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Sample records for imaging cherenkov detector

  1. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors of DELPHI

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.; Albrecht, E.; Allen, D.

    1995-08-01

    A Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector system has been built and is now in full operation within the DELPHI experiment. Large data samples of Z{sup 0} decays are being collected with good resolution on the observed Cherenkov angles. Several studies of Z{sup 0} decays using the RICH have already been performed on limited samples. Disturbance of the detector operation caused by shrinkage of polymeric construction materials and by migration of radiator substance is reported. These effects have been counteracted and do not endanger the quality of the data.

  2. Current state of ring imaging Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.B.

    1984-02-01

    This paper reviews several ring imaging Cherenkov detectors which are being used or developed to identify particles in high energy physics experiments. These detectors must have good detection efficiency for single photon-electrons and good spatial resolution over a large area. Emphasis is placed on the efficiencies and resolutions of these detectors as determined from ring imaging beam tests and other experiments. Following a brief review of the ring imaging technique, comparative evaluations are made of different forms of detectors and their respective materials.

  3. The endcap Cherenkov ring imaging detector at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hawegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H.; Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dolinsky, S.

    1995-05-01

    The authors present the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector in the endcap regions of the SLD detector and report initial performance. The endcap CRID was completed and commissioned in 1993 and is fully operational for the 1994 run. First Cherenkov rings have been observed. The endcap CRID detectors and fluid systems are described and initial operational experience is discussed.

  4. A ring imaging Cherenkov detector for CLAS12

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Rachel A.

    2013-12-01

    The energy increase of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12 GeV promises to greatly extend the physics reach of its experiments. This will include an upgrade of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to CLAS12, offering unique possibilities to study internal nucleon dynamics. For this excellent hadron identification over the full kinematical range of 3–8 GeV/c is essential. This will be achieved by the installation of a Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector. A novel hybrid imaging design incorporating mirrors, aerogel radiators and Hamamatsu H8500 multianode photomultiplier tubes is proposed. Depending on the incident particle track angle, Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly or after two reflections and passes through the aerogel. The detector design is described, along with preliminary results on individual detector components tests and from recent testbeam studies.

  5. The ring imaging Cherenkov detector for Fermilab experiment 665

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.B.; Dhawan, S.; Schuler, P.

    1988-02-01

    The authors describe a ring imaging Cherenkov counter (RICH) which uses a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) with cathode pad readout as a UV photon detector. The detector has 10800 pads, each connected to a charge sensitive amplifier, within an area of 55 x 95 cm/sup 2/. The detector offers high data rate capability and a chamber sensitive time of less than 250 nsec. In addition, the detector has 1 mm spatial resolution and a multi-hit capability of about 50 photons/event.

  6. Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Marshall, D.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Oxoby, G.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Suekane, F.; Toge, N.; Va'Vra, J.; Williams, S. ); Wilson, R.J.; Whitaker, J.S. . Dept.

    1990-10-01

    The SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector use a proportional wire detector for which a single channel hybrid has been developed. It consists of a preamplifier, gain selectable amplifier, load driver amplifier, power switching, and precision calibrator. For this hybrid, a bipolar, semicustom integrated circuit has been designed which includes video operational amplifiers for two of the gain stages. This approach allows maximization of the detector volume, allows DC coupling, and enables gain selection. System tests show good noise performance, calibration precision, system linearity, and signal shape uniformity over the full dynamic range. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  7. The Hadron Blind Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatnik, Marie; Zajac, Stephanie; Hemmick, Tom

    2013-10-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab have hinted at the existence of a new form of matter at high gluon density, the Color Glass Condensate. High energy electron scattering off of nuclei, focusing on the low-x components of the nuclear wave function, will definitively measure this state of matter. However, when a nucleus contributes a low x parton, the reaction products are highly focused in the electron-going direction and have large momentum in the lab system. High-momentum particle identification is particularly challenging. A particle is identifiable by its mass, but tracking algorithms only yield a particle's momentum based on its track's curvature. The particle's velocity is needed to identify the particle. A ring-imaging Cerenkov detector is being developed for the forward angle particle identification from the technological advancements of PHENIX's Hadron-Blind Detector (HBD), which uses Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and pixelated pad planes to detect Cerenkov photons. The new HBD will focus the Cerenkov photons into a ring to determine the parent particle's velocity. Results from the pad plane simulations, construction tests, and test beam run will be presented.

  8. New optics for resolution improving of Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, M.; Kramer, D.; Polak, J.; Steiger, L.; Finger, M.; Slunecka, M.

    2013-04-01

    The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is key tool for particle identification. Two reflecting spherical mirror surfaces, covering a total area of about 21 m2 hosted in the radiator vessel, provide Cherenkov radiation focusing to photon detectors. These ones are based on the use of multi-anode photo-multiplier tubes. They are coupled to individual lens telescopes, made from special fused silica aspherical lenses. Design, construction, and Hartmann test of lenses qualities and alignment were described. The RICH detector uses C4F10 as radiator gas. The refractive index of the radiator gas is substantial parameter. It varies with temperature, atmospheric pressure and gas purity. Its accurate knowledge is essential for the particle identification performance. A modified Jamin's interferometer was proposed, constructed and tested to allow on-line refractive index measurement with accuracy better than 10-6 The new types of fused silica Cherenkov radiators was designed to the tests of electron multiplier detector too.

  9. The fluid systems for the SLD Cherenkov ring imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H.; Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; McCulloch, M.; McShurley, D.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Peterson, H.; Ratcliff, B.; Reif, R.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Shaw, H.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Vavra, J.; Watt, R.; Weber, T.; Williams, S.H.; Baird, K.; Jacques, P.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R.; Stamer, P.; Word, G.; Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Yellin, S.; Ben-David, R.; Manly, S.; Snyder, J.; Turk, J.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Liu, X.; Schneider, M.; Williams, D.A.; Coller, J.; Shank, J.T.; Whitaker, J.S.; d`Oliveira, A.; Johnson, R.A.; Martinez, J.; Nussbaum, M.; Santha, A.K.S.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Stockdale, I.; Wilson, R.J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe the design and operation of the fluid delivery, monitor and control systems for the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID). The systems deliver drift gas (C{sub 2}H{sub 6} + TMAE), radiator gas (C{sub 5}F{sub 12} + N{sub 2}) and radiator liquid (C{sub 6}F{sub 14}). Measured critical quantities such as electron lifetime in the drift gas and ultra-violet (UV) transparencies of the radiator fluids, together with the operational experience, are also reported.

  10. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector of the NA62 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, F.

    2012-08-01

    The NA62 experiment is designed to measure the branching ratio of the decay K+ -> π +ν bar {ν } with a 10% accuracy at the CERN SPS. To suppress the main background coming from the K+ → μ+ν decay, a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH), able to separate π and μ in the momentum range between 15 and 35 GeV/c with a muon contamination in a pion sample < 10-2 is needed. The RICH must also have an unprecedented time resolution (100 ps) to disentangle accidental time 115sociatioDll of beam particles with pions. The last updates of the detector layout are presented along with the results of the beam tests of the RICH prototype: the muon misidentification probability was found to be 0. 7% and the time resolution < 100 ps in all the momentum range.

  11. Future water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bergevin, Marc

    2015-05-15

    In these proceedings a review of the current proposed large-scale Warer Cherenkov experiments is given. An argument is made that future water Cherenkov detectors would benefit in the investment in neutron detection technology. A brief overview will be given of proposed water Cherenkov experiments such as HYPER-K and MEMPHYS and other R and D experiments to demonstrate neutron capture in water Cherenkov detectors. Finally, innovation developed in the context of the now defunct LBNE Water R and D option to improve Water Cherenkov technology will be described.

  12. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2016-08-01

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  13. Aerogel Cherenkov detectors in colliding beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyuk, A. F.; Kononov, S. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses the application of aerogel Cherenkov detectors in colliding beam experiments. Such detectors are used for charged particle identification at velocities at which other methods are ineffective. The paper examines aerogel production technology and how the aerogel optical parameters are measured. Data on threshold Cherenkov counters with direct light collection and on those using wavelength shifters are evaluated. Also presented are data on Ring Image Cherenkov detectors with single and multilayer focusing aerogel radiators.

  14. Monitor and control systems for the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Fernandez, F.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Korff, P.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.; Rabinowitz, L.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Va'Vra, J.; Williams, S.; Whitaker, J.; Wilson, R.J.; Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; McHugh, S.; Mathys, L.; Morriso

    1989-10-01

    To help ensure the stable long-term operation of a Cherenkov Ring Detector at high efficiency, a comprehensive monitor and control system is being developed. This system will continuously monitor and maintain the correct operating temperatures, and will provide an on-line monitor and maintain the correct operating temperatures, and will provide an on-line monitor of the pressures, flows, mixing, and purity of the various fluids. In addition the velocities and trajectories of Cherenkov photoelectrons drifting within the imaging chambers will be measured using a pulsed uv lamp and a fiberoptic light injection system. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example 232Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  16. Evaluation of Multi-Anode Photomultipliers for the CLAS12 Ring-Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Jenna

    2015-04-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has recently upgraded its Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) to provide a comprehensive study of the complex internal structure and dynamics of the nucleon. The upgrade includes new detectors such as the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH). The RICH will use multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMTs) for the detection of Cherenkov photons. Our study compared two models of Hamamatsu MAPMTs (H8500 and H12700) under consideration for the CLAS12 RICH in terms of their single photoelectron (SPE) peak, dark current, and crosstalk. The MAPMTs were tested inside a light-tight box, using a low intensity laser to simulate single photoelectron events similar to Cherenkov radiation. The H12700's SPE peaks were on average 78% the width of the H8500's peaks. For both models, the probability of dark current was on the order of 10-4. The probability of crosstalk for H8500s was 1.6 to 2.7 times that for H12700s. The H12700s were deemed better because they had negligible crosstalk and dark current while providing a narrower peak for single photoelectron events. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship.

  17. Recent results of the forward ring imaging Cherenkov detector of the DELPHI experiment at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, W.; Albrecht, E. ); Augustinus, A. )

    1994-08-01

    The Forward Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector covers both end-cap regions of the DELPHI experiment at LEP in the polar angel 15[degree] < [theta] < 35[degree] and 145[degree] < [theta] < 165[degree]. The detector combines a layer of liquid C[sub 6]F[sub 14] and a volume of gaseous C[sub 4]F[sub 10] into a single assembly. Ultraviolet photons from both radiators are converted in a single plane of photosensitive Time Projection Chambers. Identification of charged particles is provided for momenta up to 40 GeV/c. The design of the detector is briefly described. The detector is now fully installed in DELPHI and has participated in the 1993 data taking. The overall performance will be presented together with the expectations from Monte Carlo simulations. Results close to design values are obtained.

  18. The fluid systems for the SLD Cherenkov ring imaging detector. [01

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; McCulloch, M.; McShurley, D.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Peterson, H.; Ratcliff, B.; Reif, R.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Shaw,

    1992-10-01

    We describe the design and operation of the fluid delivery, monitor and control systems for the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID). The systems deliver drift gas (C[sub 2]H[sub 6] + TMAE), radiator gas (C[sub 5]F[sub 12] + N[sub 2]) and radiator liquid (C[sub 6]F[sub 14]). Measured critical quantities such as electron lifetime in the drift gas and ultra-violet (UV) transparencies of the radiator fluids, together with the operational experience, are also reported.

  19. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contalbrigo, M.

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to -25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  20. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    SciTech Connect

    Contalbrigo, Marco

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to –25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  1. Hadron identification at 200 GeV/c using a ring imaging Cherenkov detector

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    As the energy of particle beams has continued to increase over the years, there has been a growing need to identify secondary particles with larger energies produced at the target from these beams. Over the last twenty years, much effort has gone into developing detectors which can identify these particles by the Cherenkov effect. The authors present, here, a new technique which uses the Cherenkov effect, but extends the energy range in which particles can be identified beyond currently existing detector systems. The technique involves the localization of ultraviolet photons to 0.5mm accuracy within large photon detection aperatures (approx. = 1 m/sup 2/).

  2. Hadron Identification at 200 Gev/c Using a Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, George Booth

    As the energy of particle beams has continued to increase over the years, there has been a growing need to identify secondary particles with larger energies produced at the target from these beams. Over the last twenty years, much effort has gone into developing detectors which can identify these particles by the Cherenkov effect. We present, here, a new technique which uses the Cherenkov effect, but extends the energy range in which particles can be identified beyond currently existing detector systems. The technique involves the localization of ultraviolet photons to 0.5mm accuracy within large photon detection aperatures ((DBLTURN) 1 m('2)).

  3. Ring imaging Cherenkov detector prototype results for E665 at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.B.; Biggs, B.; Dhawan, S.

    1986-02-01

    A proportional wire chamber (PWC) with cathode pad readout has been used to measure the position of Cherenkov photons produced by the passage of a 100 GeV muon beam in a five meter long radiator at Fermilab. The authors observe, on average, 6.2 photo-electrons per muon using Tetrakis (Dimethyl Amino) Ethylene (TMAE) as the photo ionizing vapor for detecting Cherenkov photons and 3.5 photo-electrons using triethylamine (TEA). The observed radius resolution was 3mm FWHM for the TEA data and 5mm FWHM for the TMAE data. In both cases a CaF/sub 2/ window transmitted the Cherenkov light from the radiator into the photon detector. The radiator gas was 20% argon and 80% helium producing Cherenkov rings with an average radius of 70mm. The detector described here offers the advantage of good timing resolution, (less than 100 nsec when using TEA), and high multi photon and multi ring reconstruction capability.

  4. The CLAS Cherenkov detector

    SciTech Connect

    G. Adams; V. Burkert; R. Carl; T. Carstens; V. Frolov; L. Houghtlin; G. Jacobs; M. Kossov; M. Klusman; B. Kross; M. Onuk; J. Napolitano; J. W. Price; C. Riggs; Y. Sharabian; A. Stavinsky; L. C. Smith; W. A. Stephens; P. Stoler; W. Tuzel; K. Ullrich; A. Vlassovc; A. Weisenberger; M. Witkowski; B. Wojtekhowski; P. F. Yergin; C. Zorn

    2001-06-01

    The design, construction, and performance of the CLAS Cerenkov threshold gas detector at Jefferson Lab is described. The detector consists of 216 optical modules. Each module consists of 3 adjustable mirrors, of lightweight composite construction, a Winston light collecting cone, a 5-inch photomultiplier tube, and specially designed magnetic shielding.

  5. Design and construction of the front-end electronics data acquisition for the SLD CRID (Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeflich, J.; McShurley, D.; Marshall, D.; Oxoby, G.; Shapiro, S.; Stiles, P. ); Spencer, E. . Inst. for Particle Physics)

    1990-10-01

    We describe the front-end electronics for the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) of the SLD at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The design philosophy and implementation are discussed with emphasis on the low-noise hybrid amplifiers, signal processing and data acquisition electronics. The system receives signals from a highly efficient single-photo electron detector. These signals are shaped and amplified before being stored in an analog memory and processed by a digitizing system. The data from several ADCs are multiplexed and transmitted via fiber optics to the SLD FASTBUS system. We highlight the technologies used, as well as the space, power dissipation, and environmental constraints imposed on the system. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Development of a 144-channel Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector for Belle II ring-imaging Cherenkov counter with an aerogel radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, S.; Adachi, I.; Hamada, N.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Iwata, S.; Kakuno, H.; Kawai, H.; Korpar, S.; Kriz^an, P.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Ŝantelj, L.; Seljak, A.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Tahirovic, E.; Yoshida, K.; Yusa, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The Belle II detector, a follow up of the very successful Belle experiment, is under construction at the SuperKEKB electron-positron collider at KEK in Japan. For the PID system in the forward region of the spectrometer, a proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov counter with an aerogel radiator is being developed. For the position sensitive photon sensor, a 144-channel Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector has been developed with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. In this report, we describe the specification of the Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector and the status of the mass production.

  7. Metamaterials for Cherenkov Radiation Based Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tyukhtin, A. V.; Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Antipov, S.

    2009-01-22

    Measurement of Cherenkov radiation (CR) has long been a useful technique for charged particle detection and beam diagnostics. We are investigating metamaterials engineered to have refractive indices tailored to enhance properties of CR that are useful for particle detectors and that cannot be obtained using conventional media. Cherenkov radiation in dispersive media with a large refractive index differs significantly from the same effect in conventional detector media, like gases or aerogel. The radiation pattern of CR in dispersive metamaterials presents lobes at very large angles with respect to particle motion. Moreover, the frequency and particle velocity dependence of the radiated energy can differ significantly from CR in a conventional dielectric medium.

  8. Cherenkov detector for beam quality measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orfanelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    A new detector to measure the machine induced background at larger radii has been developed and installed in the CMS experiment at the LHC. It consists of forty modules, each comprising a quartz bar read out by a photomultiplier tube. Since Cherenkov radiation is emitted in a forward cone around the charged particle trajectory, these detectors can distinguish between the arrival directions of the machine induced background and the collision products. The back-end electronics consists of a uTCA readout with excellent time resolution. The installation in the CMS is described and first commissioning measurements with the LHC beams in Run II are presented.

  9. First year operational experience with the Cherenkov Detector (DIRC) of BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, I.; BaBar Collaboration

    2000-04-01

    The DIRC (acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (light)) is a new type of Cherenkov ring imaging detector based on total internal reflection that is used for the first time in the BaBar detector at PEP-II ring of SLAC. The Cherenkov radiators are long rectangular bars made of synthetic fused silica. The photon detector is a water tank equipped with an array of 10,752 conventional photomultipliers. The first year operational experience in the BaBar detector is presented using cosmic data and collision data in the energy region of the Y(4s) resonance.

  10. First Year Operational Experience with the Cherenkov Detector (DIRC) of BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Spanier, Stefane

    2000-04-21

    The DIRC (acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (light)) is a new type of Cherenkov ring imaging detector based on total internal reflection that is used for the first time in the BaBar detector at PEP-II ring of SLAC. The Cherenkov radiators are long rectangular bars made of synthetic fused silica. The photon detector is a water tank equipped with an array of 10,752 conventional photomultipliers. The first year operational experience in the BaBar detector is presented using cosmic data and collision data in the energy region of the Upsilon(4S) resonance.

  11. HAWC - The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepe, Andreas; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) is an instrument for the detection of high energy cosmic gamma-rays. Its predecessor Milagro has successfully proven that the water Cherenkov technology for gamma-ray astronomy is a useful technique. HAWC is currently under construction at Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m and will include several improvements compared to Milagro. Two complementary DAQ systems of the HAWC detector allow for the observation of a large fraction of the sky with a very high duty cycle and independent of environmental conditions. HAWC will observe the gamma-ray sky from about 100 GeV up to 100 TeV. Also the cosmic ray flux anisotropy on different angular length scales is object of HAWC science. Because of HAWC's large effective area and field of view, we describe its prospects to observe gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as an example for transient sources.

  12. Volcanoes muon imaging using Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, O.; Del Santo, M.; Mineo, T.; Cusumano, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Pareschi, G.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of a volcano inner structure is one of the key-points for the volcanic hazards evaluation. To this aim, in the last decade, geophysical radiography techniques using cosmic muon particles have been proposed. By measuring the differential attenuation of the muon flux as a function of the amount of rock crossed along different directions, it is possible to determine the density distribution of the interior of a volcano. Up to now, a number of experiments have been based on the detection of the muon tracks crossing hodoscopes, made up of scintillators or nuclear emulsion planes. Using telescopes based on the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique, we propose a new approach to study the interior of volcanoes detecting of the Cherenkov light produced by relativistic cosmic-ray muons that survive after crossing the volcano. The Cherenkov light produced along the muon path is imaged as a typical annular pattern containing all the essential information to reconstruct particle direction and energy. Our new approach offers the advantage of a negligible background and an improved spatial resolution. To test the feasibility of our new method, we have carried out simulations with a toy-model based on the geometrical parameters of ASTRI SST-2M, i.e. the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope currently under installation onto the Etna volcano. Comparing the results of our simulations with previous experiments based on particle detectors, we gain at least a factor of 10 in sensitivity. The result of this study shows that we resolve an empty cylinder with a radius of about 100 m located inside a volcano in less than 4 days, which implies a limit on the magma velocity of 5 m/h.

  13. Measuring module of the Cherenkov water detector NEVOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindin, V. V.; Amelchakov, M. B.; Barbashina, N. S.; Bogdanov, A. G.; Burtsev, V. D.; Chernov, D. V.; Khokhlov, S. S.; Khomyakov, V. A.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Kovylyaeva, E. A.; Kruglikova, V. S.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shulzhenko, I. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.; Zadeba, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quasispherical Module (QSM) of Cherenkov water detector NEVOD represents six low-noise FEU-200 photomultipliers with flat photocathodes (15 cm in diameter), oriented along the axes of orthogonal coordinate system. Such configuration allows to register Cherenkov radiation arriving from any direction with almost equal efficiency. The results of measurements of QSM characteristics in the sensitive volume of the NEVOD detector during the registration of Cherenkov radiation of single muons at different distances and angles are discussed.

  14. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, MunSeong Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-15

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  15. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-01

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas. PMID:26329194

  16. Simulated response of Cherenkov glass detectors to MeV photons

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, J P; Bell, Zane W; Boatner, Lynn A; Hobbs, C. L.; Johnson, Rose E; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle

    2012-01-01

    Cherenkov detectors are widely used for par ticle identification in high-energy physics and for track imaging in astrophysics. Glass Cherenkov detectors that are sensitive to beta emissions originating from neutron activation have been demonstrated recently as a potential replacement for activation foils. In this work, we evaluate Cherenkov glass detectors for sensitivity and specificity to MeV photons through simulations using Geant4. The model has been previously compared with measurements of isotopic gamma sources. It includes Cherenkov gener ation, light transport, light collection, photoelectron pro duction and time response in photomultiplier tubes. The model incorporates measured, wavelength-dependent absorption and refractive index data. Simulations are con ducted for glasses the size of fabricated samples and also for the same glasses in monolithic, square-meter-size. Implications for selective detection of MeV photons are discussed.

  17. Detection of tau neutrinos by imaging air Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, D.; Bernardini, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the potential to detect tau neutrinos in the energy range of 1-1000 PeV searching for very inclined showers with imaging Cherenkov telescopes. A neutrino induced tau lepton escaping from the Earth may decay and initiate an air shower which can be detected by a fluorescence or Cherenkov telescope. We present here a study of the detection potential of Earth-skimming neutrinos taking into account neutrino interactions in the Earth crust, local matter distributions at various detector sites, the development of tau-induced showers in air and the detection of Cherenkov photons with IACTs. We analyzed simulated shower images on the camera focal plane and implemented generic reconstruction chains based on Hillas parameters. We find that present IACTs can distinguish air showers induced by tau neutrinos from the background of hadronic showers in the PeV-EeV energy range. We present the neutrino trigger efficiency obtained for a few configurations being considered for the next-generation Cherenkov telescopes, i.e. the Cherenkov Telescope Array. Finally, for a few representative neutrino spectra expected from astrophysical sources, we compare the expected event rates at running IACTs to what is expected for the dedicated IceCube neutrino telescope.

  18. π/K/p identification with a large-aperture ring-imaging cherenkov counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M.; Bastin, A.; Coutrakon, G.; Glass, H.; Jaffe, D.; Kirz, J.; McCarthy, R.; Hubbard, J. R.; Mangeot, Ph.; Mullie, J.; Peisert, A.; Tichit, J.; Bouclier, R.; Charpak, G.; Santiard, J. C.; Sauli, F.; Crittenden, J.; Hsiung, Y.; Kaplan, D.; Brown, C.; Childress, S.; Finley, D.; Ito, A.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Lederman, L.; Orava, R.; Smith, S.; Sugano, K.; Ueno, K.; Maki, A.; Hemmi, Y.; Miyake, K.; Nakamura, T.; Sasao, N.; Sakai, Y.; Gray, R.; Plaag, R.; Rothberg, J.; Rutherfoord, J.; Young, K.

    1983-11-01

    The operating large aperture ring-imaging Cherenkov detector from the FNAL experiment E605 is described. Cherenkov ultraviolet photons are detected with a multi-step avalanche chamber using a He/TEA gas mixture and π/K/p separation is obtained from 50 to 200 GeV/ c.

  19. Gadolinium Doped Water Cherenkov Detector for use as Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Patrick; Woltman, Brian; Mei, Dongming; Sun, Yongchen; Thomas, Keenan; Perevozchikov, Oleg

    2010-11-01

    Background characterization is imperative to the success of rare event physics research such as neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter searches. There are a number of different ways to measure backgrounds from muon-induced processes and other forms of high energy events. In our current research, we are constructing a research and development project for the feasibility of a Gadolinium doped water Cherenkov detector as a neutron detector. We are constructing a 46 liter acrylic housing for the Gd-doped water consisting of two acrylic cone sections connected to a middle acrylic cylinder to increase volume while still using 5 inch photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) on either end. I will present the challenges of a Gd-doped water detector and the reasons why our design should be much more successful than past metal housed detectors. I will also discuss our current progress and future goals of our detector including its use in characterizing the background in the future underground laboratory in the Sanford Lab, soon to be DUSEL.

  20. Light-weight spherical mirrors for Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Crateri, R.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Iodice, M.; Iommi, R.; Lucentini, M.; Mostarda, A.; Pierangeli, L.; Santavenere, F.; Urciuoli, G. M.; De Leo, R.; Lagamba, L.; Nappi, E.; Braem, A.; Vernin, P.

    2003-01-01

    Light-weight spherical mirrors have been appositely designed and built for the gas threshold Cherenkov detectors of the two Hall A spectrometers. The mirrors are made of a 1 mm thick aluminized plexiglass sheet, reinforced by a rigid backing consisting of a phenolic honeycomb sandwiched between two carbon fiber mats epoxy glued. The produced mirrors have a thickness equivalent to 0.55% of radiation length, and an optical slope error of about 5.5 mrad. These characteristics make these mirrors suitable for the implementation in Cherenkov threshold detectors. Ways to improve the mirror features are also discussed in view of their possible employment in RICH detectors.

  1. Fast timing and trigger Cherenkov detector for collider experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Karavicheva, T. L.; Konevskikh, A. S.; Kurepin, A. B.; Loginov, V. A.; Melikyan, Yu A.; Morozov, I. V.; Reshetin, A. I.; Serebryakov, D. V.; Shabanov, A. I.; Slupecki, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tykmanov, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of fast timing and trigger Cherenkov detector's design for its use in collider experiments is presented. Several specific requirements are taken into account - necessity of the radiator's placement as close to the beam pipe as possible along with the requirement of gapless (solid) radiator's design. Characteristics of the Cherenkov detector's laboratory prototype obtained using a pion beam at the CERN Proton Synchrotron are also presented, showing the possibility of obtaining sufficiently high geometrical efficiency along with good enough time resolution (50 ps sigma).

  2. Status of the development of large area photon detectors based on THGEMs and hybrid MPGD architectures for Cherenkov imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Torre, S. Dalla; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Gregori, M.; Herrmann, F.; Königsmann, K.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Steiger, K.; Novy, J.; Panzieri, D.; Pereira, F. A.; Santos, C. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schopferer, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Makke, N.

    2016-07-01

    We report about the development status of large area gaseous single photon detectors based on a novel hybrid concept for RICH applications. The hybrid concept combines Thick Gaseous Electron Multipliers (THGEMs) coupled to CsI, working as a photon sensitive pre-amplification stage, and Micromegas, as a multiplication stage. The most recent achievements within the research and development programme consist in the assembly and study of 300 × 300mm2 hybrid photon detectors, the optimization of front-end electronics, and engineering towards large area detectors. Hybrid detectors with an active area of 300 × 300mm2 have been successfully operated in laboratory conditions and at a CERN PS T10 test beam, achieving effective gains in the order of 105 and good time resolution (σ = 7 ns); APV25 front-end chips have been coupled to the detector resulting in noise levels lower than 1000 electrons; the production and characterization of 300 × 600mm2 THGEMs is ongoing. A set of hybrid detectors with 600 × 600mm2 active area is envisaged to upgrade COMPASS RICH-1 at CERN in 2016.

  3. Characterizing the radiation response of Cherenkov glass detectors with isotopic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, J P; Hobbs, C. L.; Bell, Zane W; Boatner, Lynn A; Johnson, Rose E; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Lillard, Cole R; Ramey, Lucas A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cherenkov detectors are widely used for particle identification and threshold detectors in high-energy physics. Glass Cherenkov detectors that are sensitive to beta emissions originating from neutron activation have been demonstrated recently as a potential replacement for activation foils. In this work, we set the groundwork to evaluate large Cherenkov glass detectors for sensitivity to MeV photons through first understanding the measured response of small Cherenkov glass detectors to isotopic gamma-ray sources. Counting and pulse height measurements are acquired with reflected glass Cherenkov detectors read out with a photomultiplier tube. Simulation was used to inform our understanding of the measured results. This simulation included radioactive source decay, radiation interaction, Cherenkov light generation, optical ray tracing, and photoelectron production. Implications for the use of Cherenkov glass detectors to measure low energy gammaray response are discussed.

  4. A high-efficiency focusing Cherenkov radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.; Moran, M.J.; Hall, J. ); Graser, M. )

    1992-03-01

    A new design uses advanced technology to produce an efficient, high-bandwidth Cherenkov detector for relativistic charged particles. The detector consists of a diamond-lathe machined ultraviolet-grade Lucite radiator, a parabolic focusing mirror, and a photodiode with an S-20 cathode. This article discusses some details of the detector design and describes preliminary measurements of its response characteristics. The data show the detector to have an overall gain of {approx}76 signal electrons per incident electron and a photodiode-limited response time of {approx}450 ps.

  5. The water Cherenkov detectors of the HAWC Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Megan; Mostafa, Miguel

    2012-10-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a very high-energy gamma-ray detector which is currently under construction at 4100 m in Sierra Negra, Mexico. The observatory will be composed of an array of 300 Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCDs). Each WCD consists of a 5 m tall by 7.3 m wide steel tank containing a hermetically sealed plastic bag, called a bladder, which is filled with 200,000 liters of purified water. The detectors are each equipped with four upward-facing photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), anchored to the bottom of the bladder. At Colorado State University (CSU) we have the only full-size prototype outside of the HAWC site. It serves as a testbed for installation and operation procedures for the HAWC observatory. The WCD at CSU has been fully operational since March 2011, and has several components not yet present at the HAWC site. In addition to the four HAWC position PMTs, our prototype has three additional PMTs, including one shrouded (dark) PMT. We also have five scintillator paddles, four buried underneath the HAWC position PMTs, and one freely moving paddle above the volume of water. These extra additions will allow us to work on muon reconstruction with a single WCD. We will describe the analysis being done with the data taken with the CSU prototype, its impact on the HAWC detector, and future plans for the prototype.

  6. Application of Geiger-mode photosensors in Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Ahmed; Paul, Bühler; Michael, Cargnelli; Roland, Hohler; Johann, Marton; Herbert, Orth; Ken, Suzuki

    2011-05-01

    Silicon-based photosensors (SiPMs) working in the Geiger-mode represent an elegant solution for the readout of particle detectors working at low-light levels like Cherenkov detectors. Especially the insensitivity to magnetic fields makes this kind of sensors suitable for modern detector systems in subatomic physics which are usually employing magnets for momentum resolution. We are characterizing SiPMs of different manufacturers for selecting sensors and finding optimum operating conditions for given applications. Recently we designed and built a light concentrator prototype with 8×8 cells to increase the active photon detection area of an 8×8 SiPM (Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-100P) array. Monte Carlo studies, measurements of the collection efficiency, and tests with the MPPC were carried out. The status of these developments are presented.

  7. Large size SiPM matrix for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, G.; Corti, D.; Ionica, M.; Manea, C.; Mariotti, M.; Rando, R.; Reichardt, I.; Schultz, C.

    2016-07-01

    SiPM photo detectors are nowadays commonly used in many applications. For large size telescopes like MAGIC or the future Large Size Telescope (LST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project, a pixel size of some square centimeters is needed. An analog amplifier and sum stage was built and characterized. A large and compact SiPM matrix prototype, with the associated focusing optics, was assembled into a monolithic light detector with an active area of 3 cm2. The performance of the electronics is tailored for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) applications, with fast signal and adequate signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio.

  8. The HERA-B ring imaging Cherenkov counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño, I.; Bastos, J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Carvalho, J.; Chmeissani, M.; Conde, P.; Davila, J.; Dujmić, D.; Eckmann, R.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Hamacher, T.; Gorišek, A.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Ispirian, M.; Karabekian, S.; Kim, M.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kupper, S.; Lau, K.; Maas, P.; McGill, J.; Miquel, R.; Murthy, N.; Peralta, D.; Pestotnik, R.; Pyrlik, J.; Ramachandran, S.; Reeves, K.; Rosen, J.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schwarz, A.; Schwitters, R. F.; Siero, X.; Starič, M.; Stanovnik, A.; Škrk, D.; Živko, T.

    2004-01-01

    The HERA-B RICH uses a radiation path length of 2.8 m in C 4F 10 gas and a large 24 m2 spherical mirror for imaging Cherenkov rings. The photon detector consists of 2240 Hamamatsu multi-anode photomultipliers with about 27 000 channels. A 2:1 reducing two-lens telescope in front of each photomultiplier tube increases the sensitive area at the expense of increased pixel size, resulting in a contribution to the resolution which roughly matches that of dispersion. The counter was completed in January of 1999, and its performance has been steady and reliable over the years it has been in operation. The design performance of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov counter was fully reached: the average number of detected photons in the RICH for a β=1 particle was found to be 33 with a single-hit resolution of 0.7 and 1 mrad in the fine and coarse granularity regions, respectively.

  9. About a Gadolinium-doped Water Cherenkov LAGUNA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Labarga, Luis

    2010-11-24

    Water Cherenkov (wC) detectors are extremely powerful apparatuses for scientific research. Nevertheless they lack of neutron tagging capabilities, which translates, mainly, into an inability to identify the anti-matter nature of the reacting incoming anti-neutrino particles. A solution was proposed by R. Beacon and M. Vagins back in 2004: by dissolving in the water a compound with nucleus with very large cross section for neutron capture like the Gadolinium, with a corresponding emission of photons of enough energy to be detected, they can tag thermal neutrons with an efficiency larger than 80%. In this talk we detail the technique and its implications in the measurement capabilities and, as well, the new backgrounds induced. We discuss the improvement on their physics program, also for the case of LAGUNA type detectors. We comment shortly the status of the pioneering R and D program of the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration towards dissolving a Gadolinium compound in its water.

  10. About a Gadolinium-doped Water Cherenkov LAGUNA Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labarga, Luis

    2010-11-01

    Water Cherenkov (wC) detectors are extremely powerful apparatuses for scientific research. Nevertheless they lack of neutron tagging capabilities, which translates, mainly, into an inability to identify the anti-matter nature of the reacting incoming anti-neutrino particles. A solution was proposed by R. Beacon and M. Vagins back in 2004: by dissolving in the water a compound with nucleus with very large cross section for neutron capture like the Gadolinium, with a corresponding emission of photons of enough energy to be detected, they can tag thermal neutrons with an efficiency larger than 80%. In this talk we detail the technique and its implications in the measurement capabilities and, as well, the new backgrounds induced. We discuss the improvement on their physics program, also for the case of LAGUNA type detectors. We comment shortly the status of the pioneering R&D program of the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration towards dissolving a Gadolinium compound in its water.

  11. DIRC, the internally reflecting ring imaging Cerenkov detector for BABAR: Properties of the quartz radiators

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiening, Jochen

    1998-02-01

    A description of DIRC, a particle identification detector for the BABAR experiment at the Standard Linear Collider B Factory is given. It is the barrel region of the detector and its name is an acronym for detection of internally reflected Cherenkov radiation. It is a Cherenkov ring imaging device which utilizes totally internally reflected Cherenkov light in the visible and ultraviolet regions.

  12. Optical properties of water for the Yangbajing water cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shang-qi; Sun, Zhi-bin; Jiang, Yuan-da; Wang, Chao; Du, Ke-ming

    2011-08-01

    Cherenkov radiation is used to study the production of particles during collisions, cosmic rays detections and distinguishing between different types of neutrinos and electrons. The optical properties of water are very important to the research of Cherenkov Effect. Lambert-beer law is a method to study the attenuation of light through medium. In this paper, optical properties of water are investigated by use of a water attenuation performance test system. The system is composed of the light-emitting diode (LED) light source and the photon receiver models. The LED light source model provides a pulse light signal which frequency is 1 kHz and width is 100ns. In photon receiver model, a high sensitivity photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used to detect the photons across the water. Because the output voltage amplitude of PMT is weak which is from 80mv to 120mV, a low noise pre-amplifier is used to improve the detector precise. An effective detector maximum time window of PMT is 100ns for a long lifetime, so a peak holder circuit is used to hold the maximum peak amplitude of PMT for the induced photons signal before the digitalization. In order to reduce the noise of peak holder, a multi-pulse integration is used before the sampling of analog to digital converter. At last, the detector of photons from the light source to the PMT across the water is synchronized to the pulse width of the LED. In order to calculate the attenuation coefficient and attenuation length of water precisely, the attenuation properties of air-to-water boundary is considered in the calculation.

  13. Tagging spallation backgrounds with showers in water Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shirley Weishi; Beacom, John F.

    2015-11-01

    Cosmic-ray muons and especially their secondaries break apart nuclei ("spallation") and produce fast neutrons and beta-decay isotopes, which are backgrounds for low-energy experiments. In Super-Kamiokande, these beta decays are the dominant background in 6-18 MeV, relevant for solar neutrinos and the diffuse supernova neutrino background. In a previous paper, we showed that these spallation isotopes are produced primarily in showers, instead of in isolation. This explains an empirical spatial correlation between a peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and the spallation decay, which Super-Kamiokande used to develop a new spallation cut. However, the muon light profiles that Super-Kamiokande measured are grossly inconsistent with shower physics. We show how to resolve this discrepancy and how to reconstruct accurate profiles of muons and their showers from their Cherenkov light. We propose a new spallation cut based on these improved profiles and quantify its effects. Our results can significantly benefit low-energy studies in Super-Kamiokande, and will be especially important for detectors at shallower depths, like the proposed Hyper-Kamiokande.

  14. The Cherenkov Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billoir, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory detects the atmospheric showers induced by cosmic rays of ultra-high energy (UHE). It is the first one to use the hybrid technique. A set of telescopes observes the fluorescence of the nitrogen molecules on clear moonless nights, giving access to the longitudinal profile of the shower. These telescopes surround a giant array of 1600 water Cherenkov tanks (covering more than 3000 km2), which works continuously and samples the particles reaching the ground (mainly muons, photons and electrons/positrons); the light produced within the water is recorded into FADC (Fast Analog to Digital Convertes) traces. A subsample of hybrid events provides a cross calibration of the two components. We describe the structure of the Cherenkov detectors, their sensitivity to different particles and the information they can give on the direction of origin, the energy and the nature of the primary UHE object; we discuss also their discrimination power for rare events (UHE photons or neutrinos). To cope with the variability of weather conditions and the limitations of the communication system, the procedures for trigger and real time calibration have been shared between local processors and a central acquisition system. The overall system has been working almost continuously for 10 years, while being progressively completed and increased by the creation of a dense "infill" subarray.

  15. Cherenkov imaging and biochemical sensing in vivo during radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongxiao

    While Cherenkov emission was discovered more than eighty years ago, the potential applications of imaging this during radiation therapy have just recently been explored. With approximately half of all cancer patients being treated by radiation at some point during their cancer management, there is a constant challenge to ensure optimal treatment efficiency is achieved with maximal tumor to normal tissue therapeutic ratio. To achieve this, the treatment process as well as biological information affecting the treatment should ideally be effective and directly derived from the delivery of radiation to the patient. The value of Cherenkov emission imaging was examined here, primarily for visualization of treatment monitoring and then secondarily for Cherenkov-excited luminescence for tissue biochemical sensing within tissue. Through synchronized gating to the short radiation pulses of a linear accelerator (200Hz & 3 micros pulses), and applying a gated intensified camera for imaging, the Cherenkov radiation can be captured near video frame rates (30 frame per sec) with dim ambient room lighting. This procedure, sometimes termed Cherenkoscopy, is readily visualized without affecting the normal process of external beam radiation therapy. With simulation, phantoms and clinical trial data, each application of Cherenkoscopy was examined: i) for treatment monitoring, ii) for patient position monitoring and motion tracking, and iii) for superficial dose imaging. The temporal dynamics of delivered radiation fields can easily be directly imaged on the patient's surface. Image registration and edge detection of Cherenkov images were used to verify patient positioning during treatment. Inter-fraction setup accuracy and intra-fraction patient motion was detectable to better than 1 mm accuracy. Cherenkov emission in tissue opens up a new field of biochemical sensing within the tissue environment, using luminescent agents which can be activated by this light. In the first study of

  16. CHERCAM: The Cherenkov imager of the CREAM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaz-Damaz, Y.; Barrau, A.; Bazer-Bachi, R.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J.; Boyer, B.; Buénerd, M.; Derome, L.; Eraud, L.; Foglio, R.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Lutz, L.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Malinine, A.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Périé, J. N.; Putze, A.; Scordilis, J.-P.; Seo, E. S.; Walpole, P.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, Y. S.; Zinn, S. Y.

    2008-09-01

    A Cherenkov imager, CHERCAM (CHERenkov CAMera), has been designed and built for the CREAM (Cosmic-Ray Energetic and Mass) balloon-borne experiment. The instrument will perform charge measurements of nuclear cosmic-ray over a range extending from proton to iron. It will achieve individual charge separation of the elements over this range [M. Buénerd, et al., in: 28th ICRC, Tsukuba, Japan, OG 1.5, 2003, p. 2157. [2

  17. SNM Detection with an Optimized Water Cherenkov Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, S.; Sweany, M.; Bernstein, A.

    2012-07-23

    Special Nuclear Material (SNM) can either spontaneously fission or be induced to do so: either case results in neutron emission. For this reason, neutron detection performs a crucial role in the functionality of Radiation Portal Monitoring (RPM) devices. Since neutrons are highly penetrating and difficult to shield, they could potentially be detected escaping even a well-shielded cargo container. If the shielding were sophisticated, detecting escaping neutrons would require a highly efficient detector with close to full solid angle coverage. In 2008, we reported the successful detection of neutrons with a 250 liter (l) gadolinium doped water Cherenkov prototype—a technology that could potentially be employed cost effectively with full solid angle coverage. More recently we have built and tested both 1-kl and 3.5-kl versions, demonstrating that very large, cost effective, non-flammable and environmentally benign neutron detectors can be operated efficiently without being overwhelmed by background. In our paper, we present a new design for a modular system of water-based neutron detectors that could be deployed as a real RPM. The modules contain a number of optimizations that have not previously been combined within a single system. We present simulations of the new system, based on the performance of our previous detectors. These simulations indicate that an optimized system such as is presented here could achieve SNM sensitivity competitive with a large 3He-based system. Moreover, the realization of large, cost effective neutron detectors could, for the first time, enable the detection of multiple neutrons per fission from within a large object such as a cargo container. Such a signal would provide a robust indication of the presence of fissioning material, reducing the frequency of false alarms while increasing sensitivity.

  18. SNM Detection with an Optimized Water Cherenkov Neutron Detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dazeley, S.; Sweany, M.; Bernstein, A.

    2012-07-23

    Special Nuclear Material (SNM) can either spontaneously fission or be induced to do so: either case results in neutron emission. For this reason, neutron detection performs a crucial role in the functionality of Radiation Portal Monitoring (RPM) devices. Since neutrons are highly penetrating and difficult to shield, they could potentially be detected escaping even a well-shielded cargo container. If the shielding were sophisticated, detecting escaping neutrons would require a highly efficient detector with close to full solid angle coverage. In 2008, we reported the successful detection of neutrons with a 250 liter (l) gadolinium doped water Cherenkov prototype—a technology thatmore » could potentially be employed cost effectively with full solid angle coverage. More recently we have built and tested both 1-kl and 3.5-kl versions, demonstrating that very large, cost effective, non-flammable and environmentally benign neutron detectors can be operated efficiently without being overwhelmed by background. In our paper, we present a new design for a modular system of water-based neutron detectors that could be deployed as a real RPM. The modules contain a number of optimizations that have not previously been combined within a single system. We present simulations of the new system, based on the performance of our previous detectors. These simulations indicate that an optimized system such as is presented here could achieve SNM sensitivity competitive with a large 3He-based system. Moreover, the realization of large, cost effective neutron detectors could, for the first time, enable the detection of multiple neutrons per fission from within a large object such as a cargo container. Such a signal would provide a robust indication of the presence of fissioning material, reducing the frequency of false alarms while increasing sensitivity.« less

  19. Characterization study of silica aerogel for Cherenkov imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaz-Damaz, Y.; Derome, L.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Loth, M.; Protasov, K.; Putze, A.; Vargas-Trevino, M.; Véziant, O.; Buénerd, M.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Belmont, E.; Vargas-Magaña, M.; Léon-Vargas, H.; Ortiz-Velàsquez, A.; Malinine, A.; Baraõ, F.; Pereira, R.; Bellunato, T.; Matteuzzi, C.; Perego, D. L.

    2010-03-01

    Different methods to measure the characteristics of silica aerogel tiles used as Cherenkov radiator in the CREAM and AMS experiments have been investigated to optimize the detector performances. The measurement accuracy dictated by the physics objectives on the velocity and charge resolutions set stringent requirements on the aerogel refractive index determination, namely Δn˜1.5×10-4 and Δn˜5×10-4 for the AMS and CREAM imagers, respectively. The matching of such accuracies for this material turned out to be a metrological challenge, and finally led to a full R&D program, to develop an appropriate characterization procedure. Preliminary studies performed with a standard refractive index measurement technique (laser beam deviation by a prism) have revealed a significant systematic index nonuniformity for the AMS tiles at a level (10-3), not acceptable considering the aimed accuracy. These large variations were confirmed in a beam test. A second method, mapping the transverse index gradient by deflection of a laser beam entering normally to the tile has then been developed. It is shown that this procedure is suitable to reach the required accuracy, at the price of using both methods combined. The several hundreds of tiles of the radiator plane of the CREAM and AMS Cherenkov imagers were characterized using a simplified procedure, however, appropriate for each case, compromising between the amount of work and the time available. The experimental procedures and set-ups used are described in the text, and the obtained results are reported.

  20. Cherenkov luminescence imaging in transparent media and the imaging of thin or shallow sources

    PubMed Central

    Komarov, Sergey; Zhou, Dong; Liu, Yongjian; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. In this work, we demonstrated the possibility of high spatial resolution Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) for objects in transparent media. We also demonstrated the possibility of the CLI of thin opaque objects using optical transducers. Results demonstrate that submillimeter resolution CLI is achievable for beta-emitting radionuclides, including Br76 that emits positrons of very high energy. The imaging of beta-emitters through scintillation detectors exhibits lower resolution when compared to CLI of the same sources. The application of optical transducers for the CLI was demonstrated using plants labeled with CO112 and phantoms containing beta-emitters. PMID:25789422

  1. Operation of the Cherenkov Detector DIRC of BaBar at High Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Spanier, Stefane

    2001-03-07

    The DIRC (acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (light)) is the ring imaging Cherenkov detector of the BaBar detector at the Pep-II ring of SLAC. It provides the identification of pions, kaons and protons for momenta up to 4 GeV/c with high efficiency. This is needed to reconstruct CP-violating B-decay final states and to provide B-meson flavour tagging for time dependent asymmetry measurements. The DIRC radiators consists of long rectangular bars made of synthetic fused silica and the photon detector is a water tank equipped with an array of 10,752 conventional photomultipliers. At the end of the year 2000 BaBar has recorded about 22 million {bar B}B pairs reaching the design luminosity of L = 3 x 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}s. The ability to keep the beam background level low at highest collision rates and the long term reliability of the DIRC components during continuous data taking are requirements of BaBar to accomplish its physics program.

  2. Studies of Multi-Anode PMTs for a Ring Imaging Cherenkov for CLAS12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendacky, Andrew; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kim, Andrey

    2015-10-01

    At Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), the CLAS12 detector in Hall B is undergoing an upgrade. A Ring Imaging Cherenkov (R.I.C.H) detector is being built to improve particle identification in the 3-8 GeV/c momentum range. Approximately four hundred Hamamatsu H121700 Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tubes (MA-PMTs) are being used in this detector to measure photons emitted through Cherenkov Radiation. These MA-PMTs' characteristics are being tested and measured, and I will be presenting my work about the crosstalk study. Crosstalk is the occurrence of incident light striking one area of the photocathode, but is additionally measured in nearby areas. By using a Class 3b laser in the 470 nm wavelength, and an optical density resembling the single photon emission spectrum, the crosstalk for the H121700 MA-PMTs are measured and categorized into a database for future reference.

  3. Digital FDIRC: A focused differential internal reflection Cherenkov imaged by SiPM arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchesi, P. S.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Basti, A.; Bigongiari, G.; Bonechi, S.; Brogi, P.; Checchia, C.; Collazuol, G.; Maestro, P.; Morsani, F.; Piemonte, C.; Stolzi, F.; Suh, J. E.; Sulaj, A.

    2016-07-01

    A prototype of an Internal Reflection Cherenkov, equipped with a SiO2 (fused silica) radiator bar optically connected to a cylindrical mirror, was tested at CERN SPS in March 2015 with a beam of relativistic ions obtained from fragmentation of primary argon nuclei at energies 13, 19 and 30 GeV/n. The detector, designed to identify cosmic nuclei, features an imaging focal plane of dimensions ~ 4 cm × 3 cm equipped with 16 arrays of NUV-SiPM (near-ultraviolet sensitive silicon photon avalanche detector) for a total of 1024 sensitive elements. The outstanding performance of the photodetectors (with negligible background in between adjacent photopeaks) allowed us to apply the technique of photon counting to the Cherenkov light collected on the focal plane. Thanks to the fine granularity of the array elements, the Cherenkov pattern was recorded together with the total number of detected photoelectrons increasing as Z2 as a function of the atomic number Z. In this paper, we report the performance of the SiPM arrays and the excellent resolution achieved by the digital Cherenkov prototype in the charge identification of the elements present in the beam.

  4. Use of Cherenkov-type detectors for measurements of runaway electrons in the ISTTOK tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Duarte, P.

    2008-10-15

    Gas, fluid, or solid Cherenkov-type detectors have been widely used in high-energy physics for determination of parameters of charged particles, which are moving with relativistic velocities. This paper presents experimental results on the detection of runaway electrons using Cherenkov-type detectors in the ISTTOK tokamak discharges. Such detectors have been specially designed for measurements of energetic electrons in tokamak plasma. The technique based on the use of the Cherenkov-type detectors has enabled the detection of energetic electrons (energies higher than 80 keV) and determination of their spatial and temporal parameters in the ISTTOK discharges. Obtained experimental data were found in adequate agreement to the results of numerical modeling of the runaway electron generation in ISTTOK.

  5. Underground Prototype Water Cherenkov Muon Detector with the Tibet Air Shower Array

    SciTech Connect

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Bi, X. J.; Ding, L. K.; Feng, Zhaoyang; He, H. H.; Hu, H. B.; Lu, H.; Lu, S. L.; Ren, J. R.; Tan, Y. H.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wu, H. R.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, D.; Kawata, K.

    2008-12-24

    We are planning to build a 10,000 m{sup 2} water-Cherenkov-type muon detector (MD) array under the Tibet air shower (AS) array. The Tibet AS+MD array will have the sensitivity to detect gamma rays in the 100 TeV region by an order of the magnitude better than any other previous existing detectors in the world. In the late fall of 2007, a prototype water Cherenkov muon detector of approximately 100 m{sup 2} was constructed under the existing Tibet AS array. The preliminary data analysis is in good agreement with our MC simulation. We are now ready for further expanding the underground water Cherenkov muon detector.

  6. Picosecond Cherenkov detectors for high-energy heavy ion experiments at LHEP/JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.; Batenkov, O. I.

    2016-07-01

    The modular Cherenkov detectors based on MCP-PMTs are developed for study Au+Au collisions in MPD and BM@N experiments with beams of Nuclotron and future collider NICA in Dubna. The aim of the detector is fast and effective triggering nucleus-nucleus collisions and generation of start signal for TOF detectors. The detector performance is studied with MC simulation and test measurements with a beam of Nuclotron.

  7. A threshold gas Cherenkov detector for the Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Whitney R.; Choi, Seonho; Kaczanowicz, Ed; Lukhanin, Alexander; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Sawatzky, Brad

    2015-12-01

    We report on the design, construction, commissioning, and performance of a threshold gas Cherenkov counter in an open configuration, which operates in a high luminosity environment and produces a high photo-electron yield. Part of a unique open geometry detector package called the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), this Cherenkov counter served to identify scattered electrons and reject produced pions in an inclusive scattering experiment known as the Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE), E07-003 at Jefferson Lab. The experiment consisted of a measurement of double spin asymmetries A∥ and A⊥ of a polarized electron beam impinging on a polarized ammonia target. The Cherenkov counter's performance is characterised by a yield of about 20 photoelectrons per electron or positron track. Thanks to this large number of photoelectrons per track, the Cherenkov counter had enough resolution to identify electron-positron pairs from the conversion of photons resulting mainly from π0 decays.

  8. Detection of Shielded Special Nuclear Material With a Cherenkov-Based Transmission Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Paul; Erickson, Anna; Mayer, Michael; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-10-01

    Detection of shielded special nuclear material, SSNM, while in transit, offers a unique challenge. Typical cargo imaging systems are Bremsstrahlung-based and cause an abundance of unnecessary signal in the detectors and doses to the cargo contents and surroundings. Active interrogation with dual monoenergetic photons can unveil the illicit material when coupled with a high-contrast imaging system while imparting significantly less dose to the contents. Cherenkov detectors offer speed, resilience, inherent energy threshold rejection, directionality and scalability beyond the capability of most scintillators. High energy resolution is not a priority when using two well separated gamma rays, 4.4 and 15.1 MeV, generated from low energy nuclear reactions such as 11B(d,n- γ)12C. These gamma rays offer a measure of the effective atomic number, Z, of the cargo by taking advantage of the large difference in photon interaction cross sections, Compton scattering and pair production. This imaging system will be coupled to neutron detectors to provide unique signature of SNM by monitoring delayed neutrons. Our experiments confirm that the Cherenkov imaging system can be used with the monoenergetic source to relate transmission and atomic number of the scanned material.

  9. Geomagnetic Field Effects on the Imaging Air Shower Cherenkov Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commichau, S.C.; Biland, A.; Kranich, D.; de los Reyes, R.; Moralejo, A.; Sobczyńska, D.

    Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) detect the Cherenkov light flashes of Extended Air Showers (EAS) triggered by VHE gamma-rays impinging on the Earth's atmosphere. Due to the overwhelming background from hadron induced EAS, the discrimination of the rare gamma-like events is rather difficult, in particular at energies below 100 GeV. The influence of the Geomagnetic Field (GF) on the EAS development can further complicate this discrimination and, in addition, also systematically affect the gamma-efficiency and energy resolution of an IACT. Here we present the results from dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the MAGIC telescope site, show the GF effects on real data as well as possible corrections for these effects.

  10. Study of the Planacon XP85012 photomultiplier characteristics for its use in a Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Karavicheva, T. L.; Kurepin, A. B.; Maklyaev, E. F.; Melikyan, Yu A.; Serebryakov, D. V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tykmanov, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    Main properties of the multi-anode microchannel plate photomultiplier to be used in a Cherenkov detector are discussed. The laboratory test results obtained using irradiation of the MCP-PMT photocathode by picosecond optical laser pulses with different intensities (from single photon regime to the PMT saturation conditions) are presented.

  11. Study of wavelength-shifting chemicals for use in large-scale water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dunmore, J; Felde, J; Svoboda, R; Tripathi, S M

    2011-09-21

    Cherenkov detectors employ various methods to maximize light collection at the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). These generally involve the use of highly reflective materials lining the interior of the detector, reflective materials around the PMTs, or wavelength-shifting sheets around the PMTs. Recently, the use of water-soluble wavelength-shifters has been explored to increase the measurable light yield of Cherenkov radiation in water. These wave-shifting chemicals are capable of absorbing light in the ultravoilet and re-emitting the light in a range detectable by PMTs. Using a 250 L water Cherenkov detector, we have characterized the increase in light yield from three compounds in water: 4-Methylumbelliferone, Carbostyril-124, and Amino-G Salt. We report the gain in PMT response at a concentration of 1 ppm as: 1.88 {+-} 0.02 for 4-Methylumbelliferone, stable to within 0.5% over 50 days, 1.37 {+-} 0.03 for Carbostyril-124, and 1.20 {+-} 0.02 for Amino-G Salt. The response of 4-Methylumbelliferone was modeled, resulting in a simulated gain within 9% of the experimental gain at 1 ppm concentration. Finally, we report an increase in neutron detection performance of a large-scale (3.5 kL) gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector at a 4-Methylumbelliferone concentration of 1 ppm.

  12. Studies of signal waveforms from the water-cherenkov detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, P.S.; Bui-Duc, H.; Chye, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dorofeev, A.; Matthews, J.; Nitz, D.F.; Ranchon, S.; Urban, M.; Veberic, D.; Watson, A.A.; Wileman, C.

    2005-08-01

    The ground array of the Pierre Auger Observatory will consist of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors. Such detectors give signals which can help differentiate between muons and electrons in extensive air showers. The relative numbers of muons and electrons is sensitive to the type of primary particle which initiated the shower. Results are presented using methods which describe the muon content and related information, such as the time structure of the shower front.

  13. Prospects and Challenges for a Large Water Cherenkov Detector for LBNE

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, L.

    2011-10-06

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) is a proposed experiment that would send a beam of muon neutrinos from Fermilab to the DUSEL (Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory) facility in South Dakota, a 1300 km baseline. One possible configuration for the far detector is one or more large water Cherenkov modules with a fiducial mass of at least 100 kilotons each. The prospects and challenges of such a detector, including the current design, will be presented.

  14. Strange meson spectroscopy in K[omega] and K[phi] at 11 GeV/c and Cherenkov ring imaging at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Youngjoon.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis consists of two independent parts; development of Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) system and analysis of high-statistics data of strange meson reactions from the LASS spectrometer. Part 1: The CRID system is devoted to charged particle identification in the SLAC Large Detector (SLD) to study e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  15. Gamma ray measurements at OMEGA with the newest gas Cherenkov Detector “GCD-3”

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McEvoy, A. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Zylstra, A. B.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Sedillo, T. J.; Archuleta, T. N.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Initial results from the newest Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD-3) are reported demonstrating improved performance over previous GCD iterations. Increased shielding and lengthening of the Cherenkov photon optical path have resulted in a diminished precursor signal with increased temporal separation between the precursor and the primary DT Cherenkov signal. Design changes resulted in a measured GCD-3 sensitivity comparable to GCD-1 at identical 100 psia CO2 operation. All metal gasket seals and pressure vessel certification to 400 psia operation allow for a GCD-3 lower Cherenkov threshold of 1.8 MeV using the fluorinated gas C2F6 as compared to the 6.3 MeV lower limitmore » of GCD-1 and GCD-2. Calibration data will be used to benchmark GEANT4 and ACCEPT detector models. Lastly, the GCD-3 acts as a prototype for the Super GCD being fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as part of the National Diagnostics Plan and will be installed at NIF in early 2016.« less

  16. Gamma Ray Measurements at OMEGA with the Newest Gas Cherenkov Detector “GCD-3”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, A. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Zylstra, A. B.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Sedillo, T. J.; Archuleta, T. N.; Aragonez, R. J.; Malone, R. M.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Stoeffl, W.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    Initial results from the newest Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD-3) are reported demonstrating improved performance over previous GCD iterations. Increased shielding and lengthening of the Cherenkov photon optical path have resulted in a diminished precursor signal with increased temporal separation between the precursor and the primary DT Cherenkov signal. Design changes resulted in a measured GCD-3 sensitivity comparable to GCD-1 at identical 100 psia CO2 operation. All metal gasket seals and pressure vessel certification to 400 psia operation allow for a GCD-3 lower Cherenkov threshold of 1.8 MeV using the fluorinated gas C2F6 as compared to the 6.3 MeV lower limit of GCD-1 and GCD-2. Calibration data will be used to benchmark GEANT4 and ACCEPT detector models. The GCD-3 acts as a prototype for the Super GCD being fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as part of the National Diagnostics Plan and will be installed at NIF in early 2016.

  17. Progress in Cherenkov ring imaging. Part 2: Identification of charged hadrons at 200 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeot, Ph.; Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J. R.; M´, J.; Tichit, J.; Zadra, A.; Bouclier, R.; Charpak, G.; Million, J.; Peisert, A.; Santiard, J. C.; Sauli, F.; Brown, C. N.; Finley, D.; Glass, H.; Kirz, J.; McCarthy, R. L.

    1983-10-01

    We have used a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector to separate π's, K's, and antiprotons in a 200 GeV/ c beam at Fermilab. This device was built as a prototype for a large-aperture counter now in operation in Fermilab experiment E605. The radiator consisted of 8 m of atmospheric-pressure helium gas. The photon detector was a multistep proportional chamber. Cherenkov photons near 8 eV were detected by photoionization of triethylamine (TEA) vapor in the chamber. An average of 2.5 to 2.7 Cherenkov photons were observed per event, corresponding to a figure of merit N 0 ⋍ 45 per cm. A single-photon radius uncertainty of 0.47 mm was obtained with a helium/TEA/CH 4 gas mixture in the photon detector. The rms uncertainty in the determination of the Cherenkov angle was ΔΘ c/Θ max = 0.006 , corresponding to one-standard-deviation π/K separation at 500 GeV/ c. At 200 GeV/ c, the particle identification efficiency in a beam containing 95.2% π -, 4.3% K -, and 0.5% antiprotons was 92% for the π's, 83% for the K's, and 90% for the antiprotons.

  18. A fast ring-imaging Cherenkov counter for a fixed-target heavy-quark experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.M.; Isenhower, L.D.; Atac, M. |; Brown, C.N.; Darden, C.W.

    1993-06-01

    We present a design for a fast ring-imaging Cherenkov counter operating in the visible. The Cherenkov photons are imaged on an array of small Winston cones and read out with optical fibers and VLPCs. the design is optimized for {pi}/K/p separation in the range 10 < p < 100 GeV/c.

  19. High resolution Cherenkov detectors for cosmic ray isotope experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharya, B. S.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Esposito, J. A.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Cerenkov detectors are used to measure the velocity of particles in configurations designed to study the isotopic composition of galactic cosmic rays. The geometrical properties of the detector are outlined. Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation in a diffusive detector were undertaken. The scattering properties of diffusively reflecting white paint and of surface treatments for the radiator material were measured. It is found that the absorption of light in the radiator is an important light loss mechanism. The simulations are used to find optimal mapping techniques and data reduction strategies. The application of these techniques are discussed with respect to the large area isotopic composition experiment (ALICE) Cerenkov detector.

  20. Special Nuclear Material Detection with a Water Cherenkov based Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Bowden, N; Dazeley, S; Svoboda, R

    2008-11-10

    Fission events from Special Nuclear Material (SNM), such as highly enriched uranium or plutonium, produce a number of neutrons and high energy gamma-rays. Assuming the neutron multiplicity is approximately Poissonian with an average of 2 to 3, the observation of time correlations between these particles from a cargo container would constitute a robust signature of the presence of SNM inside. However, in order to be sensitive to the multiplicity, one would require a high total efficiency. There are two approaches to maximize the total efficiency; maximizing the detector efficiency or maximizing the detector solid angle coverage. The advanced detector group at LLNL is investigating one way to maximize the detector size. We are designing and building a water Cerenkov based gamma and neutron detector for the purpose of developing an efficient and cost effective way to deploy a large solid angle car wash style detector. We report on our progress in constructing a larger detector and also present preliminary results from our prototype detector that indicates detection of neutrons.

  1. Ultra-high resolution of radiocesium distribution detection based on Cherenkov light imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune; Kawachi, Naoki; Suzui, Nobuo; Yin, Yong-Gen; Fujimaki, Shu

    2015-03-01

    After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, radiocesium contamination became a serious scientific concern and research of its effects on plants increased. In such plant studies, high resolution images of radiocesium are required without contacting the subjects. Cherenkov light imaging of beta radionuclides has inherently high resolution and is promising for plant research. Since 137Cs and 134Cs emit beta particles, Cherenkov light imaging will be useful for the imaging of radiocesium distribution. Consequently, we developed and tested a Cherenkov light imaging system. We used a high sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera (Hamamatsu Photonics, ORCA2-ER) for imaging Cherenkov light from 137Cs. A bright lens (Xenon, F-number: 0.95, lens diameter: 25 mm) was mounted on the camera and placed in a black box. With a 100-μm 137Cs point source, we obtained 220-μm spatial resolution in the Cherenkov light image. With a 1-mm diameter, 320-kBq 137Cs point source, the source was distinguished within 2-s. We successfully obtained Cherenkov light images of a plant whose root was dipped in a 137Cs solution, radiocesium-containing samples as well as line and character phantom images with our imaging system. Cherenkov light imaging is promising for the high resolution imaging of radiocesium distribution without contacting the subject.

  2. The possibilities of Cherenkov telescopes to perform cosmic-ray muon imaging of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Catalano, Osvaldo; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Del Santo, Melania; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Mineo, Teresa; Pareschi, Giovanni; Vercellone, Stefano; Zuccarello, Luciano

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic activity is regulated by the interaction of gas-liquid flow with conduit geometry. Hence, the quantitative understanding of the inner shallow structure of a volcano is mandatory to forecast the occurrence of dangerous stages of activity and mitigate volcanic hazards. Among the techniques used to investigate the underground structure of a volcano, muon imaging offers some advantages, as it provides a fine spatial resolution, and does not require neither spatially dense measurements in active zones, nor the implementation of cost demanding energizing systems, as when electric or active seismic sources are utilized. The principle of muon radiography is essentially the same as X-ray radiography: muons are more attenuated by higher density parts inside the target and thus information about its inner structure are obtained from the differential muon absorption. Up-to-date, muon imaging of volcanic structures has been mainly accomplished with detectors that employ planes of scintillator strips. These telescopes are exposed to different types of background noise (accidental coincidence of vertical shower particles, horizontal high-energy electrons, flux of upward going particles), whose amplitude is high relative to the tiny flux of interest. An alternative technique is based on the detection of the Cherenkov light produced by muons. The latter can be imaged as an annular pattern that contains the information needed to reconstruct both direction and energy of the particle. Cherenkov telescopes have never been utilized to perform muon imaging of volcanoes. Nonetheless, thanks to intrinsic features, they offer the possibility to detect the through-target muon flux with negligible levels of background noise. Under some circumstances, they would also provide a better spatial resolution and acceptance than scintillator-based telescopes. Furthermore, contrarily to the latter systems, Cherenkov detectors allow in-situ measurements of the open-sky energy spectrum of

  3. Search for long-lived heavy charged particles using a ring imaging Cherenkov technique at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-12-01

    A search is performed for heavy long-lived charged particles using 3.0 fb^{-1} of proton-proton collisions collected at √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector. The search is mainly based on the response of the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors to distinguish the heavy, slow-moving particles from muons. No evidence is found for the production of such long-lived states. The results are expressed as limits on the Drell-Yan production of pairs of long-lived particles, with both particles in the LHCb pseudorapidity acceptance, 1.8 < η < 4.9. The mass-dependent cross-section upper limits are in the range 2-4 fb (at 95 % CL) for masses between 14 and 309 { GeV/c^2}.

  4. Mass composition sensitivity of combined arrays of water cherenkov and scintillation detectors in the EeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Javier G.; Engel, Ralph; Roth, Markus

    2016-02-01

    We consider an array of scintillation detectors combined with an array of water Cherenkov detectors designed to simultaneously measure the cosmic-ray primary mass composition and energy spectrum at energies around 1EeV. In this work we investigate the sensitivity to primary mass composition of such combined arrays. The water Cherenkov detectors are arranged in a triangular grid with fixed 750m spacing and the configuration of the scintillation detectors is changed to study the impact of different configurations on the sensitivity to mass composition. We show that the performance for composition determination can be compared favorably to that of fluorescence measurements after the difference in duty cycles is considered.

  5. The C 4F 10 Cherenkov detector for DIRAC-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, S.; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Brekhovskikh, V.; Kuptsov, A.; Pentia, M.; Zhabitsky, M.

    2008-09-01

    A new threshold Cherenkov detector using C 4F 10 gas radiator was built and put into operation in the DIRAC-II experiment at CERN. Running on the C 4F 10 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, the detector discriminates between pions and kaons in the momentum range of 4- 8 GeV/c. A compact radiator-gas recirculation system including a gas-liquid separation unit, hollow-fibre membranes and molecular sieves ensures gas purity for a long term of operation without a significant loss of the gas. The system is robust and stable and the pressure in the two detector vessels is regulated in the range of ±0.5 mbar. We report on the design and the technical aspects of the detector and its response in the DIRAC 2007 run.

  6. Performance of the Two Aerogel Cherenkov Detectors of the JLab Hall A Hadron Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, Stefano; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Acha Quimper, Armando; Cisbani, Evaristo; Coman, Marius; Cusanno, Francesco; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Higinbotham, Douglas; Iodice, Mauro; LeRose, John; Macchia, D.; Markowitz, Pete; Nappi, E.; Palmisano, F.; Urciuoli, Guido; van der Werf, I.; XIANG, Hong; Xiang, Hong; XIANG, Hong; Xiang, Hong; Zhu, Lingyan

    2009-01-01

    We report on the design and commissioning of two silica aerogel Cherenkov detectors with different refractive indices. In particular, extraordinary performance in terms of the number of detected photoelectrons was achieved through an appropriate choice of PMT type and reflector, along with some design considerations. After four years of operation, the number of detected photoelectrons was found to be noticeably reduced in both detectors as a result of contamination, yellowing, of the aerogel material. Along with the details of the set-up, we illustrate the characteristics of the detectors during different time periods and the probable causes of the contamination. In particular we show that the replacement of the contaminated aerogel and parts of the reflecting material has almost restored the initial performance of the detectors.

  7. A New Event Reconstruction Algorithm for Super-Kamiokande Water Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobayama, Shimpei

    2012-10-01

    Super-Kamiokande is the world's largest water Cherenkov particle detector located underground in Kamioka-mine, Gifu, Japan. The detector has been used for proton decay search, and observation of atmospheric, solar and supernova neutrinos. It also serves as the far detector for T2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The detector consists of a cylindrical tank filled with 50kt of ultra-pure water, and an array of 11,000 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) installed on the tank's inner wall record the time and intensity of the Cherenkov light emitted by charged particles traveling in the water. Using the information from the PMTs, particle type, interaction vertex, direction and momentum can be reconstructed. A new reconstruction algorithm is being developed which performs a simultaneous maximum likelihood determination of such parameters. Through Monte Carlo studies, it was found that the new algorithm has a significantly better particle identification performance and vertex/momentum resolutions, compared to the existing reconstruction software. In this talk, an outline of the new algorithm, its performance and implications on physics analyses will be presented.

  8. Design of Cherenkov bars for the optical part of the time-of-flight detector in Geant4.

    PubMed

    Nozka, L; Brandt, A; Rijssenbeek, M; Sykora, T; Hoffman, T; Griffiths, J; Steffens, J; Hamal, P; Chytka, L; Hrabovsky, M

    2014-11-17

    We present the results of studies devoted to the development and optimization of the optical part of a high precision time-of-flight (TOF) detector for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This work was motivated by a proposal to use such a detector in conjunction with a silicon detector to tag and measure protons from interactions of the type p + p → p + X + p, where the two outgoing protons are scattered in the very forward directions. The fast timing detector uses fused silica (quartz) bars that emit Cherenkov radiation as a relativistic particle passes through and the emitted Cherenkov photons are detected by, for instance, a micro-channel plate multi-anode Photomultiplier Tube (MCP-PMT). Several possible designs are implemented in Geant4 and studied for timing optimization as a function of the arrival time, and the number of Cherenkov photons reaching the photo-sensor. PMID:25402137

  9. Design and development of a Gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, Nabin

    This thesis describes a research and development project for neutron capture and detection in Gadolinium doped water. The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is exploring rare event physics, such as neutrinoless double beta decay (MAJORANA Project) and dark-matter detection (LUX experiment). The success of these experiments requires a careful study and understanding of background radiation, including flux and energy spectrum. The background radiation from surface contamination, radioactive decays of U-238, Th-232, Rn-222 in the surrounding rocks and muon induced neutrons have a large impact on the success of rare-event physics. The main objective of this R&D project is to measure the neutron flux contributing to ongoing experiments at SURF and suppress it by identification and capture method. For this purpose, we first modeled and designed a detector with Geant4 software. The approximate dimension of the detector is determined. The neutron capture percentage of the detector is estimated using Monte Carlo. The energy response of the detector is simulated. Next, we constructed the experimental detector, an acrylic rectangular tank (60cm x 30cm x 30cm), filled with Gadolinium-doped deionized water. The tank is coated with high efficient reflector and then taped with black electrical tape to make it opaque. The voltage dividers attached to PMTs are covered with mu-metal. Two 5-inch Hamamatsu Photomultiplier tubes were attached on both sides facing the tank to collect the Cherenkov light produced in the water. The detector utilizes the principle of Cherenkov light emission by a charged particle moving through a water at a speed higher than the speed of light in the water, hence it has an inherent energy threshold of Cherenkov photon production. This property reduces the lower energy backgrounds. Event data are obtained using the Data Acquisition hardware, Flash Analog to digital converter, along with Multi Instance Data Acquisition software. Post

  10. Upgrade of the Cherenkov Detector of the JLab Hall A BigBite Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycz, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The BigBite Spectrometer of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab will be used in the upcoming MARATHON experiment at Jefferson Lab to measure the ratio of neutron to proton F2 inelastic structure functions and the ratio of up to down, d/u, quark nucleon distributions at medium and large values of Bjorken x. In preparation for this experiment, the BigBite Cherenkov detector is being modified to increase its overall efficiency for detecting electrons. This large volume counter is based on a dual system of segmented mirrors reflecting Cherenkov radiation to twenty photomultipliers. In this talk, a description of the detector and its past performance will be presented, along with the motivations for improvements and their implementation. An update on the status of the rest of the BigBite detector package, will be also presented. Additionally, current issues related to obtaining C4 F8 O, the commonly used radiator gas, which has been phased out of production by U.S. gas producers, will be discussed. This work is supported by Kent State University, NSF Grant PHY-1405814, and DOE Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  11. Cherenkov Detector For Measurements Of Fast Electrons In CASTOR-Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M. J.; Stanislawski, J.; Malinowski, K.; Zebrowski, J.; Jakubowski, M.; Weinzettl, V.; Stockel, J.; Vacha, M.; Peterka, M.

    2008-04-07

    The paper reports on capabilities of an improved version of the Cherenkov detector designed for measurements of fast electrons. The described technique enables the identification of electron beams, the measurements of their temporal characteristics, as well as the estimation of their spatial properties to be performed. Results obtained in the last experimental campaign with the CASTOR facility show good measuring capabilities of such a detection system. The radial distributions of fast-electron streams at different plasma densities, as well as the electron fluency dependences on discharge currents and toroidal magnetic fields are also presented.

  12. TORCH - Cherenkov and Time-of-Flight PID Detector for the LHCb Upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhl, K.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcì a, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    TORCH is a large-area precision time-of-flight detector, based on Cherenkov light production and propagation in a quartz radiator plate, which is read out at its edges. TORCH is proposed for the LHCb experiment at CERN to provide positive particle identification for kaons, and is currently in the Research-and-Development phase. A brief overview of the micro-channel plate photon sensor development, the custom-made electronics, and an introduction to the current test beam activities is given. Optical readout solutions are presented for the potential use of BaBar DIRC bar boxes as part of the TORCH configuration in LHCb.

  13. Software development for a Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-04-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12 GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  14. Software Development for Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting an update on my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  15. Strangeonium spectroscopy at 11 GeV/c and Cherenkov Ring Imaging at the SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bienz, T.L.

    1990-07-01

    This thesis is divided into two sections, which describe portions of the data acquisition system and online software for the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD, and analyses of several low cross section strangeonium channels in data from the LASS spectrometer. The CRID section includes a description of the data acquisition system, determination of the preamplifier gain, and development of an online pulse finding algorithm based on deconvolution. Deconvolution uses knowledge of the preamplifier impulse response to aid in pulse finding. The algorithm is fast and shows good single pulse resolution and excellent double pulse resolution in preliminary tests. The strangeonium analyses are based on data from a 4.1 event/nanobarn exposure of the LASS spectrometer in K{sup {minus}}p interactions at 11 GeV/c, and include studies of {Lambda}{eta}{pi}{sup {plus}}{pi}{sup {minus}}, {Lambda}{Kappa}*{Kappa}*, and {Lambda}{phi}{phi}.

  16. Transforming Cherenkov radiation in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginis, Vincent; Danckaert, Jan; Veretennicoff, Irina; Tassin, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    In this contribution, we explore the generation of light in transformation-optical media. When charged particles move through a transformation-optical material with a speed larger than the phase velocity of light in the medium, Cherenkov light is emitted. We show that the emitted Cherenkov cone can be modified with longitudinal and transverse stretching of the coordinates. Transverse coordinates stretching alters only the dimensions of the cone, whereas longitudinal stretching also changes the apparent velocity of the charged particle. These results demonstrate that the geometric formalism of transformation optics can be used not only for the manipulation of light beam trajectories, but also for controlling the emission of light, here for describing the Cherenkov cone in an arbitrary anisotropic medium. Subsequently, we illustrate this point by designing a radiator for a ring imaging Cherenkov radiator. Cherenkov radiators are used to identify unknown elementary particles by determining their mass from the Cherenkov radiation cone that is emitted as they pass through the detector apparatus. However, at higher particle momentum, the angle of the Cherenkov cone saturates to a value independent of the mass of the generating particle, making it difficult to effectively distinguish between different particles. Using our transformation optics description, we show how the Cherenkov cone and the cut-off can be controlled to yield a radiator medium with enhanced sensitivity for particle identification at higher momentum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 167402 (2014)].

  17. Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-04-10

    Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl{sub 3} extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants.

  18. Cherenkov Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Barbero, Marlon

    2012-04-19

    When a charged particle passes through an optically transparent medium with a velocity greater than the phase velocity of light in that medium, it emits prompt photons, called Cherenkov radiation, at a characteristic polar angle that depends on the particle velocity. Cherenkov counters are particle detectors that make use of this radiation. Uses include prompt particle counting, the detection of fast particles, the measurement of particle masses, and the tracking or localization of events in very large, natural radiators such as the atmosphere, or natural ice fields, like those at the South Pole in Antarctica. Cherenkov counters are used in a number of different fields, including high energy and nuclear physics detectors at particle accelerators, in nuclear reactors, cosmic ray detectors, particle astrophysics detectors and neutrino astronomy, and in biomedicine for labeling certain biological molecules.

  19. Understanding fast neutrons utilizing a water Cherenkov detector and a gas-filled detector at the soudan underground laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, Chiranjibi

    Many experiments are currently searching for Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs), a well-motivated class of hypothetical dark matter candidates. These direct dark matter detection experiments are located in deep underground to shield from cosmic-ray muons and the fast neutrons they produce. Fast neutrons are particularly dangerous to WIMP detectors because they can penetrate a WIMP-search experiment's neutron shielding. Once inside, these fast neutrons can interact with high-Z material near the WIMP detector, producing slower neutrons capable of mimicking the expected WIMP signal. My research uses two detectors located in Soudan Underground Laboratory to understand fast neutron production by muons in an underground environment: a water-Cherenkov detector sensitive to fast neutrons; and a gas-filled detector sensitive to charged particles like muons. The different kinds of selection criterion and their efficiencies are reported in this thesis. This thesis estimate the number of high energy neutron-like candidates associated with a nearby muon by using data from both detector systems.

  20. Optic detectors calibration for measuring ultra-high energy extensive air showers Cherenkov radiation by 532 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knurenko, Stanislav; Petrov, Igor; Egorov, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    Calibration of a PMT matrix is crucial for the treatment of the data obtained with Cherenkov tracking detector. Furthermore, due to high variability of the aerosol abundance in the atmosphere depending on season, weather etc. A constant monitoring of the atmospheric transparency is required during the measurements. For this purpose, besides traditional methods, a station for laser atmospheric probing is used.

  1. Muon data from a water Cherenkov detector prototype at Colorado State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Megan; Mostafa, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a very high energy gamma-ray experiment currently under construction in Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico, at an altitude of 4,100 m a.s.l. The HAWC Observatory will consist of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each instrumented with three 8'' photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and one 10'' high efficiency (HE) PMT. The PMTs are upward facing, anchored to the bottom of a 5 m deep by 7.3 m diameter steel tank, containing a multilayer hermetic plastic bag holding 200,000 L of purified water. The only full size WCD prototype outside of the HAWC site is located at Colorado State University (CSU) in Fort Collins, CO at an altitude of 1,525 m a.s.l. This prototype is instrumented with six 8'' PMTs, one 10'' HE PMT, and the same laser calibration system, electronics, and data acquisition system as the WCDs at the HAWC site. The CSU prototype is additionally equipped with scintillator paddles both under and above the volume of water, temperature probes (in the water, outside, and in the DAQ room), and one covered PMT. Preliminary results for muon rates and their temperature dependance using data collected with the CSU prototype will be presented.

  2. Note: Measurements of fast electrons in the TORE-SUPRA tokamak by means of modified Cherenkov-type diamond detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M. J.; Zebrowski, J.; Rabinski, M.; Jakubowski, M. J.; Malinowski, K.; Mirowski, R.; Lotte, Ph.; Goniche, M.; Gunn, J.; Colledani, G.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Basiuk, V.

    2013-01-15

    The Note reports on experimental studies of ripple born fast electrons within the TORE-SUPRA facility, which were performed by means of a modified measuring head equipped with diamond detectors designed especially for recording the electron-induced Cherenkov radiation. There are presented signals produced by fast electrons in the TORE-SUPRA machine, which were recorded during two experimental campaigns performed in 2010. Shapes of these electron-induced signals are considerably different from those observed during the first measurements carried out by the prototype Cherenkov probe in 2008. An explanation of the observed differences is given.

  3. Monte Carlo validation experiments for the gas Cherenkov detectors at the National Ignition Facility and Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; McEvoy, A.; Caldwell, S. E.; Grafil, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Milnes, J. S.

    2013-07-15

    The gas Cherenkov detectors at NIF and Omega measure several ICF burn characteristics by detecting multi-MeV nuclear γ emissions from the implosion. Of primary interest are γ bang-time (GBT) and burn width defined as the time between initial laser-plasma interaction and peak in the fusion reaction history and the FWHM of the reaction history respectively. To accurately calculate such parameters the collaboration relies on Monte Carlo codes, such as GEANT4 and ACCEPT, for diagnostic properties that cannot be measured directly. This paper describes a series of experiments performed at the High Intensity γ Source (HIγS) facility at Duke University to validate the geometries and material data used in the Monte Carlo simulations. Results published here show that model-driven parameters such as intensity and temporal response can be used with less than 50% uncertainty for all diagnostics and facilities.

  4. Monte Carlo validation experiments for the gas Cherenkov detectors at the National Ignition Facility and Omega.

    PubMed

    Rubery, M S; Horsfield, C J; Herrmann, H; Kim, Y; Mack, J M; Young, C; Evans, S; Sedillo, T; McEvoy, A; Caldwell, S E; Grafil, E; Stoeffl, W; Milnes, J S

    2013-07-01

    The gas Cherenkov detectors at NIF and Omega measure several ICF burn characteristics by detecting multi-MeV nuclear γ emissions from the implosion. Of primary interest are γ bang-time (GBT) and burn width defined as the time between initial laser-plasma interaction and peak in the fusion reaction history and the FWHM of the reaction history respectively. To accurately calculate such parameters the collaboration relies on Monte Carlo codes, such as GEANT4 and ACCEPT, for diagnostic properties that cannot be measured directly. This paper describes a series of experiments performed at the High Intensity γ Source (HIγS) facility at Duke University to validate the geometries and material data used in the Monte Carlo simulations. Results published here show that model-driven parameters such as intensity and temporal response can be used with less than 50% uncertainty for all diagnostics and facilities. PMID:23902060

  5. Measuring direct drive ICF remaining ablator areal density using a gas Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubery, Michael; Horsfield, Colin; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yongho; Hoffmann, Nelson; Mack, Joseph; Young, Carl; Evans, Scott; Sedillo, Tom; Caldwell, Steven; Grafil, Elliot; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Milnes, James; Atomic Weapons Establishment PLC Team; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Team; Photek Ltd Team

    2013-10-01

    Neutrons from a compressed direct drive ICF target produce γ rays through inelastic interactions with ablator material. The inelastic γ intensity is proportional to the remaining ablator areal density at bang time and the neutron yield. Remaining ablator areal density is an important metric for the quality of the implosion and is strongly correlated with fuel temperature and compression. This contribution describes how a background signal routinely measured on the gas Cherenkov detectors can be used to infer the intensity of the low-energy inelastic gammas from the ablator on the same trace as the DT fusion γ signal, which is directly proportional to the neutron yield; therefore allowing the remaining ablator areal density to be measured in a self consistent manner. Results from recent experiments at the Omega laser facility designed to prove the technique are discussed. In addition, Monte Carlo modelling shows the technique can be used to measure remaining ablator areal density for both plastic and glass capsules.

  6. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ˜400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  7. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H. W. Kim, Y. H.; Young, C. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Malone, R. M.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2014-11-15

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds.

  8. Extended performance gas Cherenkov detector for gamma-ray detection in high-energy density experiments.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Young, C S; Fatherley, V E; Lopez, F E; Oertel, J A; Malone, R M; Rubery, M S; Horsfield, C J; Stoeffl, W; Zylstra, A B; Shmayda, W T; Batha, S H

    2014-11-01

    A new Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) with low-energy threshold and high sensitivity, currently known as Super GCD (or GCD-3 at OMEGA), is being developed for use at the OMEGA Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Super GCD is designed to be pressurized to ≤400 psi (absolute) and uses all metal seals to allow the use of fluorinated gases inside the target chamber. This will allow the gamma energy threshold to be run as low at 1.8 MeV with 400 psi (absolute) of C2F6, opening up a new portion of the gamma ray spectrum. Super GCD operating at 20 cm from TCC will be ∼400 × more efficient at detecting DT fusion gammas at 16.7 MeV than the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic at NIF (GRH-6m) when operated at their minimum thresholds. PMID:25430303

  9. MO-A-BRD-06: In Vivo Cherenkov Video Imaging to Verify Whole Breast Irradiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R; Glaser, A; Jarvis, L; Gladstone, D; Andreozzi, J; Hitchcock, W; Pogue, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To show in vivo video imaging of Cherenkov emission (Cherenkoscopy) can be acquired in the clinical treatment room without affecting the normal process of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Applications of Cherenkoscopy, such as patient positioning, movement tracking, treatment monitoring and superficial dose estimation, were examined. Methods: In a phase 1 clinical trial, including 12 patients undergoing post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation, Cherenkov emission was imaged with a time-gated ICCD camera synchronized to the radiation pulses, during 10 fractions of the treatment. Images from different treatment days were compared by calculating the 2-D correlations corresponding to the averaged image. An edge detection algorithm was utilized to highlight biological features, such as the blood vessels. Superficial dose deposited at the sampling depth were derived from the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and compared with the Cherenkov images. Skin reactions were graded weekly according to the Common Toxicity Criteria and digital photographs were obtained for comparison. Results: Real time (fps = 4.8) imaging of Cherenkov emission was feasible and feasibility tests indicated that it could be improved to video rate (fps = 30) with system improvements. Dynamic field changes due to fast MLC motion were imaged in real time. The average 2-D correlation was about 0.99, suggesting the stability of this imaging technique and repeatability of patient positioning was outstanding. Edge enhanced images of blood vessels were observed, and could serve as unique biological markers for patient positioning and movement tracking (breathing). Small discrepancies exists between the Cherenkov images and the superficial dose predicted from the TPS but the former agreed better with actual skin reactions than did the latter. Conclusion: Real time Cherenkoscopy imaging during EBRT is a novel imaging tool that could be utilized for patient positioning, movement tracking

  10. SiPM detectors for the ASTRI project in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billotta, Sergio; Marano, Davide; Bonanno, Giovanni; Belluso, Massimiliano; Grillo, Alessandro; Garozzo, Salvatore; Romeo, Giuseppe; Timpanaro, Maria Cristina; Maccarone, Maria Concetta C.; Catalano, Osvaldo; La Rosa, Giovanni; Sottile, Giuseppe; Impiombato, Domenico; Gargano, Carmelo; Giarrusso, Salavtore

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a worldwide new generation project aimed at realizing an array of a hundred ground based gamma-ray telescopes. ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is the Italian project whose primary target is the development of an end-to-end prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, of the CTA small size class of telescopes devoted to investigation of the highest energy region, from 1 to 100 TeV. Next target is the implementation of an ASTRI/CTA mini-array based on seven identical telescopes. Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are the semiconductor photosensor devices designated to constitute the camera detection system at the focal plane of the ASTRI telescopes. SiPM photosensors are suitable for the detection of the Cherenkov flashes, since they are very fast and sensitive to the light in the 300-700nm wavelength spectrum. Their drawbacks compared to the traditional photomultiplier tubes are high dark count rates, after-pulsing and optical cross-talk contributions, and intrinsic gains strongly dependent on temperature. Nonetheless, for a single pixel, the dark count rate is well below the Night Sky Background, the effects of cross-talk and afterpulses are typically lower than 20%, and the gain can be kept stable against temperature variations by means of adequate bias voltage compensation strategies. This work presents and discusses some experimental results from a large set of measurements performed on the SiPM sensors to be used for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype camera and on recently developed detectors demonstrating outstanding performance for the future evolution of the project in the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  11. ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector for Gamma Ray Measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lopez, F. E.; Griego, J. R.; Fatherley, V. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Carpenter, A.; Rubery, M. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Malone, R. M.; Shmayda, W. T.

    2015-11-01

    New requirements to improve reaction history and ablator areal density measurements at the NIF necessitate improvements in sensitivity, temporal and spectral response relative to the existing Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH-6m) located 6 meters from target chamber center (TCC). A new DIM-based ``Super'' Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) will ultimately provide ~ 200x more sensitivity to DT fusion gamma rays, reduce the effective temporal resolution from ~ 100 to ~ 10 ps and lower the energy threshold from 2.9 to 1.8 MeV, relative to GRH-6m. The first phase is to insert the existing coaxial GCD-3 detector into a reentrant well on the NIF chamber which will put it within 4 meters of TCC. This diagnostic platform will allow assessment of the x-ray radiation background environment within the well which will be fed into the shielding design for the follow-on ``Super'' GCD. It will also enable use of a pulse-dilation PMT which has the potential to improve the effective measurement bandwidth by ~ 10x relative to current PMT technology. GCD-3 has been thoroughly tested at the OMEGA Laser Facility and characterized at the High Intensity Gamma Ray Source (HIgS).

  12. CHERENCUBE: Concept definition and implementation challenges of a Cherenkov-based detector block for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Somlai-Schweiger, I. Ziegler, S. I.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: A new concept for a depth-of-interaction (DOI) capable time-of-flight (TOF) PET detector is defined, based only on the detection of Cherenkov photons. The proposed “CHERENCUBE” consists of a cubic Cherenkov radiator with position-sensitive photodetectors covering each crystal face. By means of the spatial distribution of the detected photons and their time of arrival, the point of interaction of the gamma-ray in the crystal can be determined. This study analyzes through theoretical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations the potential advantages of the concept toward reaching a Cherenkov-only detector for TOF-PET with DOI capability. Furthermore, an algorithm for the DOI estimation is presented and the requirements for a practical implementation of the proposed concept are defined. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulations consisted of a cubic crystal with one photodetector coupled to each one of the faces of the cube. The sensitive area of the detector matched exactly the crystal size, which was varied in 1 mm steps between 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3} and 10 × 10 × 10 mm{sup 3}. For each size, five independent simulations of ten thousand 511 keV gamma-rays were triggered at a fixed distance of 10 mm. The crystal chosen was PbWO{sub 4}. Its scintillation properties were simulated, but only Cherenkov photons were analyzed. Photodetectors were simulated having perfect photodetection efficiency and infinite time resolution. For every generated particle, the analysis considered its creation process, parent and daughter particles, energy, origin coordinates, trajectory, and time and position of detection. The DOI determination is based on the distribution of the emission time of all photons per event. These values are calculated as a function of the coordinates of detection and origin for every photon. The common origin is estimated by finding the distribution with the most similar emission time-points. Results: Detection efficiency increases with crystal size from

  13. Construction and testing of the SLD Cerenkov ring imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Gagnon, P.; Williams, D.A. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Zucchelli, P. . Ist. di Fisica); Jacques, P.; Piano, R.; Stamer, P. . Serin Physics Lab.); Whitaker, J.S.; Wilson, R.J. . Dept. of Physics); Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; HcHugh, S.; Morrison, R.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S. . Dept. of Physics); Antiligus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dosu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, B.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Valvre, J.; Williams, S. ); Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-06-01

    The authors report on the construction of the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider and the testing of its components. The authors include results from testing the drift boxes, liquid radiator trays, and mirrors for the barrel CRID. The authors also discuss development of the support systems essential for the operation of the CRID: gas and liquid recirculator systems and monitoring.

  14. Identification of large-transverse-momentum hadrons using a ring-imaging Cherenkov counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, R.; Adams, M.; Brown, C.; Coutrakon, G.; Charpak, G.; Finley, D.; Glass, H.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaffe, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Kirz, J.; Mangeot, Ph.; Peisert, A.; Santiard, J. C.; Sauli, F.

    1986-07-01

    We have constructed and operated a large-aperture ring-imaging Cherenkov counter in a large-transverse-momentum experiment at Fermilab. Approximately 3 photons per relativistic particle are emitted in helium gas, focused by spherical mirrors and detected by multistep proportional chambers using a He/TEA gas mixture. Hadron identification is obtained from threshold to approximately 200 {GeV}/{c}.

  15. Review of recent progress in the development of Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1985-11-01

    The principle behind the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detectors (CRIDs) involves focussing the Cherenkov light, emitted by a relativistic charged particle in passing through a radiator medium, onto a high efficiency photocathode which can be in turn read out with good spatial resolution, to localize the point of origin of the photoelectrons. This information permits the reconstruction of the circle of Cherenkov light for each particle above threshold, and hence the determination of the Cherenkov angle to an accuracy of a few percent. The groups currently working on these detectors are discussed, the status of these projects is examined, and progress is reported on the R and D on two 4-pi devices being prepared for physics at the Z. The activities are being done at Fermilab, CERN, and SLAC. 8 refs., 32 figs. (LEW)

  16. Application of imaging to the atmospheric Cherenkov technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawley, M. F.; Fegan, D. J.; Gibbs, K.; Gorham, P. W.; Hillas, A. M.; Lamb, R. C.; Liebing, D. F.; Mackeown, P. K.; Porter, N. A.; Stenger, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    Turver and Weekes proposed using a system of phototubes in the focal plane of a large reflector to give an air Cherenkov camera for gamma ray astronomy. Preliminary results with a 19 element camera have been reported previously. In 1983 the camera was increased to 37 pixels; it has now been routinely operated for two years. A brief physical description of the camera, its mode of operation, and the data reduction procedures are presented. The Monte Carlo simultations on which these are based on also reviewed.

  17. Design, transport, and installation of autonomous Cherenkov detectors at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubén Calderón Cueva, Mario; Alejandro Vasquez, Nicolas; Martínez, Oscar; Carrera, Edgar; Cazar, Dennis; Audelo, Mario; Mantilla, Cristina; Quishpe, Raquel

    2015-08-01

    Ecuador, as a member of the Latin American Giant Observatory (LAGO), wishes to expand the understanding of astroparticle physics and space weather by the installation of Water Cherenkov detectors at high altitude. The challenge for such devices lies on their transport to the remote areas of operation, the autonomy of their electrical power supply, the robustness of their data transmission system, their remote operation stability, and the reliability of the water integrity for long periods of time. LAGO Ecuador features several studies of gamma ray bursts and high energy astrophysical sources, as well as of space weather. Based on these studies, we develop a feasibility study for the design, installation, operation and maintenance of the aforementioned devices in Papallacta, Chimborazo and Cruz Loma in the Ecuadorean highlands. As the atmospheric absorption, and so the area of detection to be instrumented, is significantly reduced with the altitude, the easy access to locations higher than 4000 m a.s.l. is one of the main advantages of the Ecuadorean Andes for the installation of these facilities.

  18. Imaging MAMA detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Kasle, David B.

    1990-07-01

    Imaging multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with 1024 x 1024 pixel formats have been produced for visible and UV wavelengths; the UV types employ 'solar blind' photocathodes whose detective quantum efficiencies are significantly higher than those of currently available CCDs operating at far-UV and EUV wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the configurations and performance capabilities of state-of-the-art MAMA detectors, with a view to the development requirements of the hybrid electronic circuits needed for forthcoming spacecraft-sensor applications. Gain, dark noise, uniformity, and dynamic range performance data are presented for the curved-channel 'chevron', 'Z-plate', and helical-channel high gain microchannel plate configurations that are currently under evaluation with MAMA detector systems.

  19. SU-E-T-186: Feasibility Study of Glass Cherenkov Detector for Prompt Gamma Detection in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A; Chen, Y; Ahmad, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To simulate a Cherenkov glass detector system utilizing prompt gamma (PG) technique to quantify range uncertainties in proton radiation therapy. Methods: A simulation of high energy photons typically produced in proton interactions with materials incident onto a block of Cherenkov glass was performed with the Geant4 toolkit. The standard electromagnetic package was used along with several decay modules (G4Decay, G4DecayPhysics, and G4RadioactiveDecayPhysics) and the optical photon components (G4OpticalPhysics). Our setup included a pencil beam consisting of a hundred thousand 6 MeV photons (approximately the deexcitation energy released from 16O) incident onto a 2.5 ⊗ 2.5 ⊗ 1.5 cm3 of a Cherenkov glass (7.2 g of In2O3 + 90 g cladding, density of 2.82 g/cm3, Zeff = 33.7, index of refraction 1.56). The energy deposited from incident 6 MeV photons as well as secondary electrons and resulting optical photons were recorded. Results: The energy deposited by 6 MeV photons in glass material showed several peaks that included the photoelectric, the single and double escape peaks. About 11% of incident photons interacted with glass material to deposit energy. Most of the photons collected were in the region of double escape peak (approximately 4.98 MeV). The secondary electron spectrum produced from incident photons showed a high energy peak located near 6 MeV and a sharp peak located ∼120 keV with a continuous distribution between these two points. The resulting Cherenkov photons produced showed a continuous energy distribution between 2 and 5 eV with a slight increase in yield beginning about 3 eV. The amount of Cherenkov photons produced per interacting incident 6 MeV photon was ∼240.7. Conclusion: This study suggests the viability of utilizing the Cherenkov glass material as a possible prompt gamma photon detection device. Future work will include optimization of the detector system to maximize photon detection efficiency.

  20. Cherenkov Video Imaging Allows for the First Visualization of Radiation Therapy in Real Time

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Lesley A.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gladstone, David J.; Jiang, Shudong; Hitchcock, Whitney; Friedman, Oscar D.; Glaser, Adam K.; Jermyn, Michael; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether Cherenkov light imaging can visualize radiation therapy in real time during breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: An intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was synchronized to the 3.25-μs radiation pulses of the clinical linear accelerator with the intensifier set × 100. Cherenkov images were acquired continuously (2.8 frames/s) during fractionated whole breast irradiation with each frame an accumulation of 100 radiation pulses (approximately 5 monitor units). Results: The first patient images ever created are used to illustrate that Cherenkov emission can be visualized as a video during conditions typical for breast radiation therapy, even with complex treatment plans, mixed energies, and modulated treatment fields. Images were generated correlating to the superficial dose received by the patient and potentially the location of the resulting skin reactions. Major blood vessels are visible in the image, providing the potential to use these as biological landmarks for improved geometric accuracy. The potential for this system to detect radiation therapy misadministrations, which can result from hardware malfunction or patient positioning setup errors during individual fractions, is shown. Conclusions: Cherenkoscopy is a unique method for visualizing surface dose resulting in real-time quality control. We propose that this system could detect radiation therapy errors in everyday clinical practice at a time when these errors can be corrected to result in improved safety and quality of radiation therapy.

  1. A nuclear fuel verification system using digital imaging of Cherenkov light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael Attas, E.; Burton, Gordon R.; Dennis Chen, J.; Young, Gary J.; Hildingsson, Lars; Trepte, Oliver

    1997-02-01

    An UV-sensitive scientific CCD camera has been tested at a power reactor facility to image the faint Cherenkov light from irradiated nuclear fuel. The instrument mates custom optical components (lens, UV-pass filter) to a commercial scientific camera (Astrocam 4100) with a coated frame-transfer CCD chip (EEV 37-10) to produce 12-bit images of 512 × 512 pixels at several frames per second. A 250-mm {f}/{2.6} catadioptric lens has been designed with transmissive optics optimized for this application, incorporating colour correction for viewing through 10 m of water. The filter has an average transmission of 80% from 280 to 320 nm, with visible-light transmission of less than 0.03% from 365 to 780 nm to block artificial lighting in the fuel bay. Measurements were made with this instrument at the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, and the CLAB fuel storage facility in Sweden. Both fuel and non-fuel assemblies of boiling-water reactor (BWR) type were studied. Performance is superior to that of the earlier Cherenkov viewing devices (CVDs) based on image intensifier tubes. Increased sensitivity extends the range of the Cherenkov verification technique to fuel with older discharge dates. Increased resolution allows fine details of the fuel to be examined for higher-confidence safeguards verification. Sample digital images are presented, and the advantages to irradiated-fuel verification of image quantitation, storage, transmission, and processing are discussed.

  2. Camera selection for real-time in vivo radiation treatment verification systems using Cherenkov imaging

    PubMed Central

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Gladstone, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify achievable camera performance and hardware needs in a clinical Cherenkov imaging system for real-time, in vivo monitoring of the surface beam profile on patients, as novel visual information, documentation, and possible treatment verification for clinicians. Methods: Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS), charge-coupled device (CCD), intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), and electron multiplying-intensified charge coupled device (EM-ICCD) cameras were investigated to determine Cherenkov imaging performance in a clinical radiotherapy setting, with one emphasis on the maximum supportable frame rate. Where possible, the image intensifier was synchronized using a pulse signal from the Linac in order to image with room lighting conditions comparable to patient treatment scenarios. A solid water phantom irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam was imaged by the cameras to evaluate the maximum frame rate for adequate Cherenkov detection. Adequate detection was defined as an average electron count in the background-subtracted Cherenkov image region of interest in excess of 0.5% (327 counts) of the 16-bit maximum electron count value. Additionally, an ICCD and an EM-ICCD were each used clinically to image two patients undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy to compare clinical advantages and limitations of each system. Results: Intensifier-coupled cameras were required for imaging Cherenkov emission on the phantom surface with ambient room lighting; standalone CMOS and CCD cameras were not viable. The EM-ICCD was able to collect images from a single Linac pulse delivering less than 0.05 cGy of dose at 30 frames/s (fps) and pixel resolution of 512 × 512, compared to an ICCD which was limited to 4.7 fps at 1024 × 1024 resolution. An intensifier with higher quantum efficiency at the entrance photocathode in the red wavelengths [30% quantum efficiency (QE) vs previous 19%] promises at least 8.6 fps at a resolution of 1024 × 1024 and lower monetary

  3. Camera selection for real-time in vivo radiation treatment verification systems using Cherenkov imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M. Glaser, Adam K.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To identify achievable camera performance and hardware needs in a clinical Cherenkov imaging system for real-time, in vivo monitoring of the surface beam profile on patients, as novel visual information, documentation, and possible treatment verification for clinicians. Methods: Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS), charge-coupled device (CCD), intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), and electron multiplying-intensified charge coupled device (EM-ICCD) cameras were investigated to determine Cherenkov imaging performance in a clinical radiotherapy setting, with one emphasis on the maximum supportable frame rate. Where possible, the image intensifier was synchronized using a pulse signal from the Linac in order to image with room lighting conditions comparable to patient treatment scenarios. A solid water phantom irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam was imaged by the cameras to evaluate the maximum frame rate for adequate Cherenkov detection. Adequate detection was defined as an average electron count in the background-subtracted Cherenkov image region of interest in excess of 0.5% (327 counts) of the 16-bit maximum electron count value. Additionally, an ICCD and an EM-ICCD were each used clinically to image two patients undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy to compare clinical advantages and limitations of each system. Results: Intensifier-coupled cameras were required for imaging Cherenkov emission on the phantom surface with ambient room lighting; standalone CMOS and CCD cameras were not viable. The EM-ICCD was able to collect images from a single Linac pulse delivering less than 0.05 cGy of dose at 30 frames/s (fps) and pixel resolution of 512 × 512, compared to an ICCD which was limited to 4.7 fps at 1024 × 1024 resolution. An intensifier with higher quantum efficiency at the entrance photocathode in the red wavelengths [30% quantum efficiency (QE) vs previous 19%] promises at least 8.6 fps at a resolution of 1024 × 1024 and lower monetary

  4. Cherenkov radiation imaging of beta emitters: in vitro and in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Boschi, Federico; D'Ambrosio, Daniela; Calderan, Laura; Marengo, Mario; Fenzi, Alberto; Menegazzi, Marta; Sbarbati, Andrea; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2011-08-01

    The main purpose of this work was to investigate both in vitro and in vivo Cherenkov radiation (CR) emission coming from 18F and 32P. The main difference between 18F and 32P is mainly the number of the emitted light photons, more precisely the same activity of 32P emits more CR photons with respect to 18F. In vitro results obtained by comparing beta counter measurements with photons average radiance showed that Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) allows quantitative tracer activity measurements. In order to investigate in vivo the CLI approach, we studied an experimental xenograft tumor model of mammary carcinoma (BB1 tumor cells). Cherenkov in vivo dynamic whole body images of tumor bearing mice were acquired and the tumor tissue time activity curves reflected the well-known physiological accumulation of 18F-FDG in malignant tissues with respect to normal tissues. The results presented here show that it is possible to use conventional optical imaging devices for in vitro or in vivo study of beta emitters.

  5. Total absorption Cherenkov spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovski, E. I.

    2015-05-01

    A short review of 50 years of work done with Cherenkov detectors in laboratories at the Lebedev Physical Institute is presented. The report considers some issues concerning the use of Cherenkov total absorption counters based on lead glass and heavy crystals in accelerator experiments.

  6. Characteristics of four-channel Cherenkov-type detector for measurements of runaway electrons in the ISTTOK tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Plyusnin, V. V.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.

    2010-10-15

    A diagnostics capable of characterizing the runaway and superthermal electrons has been developing on the ISTTOK tokamak. In previous paper, a use of single-channel Cherenkov-type detector with titanium filter for runaway electron studies in ISTTOK was reported. To measure fast electron populations with different energies, a prototype of a four-channel detector with molybdenum filters was designed. Test-stand studies of filters with different thicknesses (1, 3, 7, 10, 20, 50, and 100 {mu}m) have shown that they should allow the detection of electrons with energies higher than 69, 75, 87, 95, 120, 181, and 260 keV, respectively. First results of measurements with the four-channel detector revealed the possibility to measure reliably different fast electrons populations simultaneously.

  7. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  8. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  9. Cherenkov radiation fluence estimates in tissue for molecular imaging and therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Adam K.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Gladstone, David; Pogue, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Cherenkov radiation has emerged as a novel source of light with a number of applications in the biomedical sciences. It's unique properties, including its broadband emission spectrum, spectral weighting in the ultraviolet and blue wavebands, and local generation of light within a given tissue have made it an attractive source of light for techniques ranging from widefield imaging to oximetry and phototherapy. To help guide the future development of this field in the context of molecular imaging, quantitative estimates of the light fluence rates of Cherenkov radiation from a number of radionuclide and external radiotherapy beams in tissue was explored for the first time. Using Monte Carlo simulations, these values were found to be on the order of 0.1 - 1 nW/cm2 per MBq/g for radionuclides and 1 - 10 μW/cm2 per Gy/sec for external radiotherapy beams, dependent on the given waveband and optical properties. For phototherapy applications, the total light fluence was found to be on the order of nJ/cm2 for radionuclides, and mJ/cm2 for radiotherapy beams. To validate these findings, experimental validation was completed with an MV x-ray photon beam incident onto a tissue phantom, confirming the magnitudes of the simulation values. The results indicate that diagnostic potential is reasonable for Cherenkov excitation of molecular probes, but phototherapy may remain elusive at these relatively low fluence values.

  10. Cherenkov radiation fluence estimates in tissue for molecular imaging and therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Adam K; Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W

    2015-09-01

    Cherenkov radiation has recently emerged as an interesting phenomenon for a number of applications in the biomedical sciences. Its unique properties, including broadband emission spectrum, spectral weight in the ultraviolet and blue wavebands, and local generation of light within a given tissue, have made it an attractive new source of light within tissue for molecular imaging and phototherapy applications. While several studies have investigated the total Cherenkov light yield from radionuclides in units of [photons/decay], further consideration of the light propagation in tissue is necessary to fully consider the utility of this signal in vivo. Therefore, to help further guide the development of this novel field, quantitative estimates of the light fluence rate of Cherenkov radiation from both radionuclides and radiotherapy beams in a biological tissue are presented for the first time. Using Monte Carlo simulations, these values were found to be on the order of 0.01-1 nW cm(-2) per MBq g(-1) for radionuclides, and 1-100 μW cm(-2) per Gy s(-1) for external radiotherapy beams, dependent on the given waveband, optical properties, and radiation source. For phototherapy applications, the total light fluence was found to be on the order of nJ cm(-2) for radionuclides, and mJ cm(-2) for radiotherapy beams. The results indicate that diagnostic potential is reasonable for Cherenkov excitation of molecular probes, but phototherapy may remain elusive at such exceedingly low fluence values. The results of this study are publicly available for distribution online at www.dartmouth.edu/optmed/. PMID:26270125

  11. Cherenkov-type diamond detectors for measurements of fast electrons in the TORE-SUPRA tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, L.; Sadowski, M. J.; Zebrowski, J.; Rabinski, M.; Malinowski, K.; Mirowski, R.; Lotte, Ph.; Gunn, J.; Pascal, J-Y.; Colledani, G.; Basiuk, V.; Goniche, M.; Lipa, M.

    2010-01-15

    The paper presents a schematic design and tests of a system applicable for measurements of fast electron pulses emitted from high-temperature plasma generated inside magnetic confinement fusion machines, and particularly in the TORE-SUPRA facility. The diagnostic system based on the registration of the Cherenkov radiation induced by fast electrons within selected solid radiators is considered, and electron low-energy thresholds for different radiators are given. There are some estimates of high thermal loads, which might be deposited by intense electron beams upon parts of the diagnostic equipment within the TORE-SUPRA device. There are some proposed measures to overcome this difficulty by the selection of appropriate absorption filters and Cherenkov radiators, and particularly by the application of a fast-moving reciprocating probe. The paper describes the measuring system, its tests, as well as some results of the preliminary measurements of fast electrons within TORE-SUPRA facility.

  12. Quenching the scintillation in CF4 Cherenkov gas radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, T.; D`Ambrosio, C.; Easo, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gibson, V.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Hunt, P.; Jones, C. R.; Lambert, R. W.; Matteuzzi, C.; Muheim, F.; Papanestis, A.; Perego, D. L.; Piedigrossi, D.; Plackett, R.; Powell, A.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Ullaland, O.; Websdale, D.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.

    2015-08-01

    CF4 is used as a Cherenkov gas radiator in one of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors at the LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. CF4 is well known to have a high scintillation photon yield in the near and far VUV, UV and in the visible wavelength range. A large flux of scintillation photons in our photon detection acceptance between 200 and 800 nm could compromise the particle identification efficiency. We will show that this scintillation photon emission system can be effectively quenched, consistent with radiationless transitions, with no significant impact on the photons resulting from Cherenkov radiation.

  13. The Topo-trigger: a new concept of stereo trigger system for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, R.; Mazin, D.; Paoletti, R.; Blanch Bigas, O.; Cortina, J.

    2016-04-01

    Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) such as the Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes endeavor to reach the lowest possible energy threshold. In doing so the trigger system is a key element. Reducing the trigger threshold is hampered by the rapid increase of accidental triggers generated by ambient light (the so-called Night Sky Background NSB). In this paper we present a topological trigger, dubbed Topo-trigger, which rejects events on the basis of their relative orientation in the telescope cameras. We have simulated and tested the trigger selection algorithm in the MAGIC telescopes. The algorithm was tested using MonteCarlo simulations and shows a rejection of 85% of the accidental stereo triggers while preserving 99% of the gamma rays. A full implementation of this trigger system would achieve an increase in collection area between 10 and 20% at the energy threshold. The analysis energy threshold of the instrument is expected to decrease by ~ 8%. The selection algorithm was tested on real MAGIC data taken with the current trigger configuration and no γ-like events were found to be lost.

  14. Development of Gigahertz Analog Memory for Front-End Electronics of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, T.; Higashi, Y.; Nakano, S.; Nakamori, T.; Kubo, H.; Tanimori, T.; Tanaka, M.

    The night sky light is one of the major components of background for imaging air Cherenkov telescopes. It disturbs images of air shower and makes both the gamma/hadron separation and the angular resolution worse. For example, The CANGAROO-III electronics consists of charge ADCs and multi-hit TDCs. In using charge ADCs, we have to delay the signal from PMTs until the trigger signal input to ADCs. After through this delay line chip, signals from PMTs are distorted, and we have to take the signal integration time longer than Cherenkov signal time constant and more night sky light is mixed to the real signal. In order to reduce this night sky light, we are planning to replace the charge ADCs to capacitor arrays called AMC (Analog Memory Cell). AMC consists of 512 capacitors and can record the waveform of the input signal for 512 ns at high sampling rate of 1 GHz. We already developed a test type of AMC chip and its dynamic range is more than 7 bits. We will report the current status of the development of AMC.

  15. Cherenkov radiation dosimetry in water tanks - video rate imaging, tomography and IMRT & VMAT plan verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Glaser, Adam K.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gladstone, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of three types of imaging of radiation beams in water tanks for comparison to dose maps. The first was simple depth and lateral profile verification, showing excellent agreement between Cherenkov and planned dose, as predicted by the treatment planning system for a square 5cm beam. The second approach was 3D tomography of such beams, using a rotating water tank with camera attached, and using filtered backprojection for the recovery of the 3D volume. The final presentation was real time 2D imaging of IMRT or VMAT treatments in a water tank. In all cases the match to the treatment planning system was within what would be considered acceptable for clinical medical physics acceptance.

  16. A hybrid version of the Whipple observatory's air Cherenkov imaging camera for use in moonlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantell, M. C.; Akerlof, C. W.; Badran, H. M.; Buckley, J.; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Cawley, M. F.; Connaughton, V.; Fegan, D. J.; Fleury, P.; Gaidos, J.; Hillas, A. M.; Lamb, R. C.; Pare, E.; Rose, H. J.; Rovero, A. C.; Sarazin, X.; Sembroski, G.; Schubnell, M. S.; Urban, M.; Weekes, T. C.; Wilson, C.

    1997-02-01

    A hybrid version of the Whipple Observatory's atmospheric Cherenkov imaging camera that permits observation during periods of bright moonlight is described. The hybrid camera combines a blue-light blocking filter with the standard Whipple imaging camera to reduce sensitivity to wavelengths greater than 360 nm. Data taken with this camera are found to be free from the effects of the moonlit night-sky after the application of simple off-line noise filtering. This camera has been used to successfully detect TeV gamma rays, in bright moon light, from both the Crab Nebula and the active galactic nucleus Markarian 421 at the 4.9σ and 3.9σ levels of statistical significance, respectively. The energy threshold of the camera is estimated to be 1.1 ( +0.6/-0.3) TeV from Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The observation of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma rays is an excellent tool to study the most energetic and violent environments in the Galaxy. This energy range is only accessible with ground-based instruments such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) that reconstruct the energy and direction of the primary gamma ray by observing the Cherenkov light from the induced extended air showers in Earths atmosphere. The main goals of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are the identification of individual sources of cosmic rays (CRs), such as supernova remnants (SNRs), and the study of other extreme astrophysical objects at the highest energies, such as gamma-ray binaries and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). One of the main challenges is the discrimination between leptonic and hadronic gamma-ray production channels. To that end, the gamma-ray signal from each individual source needs to be brought into context with the multi-wavelength environment of the astrophysical object in question, particularly with observations tracing the density of the surrounding interstellar medium, or synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons. In this review presented at the European Cosmic Ray Symposium 2014 (ECRS2014), the most recent developments in the field of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are highlighted, with particular emphasis on SNRs and PWNe.

  18. Front-end electronics and data acquisition system for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. T.; de La Taille, C.; Suomijärvi, T.; Cao, Z.; Deligny, O.; Dulucq, F.; Ge, M. M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Nguyen Trung, T.; Wanlin, E.; Xiao, G.; Yin, L. Q.; Yun Ky, B.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, S. S.; Zhu, Z.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a front-end electronics based on an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented for the future imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). To achieve this purpose, a 16-channel ASIC chip, PARISROC 2 (Photomultiplier ARray Integrated in SiGe ReadOut Chip) is used in the analog signal processing and digitization. The digitized results are sent to the server by a user-defined User Datagram Protocol/Internet Protocol (UDP/IP) hardcore engine through Ethernet that is managed by a FPGA. A prototype electronics fulfilling the requirements of the Wide Field of View Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA) of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project has been designed, fabricated and tested to prove the concept of the design. A detailed description of the development with the results of the test measurements are presented. By using a new input structure and a new configuration of the ASIC, the dynamic range of the circuit is extended. A highly precise-time calibrating algorithm is also proposed, verified and optimized for the mass production. The test results suggest that the proposed electronics design fulfills the general specification of the future IACTs.

  19. Optimal strategies for observation of active galactic nuclei variability with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Matteo; Gerard, Lucie; Maier, Gernot

    2016-07-01

    Variable emission is one of the defining characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGN). While providing precious information on the nature and physics of the sources, variability is often challenging to observe with time- and field-of-view-limited astronomical observatories such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In this work, we address two questions relevant for the observation of sources characterized by AGN-like variability: what is the most time-efficient way to detect such sources, and what is the observational bias that can be introduced by the choice of the observing strategy when conducting blind surveys of the sky. Different observing strategies are evaluated using simulated light curves and realistic instrument response functions of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future gamma-ray observatory. We show that strategies that makes use of very small observing windows, spread over large periods of time, allows for a faster detection of the source, and are less influenced by the variability properties of the sources, as compared to strategies that concentrate the observing time in a small number of large observing windows. Although derived using CTA as an example, our conclusions are conceptually valid for any IACTs facility, and in general, to all observatories with small field of view and limited duty cycle.

  20. Cherenkov imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy for real-time radiation beam tracking and treatment response monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    External beam radiotherapy utilizes high energy radiation to target cancer with dynamic, patient-specific treatment plans. The otherwise invisible radiation beam can be observed via the optical Cherenkov photons emitted from interaction between the high energy beam and tissue. Using a specialized camera-system, the Cherenkov emission can thus be used to track the radiation beam on the surface of the patient in real-time, even for complex cases such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Two patients undergoing VMAT of the head and neck were imaged and analyzed, and the viability of the system to provide clinical feedback was established.

  1. Light sheet luminescence imaging with Cherenkov excitation in thick scattering media.

    PubMed

    Brůža, Petr; Lin, Huiyun; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Jarvis, Lesley A; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    Light scattering leads to a severe loss of axial and transverse resolution with depth into tissue, limiting accuracy and value of biomedical luminescence imaging techniques. High-resolution imaging beyond a few-millimeter depth is prohibited because diffusive transport dominates beyond a few scattering distances. In this study, light sheet imaging through scattering media is demonstrated using a radiotherapy linear accelerator to deliver well-defined thin scanned sheets of x-rays. These sheets produce Cherenkov light within the medium, which in turn excites luminescence of an optical probe across the sheet plane. This luminescence can then be imaged by an intensified camera positioned perpendicular to the sheet plane. The precise knowledge of the light sheet position within the medium allowed for efficient attenuation correction of the signal with depth as well as spatial deconvolution of the excitation light. Together these methods allowed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, high-resolution imaging of tissue-equivalent phantoms up to 3 cm thick, yielding the precise position and shape of luminescent lesions located deep in tissue without the need for nonlinear image reconstruction. PMID:27367082

  2. Mercubic iodine imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortale, C.; Padgett, L.; Schnepple, W. F.

    1983-07-01

    Linear and two-dimensional monolithic arrays of different configurations have been fabricated using photolithographic techniques. The fabrication technology, electronic setup, and pinhole imaging experiments are described. Spatial resolutions of 1-2 mm have been achieved.

  3. Prototype of a front-end readout ASIC designed for the Water Cherenkov Detector Array in LHAASO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Wu, W.; Liu, J.; Liang, Y.; Qin, J.; Yu, L.; Liu, S.; An, Q.

    2015-03-01

    The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory is in the R&D phase, in which the Water Cherenkov Detector Array is an important part. The signals of Photo-Multiplier Tubes would vary from single photo electron to 4000 photo electrons, and both high precision charge and time measurement is required. To simplify the signal processing chain, the charge-to-time conversion method is employed. A prototype of the front-end readout ASIC is designed and fabricated in Chartered 0.35 μ m CMOS technology, which integrates time disctrimination and converts the input charge information to pulse widths. With Time-to-Digital Converters, both time and charge can be digitized at the same time. We have conducted initial tests on this chip, and the results indicate that a time resolution better than 0.5 ns is achieved over the full dynamic range (1 ~ 4000 photo electrons, corresponding to 0.75 ~ 3000 pC with the threshold of 0.188 pC); the charge resolution is better than 1% with large input amplitudes (500 ~ 4000 photo electrons), and remains better than 15% with a 1 photo electron input amplitude, which is beyond the application requirement.

  4. Intensity Interferometry with Cherenkov Telescope Arrays: Prospects for submilliarcsecond optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, D.

    2014-04-01

    Intensity interferometry measures the second-order coherence of light. Very rapid (nanosecond) fluctuations are correlated between separate telescopes, without any optical connection. This makes the method insensitive to atmospheric turbulence and optical imperfections, permitting observations over long baselines, and at short wavelengths. The required large telescopes are becoming available as those primarily erected to study gamma rays: the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (https://www.cta-observatory.org/) envisions many tens of telescopes distributed over a few square km. Digital signal handling enables very many baselines to be simultaneously synthesized between many pairs of telescopes, while stars may be tracked across the sky with electronic time delays, synthesizing an optical interferometer in software. Simulations indicate limiting magnitudes around m(v)=8, reaching a resolution of 30 microarcseconds in the violet. Since intensity interferometry provides only the modulus (not phase) of any spatial frequency component of the source image, image reconstruction requires phase retrieval techniques. As shown in simulations, full two-dimensional images can be retrieved, provided there is an extensive coverage of the (u,v)-plane, such as will be available once the number of telescopes reaches numbers on the order of ten.

  5. Real-time Cherenkov emission portal imaging during CyberKnife® radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roussakis, Yiannis; Zhang, Rongxiao; Heyes, Geoff; Webster, Gareth; Mason, Suzannah; Green, Stuart; Pogue, Brian; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-11-21

    The feasibility of real-time portal imaging during radiation therapy, through the Cherenkov emission (CE) effect is investigated via a medical linear accelerator (CyberKnife(®)) irradiating a partially-filled water tank with a 60 mm circular beam. A graticule of lead/plywood and a number of tissue equivalent materials were alternatively placed at the beam entrance face while the induced CE at the exit face was imaged using a gated electron-multiplying-intensified-charged-coupled device (emICCD) for both stationary and dynamic scenarios. This was replicated on an Elekta Synergy(®) linear accelerator with portal images acquired using the iViewGT(™) system. Profiles across the acquired portal images were analysed to reveal the potential resolution and contrast limits of this novel CE based portal imaging technique and compared against the current standard. The CE resolution study revealed that using the lead/plywood graticule, separations down to 3.4  ±  0.5 mm can be resolved. A 28 mm thick tissue-equivalent rod with electron density of 1.69 relative to water demonstrated a CE contrast of 15% through air and 14% through water sections, as compared to a corresponding contrast of 19% and 12% using the iViewGT(™) system. For dynamic scenarios, video rate imaging with 30 frames per second was achieved. It is demonstrated that CE-based portal imaging is feasible to identify both stationary and dynamic objects within a CyberKnife(®) radiotherapy treatment field. PMID:26513015

  6. Real-time Cherenkov emission portal imaging during CyberKnife® radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussakis, Yiannis; Zhang, Rongxiao; Heyes, Geoff; Webster, Gareth; Mason, Suzannah; Green, Stuart; Pogue, Brian; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of real-time portal imaging during radiation therapy, through the Cherenkov emission (CE) effect is investigated via a medical linear accelerator (CyberKnife®) irradiating a partially-filled water tank with a 60 mm circular beam. A graticule of lead/plywood and a number of tissue equivalent materials were alternatively placed at the beam entrance face while the induced CE at the exit face was imaged using a gated electron-multiplying-intensified-charged-coupled device (emICCD) for both stationary and dynamic scenarios. This was replicated on an Elekta Synergy® linear accelerator with portal images acquired using the iViewGT™ system. Profiles across the acquired portal images were analysed to reveal the potential resolution and contrast limits of this novel CE based portal imaging technique and compared against the current standard. The CE resolution study revealed that using the lead/plywood graticule, separations down to 3.4  ±  0.5 mm can be resolved. A 28 mm thick tissue-equivalent rod with electron density of 1.69 relative to water demonstrated a CE contrast of 15% through air and 14% through water sections, as compared to a corresponding contrast of 19% and 12% using the iViewGT™ system. For dynamic scenarios, video rate imaging with 30 frames per second was achieved. It is demonstrated that CE-based portal imaging is feasible to identify both stationary and dynamic objects within a CyberKnife® radiotherapy treatment field.

  7. A study on large area Hamamatsu photomultipliers for Cherenkov neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonora, E.; Aiello, S.; Giordano, V.; Randazzo, N.; Lo Presti, D.; Bonanno, D.; Longhitano, F.; Sipala, V.

    2015-11-01

    Many of the existing neutrino telescopes use large area photomultipliers integrated into transparent glass vessels to make the detection element called ``optical module''. The characteristics of the photomultipliers have a severe impact on the performance of the whole detectors. This paper describes a large work of characterization of large area photomultipliers performed in the frame of R&D activities of large volume underwater neutrino detectors. Dedicated studies are also reported about noise pulses, super bialkali photocathode photomultipliers, ageing effects, influences of the Earth's magnetic field and on the effects of the external glass vessels on the optical module's noise pulses.

  8. Focal Plane Detectors for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, A. N.; Williams, D. A.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Horan, D.; Smith, A.; Wagner, R. G.; Falcone, A.; Funk, S.; Tajima, H.; Mukherjee, R.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Simulations show that a substantial improvement in angular resolution may be achieved if the pixel diameter is reduced to the order of 0.05 deg, i.e. two to three times smaller than the pixel diameter of current Cherenkov telescope cameras. At these dimensions, photon detectors with smaller physical dimensions can be attractive alternatives to the classical photomultiplier tube (PMT). Furthermore, the operation of an experiment with the size of AGIS requires photon detectors that are among other things more reliable, more durable, and possibly higher efficiency photon detectors. Alternative photon detectors we are considering for AGIS include both silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMTs). Here we present results from laboratory testing of MAPMTs and SiPMs along with results from the first incorporation of these devices into cameras on test bed Cherenkov telescopes.

  9. Progress in Cherenkov ring imaging: Part 1. Detection and localization of photons with the multistep proportional chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouclier, R.; Charpak, G.; Cattai, A.; Million, G.; Peisert, A.; Santiard, J. C.; Sauli, F.; Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J. R.; Mangeot, Ph.; Mullie, J.; Tichit, J.; Glass, H.; Kirz, J.; McCarthy, R.

    1983-02-01

    The multistep proportional chamber, operated with a photosensitive gas filling, makes it possible to obtain stable multiplication factors in excess of 10 6 and can be used for the detection of single photoelectrons released in the gas. The efficiency and localization properties of the device in the detection of vacuum ultraviolet photons are discussed here, in view of its use for particle identification exploiting the Cherenkov ring-imaging method.

  10. Construction of prototype two-mirror Schwartzchild-Couder Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) for VHE gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieda, David; CTA-US Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Next generation ground-based VHE gamma-ray observatories such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will employ an array of different sized IACTs distributed across square kilometer areas. During 2015-2016, the CTA-US collaboration is constructing a prototype 9.6 m primary diameter Schwartzchild-Couder IACT (SCT) at the FL Whipple Observatory, Amado, AZ USA. The two-mirror SCT design provides 8 degree field of view with 0.067 degree pixel size. The SCT uses a high resolution (11,328 pixel) Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) camera to record atmospheric Cherenkov light images generated by gamma-ray and cosmic ray primaries. Incorporation of SCT telescopes into a CTA-type observatory can provide superior angular resolution (30 % improvement) and point source sensitivity (30-50 %). In this talk, I will describe the capabilities of the SCT telescope, and the construction and commissioning of the prototype SCT telescope during 2016.

  11. Integrating IR detector imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, G. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An integrating IR detector array for imaging is provided in a hybrid circuit with InSb mesa diodes in a linear array, a single J-FET preamplifier for readout, and a silicon integrated circuit multiplexer. Thin film conductors in a fan out pattern deposited on an Al2O3 substrate connect the diodes to the multiplexer, and thick film conductors also connect the reset switch and preamplifier to the multiplexer. Two phase clock pulses are applied with a logic return signal to the multiplexer through triax comprised of three thin film conductors deposited between layers. A lens focuses a scanned image onto the diode array for horizontal read out while a scanning mirror provides vertical scan.

  12. Results on the Performance of a Broad Band Focussing Cherenkov Counter

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cester, R.; Fitch, V. L.; Montag, A.; Sherman, S.; Webb, R. C.; Witherell, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    The field of ring imaging (broad band differential) Cherenkov detectors has become a very active area of interest in detector development at several high energy physics laboratories. Our group has previously reported on a method of Cherenkov ring imaging for a counter with large momentum and angular acceptance using standard photo multipliers. Recently, we have applied this technique to the design of a set of Cherenkov counters for use in a particle search experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). This new detector operates over the range 0.998 < ..beta.. < 1.000 in velocity with a delta..beta.. approx. 2 x 10{sup -4}. The acceptance in angle is +- 14 mrad in the horizontal and +- 28 mrad in the vertical. We report here on the performance of this counter.

  13. Directional Spherical Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2010-01-01

    A proposed radiation-detecting apparatus would provide information on the kinetic energies, directions, and electric charges of highly energetic incident subatomic particles. The apparatus was originally intended for use in measuring properties of cosmic rays in outer space, but could also be adapted to terrestrial uses -- for example, radiation dosimetry aboard high-altitude aircraft and in proton radiation therapy for treatment of tumors.

  14. TH-C-17A-05: Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen (CEPhOx) Imaging During Multi-Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R; Pogue, B; Holt, R; Esipova, T; Vinogradov, S; Gladstone, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cherenkov radiation is created during external beam radiation therapy that can excite phosphorescence in tissue from oxygen-sensitive, bio-compatible probes. Utilizing the known spatial information of the treatment plan with directed multiple beam angles, Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen (CEPhOx) imaging was realized from the reconstructions of Cherenkov excited phosphorescence lifetime. Methods: Platinum(II)-G4 (PtG4) was used as the oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe and added to a oxygenated cylindrical liquid phantom with a oxygenated/deoxygenated cylindrical anomaly. Cherenkov excited phosphorescence was imaged using a time-gated ICCD camera temporallysynchronized to the LINAC pulse output. Lifetime reconstruction was carried out in NIRFAST software. Multiple angles of the incident radiation beam was combined with the location of the prescribed treatment volume (PTV) to improve the tomographic recovery as a function of location. The tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the background and PTV was calculated based on the recovered lifetime distribution and Stern-Volmer equation. Additionally a simulation study was performed to examine the accuracy of this technique in the setting of a human brain tumor. Results: Region-based pO2 values in the oxygenated background and oxygenated/deoxygenated PTV were correctly recovered, with the deoxygenated anomaly (15.4 mmHg) easily distinguished from the oxygenated background (143 mmHg). The data acquisition time could be achieved within the normal irradiation time for a human fractionated plan. The simulations indicated that CEPhOx would be a sufficient to sample tumor pO2 sensing from tumors which are larger than 2cm in diameter or within 23mm depth from the surface. Conclusion: CEPhOx could be a novel imaging tool for pO2 assessment during external radiation beam therapy. It is minimally invasive and should work within the established treatment plan of radiation therapy with multiple beams in

  15. A new analysis strategy for detection of faint γ-ray sources with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becherini, Y.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Marandon, V.; Punch, M.; Pita, S.

    2011-07-01

    A new background rejection strategy for γ-ray astrophysics with stereoscopic Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT), based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and real background data from the H.E.S.S. [High Energy Stereoscopic System, see [1].] experiment, is described. The analysis is based on a multivariate combination of both previously-known and newly-derived discriminant variables using the physical shower properties, as well as its multiple images, for a total of eight variables. Two of these new variables are defined thanks to a new energy evaluation procedure, which is also presented here. The method allows an enhanced sensitivity with the current generation of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes to be achieved, and at the same time its main features of rapidity and flexibility allow an easy generalization to any type of IACT. The robustness against Night Sky Background (NSB) variations of this approach is tested with MC simulated events. The overall consistency of the analysis chain has been checked by comparison of the real γ-ray signal obtained from H.E.S.S. observations with MC simulations and through reconstruction of known source spectra. Finally, the performance has been evaluated by application to faint H.E.S.S. sources. The gain in sensitivity as compared to the best standard Hillas analysis ranges approximately from 1.2 to 1.8 depending on the source characteristics, which corresponds to an economy in observation time of a factor 1.4 to 3.2.

  16. Intravascular imaging with a storage phosphor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Petrek, Peter; Matthews, Kenneth L., II; Fritz, Shannon G.; Bujenovic, L. Steven; Xu, Tong

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and test an intravascular positron imaging system based on a storage phosphor detector for imaging and detecting vulnerable plaques of human coronary arteries. The radiotracer F18-FDG accumulates in vulnerable plaques with inflammation of the overlying cap. The vulnerable plaques can, therefore, be imaged by recording positrons emitted from F18-FDG with a detector inserted into the artery. A prototype intravascular detector was constructed based on storage phosphor. The detector uses a flexible storage phosphor tube with 55 mm length, 2 mm diameter and 0.28 mm wall thickness. The intravascular detector is guided into the vessel using x-ray fluoroscopy and the accumulated x-ray signal must be erased prior to positron imaging. For this purpose, a light diffuser, 0.9 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length, was inserted into the detector tube. The light diffuser was connected to a laser source through a 2 m long optical fiber. The diffuser redirected the 0.38 W laser light to the inner surface of the phosphor detector to erase it. A heart phantom with 300 cm3 volume and three coronary arteries with 3.2 mm diameter and with several plaques was constructed. FDG solution with 0.5 µCi cm-3 activity concentration was filled in the heart and coronary arteries. The detector was inserted in a coronary artery and the signal from the plaques and surrounding background activity was recorded for 2 min. Then the phosphor detector was extracted and read out using a storage phosphor reader. The light diffuser erased the signal resulting from fluoroscopic exposure to level below that encountered during positron imaging. Vulnerable plaques with area activities higher than 1.2 nCi mm-2 were visualized by the detector. This activity is a factor of 10-20 lower than that expected in human vulnerable plaques. The detector was able to image the internal surface of the coronary vessels with 50 mm length and 360° circumference. Spatial resolution was 0

  17. Enhanced neutron imaging detector using optical processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1992-08-01

    Existing neutron imaging detectors have limited count rates due to inherent property and electronic limitations. The popular multiwire proportional counter is qualified by gas recombination to a count rate of less than 10{sup 5} n/s over the entire array and the neutron Anger camera, even though improved with new fiber optic encoding methods, can only achieve 10{sup 6} cps over a limited array. We present a preliminary design for a new type of neutron imaging detector with a resolution of 2--5 mm and a count rate capability of 10{sup 6} cps pixel element. We propose to combine optical and electronic processing to economically increase the throughput of advanced detector systems while simplifying computing requirements. By placing a scintillator screen ahead of an optical image processor followed by a detector array, a high throughput imaging detector may be constructed.

  18. Progress in Cherenkov femtosecond fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Svane, Ask S.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    We review the recent developments in the field of ultrafast Cherenkov fiber lasers. Two essential properties of such laser systems—broad wavelength tunability and high efficiency of Cherenkov radiation wavelength conversion are discussed. The exceptional performance of the Cherenkov fiber laser systems are highlighted—dependent on the realization scheme, the Cherenkov lasers can generate the femtosecond output tunable across the entire visible and even the UV range, and for certain designs more than 40% conversion efficiency from the pump to Cherenkov signal can be achieved. The femtosecond Cherenkov laser with all-fiber architecture is presented and discussed. Operating in the visible range, it delivers 100-200 fs wavelength-tunable pulses with multimilliwatt output power and exceptionally low noise figure an order of magnitude lower than the traditional wavelength tunable supercontinuum-based femtosecond sources. The applications for Cherenkov laser systems in practical biophotonics and biomedical applications, such as bio-imaging and microscopy, are discussed.

  19. Ghost imaging with a single detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Yaron; Katz, Ori; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate pseudothermal ghost imaging and ghost diffraction using only a single detector. We achieve this by replacing the high-resolution detector of the reference beam with a computation of the propagating field, following a recent proposal by Shapiro [Phys. Rev. A 78, 061802(R) (2008)]. Since only a single detector is used, this provides experimental evidence that pseudothermal ghost imaging does not rely on nonlocal quantum correlations. In addition, we show the depth-resolving capability of this ghost imaging technique.

  20. Strange meson spectroscopy in K{omega} and K{phi} at 11 GeV/c and Cherenkov ring imaging at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Youngjoon

    1993-01-01

    This thesis consists of two independent parts; development of Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) system and analysis of high-statistics data of strange meson reactions from the LASS spectrometer. Part 1: The CRID system is devoted to charged particle identification in the SLAC Large Detector (SLD) to study e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at {radical}s = m{sub Z{sup 0}}. By measuring the angles of emission of the Cherenkov photons inside liquid and gaseous radiators, {pi}/K/p separation will be achieved up to {approximately}30 GeV/c. The signals from CRID are read in three coordinates, one of which is measured by charge-division technique. To obtain a {approximately}1% spatial resolution in the charge-division, low-noise CRID preamplifier prototypes were developed and tested resulting in <1000 electrons noise for an average photoelectron signal with 2 {times} 10{sup 5} gain. To help ensure the long-term stability of CRID operation at high efficiency, a comprehensive monitoring and control system was developed. Part 2: Results from the partial wave analysis of strange meson final states in the reactions K{sup {minus}}p {yields} K{sup {minus}}{omega}p and K{sup {minus}}p {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{phi}n are presented. The analyses are based on data from a 4.1 event/nb exposure of the LASS spectrometer in K{sup {minus}}p interactions at 11 GeV/c. The data sample of K{sup {minus}}{omega}p final state contains {approximately}10{sup 5} events. From the partial wave analysis, resonance structures of J{sup P} = 2{sup {minus}}, 3{sup {minus}} and 2{sup +} amplitudes are observed in the K{omega} system. The analysis of 2{sup {minus}} amplitudes provides an evidence for two strange meson states in the mass region around 1.75 GeV/c{sup 2}. The appropriate branching fractions are calculated and compared with the SU(3) predictions. The partial wave analysis of {bar K}{sup 0}{phi} system favors J{sup P} = 1{sup {minus}} and 2{sup +} states in the 1.9--2.0 GeV/c{sup 2} region.

  1. Using a reflectance-based correction on Cherenkov images to strengthen correlation with radiation surface dose in an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-02-01

    Cherenkov imaging during radiotherapy is a method by which an optical analog for the high-energy radiation beam can be observed directly on the surface of the patient. While simple geometries and volumes demonstrate a strong correlation between Cherenkov emission intensity and surface dose, in vivo data collected from 14 whole-breast patients has not exhibited the same correlation. The purpose of this anthropomorphic phantom study was to investigate a new method for improving the in vivo correlation based on a pixel-by-pixel correction from a reference reflectance image. The pixel intensities in Cherenkov images of a phantom were correlated with the surface dose measured from thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on the phantom's surface. Because the phantom had homogeneous optical properties, results show a no appreciable change in correlation between Cherenkov intensity and surface dose when using the correction method on images of an anthropomorphic solid silicone phantom, nor a change in the dose fall-off at the edges of the phantom. The method may improve correlation with in vivo data.

  2. Tomographic imaging using poissonian detector data

    DOEpatents

    Aspelmeier, Timo; Ebel, Gernot; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-10-15

    An image reconstruction method for reconstructing a tomographic image (f.sub.j) of a region of investigation within an object (1), comprises the steps of providing detector data (y.sub.i) comprising Poisson random values measured at an i-th of a plurality of different positions, e.g. i=(k,l) with pixel index k on a detector device and angular index l referring to both the angular position (.alpha..sub.l) and the rotation radius (r.sub.l) of the detector device (10) relative to the object (1), providing a predetermined system matrix A.sub.ij assigning a j-th voxel of the object (1) to the i-th detector data (y.sub.i), and reconstructing the tomographic image (f.sub.j) based on the detector data (y.sub.i), said reconstructing step including a procedure of minimizing a functional F(f) depending on the detector data (y.sub.i) and the system matrix A.sub.ij and additionally including a sparse or compressive representation of the object (1) in an orthobasis T, wherein the tomographic image (f.sub.j) represents the global minimum of the functional F(f). Furthermore, an imaging method and an imaging device using the image reconstruction method are described.

  3. NICHE: Using Cherenkov radiation to extend Telescope Array to sub-PeV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Douglas; Krizmanic, John; Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Abu-Zayyad, Tareq; Belz, John; Thomson, Gordon

    2016-03-01

    The Non-Imaging CHErenkov (NICHE) Array will measure the flux and nuclear composition evolution of cosmic rays (CRs) from below 1 PeV to 1 EeV. NICHE will be co-sited with the Telescope Array (TA) Low Energy (TALE) extension, and will observe events simultaneously with the TALE telescopes acting in imaging-Cherenkov mode. This will be the first hybrid-Cherenkov (simultaneous imaging and non-imaging Cherenkov) measurements of CRs in the Knee region of the CR energy spectrum. NICHE uses easily deployable detectors to measure the amplitude and time-spread of the air-shower Cherenkov signal to achieve an event-by-event measurement of Xmax and energy, each with excellent resolution. First generation detectors are under construction and will form an initial prototype array (j-NICHE) that will be deployed in Summer 2016. In this talk, the NICHE design, array performance, prototype development, and status will be discussed as well as NICHE's ability to measure the cosmic ray nuclear composition as a function of energy.

  4. The Cherenkov radiator system of the high momentum particle identification detector of the ALICE experiment at CERN-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, C.; Sgura, I.; De Cataldo, G.; Franco, A.; Fratino, U.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the design, the implementation and the operational modes of the Liquid Circulation System (LCS) built to circulate, purify and monitor the liquid perfluorohexane (C 6F 14) in the ALICE HMPID. The HMPID RICH uses C 6F 14 as Cherenkov radiator medium circulating in 21 quartz trays. LCS features a pressure-regulated closed circuit, ensuring the C 6F 14 highest transparency to ultraviolet light. Intrinsically safe working conditions are obtained, thanks to a novel liquid distribution "cascade" system. Moreover the system is protected against anomalous working conditions by a dedicated Control System, which operates it in both automatic and manual mode, locally and remotely, safeguarding the quartz radiator vessels.

  5. A simple controller for bidimensional image detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeles, F.; Martínez, L. A.

    2012-07-01

    The increasing use of many and different kind of light detectors to acquire, monitor and control various aspects of the observation imposes the need to standardize the acquisition and processing of images and data. While scientific image acquisition systems usually include a complex controller, some less demanding subsystems require the development of electronics and software to read the image. Most of the times these image detectors are rather small and high speed is of no concern, so controllers need not to be fast; take for instance a telescope guider. With these directives in mind, in this work we present a very simple image acquisition system based on a Texas Instruments microcontroller of the family MSP430 and a serial static memory as a standard instrumentation starting for small image acquisition controllers.

  6. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.; Ratcliff, B.

    1988-10-01

    We present recent progress on the construction and testing of the first drift boxes and single electron detectors as they come from the production line. These detectors will be used for particle identification using the Ring Imaging technique in the SLD experiment at SLAC. Various experimental results are presented, including single electron pulse height measurements as a function of gas gain, detector gating capability, uniformity of response across the wire plane, charge division performance of a single electron signal, average pulse shape and its comparison with predicted shape, and cross-talk. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Efficient nucleus detector in histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Vink, J P; Van Leeuwen, M B; Van Deurzen, C H M; De Haan, G

    2013-02-01

    In traditional cancer diagnosis, (histo)pathological images of biopsy samples are visually analysed by pathologists. However, this judgment is subjective and leads to variability among pathologists. Digital scanners may enable automated objective assessment, improved quality and reduced throughput time. Nucleus detection is seen as the corner stone for a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. In this paper, we propose an efficient nucleus detector designed with machine learning. We applied colour deconvolution to reconstruct each applied stain. Next, we constructed a large feature set and modified AdaBoost to create two detectors, focused on different characteristics in appearance of nuclei. The proposed modification of AdaBoost enables inclusion of the computational cost of each feature during selection, thus improving the computational efficiency of the resulting detectors. The outputs of the two detectors are merged by a globally optimal active contour algorithm to refine the border of the detected nuclei. With a detection rate of 95% (on average 58 incorrectly found objects per field-of-view) based on 51 field-of-view images of Her2 immunohistochemistry stained breast tissue and a complete analysis in 1 s per field-of-view, our nucleus detector shows good performance and could enable a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. PMID:23252774

  8. Cherenkov Source for PMT Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ at UC Berkeley Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    My research is focused on building a deployable source for PMT calibrations in the SNO+ detector. I work for the SNO+ group at UC Berkeley headed by Gabriel Orebi Gann. SNO+ is an addition to the SNO project, and its main goal is to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be monitored by over 9500 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In order to characterize the PMTs, several calibration sources are being constructed. One of which, the Cherenkov Source, will provide a well-understood source of non-isotropic light for calibrating the detector response. My goal is to design and construct multiple aspects of the Cherenkov Source. However, there are multiple questions that arose with its design. How do we keep the scintillation light inside the Cherenkov source so it does not contaminate calibration? How do we properly build the Cherenkov source: a hollow acrylic sphere with a neck? Can we maintain a clean source throughout these processes? These are some of the problems I have been working on, and will continue to work on, until the deployment of the source. Additionally, I have worked to accurately simulate the physics inside the source, mainly the energy deposition of alphas.

  9. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1982-07-21

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  10. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1984-01-01

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  11. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, G.; Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Cavenago, M.; Claps, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2015-04-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m2) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards the

  12. RF Cherenkov picosecond timing technique for high energy physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Margaryan, Amur; Hashimoto, Osamu; Majewski, Stanislaw; Tang, Liguang

    2008-09-01

    The Cherenkov time-of-propagation (TOP) detector and Cherenkov time-of-flight (TOF) detector in a ?head-on? geometry based on the recently proposed time measuring technique with radio frequency (RF) phototube are considered. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented.

  13. Optical Ranicon detectors for photon counting imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, Mark; Crocker, Jim; Paresce, Francesco; Rafal, Marc

    1988-08-01

    The design and development of two detectors, known as Ranicon and advanced Ranicon, for optical photon counting imaging on ground-based telescopes are discussed. The proximity focusing, microchannel-plate stack, resistive anode, and signal processing characteristics are described. The theory behind the overall resolution of the Ranicon system is reviewed. Resolution measurements for the instruments are reported and discussed.

  14. TH-C-17A-01: Imaging Sensor Comparison for Real-Time Cherenkov Signal Detection From Tissue for Treatment Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Andreozzi, J; Zhang, R; Glaser, A; Pogue, B; Jarvis, L; Gladstone, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the optimum imaging sensor for a clinical system that would provide real-time imaging of the surface beam profile on patients as novel visual information to radiation therapy technologists, and more rapidly collect clinical data for large-scale studies of Cherenkov applications in radiotherapy. Methods: Four camera types, CMOS, CCD, ICCD and EMICCD, were tested to determine proficiency in the detection of Cherenkov signal in the clinical radiotherapy setting, and subsequent maximum supportable frame rate. Where possible, time-gating between the trigger signal from the LINAC and the intensifiers was implemented to detect signal with room lighting conditions comparable to patient treatment scenarios. A solid water phantom was imaged by the EM-ICCD and ICCD to evaluate the minimum number of accumulations-on-chip required for adequate Cherenkov detection, defined as >200% electron counts per pixel over background signal. Additionally, an ICCD and EM-ICCD were used clinically to image patients undergoing whole-breast radiation therapy, to understand the impact of the resolution limitation of the EM-ICCD. Results: The intensifier-coupled cameras performed best at imaging Cherenkov signal, even with room lights on, which is essential for patient comfort. The tested EM-ICCD was able to support single-shot imaging and frame rates of 30 fps, however, the current maximum resolution of 512 × 512 pixels was restricting. The ICCD used in current clinical trials was limited to 4.7 fps at a 1024 × 1024 resolution. An intensifier with higher quantum efficiency at the entrance photocathode in the red wavelengths (30% QE vs current 7%) promises 16 fps at the same resolution at lower cost than the EM-ICCD. Conclusion: The ICCD with the better red wavelength QE intensifier was determined to be the best suited commercial-off-the-shelf camera to detect real-time Cherenkov signal and provide the best potential for real-time display of radiation dose on the skin

  15. X-ray detectors in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare systems are subject to continuous adaptation, following trends such as the change of demographic structures, the rise of life-style related and chronic diseases, and the need for efficient and outcome-oriented procedures. This also influences the design of new imaging systems as well as their components. The applications of X-ray imaging in the medical field are manifold and have led to dedicated modalities supporting specific imaging requirements, for example in computed tomography (CT), radiography, angiography, surgery or mammography, delivering projection or volumetric imaging data. Depending on the clinical needs, some X-ray systems enable diagnostic imaging while others support interventional procedures. X-ray detector design requirements for the different medical applications can vary strongly with respect to size and shape, spatial resolution, frame rates and X-ray flux, among others. Today, integrating X-ray detectors are in common use. They are predominantly based on scintillators (e.g. CsI or Gd2O2S) and arrays of photodiodes made from crystalline silicon (Si) or amorphous silicon (a-Si) or they employ semiconductors (e.g. Se) with active a-Si readout matrices. Ongoing and future developments of X-ray detectors will include optimization of current state-of-the-art integrating detectors in terms of performance and cost, will enable the usage of large size CMOS-based detectors, and may facilitate photon counting techniques with the potential to further enhance performance characteristics and foster the prospect of new clinical applications.

  16. Results from the SLD barrel CRID detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Antilogus, P. |; Aston, D.

    1993-11-01

    We report on operational experience with and experimental performance of the SLD barrel Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector from the 1992 and 1993 physics runs. The liquid (C{sub 6}F{sub 14}) and gas (C{sub 5}F{sub 12}) radiator recirculation systems have performed well, and the drift gas supply system has operated successfully with TMAE for three years. Cherenkov rings have been observed from both the liquid and gas radiators. The number and angular resolution of Cherenkov photons have been measured, and found to be close to design specifications.

  17. MACHETE: A transit imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope to survey half of the very high energy γ-ray sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortina, J.; López-Coto, R.; Moralejo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes for very high energy γ-ray astrophysics are pointing instruments with a field of view up to a few tens of sq deg. We propose to build an array of two non-steerable (drift) telescopes. Each of the telescopes would have a camera with a FOV of 5 × 60 sq deg oriented along the meridian. About half of the sky drifts through this FOV in a year. We have performed a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the performance of this instrument. We expect it to survey this half of the sky with an integral flux sensitivity of ˜0.77% of the steady flux of the Crab Nebula in 5 years, an analysis energy threshold of ˜150 GeV and an angular resolution of ˜0.1°. For astronomical objects that transit over the telescope for a specific night, we can achieve an integral sensitivity of 12% of the Crab Nebula flux in a night, making it a very powerful tool to trigger further observations of variable sources using steerable IACTs or instruments at other wavelengths.

  18. Neutron Detection via the Cherenkov Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane W; Boatner, Lynn A

    2010-01-01

    We have incorporated neutron-absorbing elements in transparent, nonscintillating glasses and used the Cherenkov effect to convert neutron-induced beta-gamma radiation directly into light. Use of the Cherenkov effect requires glasses with a high index of refraction (to lower the threshold and increase the number of Cherenkov photons) and neutron absorbers resulting in radioactive products emitting high-energy beta or gamma radiation. In this paper, we present a brief description of the requirements for developing efficient Cherenkov-based neutron detectors, show the results of measurements of the response of representative samples to thermal and fast neutron fluxes, and give the results of a calculation of the expected response of a detector to a moderated fission spectrum.

  19. Automated lesion detectors in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, I N; Kumar, S; Oliveira, C M; Ramos, J D; Engquist, B

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a sight-threatening condition occurring in persons with diabetes, which causes progressive damage to the retina. The early detection and diagnosis of DR is vital for saving the vision of diabetic persons. The early signs of DR which appear on the surface of the retina are the dark lesions such as microaneurysms (MAs) and hemorrhages (HEMs), and bright lesions (BLs) such as exudates. In this paper, we propose a novel automated system for the detection and diagnosis of these retinal lesions by processing retinal fundus images. We devise appropriate binary classifiers for these three different types of lesions. Some novel contextual/numerical features are derived, for each lesion type, depending on its inherent properties. This is performed by analysing several wavelet bands (resulting from the isotropic undecimated wavelet transform decomposition of the retinal image green channel) and by using an appropriate combination of Hessian multiscale analysis, variational segmentation and cartoon+texture decomposition. The proposed methodology has been validated on several medical datasets, with a total of 45,770 images, using standard performance measures such as sensitivity and specificity. The individual performance, per frame, of the MA detector is 93% sensitivity and 89% specificity, of the HEM detector is 86% sensitivity and 90% specificity, and of the BL detector is 90% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Regarding the collective performance of these binary detectors, as an automated screening system for DR (meaning that a patient is considered to have DR if it is a positive patient for at least one of the detectors) it achieves an average 95-100% of sensitivity and 70% of specificity at a per patient basis. Furthermore, evaluation conducted on publicly available datasets, for comparison with other existing techniques, shows the promising potential of the proposed detectors. PMID:26378502

  20. Dynamic cardiac volume imaging using area detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Herbert; Hoelzel, Arne; Stierstorfer, Karl; Rauscher, Annabella; Flohr, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    We present a reconstruction scheme for dynamic cardiac volume imaging using Area Detector Computed Tomography (CT) named Multi-Sector Cardiac Volume Reconstruction (MCVR) which is based on a 3D-backprojection of the Feldkamp-type. It is intended for circular scanning using area detectors covering the whole heart volume, but the method can easily be extended to cardiac spiral imaging using multi-slice CT. In cardiac imaging with multi-slice CT continuous data acquisition combined with the parallel recording of the patient's ECG enables retrospective gating of data segments for image reconstruction. Using consecutive heart cycles MCVR identifies complementary and time consistent projection data segments <= π using temporal information of the ECG. After a row by row parallel rebinning and temporal rebinning the projection data have to be filtered using conventional convolution kernels and finally reconstructed to image space using a 3D-backprojection. A dynamic anthropomorphic computer model of the human heart was developed in order to validate the MCVR approach. A 256-slice detector system with 0.5mm slice collimation was simulated operating in a circular scanning mode at a gantry rotation time of 330ms and compared to state-of-the-art 16-slice technology. At enddiastole the coronary anatomy can be visualized with excellent image quality. Although an area detector with large cone angling covering the entire heart volume was used no cone-artifacts could be observed. Using a 2-sector approach a nearly motion free 3D visualization of the heart chambers was obtained even at endsystole.

  1. Characterisation of a track structure imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, M; Bashkirov, V A; Hurley, R F; Schulte, R W

    2015-09-01

    The spatial distribution of radiation-induced ionisations in sub-cellular structures plays an important role in the initial formation of radiation damage to biological tissues. Using the nanodosimetry approach, physical characteristics of the track structure can be measured and correlated to DNA damage. In this work, a novel nanodosimeter is presented, which detects positive ions produced by radiation interacting with a gas-sensitive volume in order to obtain a high resolution image of the radiation track structure. The characterisation of the detector prototype was performed and different configurations of the device were tested by varying the detector cathode material and the working gas. Preliminary results show that the ionisation cluster size distribution can be obtained with this approach. Further work is planned to improve the detector efficiency in order to register the complete three-dimensional track structure of ionising radiation. PMID:25877534

  2. The SORDS trimodal imager detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Daniel; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Li, Liqian; Bray, Nick; Locklin, Darren; Hynes, Michael V.; Toolin, Maurice; Harris, Bernard; McElroy, John; Wallace, Mark; Lanza, Richard

    2009-05-01

    The Raytheon Trimodal Imager (TMI) uses coded aperture and Compton imaging technologies as well as the nonimaging shadow technology to locate an SNM or radiological threat in the presence of background. The heart of the TMI is two arrays of NaI crystals. The front array serves as both a coded aperture and the first scatterer for Compton imaging. It is made of 35 5x5x2" crystals with specially designed low profile PMTs. The back array is made of 30 2.5x3x24" position-sensitive crystals which are read out at both ends. These crystals are specially treated to provide the required position resolution at the best possible energy resolution. Both arrays of detectors are supported by aluminum superstructures. These have been efficiently designed to allow a wide field of view and to provide adequate support to the crystals to permit use of the TMI as a vehicle-mounted, field-deployable system. Each PMT has a locally mounted high-voltage supply that is remotely controlled. Each detector is connected to a dedicated FPGA which performs automated gain alignment and energy calibration, event timing and diagnostic health checking. Data are streamed, eventby- event, from each of the 65 detector FPGAs to one master FPGA. The master FPGA acts both as a synchronization clock, and as an event sorting unit. Event sorting involves stamping events as singles or as coincidences, based on the approximately instantaneous detector hit pattern. Coincidence determination by the master FPGA provides a pre-sorting for the events that will ultimately be used in the Compton imaging and coded aperture imaging algorithms. All data acquisition electronics have been custom designed for the TMI.

  3. Multispectral imaging with type II superlattice detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyawansa, Gamini; Duran, Joshua M.; Grupen, Matt; Scheihing, John E.; Nelson, Thomas R.; Eismann, Michael T.

    2012-06-01

    Infrared (IR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) with multispectral detector elements promise significant advantages for airborne threat warning, surveillance, and targeting applications. At present, the use of type II superlattice (T2SL) structures based on the 6.1Å-family materials (InAs, GaSb, and AlSb) has become an area of interest for developing IR detectors and their FPAs. The ability to vary the bandgap in the IR range, suppression of Auger processes, prospective reduction of Shockley-Read-Hall centers by improved material growth capabilities, and the material stability are a few reasons for the predicted dominance of the T2SL technology over presently leading HgCdTe and quantum well technologies. The focus of the work reported here is on the development of T2SL based dual-band IR detectors and their applicability for multispectral imaging. A new NpBPN detector designed for the detection of IR in the 3-5 and 8-12 μm atmospheric windows is presented; comparing its advantages over other T2SL based approaches. One of the key challenges of the T2SL dual-band detectors is the spectral crosstalk associated with the LWIR band. The properties of the state-of-the-art T2SLs (i.e., absorption coefficient, minority carrier lifetime and mobility, etc.) and the present growth limitations that impact spectral crosstalk are discussed.

  4. Cerenkov ring imaging detector development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.H.

    1984-06-01

    The imaging of Cerenkov light on to photosensitive detectors promises to be a powerful technique for identifying particles in colliding beam spectrometers. Toward this end two and three dimensional imaging photon detectors are being developed at SLAC. The present techniques involve photon conversion using easily ionized exotic chemicals like tetrakisdimethyl-amino-ethylene (TMAE) in a drift and amplifying gas mixture of methane and isobutane. Single photoelectrons from Cerenkov light are currently being drifted 20 cm and a new device under study will be used to study drifting up to 80 cm along a magnetic field. A short description of a large device currently being designed for the SLD spectrometer at the Stanford Linear Collider will be given.

  5. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector's fast response, a scene's 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers. PMID:27103168

  6. Measurement of the Muon Atmospheric Production Depth with the Water Cherenkov Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Bueno, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECR) are particles of uncertain origin and composition, with energies above 1 EeV (1018 eV or 0.16 J). The measured flux of UHECR is a steeply decreasing function of energy. The largest and most sensitive apparatus built to date to record and study cosmic ray Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is the Pierre Auger Observatory. The Pierre Auger Observatory has produced the largest and finest amount of data ever collected for UHECR. A broad physics program is being carried out covering all relevant topics of the field. Among them, one of the most interesting is the problem related to the estimation of the mass composition of cosmic rays in this energy range. Currently the best measurements of mass are those obtained by studying the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic part of the EAS with the Fluorescence Detector. However, the collected statistics is small, specially at energies above several tens of EeV. Although less precise, the volume of data gathered with the Surface Detector is nearly a factor ten larger than the fluorescence data. So new ways to study composition with data collected at the ground are under investigation. The subject of this thesis follows one of those new lines of research. Using preferentially the time information associated with the muons that reach the ground, we try to build observables related to the composition of the primaries that initiated the EAS. A simple phenomenological model relates the arrival times with the depths in the atmosphere where muons are produced. The experimental confirmation that the distributions of muon production depths (MPD) correlate with the mass of the primary particle has opened the way to a variety of studies, of which this thesis is a continuation, with the aim of enlarging and improving its range of applicability. We revisit the phenomenological model which is at the root of the analysis and discuss a new way to improve some aspects of the model. We carry

  7. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  8. Development of a custom on-line ultrasonic vapour analyzer and flow meter for the ATLAS inner detector, with application to Cherenkov and gaseous charged particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhroob, M.; Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Bozza, G.; Crespo-Lopez, O.; Degeorge, C.; Deterre, C.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Favre, G.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Hasib, A.; Katunin, S.; Langevin, N.; Lombard, D.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; O'Rourke, A.; Pearson, B.; Robinson, D.; Rossi, C.; Rozanov, A.; Strauss, M.; Vacek, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-03-01

    Precision sound velocity measurements can simultaneously determine binary gas composition and flow. We have developed an analyzer with custom microcontroller-based electronics, currently used in the ATLAS Detector Control System, with numerous potential applications. Three instruments monitor C3F8 and CO2 coolant leak rates into the nitrogen envelopes of the ATLAS silicon microstrip and Pixel detectors. Two further instruments will aid operation of the new thermosiphon coolant recirculator: one of these will monitor air leaks into the low pressure condenser while the other will measure return vapour flow along with C3F8/C2F6 blend composition, should blend operation be necessary to protect the ATLAS silicon tracker under increasing LHC luminosity. We describe these instruments and their electronics.

  9. Simulation studies of the high-energy component of a future imaging Cherenkov telescope array

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.

    2008-12-24

    The current generation of Imaging Atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) has demonstrated the power of the technique in an energy range between {approx}100 GeV up to several tens of TeV. At the high-energy end, these instruments are limited by photon statistics. Future arrays of IACTs such as CTA or AGIS are planned to push into the energy range beyond 100 TeV. Scientifically, this region is very promising, providing a probe of particles up to the 'knee' in the cosmic ray spectrum and access to an unexplored region in the spectra of nearby extragalactic sources. We present first results from our simulation studies of the high-energy part of a future IACT array and discuss the design parameters of such an array.

  10. Imaging the sensitivity inhomogeneities ofdiamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, R.; Tromson, D.; Hainaut, O.; Amosov, V. N.; Bergonzo, P.

    2003-03-01

    Diamond is a semiconducting material which can withstand high temperatures, a wide range of corrosive environments and exhibits high radiation hardness. This combination of properties makes it extremely attractive for use as photon and particle detectors. The ESRF ID21 SXM has been used to image the spatial variations of detector sensitivity over a range of both natural and Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) diamond devices. The measurements are performed by mapping the photon-induced current flow of the biased detectors. Evaluation of the sensitivity inhomogeneities are of dual interest; For detection applications involving relatively small beams it is important that the device response be as uniform as possible. Furthermore, from a fundamental aspect, the understanding of the origin of the sensitivity variations can be a route, for example in CVD materials, to modifying the growth and processing parameters in order to produce improved devices. This paper demonstrates an application of alternative detection modes in X-ray microscopy for a problem of technological interest. Moreover, it shows how the flexible control of the primary X-ray penetration depth by varying the probe energy permits an evaluation of the relative influence of the surface and bulk material.

  11. Multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Situ, Guohai; Li, Ziwei; Fan, Jingtao; Chen, Feng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Existing multispectral imagers mostly use available array sensors to separately measure 2D data slices in a 3D spatial-spectral data cube. Thus they suffer from low photon efficiency, limited spectrum range and high cost. To address these issues, we propose to conduct multispectral imaging using a single bucket detector, to take full advantage of its high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost, small size and light weight. Technically, utilizing the detector’s fast response, a scene’s 3D spatial-spectral information is multiplexed into a dense 1D measurement sequence and then demultiplexed computationally under the single pixel imaging scheme. A proof-of-concept setup is built to capture multispectral data of 64 pixels × 64 pixels × 10 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 650 nm, with the acquisition time being 1 minute. The imaging scheme holds great potentials for various low light and airborne applications, and can be easily manufactured as production-volume portable multispectral imagers. PMID:27103168

  12. Computational imaging with a balanced detector.

    PubMed

    Soldevila, F; Clemente, P; Tajahuerce, E; Uribe-Patarroyo, N; Andrés, P; Lancis, J

    2016-01-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media. PMID:27353733

  13. Computational imaging with a balanced detector

    PubMed Central

    Soldevila, F.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Uribe-Patarroyo, N.; Andrés, P.; Lancis, J.

    2016-01-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media. PMID:27353733

  14. Computational imaging with a balanced detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldevila, F.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Uribe-Patarroyo, N.; Andrés, P.; Lancis, J.

    2016-06-01

    Single-pixel cameras allow to obtain images in a wide range of challenging scenarios, including broad regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and through scattering media. However, there still exist several drawbacks that single-pixel architectures must address, such as acquisition speed and imaging in the presence of ambient light. In this work we introduce balanced detection in combination with simultaneous complementary illumination in a single-pixel camera. This approach enables to acquire information even when the power of the parasite signal is higher than the signal itself. Furthermore, this novel detection scheme increases both the frame rate and the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. By means of a fast digital micromirror device together with a low numerical aperture collecting system, we are able to produce a live-feed video with a resolution of 64 × 64 pixels at 5 Hz. With advanced undersampling techniques, such as compressive sensing, we can acquire information at rates of 25 Hz. By using this strategy, we foresee real-time biological imaging with large area detectors in conditions where array sensors are unable to operate properly, such as infrared imaging and dealing with objects embedded in turbid media.

  15. Qualification and Testing of a Large Hot Slumped Secondary Mirror for Schwarzschild-Couder Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodeghiero, G.; Giro, E.; Canestrari, R.; Pernechele, C.; Sironi, G.; Pareschi, G.; Lessio, L.; Conconi, P.

    2016-05-01

    Dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) telescopes are based on highly aspherical optics, and they represent a novel design in the world of very high energy astrophysics. This work addresses the realization and the qualification of the secondary mirror for an SC telescope, named ASTRI, developed in the context of the Cherenkov Telescope Array Observatory. The discussion surveys the overall development from the early design concept to the final acceptance optical tests.

  16. Development of a custom on-line ultrasonic vapour analyzer/flowmeter for the ATLAS inner detector, with application to gaseous tracking and Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Berthoud, J.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Botelho-Direito, J.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Bozza, G.; Da Riva, E.; Degeorge, C.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Katunin, S.; Lombard, D.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Perez-Rodriguez, E.; Rossi, C.; Rozanov, A.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-01-01

    Precision sound velocity measurements can simultaneously determine binary gas composition and flow. We have developed an analyzer with custom electronics, currently in use in the ATLAS inner detector, with numerous potential applications. The instrument has demonstrated ~ 0.3% mixture precision for C3F8/C2F6 mixtures and < 10-4 resolution for N2/C3F8 mixtures. Moderate and high flow versions of the instrument have demonstrated flow resolutions of ± 2% of full scale for flows up to 250 l min-1, and ± 1.9% of full scale for linear flow velocities up to 15 m s-1 the latter flow approaching that expected in the vapour return of the thermosiphon fluorocarbon coolant recirculator being built for the ATLAS silicon tracker.

  17. Status and perspectives of gaseous photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    This article aims at reviewing the state of the art of gaseous photon detectors for RICH applications. Emphasis will be put on THGEM based devices which represent the most advanced development among the various micro-pattern gaseous photon sensors proposed for Cherenkov imaging in very high rate environments.

  18. High time-resolution imaging with the MAMA detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn; Smith, Andrew M.; Hill, Bob; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Current uses of the MAMA detector which utilize the photon time-tagging capabilities of these detectors are reported. These applications currently include image stabilization by means of post-processing corrections of platform drift and speckle interferometry. The initial results of a sounding rocket experiment to obtain UV images of NGC 6240 and results from speckle interferometry of Neptune's moon Triton are presented.

  19. TH-C-17A-03: Dynamic Visualization and Dosimetry of IMRT and VMAT Treatment Plans by Video-Rate Imaging of Cherenkov Radiation in Pure Water

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, A; Andreozzi, J; Davis, S; Zhang, R; Fox, C; Gladstone, D; Pogue, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel optical dosimetry technique for the QA and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiotherapy plans was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cherenkov radiation in water. Methods: An intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was used to acquire a two-dimensional (2D) projection image of the Cherenkov radiation induced by IMRT and VMAT plans, based on the Task Group 119 C-Shape geometry. Plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using 6 MV x-rays from a Varian TrueBeam Linear Accelerator (Linac) incident on a water tank. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the Linac, operated for single pulse imaging, and binned to a resolution of 512×512 pixels. The resulting videos were analyzed temporally for regions of interest (ROI) covering the planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR) and summed to obtain an overall light distribution, which was compared to the expected dose distribution from the TPS using a gammaindex analysis. Results: The chosen camera settings resulted in data at 23.5 frames per second. Temporal intensity plots of the PTV and OAR ROIs confirmed the preferential delivery of dose to the PTV versus the OAR, and the gamma analysis yielded 95.2% and 95.6% agreement between the light distribution and expected TPS dose distribution based upon a 3% / 3 mm dose difference and distance-to-agreement criterion for the IMRT and VMAT plans respectively. Conclusion: The results from this initial study demonstrate the first documented use of Cherenkov radiation for optical dosimetry of dynamic IMRT and VMAT treatment plans. The proposed modality has several potential advantages over alternative methods including the real-time nature of the acquisition, and upon future refinement may prove to be a robust and novel dosimetry method with both research and clinical applications. NIH R01CA109558 and R21EB017559.

  20. Mosaic-Detector-Based Fluorescence Spectral Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-Ah; Moon, Jeong

    2007-01-01

    A battery-powered, pen-sized, portable instrument for measuring molecular fluorescence spectra of chemical and biological samples in the field has been proposed. Molecular fluorescence spectroscopy is among the techniques used most frequently in laboratories to analyze compositions of chemical and biological samples. Heretofore, it has been possible to measure fluorescence spectra of molecular species at relative concentrations as low as parts per billion (ppb), with a few nm spectral resolution. The proposed instrument would include a planar array (mosaic) of detectors, onto which a fluorescence spectrum would be spatially mapped. Unlike in the larger laboratory-type molecular fluorescence spectrometers, mapping of wavelengths to spatial positions would be accomplished without use of relatively bulky optical parts. The proposed instrument is expected to be sensitive enough to enable measurement of spectra of chemical species at relative concentrations <1 ppb, with spectral resolution that could be tailored by design to be comparable to a laboratory molecular fluorescence spectrometer. The proposed instrument (see figure) would include a button-cell battery and a laser diode, which would generate the monochromatic ultraviolet light needed to excite fluorescence in a sample. The sample would be held in a cell bounded by far-ultraviolet-transparent quartz or optical glass. The detector array would be, more specifically, a complementary metal oxide/ semiconductor or charge-coupled- device imaging photodetector array, the photodetectors of which would be tailored to respond to light in the wavelength range of the fluorescence spectrum to be measured. The light-input face of the photodetector array would be covered with a matching checkerboard array of multilayer thin film interference filters, such that each pixel in the array would be sensitive only to light in a spectral band narrow enough so as not to overlap significantly with the band of an adjacent pixel. The

  1. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    PubMed Central

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors. PMID:25995846

  2. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  3. Imaging detectors and electronics - A view of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth

    2004-06-16

    Imaging sensors and readout electronics have made tremendous strides in the past two decades. The application of modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and the introduction of customized monolithic integrated circuits have made large scale imaging systems routine in high energy physics. This technology is now finding its way into other areas, such as space missions, synchrotron light sources, and medical imaging. I review current developments and discuss the promise and limits of new technologies. Several detector systems are described as examples of future trends. The discussion emphasizes semiconductor detector systems, but I also include recent developments for large-scale superconducting detector arrays.

  4. Evolution of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy from the early days to the Cherenkov Telescope Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillas, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Most of what we know of cosmic gamma rays has come from spacecraft, but at energies above tens of GeV it has become possible to make observations with ground-based detectors of enormously greater collecting area. In recent years one such detector type, the cluster of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, has reached a very productive state, whilst several alternative approaches have been explored, including converted solar power collectors and novel high-altitude particle shower detectors which promised to extend the energy range covered. Key examples of development from 1952 to 2011 are followed, noting the problems and discoveries that stimulated the current work, explaining the logic of the alternative approaches that were taken. The merits of the current major Cherenkov observatories and of other viable detectors are examined and compared, with examples of the astrophysical information they are beginning to provide. The detectors are still evolving, as we still do not understand the processes onto which the gamma rays provide a window. These include the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays (in particular, the wide-band spectra of radiation from some individual supernova remnants are still hard to interpret), the highly relativistic and variable jets from active galactic nuclei, and aspects of the electrodynamics of pulsars. Larger groups of Cherenkov telescopes still offer the possibility of an increase in power of the technique for resolvable Galactic sources especially.

  5. Infrared imaging using carbon nanotube-based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongzhi; Xi, Ning; Song, Bo; Chen, Liangliang; Lai, King W. C.; Lou, Jianyong

    2011-06-01

    Using carbon nanotubes (CNT), high performance infrared detectors have been developed. Since the CNTs have extraordinary optoelectronics properties due to its unique one dimensional geometry and structure, the CNT based infrared detectors have extremely low dark current, low noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD), short response time, and high dynamic range. Most importantly, it can detect 3-5 um middle-wave infrared (MWIR) at room temperature. This unique feature can significantly reduce the size and weight of a MWIR imaging system by eliminating a cryogenic cooling system. However, there are two major difficulties that impede the application of CNT based IR detectors for imaging systems. First, the small diameter of the CNTs results in low fill factor. Secondly, it is difficult to fabricate large scale of detector array for high resolution focal plane due to the limitations on the efficiency and cost of the manufacturing. In this paper, a new CNT based IR imaging system will be presented. Integrating the CNT detectors with photonic crystal resonant cavity, the fill factor of the CNT based IR sensor can reach as high as 0.91. Furthermore, using the compressive sensing technology, a high resolution imaging can be achieved by CNT based IR detectors. The experimental testing results show that the new imaging system can achieve the superb performance enabled by CNT based IR detectors, and, at the same time, overcame its difficulties to achieve high resolution and efficient imaging.

  6. Multianode microchannel array detectors for Space Shuttle imaging applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMAs) are a family of photoelectric, photoncounting array detectors that have been developed and qualified specifically for use in space. MAMA detectors with formats as large as 256 x 1024 pixels are now in use or under construction for a variety of imaging and tracking applications. These photo-emissive detectors can be operated in a windowless configuration at extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths or in a sealed configuration at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. The construction and modes-of-operation of the MAMA detectors are briefly described and the scientific objectives of a number of sounding rocket and Space Shuttle instruments utilizing these detectors are outlined. Performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors that are of fundamental importance for operation in the Space Shuttle environment are described and compared with those of the photo-conductive array detectors such as the CCDs and CIDs.

  7. Anisotropic imaging performance in indirect x-ray imaging detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Badano, Aldo; Kyprianou, Iacovos S.; Sempau, Josep

    2006-08-15

    We report on the variability in imaging system performance due to oblique x-ray incidence, and the associated transport of quanta (both x rays and optical photons) through the phosphor, in columnar indirect digital detectors. The analysis uses MANTIS, a combined x-ray, electron, and optical Monte Carlo transport code freely available. We describe the main features of the simulation method and provide some validation of the phosphor screen models considered in this work. We report x-ray and electron three-dimensional energy deposition distributions and point-response functions (PRFs), including optical spread in columnar phosphor screens of thickness 100 and 500 {mu}m, for 19, 39, 59, and 79 keV monoenergetic x-ray beams incident at 0 deg., 10 deg., and 15 deg. . In addition, we present pulse-height spectra for the same phosphor thickness, x-ray energies, and angles of incidence. Our results suggest that the PRF due to the phosphor blur is highly nonsymmetrical, and that the resolution properties of a columnar screen in a tomographic, or tomosynthetic imaging system varies significantly with the angle of x-ray incidence. Moreover, we find that the noise due to the variability in the number of light photons detected per primary x-ray interaction, summarized in the information or Swank factor, is somewhat independent of thickness and incidence angle of the x-ray beam. Our results also suggest that the anisotropy in the PRF is not less in screens with absorptive backings, while the noise introduced by variations in the gain and optical transport is larger. Predictions from MANTIS, after additional validation, can provide the needed understanding of the extent of such variations, and eventually, lead to the incorporation of the changes in imaging performance with incidence angle into the reconstruction algorithms for volumetric x-ray imaging systems.

  8. Development of a GSO positron/single-photon imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Senda, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and tested a GSO (gadolinium oxyorthosilicate) position-sensitive gamma detector which can be used with positron and single-photon radionuclides for imaging breast cancer or sentinel lymph node detection. Because GSO has a relatively good energy resolution for annihilation gammas as well as low energy gamma photons, and does not contain any natural radioisotopes, it can be used for positron imaging and lower energy single-photon imaging. The imaging detector consists of a GSO block, 2 inch square multi-channel position-sensitive photo-multiplier tube (PSPMT), and associated electronics. The size of a single GSO element was 2.9 mm × 2.9 mm × 20 mm and these elements were arranged into 15 × 15 matrixes to form a block that was optically coupled to the PSPMT. It was possible to separate all GSO crystals into a two-dimensional position histogram for annihilation gammas (511 keV) and low energy gamma photons (122 keV). The typical energy resolution was 24% FWHM and 37% FWHM for 511 keV and 122 keV gamma photons, respectively. For the positron imaging, coincidence between the imaging detector and a single gamma probe is measured. For the single-photon imaging, a tungsten collimator is mounted in front of the imaging detector. With this configuration, it was possible to image both positron radionuclides and low energy single-photon radionuclides. We measured spatial resolution and sensitivity as well as image quality of the developed imaging detector. Results indicated that the developed imaging detector has the potential to be a new and useful instrument for nuclear medicine.

  9. Photoconducting positions monitor and imaging detector

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    2000-01-01

    A photoconductive, high energy photon beam detector/monitor for detecting x-rays and gamma radiation, having a thin, disk-shaped diamond substrate with a first and second surface, and electrically conductive coatings, or electrodes, of a predetermined configuration or pattern, disposed on the surfaces of the substrate. A voltage source and a current amplifier is connected to the electrodes to provide a voltage bias to the electrodes and to amplify signals from the detector.

  10. Imaging characteristics of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Kaplan, G. C.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite will conduct an all-sky survey over the wavelength range from 70 A to 760 A using four grazing-incidence telescopes and seven microchannel-plate (MCP) detectors. The imaging photon-counting MCP detectors have active areas of 19.6 cm2. Photon arrival position is determined using a wedge-and-strip anode and associated pulse-encoding electronics. The imaging characteristics of the EUVE flight detectors are presented including image distortion, flat-field response, and spatial differential nonlinearity. Also included is a detailed discussion of image distortions due to the detector mechanical assembly, the wedge-and-strip anode, and the electronics. Model predictions of these distortions are compared to preflight calibration images which show distortions less than 1.3 percent rms of the detector diameter of 50 mm before correction. The plans for correcting these residual detector image distortions to less than 0.1 percent rms are also presented.

  11. Photoacoustic section imaging with an integrating cylindrical detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratt, Sibylle; Passler, Klaus; Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Guenther

    2011-07-01

    A piezoelectric detector with cylindrical shape for photoacoustic section imaging is characterized. This detector is larger than the imaging object in direction of the cylinder axis, giving rise to its integrating properties. Its focal volume has the shape of a slice and the acquisition of signals for one section image requires rotation of an object about an axis perpendicular to this slice. Image reconstruction from the signals requires the application of the inverse Radon transform. It is shown that implementing the Abel transform is a suitable step in data processing, allowing speeding up the data acquisition since the scanning angle can be reduced. The resolution of the detector was estimated in directions perpendicular and parallel to the detection plane. An upper limit for the out of plane resolution is given and section images of a zebra fish are shown.

  12. A novel phoswich imaging detector for simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging of plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heyu; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2011-09-01

    To meet the growing demand for functional imaging technology for use in studying plant biology, we are developing a novel technique that permits simultaneous imaging of escaped positrons and coincidence gammas from annihilation of positrons within an intake leaf. The multi-modality imaging system will include two planar detectors: one is a typical PET detector array and the other is a phoswich imaging detector that detects both beta and gamma. The novel phoswich detector is made of a plastic scintillator, a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) array, and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT). The plastic scintillator serves as a beta detector, while the LSO array serves as a gamma detector and light guide that couples scintillation light from the plastic detector to the PMT. In our prototype, the PMT signal was fed into the Siemens QuickSilver electronics to achieve shaping and waveform sampling. Pulse-shape discrimination based on the detectors' decay times (2.1 ns for plastic and 40 ns for LSO) was used to differentiate beta and gamma events using the common PMT signals. Using our prototype phoswich detector, we simultaneously measured a beta image and gamma events (in single mode). The beta image showed a resolution of 1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum using F-18 line sources. Because this shows promise for plant-scale imaging, our future plans include development of a fully functional simultaneous beta-and-coincidence-gamma imager with sub-millimeter resolution imaging capability for both modalities.

  13. CMOS APS detector characterization for quantitative X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, Marco; Oliva, Piernicola; Golosio, Bruno; Delogu, Pasquale

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray Imaging detector based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensor and structured scintillator is characterized for quantitative X-ray imaging in the energy range 11-30 keV. Linearity, dark noise, spatial resolution and flat-field correction are the characteristics of the detector subject of investigation. The detector response, in terms of mean Analog-to-Digital Unit and noise, is modeled as a function of the energy and intensity of the X-rays. The model is directly tested using monochromatic X-ray beams and it is also indirectly validated by means of polychromatic X-ray-tube spectra. Such a characterization is suitable for quantitative X-ray imaging and the model can be used in simulation studies that take into account the actual performance of the detector.

  14. Flat detector ghost image reduction by UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeren, Rudolph M.; Steinhauser, Heidrun; Alving, Lex; Stouten, Hans; de With, Peter H. N.

    2009-02-01

    We study flat detectors for X-ray imaging performance degradation. In cone beam C-arm-CT, memory effects have a detrimental effect on image quality. Depending on the magnitude and history of irradiance differences, detector sensitivity variations may persist for a long period of time (days) and are visible as rings upon 3D reconstruction. A new method is proposed for reducing memory effects produced in CsI:Tl based Flat Detector X-ray imaging, which is based upon trap-filling by UV-light. For experiments, a commercial detector has been modified such that UV back-lighting is accomplished. A regular LED refresh light array for reducing photodiode temporal effects is interleaved with UV LED sub-arrays of different wavelengths in the near UV range. The array irradiates the scintillator through translucent parts of the detector substrate. In order to assess the efficacy of the method, ghost images are imprinted by well-defined transitions between direct radiation and attenuated or shuttered radiation. As an advantage, the new method accomplishes ghost-prevention, either by (1) continuous trap-filling at image-synchronous UV light pulsing, or (2) by applying a single dose of UV light. As a result, ring artefacts in reconstructed 3D-images are reduced to low levels. An effective wavelength has been found and an equilibrium UV dosage could be set for effective trap-filling. The overall sensitivity of the detector increases at saturated trap-filling. It was found that with optimised detector settings, i.e. optimum saturated trap-filling, the dependence on X-ray irradiation levels is low, so that the usage of the detector and its performance is robust.

  15. The first results from the CRID detector at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.; Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; hallewell, G.; Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Williams, S.H.; Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hasegawa, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H.; Baird, K.; Jacques, P.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R.; Stamer, P.; Word, G.; Bean, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Duboscq, J.; Huber, J.; Lu, A.; Mathys, L.; McHugh, S.; Yellin, S.; David, R.B.; Manly, S.; Snyder, J.; Sforza, M.C.; Coyle, P.; Coyne, D.; Liu, X.; Williams, D.A.; Coller, J.; Shank, J.T.; Whitaker, J.S.; d`Oliveira, A.; Johnson, R.A.; Martinez, J.; Meadows, B.; Nussbaum, M.; Santha, A.K.S.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Stockdale, I.; Turk, J.; Wilson, R.J.

    1992-10-01

    We report first results from the initial physics run of the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) in the SLD experiment at the SLC. We describe the experimental conditions, show liquid and gas rings, report the number of photoelectrons per ring, and comment on resolution.

  16. Particle identification via Cherenkov correlated timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honscheid, K.; Selen, M.; Sivertz, M.

    1994-04-01

    We describe a new particle-identification technique based on precision timing measurements to determine the Cherenkov angle of photons emitted by particles passing through a quartz radiator. A Monte Carlo simulation indicates that good π-K separation can be obtained for a large range of particle momenta and incident angles. A prototype detector to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept is under construction.

  17. Microelectronics used for Semiconductor Imaging Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Heijne, Erik H. M.

    2010-01-05

    Semiconductor crystal technology, microelectronics developments and nuclear particle detection have been in a relation of symbiosis, all the way from the beginning. The increase of complexity in electronics chips can now be applied to obtain much more information on the incident nuclear radiation. Some basic technologies are described, in order to acquire insight in possibilities and limitations for the most recent detectors.

  18. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  19. Detectors for medical radioisotope imaging: demands and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. I.; Chepel, V.

    2004-10-01

    Radioisotope imaging is used to obtain information on biochemical processes in living organisms, being a tool of increasing importance for medical diagnosis. The improvement and expansion of these techniques depend on the progress attained in several areas, such as radionuclide production, radiopharmaceuticals, radiation detectors and image reconstruction algorithms. This review paper will be concerned only with the detector technology. We will review in general terms the present status of medical radioisotope imaging instrumentation with the emphasis put on the developments of high-resolution gamma cameras and PET detector systems for scinti-mammography and animal imaging. The present trend to combine two or more modalities in a single machine in order to obtain complementary information will also be considered.

  20. Simulation of computed radiography with imaging plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Mathy, F.; Schumm, A.

    2014-02-18

    Computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plate detectors is taking an increasing place in Radiography Testing. CR uses similar equipment as conventional radiography except that the classical X-ray film is replaced by a numerical detector, called image plate (IP), which is made of a photostimulable layer and which is read by a scanning device through photostimulated luminescence. Such digital radiography has already demonstrated important benefits in terms of exposure time, decrease of source energies and thus reduction of radioprotection area besides being a solution without effluents. This paper presents a model for the simulation of radiography with image plate detectors in CIVA together with examples of validation of the model. The study consists in a cross comparison between experimental and simulation results obtained on a step wedge with a classical X-ray tube. Results are proposed in particular with wire Image quality Indicator (IQI) and duplex IQI.

  1. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  2. Reconstruction algorithms for optoacoustic imaging based on fiber optic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamela, Horacio; Díaz-Tendero, Gonzalo; Gutiérrez, Rebeca; Gallego, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Optoacoustic Imaging (OAI), a novel hybrid imaging technology, offers high contrast, molecular specificity and excellent resolution to overcome limitations of the current clinical modalities for detection of solid tumors. The exact time-domain reconstruction formula produces images with excellent resolution but poor contrast. Some approximate time-domain filtered back-projection reconstruction algorithms have also been reported to solve this problem. A wavelet transform implementation filtering can be used to sharpen object boundaries while simultaneously preserving high contrast of the reconstructed objects. In this paper, several algorithms, based on Back Projection (BP) techniques, have been suggested to process OA images in conjunction with signal filtering for ultrasonic point detectors and integral detectors. We apply these techniques first directly to a numerical generated sample image and then to the laserdigitalized image of a tissue phantom, obtaining in both cases the best results in resolution and contrast for a waveletbased filter.

  3. Monte Carlo studies for medical imaging detector optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fois, G. R.; Cisbani, E.; Garibaldi, F.

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the Monte Carlo optimization studies of detection systems for Molecular Breast Imaging with radionuclides and Bremsstrahlung Imaging in nuclear medicine. Molecular Breast Imaging requires competing performances of the detectors: high efficiency and high spatial resolutions; in this direction, it has been proposed an innovative device which combines images from two different, and somehow complementary, detectors at the opposite sides of the breast. The dual detector design allows for spot compression and improves significantly the performance of the overall system if all components are well tuned, layout and processing carefully optimized; in this direction the Monte Carlo simulation represents a valuable tools. In recent years, Bremsstrahlung Imaging potentiality in internal radiotherapy (with beta-radiopharmaceuticals) has been clearly emerged; Bremsstrahlung Imaging is currently performed with existing detector generally used for single photon radioisotopes. We are evaluating the possibility to adapt an existing compact gamma camera and optimize by Monte Carlo its performance for Bremsstrahlung imaging with photons emitted by the beta- from 90 Y.

  4. Investigation of Hamamatsu H8500 phototubes as single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, R. A.; Hoek, M.; Lucherini, V.; Mirazita, M.; Orlandi, A.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Pisano, S.; Rossi, P.; Viticchiè, A.; Witchger, A.

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the response of a significant sample of Hamamatsu H8500 MultiAnode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MAPMTs) as single photon detectors, in view of their use in a ring imaging Cherenkov counter for the CLAS12 spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For this, a laser working at 407.2 nm wavelength was employed. The sample is divided equally into standard window type, with a spectral response in the visible light region, and UV-enhanced window type MAPMTs. The studies confirm the suitability of these MAPMTs for single photon detection in such a Cherenkov imaging application.

  5. A Photon Counting Imaging Detector for NASA Exoplanet Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald

    The key objective of the proposed project is to advance the maturity of a 256x256 pixel single-photon optical imaging detector. The detector has zero read noise and is resilient against the harsh effects of radiation in space. We expect that the device will have state-of-the-art performance in other parameters, e.g., high quantum efficiency from UV to 1 #m, low dark current, etc.

  6. Measurement dimensions compressed spectral imaging with a single point detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Feng; Yu, Wen-Kai; Yao, Xu-Ri; Dai, Bin; Li, Long-Zhen; Wang, Chao; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2016-04-01

    An experimental demonstration of spectral imaging with measurement dimensions compressed has been performed. With the method of dual compressed sensing (CS) we derive, the spectral image of a colored object can be obtained with only a single point detector, and sub-sampling is achieved in both spatial and spectral domains. The performances of dual CS spectral imaging are analyzed, including the effects of dual modulation numbers and measurement noise on the imaging quality. Our scheme provides a stable, high-flux measurement approach of spectral imaging.

  7. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirov, J. P.; Chigarev, N. V.; Matveev, O. I.; Omenetto, N.; Smith, B. W.; Winefordner, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm.

  8. Astronomical imaging with infrared array detectors.

    PubMed

    Gatley, I; Depoy, D L; Fowler, A M

    1988-12-01

    History shows that progress in astronomy often stems directly from technological innovation and that each portion of the electromagnetic spectrum offers unique insights into the nature of the universe. Most recently, the widespread availability of infrared-sensitive two-dimensional array detectors has led to dramatic improvements in the capabilities of conventional ground-based observatories. The impact of this new technology on our understanding of a wide variety of phenomena is illustrated here by infrared pictures of star-forming regions, of nebulae produced by the late stages of stellar evolution, of the nucleus of our own galaxy(the Milky Way), and of activity in other galaxies. PMID:17817072

  9. Development and performance of a gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; La Torre, M.; Álvarez, L.; Karelin, D.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2012-09-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV. The innovative concept of focusing gamma-ray telescopes in this energy range, should allow reaching unprecedented sensitivities and angular resolution, thanks to the decoupling of collecting area and detector volume. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to achieve the needed performance, a gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. In order to fulfill the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial prototype of a gamma-ray imaging detector based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. It consists of a stack of several layers of CdTe detectors with increasing thickness, in order to enhance the gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. A CdTe module detector lies in a 11 x 11 pixel detector with a pixel pitch of 1mm attached to the readout chip. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fan-out board made of alumina (Al2O3) substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report the main features of the gamma-ray imaging detector performance such as the energy resolution for a set of radiation sources at different operating temperatures.

  10. Bokeh mirror alignment for Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Baack, D.; Balbo, M.; Bergmann, M.; Biland, A.; Blank, M.; Bretz, T.; Bruegge, K. A.; Buss, J.; Domke, M.; Dorner, D.; Einecke, S.; Hempfling, C.; Hildebrand, D.; Hughes, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mannheim, K.; Mueller, S. A.; Neise, D.; Neronov, A.; Noethe, M.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Paravac, A.; Pauss, F.; Rhode, W.; Shukla, A.; Temme, F.; Thaele, J.; Toscano, S.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Wilbert, A.

    2016-09-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) need imaging optics with large apertures and high image intensities to map the faint Cherenkov light emitted from cosmic ray air showers onto their image sensors. Segmented reflectors fulfill these needs, and composed from mass production mirror facets they are inexpensive and lightweight. However, as the overall image is a superposition of the individual facet images, alignment remains a challenge. Here we present a simple, yet extendable method, to align a segmented reflector using its Bokeh. Bokeh alig nment does not need a star or good weather nights but can be done even during daytime. Bokeh alignment optimizes the facet orientations by comparing the segmented reflectors Bokeh to a predefined template. The optimal Bokeh template is highly constricted by the reflector's aperture and is easy accessible. The Bokeh is observed using the out of focus image of a near by point like light source in a distance of about 10 focal lengths. We introduce Bokeh alignment on segmented reflectors and demonstrate it on the First Geiger-mode Avalanche Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) on La Palma, Spain.

  11. The PICASSO digital detector for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging at ELETTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Arfelli, F.; Longo, R.; Castelli, E.; Astolfo, A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Vallazza, E.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.

    2010-07-23

    A clinical mammography program is in progress at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the Italian synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste. A conventional screen-film system is utilized as detector for the examinations on patients. For the next experimental step a digital detector has been designed taking into account the essential requirements for mammography such as high spatial and contrast resolution, high efficiency for low dose examinations and high speed for short acquisition time. A double-layer prototype has already been tested in the frame of the PICASSO project. In addition, an analyzer crystal set-up for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) has been available for many years at the SYRMEP beamline. Applying the DEI technique several successful experiments have been carried out in biomedical imaging and in particular in-vitro breast imaging utilizing commercially available detectors. Recently a system upgrade yielded a double-crystal analyzer set-up with improved stability and higher angular resolution. In this study the PICASSO detector has been utilized in combination with the new analyzer set-up for imaging in-vitro breast tissue samples. In order to test the potential of the combined system planar and tomographic images have been acquired and the first results are here presented.

  12. The PICASSO digital detector for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging at ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Astolfo, A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2010-07-01

    A clinical mammography program is in progress at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the Italian synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste. A conventional screen-film system is utilized as detector for the examinations on patients. For the next experimental step a digital detector has been designed taking into account the essential requirements for mammography such as high spatial and contrast resolution, high efficiency for low dose examinations and high speed for short acquisition time. A double-layer prototype has already been tested in the frame of the PICASSO project. In addition, an analyzer crystal set-up for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) has been available for many years at the SYRMEP beamline. Applying the DEI technique several successful experiments have been carried out in biomedical imaging and in particular in-vitro breast imaging utilizing commercially available detectors. Recently a system upgrade yielded a double-crystal analyzer set-up with improved stability and higher angular resolution. In this study the PICASSO detector has been utilized in combination with the new analyzer set-up for imaging in-vitro breast tissue samples. In order to test the potential of the combined system planar and tomographic images have been acquired and the first results are here presented.

  13. Design considerations for ultrasound detectors in photoacoustic breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Singh, Mithun K. A.; van Hespen, Johan C. G.; van Veldhoven, Spiridon; Prins, Christian; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelft; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-03-01

    The ultrasound detector is the heart of a photoacoustic imaging system. In photoacoustic imaging of the breast there is a requirement to detect tumors located a few centimeters deep in tissue, where the light is heavily attenuated. Thus a sensitive ultrasound transducer is of crucial importance. As the frequency content of photoacoustic waves are inversely proportional to the dimensions of the absorbing structures, and in tissue can range from hundreds of kHz to tens of MHz, a broadband ultrasound transducer is required centered on an optimum frequency. A single element piezoelectric transducer structurally consists of the active piezoelectric material, front- and back-matching layers and a backing layer. To have both high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, the materials, their acoustic characteristics and their dimensions should be carefully chosen. In this paper, we present design considerations of an ultrasound transducer for imaging the breast such as the detector sensitivity and frequency response, which guides the selection of active material, matching layers and their geometries. We iterate between simulation of detector performance and experimental characterization of functional models to arrive at an optimized implementation. For computer simulation, we use 1D KLM and 3D finite-element based models. The optimized detector has a large-aperture possessing a center frequency of 1 MHz with fractional bandwidth of more than 80%. The measured minimum detectable pressure is 0.5 Pa, which is two orders of magnitude lower than the detector used in the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope.

  14. Velocity map imaging using an in-vacuum pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gademann, Georg; Huismans, Ymkje; Gijsbertsen, Arjan; Jungmann, Julia; Visschers, Jan; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The use of a new type in-vacuum pixel detector in velocity map imaging (VMI) is introduced. The Medipix2 and Timepix semiconductor pixel detectors (256×256 square pixels, 55×55 μm2) are well suited for charged particle detection. They offer high resolution, low noise, and high quantum efficiency. The Medipix2 chip allows double energy discrimination by offering a low and a high energy threshold. The Timepix detector allows to record the incidence time of a particle with a temporal resolution of 10 ns and a dynamic range of 160 μs. Results of the first time application of the Medipix2 detector to VMI are presented, investigating the quantum efficiency as well as the possibility to operate at increased background pressure in the vacuum chamber.

  15. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  16. A Compact Imaging Detector of Polarization and Spectral Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Kumar, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new type of image detector will simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beam splitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. The polarizing beam splitter can be either a Ronchi ruling, or an array of cylindrical lenslets, bonded to a birefringent wafer. The wafer, in turn, is bonded to the CCD so that light in the two orthogonal planes of polarization falls on adjacent pairs of pixels. The use of a high-index birefringent material, e.g., rutile, allows the IDID to operate at f-numbers as high as f/3.5. Other aspects of the detector are discussed.

  17. A compact imaging detector of polarization and spectral content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, D. M.; Kumar, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    A new type of image detector will simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging Detector (IDID) consists of a polarizing beam splitter bonded to a charge-coupled device (CCD), with signal-analysis circuitry and analog-to-digital converters, all integrated on a silicon chip. The polarizing beam splitter can be either a Ronchi ruling, or an array of cylindrical lenslets, bonded to a birefringent wafer. The wafer, in turn, is bonded to the CCD so that light in the two orthogonal planes of polarization falls on adjacent pairs of pixels. The use of a high-index birefringent material, e.g., rutile, allows the IDID to operate at f-numbers as high as f/3.5. Other aspects of the detector are discussed.

  18. Detectors for single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    MICHALET, X.; SIEGMUND, O.H.W.; VALLERGA, J.V.; JELINSKY, P.; MILLAUD, J.E.; WEISS, S.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule observation, characterization and manipulation techniques have recently come to the forefront of several research domains spanning chemistry, biology and physics. Due to the exquisite sensitivity, specificity, and unmasking of ensemble averaging, single-molecule fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy have become, in a short period of time, important tools in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. These methods led to new ways of thinking about biological processes such as viral infection, receptor diffusion and oligomerization, cellular signaling, protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid interactions, and molecular machines. Such achievements require a combination of several factors to be met, among which detector sensitivity and bandwidth are crucial. We examine here the needed performance of photodetectors used in these types of experiments, the current state of the art for different categories of detectors, and actual and future developments of single-photon counting detectors for single-molecule imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:20157633

  19. Optical and UV Sensing Sealed Tube Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors with High Time Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Tremsin, A.; Hull, J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.

    2014-09-01

    recently ALD MCPs with an opaque GaN photocathode (100-350nm range) on the MCP surface has been demonstrated in a sealed tube configuration. These ALD MCPs show a stable and permanent 10x gain increase during tube processing. Efforts are also underway to establish ALD MCP configurations with large area sealed tubes from 5cm up to 20cm in size. We will discuss these efforts and their performance characteristics. We will discuss how we are applying these detector system developments to a number of applications. This includes ground based instruments for observations of transient and variable astronomical objects, as well as implementation in satellite instruments for earth atmospheric and solar observations. The XS 18mm sealed tube detectors are being implemented for night time remote reconnaissance and biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Related efforts also include development of large (20cm) sealed tubes for Cherenkov light detection and large area focal plane imagers, and GaN sealed tube devices are candidates for future astronomical space based UV imaging and spectroscopy.

  20. A low-energy gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    We describe a hard-X-ray/soft-gamma-ray imaging detector, incorporating a microchannel-plate (MCP) electron multiplier for possible use in future telescopes. In contrast to previous attempts using MCP's this approach promises to achieve high quantum detection efficiencies in addition to high spatial and temporal resolution. Preliminary results indicate not only the capability of simultaneous imaging and single-photon counting, but also coarse energy resolution.

  1. A novel phoswich imaging detector for simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging of plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heyu; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2011-09-01

    To meet the growing demand for functional imaging technology for use in studying plant biology, we are developing a novel technique that permits simultaneous imaging of escaped positrons and coincidence gammas from annihilation of positrons within an intake leaf. The multi-modality imaging system will include two planar detectors: one is a typical PET detector array and the other is a phoswich imaging detector that detects both beta and gamma. The novel phoswich detector is made of a plastic scintillator, a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) array, and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT). The plastic scintillator serves as a beta detector, while the LSO array serves as a gamma detector and light guide that couples scintillation light from the plastic detector to the PMT. In our prototype, the PMT signal was fed into the Siemens QuickSilver electronics to achieve shaping and waveform sampling. Pulse-shape discrimination based on the detectors' decay times (2.1 ns for plastic and 40 ns for LSO) was used to differentiate beta and gamma events using the common PMT signals. Using our prototype phoswich detector, we simultaneously measured a beta image and gamma events (in single mode). The beta image showed a resolution of 1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum using F-18 line sources. Because this shows promise for plant-scale imaging, our future plans include development of a fully functional simultaneous beta-and-coincidence-gamma imager with sub-millimeter resolution imaging capability for both modalities. PMID:21828901

  2. RICH Detector for Jefferson Labs CLAS12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotta, Richard; Torisky, Ben; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-10-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to its Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beams. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new hybrid Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 8 GeV/c momentum range. This detector will be used for a variety of Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. Cherenkov light can be accurately detected by a large array of sophisticated Multi-Anode Photomultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT) and heavier particles, like kaons, will span the inner radii. We are presenting our work on the creation of the RICH's geometry within the CLAS12 java framework. This development is crucial for future calibration, reconstructions and analysis of the detector.

  3. Speckle imaging with the MAMA detector: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horch, E.; Heanue, J. F.; Morgan, J. S.; Timothy, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the first successful speckle imaging studies using the Stanford University speckle interferometry system, an instrument that uses a multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector as the imaging device. The method of producing high-resolution images is based on the analysis of so-called 'near-axis' bispectral subplanes and follows the work of Lohmann et al. (1983). In order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the bispectrum, the frame-oversampling technique of Nakajima et al. (1989) is also employed. We present speckle imaging results of binary stars and other objects from V magnitude 5.5 to 11, and the quality of these images is studied. While the Stanford system is capable of good speckle imaging results, it is limited by the overall quantum efficiency of the current MAMA detector (which is due to the response of the photocathode at visible wavelengths and other detector properties) and by channel saturation of the microchannel plate. Both affect the signal-to-noise ratio of the power spectrum and bispectrum.

  4. CMOS Imaging Detectors as X-ray Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Inoue, Katsuaki

    2004-05-12

    CMOS imagers are matrix-addressed photodiode arrays, which have been utilized in devices such as commercially available digital cameras. The pixel size of CMOS imagers is usually larger than that of CCD and smaller than that of TFT, giving them a unique position. Although CMOS x-ray imaging devices have already become commercially available, they have not been used as an x-ray area detector in synchrotron radiation experiments. We tested performance of a CMOS detector from Rad-icon (Shad-o-Box1024) in medical imaging, small-angle scattering, and protein crystallography experiments. It has pixels of 0.048 mm square, read-out time of 0.45 sec, 12-bit ADC, and requires a frame grabber for image acquisition. The detection area is 5-cm square. It uses a Kodak Min-R scintillator screen as a phosphor. The sensitivity to x-rays with an energy less than 15 keV was low because of the thick window materials. Since the readout noise is high, the dynamic range is limited to 2000. The biggest advantages of this detector are cost-effectiveness (about 10,000 US dollars) and compactness (thickness < 3 cm, weight < 2 kg)

  5. Energy calibration of Cherenkov Telescopes using GLAST data

    SciTech Connect

    Bastieri, D.; Busetto, G.; Piano, G.; Rando, R.; Saggion, A.; De Angelis, A.; Longo, F.

    2007-07-12

    We discuss the possibility of using the observations by GLAST of steady gamma sources, as the Crab Nebula and some selected AGNs, to calibrate the Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) and improve their energy resolution, in particular. We show that at around 100 GeV, exploiting the features in the spectrum of the Crab Nebula, the absolute energy calibration uncertainty of Cherenkov telescopes can be reduced to < 10%.

  6. Autoradiography Imaging in Targeted Alpha Therapy with Timepix Detector

    PubMed Central

    AL Darwish, Ruqaya; Staudacher, Alexander Hugo; Bezak, Eva; Brown, Michael Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB), with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy. PMID:25688285

  7. Two-Sided Coded Aperture Imaging Without a Detector Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Cunningham, Mark F; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel design for a two-sided, coded-aperture, gamma-ray imager suitable for use in stand off detection of orphan radioactive sources. The design is an extension of an active-mask imager that would have three active planes of detector material, a central plane acting as the detector for two (active) coded-aperture mask planes, one on either side of the detector plane. In the new design the central plane is removed and the mask on the left (right) serves as the detector plane for the mask on the right (left). This design reduces the size, mass, complexity, and cost of the overall instrument. In addition, if one has fully position-sensitive detectors, then one can use the two planes as a classic Compton camera. This enhances the instrument's sensitivity at higher energies where the coded-aperture efficiency is decreased by mask penetration. A plausible design for the system is found and explored with Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Autoradiography imaging in targeted alpha therapy with Timepix detector.

    PubMed

    A L Darwish, Ruqaya; Staudacher, Alexander Hugo; Bezak, Eva; Brown, Michael Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data related to activity uptake and particle track distribution in targeted alpha therapy. These data are required to estimate the absorbed dose on a cellular level as alpha particles have a limited range and traverse only a few cells. Tracking of individual alpha particles is possible using the Timepix semiconductor radiation detector. We investigated the feasibility of imaging alpha particle emissions in tumour sections from mice treated with Thorium-227 (using APOMAB), with and without prior chemotherapy and Timepix detector. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Timepix detector to monitor variations in tumour uptake based on the necrotic tissue volume was also studied. Compartmental analysis model was used, based on the obtained imaging data, to assess the Th-227 uptake. Results show that alpha particle, photon, electron, and muon tracks were detected and resolved by Timepix detector. The current study demonstrated that individual alpha particle emissions, resulting from targeted alpha therapy, can be visualised and quantified using Timepix detector. Furthermore, the variations in the uptake based on the tumour necrotic volume have been observed with four times higher uptake for tumours pretreated with chemotherapy than for those without chemotherapy. PMID:25688285

  9. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  10. Quantitative SPECT brain imaging: Effects of attenuation and detector response

    SciTech Connect

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Bowsher, J.E.; Turkington, T.G.; Liang, Z.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-06-01

    Two physical factors that substantially degrade quantitative accuracy in SPECT imaging of the brain are attenuation and detector response. In addition to the physical factors, random noise in the reconstructed image can greatly affect the quantitative measurement. The purpose of this work was to implement two reconstruction methods that compensate for attenuation and detector response, a 3D maximum likelihood-EM method (ML) and a filtered backprojection method (FB) with Metz filter and Chang attenuation compensation, and compare the methods in terms of quantitative accuracy and image noise. The methods were tested on simulated data of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. The simulation incorporated attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Bias and standard deviation of reconstructed voxel intensities were measured in the gray and white matter regions. The results with ML showed that in both the gray and white matter regions as the number of iterations increased, bias decreased and standard deviation increased. Similar results were observed with FB as the Metz filter power increased. In both regions, ML had smaller standard deviation than FB for a given bias. Reconstruction times for the ML method have been greatly reduced through efficient coding, limited source support, and by computing attenuation factors only along rays perpendicular to the detector.