ventricle. The experiments were carried out in a specially designed setup in a CT scanner with submillimeter isotropic voxels. The non-communicative hydrocephalus and ventriculostomy were simulated by consequently inflating and deflating the internal rubber membrane. The obtained images were analyzed to derive displacement fields, meshed, and incorporated into ABAQUS. The subsequent Inverse Finite Element Analysis (based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm) allowed for optimization of the parameters of the Mooney-Rivlin non-linear elastic model for the phantom material. The calculated mechanical properties were consistent with those obtained from the element tests, providing justification for the future application of the IGCM to in-vivo brain tissue.

  1. Image-Guided Predictions of Liposome Transport in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Shawn

    Due to the ability to preferentially accumulate and deliver drug payloads to solid tumours, liposomes have emerged as an exciting therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. Unfortunately, the initial excitement was dampened by limited clinical results, where only negligible increases in patient survival following liposome therapy have been observed. What are the reasons for the limited clinical efficacy? Is the nanoparticle formulation optimal? Is the enhanced permeability and retention effect overstated? What are the barriers limiting the delivery of drugs to cancer cells? What is the optimal dosing and treatment schedule? Addressing these questions requires developing quantitative tools to understand the behaviour of liposomes in vivo, such as pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, intra-tumoural accumulation, and drug release. Central to each of these questions is the concept of transport - the collection of biophysical processes responsible for the delivery of molecules to tissues. Understanding transport means understanding the crucial links between the spatio-temporal accumulation of liposomes, the physicochemical properties of liposomes, and properties of the tumour microenvironment. In this thesis, a biophysical mathematical transport model is developed that when used in combination with non-invasive imaging methods can predict liposome transport in solid tumours. The mathematical transport framework is validated in its ability to predict the bulk and intra-tumoural accumulation of liposomes based on biophysical transport properties of solid tumours. Furthermore, novel imaging methods are developed and used to elucidate the crucial links between transport barriers and spatial heterogeneity in liposome accumulation. Finally, methods are presented to integrate quantitative imaging and mathematical modelling such that an accurate prediction of liposome transport in solid tumours is possible. In summary, this thesis presents and validates an image-guided mathematical

  2. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  3. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Parker, William; Breen, Stephen; Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing; Papiez, Lech S.; Li, X. Allen; Bednarz, Greg; Chen Wenzhou; Xiao Ying

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  4. Imaging guided mediastinal percutaneal core biopsy--technique and complications.

    PubMed

    Azrumelashvili, T; Mizandari, M; Magalashvili, D; Dundua, T

    2015-05-01

    165 percutaneous biopsies of anterior, middle and posterior mediastinum lesions were performed to 156 patients. Procedure was guided by US in 40 cases, by CT - in 125 cases. Hydrodissection was used in 5 cases, artificial pneumothorax - in 3 cases in order to avoid transpulmonary needle pass. Post-biopsy CT scan was performed and patients observed for any complications. Adequate tissue for histological diagnosis was obtained in 156 (94.5%) cases at the first attempt; in 9 (5.5%) cases the repeated procedure was needed. No major complications were detected after biopsy procedures; minor complications (pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemophtysis) were detected in 23 (13.9%) cases. No complications were detected after US guided procedures; In 17 (10.3% of all complications) cases pneumothorax, in 4 (2.4%) cases - hemothorax and in 2 (1.2%) cases hemophtisis was detected on CT guided procedures. All hemothorax and hemophtisis and 10 pneumothorax cases happened to be self-limited; in 3 pneumothorax cases aspiration and in 4 cases - pleural drainage was needed. Percutaneous image-guided core biopsy of mediastinal lesions is an accurate and safe procedure, which enables to get the tissue material from all mediastinum compartments. Ultrasound is the most efficient for biopsy guidance, if the target is adequately imaged by it; the advantages of US guidance are: a) possibility of real-time needle movement control b) possibility of real-time blood flow imaging b) noninvasiveness c) cost-effectiveness d) possibility to perform the biopsy at the bedside, in a semiupright position; so, ultrasound is a "Gold Standard" for procedure guidance if the 'target" can be adequately imaged by this technique. If US guidance is impossible biopsy should be performed under CT guidance. Hydrodissection and artificial pneumothorax enables to avoid the lung tissue penetration related complications. Pneumothorax was associated with multiple Needle passes and larger diameter needle use. The safety

  5. Testicular Doses in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Yu, James B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Peschel, Richard E.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate testicular doses contributed by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions from kVCBCT on 3 prostate cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were compared between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments and kVCBCT scans. The impact of CBCT scanning mode, kilovoltage peak energy (kVp), and CBCT field span on dose deposition to testes and other organs was investigated. Results: In comparison with one 10-MV IMRT treatment, a 125-kV half-fan CBCT scan delivered 3.4, 3.8, 4.1, and 5.7 cGy to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, respectively, accounting for 1.7%, 3.2%, 3.2%, and 8.4% of megavoltage photon dose contributions. However, the testes received 2.9 cGy from the same CBCT scan, a threefold increase as compared with 0.7 cGy received during IMRT. With the same kVp, full-fan mode deposited much less dose to organs than half-fan mode, ranging from 9% less for prostate to 69% less for testes, except for rectum, where full-fan mode delivered 34% more dose. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, kVCBCT-contributed doses increased exponentially for all organs, irrespective of scanning mode. Reducing CBCT field span from 30 to 10 cm in the superior-inferior direction cut testicular doses from 5.7 to 0.2 cGy in half-fan mode and from 1.5 to 0.1 cGy in full-fan mode. Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, kVCBCT-contributed doses to the prostate, rectum, bladder, and femoral heads are clinically insignificant, whereas dose to the testes is threefold more. Full-fan CBCT usually deposits much less dose to organs (except for rectum) than half-fan mode in prostate patients. Kilovoltage CBCT-contributed doses increase exponentially with photon beam energy. Reducing CBCT field significantly cuts doses to testes and other organs.

  6. Development of a Micro-Computed Tomography-Based Image-Guided Conformal Radiotherapy System for Small Animals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hu; Rodriguez, Manuel; Haak, Fred van den; Nelson, Geoffrey; Jogani, Rahil

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To report on the physical aspects of a system in which radiotherapy functionality was added to a micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanner, to evaluate the accuracy of this instrument, and to and demonstrate the application of this technology for irradiating tumors growing within the lungs of mice. Methods and Materials: A GE eXplore RS120 microCT scanner was modified by the addition of a two-dimensional subject translation stage and a variable aperture collimator. Quality assurance protocols for these devices, including measurement of translation stage positioning accuracy, collimator aperture accuracy, and collimator alignment with the X-ray beam, were devised. Use of this system for image-guided radiotherapy was assessed by irradiation of a solid water phantom as well as of two mice bearing spontaneous MYC-induced lung tumors. Radiation damage was assessed ex vivo by immunohistochemical detection of {gamma}H2AX foci. Results: The positioning error of the translation stage was found to be <0.05 mm, whereas after alignment of the collimator with the X-ray axis through adjustment of its displacement and rotation, the collimator aperture error was <0.1 mm measured at isocenter. Computed tomography image-guided treatment of a solid water phantom demonstrated target localization accuracy to within 0.1 mm. Gamma-H2AX foci were detected within irradiated lung tumors in mice, with contralateral lung tissue displaying background staining. Conclusions: Addition of radiotherapy functionality to a microCT scanner is an effective means of introducing image-guided radiation treatments into the preclinical setting. This approach has been shown to facilitate small-animal conformal radiotherapy while leveraging existing technology.

  7. Transvaginal 3D Image-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Robert; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a transvaginal image-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) device using piezocomposite HIFU array technology, and commercially-available ultrasound imaging. Potential applications include treatment of uterine fibroids and abnormal uterine bleeding. The HIFU transducer was an annular phased array, with a focal length range of 30-60 mm, an elliptically-shaped aperture of 35×60 mm, and an operating frequency of 3 MHz. A pillow-shaped bag with water circulation will be used for coupling the HIFU energy into the tissue. An intra-cavity imaging probe (C9-5, Philips) was integrated with the HIFU array such that the focal axis of the HIFU transducer was within the image plane. The entire device will be covered by a gel-filled condom when inserted in the vaginal cavity. To control it, software packages were developed in the LabView programming environment. An imaging algorithm processed the ultrasound image to remove noise patterns due to the HIFU signal. The device will be equipped with a three-dimensional tracking system, using a six-degrees-of-freedom articulating arm. Necrotic lesions were produced in a tissue-mimicking phantom and a turkey breast sample for all focal lengths. Various HIFU doses allow various necrotic lesion shapes, including thin ellipsoidal, spherical, wide cylindrical, and teardrop-shaped. Software control of the device allows multiple foci to be activated sequentially for desired lesion patterns. Ultrasound imaging synchronization can be achieved using hardware signals obtained from the imaging system, or software signals determined empirically for various imaging probes. The image-guided HIFU device will provide a valuable tool in visualization of uterine fibroid tumors for the purposes of planning and subsequent HIFU treatment of the tumor, all in a 3D environment. The control system allows for various lesions of different shapes to be optimally positioned in the tumor to cover the entire tumor

  8. Image guided versus palpation guided core needle biopsy of palpable breast masses: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Smriti; Kumari, Swati; Srivastava, Anurag; Thulkar, Sanjay; Mathur, Sandeep; Veedu, Prasad Thotton

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Biopsy of palpable breast masses can be performed manually by palpation guidance or under imaging guidance. Based on retrospective studies, image guided biopsy is considered more accurate than palpation guided breast biopsy; however, these techniques have not been compared prospectively. We conducted this prospective study to verify the superiority and determine the size of beneficial effect of image guided biopsy over palpation guided biopsy. Methods: Over a period of 18 months, 36 patients each with palpable breast masses were randomized into palpation guided and image guided breast biopsy arms. Ultrasound was used for image guidance in 33 patients and mammographic (stereotactic) guidance in three patients. All biopsies were performed using 14 gauge automated core biopsy needles. Inconclusive, suspicious or imaging-histologic discordant biopsies were repeated. Results: Malignancy was found in 30 of 36 women in palpation guided biopsy arm and 27 of 36 women in image guided biopsy arm. Palpation guided biopsy had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 46.7, 100, 100, 27.3 per cent, respectively, for diagnosing breast cancer. Nineteen of 36 women (52.8%) required repeat biopsy because of inadequate samples (7 of 19), suspicious findings (2 of 19) or imaging-histologic discordance (10 of 19). On repeat biopsy, malignancy was found in all cases of imaging-histologic discordance. Image guided biopsy had 96.3 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity. There was no case of inadequate sample or imaging-histologic discordance with image guided biopsy. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in palpable breast masses, image guided biopsy was superior to palpation guided biopsy in terms of sensitivity, false negative rate and repeat biopsy rates. PMID:27488003

  9. Towards magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanescu, Teodor Marius

    The goal of this work is to address key aspects of the magnetic resonance imaging guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT) process of cancer sites. MRIgRT is implemented by using a system comprised of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner coupled with a radiation source, in our case a radiotherapy accelerator (Linac). The potential benefits of MRIgRT are the real-time tracking of the tumor and neighbouring healthy anatomy during treatment irradiation leading to on-line treatment plan optimization. Ultimately, this results in an increased accuracy and efficiency of the overall treatment process. A large research effort is conducted at Cross Cancer Institute to develop a hybrid MRI-Linac system consisting of a bi-planar 0.2 T permanent magnet coupled with a 6 MV Linac. The present work is part of this project and aims to address the following key components: (a) magnetic shielding and dosimetric effects of the MRI-Linac system, (b) measure and correction of scanner-related MR image distortions, and (c) MRI-based treatment planning procedure for intracranial lesions. The first two components are essential for the optimal construction and operation of the MRI-Linac system while the third one represents a direct application of the system. The linac passive shielding was achieved by (a) adding two 10 cm thick steel (1020) plates placed at a distance of 10 cm from the structure on opposite sides of the magnet; and (b) a box lined with a 1 mm MuMetal(TM) wall surrounding the Linac. For our proposed MRI-Linac configuration (i.e. 0.2 T field and rotating bi-planar geometry) the maximum dose difference from zero magnetic field case was found to be within 6% and 12% in a water and water-lung-water phantom, respectively. We developed an image system distortion correction method for MRI that relies on adaptive thresholding and an iterative algorithm to determine the 3D distortion field. Applying this technique the residual image distortions were reduced to within the voxel

  10. Optimizing Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) System for Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chun Joo

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) system is the most widely used imaging device in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), where set of 3D volumetric image of patient can be reconstructed to identify and correct position setup errors prior to the radiation treatment. This CBCT system can significantly improve precision of on-line setup errors of patient position and tumor target localization prior to the treatment. However, there are still a number of issues that needs to be investigated with CBCT system such as 1) progressively increasing defective pixels in imaging detectors by its frequent usage, 2) hazardous radiation exposure to patients during the CBCT imaging, 3) degradation of image quality due to patients' respiratory motion when CBCT is acquired and 4) unknown knowledge of certain anatomical features such as liver, due to lack of soft-tissue contrast which makes tumor motion verification challenging. In this dissertation, we explore on optimizing the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system under such circumstances. We begin by introducing general concept of IGRT. We then present the development of automated defective pixel detection algorithm for X-ray imagers that is used for CBCT imaging using wavelet analysis. We next investigate on developing fast and efficient low-dose volumetric reconstruction techniques which includes 1) fast digital tomosynthesis reconstruction using general-purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) programming and 2) fast low-dose CBCT image reconstruction based on the Gradient-Projection-Barzilai-Borwein formulation (GP-BB). We further developed two efficient approaches that could reduce the degradation of CBCT images from respiratory motion. First, we propose reconstructing four dimensional (4D) CBCT and DTS using respiratory signal extracted from fiducial markers implanted in liver. Second, novel motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) is proposed that allows reconstruction of high quality and high phase

  11. Multi-System Verification of Registrations for Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Straube, William L.; Bosch, Walter R.; Purdy, James A.; Li, X. Allen; Xiao Ying

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To provide quantitative information on the image registration differences from multiple systems for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) credentialing and margin reduction in clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Images and IGRT shift results from three different treatment systems (Tomotherapy Hi-Art, Elekta Synergy, Varian Trilogy) have been sent from various institutions to the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center (ITC) for evaluation for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Nine patient datasets (five head-and-neck and four prostate) were included in the comparison, with each patient having 1-4 daily individual IGRT studies. In all cases, daily shifts were re-calculated by re-registration of the planning CT with the daily IGRT data using three independent software systems (MIMvista, FocalSim, VelocityAI). Automatic fusion was used in all calculations. The results were compared with those submitted from institutions. Similar regions of interest (ROIs) and same initial positions were used in registrations for inter-system comparison. Different slice spacings for CBCT sampling and different ROIs for registration were used in some cases to observe the variation of registration due to these factors. Results: For the 54 comparisons with head-and-neck datasets, the absolute values of differences of the registration results between different systems were 2.6 {+-} 2.1 mm (mean {+-} SD; range 0.1-8.6 mm, left-right [LR]), 1.7 {+-} 1.3 mm (0.0-4.9 mm, superior-inferior [SI]), and 1.8 {+-} 1.1 mm (0.1-4.0 mm, anterior-posterior [AP]). For the 66 comparisons in prostate cases, the differences were 1.1 {+-} 1.0 mm (0.0-4.6 mm, LR), 2.1 {+-} 1.7 mm (0.0-6.6 mm, SI), and 2.0 {+-} 1.8 mm (0.1-6.9 mm, AP). The differences caused by the slice spacing variation were relatively small, and the different ROI selections in FocalSim and MIMvista also had limited impact. Conclusion: The extent of differences was reported when different systems were used for image

  12. Designing Tracking Software for Image-Guided Surgery Applications: IGSTK Experience

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Gobbi, David; Turek, Matt; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Lindseth, Frank; Cleary, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Objective Many image-guided surgery applications require tracking devices as part of their core functionality. The Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK) was designed and developed to interface tracking devices with software applications incorporating medical images. Methods IGSTK was designed as an open source C++ library that provides the basic components needed for fast prototyping and development of image-guided surgery applications. This library follows a component-based architecture with several components designed for specific sets of image-guided surgery functions. At the core of the toolkit is the tracker component that handles communication between a control computer and navigation device to gather pose measurements of surgical instruments present in the surgical scene. The representations of the tracked instruments are superimposed on anatomical images to provide visual feedback to the clinician during surgical procedures. Results The initial version of the IGSTK toolkit has been released in the public domain and several trackers are supported. The toolkit and related information are available at www.igstk.org. Conclusion With the increased popularity of minimally invasive procedures in health care, several tracking devices have been developed for medical applications. Designing and implementing high-quality and safe software to handle these different types of trackers in a common framework is a challenging task. It requires establishing key software design principles that emphasize abstraction, extensibility, reusability, fault-tolerance, and portability. IGSTK is an open source library that satisfies these needs for the image-guided surgery community. PMID:20037671

  13. TU-D-BRD-01: Image Guided SBRT II: Challenges ' Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z; Yin, F; Cho, J

    2014-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been effective treatment for the management of various diseases, which often delivers high radiation dose in a single or a few fractions. SBRT therefore demands precise treatment delivery to the tumor while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Recent developments in image guidance enable target localization with increased accuracy. With such improvements in localization, image-guided SBRT has been widely adopted into clinical practice. In SBRT, high radiation dose is generally delivered with small fields. Therefore, it is crucial to accurately measure dosimetric data for the small fields during commissioning. In addition, image-guided SBRT demands accurate image localization to ensure safety and quality of patient care. Lately, the reports of AAPM TG 142 and TG 104 have been published and added recommendations for imaging devices that are integrated with the linear accelerator for SBRT. Furthermore, various challenges and potential pitfalls lie in the clinical implementation of image-guided SBRT. In this lecture, these challenges and pitfalls of image-guided SBRT will be illustrated and discussed from dosimetric, technical and clinical perspectives.Being a promising technique, image-guided SBRT has shown great potentials, and will lead to more accurate and safer SBRT treatments. Learning Objectives: To understand dosimetric challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major clinical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major technical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT.

  14. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy. PMID:27494561

  15. Microenvironment-Driven Bioelimination of Magnetoplasmonic Nanoassemblies and Their Multimodal Imaging-Guided Tumor Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Fu, Shiyan; Chen, Chuanfang; Wang, Xuandong; Fu, Changhui; Wang, Shu; Guo, Weibo; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Zhirong; Qiu, Jichuan; Liu, Hong

    2016-07-26

    Biocompatibility and bioelimination are basic requirements for systematically administered nanomaterials for biomedical purposes. Gold-based plasmonic nanomaterials have shown potential applications in photothermal cancer therapy. However, their inability to biodegrade has impeded practical biomedical application. In this study, a kind of bioeliminable magnetoplasmonic nanoassembly (MPNA), assembled from an Fe3O4 nanocluster and gold nanoshell, was elaborately designed for computed tomography, photoacoustic tomography, and magnetic resonance trimodal imaging-guided tumor photothermal therapy. A single dose of photothermal therapy under near-infrared light induced a complete tumor regression in mice. Importantly, MPNAs could respond to the local microenvironment with acidic pH and enzymes where they accumulated including tumors, liver, spleen, etc., collapse into small molecules and discrete nanoparticles, and finally be cleared from the body. With the bioelimination ability from the body, a high dose of 400 mg kg(-1) MPNAs had good biocompatibility. The MPNAs for cancer theranostics pave a way toward biodegradable bio-nanomaterials for biomedical applications. PMID:27309678

  16. 5-ALA Fluorescence Image Guided Resection of Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Meta-Analysis of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Eljamel, Samy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most deadly cancers in humans. Despite recent advances in anti-cancer therapies, most patients with GBM die from local disease progression. Fluorescence image guided surgical resection (FIGR) was recently advocated to enhance local control of GBM. This is meta-analyses of 5-aminolevulinic (5-ALA) induced FIGR. Materials: Review of the literature produced 503 potential publications; only 20 of these fulfilled the inclusion criteria of this analysis, including a total of 565 patients treated with 5-ALA-FIGR reporting on its outcomes and 800 histological samples reporting 5-ALA-FIGR sensitivity and specificity. Results: The mean gross total resection (GTR) rate was 75.4% (95% CI: 67.4–83.5, p < 0.001). The mean time to tumor progression (TTP) was 8.1 months (95% CI: 4.7–12, p < 0.001). The mean overall survival gain reported was 6.2 months (95% CI: −1–13, p < 0.001). The specificity was 88.9% (95% CI: 83.9–93.9, p < 0.001) and the sensitivity was 82.6% (95% CI: 73.9–91.9, p < 0.001). Conclusion: 5-ALA-FIGR in GBM is highly sensitive and specific, and imparts significant benefits to patients in terms of improved GTR and TTP. PMID:25961952

  17. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C.; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B.

    2004-12-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  18. Imaging-guided two-photon excitation-emission-matrix measurements of human skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingqiu; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Wang, Hequn; Tang, Shuo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-07-01

    There are increased interests on using multiphoton imaging and spectroscopy for skin tissue characterization and diagnosis. However, most studies have been done with just a few excitation wavelengths. Our objective is to perform a systematic study of the two-photon fluorescence (TPF) properties of skin fluorophores, normal skin, and diseased skin tissues. A nonlinear excitation-emission-matrix (EEM) spectroscopy system with multiphoton imaging guidance was constructed. A tunable femtosecond laser was used to vary excitation wavelengths from 730 to 920 nm for EEM data acquisition. EEM measurements were performed on excised fresh normal skin tissues, seborrheic keratosis tissue samples, and skin fluorophores including: NADH, FAD, keratin, melanin, collagen, and elastin. We found that in the stratum corneum and upper epidermis of normal skin, the cells have large sizes and the TPF originates from keratin. In the lower epidermis, cells are smaller and TPF is dominated by NADH contributions. In the dermis, TPF is dominated by elastin components. The depth resolved EEM measurements also demonstrated that keratin structure has intruded into the middle sublayers of the epidermal part of the seborrheic keratosis lesion. These results suggest that the imaging guided TPF EEM spectroscopy provides useful information for the development of multiphoton clinical devices for skin disease diagnosis.

  19. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  20. The clinical utility of image-guided iodine-125 seed in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongxin; Zhang, Xikun; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Zhao; Wang, Jian; Xu, Zhongfa

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the clinical effects of image-guided iodine-125 ((125)I) seed on unresectable pancreatic cancer. Twenty-five patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer were enrolled in this study, including 13 patients with seed implantation and 12 patients as control. The survival status, clinical benefits, objective curative effects, and relevant tumor markers were analyzed to assess the feasibility and safety of interstitial (125)I seed implantation. We found that the clinical benefit rate of the seed implantation group is 92.3 % (12/13), compared with 41.7 % (5/12) in the control, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Compared with control, patients with seed implantation had significantly shorter operative time, less bleeding, higher albumin, shorter periods to bowel movement, and normal diet as well as lower risk of complications (p < 0.001). The differences of objective curative effects adverse effects, complications, and median survival between these two groups were not significant statistically (p > 0.05). In conclusion, (125)I seed implantation provides a safe and effective method to inhibit the tumor development, relieve pain, and improve quality of life for unresectable pancreatic cancer. These findings need to be validated by conducting further studies with larger cohorts. PMID:26353858

  1. Dual-Mode IVUS Catheter for Intracranial Image-Guided Hyperthermia: Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Herickhoff, Carl D.; Grant, Gerald A.; Britz, Gavin W.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of modifying 3-Fr IVUS catheters in several designs to potentially achieve minimally-invasive, endovascular access for image-guided ultrasound hyperthermia treatment of tumors in the brain. Using a plane wave approximation, target frequencies of 8.7 and 3.5 MHz were considered optimal for heating at depths (tumor sizes) of 1 and 2.5 cm, respectively. First, a 3.5-Fr IVUS catheter with a 0.7-mm diameter transducer (30 MHz nominal frequency) was driven at 8.6 MHz. Second, for a low-frequency design, a 220-μm-thick, 0.35 × 0.35-mm PZT-4 transducer—driven at width-mode resonance of 3.85 MHz—replaced a 40-MHz element in a 3.5-Fr coronary imaging catheter. Third, a 5 × 0.5-mm PZT-4 transducer was evaluated as the largest aperture geometry possible for a flexible 3-Fr IVUS catheter. Beam plots and on-axis heating profiles were simulated for each aperture, and test transducers were fabricated. The electrical impedance, impulse response, frequency response, maximum intensity, and mechanical index were measured to assess performance. For the 5 × 0.5-mm transducer, this testing also included mechanically scanning and reconstructing an image of a 2.5-cm-diameter cyst phantom as a preliminary measure of imaging potential. PMID:21041144

  2. A Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Image-Guided HIFU Hemostasis of Blood Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Greaby, Robyn; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-28

    A pulsatile flow phantom for studying ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis in a controlled environment has been developed. An ex vivo porcine carotid artery was attached to the phantom and embedded in a visually and ultrasonically transparent gel. Heparinized porcine blood was pumped through the phantom. Power-Doppler and B-mode ultrasound were used to remotely target the HIFU focus to the site of a needle puncture. In nine trials, complete hemostasis was achieved after an average HIFU application of 55 +/- 34 seconds. The vessels remained patent after treatment. With this phantom, it will be possible to do controlled studies of ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis.

  3. From clinical imaging and computational models to personalised medicine and image guided interventions.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, David J

    2016-10-01

    This short paper describes the development of the UCL Centre for Medical Image Computing (CMIC) from 2006 to 2016, together with reference to historical developments of the Computational Imaging sciences Group (CISG) at Guy's Hospital. Key early work in automated image registration led to developments in image guided surgery and improved cancer diagnosis and therapy. The work is illustrated with examples from neurosurgery, laparoscopic liver and gastric surgery, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer and breast cancer, and image guided radiotherapy for lung cancer. PMID:27407003

  4. Resection of spinal column tumors utilizing image-guided navigation: a multicenter analysis.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Rani; Drazin, Doniel; Nakhla, Jonathan; Al-Khouja, Lutfi; Brien, Earl; Baron, Eli M; Kim, Terrence T; Patrick Johnson, J; Yassari, Reza

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The use of intraoperative stereotactic navigation has become more available in spine surgery. The authors undertook this study to assess the utility of intraoperative CT navigation in the localization of spinal lesions and as an intraoperative tool to guide resection in patients with spinal lesions. METHODS This was a retrospective multicenter study including 50 patients from 2 different institutions who underwent biopsy and/or resection of spinal column tumors using image-guided navigation. Of the 50 cases reviewed, 4 illustrative cases are presented. In addition, the authors provide a description of surgical technique with image guidance. RESULTS The patient group included 27 male patients and 23 female patients. Their average age was 61 ± 17 years (range 14-87 years). The average operative time (incision to closure) was 311 ± 188 minutes (range 62-865 minutes). The average intraoperative blood loss was 882 ± 1194 ml (range 5-7000 ml). The average length of hospitalization was 10 ± 8.9 days (range 1-36 days). The postoperative complications included 2 deaths (4.0%) and 4 radiculopathies (8%) secondary to tumor burden. CONCLUSIONS O-arm 3D imaging with stereotactic navigation may be used to localize lesions intraoperatively with real-time dynamic feedback of tumor resection. Stereotactic guidance may augment resection or biopsy of primary and metastatic spinal tumors. It offers reduced radiation exposure to operating room personnel and the ability to use minimally invasive approaches that limit tissue injury. In addition, acquisition of intraoperative CT scans with real-time tracking allows for precise targeting of spinal lesions with minimal dissection. PMID:27476839

  5. Image-Guided Ablation of Malignant Liver Tumors: Recommendations for Clinical Validation of Novel Thermal and Non-Thermal Technologies – A Western Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lencioni, Riccardo; de Baere, Thierry; Martin, Robert C.; Nutting, Charles W.; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    Background Image-guided ablation is used to treat patients with unresectable malignant hepatic tumors that are limited in number and size, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal hepatic metastases. While radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been the most popular technique, several alternate options for focal tissue destruction have recently attracted attention. These technologies appear to be able to overcome some specific limitations of RFA. Currently, there is no accepted algorithm for the use of the different techniques for image-guided ablation. Summary A panel of physicians practicing in North America or Europe met to develop a set of recommendations aimed at providing directions for clinical validation of energy-based, thermal and non-thermal image-guided ablation technologies in the treatment of malignant liver tumors. The recommendations were developed through a critical appraisal of potential advantages and disadvantages of each ablation technology, based on experimental findings and available data, as well as on critical considerations for their clinical validation in hepatic tumor treatment from a Western perspective. Key Messages Significant variability appears to exist among the different equipment and devices within each type of technology. A comprehensive understanding of the data and a critical appraisal of the efficacy and safety profile of each ablation system is required. Clinical practice guidelines should include specific information of the recommended techniques and protocols instead of a generic indication of the technology. PMID:26734576

  6. Critical parameters for parallel interconnects using VCSEL arrays and fiber image guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayan D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Geib, Kent M.; Choquette, Kent D.; Carter, Tony R.; Fischer, Arthur J.; Robinson, Matthew; Sullivan, Charles T.

    2003-04-01

    Several thousand glass optical fibers fused together is routinely used as fiber image guides for medical and other image remoting applications. Fiber image guides also offer possibility for flexible optical interconnect links with potentially thousands of bi-directional parallel channels with data rates as high as 10 Gbps per channel, leading to more than Tera bits per second aggregate data transfer rates. A fair number of fiber image guide based link demonstrations using vertical cavity surface emitting lasers have been reported. However, little is known about designable parameters and optimization paradigms for applications to massively parallel optical interconnects. This paper discusses critical optical parameters that characterize a massively parallel link. Experimental characterizations were carried out to explore some of the fundamental interactions between single-mode 850 nm VCSELs and fiber image guides having different numerical apertures, 0.25, 0.55 and 1.00. Preliminary optical simulation results are given. Finally, potential directions for further experimental and analytical explorations, and for applicability into designable link systems are suggested.

  7. Sclerotic Vertebral Metastases: Pain Palliation Using Percutaneous Image-Guided Cryoablation

    SciTech Connect

    Costa de Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Menezes, Marcos Roberto de; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Cryoablative therapies have been proposed to palliate pain from soft-tissue or osteolytic bone tumors. A case of a patient with painful thoracic and sacral spine sclerotic metastases successfully treated by image-guided percutaneous cryoablation with the aid of insulation techniques and thermosensors is reported in this case report.

  8. Image-guided diagnosis of prostate cancer can increase detection of tumors

    Cancer.gov

    In the largest prospective study to date of image-guided technology for identifying suspicious regions of the prostate to biopsy, researchers compared the ability of this technology to detect high-risk prostate cancer with that of the current standard of

  9. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-Term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Steven M.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Waldman, Stephen D.; Rudan, John F.; Bardana, Davide D.; Stewart, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous osteochondral cartilage repair is a valuable reconstruction option for cartilage defects, but the accuracy to harvest and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically guided and template guided) can improve the outcome of these procedures. Design: Fifteen sheep were operated to create traumatic chondral injuries in each knee. After 4 months, the chondral defect in one knee was repaired using (a) conventional approach, (b) optically guided method, or (c) template-guided method. For both image-guided groups, harvest and delivery sites were preoperatively planned using custom-made software. During optically guided surgery, instrument position and orientation were tracked and superimposed onto the surgical plan. For the template-guided group, plastic templates were manufactured to allow an exact fit between template and the joint anatomy. Cylindrical holes within the template guided surgical tools according to the plan. Three months postsurgery, both knees were harvested and computed tomography scans were used to compare the reconstructed versus the native pre-injury joint surfaces. For each repaired defect, macroscopic (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS]) and histological repair (ICRS II) scores were assessed. Results: Three months after repair surgery, both image-guided surgical approaches resulted in significantly better histology scores compared with the conventional approach (improvement by 55%, P < 0.02). Interestingly, there were no significant differences found in cartilage surface reconstruction and macroscopic scores between the image-guided and the conventional surgeries. PMID:26069658

  10. A novel technique for image-guided local heart irradiation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G; Boerma, Marjan; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Han, Eun Young; Clarkson, Richard; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Corry, Peter M

    2014-12-01

    In radiotherapy treatment of thoracic, breast and chest wall tumors, the heart may be included (partially or fully) in the radiation field. As a result, patients may develop radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) several years after exposure to radiation. There are few methods available to prevent or reverse RIHD and the biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. In order to further study the effects of radiation on the heart, we developed a model of local heart irradiation in rats using an image-guided small animal conformal radiation therapy device (SACRTD) developed at our institution. First, Monte Carlo based simulations were used to design an appropriate collimator. EBT-2 films were used to measure relative dosimetry, and the absolute dose rate at the isocenter was measured using the AAPM protocol TG-61. The hearts of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with a total dose of 21 Gy. For this purpose, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and placed in a custom-made vertical rat holder. Each heart was irradiated with a 3-beam technique (one AP field and 2 lateral fields), with each beam delivering 7 Gy. For each field, the heart was visualized with a digital flat panel X-ray imager and placed at the isocenter of the 1.8 cm diameter beam. In biological analysis of radiation exposure, immunohistochemistry showed γH2Ax foci and nitrotyrosine throughout the irradiated hearts but not in the lungs. Long-term follow-up of animals revealed histopathological manifestations of RIHD, including myocardial degeneration and fibrosis. The results demonstrate that the rat heart irradiation technique using the SACRTD was successful and that surrounding untargeted tissues were spared, making this approach a powerful tool for in vivo radiobiological studies of RIHD. Functional and structural changes in the rat heart after local irradiation are ongoing. PMID:24000983

  11. A Novel Technique for Image-Guided Local Heart Irradiation in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Boerma, Marjan; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Han, Eun Young; Clarkson, Richard; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Corry, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatment of thoracic, breast and chest wall tumors, the heart may be included (partially or fully) in the radiation field. As a result, patients may develop radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) several years after exposure to radiation. There are few methods available to prevent or reverse RIHD and the biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. In order to further study the effects of radiation on the heart, we developed a model of local heart irradiation in rats using an image-guided small animal conformal radiation therapy device (SACRTD) developed at our institution. First, Monte Carlo based simulations were used to design an appropriate collimator. EBT-2 films were used to measure relative dosimetry, and the absolute dose rate at the isocenter was measured using the AAPM protocol TG-61. The hearts of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with a total dose of 21 Gy. For this purpose, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and placed in a custom-made vertical rat holder. Each heart was irradiated with a 3-beam technique (one AP field and 2 lateral fields), with each beam delivering 7 Gy. For each field, the heart was visualized with a digital flat panel X-ray imager and placed at the isocenter of the 1.8 cm diameter beam. In biological analysis of radiation exposure, immunohistochemistry showed γH2Ax foci and nitrotyrosine throughout the irradiated hearts but not in the lungs. Long-term follow-up of animals revealed histopathological manifestations of RIHD, including myocardial degeneration and fibrosis. The results demonstrate that the rat heart irradiation technique using the SACRTD was successful and that surrounding untargeted tissues were spared, making this approach a powerful tool for in vivo radiobiological studies of RIHD. Functional and structural changes in the rat heart after local irradiation are ongoing. PMID:24000983

  12. Accuracy of image-guided surgical navigation using near infrared (NIR) optical tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Farooq, Hamza; Alarcon, Joseph; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2015-03-01

    Spinal surgery is particularly challenging for surgeons, requiring a high level of expertise and precision without being able to see beyond the surface of the bone. Accurate insertion of pedicle screws is critical considering perforation of the pedicle can result in profound clinical consequences including spinal cord, nerve root, arterial injury, neurological deficits, chronic pain, and/or failed back syndrome. Various navigation systems have been designed to guide pedicle screw fixation. Computed tomography (CT)-based image guided navigation systems increase the accuracy of screw placement allowing for 3- dimensional visualization of the spinal anatomy. Current localization techniques require extensive preparation and introduce spatial deviations. Use of near infrared (NIR) optical tracking allows for realtime navigation of the surgery by utilizing spectral domain multiplexing of light, greatly enhancing the surgeon's situation awareness in the operating room. While the incidence of pedicle screw perforation and complications have been significantly reduced with the introduction of modern navigational technologies, some error exists. Several parameters have been suggested including fiducial localization and registration error, target registration error, and angular deviation. However, many of these techniques quantify error using the pre-operative CT and an intra-operative screenshot without assessing the true screw trajectory. In this study we quantified in-vivo error by comparing the true screw trajectory to the intra-operative trajectory. Pre- and post- operative CT as well as intra-operative screenshots were obtained for a cohort of patients undergoing spinal surgery. We quantified entry point error and angular deviation in the axial and sagittal planes.

  13. Anisotropic Margin Expansions in 6 Anatomic Directions for Oropharyngeal Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yock, Adam D.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.; Beadle, Beth M.; Zhang, Lifei; Dong, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to determine the expansions in 6 anatomic directions that produced optimal margins considering nonrigid setup errors and tissue deformation for patients receiving image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: For 20 patients who had received IGRT to the head and neck, we deformably registered each patient's daily images acquired with a computed tomography (CT)-on-rails system to his or her planning CT. By use of the resulting vector fields, the positions of volume elements within the clinical target volume (CTV) (target voxels) or within a 1-cm shell surrounding the CTV (normal tissue voxels) on the planning CT were identified on each daily CT. We generated a total of 15,625 margins by dilating the CTV by 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm in the posterior, anterior, lateral, medial, inferior, and superior directions. The optimal margins were those that minimized the relative volume of normal tissue voxels positioned within the margin while satisfying 1 of 4 geometric target coverage criteria and 1 of 3 population criteria. Results: Each pair of geometric target coverage and population criteria resulted in a unique, anisotropic, optimal margin. The optimal margin expansions ranged in magnitude from 1 to 5 mm depending on the anatomic direction of the expansion and on the geometric target coverage and population criteria. Typically, the expansions were largest in the medial direction, were smallest in the lateral direction, and increased with the demand of the criteria. The anisotropic margin resulting from the optimal set of expansions always included less normal tissue than did any isotropic margin that satisfied the same pair of criteria. Conclusions: We demonstrated the potential of anisotropic margins to reduce normal tissue exposure without compromising target coverage in IGRT to the head and neck.

  14. Atlas-based method for model updating in image-guided liver surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Logan W.; Dumpuri, Prashanth; Chapman, William C.; Galloway, Robert L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2007-03-01

    Similar to the well documented brain shift experienced during neurosurgical procedures, intra-operative soft tissue deformation in open hepatic resections is the primary source of error in current image-guided liver surgery (IGLS) systems. The use of bio-mechanical models has shown promise in providing the link between the deformed, intra-operative patient anatomy and the pre-operative image data. More specifically, the current protocol for deformation compensation in IGLS involves the determination of displacements via registration of intra-operatively acquired sparse data and subsequent use of the displacements to drive solution of a linear elastic model via the finite element method (FEM). However, direct solution of the model during the surgical procedure has several logistical limitations including computational time and the ability to accurately prescribe boundary conditions and material properties. Recently, approaches utilizing an atlas of pre-operatively computed model solutions based on a priori information concerning the surgical loading conditions have been proposed as a more realistic avenue for intra-operative deformation compensation. Similar to previous work, we propose the use of a simple linear inverse model to match the intra-operatively acquired data to the pre-operatively computed atlas. Additionally, an iterative approach is implemented whereby point correspondence is updated during the matching process, being that the correspondence between intra-operative data and the pre-operatively computed atlas is not explicitly known in liver applications. Preliminary validation experiments of the proposed algorithm were performed using both simulation and phantom data. The proposed method provided comparable results in the phantom experiments with those obtained using the traditional incremental FEM approach.

  15. Target Coverage in Image-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderink, Wouter . E-mail: w.wunderink@erasmusmc.nl; Romero, Alejandra Mendez; Osorio, Eliana M. Vasquez; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of image-guided procedures (with computed tomography [CT] and electronic portal images before each treatment fraction) on target coverage in stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver patients using a stereotactic body frame (SBF) and abdominal compression. CT guidance was used to correct for day-to-day variations in the tumor's mean position in the SBF. Methods and Materials: By retrospectively evaluating 57 treatment sessions, tumor coverage, as obtained with the clinically applied CT-guided protocol, was compared with that of alternative procedures. The internal target volume-plus (ITV{sup +}) was introduced to explicitly include uncertainties in tumor delineations resulting from CT-imaging artifacts caused by residual respiratory motion. Tumor coverage was defined as the volume overlap of the ITV{sup +}, derived from a tumor delineated in a treatment CT scan, and the planning target volume. Patient stability in the SBF, after acquisition of the treatment CT scan, was evaluated by measuring the displacement of the bony anatomy in the electronic portal images relative to CT. Results: Application of our clinical protocol (with setup corrections following from manual measurements of the distances between the contours of the planning target volume and the daily clinical target volume in three orthogonal planes, multiple two-dimensional) increased the frequency of nearly full ({>=}99%) ITV{sup +} coverage to 77% compared with 63% without setup correction. An automated three-dimensional method further improved the frequency to 96%. Patient displacements in the SBF were generally small ({<=}2 mm, 1 standard deviation), but large craniocaudal displacements (maximal 7.2 mm) were occasionally observed. Conclusion: Daily, CT-assisted patient setup may substantially improve tumor coverage, especially with the automated three-dimensional procedure. In the present treatment design, patient stability in the SBF should be verified with portal

  16. SU-E-T-154: Establishment and Implement of 3D Image Guided Brachytherapy Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, S; Zhao, S; Chen, Y; Li, Z; Li, P; Huang, Z; Yang, Z; Zhang, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cannot observe the dose intuitionally is a limitation of the existing 2D pre-implantation dose planning. Meanwhile, a navigation module is essential to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the implantation. Hence a 3D Image Guided Brachytherapy Planning System conducting dose planning and intra-operative navigation based on 3D multi-organs reconstruction is developed. Methods: Multi-organs including the tumor are reconstructed in one sweep of all the segmented images using the multiorgans reconstruction method. The reconstructed organs group establishs a three-dimensional visualized operative environment. The 3D dose maps of the three-dimentional conformal localized dose planning are calculated with Monte Carlo method while the corresponding isodose lines and isodose surfaces are displayed in a stereo view. The real-time intra-operative navigation is based on an electromagnetic tracking system (ETS) and the fusion between MRI and ultrasound images. Applying Least Square Method, the coordinate registration between 3D models and patient is realized by the ETS which is calibrated by a laser tracker. The system is validated by working on eight patients with prostate cancer. The navigation has passed the precision measurement in the laboratory. Results: The traditional marching cubes (MC) method reconstructs one organ at one time and assembles them together. Compared to MC, presented multi-organs reconstruction method has superiorities in reserving the integrality and connectivity of reconstructed organs. The 3D conformal localized dose planning, realizing the 'exfoliation display' of different isodose surfaces, helps make sure the dose distribution has encompassed the nidus and avoid the injury of healthy tissues. During the navigation, surgeons could observe the coordinate of instruments real-timely employing the ETS. After the calibration, accuracy error of the needle position is less than 2.5mm according to the experiments. Conclusion: The speed and

  17. Radiation Dose From Kilovoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography in an Image-Guided Radiotherapy Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X. Coffey, Charles W.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy has emerged as the new paradigm in radiotherapy. This work is to provide detailed information concerning the additional imaging doses to patients' radiosensitive organs from a kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT) scan procedure. Methods and Materials: The Vanderbilt-Monte-Carlo-Beam-Calibration (VMCBC; Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN) algorithm was used to calculate radiation dose to organs resulting from a kV CBCT imaging guidance procedure. Eight patients, including 3 pediatric and 5 adult patients, were investigated. The CBCT scans in both full- and half-fan modes were studied. Results: For a head-and-neck scan in half-fan mode, dose-volume histogram analyses show mean doses of 7 and 8 cGy to the eyes, 5 and 6 cGy to the spinal cord, 5 and 6 cGy to the brain, and 18 and 23 cGy to the cervical vertebrae for an adult and a 29-month-old child, respectively. The dose from a scan in full-fan mode is 10-20% lower than that in half-fan mode. For an abdominal scan, mean doses are 3 and 7 cGy to prostate and 7 and 17 cGy to femoral heads for a large adult patient and a 31-month-old pediatric patient, respectively. Conclusions: Doses to radiosensitive organs can total 300 cGy accrued over an entire treatment course if kV CBCT scans are acquired daily. These findings provide needed data for clinicians to make informed decisions concerning additional imaging doses. The dose to bone is two to four times greater than dose to soft tissue for kV x-rays, which should be considered, especially for pediatric patients.

  18. Preprocedural magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided catheter ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qian; Piers, Sebastiaan R D; Lamb, Hildo J; Zeppenfeld, Katja; van der Geest, Rob J

    2015-02-01

    To present and validate a highly automated MRI analysis workflow for image-guided catheter ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation procedures. A cohort of 15 post-infarction patients underwent MRI prior to VT ablation. The MRI study included a black-blood turbo spin echo sequence for visualizing the aortic root and ostium of the left main (LM) coronary artery, and a 3D late gadolinium enhanced sequence for visualizing the LV anatomy and myocardial scar substrate. Semi-automated segmentation of the LV, aortic root and ostium of LM was performed, followed by fully automated segmentation of myocardial scar. All segmented structures were aligned using an automated image registration algorithm to remove inter-scan displacement. MRI was integrated at the beginning of the procedure after mapping a single LM point. The integration performance was compared to that of the traditional iterative closest point (ICP) method. The proposed method required a single LM mapping point only, compared to 255 ± 43 points with the ICP method. The single-point method achieved a mean point-to-surface distance of 4.9 ± 1.5 mm on the LV surface and 5.1 ± 1.7 mm on the aorta surface (ICP: 3.7 ± 0.8 and 9.2 ± 7.2 mm, P < 0.05). The Cohen's kappa coefficient between the MRI-defined and EAM-defined scar was 0.36 ± 0.16 for the presented method, significantly higher than that of ICP method (0.23 ± 0.21, P = 0.03), indicating more accurate scar substrate localization during integration. This study demonstrated the feasibility of preprocedural MRI integration into the VT ablation procedure, with highly automated image analysis workflow and minimal mapping effort. PMID:25341408

  19. The Use of TLD and Gafchromic Film to Assure Submillimeter Accuracy for Image-Guided Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Anthony K. Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steve D.; Main, Bill; Adler, John R.

    2008-04-01

    The Cyberknife is an image-guided radiosurgical system. It uses a compact X-band 6-MV linear accelerator mounted on a robotic arm to deliver radiosurgical doses. While routine quality assurance (QA) is essential for any radiosurgery system, QA plays an even more vital role for the Cyberknife system, due to the complexity of the system and the wide range of applications. This paper presents a technique for performing quality assurance using thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) and Gafchromic films that is intended to be specific for the Cyberknife. However, with minor modification, the proposed method can also be used for QA of other radiosurgery systems. Our initial QA procedure for the CyberKnife utilized a 30 x 30 x 11-cm solid water phantom containing a planar array of slots for 1x 1 x 1-mm TLDs on a 2-mm grid. With the objective of significantly simplifying CyberKnife QA, a new procedure for verification was developed, which uses much fewer TLDs than the prior solid water phantom technique. This new method requires only that the system target dose to the center of a cluster of 7 TLDs. In a prior study with Gafchromic films, conducted at 3 different Cyberknife facilities, the mean clinically relevant error was demonstrated to be 0.7 mm. A similar Gafchromic film analysis replicated these error measurements as part of the present investigation. It cannot be emphasized enough the importance of implementing routine QA to verify the accuracy of any radiosurgery system. Our quality assurance procedure tests the treatment planning system, as well as the entire treatment delivery including the image targeting system and the robot system. Either TLDs or Gafchromic films may be used for QA test of a radiosurgery system. Using both methods for measurement has the advantage independently verifying the accuracy of the system. This approach, which is routinely in used at our institution, has repeatedly confirmed the submillimeter targeting accuracy of our Cyberknife.

  20. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  1. Five-Year Outcomes from 3 Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph; Henderson, Randal H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To report 5-year clinical outcomes of 3 prospective trials of image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 211 prostate cancer patients (89 low-risk, 82 intermediate-risk, and 40 high-risk) were treated in institutional review board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel therapy followed by androgen deprivation therapy for high-risk disease. Toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Results: Five-year rates of biochemical and clinical freedom from disease progression were 99%, 99%, and 76% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year rates of late CTCAE, version 3.0 (or version 4.0) grade 3 gastrointestinal and urologic toxicity were 1.0% (0.5%) and 5.4% (1.0%), respectively. Median pretreatment scores and International Prostate Symptom Scores at >4 years posttreatment were 8 and 7, 6 and 6, and 9 and 8, respectively, among the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. There were no significant changes between median pretreatment summary scores and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite scores at >4 years for bowel, urinary irritative and/or obstructive, and urinary continence. Conclusions: Five-year clinical outcomes with image-guided proton therapy included extremely high efficacy, minimal physician-assessed toxicity, and excellent patient-reported outcomes. Further follow-up and a larger patient experience are necessary to confirm these favorable outcomes.

  2. Geological modeling and infiltration pattern of a karstic system based upon crossed geophysical methods and image-guided inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Lea; Jardani, Abderrahim; Fournier, Matthieu; Massei, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Karstic aquifers represent an important part of the water resources worldwide. Though they have been widely studied on many aspects, their geological and hydrogeological modeling is still complex. Geophysical methods can provide useful subsurface information for the characterization and mapping of karstic systems, especially when not accessible by speleology. The site investigated in this study is a sinkhole-spring system, with small diameter conduits that run within a chalk aquifer (Norville, in Upper Normandy, France). This site was investigated using several geophysical methods: electrical tomography, self-potential, mise-à-la-masse methods, and electromagnetic method (EM34). Coupling those results with boreholes data, a 3D geological model of the hydrogeological basin was established, including tectonic features as well as infiltration structures (sinkhole, covered dolines). The direction of the karstic conduits near the main sinkhole could be established, and the major fault was shown to be a hydraulic barrier. Also the average concentration of dolines on the basin could be estimated, as well as their depth. At last, several hypotheses could be made concerning the location of the main conduit network between the sinkhole and the spring, using previous hydrodynamic study of the site along with geophysical data. In order to validate the 3D geological model, an image-guided inversion of the apparent resistivity data was used. With this approach it is possible to use geological cross sections to constrain the inversion of apparent resistivity data, preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. This method was used on the major fault, enabling to choose one geological interpretation over another (fault block structure near the fault, rather than important folding). The constrained inversion was also applied on covered dolines, to validate the interpretation of their shape and depth. Key words: Magnetic and electrical

  3. Tailored Near-Infrared Contrast Agents for Image Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Njiojob, Costyl N.; Owens, Eric A.; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    The success of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence to be employed for intraoperative imaging relies on the ability to develop a highly stable, NIR fluorescent, nontoxic, biocompatible, and highly excreted compound that retains a reactive functionality for conjugation to a cancer-recognizing peptide. Herein, systematic modifications to previously detailed fluorophore ZW800-1 are explored. Specific modifications, including the isosteric replacement of the O atom of ZW800-1, include nucleophilic amine and sulfur species attached to the heptamethine core. These novel compounds have shown similar satisfactory results in biodistribution and clearance while also expressing increased stability in serum. Most importantly, all of the synthesized and evaluated compounds display a reactive functionality (either a free amino group or carboxylic acid moiety) for further bioconjugation. The results obtained from the newly prepared derivatives demonstrate that the central substitution with the studied linking agents retains the ultralow background in vivo performance of the fluorophores regardless of the total net charge. PMID:25711712

  4. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps of the treatment chain are explained, including imaging techniques and beam delivery techniques. Clinical studies using different motion management techniques are reviewed, and finally future directions for image guidance and motion management are outlined. PMID:25955231

  5. Image-Guided Percutaneous Ablation of Hepatic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Gretchen

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a common site of primary and secondary malignancies, often resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Evaluating these patients in a multidisciplinary setting allows for optimal utilization of all oncologic therapies including surgery, radiation, systemic chemotherapy, transarterial therapies, and ablation. While surgical intervention often provides the best outcomes when treating most hepatic tumors, many patients are not surgical candidates due to extensive tumor burden, underlying liver disease, or other comorbid conditions. The evolution of imaging and ablation devices has allowed for the increased utilization of percutaneous ablation as definitive and palliative treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic malignancies. Ablation induces tumor necrosis by injection of chemicals (chemical ablation) or temperature modification (thermal ablation). The goal of this review is to provide an overview of different ablation techniques commonly used for hepatic malignancies, discuss the oncologic outcomes of these interventions, and outline the current indications, contraindications, and reported complications of these therapies. PMID:25071304

  6. Image-guided drug delivery to the brain using nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hong; Wu, Fang; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting across the blood--brain barrier (BBB) for treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases represents the most challenging aspect of, as well as one of the largest growing fields in, neuropharmaceutics. Combining nanotechnology with multiple imaging techniques has a unique role in the diagnosis and treatment (theranostics) of CNS disease. Such imaging techniques include anatomical imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), electron microscopy, autoradiography and optical imaging as well as thermal images. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent advances in formulations, current challenges and possible hypotheses concerning the use of such theranostics across the BBB.[LM1] PMID:23817076

  7. The chemistry of acrylic bone cements and implications for clinical use in image-guided therapy.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, David A; Gailloud, Philippe; Murphy, Kieran

    2004-02-01

    Advances in image-guided therapy for vertebral fractures and other bone-related disorders have made acrylic bone cement an integral part of the interventional armamentarium. Unfortunately, information on the properties and chemistry of these compounds is mostly published in the biomaterial sciences literature, a source with which the interventional community is generally unfamiliar. This review focuses on the chemistry of bone cement polymerization and the properties of components in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based polymers, the most commonly used bone cements in interventional procedures such as percutaneous vertebroplasty. The effects of altering the concentration of components such as methylmethacrylate monomers, PMMA beads, benzoyl peroxide activator, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT) initiator, and radiopacifiers on the setting time, polymerization temperature, and compressive strength of the cement are also considered. This information will allow interventional radiologists to manipulate bone cement characteristics for specific applications and maximize the clinical potential of image-guided interventions. PMID:14963178

  8. Computational challenges for image-guided radiation therapy: framework and current research.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lei; Siebers, Jeffrey; Keall, Paul

    2007-10-01

    It is arguable that the imaging and delivery hardware necessary for delivering real-time adaptive image-guided radiotherapy is available on high-end linear accelerators. Robust and computationally efficient software is the limiting factor in achieving highly accurate and precise radiotherapy to the constantly changing anatomy of a cancer patient. The limitations are not caused by the availability of algorithms but rather issues of reliability, integration, and calculation time. However, each of the software components is an active area of research and development at academic and commercial centers. This article describes the software solutions in 4 broad areas: deformable image registration, adaptive replanning, real-time image guidance, and dose calculation and accumulation. Given the pace of technological advancement, the integration of these software solutions to develop real-time adaptive image-guided radiotherapy and the associated challenges they bring will be implemented to varying degrees by all major manufacturers over the coming years. PMID:17903702

  9. Image-guided interventions and computer-integrated therapy: Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Peters, Terry M; Linte, Cristian A

    2016-10-01

    Significant efforts have been dedicated to minimizing invasiveness associated with surgical interventions, most of which have been possible thanks to the developments in medical imaging, surgical navigation, visualization and display technologies. Image-guided interventions have promised to dramatically change the way therapies are delivered to many organs. However, in spite of the development of many sophisticated technologies over the past two decades, other than some isolated examples of successful implementations, minimally invasive therapy is far from enjoying the wide acceptance once envisioned. This paper provides a large-scale overview of the state-of-the-art developments, identifies several barriers thought to have hampered the wider adoption of image-guided navigation, and suggests areas of research that may potentially advance the field. PMID:27373146

  10. In vivo 808 nm image-guided photodynamic therapy based on an upconversion theranostic nanoplatform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Que, Ivo; Kong, Xianggui; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Chang, Yulei; Wang, Tong Tong; Chan, Alan; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; Zhang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    A new strategy for efficient in vivo image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated utilizing a ligand-exchange constructed upconversion-C60 nanophotosensitizer. This theranostic platform is superior to the currently reported nanophotosensitizers in (i) directly bonding photosensitizer C60 to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) by a smart ligand-exchange strategy, which greatly shortened the energy transfer distance and enhanced the 1O2 production, resulting in the improvement of the therapeutic effect; (ii) realizing in vivo NIR 808 nm image-guided PDT with both excitation (980 nm) and emission (808 nm) light falling in the biological window of tissues, which minimized auto-fluorescence, reduced light scatting and improved the imaging contrast and depth, and thus guaranteed noninvasive diagnostic accuracy. In vivo and ex vivo tests demonstrated its favorable bio-distribution, tumor-selectivity and high therapeutic efficacy. Owing to the effective ligand exchange strategy and the excellent intrinsic photophysical properties of C60, 1O2 production yield was improved, suggesting that a low 980 nm irradiation dosage (351 J cm-2) and a short treatment time (15 min) were sufficient to perform NIR (980 nm) to NIR (808 nm) image-guided PDT. Our work enriches the understanding of UCNP-based PDT nanophotosensitizers and highlights their potential use in future NIR image-guided noninvasive deep cancer therapy.A new strategy for efficient in vivo image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated utilizing a ligand-exchange constructed upconversion-C60 nanophotosensitizer. This theranostic platform is superior to the currently reported nanophotosensitizers in (i) directly bonding photosensitizer C60 to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) by a smart ligand-exchange strategy, which greatly shortened the energy transfer distance and enhanced the 1O2 production, resulting in the improvement of the therapeutic effect; (ii

  11. A computer-controlled pump and realistic anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for validating image-guided systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ralph; Wilson, Emmanuel; Tang, Jonathan; Stoianovici, Dan; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    The development of image-guided interventions requires validation studies to evaluate new protocols. So far, these validation studies have been limited to animal models and to software and physical phantoms that simulate respiratory motion but cannot accommodate needle punctures in a realistic manner. We have built a computer-controlled pump that drives an anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for simulating natural breathing patterns. This pump consists of a power supply, a motion controller with servo amplifier, linear actuator, and custom fabricated pump assembly. By generating several sample waveforms, we were able to simulate typical breathing patterns. Using this pump, we were able to produce chest wall movements similar to typical chest wall movements observed in humans. This system has potential applications for evaluating new respiratory compensation algorithms and may facilitate improved testing of image-guided protocols under realistic interventional conditions.

  12. Compact wearable dual-mode imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Nan; Huang, Chih-Yu; Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Huang, Chongyuan; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel; Liang, Rongguang

    2015-09-01

    A wearable all-plastic imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery is presented. The compact size of the system is especially suitable for applications in the operating room. The system consists of a dual-mode imaging system, see-through goggle, autofocusing, and auto-contrast tuning modules. The paper will discuss the system design and demonstrate the system performance.

  13. Compact wearable dual-mode imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Nan; Huang, Chih-Yu; Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Huang, Chongyuan; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel; Liang, Rongguang

    2015-09-01

    A wearable all-plastic imaging system for real-time fluorescence image-guided surgery is presented. The compact size of the system is especially suitable for applications in the operating room. The system consists of a dual-mode imaging system, see-through goggle, autofocusing, and auto-contrast tuning modules. The paper will discuss the system design and demonstrate the system performance. PMID:26358823

  14. Technique for Targeting Arteriovenous Malformations Using Frameless Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, Dimitre; Liu, Lina; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Moore, Teri; Sarmiento, Marily; Chang, Steve D.; Dodd, Robert; Marks, Michael; Do, Huy M.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To integrate three-dimensional (3D) digital rotation angiography (DRA) and two-dimensional (2D) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging into a targeting methodology enabling comprehensive image-guided robotic radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: DRA geometric integrity was evaluated by imaging a phantom with embedded markers. Dedicated DSA acquisition modes with preset C-arm positions were configured. The geometric reproducibility of the presets was determined, and its impact on localization accuracy was evaluated. An imaging protocol composed of anterior-posterior and lateral DSA series in combination with a DRA run without couch displacement between acquisitions was introduced. Software was developed for registration of DSA and DRA (2D-3D) images to correct for: (a) small misalignments of the C-arm with respect to the estimated geometry of the set positions and (b) potential patient motion between image series. Within the software, correlated navigation of registered DRA and DSA images was incorporated to localize AVMs within a 3D image coordinate space. Subsequent treatment planning and delivery followed a standard image-guided robotic radiosurgery process. Results: DRA spatial distortions were typically smaller than 0.3 mm throughout a 145-mm x 145-mm x 145-mm volume. With 2D-3D image registration, localization uncertainties resulting from the achievable reproducibility of the C-arm set positions could be reduced to about 0.2 mm. Overall system-related localization uncertainty within the DRA coordinate space was 0.4 mm. Image-guided frameless robotic radiosurgical treatments with this technique were initiated. Conclusions: The integration of DRA and DSA into the process of nidus localization increases the confidence with which radiosurgical ablation of AVMs can be performed when using only an image-guided technique. Such an approach can increase patient comfort, decrease time pressure on clinical and

  15. Microencapsulation of Indocyanine Green for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery†

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel process to encapsulate Indocyanine Green (ICG) in liposomal droplets at high concentration for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery. The microencapsulation process follows two consecutive steps of droplet formation by liquid-driving coaxial flow focusing (LDCFF) and solvent removal by oil phase dewetting. These biocompatible lipid vesicles may have important applications in drug delivery and fluorescence imaging. PMID:25450664

  16. Electrospray of multifunctional microparticles for image-guided drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leilei; Yan, Yan; Mena, Joshua; Sun, Jingjing; Letson, Alan; Roberts, Cynthia; Zhou, Chuanqing; Chai, Xinyu; Ren, Qiushi; Xu, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    Anti-VEGF therapies have been widely explored for the management of posterior ocular disease, like neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Loading anti-VEGF therapies in biodegradable microparticles may enable sustained drug release and improved therapeutic outcome. However, existing microfabrication processes such as double emulsification produce drug-loaded microparticles with low encapsulation rate and poor antibody bioactivity. To overcome these limitations, we fabricate multifunctional microparticles by both single needle and coaxial needle electrospray. The experimental setup for the process includes flat-end syringe needles (both single needle and coaxial needle), high voltage power supplies, and syringe pumps. Microparticles are formed by an electrical field between the needles and the ground electrode. Droplet size and morphology are controlled by multiple process parameters and material properties, such as flow rate and applied voltage. The droplets are collected and freezing dried to obtain multifunctional microparticles. Fluorescent beads encapsulated poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) microparticles are injected into rabbits eyes through intravitreal injection to test the biodegradable time of microparticles.

  17. Image-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of ovarian tumors: An assessment of diagnostic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ghazala; Maheshwari, Veena; Afzal, Sheerin; Ansari, Hena A; Ansari, Maryem

    2010-01-01

    Background: Image-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of ovarian lumps is being increasingly used for the successful diagnosis of ovarian tumors, although borderline cases may be difficult to diagnose by this method. Aim: To demonstrate the efficacy of image-guided FNAC in diagnosing ovarian tumors (benign and malignant) and to evaluate the usefulness of cytology as a mode of easy and rapid diagnosis of ovarian lumps. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 42 female patients. Clinical evaluation and relevant investigations were carried out. Diagnosis was established by FNAC performed under image guidance (ultrasonography/computed tomography). The cytological diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination. Results: Cytological diagnosis was rendered on all the 42 ovarian lesions, with a correct diagnosis in 34 cases, resulting in a diagnostic accuracy of 80.9%. Most of the cases with discordant diagnoses were surface epithelial tumors of low malignant potential and required histopathological examination for a final diagnosis. Conclusions: Image-guided FNAC is an inexpensive, rapid and fairly accurate procedure for the diagnosis of ovarian lesions. It provides a safe alternative to the more expensive, time consuming and cumbersome surgical route to diagnosis. PMID:21187883

  18. Image-guided fine-needle aspiration of retroperitoneal masses: The role of the cytopathologist

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ghazala; Maheshwari, Veena; Afzal, Sheerin; Ansari, Hena A; Ahmad, Ibne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Retroperitoneal tumors constitute a difficult diagnostic category as they are not easily accessible. The advent of image-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has resolved this problem significantly. Aims: We present a short study based on guided aspiration of retroperitoneal tumors, in which we have tried to assess the role of image-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology as a tool for pre-operative diagnosis. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on patients diagnosed with retroperitoneal masses. FNA was performed under image guidance with the help of ultrasonography and/or computed tomography; smears were prepared and meticulously screened according to a fixed protocol. The results were analyzed to determine sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic efficacy of cytopathological diagnosis using image-guided FNA techniques. Results: We assessed 38 patients with retroperitoneal masses. In all cases, adequate cellular material was obtained. No major complications were encountered. Statistical analysis was carried out in 35 cases; sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 100% in these cases. Conclusion: FNA under image guidance should be considered a first-line diagnostic approach for retroperitoneal and other abdominal tumors, although caution should be exercised in case selection. In areas where advanced tests are not available, the cytotechnologist and cytopathologist have a very important role to play in ensuring accurate diagnoses. PMID:23661939

  19. Polydopamine Nanoparticles as a Versatile Molecular Loading Platform to Enable Imaging-guided Cancer Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ziliang; Gong, Hua; Gao, Min; Zhu, Wenwen; Sun, Xiaoqi; Feng, Liangzhu; Fu, Tingting; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer combination therapy to treat tumors with different therapeutic approaches can efficiently improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects. Herein, we develop a theranostic nano-platform based on polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, which then are exploited as a versatile carrier to allow simultaneous loading of indocyanine green (ICG), doxorubicin (DOX) and manganese ions (PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn)), to enable imaging-guided chemo & photothermal cancer therapy. In this system, ICG acts as a photothermal agent, which shows red-shifted near-infrared (NIR) absorbance and enhanced photostability compared with free ICG. DOX, a model chemotherapy drug, is then loaded onto the surface of PDA-ICG-PEG with high efficiency. With Mn2+ ions intrinsically chelated, PDA-ICG-PEG/DOX(Mn) is able to offer contrast under T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In a mouse tumor model, the MR imaging-guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy achieves a remarkable synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the respective single treatment modality. This work demonstrates that PDA nanoparticles could serve as a versatile molecular loading platform for MR imaging guided combined chemo- & photothermal therapy with minimal side effects, showing great potential for cancer theranostics. PMID:27217836

  20. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  1. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  2. The MEPUC concept adapts the C-arm fluoroscope to image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Suhm, Norbert; Müller, Paul; Bopp, Urs; Messmer, Peter; Regazzoni, Pietro

    2004-06-01

    Image-guided surgery requires surgeons to be able to manipulate the imaging modality themselves and without delay. Intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging does not meet this requirement as the C-arm fluoroscope cannot be operated or positioned by the surgeons themselves. The Motorized Exact Positioning Unit for C-arm (MEPUC) concept aims to optimize the workflow of positioning the C-arm fluoroscope. The hardware component of the MEPUC equips the fluoroscope with electric stepping motors. The software component allows the surgeon to control the fluoroscope's movements. The study presented here showed that translational movements within the x-y plane are most frequently performed when positioning the C-arm fluoroscope. Furthermore, reproducing a former projection was found to be a frequent task during image-guided procedures. In our opinion, the MEPUC concept adapts the fluoroscope to image-guided surgery. The most important improvement being definition of a bidirectional data exchange between the surgeon and the C-arm fluoroscope: positioning data from the surgeon to the C-arm fluoroscope and-subsequently-image information from C-arm fluoroscope to the surgeon. PMID:15183713

  3. Photosensitizer-Conjugated Silica-Coated Gold Nanoclusters for Fluorescence Imaging-Guided Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Lin, Jing; Wang, Shouju; Zhou, Zhijun; Li, Zhiming; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Chunlei; Yue, Xuyi; Niu, Gang; Yang, Min; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Multifunctional theranostics have recently been intensively explored to optimize the efficacy and safety of therapeutic regimens. In this work, a photo-theranostic agent based on chlorin e6 (Ce6) photosensitizer-conjugated silica-coated gold nanoclusters (AuNCs@SiO2-Ce6) is strategically designed and prepared for fluorescence imaging-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT). The AuNCs@SiO2-Ce6 shows the following features: i) high Ce6 photosensitizer loading; ii) no non-specific release of Ce6 during its circulation; iii) significantly enhanced cellular uptake efficiency of Ce6, offering a remarkably improved photodynamic therapeutic efficacy compared to free Ce6; iv) subcellular characterization of the nanoformula via both the fluorescence of Ce6 and plasmon luminescence of AuNCs; v) fluorescence imaging-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT). This photo-theranostics owns good stability, high water dispersibility and solubility, non-cytotoxicity, and good biocompatibility, thus facilitating its biomedical applications, particularly for multi-modal optical, CT and photoacoustic (PA) imaging guided PDT or sonodynamic therapy. PMID:23523428

  4. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  5. Pleural controversies: image guided biopsy vs. thoracoscopy for undiagnosed pleural effusions?

    PubMed

    Dixon, Giles; de Fonseka, Duneesha; Maskell, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Undiagnosed pleural effusions present an increasing diagnostic burden upon healthcare providers internationally. The investigation of pleural effusions often requires the acquisition of tissue for histological analysis and diagnosis. Historically there were two options for tissue biopsy: a 'gold standard' surgical biopsy or a "blind" closed pleural biopsy. Over the last decade however, image-guided Tru-cut biopsies and local anaesthetic thoracoscopic (local anaesthetic thoracoscopy) biopsies have become more widespread. Image-guided techniques acquire samples under ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) guidance whereas LAT involves the direct visualisation and biopsy of the pleura with pleuroscopy. Both techniques have been shown to be superior to 'blind' closed pleural biopsy for the diagnosis of pleural or metastatic malignancy. However, closed biopsy remains a viable method of investigation in areas of high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Beyond this, each investigative technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. Image-guided biopsy is less invasive, usually carried out as an outpatient procedure, and enables tissue biopsy in frail patients and those with pleural thickening but no pleural fluid. Local anaesthetic thoracoscopy (LAT) provides diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in one procedure. Large volume thoracentesis, multiple pleural biopsies and talc poudrage can be carried out in a single procedure. The overall diagnostic yield is similar for both techniques, although there are no large-scale direct comparisons. Both techniques share low complication rates. PMID:26150917

  6. Pleural controversies: image guided biopsy vs. thoracoscopy for undiagnosed pleural effusions?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Giles; de Fonseka, Duneesha

    2015-01-01

    Undiagnosed pleural effusions present an increasing diagnostic burden upon healthcare providers internationally. The investigation of pleural effusions often requires the acquisition of tissue for histological analysis and diagnosis. Historically there were two options for tissue biopsy: a ‘gold standard’ surgical biopsy or a “blind” closed pleural biopsy. Over the last decade however, image-guided Tru-cut biopsies and local anaesthetic thoracoscopic (local anaesthetic thoracoscopy) biopsies have become more widespread. Image-guided techniques acquire samples under ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) guidance whereas LAT involves the direct visualisation and biopsy of the pleura with pleuroscopy. Both techniques have been shown to be superior to ‘blind’ closed pleural biopsy for the diagnosis of pleural or metastatic malignancy. However, closed biopsy remains a viable method of investigation in areas of high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Beyond this, each investigative technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. Image-guided biopsy is less invasive, usually carried out as an outpatient procedure, and enables tissue biopsy in frail patients and those with pleural thickening but no pleural fluid. Local anaesthetic thoracoscopy (LAT) provides diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in one procedure. Large volume thoracentesis, multiple pleural biopsies and talc poudrage can be carried out in a single procedure. The overall diagnostic yield is similar for both techniques, although there are no large-scale direct comparisons. Both techniques share low complication rates. PMID:26150917

  7. Image-guided, Lobe-specific Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery to Swine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Suda, Takeshi; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Guisheng; Liu, Dexi

    2009-01-01

    Image-guided, lobe-specific hydrodynamic gene delivery to liver was assessed in pigs. The procedure involved image-guided insertion of a balloon catheter to the hepatic vein of the selected lobe from the jugular vein and hydrodynamic injection of plasmid DNA using a newly developed computer-controlled injection device. We demonstrated that the impact of the procedure was regional with minimal effects on neighboring lobes. Level of gene expression resulted from the procedure was 107 relative light units (RLU)/mg in the targeted lobes and 102–105 RLU/mg in the nontargeted lobes 4 hours after hydrodynamic injection of pCMV-Luc plasmids. Occlusion of blood flow in the inferior vena cava (IVC) or IVC plus portal vein (PV) was effective in elevating hydrodynamic pressure in the targeted vasculature but did not enhance gene delivery efficiency. Physiological examination on pigs with IVC occlusion revealed transient decreases of blood pressure and respiration rate. Removal of occlusion from IVC resulted in a rapid and transient increase in heart rate. Occlusion of the PV and hepatic vein showed no effect on physiological and cardiac activities. No major changes in serum composition were observed. These results suggest that (i) image-guided, lobe-specific hydrodynamic procedure is effective for regional gene delivery to liver, (ii) blockade in IVC should be avoided for hydrodynamic gene delivery to the liver, and (iii) clinical application of hydrodynamic gene delivery to liver is feasible. PMID:19156134

  8. Image-Guided Local Delivery Strategies Enhance Therapeutic Nanoparticle Uptake in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mouli, Samdeep K.; Tyler, Patrick; McDevitt, Joseph L.; Eifler, Aaron C.; Guo, Yang; Nicolai, Jodi; Lewandowski, Robert .J.; Li, Weiguo; Procissi, Daniel; Ryu, Robert K.; Wang, Y. Andrew; Salem, Riad; Larson, Andrew C.; Omary, Reed A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) have emerged as a novel class of therapeutic agents that overcome many of the limitations of current cancer chemotherapeutics. However, a major challenge to many current NP platforms is unfavorable biodistribution, and limited tumor uptake, upon systemic delivery. Delivery, therefore, remains a critical barrier to widespread clinical adoption of NP therapeutics. To overcome these limitations, we have adapted the techniques of image-guided local drug delivery to develop nano-ablation and nano-embolization. Nano-ablation is a tumor ablative strategy that employs image-guided placement of electrodes into tumor tissue to electroporate tumor cells, resulting in rapid influx of NPs that is not dependent on cellular uptake machinery or stage of the cell cycle. Nano-embolization involves the image-guided delivery of NPs and embolic agents directly into the blood supply of tumors. We describe the design and testing of our innovative local delivery strategies using doxorubicin functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (DOX-SPIOs) in cell culture, and the N1S1 hepatoma and VX2 tumor models, imaged by high resolution 7T MRI. We demonstrate that local delivery techniques result in significantly increased intra-tumoral DOX-SPIO uptake, with limited off-target delivery in tumor bearing animal models. The techniques described are versatile enough to be extended to any NP platform, targeting any solid organ malignancy that can be accessed via imaging guidance. PMID:23952712

  9. An integrated platform for image-guided cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying Liang; Shetty, Anoop K.; Duckett, Simon; Etyngier, Patrick; Gijsbers, Geert; Bullens, Roland; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Rhode, Kawal S.

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective procedure for patients with heart failure but 30% of patients do not respond. This may be due to sub-optimal placement of the left ventricular (LV) lead. It is hypothesized that the use of cardiac anatomy, myocardial scar distribution and dyssynchrony information, derived from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may improve outcome by guiding the physician for optimal LV lead positioning. Whole heart MR data can be processed to yield detailed anatomical models including the coronary veins. Cine MR data can be used to measure the motion of the LV to determine which regions are late-activating. Finally, delayed Gadolinium enhancement imaging can be used to detect regions of scarring. This paper presents a complete platform for the guidance of CRT using pre-procedural MR data combined with live x-ray fluoroscopy. The platform was used for 21 patients undergoing CRT in a standard catheterization laboratory. The patients underwent cardiac MRI prior to their procedure. For each patient, a MRI-derived cardiac model, showing the LV lead targets, was registered to x-ray fluoroscopy using multiple views of a catheter looped in the right atrium. Registration was maintained throughout the procedure by a combination of C-arm/x-ray table tracking and respiratory motion compensation. Validation of the registration between the three-dimensional (3D) roadmap and the 2D x-ray images was performed using balloon occlusion coronary venograms. A 2D registration error of 1.2 ± 0.7 mm was achieved. In addition, a novel navigation technique was developed, called Cardiac Unfold, where an entire cardiac chamber is unfolded from 3D to 2D along with all relevant anatomical and functional information and coupled to real-time device detection. This allowed more intuitive navigation as the entire 3D scene was displayed simultaneously on a 2D plot. The accuracy of the unfold navigation was assessed off-line using 13 patient data sets

  10. Multimodal-Imaging-Guided Cancer Phototherapy by Versatile Biomimetic Theranostics with UV and γ-Irradiation Protection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Min; Hu, Hao; Yang, Xiangyu; Wen, Bronte; Wang, Zhantong; Jacobson, Orit; Song, Jibin; Zhang, Guofeng; Niu, Gang; Huang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-05-01

    A versatile biomimetic theranostic agent based on magnetic melanin nanoparticles is developed for positron-emission tomography/magnetic resonance/photoacoustic/photothermal multimodal-imaging-guided cancer photothermal therapy and UV and γ-irradiation protection. PMID:26928972

  11. Multi-institutional dosimetric and geometric commissioning of image-guided small animal irradiators

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, P. E.; Granton, P. V.; Hoof, S. van; Hermans, J.; Gasparini, A.; Jelveh, S.; Clarkson, R.; Kaas, J.; Wittkamper, F.; Sonke, J.-J.; Verhaegen, F.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric and geometric properties of a commercial x-ray based image-guided small animal irradiation system, installed at three institutions and to establish a complete and broadly accessible commissioning procedure. Methods: The system consists of a 225 kVp x-ray tube with fixed field size collimators ranging from 1 to 44 mm equivalent diameter. The x-ray tube is mounted opposite a flat-panel imaging detector, on a C-arm gantry with 360° coplanar rotation. Each institution performed a full commissioning of their system, including half-value layer, absolute dosimetry, relative dosimetry (profiles, percent depth dose, and relative output factors), and characterization of the system geometry and mechanical flex of the x-ray tube and detector. Dosimetric measurements were made using Farmer-type ionization chambers, small volume air and liquid ionization chambers, and radiochromic film. The results between the three institutions were compared. Results: At 225 kVp, with 0.3 mm Cu added filtration, the first half value layer ranged from 0.9 to 1.0 mm Cu. The dose-rate in-air for a 40 × 40 mm{sup 2} field size, at a source-to-axis distance of 30 cm, ranged from 3.5 to 3.9 Gy/min between the three institutions. For field sizes between 2.5 mm diameter and 40 × 40 mm{sup 2}, the differences between percent depth dose curves up to depths of 3.5 cm were between 1% and 4% on average, with the maximum difference being 7%. The profiles agreed very well for fields >5 mm diameter. The relative output factors differed by up to 6% for fields larger than 10 mm diameter, but differed by up to 49% for fields ≤5 mm diameter. The mechanical characteristics of the system (source-to-axis and source-to-detector distances) were consistent between all three institutions. There were substantial differences in the flex of each system. Conclusions: With the exception of the half-value layer, and mechanical properties, there were significant differences between the

  12. A strategy to objectively evaluate the necessity of correcting detected target deviations in image guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Kim, Sung; Jabbour, Salma; Narra, Venkat; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2007-11-15

    Image guided radiotherapy technologies are being increasingly utilized in the treatment of various cancers. These technologies have enhanced the ability to detect temporal and spatial deviations of the target volume relative to planned radiation beams. Correcting these detected deviations may, in principle, improve the accuracy of dose delivery to the target. However, in many situations, a clinical decision has to be made as to whether it is necessary to correct some of the deviations since the relevant dosimetric impact may or may not be significant, and the corresponding corrective action may be either impractical or time consuming. Ideally this decision should be based on objective and reproducible criteria rather than subjective judgment. In this study, a strategy is proposed for the objective evaluation of the necessity of deviation correction during the treatment verification process. At the treatment stage, without any alteration from the planned beams, the treatment beams should provide the desired dose coverage to the geometric volume identical to the planning target volume (PTV). Given this fact, the planned dose distribution and PTV geometry were used to compute the dose coverage and PTV enclosure of the clinical target volume (CTV) that was detected from imaging during the treatment setup verification. The spatial differences between the detected CTV and the planning CTV are essentially the target deviations. The extent of the PTV enclosure of the detected CTV as well as its dose coverage were used as criteria to evaluate the necessity of correcting any of the target deviations. This strategy, in principle, should be applicable to any type of target deviations, including both target deformable and positional changes and should be independent of how the deviations are detected. The proposed strategy was used on two clinical prostate cancer cases. In both cases, gold markers were implanted inside the prostate for the purpose of treatment setup

  13. Prostate Planning Treatment Volume Margin Calculation Based on the ExacTrac X-Ray 6D Image-Guided System: Margins for Various Clinical Implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Arrizabalaga, Sara Brualla Gonzalez, Luis; Rosello Ferrando, Juan V.; Pastor Peidro, Jorge; Lopez Torrecilla, Jose; Planes Meseguer, Domingo; Garcia Hernandez, Trinidad

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the prostate motion from day-to-day setup, as well as during irradiation time, to calculate planning target volume (PTV) margins. PTV margins differ depending on the clinical implementation of an image-guided system. Three cases were considered in this study: daily bony anatomy match, center of gravity of the implanted marker seeds calculated with a limited number of imaged days, and daily online correction based on implanted marker seeds. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 30 nonrandomized patients and 1,330 pairs of stereoscopic kV images have been used to determine the prostate movement. The commercial image guided positioning tool employed was ExacTrac X-Ray 6D (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Results: Planning target volume margins such that a minimum of 95% of the prescribed dose covers the clinical target volume for 90% of the population are presented. PTV margins based on daily bony anatomy match, including intrafraction correction, would be 11.5, 13.5, and 4.5 mm in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior, and right-left directions, respectively. This margin can be further reduced to 8.1, 8.6, and 4.8 mm (including intrafraction motion) if implanted marker seeds are used. Finally, daily on line correction based on marker seeds would result in the smallest of the studied margins: 4.7, 6.2, and 1.9 mm. Conclusion: Planning target volume margins are dependent on the local clinical use of the image-guided RT system available in any radiotherapy department.

  14. Model-based brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Liu, Fenghong; Fan, Xiaoyao; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2009-02-01

    Intraoperative brain shift compensation is important for improving the accuracy of neuronavigational systems and ultimately, the accuracy of brain tumor resection as well as patient quality of life. Biomechanical models are practical methods for brain shift compensation in the operating room (OR). These methods assimilate incomplete deformation data on the brain acquired from intraoperative imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound and stereovision), and simulate whole-brain deformation under loading and boundary conditions in the OR. Preoperative images of the patient's head (e.g., preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR)) are then deformed accordingly based on the computed displacement field to generate updated visualizations for subsequent surgical guidance. Apparently, the clinical feasibility of the technique depends on the efficiency as well as the accuracy of the computational scheme. In this paper, we identify the major steps involved in biomechanical simulation of whole-brain deformation and demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of each step. We show that a combined computational cost of 5 minutes with an accuracy of 1-2 millimeter can be achieved which suggests that the technique is feasible for routine application in the OR.

  15. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-li; Xue, Chao-fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05). The local failure rate (P<0.05) and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05). The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  16. Image-guided thermal therapy with a dual-contrast magnetic nanoparticle formulation: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Attaluri, Anilchandra; Seshadri, Madhav; Mirpour, Sahar; Wabler, Michele; Marinho, Thomas; Furqan, Muhammad; Zhou, Haoming; De Paoli, Silvia; Gruettner, Cordula; Gilson, Wesley; DeWeese, Theodore; Garcia, Monica; Ivkov, Robert; Liapi, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/objective The aim of this study was to develop and investigate the properties of a magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle–ethiodised oil formulation for image-guided thermal therapy of liver cancer. Materials and methods The formulation comprises bionised nano-ferrite (BNF) nanoparticles suspended in ethiodised oil, emulsified with polysorbate 20 (BNF-lip). Nanoparticle size was measured via photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In vivo thermal therapy capability was tested in two groups of male Foxn1nu mice bearing subcutaneous HepG2 xenograft tumours. Group I (n =12) was used to screen conditions for group II (n =48). In group II, mice received one of BNF-lip (n =18), BNF alone (n =16), or PBS (n =14), followed by alternating magnetic field (AMF) hyperthermia, with either varied duration (15 or 20 min) or amplitude (0, 16, 20, or 24 kA/m). Image-guided fluoroscopic intra-arterial injection of BNF-lip was tested in New Zealand white rabbits (n =10), bearing liver VX2 tumours. The animals were subsequently imaged with CT and 3 T MRI, up to 7 days post-injection. The tumours were histopathologically evaluated for distribution of BNF-lip. Results The BNF showed larger aggregate diameters when suspended in BNF-lip, compared to clear solution. The BNF-lip formulation produced maximum tumour temperatures with AMF >20 kA/m and showed positive X-ray visibility and substantial shortening of T1 and T2 relaxation time, with sustained intratumoural retention up to 7 days post-injection. On pathology, intratumoural BNF-lip distribution correlated well with CT imaging of intratumoural BNF-lip distribution. Conclusion The BNF-lip formulation has favourable thermal and dual imaging capabilities for image-guided thermal therapy of liver cancer, suggesting further exploration for clinical applications. PMID:27151045

  17. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Fu, Zhongjie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Evans, Lucy; Tian, Katherine; Saba, Nicholas; Fredrick, Thomas; Morss, Peyton; Chen, Jing; Smith, Lois E. H.

    2015-01-01

    The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model. PMID:26161975

  18. The use of virtual fiducials in image-guided kidney surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisson, Courtenay; Ong, Rowena; Simpson, Amber; Clark, Peter; Herrell, S. D.; Galloway, Robert

    2011-03-01

    The alignment of image-space to physical-space lies at the heart of all image-guided procedures. In intracranial surgery, point-based registrations can be used with either skin-affixed or bone-implanted extrinsic objects called fiducial markers. The advantages of point-based registration techniques are that they are robust, fast, and have a well developed mathematical foundation for the assessment of registration quality. In abdominal image-guided procedures such techniques have not been successful. It is difficult to accurately locate sufficient homologous intrinsic points in imagespace and physical-space, and the implantation of extrinsic fiducial markers would constitute "surgery before the surgery." Image-space to physical-space registration for abdominal organs has therefore been dominated by surfacebased registration techniques which are iterative, prone to local minima, sensitive to initial pose, and sensitive to percentage coverage of the physical surface. In our work in image-guided kidney surgery we have developed a composite approach using "virtual fiducials." In an open kidney surgery, the perirenal fat is removed and the surface of the kidney is dotted using a surgical marker. A laser range scanner (LRS) is used to obtain a surface representation and matching high definition photograph. A surface to surface registration is performed using a modified iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. The dots are extracted from the high definition image and assigned the three dimensional values from the LRS pixels over which they lie. As the surgery proceeds, we can then use point-based registrations to re-register the spaces and track deformations due to vascular clamping and surgical tractions.

  19. Construction of a high-tech operating room for image-guided surgery using VR.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Otake, Yoshito; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Susumu; Nezu, Takehiko; Sakai, Haruo; Umezawa, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    This project aimed to construct an operating room to implement high dimensional (3D, 4D) medical imaging and medical virtual reality techniques that would enable clinical tests for new surgical procedures. We designed and constructed such an operating room at Dai-san Hospital, the Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. The room was equipped with various facilities for image-guided, robot and tele- surgery. In this report, we describe an outline of our "high-tech operating room" and future plans. PMID:15718793

  20. Image-guided percutaneous needle biopsy in cancer diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjay; Madoff, David C

    2007-06-01

    Image-guided percutaneous biopsy is a well-established and safe technique and plays a crucial role in management of cancer patients. Improvements in needle designs, development of new biopsy techniques, and continual advances in image-guidance technology have improved the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Lesions previously considered relatively inaccessible can now be safely biopsied. In this article, we review the various needle types, biopsy techniques, methods of safely assessing difficult-to-reach lesions, the advantages and disadvantages of various imaging modalities, and specific biopsy techniques applicable to different regions of the body. PMID:18070687

  1. Recent Advances in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sameer K.; Simpson, Daniel R.; Rose, Brent S.; Sandhu, Ajay P.

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a well-established role in the management of head and neck cancers. Over the past decade, a variety of new imaging modalities have been incorporated into the radiotherapy planning and delivery process. These technologies are collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy and may lead to significant gains in tumor control and radiation side effect profiles. In the following review, these techniques as they are applied to head and neck cancer patients are described, and clinical studies analyzing their use in target delineation, patient positioning, and adaptive radiotherapy are highlighted. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of potential areas of further radiotherapy advancement. PMID:19644564

  2. Complications of Image-Guided Thermal Ablation of Liver and Kidney Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Rae; Thomas, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation is a widely accepted tool in the treatment of a variety of solid organ neoplasms. Among the different techniques of ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation have been most commonly used and investigated in the treatment of liver and kidney neoplasms. This article will review complications following thermal ablation of tumors in the liver and kidney, and discuss the risks and clinical presentation of each complication as well as how to treat and potentially avoid complications. PMID:25049443

  3. Image-Guided Radio-Frequency Gain Calibration for High-Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Elodie; McGorty, KellyAnne; Wiggins, Graham C.; Axel, Leon; Kim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    High-field (≥ 3T) MRI provides a means to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, due to its higher tissue magnetization compared with 1.5T. However, both the static magnetic field (B0) and the transmit radio-frequency (RF) field (B1+) inhomogeneities are comparatively higher than those at 1.5T. These challenging factors at high-field strengths make it more difficult to accurately calibrate the transmit RF gain using standard RF calibration procedures. An image-based RF calibration procedure was therefore developed, in order to accurately calibrate the transmit RF gain within a specific region-of-interest (ROI). Using a single-shot ultra-fast gradient echo pulse sequence with centric k-space reordering, a series of “saturation-no-recovery” images was acquired by varying the flip angle of the preconditioning pulse. In the resulting images, the signal null occurs in regions where the flip angle of the preconditioning pulse is 90°. For a given ROI, the mean signal can be plotted as a function of the nominal flip angle, and the resulting curve can be used to quantitatively identify the signal null. This image-guided RF calibration procedure was evaluated through phantom and volunteer imaging experiments at 3T and 7T. The image-guided RF calibration results in vitro were consistent with standard B0 and B1+ maps. The standard automated RF calibration procedure produced approximately 20% and 15–30% relative error in the transmit RF gain in the left kidney at 3T and brain at 7T, respectively. For initial application, a T2 mapping pulse sequence was applied at 7T. The T2 measurements in the thalamus at 7T were 60.6 ms and 48.2 ms using the standard and image-guided RF calibration procedures, respectively. This rapid, image-guided RF calibration procedure can be used to optimally calibrate the flip angle for a given ROI and thus minimize measurement errors for quantitative MRI and MR spectroscopy. PMID:20014333

  4. Image-guided surgery using near-infrared fluorescent light: from bench to bedside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Handgraaf, Henricus J. M.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2015-03-01

    Due to its relatively high tissue penetration, near-infrared (NIR; 700-900 nm) fluorescent light has the potential to visualize structures that need to be resected (e.g. tumors, lymph nodes) and structures that need to be spared (e.g. nerves, ureters, bile ducts). Until now, most clinical trials have focused on suboptimal, non-targeted dyes. Although successful, a new era in image-guided surgery has begun by the introduction of tumor-targeted agents. In this paper, we will describe how tumor-targeted NIR fluorescent imaging can be applied in a clinical setting.

  5. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in inoperable endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petsuksiri, J; Chansilpa, Y; Hoskin, P J

    2014-01-01

    Inoperable endometrial cancer may be treated with curative aim using radical radiotherapy alone. The radiation techniques are external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone, EBRT plus brachytherapy and brachytherapy alone. Recently, high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been used instead of low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Image-guided brachytherapy enables sufficient coverage of tumour and reduction of dose to the organs at risk, thus increasing the therapeutic ratio of treatment. Local control rates with three-dimensional brachytherapy appear better than with conventional techniques (about 90–100% and 70–90%, respectively). PMID:24807067

  6. Sample handler for x-ray tomographic microscopy and image-guided failure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, Peter; Thurner, Philipp; Broennimann, Rolf; Sennhauser, Urs; Stampanoni, Marco; Abela, Rafael; Mueller, Ralph

    2005-07-15

    X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) yields a three-dimensional data model of an investigated specimen. XTM providing micrometer resolution requires synchrotron light, high resolution area detectors, and a precise sample handler. The sample handler has a height of 270 mm only, is usable for 1 {mu}m resolution, and is able to carry loading machines with a weight of up to 20 kg. This allows exposing samples to load between scans for image-guided failure assessment. This system has been used in the XTM end station of the materials science beamline of the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institut.

  7. Treatment planning for image-guided neuro-vascular interventions using patient-specific 3D printed phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; O'Hara, R.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Mokin, M.; Jimenez, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Bednarek, D.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C.

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are the preferred procedures for treatment of a wide range of vascular disorders. Despite benefits including reduced trauma and recovery time, EIGIs have their own challenges. Remote catheter actuation and challenging anatomical morphology may lead to erroneous endovascular device selections, delays or even complications such as vessel injury. EIGI planning using 3D phantoms would allow interventionists to become familiarized with the patient vessel anatomy by first performing the planned treatment on a phantom under standard operating protocols. In this study the optimal workflow to obtain such phantoms from 3D data for interventionist to practice on prior to an actual procedure was investigated. Patientspecific phantoms and phantoms presenting a wide range of challenging geometries were created. Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) data was uploaded into a Vitrea 3D station which allows segmentation and resulting stereo-lithographic files to be exported. The files were uploaded using processing software where preloaded vessel structures were included to create a closed-flow vasculature having structural support. The final file was printed, cleaned, connected to a flow loop and placed in an angiographic room for EIGI practice. Various Circle of Willis and cardiac arterial geometries were used. The phantoms were tested for ischemic stroke treatment, distal catheter navigation, aneurysm stenting and cardiac imaging under angiographic guidance. This method should allow for adjustments to treatment plans to be made before the patient is actually in the procedure room and enabling reduced risk of peri-operative complications or delays.

  8. Enhanced Fluorescence Imaging Guided Photodynamic Therapy of Sinoporphyrin Sodium Loaded Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuefeng; Niu, Gang; Lin, Jing; Jin, Albert J.; Hu, Hao; Tang, Yuxia; Zhang, Yujie; Wu, Aiguo; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Shaoliang; Huang, Peng; Shen, Baozhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research indicates that graphene oxide (GO) can effectively deliver photosensitives (PSs) by π-π stacking for photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, due to the tight complexes of GO and PSs, the fluorescence of PSs are often drastically quenched via an energy/charge transfer process, which limits this GO-PS system for photodiagnostics especially in fluorescence imaging. To solve this problem, we herein strategically designed and prepared a novel photo-theranostic agent based on sinoporphyrin sodium (DVDMS) loaded PEGylated GO (GO-PEG-DVDMS) with improved fluorescence property for enhanced optical imaging guided PDT. The fluorescence of loaded DVDMS is drastically enhanced via intramolecular charge transfer. Meanwhile, the GO-PEG vehicles can significantly increase the tumor accumulation efficiency of DVDMS and lead to an improved photodynamic therapy (PDT) efficacy as compared to DVDMS alone. The cancer theranostic capability of the as-prepared GO-PEG-DVDMS was carefully investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Most intriguingly, 100% in vivo tumor elimination was achieved by intravenous injection of GO-PEG-DVDMS (2 mg/kg of DVDMS, 50 J) without tumor recurrence, loss of body weight or other noticeable toxicity. This novel GO-PEG-DVDMS theranostics is well suited for enhanced fluorescence imaging guided PDT. PMID:25542797

  9. Image-guided radiotherapy platform using single nodule conditional lung cancer mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Korideck, Houari; Christensen, Camilla L.; Herter, Jan M.; Rhee, Kevin; Berbeco, Ross I.; Bennett, David G.; Akbay, Esra A.; Kozono, David; Mak, Raymond H.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-01-01

    Close resemblance of murine and human trials is essential to achieve the best predictive value of animal-based translational cancer research. Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer faithfully predict the response of human lung cancers to systemic chemotherapy. Due to development of multifocal disease, however, these models have not been usable in studies of outcomes following focal radiotherapy (RT). We report the development of a preclinical platform to deliver state-of-the-art image-guided RT in these models. Presence of a single tumour as usually diagnosed in patients is modelled by confined injection of adenoviral Cre recombinase. Furthermore, three-dimensional conformal planning and state-of-the-art image-guided dose delivery are performed as in humans. We evaluate treatment efficacies of two different radiation regimens and find that Kras-driven tumours can temporarily be stabilized upon RT, whereas additional loss of either Lkb1 or p53 renders these lesions less responsive to RT. PMID:25519892

  10. Hybrid graphene/Au activatable theranostic agent for multimodalities imaging guided enhanced photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shi; Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Guohao; Yang, Kai; Chen, Minglong; Tian, Rui; Ma, Qingjie; Zhu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) has been increasingly investigated. However, there are still challenges in strategies that can further enhance photoconversion efficiency and improve photothermal tumor ablation effect of current nanomaterials. Herein, we developed a fluorescent/photoacoustic imaging guided PTT agent by seeding Gold (Au) nanoparticles onto graphene oxide (GO). Near infrared dye (Cy5.5) labeled-matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) substrate (CP) was conjugated onto the GO/Au complex (GA) forming tumor targeted theranostic probe (CPGA), whereCy5.5 fluorescent signal is quenched by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) capacity from both GO and Au, yet it can boost strong fluorescence signals after degradation by MMP-14. The photothermal effect of GA hybrid was found significantly elevated compared with Au or GO alone. After intravenous administration of CPGA into SCC7 tumor-bearing mice, high fluorescence and PA signals were observed in the tumor area over time, which peaked at the 6 h time point (tumor-to-normal tissue ratio of 3.64 ± 0.51 for optical imaging and 2.5 ± 0.27 for PA imaging). The tumors were then irradiated with a laser, and an excellent tumor inhibition was observedwithoutrecurrence. Our studies further encourage applications of the hybrid nanocomposite for image-guided enhanced PTT in biomedical applications, especially in cancer theranostics. PMID:26691399

  11. Development and testing of an image-guided FT-IR instrument for field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaobing; Liu, Xiangyan; Liu, Li

    2015-09-01

    Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemicals require sensitive spectrometers with calibration capabilities. We have developed a compact novel instrument that can not only provide imaging capability, bust also one that provides spectral capability of the field of view (FOV) center under the image-guided. The system employs a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer, coupled with chalcogenide glass optical fiber, and a specially designed infrared optic lens. A special kit provided by Bruker Optics is connected on the spectrometer to focus the infrared beam from the lens at the entry of the fiber. Its spectral range covers the infrared band from 1850cm-1 to 5000cm-1 and its spectral resolution could be chosen among six selected values 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32cm-1. This paper will address the issues of image-guided spectroscopy and will show how an instrument designed for specifically imaging applications can dramatically improve the performance of the system and quality of the data acquired. The benefit of these technologies in spectroscopy can be demonstrated with a system optimally designed for detecting spectral characteristics of moving targets.

  12. Quality Assurance Issues for Computed Tomography-, Ultrasound-, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cormack, Robert A.

    2008-05-01

    The requirements of quality assurance (QA) for both brachytherapy and imaging devices are well-defined, but image-guided brachytherapy has raised new issues. Image guidance in brachytherapy involves the transition from reference point dosimetry using films to volumetric imaging such as computed tomography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging for treatment planning and guidance of applicator, needle, or seed placement. The QA of these devices might not reflect the conditions of use in brachytherapy or the requirements of brachytherapy treatment planning. Image interpretation becomes much more important with image-guided brachytherapy. The success of a procedure could depend on the interpretation of a single image in a calibration phase done under the time pressures of the operative setting. This change has implications at the level of treatment, the process, and the field of brachytherapy as a whole. The QA concerns arising from brachytherapy procedures using ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging guidance are discussed, as are the problems associated with using imaging in an interventional setting. This report was intended to indicate the QA concerns arising from the convergence of brachytherapy and imaging-highlighting areas in which technical improvements are needed.

  13. Biophysical characterization of a relativistic proton beam for image-guided radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhan; Vanstalle, Marie; La Tessa, Chiara; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Durante, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We measured the physical and radiobiological characteristics of 1 GeV protons for possible applications in stereotactic radiosurgery (image-guided plateau-proton radiosurgery). A proton beam was accelerated at 1 GeV at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and a target in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was used. Clonogenic survival was measured after exposures to 1–10 Gy in three mammalian cell lines. Measurements and simulations demonstrate that the lateral scattering of the beam is very small. The lateral dose profile was measured with or without the 20-cm plastic target, showing no significant differences up to 2 cm from the axis A large number of secondary swift protons are produced in the target and this leads to an increase of approximately 40% in the measured dose on the beam axis at 20 cm depth. The relative biological effectiveness at 10% survival level ranged between 1.0 and 1.2 on the beam axis, and was slightly higher off-axis. The very low lateral scattering of relativistic protons and the possibility of using online proton radiography during the treatment make them attractive for image-guided plateau (non-Bragg peak) stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:22843629

  14. Liver surgery perspective: from pre-operative surgery planning to intra-operative image guided operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Senhu; Lennon, Brian T.; Waite, Jon M.; Clements, Logan W.; Scherer, Mike A.; Stefansic, Jim D.

    2009-10-01

    Liver cancer represents a major health care problem in the world, especially in China and several countries in Southeast Asia. The most effective treatment is through tumor resection. To improve the outcome of surgery, a combination of preoperative planning and intra operative image guided liver surgery (IGLS) system has been developed at Pathfinder Therapeutics, Inc. The preoperative planning subsystem (Linasys® PlaniSight®) is user-oriented and applies several novel algorithms on image segmentation and modeling, which allows the user to build various organ and tumor models with anticipated resection planes in less than 30 minutes. The surgeons can analyze the patient-specific case and set up surgical protocols. This information in image space can then be transferred into physical space through our intra operative image guided liver surgery system (Linasys® SurgSight®) based on modifications of existing surface registration algorithms, allowing surgeons to perform more accurate resections after preoperative planning. This tool gives surgeons a better understanding of vessel structure and tumor locations within the liver parenchyma during the surgery. Our ongoing clinical trial shows that it greatly facilitates liver resection operation and it is expected to improve the surgery outcome and create more candidates for surgery.

  15. Optical clearing of the skin for near-infrared fluorescence image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Aya; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light penetrates relatively deep into skin, but its usefulness for biomedical imaging is constrained by high scattering of living tissue. Previous studies have suggested that treatment with hyperosmotic ``clearing'' agents might change the optical properties of tissue, resulting in improved photon transport and reduced scatter. Since this would have a profound impact on image-guided surgery, we seek to quantify the magnitude of the optical clearing effect in living subjects. A custom NIR imaging system is used to perform sentinel lymph node mapping and superficial perforator angiography in vivo on 35-kg pigs in the presence or absence of glycerol or polypropylene glycol:polyethylene glycol (PPG:PEG) pretreatment of skin. Ex-vivo, NIR fluorescent standards are placed at a fixed distance beneath sections of excised porcine skin, either preserved in saline or stored dry, then treated or not treated with glycerol. Fluorescence intensity through the skin is quantified and analyzed statistically. Surprisingly, the expected increase in intensity is not measurable either in vivo or ex vivo, unless the skin is previously dried. Histological evaluation shows a morphological difference only in stratum corneum, with this difference being negligible in living tissue. In conclusion, topically applied hyperosmotic agents are ineffective for image-guided surgery of living subjects.

  16. Indocyanine Green-Loaded Nanoparticles for Image-Guided Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Tanner K.; Abdulahad, Asem; Kelkar, Sneha S.; Marini, Frank C.; Long, Timothy E.; Provenzale, James M.; Mohs, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Detecting positive tumor margins and local malignant masses during surgery is critical for long-term patient survival. The use of image-guided surgery for tumor removal, particularly with near-infrared fluorescent imaging, is a potential method to facilitate removing all neoplastic tissue at the surgical site. In this study we demonstrate a series of hyaluronic acid (HLA)-derived nanoparticles that entrap the near-infrared dye indocyanine green, termed NanoICG, for improved delivery of the dye to tumors. Self-assembly of the nanoparticles was driven by conjugation of one of three hydrophobic moieties: aminopropyl-1-pyrenebutanamide (PBA), aminopropyl-5β-cholanamide (5βCA), or octadecylamine (ODA). Nanoparticle self-assembly, dye loading, and optical properties were characterized. NanoICG exhibited quenched fluorescence that could be activated by disassembly in a mixed solvent. NanoICG was found to be nontoxic at physiologically relevant concentrations and exposure was not found to inhibit cell growth. Using an MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft model in mice, strong fluorescence enhancement in tumors was observed with NanoICG using a fluorescence image-guided surgery system and a whole-animal imaging system. Tumor contrast with NanoICG was significantly higher than with ICG alone. PMID:25565445

  17. Image-guided, Intravascular Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery to Skeletal Muscle in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Zhang, Guisheng; Liu, Dexi

    2009-01-01

    Development of an effective, safe, and convenient method for gene delivery to muscle is a critical step toward gene therapy for muscle-associated diseases. Toward this end, we have explored the possibility of combining the image-guided catheter insertion technique with the principle of hydrodynamic delivery to achieve muscle-specific gene transfer in pigs. We demonstrate that gene transfer efficiency of the procedure is directly related to flow rate, injection pressure, and injection volume. The optimal gene delivery was achieved at a flow rate of 15 ml/second with injection pressure of 300 psi and injection volume equal to 1.5% of body weight. Under such a condition, hydrodynamic injection of saline containing pCMV-Luc (100 µg/ml) resulted in luciferase activity of 106 to 107 relative light units (RLU)/mg of proteins extracted from the targeted muscle 5 days after hydrodynamic gene delivery. Result from immunohistochemical analysis revealed 70–90% transfection efficiency of muscle groups in the hindlimb and persistent reporter gene expression for 2 months in transfected cells. With an exception of transient edema and elevation of creatine phosphokinase, no permanent tissue damage was observed. These results suggest that the image-guided, intravenous hydrodynamic delivery is an effective and safe method for gene delivery to skeletal muscle. PMID:19738603

  18. In vivo early diagnosis of gastric dysplasia using narrow-band image-guided Raman endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiwei; Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan

    2010-05-01

    We first report on the implementation of a novel narrow-band image-guided Raman endoscopy technique for in vivo diagnosis of gastric dysplasia. High-quality in vivo Raman spectra can be acquired from normal and dysplastic gastric mucosal tissue within 0.5 sec under narrow-band image (NBI) guidance at gastroscopy. Significant differences are observed in in vivo Raman spectra between normal (n=54) and dysplastic (n=18) gastric tissue from 30 gastric patients, particularly in the spectral ranges of 825 to 950, 1000 to 1100, 1250 to 1500, and 1600 to 1800 cm-1, which primarily contain signals related to proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The multivariate analysis [i.e., principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA)], together with the leave-one tissue site-out, cross validation on in vivo gastric Raman spectra yields a diagnostic sensitivity of 94.4% (17/18) and specificity of 96.3% (52/54) for distinction of gastric dysplastic tissue. This study suggests that narrowband image-guided Raman endoscopy associated with PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms has potential for the noninvasive, in vivo early diagnosis and detection of gastric precancer during clinical gastroscopic examination.

  19. Automatic electrode configuration selection for image-guided cochlear implant programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiyuan; Dawant, Benoit M.; Noble, Jack H.

    2015-03-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are neural prosthetics that stimulate the auditory nerve pathways within the cochlea using an implanted electrode array to restore hearing. After implantation, the CI is programmed by an audiologist who determines which electrodes are active, i.e., the electrode configuration, and selects other stimulation settings. Recent clinical studies by our group have shown that hearing outcomes can be significantly improved by using an image-guided electrode configuration selection technique we have designed. Our goal in this work is to automate the electrode configuration selection step with the long term goal of developing a fully automatic system that can be translated to the clinic. Until now, the electrode configuration selection step has been performed by an expert with the assistance of image analysis-based estimates of the electrode-neural interface. To automatically determine the electrode configuration, we have designed an optimization approach and propose the use of a cost function with feature terms designed to interpret the image analysis data in a similar fashion as the expert. Further, we have designed an approach to select parameters in the cost function using our database of existing electrode configuration plans as training data. The results we present show that our automatic approach results in electrode configurations that are better or equally as good as manually selected configurations in over 80% of the cases tested. This method represents a crucial step towards clinical translation of our image-guided cochlear implant programming system.

  20. Ultrasmall Cu2-x S Nanodots for Highly Efficient Photoacoustic Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mou, Juan; Li, Pei; Liu, Chengbo; Xu, Huixiong; Song, Liang; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Yu; Shi, Jianlin; Chen, Hangrong

    2015-05-20

    Monodisperse, ultrasmall (<5 nm) Cu(2-x)S nanodots (u-Cu(2-x)S NDs) with significantly strong near-infrared absorption and conversion are successfully demonstrated for effective deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging-guided photothermal therapy both in vitro and in vivo. Owing to ultrasmall nanoparticle size and high water dispersibility as well as long stability, such nanodots possess a prolonged circulation in blood and good passive accumulation within tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. These u-Cu(2-x)S NDs have negligible side effects to both blood and normal tissues according to in vivo toxicity evaluations for up to 3 months, showing excellent hemo/histocompatibility. Furthermore, these u-Cu(2-x)S NDs can be thoroughly cleared through feces and urine within 5 days, showing high biosafety for further potential clinical translation. This novel photoacoustic imaging-guided photothermal therapy based on u-Cu(2-x)S NDs composed of a single component shows great prospects as a multifunctional nanoplatform with integration and multifunction for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25641784

  1. Accurate calibration of a stereo-vision system in image-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dezhi; Li, Shidong

    2006-11-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy using a three-dimensional (3D) camera as the on-board surface imaging system requires precise and accurate registration of the 3D surface images in the treatment machine coordinate system. Two simple calibration methods, an analytical solution as three-point matching and a least-squares estimation method as multipoint registration, were introduced to correlate the stereo-vision surface imaging frame with the machine coordinate system. Both types of calibrations utilized 3D surface images of a calibration template placed on the top of the treatment couch. Image transformational parameters were derived from corresponding 3D marked points on the surface images to their given coordinates in the treatment room coordinate system. Our experimental results demonstrated that both methods had provided the desired calibration accuracy of 0.5 mm. The multipoint registration method is more robust particularly for noisy 3D surface images. Both calibration methods have been used as our weekly QA tools for a 3D image-guided radiotherapy system. PMID:17153416

  2. Accurate calibration of a stereo-vision system in image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Dezhi; Li Shidong

    2006-11-15

    Image-guided radiotherapy using a three-dimensional (3D) camera as the on-board surface imaging system requires precise and accurate registration of the 3D surface images in the treatment machine coordinate system. Two simple calibration methods, an analytical solution as three-point matching and a least-squares estimation method as multipoint registration, were introduced to correlate the stereo-vision surface imaging frame with the machine coordinate system. Both types of calibrations utilized 3D surface images of a calibration template placed on the top of the treatment couch. Image transformational parameters were derived from corresponding 3D marked points on the surface images to their given coordinates in the treatment room coordinate system. Our experimental results demonstrated that both methods had provided the desired calibration accuracy of 0.5 mm. The multipoint registration method is more robust particularly for noisy 3D surface images. Both calibration methods have been used as our weekly QA tools for a 3D image-guided radiotherapy system.

  3. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean {+-} SD) was 4.0 {+-} 2.1 mm and 3.5 {+-} 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r {>=} 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 {+-} 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  4. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-21

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks. PMID:27008208

  5. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel-loaded microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xu; Guo, Jun; He, Cancan; Geng, Huaxiao; Yu, Gengsheng; Li, Jinqing; Zheng, Hairong; Ji, Xiaojuan; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) has been recognized as a promising drug for intervention of vascular reconstructions. However, it is still difficult to achieve local drug delivery in a spatio-temporally controllable manner under real-time image guidance. Here, we introduce an ultrasound (US) triggered image-guided drug delivery approach to inhibit vascular reconstruction via paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded microbubbles (PLM) in a rabbit iliac balloon injury model. PLM was prepared through encapsulating PTX in the shell of lipid microbubbles via film hydration and mechanical vibration technique. Our results showed PLM could effectively deliver PTX when exposed to US irradiation and result in significantly lower viability of vascular smooth muscle cells. Ultrasonographic examinations revealed the US signals from PLM in the iliac artery were greatly increased after intravenous administration of PLM, making it possible to identify the restenosis regions of iliac artery. The in vivo anti-restenosis experiments with PLM and US greatly inhibited neointimal hyperplasia at the injured site, showing an increased lumen area and reduced the ratio of intima area and the media area (I/M ratio). No obvious functional damages to liver and kidney were observed for those animals. Our study provided a promising approach to realize US triggered image-guided PTX delivery for therapeutic applications against iliac restenosis. PMID:26899550

  6. Quality assurance of multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery at the lateral skull base.

    PubMed

    Nau-Hermes, Maria; Schmitt, Robert; Becker, Meike; El-Hakimi, Wissam; Hansen, Stefan; Klenzner, Thomas; Schipper, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    For multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery at the lateral skull base a quality management is necessary to avoid the damage of closely spaced critical neurovascular structures. So far there is no standardized method applicable independently from the surgery. Therefore, we adapt a quality management method, the quality gates (QG), which is well established in, for example, the automotive industry and apply it to multiport image-guided minimally invasive surgery. QG divide a process into different sections. Passing between sections can only be achieved if previously defined requirements are fulfilled which secures the process chain. An interdisciplinary team of otosurgeons, computer scientists, and engineers has worked together to define the quality gates and the corresponding criteria that need to be fulfilled before passing each quality gate. In order to evaluate the defined QG and their criteria, the new surgery method was applied with a first prototype at a human skull cadaver model. We show that the QG method can ensure a safe multiport minimally invasive surgical process at the lateral skull base. Therewith, we present an approach towards the standardization of quality assurance of surgical processes. PMID:25105146

  7. Enhanced fluorescence imaging guided photodynamic therapy of sinoporphyrin sodium loaded graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuefeng; Niu, Gang; Lin, Jing; Jin, Albert J; Hu, Hao; Tang, Yuxia; Zhang, Yujie; Wu, Aiguo; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Shaoliang; Huang, Peng; Shen, Baozhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-02-01

    Extensive research indicates that graphene oxide (GO) can effectively deliver photosensitives (PSs) by π-π stacking for photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, due to the tight complexes of GO and PSs, the fluorescence of PSs are often drastically quenched via an energy/charge transfer process, which limits GO-PS systems for photodiagnostics especially in fluorescence imaging. To solve this problem, we herein strategically designed and prepared a novel photo-theranostic agent based on sinoporphyrin sodium (DVDMS) loaded PEGylated GO (GO-PEG-DVDMS) with improved fluorescence property for enhanced optical imaging guided PDT. The fluorescence of loaded DVDMS is drastically enhanced via intramolecular charge transfer. Meanwhile, the GO-PEG vehicles can significantly increase the tumor accumulation efficiency of DVDMS and lead to an improved PDT efficacy as compared to DVDMS alone. The cancer theranostic capability of the as-prepared GO-PEG-DVDMS was carefully investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Most intriguingly, 100% in vivo tumor elimination was achieved by intravenous injection of GO-PEG-DVDMS (2 mg/kg of DVDMS, 50 J) without tumor recurrence, loss of body weight or other noticeable toxicity. This novel GO-PEG-DVDMS theranostics is well suited for enhanced fluorescence imaging guided PDT. PMID:25542797

  8. A Novel End-Effector Design for Robotics in Image Guided Needle Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sun, David; Willingham, Chris; Durrani, Amir; King, Paul; Cleary, Kevin; Wood, Bradford

    2008-01-01

    Robotic end-effectors are being developed to facilitate image-guided minimally-invasive needle-based procedures such as tumor ablation, biopsy, thoracentesis, and blood sampling. A novel mechanical end-effector was designed to address the challenges associated with any major needle-based procedure, focusing on liver biopsy and ablation. In this end-effector embodiment, the distal end of a single articulating arm can grip needles and instruments and allow a fairly high number of degrees of freedom of movement during the complex motions associated with positioning and driving needles, as well as the periodic motions associated with breathing patterns. Tightening a cable that runs through the articulations fixes the arm in a rigid state, allowing insertion of the gripped needle. In its final form, we diagram a design that will require electro-mechanical stimulation and remote joystick control. Moreover, we discuss how cranial-caudal motion of soft tissue organs and the associated forces affect design constraints. A simulation protocol describes the use of tissue phantoms with mechanical properties in the range of hepatic tissue and the overlying abdominal wall. Finally, an in vivo protocol details the possible use of a robotic arm coupled with our end-effector in an image-guided interventional suite. Such a switchable and flexible mode for a robotic arm overcomes much of the current limitations for automated needle placements for mobile targets, subject to breathing or patient motion and the inherent risks thereof. PMID:17520618

  9. Active illumination based 3D surface reconstruction and registration for image guided medialization laryngoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ge; Lee, Sang-Joon; Hahn, James K.; Bielamowicz, Steven; Mittal, Rajat; Walsh, Raymond

    2007-03-01

    The medialization laryngoplasty is a surgical procedure to improve the voice function of the patient with vocal fold paresis and paralysis. An image guided system for the medialization laryngoplasty will help the surgeons to accurately place the implant and thus reduce the failure rates of the surgery. One of the fundamental challenges in image guided system is to accurately register the preoperative radiological data to the intraoperative anatomical structure of the patient. In this paper, we present a combined surface and fiducial based registration method to register the preoperative 3D CT data to the intraoperative surface of larynx. To accurately model the exposed surface area, a structured light based stereo vision technique is used for the surface reconstruction. We combined the gray code pattern and multi-line shifting to generate the intraoperative surface of the larynx. To register the point clouds from the intraoperative stage to the preoperative 3D CT data, a shape priori based ICP method is proposed to quickly register the two surfaces. The proposed approach is capable of tracking the fiducial markers and reconstructing the surface of larynx with no damage to the anatomical structure. We used off-the-shelf digital cameras, LCD projector and rapid 3D prototyper to develop our experimental system. The final RMS error in the registration is less than 1mm.

  10. Accuracy validation of an image guided laparoscopy system for liver resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Stephen; Totz, Johannes; Song, Yi; Johnsen, Stian; Stoyanov, Danail; Ourselin, Sébastien; Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Schneider, Crispin; Davidson, Brian; Hawkes, David; Clarkson, Matthew J.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the registration component of a proposed image guidance system for image guided liver surgery, using contrast enhanced CT. The analysis is performed on a visually realistic liver phantom and in-vivo porcine data. A robust registration process that can be deployed clinically is a key component of any image guided surgery system. It is also essential that the accuracy of the registration can be quantified and communicated to the surgeon. We summarise the proposed guidance system and discuss its clinical feasibility. The registration combines an intuitive manual alignment stage, surface reconstruction from a tracked stereo laparoscope and a rigid iterative closest point registration to register the intra-operative liver surface to the liver surface derived from CT. Testing of the system on a liver phantom shows that subsurface landmarks can be localised to an accuracy of 2.9 mm RMS. Testing during five porcine liver surgeries demonstrated that registration can be performed during surgery, with an error of less than 10 mm RMS for multiple surface landmarks.